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Sample records for axially symmetric model

  1. Revised NASA axially symmetric ring model for coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1987-01-01

    A versatile large-signal, two-dimensional computer program is used by NASA to model coupled-cavity travelling-wave tubes (TWTs). In this model, the electron beam is divided into a series of disks, each of which is further divided into axially symmetric rings which can expand and contract. The trajectories of the electron rings and the radiofrequency (RF) fields are determined from the calculated axial and radial space-charge, RF, and magnetic forces as the rings pass through a sequence of cavities. By varying electrical and geometric properties of individual cavities, the model is capable of simulating severs, velocity tapers, and voltage jumps. The calculated electron ring trajectories can be used in designing magnetic focusing and multidepressed collectors. The details of using the program are presented, and results are compared with experimental data.

  2. Thermophoresis of Axially Symmetric Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Sweden Abstract. Thermophoresis of axially symmetric bodies is investigated to first order in the Knudsen-mimber, Kn. The study is made in the limit...derived. Asymptotic solutions are studied. INTRODUCTION Thermophoresis as a phenomenon has been known for a long time, and several authors have approached

  3. Axially symmetric anisotropic string cosmological models in Saez-Ballester theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Rao, G. Ananda; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-02-01

    Field equations of a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986) are derived with the help of a spatially homogeneous axially symmetric anisotropic Bianchi type metric in the presence of cosmic string source. To obtain determinate solutions of the field equations we have used the fact that the scalar expansion is proportional to shear scalar and the equations of state which correspond to geometric, Takabayasi and massive strings. It is found that geometric and massive strings do not coexist with the Saez-Ballester Scalar field. However, Takabayasi string which survives has been determined. Also, physical discussion of the dynamical parameters of the model is presented.

  4. Kinetic models of two-dimensional plane and axially symmetric current sheets: Group theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, I. Y.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Y.; Malova, H. V.

    2013-02-15

    In this paper, we present new class of solutions of Grad-Shafranov-like (GS-like) equations, describing kinetic plane and axially symmetric 2D current sheets. We show that these equations admit symmetry groups only for Maxwellian and {kappa}-distributions of charged particles. The admissible symmetry groups are used to reduce GS-like equations to ordinary differential equations for invariant solutions. We derive asymptotes of invariant solutions, while invariant solutions are found analytically for the {kappa}-distribution with {kappa}=7/2. We discuss the difference of obtained solutions from equilibria widely used in other studies. We show that {kappa} regulates the decrease rate of plasma characteristics along the current sheet and determines the spatial distribution of magnetic field components. The presented class of plane and axially symmetric (disk-like) current sheets includes solutions with the inclined neutral plane.

  5. Axially symmetric static sources of gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Pastora, J. L.; Herrera, L.; Martin, J.

    2016-12-01

    A general procedure to find static and axially symmetric, interior solutions to the Einstein equations is presented. All the so obtained solutions, verify the energy conditions for a wide range of values of the parameters, and match smoothly to some exterior solution of the Weyl family, thereby representing globally regular models describing non-spherical sources of gravitational field. In the spherically symmetric limit, all our models converge to the well known incompressible perfect fluid solution. The key stone of our approach is based on an ansatz allowing to define the interior metric in terms of the exterior metric functions evaluated at the boundary source. Some particular sources are obtained, and the physical variables of the energy-momentum tensor are calculated explicitly, as well as the geometry of the source in terms of the relativistic multipole moments. The total mass of different configurations is also calculated, it is shown to be equal to the monopole of the exterior solution.

  6. Scalar resonances in axially symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranea-Sandoval, Ignacio F.; Vucetich, Héctor

    2015-03-01

    We study properties of resonant solutions to the scalar wave equation in several axially symmetric spacetimes. We prove that nonaxial resonant modes do not exist neither in the Lanczos dust cylinder, the extreme (2 + 1) dimensional Bañados-Taitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) spacetime nor in a class of simple rotating wormhole solutions. Moreover, we find unstable solutions to the wave equation in the Lanczos dust cylinder and in the r2 < 0 region of the extreme (2 + 1) dimensional BTZ spacetime, two solutions that possess closed timelike curves. Similarities with previous results obtained for the Kerr spacetime are explored.

  7. Model for interpreting Doppler broadened optical line emission measurements on axially symmetric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.; Patch, R. W.; Reinmann, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    A plasma model, previously developed to interpret neutral-particle analyzer measurements on E x B heating devices, is adapted to analyze Doppler broadened charge-exchange-neutral lines measured by an optical monochromator. Comparison of theoretical with experimental results indicates that azimuthal drift as well as cyclotron motion are quite influential in determining line shapes and widths, and thus important in temperature determination, even when the monochromator line of sight is intersecting the plasma axis of symmetry. At this central sighting position, however, results are quite insensitive to radial ion density distribution when time lag between the charge-exchange-excitation events and emission is neglected. Line shapes and widths obtained by sighting across chords of plasma at various distances from the plasma axis of symmetry indicate a strong dependence on time lag.

  8. Axially symmetric pulse propagation in semi-infinite hollow cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, T.; Datta, S. K.; Shah, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of dispersion and end conditions on axially symmetric pulse propagation in semiinfinite tubes are investigated. Numerical modeling of the dynamic response is accomplished using a stable and efficient finite element and wave propagation based method. This method yields the dispersive and modal data required to express displacements in a frequency domain modal expansion. Boundary conditions are applied to the tube end to obtain mode amplitudes. A fast Fourier transform is then used to get the time response. The specific end conditions considered are intended to give some insight into how the tube would behave as a member of a jointed truss structure.

  9. Axially symmetric shapes with minimum wave drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaslet, Max A; Fuller, Franklyn B

    1956-01-01

    The external wave drag of bodies of revolution moving at supersonic speeds can be expressed either in terms of the geometry of the body, or in terms of the body-simulating axial source distribution. For purposes of deriving optimum bodies under various given conditions, it is found that the second of the methods mentioned is the more tractable. By use of a quasi-cylindrical theory, that is, the boundary conditions are applied on the surface of a cylinder rather than on the body itself, the variational problems of the optimum bodies having prescribed volume or caliber are solved. The streamline variations of cross-sectional area and drags of the bodies are exhibited, and some numerical results are given.

  10. Electromagnetic fields in axial symmetric waveguides with variable cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1980-02-15

    A new class of separable variables is found which allows one to find an approximate analytical solution of the Maxwell equations for axial symmetric waveguides with slow (but not necessarily small) varying boundary surfaces. An example of the solution is given. Possible applications and limitations of this approach are discussed. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Modifications to Axially Symmetric Simulations Using New DSMC (2007) Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    Several modifications aimed at improving physical accuracy are proposed for solving axially symmetric problems building on the DSMC (2007) algorithms introduced by Bird. Originally developed to solve nonequilibrium, rarefied flows, the DSMC method is now regularly used to solve complex problems over a wide range of Knudsen numbers. These new algorithms include features such as nearest neighbor collisions excluding the previous collision partners, separate collision and sampling cells, automatically adaptive variable time steps, a modified no-time counter procedure for collisions, and discontinuous and event-driven physical processes. Axially symmetric solutions require radial weighting for the simulated molecules since the molecules near the axis represent fewer real molecules than those farther away from the axis due to the difference in volume of the cells. In the present methodology, these radial weighting factors are continuous, linear functions that vary with the radial position of each simulated molecule. It is shown that how one defines the number of tentative collisions greatly influences the mean collision time near the axis. The method by which the grid is treated for axially symmetric problems also plays an important role near the axis, especially for scalar pressure. A new method to treat how the molecules are traced through the grid is proposed to alleviate the decrease in scalar pressure at the axis near the surface. Also, a modification to the duplication buffer is proposed to vary the duplicated molecular velocities while retaining the molecular kinetic energy and axially symmetric nature of the problem.

  12. Perturbation approximation for orbits in axially symmetric funnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A perturbation method that can be traced back to Isaac Newton is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for objects sliding in axially symmetric funnels in near circular orbits. Some experimental observations are presented for balls rolling in inverted cones with different opening angles, and in a funnel with a hyperbolic surface that approximately simulates the gravitational force.

  13. Propagation of Axially Symmetric Detonation Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Druce, R L; Roeske, F; Souers, P C; Tarver, C M; Chow, C T S; Lee, R S; McGuire, E M; Overturf, G E; Vitello, P A

    2002-06-26

    We have studied the non-ideal propagation of detonation waves in LX-10 and in the insensitive explosive TATB. Explosively-driven, 5.8-mm-diameter, 0.125-mm-thick aluminum flyer plates were used to initiate 38-mm-diameter, hemispherical samples of LX-10 pressed to a density of 1.86 g/cm{sup 3} and of TATB at a density of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3}. The TATB powder was a grade called ultrafine (UFTATB), having an arithmetic mean particle diameter of about 8-10 {micro}m and a specific surface area of about 4.5 m{sup 2}/g. Using PMMA as a transducer, output pressure was measured at 5 discrete points on the booster using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. Breakout time was measured on a line across the booster with a streak camera. Each of the experimental geometries was calculated using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model, the JWL++ Model and the Programmed Burn Model. Boosters at both ambient and cold (-20 C and -54 C) temperatures have been experimentally and computationally studied. A comparison of experimental and modeling results is presented.

  14. Electrons Confined with an Axially Symmetric Magnetic Mirror Field

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Kira, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2008-08-08

    Low energy non-neutral electron plasmas were confined with an axially symmetric magnetic mirror field and an electrostatic potential to investigate the basic confinement properties of a simple magnetic mirror trap. As expected the confinement time became longer as a function of the mirror ratio. The axial electrostatic oscillations of a confined electron plasma were also observed. Obtained results suggested an improved scheme to accumulate low energy charged particles with the use of a magnetic mirror field, which would enable the investigation of electron-positron plasmas.

  15. Axially symmetric pseudo-Newtonian hydrodynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Kim, Hee Il; Choptuik, Matthew William; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2012-08-01

    We develop a numerical hydrodynamics code using a pseudo-Newtonian formulation that uses the weak-field approximation for the geometry, and a generalized source term for the Poisson equation that takes into account relativistic effects. The code was designed to treat moderately relativistic systems such as rapidly rotating neutron stars. The hydrodynamic equations are solved using a finite volume method with high-resolution shock-capturing techniques. We implement several different slope limiters for second-order reconstruction schemes and also investigate higher order reconstructions such as the piecewise parabolic method, essentially non-oscillatory method (ENO) and weighted ENO. We use the method of lines to convert the mixed spatial-time partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that depend only on time. These ODEs are solved using second- and third-order Runge-Kutta methods. The Poisson equation for the gravitational potential is solved with a multigrid method, and to simplify the boundary condition, we use compactified coordinates which map spatial infinity to a finite computational coordinate using a tangent function. In order to confirm the validity of our code, we carry out four different tests including one- and two-dimensional shock tube tests, stationary star tests of both non-rotating and rotating models, and radial oscillation mode tests for spherical stars. In the shock tube tests, the code shows good agreement with analytic solutions which include shocks, rarefaction waves and contact discontinuities. The code is found to be stable and accurate: for example, when solving a stationary stellar model the fractional changes in the maximum density, total mass, and total angular momentum per dynamical time are found to be 3 × 10-6, 5 × 10-7 and 2 × 10-6, respectively. We also find that the frequencies of the radial modes obtained by the numerical simulation of the steady-state star agree very well with those obtained by

  16. The 2.5-Dimensional Photoionization Code ``PAN'' for Modeling of Axially Symmetric Nebulae: The Distinctive Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokach, Oleg V.

    2005-11-01

    A multi-purpose spectrum synthesis code ``PAN'' (``Photoionized Axisymmetric Nebula'') is presented. The code allows computing of self-consistent steady-state models of morphologically-realistic axisymmetric gaseous, dust or gas+dust envelopes. Only the main features of the code ``PAN'' are enumerated here.

  17. Charged axially-symmetric solution in f( T) gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nashed, G. G. L.

    2015-01-01

    In present article, an axially symmetric tetrad field has been applied to the charged field equations of f( T) gravity theory. Some constraints have been imposed to solve the resulting non-linear partial differential equations. An exact non-vacuum charged solution with three constants of integration is derived. The solution does not have non-trivial scalar torsion, T={T^i}_{jk}{S_i}^{jk}. Total conserved charges, using Poincaré gauge version, are calculated to understand the physical meaning of the three constants of integration. It has been shown that these constants are gravitational mass, angular momentum of the rotating source and charge parameter.

  18. Numerical evidences for the angular momentum-mass inequality for multiple axially symmetric black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Dain, Sergio; Ortiz, Omar E.

    2009-07-15

    We present numerical evidences for the validity of the inequality between the total mass and the total angular momentum for multiple axially symmetric (nonstationary) black holes. We use a parabolic heat flow to solve numerically the stationary axially symmetric Einstein equations. As a by-product of our method, we also give numerical evidences that there are no regular solutions of Einstein equations that describe two extreme, axially symmetric black holes in equilibrium.

  19. Method of characteristics for three-dimensional axially symmetrical supersonic flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R

    1947-01-01

    An approximation method for three-dimensional axially symmetrical supersonic flows is developed; it is based on the characteristics theory (represented partly graphically, partly analytically). Thereafter this method is applied to the construction of rotationally symmetrical nozzles. (author)

  20. Gravitating axially-symmetric monopole-antimonopole configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnir, Ya

    2010-04-01

    We discuss static axially symmetric solutions of SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs theory. These regular asymptotically flat solutions represent monopole-antimonopole chain and vortex ring solutions, as well as new configurations, present only for larger values of the scalar coupling λ. When gravity is coupled to the Yang-Mills-Higgs system, branches of gravitating solutions emerge from the flat-space solutions, and extend up to critical values of the gravitational coupling constant. For small scalar coupling only two branches of gravitating solutions exist, where the second branch connects to a generalized Bartnik-McKinnon solution. For large scalar coupling, however, a plethora of gravitating branches can be present and indicate the emergence of new flat-space branches.

  1. Three-dimensional equilibria in axially symmetric tokamaks

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    The NSTAB and TRAN computer codes have been developed to study equilibrium, stability, and transport in fusion plasmas with three-dimensional (3D) geometry. The numerical method that is applied calculates islands in tokamaks like the Doublet III-D at General Atomic and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. When bifurcated 3D solutions are used in Monte Carlo computations of the energy confinement time, a realistic simulation of transport is obtained. The significance of finding many 3D magnetohydrodynamic equilibria in axially symmetric tokamaks needs attention because their cumulative effect may contribute to the prompt loss of α particles or to crashes and disruptions that are observed. The 3D theory predicts good performance for stellarators. PMID:17159158

  2. Neoclassical transport in quasi-axially symmetric stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1997-04-01

    The author presents a numerical and analytic assessment of the transport in two quasi-axially symmetric stellarators, including one variant of the MHH2 class of such devices, and a configuration they refer to as NHH2, closely related to MHH2. Monte Carlo simulation results are compared with expectations from established stellarator neoclassical theory, and with some empirical stellarator scalings, used as an estimate of the turbulent transport which might be expected. From the standpoint of transport, these may be viewed as either tokamaks with large ({delta} {approximately} 1%) but low-n ripple, or as stellarators with small ripple. For NHH2, numerical results are reasonably well explained by analytic neoclassical theory. MHH2 adheres less to assumptions made in most analytic theory, and its numerical results agree less well with theory than those for NHH2. However, for both, the non-axisymmetric contribution to the heat flux is comparable with the symmetric neoclassical contribution, and also falls into the range of the expected anomalous (turbulent) contribution. Thus, it appears effort to further optimize the thermal transport beyond the particular incarnations studied here would be of at most modest utility. However, the favorable thermal confinement relies heavily on the radial electric field. Thus, the present configurations will have a loss cone for trapped energetic ions, so that further optimization may be indicated for large devices of this type.

  3. Axially symmetric equations for differential pulsar rotation with superfluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, M.; Pizzochero, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present an analytical two-component model for pulsar rotational dynamics. Under the assumption of axial symmetry, implemented by a paraxial array of straight vortices that thread the entire neutron superfluid, we are able to project exactly the 3D hydrodynamical problem to a 1D cylindrical one. In the presence of density-dependent entrainment the superfluid rotation is non-columnar: we circumvent this by using an auxiliary dynamical variable directly related to the areal density of vortices. The main result is a system of differential equations that take consistently into account the stratified spherical structure of the star, the dynamical effects of non-uniform entrainment, the differential rotation of the superfluid component and its coupling to the normal crust. These equations represent a mathematical framework in which to test quantitatively the macroscopic consequences of the presence of a stable vortex array, a working hypothesis widely used in glitch models. Even without solving the equations explicitly, we are able to draw some general quantitative conclusions; in particular, we show that the reservoir of angular momentum (corresponding to recent values of the pinning forces) is enough to reproduce the largest glitch observed in the Vela pulsar, provided its mass is not too large.

  4. The influence of centrifugal forces on the B field structure of an axially symmetric equilibrium magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Gang; Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1989-01-01

    A model is presented of an axially symmetric pole-on magnetosphere in MHD force balance, in which both plasma thermal pressure gradients and centrifugal force are taken into account. Assuming that planetary rotation leads to differentially rotating magnetotail field lines, the deformation of magnetotail field lines under the influence of both thermal plasma pressure and centrifugal forces was calculated. Analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented, which include the centrifugal force term. It is shown that the nonrotational magnetosphere with hot thermal plasma leads to a field configuration without a toroidal B(phi) component and without field-aligned Birkeland currents. The other extreme, a rapidly rotating magnetosphere with cold plasma, leads to a configuration in which plasma must be confined within a thin disk in a plane where the radial magnetic field component B(r) vanishes locally.

  5. Design and rigorous analysis of generalized axially- symmetric dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Fernando J. S.

    1997-10-01

    The development of reflector antennas is continuously driven by ever increasing performance requirements, creating a demand for improved design and analysis tools. Ideally, the antenna synthesis should rely on general closed-form design equations (to establish the initial geometry and performance), as well as on accurate analysis techniques (to tune up the antenna performance by accounting for all pertinent electrical effects). Driven by these motivations, this dissertation provides the required formulation for the rigorous (in a numerical sense) analysis of axially-symmetric dual-reflector antennas and for their effective design. The rigorous analysis is performed using integral-equation techniques, which permit the inclusion of all relevant antenna components (i.e., reflector surfaces and feed structure), with the exception of the supporting struts and radomes. These techniques allow the electrical performance of a designed antenna to be accurately determined, hence minimizing the use of hardware models. The design portion starts with a unified investigation of generalized classical axially-symmetric dual-reflector antennas- conic-section generated configurations that minimize the main-reflector scattering towards the subreflector while providing a uniform-phase aperture illumination. It is shown that all possible configurations can be grouped in four basic categories. Using Geometrical Optics principles, useful closed-form design expressions are obtained, allowing a straightforward determination of the initial geometry and its upper-bound high-frequency performance. The improvement of the antenna radiation characteristics through the reflector shaping is also explored. An amplitude distribution is proposed for the shaped-antenna aperture field (with constant phase), providing high efficiency while controlling the sidelobe envelope. The diffraction and spillover effects are also investigated using Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, yielding useful formulas and

  6. Electromagnetic fields in an axial symmetric waveguide with variable cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.

    1980-07-01

    A new class of separable variables is found which allows one to find an approximate analytical solution of the Maxwell equations for axial symmetric waveguides with slow (but not necessarily small) varying boundary surfaces. An example of the solution is given. Possible applications and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  7. Space charge field in a FEL with axially symmetric electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, I.A.; Belyavskiy, E.D.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear two-dimensional theory of the space charge of an axially symmetric electron beam propagating in combined right-hand polarized wiggler and uniform axial guide fields in a presence of high-frequency electromagnetic wave is presented. The well-known TE{sub 01} mode in a cylindrical waveguide for the model of radiation fields and paraxial approximation for the wiggler field are used. Space charge field components are written in the Lagrange coordinates by the twice averaged Green`s functions of two equally charged infinitely thin discs. For that {open_quotes}compensating charges{close_quotes} method is applied in which an electron ring model is substituted by one with two different radii and signs discs. On this approach the initial Green`s functions peculiarities are eliminated and all calculations are considerably simplified. Coefficients of a twice averaged Green`s function expansion into a Fourier series are obtained by use of corresponding expansion coefficients of longitudinal Green`s functions of equal radii discs and identical rings known from the one-dimensional theory of super HF devices taking into account electron bunches periodicity. This approach permit the space charge field components for an arbitrary stratified stream to be expressed in a simple and strict enough form. The expressions obtained can be employed in a nonlinear two-dimensional FEL theory in order to investigate beam dynamical defocusing and electrons failing on the waveguide walls in the high gain regime. This is especially important for FEL operation in mm and submm.

  8. Instability of propagating axial symmetric waves generated by a vertically oscillating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng; Liu, Yuming

    2015-11-01

    We study the instability of propagating axial symmetric waves in a basin that are generated by a vertically oscillating sphere. Laboratory experiments indicate that when the oscillation amplitude exceeds a threshold value, the axial symmetric propagating waves abruptly transfigure into non-axial symmetric waves. Fully-nonlinear time-domain numerical simulation of wave-body interaction is applied to describe the nonlinear temporal and spatial evolution dynamics of the propagating waves. Transition matrix method is employed to analyze the stability of the nonlinear time periodic wave-body interaction system. We identify the fundamental mechanism leading to the instability of the wave-body system and investigate the critical condition for the occurrence of the instability. We quantify the growth rate and dominant modes of unstable disturbances and study their dependence on physical parameters including body motion frequency and amplitude, body geometry, surface tension and basin size. Moreover, the long-time evolution dynamics of the unstable wave-bod y system including wave patterns and responsive body forces are also investigated.

  9. Modeling Symmetric Macromolecular Structures in Rosetta3

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Frank; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Bradley, Phil; Baker, David; André, Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    Symmetric protein assemblies play important roles in many biochemical processes. However, the large size of such systems is challenging for traditional structure modeling methods. This paper describes the implementation of a general framework for modeling arbitrary symmetric systems in Rosetta3. We describe the various types of symmetries relevant to the study of protein structure that may be modeled using Rosetta's symmetric framework. We then describe how this symmetric framework is efficiently implemented within Rosetta, which restricts the conformational search space by sampling only symmetric degrees of freedom, and explicitly simulates only a subset of the interacting monomers. Finally, we describe structure prediction and design applications that utilize the Rosetta3 symmetric modeling capabilities, and provide a guide to running simulations on symmetric systems. PMID:21731614

  10. The role played by self-orientational properties in nematics of colloids with molecules axially symmetric.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Waess, O

    2010-04-14

    The self-orientational structure factor as well as the short-time self-orientational diffusion coefficient is computed for colloids composed by nonspherical molecules. To compute the short-time dynamics the hydrodynamic interactions are not taken into account. The hard molecules with at least one symmetry axis considered are: rods, spherocylinders, and tetragonal parallelepipeds. Because both orientational properties in study are written in terms of the second and fourth order parameters, these automatically hold the features of the order parameters. That is, they present a discontinuity for first order transitions, determining in this way the spinodal line. In order to analyze the nematic phase only, we choose the appropriate values for the representative quantities that characterize the molecules. Different formalisms are used to compute the structural properties: de Gennes-Landau approach, Smoluchowski equation and computer simulations. Some of the necessary inputs are taken from literature. Our results show that the self-orientational properties play an important role in the characterization and the localization of axially symmetric phases. While the self-structure decreases throughout the nematics, the short-time self-diffusion does not decrease but rather increases. We study the evolution of the second and fourth order parameters; we find different responses for axial and biaxial nematics, predicting the possibility of a biaxial nematics in tetragonal parallelepiped molecules. By considering the second order in the axial-biaxial phase transition, with the support of the self-orientational structure factor, we are able to propose the density at which this occurs. The short-time dynamics is able to predict a different value in the axial and the biaxial phases. Because the different behavior of the fourth order parameter, the diffusion coefficient is lower for a biaxial phase than for an axial one. Therefore the self-structure factor is able to localize

  11. A cylindrical shell with an axial crack under skew-symmetric loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Erdogan, F.

    1973-01-01

    The skew-symmetric problem for a cylindrical shell containing an axial crack is considered. It is assumed that the material has a special orthotropy - namely, that the shear modulus may be evaluated from the measured Young's moduli and Poisson ratios and is not an independent material constant. The problem is solved within the confines of an eighth-order linearized shallow shell theory. As numerical examples, the torsion of an isotropic cylinder and that of a specially orthotropic cylinder (titanium) are considered. The membrane and bending components of the stress intensity factor are calculated and are given as functions of a dimensionless shell parameter. In the torsion problem for the axially cracked cylinder the bending effects appear to be much more significant than that found for the circumferentially cracked cylindrical shell. Also, as the shell parameter increases, unlike the results found in the pressurized shell, the bending stresses around crack ends do not change sign.

  12. New classes of bi-axially symmetric solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundell, Per; Yin, Yihao

    2017-01-01

    We present new infinite-dimensional spaces of bi-axially symmetric asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions to four-dimensional Vasiliev higher spin gravity, obtained by modifications of the Ansatz used in arXiv:1107.1217, which gave rise to a Type-D solution space. The current Ansatz is based on internal semigroup algebras (without identity) generated by exponentials formed out of the bi-axial symmetry generators. After having switched on the vacuum gauge function, the resulting generalized Weyl tensor is given by a sum of generalized Petrov type-D tensors that are Kerr-like or 2-brane-like in the asymptotic AdS4 region, and the twistor space connection is smooth in twistor space over finite regions of spacetime. We provide evidence for that the linearized twistor space connection can be brought to Vasiliev gauge.

  13. High-efficiency Fresnel lens fabricated by axially symmetric photoalignment method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Han; Ko, Shih-Wei; Chu, Shu-Chun; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey

    2012-11-10

    In this study, a Fresnel lens with radial and azimuthal liquid crystal (LC) alignments in the odd and even zones was fabricated using the photoalignment technique based on an azo dye doped in LC cells. The lens has approximately 35% focusing efficiency as determined using a linearly polarized probe beam. In addition, the lens converts the input linear polarization into axially symmetrical polarization at the focal plane. The fabricated Fresnel lens is polarization-independent and has electrically controllable focusing efficiency. Moreover, the far-field pattern of a probe beam through the device placed between the polarizers agrees with the pattern obtained from the simulation.

  14. The design and performance of axially symmetrical contoured wall diffusers employing suction boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. D., Jr.; Hudson, W. G.; Yang, T.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for the design and the performance prediction of axially symmetrical contoured wall diffusers employing suction boundary layer control. An inverse problem approach was used in the potential flow design of the diffuser wall contours. The experimentally observed flow characteristics and the stability of flows within the diffuser are also described. Guidelines for the design of low suction (less than 10 percent of the inlet flow) and thus high effectiveness contoured wall diffusers are also provided based on the results of the experimental program.

  15. EBQ code: transport of space-charge beams in axially symmetric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    Such general-purpose space charge codes as EGUN, BATES, WOLF, and TRANSPORT do not gracefully accommodate the simulation of relativistic space-charged beams propagating a long distance in axially symmetric devices where a high degree of cancellation has occurred between the self-magnetic and self-electric forces of the beam. The EBQ code was written specifically to follow high current beam particles where space charge is important in long distance flight in axially symmetric machines possessing external electric and magnetic field. EBQ simultaneously tracks all trajectories so as to allow procedures for charge deposition based on inter-ray separations. The orbits are treated in Cartesian geometry (position and momentum) with z as the independent variable. Poisson's equation is solved in cylindrical geometry on an orthogonal rectangular mesh. EBQ can also handle problems involving multiple ion species where the space charge from each must be included. Such problems arise in the design of ion sources where different charge and mass states are present.

  16. Curvature dependence of relativistic epicyclic frequencies in static, axially symmetric spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Kluźniak, Włodek; Abramowicz, Marek

    2017-02-01

    The sum of squared epicyclic frequencies of nearly circular motion (ωr2+ωθ2 ) in axially symmetric configurations of Newtonian gravity is known to depend both on the matter density and on the angular velocity profile of circular orbits. It was recently found that this sum goes to zero at the photon orbits of Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes. However, these are the only relativistic configurations for which such a result exists in the literature. Here, we extend the above formalism in order to describe the analogous relation for geodesic motion in arbitrary static, axially symmetric, asymptotically flat solutions of general relativity. The sum of squared epicyclic frequencies is found to vanish at photon radii of vacuum solutions. In the presence of matter, we obtain that ωr2+ωθ2>0 for perturbed timelike circular geodesics on the equatorial plane if the strong energy condition holds for the matter-energy fluid of spacetime; in vacuum, the allowed region for timelike circular geodesic motion is characterized by the inequality above. The results presented here may be of use to shed light on general issues concerning the stability of circular orbits once they approach photon radii, mainly the ones corresponding to stable photon motion.

  17. Charge-exchange QRPA with the Gogny Force for Axially-symmetric Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.

    2014-06-15

    In recent years fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations using finite range Gogny force have been performed to study electromagnetic excitations of several axially-symmetric deformed nuclei up to the {sup 238}U. Here we present the extension of this approach to the charge-exchange nuclear excitations (pnQRPA). In particular we focus on the Isobaric Analog and Gamow-Teller resonances. A comparison of the predicted GT strength distribution with existing experimental data is presented. The role of nuclear deformation is shown. Special attention is paid to β-decay half-lives calculations for which experimental data exist and for specific isotone chains of relevance for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  18. Multiple optical trapping based on high-order axially symmetric polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhe-Hai; Zhu, Lian-Qing

    2015-02-01

    Multiple optical trapping with high-order axially symmetric polarized beams (ASPBs) is studied theoretically, and a scheme based on far-field optical trapping with ASPBs is first proposed. The focused fields and the corresponding gradient forces on Rayleigh dielectric particles are calculated for the scheme. The calculated results indicate that multiple ultra-small focused spots can be achieved, and multiple nanometer-sized particles with refractive index higher than the ambient can be trapped simultaneously near these focused spots, which are expected to enhance the capabilities of traditional optical trapping systems and provide a solution for massive multiple optical trapping of nanometer-sized particles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61108047 and 61475021), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-13-0667), and the Beijing Top Young Talents Support Program, China (Grant No. CIT&TCD201404113).

  19. Field line twist and field-aligned currents in an axially symmetric equilibrium magnetosphere. [of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1986-01-01

    Field-aligned Birkeland currents and the angle of the magnetic line twist were calculated for an axially symmetric pole-on magnetosphere (assumed to be in MHD equilibrium). The angle of the field line twist was shown to have a strong radial dependence on the axisymmetric magnetotail as well as on the ionospheric conductivity and the amount of thermal plasma contained in closed magnetotail flux tubes. The field line twist results from the planetary rotation, which leads to the development of a toroidal magnetic B-sub-phi component and to differentially rotating magnetic field lines. It was shown that the time development of the toroidal magnetic B-sub-phi component and the rotation frequency are related through an induction equation.

  20. A combined finite element-boundary element formulation for solution of axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffrey D.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    A new method is presented for the computation of electromagnetic scattering from axially symmetric bodies. To allow the simulation of inhomogeneous cross sections, the method combines the finite element and boundary element techniques. Interior to a fictitious surface enclosing the scattering body, the finite element method is used which results in a sparce submatrix, whereas along the enclosure the Stratton-Chu integral equation is enforced. By choosing the fictitious enclosure to be a right circular cylinder, most of the resulting boundary integrals are convolutional and may therefore be evaluated via the FFT with which the system is iteratively solved. In view of the sparce matrix associated with the interior fields, this reduces the storage requirement of the entire system to O(N) making the method attractive for large scale computations. The details of the corresponding formulation and its numerical implementation are described.

  1. Republication of: 5. Comment on the axially symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyl, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    This is the English translation of the second of a series of 3 papers by Hermann Weyl (the third one jointly with Rudolf Bach), first published in 1917-1922, in which the authors derived and discussed the now-famous Weyl two-body static axially symmetric vacuum solution of Einstein's equations. The English translations of the other two papers are published alongside this one. The papers have been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Gernot Neugebauer, David Petroff and Bahram Mashhoon, and by a brief biography of R. Bach, written by H. Goenner.

  2. Octupolar approximation for the excluded volume of axially symmetric convex bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a simply computable formula for the excluded volume of convex, axially symmetric bodies, based on the classical Brunn-Minkoski theory for convex bodies, which is briefly outlined in an Appendix written in a modern mathematical language. This formula is applied to cones and spherocones, which are regularized cones; a shape-reconstruction algorithm is able to generate the region in space inaccessible to them and to compute their excluded volume, which is found to be in good agreement with our approximate analytical formula. Finally, for spherocones with an appropriately tuned amplitude, we predict the occurrence of a relative deep minimum of the excluded volume in a configuration lying between the parallel alignment (where the excluded volume is maximum) and the antiparallel alignment (where the excluded volume is minimum).

  3. Motion of relativistic particles in axially symmetric and perturbed magnetic fields in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    de Rover, M.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Montvai, A.

    1996-12-01

    An extensive comparison is given between an analytical theory for the computations of particle orbits of relativistic runaway electrons [M. de Rover {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 4468 (1996)], and numerical simulations. A new numerical scheme is used for the computer simulations of guiding center orbits. Furthermore, simulations of the full particle motion, including the gyration are performed to check the guiding center approximation. The behavior of drift surfaces and particle orbits in axially symmetric magnetic fields, as predicted in the companion paper are confirmed. This includes the smaller minor radius of a drift surface compared to a magnetic flux surface with identical rotational transform, and the decrease of the minor radius of a drift surface with increasing particle energy. Magnetic islands and drift islands appear when the axial symmetry of the magnetic field is broken by harmonic perturbations. In the numerical simulations the amplitudes of the perturbations have been chosen to increase towards the plasma edge. The analytic theory gave predictions of the width of the drift islands that are in good agreement with the numerical simulations. When overlap of the magnetic perturbations introduces stochasticity, the Hamiltonian theory shows that drift islands can exist in the region of stochastic magnetic field lines, which is also confirmed by the numerical simulations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Dynamics of aspherical dust grains in a cometary atmosphere: I. axially symmetric grains in a spherically symmetric atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovski, S. L.; Zakharov, V. V.; Della Corte, V.; Crifo, J.-F.; Rotundi, A.; Fulle, M.

    2017-01-01

    In-situ measurements of individual dust grain parameters in the immediate vicinity of a cometary nucleus are being carried by the Rosetta spacecraft at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. For the interpretations of these observational data, a model of dust grain motion as realistic as possible is requested. In particular, the results of the Stardust mission and analysis of samples of interplanetary dust have shown that these particles are highly aspherical, which should be taken into account in any credible model. The aim of the present work is to study the dynamics of ellipsoidal shape particles with various aspect ratios introduced in a spherically symmetric expanding gas flow and to reveal the possible differences in dynamics between spherical and aspherical particles. Their translational and rotational motion under influence of the gravity and of the aerodynamic force and torque is numerically integrated in a wide range of physical parameters values including those of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The main distinctions of the dynamics of spherical and ellipsoidal particles are discussed. The aerodynamic characteristics of the ellipsoidal particles, and examples of their translational and rotational motion in the postulated gas flow are presented.

  5. Hall attractor in axially symmetric magnetic fields in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N; Cumming, Andrew

    2014-05-02

    We find an attractor for an axially symmetric magnetic field evolving under the Hall effect and subdominant Ohmic dissipation, resolving the question of the long-term fate of the magnetic field in neutron star crusts. The electron fluid is in isorotation, analogous to Ferraro's law, with its angular velocity being approximately proportional to the poloidal magnetic flux, Ω∝Ψ. This equilibrium is the long-term configuration of a magnetic field evolving because of the Hall effect and Ohmic dissipation. For an initial dipole-dominated field, the attractor consists mainly of a dipole and an octupole component accompanied by an energetically negligible quadrupole toroidal field. The field dissipates in a self-similar way: Although higher multipoles should decay faster, the toroidal field mediates transfer of energy into them from the lower ones, leading to an advection diffusion equilibrium and keeping the ratio of the poloidal multipoles almost constant. This has implications for the structure of the intermediate-age neutron stars, suggesting that their poloidal field should consist of a dipole and an octupole component accompanied by a very weak toroidal quadrupole. For initial conditions that have a higher multipole ℓ structure, the attractor consists mainly of ℓ and ℓ+2 poloidal components.

  6. Optically switchable and axially symmetric half-wave plate based on photoaligned liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-C.; Huang, T.-C.; Chu, C.-C.; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an optically switchable half-wave plate (HWP) composed of a photoaligned and axially symmetric liquid crystal (ASLC) film containing two azobenzene derivatives, methyl red (MR) and 4-butyl-4‧-methoxyazobenzene (BMAB). MR is responsible for photoalignment, and BMAB is used for optical tuning and switching the state of polarization (SOP) of probe beam (633 nm He-Ne laser) passing through the MR/BMAB doped ASLC film. The photoaligned ASLC film is first fabricated using a line-shaped laser beam (532 nm) exposure applied on a rotating LC sample. The fabricated ASLC film can passively change the linearly polarized light. Under UV light exposure, the formation of cis-BMAB (bend-like shape) within the film disrupts the LC molecules, switches the LC orientation, and further changes the SOP of the probe beam. Under laser irradiation (532 nm), the formation of trans-BMAB (rod-like shape) reverts the LC orientation back and simultaneously generates cis-MR, helping anchor the LC in the previously photoaligned orientation. The photoaligned MR/BMAB-doped LC HWP can change the linear SOP under alternating UV and visible light exposure.

  7. Buckling Behavior of Long Symmetrically Laminated Plates Subjected to Shear and Linearly Varying Axial Edge Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    1997-01-01

    A parametric study of the buckling behavior of infinitely long symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates that are subjected to linearly varying edge loads, uniform shear loads, or combinations of these loads is presented. The study focuses on the effects of the shape of linearly varying edge load distribution, plate orthotropy, and plate flexural anisotropy on plate buckling behavior. In addition, the study exmines the interaction of linearly varying edge loads and uniform shear loads with plate flexural anisotropy and orthotropy. Results obtained by using a special purpose nondimensional analysis that is well suited for parametric studies of clamped and simply supported plates are presented for [+/- theta](sub s), thin graphite-epoxy laminates that are representative of spacecraft structural components. Also, numerous generic buckling-design charts are presented for a wide range of nondimensional parameters that are applicable to a broad class of laminate constructions. These charts show explicitly the effects of flexural orthotropy and flexural anisotropy on plate buckling behavior for linearly varying edge loads, uniform shear loads, or combinations of these loads. The most important finding of the present study is that specially orthotropic and flexurally anisotropic plates that are subjected to an axial edge load distribution that is tension dominated can support shear loads that are larger in magnitude than the shear buckling load.

  8. Modeling axial compression fatigue in fiber ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Hearle, J.W.S.; Hobbs, R.E.; Overington, M.S.; Banfield, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The modeling of long-term fatigue performance of twisted ropes has been extended to cover axial compression fatigue. This mode of failure has been observed in use and testing of ropes. It is characterized by sharp cooperative kinking of yarns, which leads to flex fatigue breakage of fibers. A model of pipeline buckling was modified to allow for plasticity in bending. An axial and lateral restraints, which influence the buckling, were derived from the existing rope mechanics model. Axial compression was introduced into the total computational model, in order to predict the form of buckling and the consequent fiber failure. An alternative use of the program is simply to detect conditions in which axial compression occurs as an indication of the occurrence of fatigue.

  9. Modelling non-symmetric collagen fibre dispersion in arterial walls.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Ogden, Ray W; Reinisch, Andreas J; Schriefl, Andreas J

    2015-05-06

    New experimental results on collagen fibre dispersion in human arterial layers have shown that the dispersion in the tangential plane is more significant than that out of plane. A rotationally symmetric dispersion model is not able to capture this distinction. For this reason, we introduce a new non-symmetric dispersion model, based on the bivariate von Mises distribution, which is used to construct a new structure tensor. The latter is incorporated in a strain-energy function that accommodates both the mechanical and structural features of the material, extending our rotationally symmetric dispersion model (Gasser et al. 2006 J. R. Soc. Interface 3, 15-35. (doi:10.1098/rsif.2005.0073)). We provide specific ranges for the dispersion parameters and show how previous models can be deduced as special cases. We also provide explicit expressions for the stress and elasticity tensors in the Lagrangian description that are needed for a finite-element implementation. Material and structural parameters were obtained by fitting predictions of the model to experimental data obtained from human abdominal aortic adventitia. In a finite-element example, we analyse the influence of the fibre dispersion on the homogeneous biaxial mechanical response of aortic strips, and in a final example the non-homogeneous stress distribution is obtained for circumferential and axial strips under fixed extension. It has recently become apparent that this more general model is needed for describing the mechanical behaviour of a variety of fibrous tissues.

  10. Modelling non-symmetric collagen fibre dispersion in arterial walls

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Ogden, Ray W.; Reinisch, Andreas J.; Schriefl, Andreas J.

    2015-01-01

    New experimental results on collagen fibre dispersion in human arterial layers have shown that the dispersion in the tangential plane is more significant than that out of plane. A rotationally symmetric dispersion model is not able to capture this distinction. For this reason, we introduce a new non-symmetric dispersion model, based on the bivariate von Mises distribution, which is used to construct a new structure tensor. The latter is incorporated in a strain-energy function that accommodates both the mechanical and structural features of the material, extending our rotationally symmetric dispersion model (Gasser et al. 2006 J. R. Soc. Interface 3, 15–35. (doi:10.1098/rsif.2005.0073)). We provide specific ranges for the dispersion parameters and show how previous models can be deduced as special cases. We also provide explicit expressions for the stress and elasticity tensors in the Lagrangian description that are needed for a finite-element implementation. Material and structural parameters were obtained by fitting predictions of the model to experimental data obtained from human abdominal aortic adventitia. In a finite-element example, we analyse the influence of the fibre dispersion on the homogeneous biaxial mechanical response of aortic strips, and in a final example the non-homogeneous stress distribution is obtained for circumferential and axial strips under fixed extension. It has recently become apparent that this more general model is needed for describing the mechanical behaviour of a variety of fibrous tissues. PMID:25878125

  11. Integrable discrete PT symmetric model.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Musslimani, Ziad H

    2014-09-01

    An exactly solvable discrete PT invariant nonlinear Schrödinger-like model is introduced. It is an integrable Hamiltonian system that exhibits a nontrivial nonlinear PT symmetry. A discrete one-soliton solution is constructed using a left-right Riemann-Hilbert formulation. It is shown that this pure soliton exhibits unique features such as power oscillations and singularity formation. The proposed model can be viewed as a discretization of a recently obtained integrable nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  12. PT -symmetric model of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Ghatak, Ananya; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna

    2017-01-01

    The study of PT -symmetric physical systems began in 1998 as a complex generalization of conventional quantum mechanics, but beginning in 2007 experiments began to be published in which the predicted PT phase transition was clearly observed in classical rather than in quantum-mechanical systems. This paper examines the classical PT phase transition in dynamical-system models that are moderately accurate representations of antigen-antibody systems. A surprising conclusion that can be drawn from these models is that it might be possible treat a serious disease in which the antigen concentration grows out of bounds (and the host dies) by injecting a small dose of a second (different) antigen. In this case a PT -symmetric analysis shows there are two possible favorable outcomes. In the unbroken-PT -symmetric phase the disease becomes chronic and is no longer lethal, while in the appropriate broken-PT -symmetric phase the concentration of lethal antigen goes to zero and the disease is completely cured.

  13. PT symmetric Aubry-Andre model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuce, C.

    2014-06-01

    PT symmetric Aubry-Andre model describes an array of N coupled optical waveguides with position-dependent gain and loss. We show that the reality of the spectrum depends sensitively on the degree of quasi-periodicity for small number of lattice sites. We obtain the Hofstadter butterfly spectrum and discuss the existence of the phase transition from extended to localized states. We show that rapidly changing periodical gain/loss materials almost conserve the total intensity.

  14. Mechanical analysis of an axially symmetric cylindrical phantom with a spherical heterogeneity for MR elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Benjamin L.; Yin, Ziying; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-09-01

    Cylindrical homogenous phantoms for magnetic resonance (MR) elastography in biomedical research provide one way to validate an imaging systems performance, but the simplified geometry and boundary conditions can cloak complexity arising at tissue interfaces. In an effort to develop a more realistic gel tissue phantom for MRE, we have constructed a heterogenous gel phantom (a sphere centrally embedded in a cylinder). The actuation comes from the phantom container, with the mechanical waves propagating toward the center, focusing the energy and thus allowing for the visualization of high-frequency waves that would otherwise be damped. The phantom was imaged and its stiffness determined using a 9.4 T horizontal MRI with a custom build piezo-elastic MRE actuator. The phantom was vibrated at three frequencies, 250, 500, and 750 Hz. The resulting shear wave images were first used to reconstruct material stiffness maps for thin (1 mm) axial slices at each frequency, from which the complex shear moduli μ were estimated, and then compared with forward modeling using a recently developed theoretical model which took μ as inputs. The overall accuracy of the measurement process was assessed by comparing theory with experiment for selected values of the shear modulus (real and imaginary parts). Close agreement is shown between the experimentally obtained and theoretically predicted wave fields.

  15. On the solution of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for hypersonic flow about axially-symmetric blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warsi, Z. U. A.; Weed, R. A.; Thompson, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    A formulation of the complete Navier-Stokes problem for a viscous hypersonic flow in general curvilinear coordinates is presented. This formulation is applicable to both the axially symmetric and three dimensional flows past bodies of revolution. The equations for the case of zero angle of attack were solved past a circular cylinder with hemispherical caps by point SOR finite difference approximation. The free stream Mach number and the Reynolds number for the test case are respectively 22.04 and 168883. The whole algorithm is presented in detail along with the preliminary results for pressure, temperature, density and velocity distributions along the stagnation line.

  16. Modelling larval transport in a axial convergence front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, P.

    2010-12-01

    Marine larvae exhibit different vertical swimming behaviours, synchronised by factors such as tidal currents and daylight, in order to aid retention near the parent populations and hence promote production, avoid predation, or to stimulate digestion. This paper explores two types of larval migration in an estuarine axial convergent front which is an important circulatory mechanism in many coastal regions where larvae are concentrated. A parallelised, three-dimensional, ocean model was applied to an idealised estuarine channel which was parameterised from observations of an axial convergent front which occurs in the Conwy Estuary, U.K. (Nunes and Simpson, 1985). The model successfully simulates the bilateral cross-sectional recirculation of an axial convergent front, which has been attributed to lateral density gradients established by the interaction of the lateral shear of the longitudinal currents with the axial salinity gradients. On the flood tide, there is surface axial convergence whereas on the ebb tide, there is (weaker) surface divergence. Further simulations with increased/decreased tidal velocities and with stronger/weaker axial salinity gradients are planned so that the effects of a changing climate on the secondary flow can be understood. Three-dimensional Lagrangian Particle Tracking Models (PTMs) have been developed which use the simulated velocity fields to track larvae in the estuarine channel. The PTMs take into account the vertical migrations of two shellfish species that are commonly found in the Conwy Estuary: (i) tidal migration of the common shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and (ii), diel (daily) migration of the Great scallop (Pecten maximus). These migration behaviours are perhaps the most widespread amongst shellfish larvae and have been compared with passive (drifting) particles in order to assess their relative importance in terms of larval transport. Preliminary results suggest that the net along-estuary dispersal over a typical larval

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance structural studies of an axially symmetric lanthanide ion chelate in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherry, A. D.; Singh, M.; Geraldes, C. F. G. C.

    The complexes of the macrocyclic ligand 1,4, 7-triazacyclononane- N,N',N″-triacetic acid (NOTA) with the paramagnetic trivalent lanthanide canons have been examined by proton and 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Lanthanide-induced shifts (LIS) have been measured for all proton and carbon resonances in nine paramagnetic Ln(NOTA) complexes at 25 and 70°C. At both temperatures the ethylene protons appear as a pair of resonances forming an AA'XX' splitting pattern (visible only in the Eu(NOTA) spectrum) while the acetate protons remain a singlet. The directions and magnitudes of the 1H and 13C shifts indicate they are dominated by contact interactions in most of the Ln(NOTA) complexes. The 13C spectrum of Pr(NOTA) provides evidence that more than one chelate structure is present in solution. The addition of LiCl to Pr(NOTA) and Eu(NOTA) samples results in significant shifts in the bound 1H and 13C resonances whereas the spectra of Dy(NOTA) and Yb(NOTA) do not change significantly when LiCl is added. These results, along with observed breaks in plots of experimental LIS data versus theoretical pseudocontact and contact shift values, suggest that the early members of the lanthanide ion series form mixed complexes with NOTA in aqueous solution, some with NOTA bound as a hexadentate chelate and some a pentadentate species with one unbound acetate group. The smaller trivalent lanthanide cations (Dy → Yb) appear to form complexes containing only hexadentate chelated NOTA. The contact and pseudocontact contributions to each of the observed LIS have been separated and the resulting pseudocontact shifts for the Dy → Yb complexes agree reasonably well with those calculated using the axial symmetry model. The 1H and 13C relaxation rates determined for three Ln(NOTA) complexes indicate that the smaller lanthanide cations fit into the triazamacrocyclic cavity better than do the larger ions resulting in structurally more rigid Ln(NOTA) complexes.

  18. Global Aspects of Charged Particle Motion in Axially Symmetric Multipole Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    The motion of a single charged particle in the space outside of a compact region of steady currents is investigated. The charged particle is assumed to produce negligible electromagnetic radiation, so that its energy is conserved. The source of the magnetic field is represented as a point multipole. After a general description, attention is focused on magnetic fields with axial symmetry. Lagrangian dynamical theory is utilized to identify constants of the motion as well as the equations of motion themselves. The qualitative method of Stonner is used to examine charged particle motion in axisymmetric multipole fields of all orders. Although the equations of motion generally have no analytical solutions and must be integrated numerically to produce a specific orbit, a topological examination of dynamics is possible, and can be used, d la Stonner, to completely describe the global aspects of the motion of a single charged particle in a space with an axisymmetric multipole magnetic field.

  19. An error criterion for the pointing of axially symmetric spacecraft payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, T. C.

    1983-12-01

    In connection with approaches to minimize the pointing error of the actual orientation of a spacecraft antenna or sensor with respect to the direction of interest, most investigators choose to structure their analysis around one of three conventional measures of the pointing error covariance matrix. The considered investigation is concerned with the development of an error criterion which is 'tailor-made' to the pointing application. The error criterion developed takes special account of the fact that most spacecraft components which require pointing are symmetrical about the boresight axis. This new criterion J(Phi) does not penalize rotation errors about the boresight axis. Moreover, J(Phi) is a measure of the statistical expectation of the mean-square boresight deflection error for that pointing direction which maximizes this error, given a statistically specified set of spacecraft attitude errors. The cost function J(Phi) is compared and related to three more commonly used

  20. Neutron tomography of axially symmetric objects using 14 MeV neutrons from a portable neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, P. Andersson-Sunden, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S.

    2014-08-01

    In nuclear boiling water reactor cores, the distribution of water and steam (void) is essential for both safety and efficiency reasons. In order to enhance predictive capabilities, void distribution assessment is performed in two-phase test-loops under reactor-relevant conditions. This article proposes the novel technique of fast-neutron tomography using a portable deuterium-tritium neutron generator to determine the time-averaged void distribution in these loops. Fast neutrons have the advantage of high transmission through the metallic structures and pipes typically concealing a thermal-hydraulic test loop, while still being fairly sensitive to the water/void content. However, commercially available fast-neutron generators also have the disadvantage of a relatively low yield and fast-neutron detection also suffers from relatively low detection efficiency. Fortunately, some loops are axially symmetric, a property which can be exploited to reduce the amount of data needed for tomographic measurement, thus limiting the interrogation time needed. In this article, three axially symmetric test objects depicting a thermal-hydraulic test loop have been examined; steel pipes with outer diameter 24 mm, thickness 1.5 mm, and with three different distributions of the plastic material POM inside the pipes. Data recorded with the FANTOM fast-neutron tomography instrument have been used to perform tomographic reconstructions to assess their radial material distribution. Here, a dedicated tomographic algorithm that exploits the symmetry of these objects has been applied, which is described in the paper. Results are demonstrated in 20 rixel (radial pixel) reconstructions of the interior constitution and 2D visualization of the pipe interior is demonstrated. The local POM attenuation coefficients in the rixels were measured with errors (RMS) of 0.025, 0.020, and 0.022 cm{sup −1}, solid POM attenuation coefficient. The accuracy and precision is high enough to provide a useful

  1. Neutron tomography of axially symmetric objects using 14 MeV neutrons from a portable neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Andersson, P; Andersson-Sunden, E; Sjöstrand, H; Jacobsson-Svärd, S

    2014-08-01

    In nuclear boiling water reactor cores, the distribution of water and steam (void) is essential for both safety and efficiency reasons. In order to enhance predictive capabilities, void distribution assessment is performed in two-phase test-loops under reactor-relevant conditions. This article proposes the novel technique of fast-neutron tomography using a portable deuterium-tritium neutron generator to determine the time-averaged void distribution in these loops. Fast neutrons have the advantage of high transmission through the metallic structures and pipes typically concealing a thermal-hydraulic test loop, while still being fairly sensitive to the water/void content. However, commercially available fast-neutron generators also have the disadvantage of a relatively low yield and fast-neutron detection also suffers from relatively low detection efficiency. Fortunately, some loops are axially symmetric, a property which can be exploited to reduce the amount of data needed for tomographic measurement, thus limiting the interrogation time needed. In this article, three axially symmetric test objects depicting a thermal-hydraulic test loop have been examined; steel pipes with outer diameter 24 mm, thickness 1.5 mm, and with three different distributions of the plastic material POM inside the pipes. Data recorded with the FANTOM fast-neutron tomography instrument have been used to perform tomographic reconstructions to assess their radial material distribution. Here, a dedicated tomographic algorithm that exploits the symmetry of these objects has been applied, which is described in the paper. Results are demonstrated in 20 rixel (radial pixel) reconstructions of the interior constitution and 2D visualization of the pipe interior is demonstrated. The local POM attenuation coefficients in the rixels were measured with errors (RMS) of 0.025, 0.020, and 0.022 cm(-1), solid POM attenuation coefficient. The accuracy and precision is high enough to provide a useful

  2. Reversing-pulse electric birefringence of multicomponent systems: the formulation and signal simulation for two axially symmetric components in equilibrium and the appearance of unusual signal patterns.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kiwamu

    2007-04-15

    This paper consists of two parts on reversing-pulse electric birefringence (RPEB) signal patterns. The first is the theoretical formulation of two axially symmetric models coexisting in equilibrium in solution. The present RPEB theory is based on the original Tinoco-Yamaoka theory with classical electric dipole moments, which was recently modified and extended by Yamaoka, Sasai, and Kohno to include various electric and optical parameters and most importantly the ion-fluctuation dipole moment (1/2) along the longitudinal direction of axially symmetric molecules. The theory contains the electric polarizability anisotropy Deltaalpha', which can be either positive or negative in relation to the shape of components. The overall signal can be expressed as the sum of the fractions of two components in proportions to the coefficient F(1) or F(2) (=1-F(1)). The second part is the simulation of theoretical RPEB curves for the two-component system with various sets of electric and hydrodynamic parameters for hypothetical but interesting cases. In consideration of the decay behavior, calculated decay curves were compared with experimentally conceivable signals, classifying them into three categories according to cases: F(1)>1, 0/ktDeltaalpha(') is the crucial factor that controls the pattern of RPEB signals. If q value of one component is positive and the other is negative, the simulated RPEB curves are characterized by three cases: q>0, q<-1, and -10 or q<-1, the resultant patterns are often encountered with experimental signals. If -1

  3. Alloy synthesis using the mach stem region in an axial symmetric implosive shock: Understanding the pressure strain-temperature contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, Karl P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mach stem region in an axial symmetric shock implosion has generally been avoided in the dynamic consolidation of powders for a number of reasons. The prime reason being that the convergence of the shock waves in the cylindrical axis produce enormous pressures and concomitant temperatures that have melted tungsten. This shock wave convergence consequently results in a discontinuity in the hydro-code calculations. Dynamic deformation experiments on gold plated 304L stainless steel powders were undertaken. These experiments utilized pressures of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar and contained a symmetric radial melt region along the central axis of the sample holder. To understand the role of deformation in a porous material, the pressure, and temperature as well as the deformation heat and associated defects must be accounted for. When the added heat of consolidation deformation exceeds the melt temperature of the 304 powders, a melt zone results that can consume large regions of the compact while still under the high-pressure pulse. As the shock wave traverses the sample and is removed in a momentum trap, its pressure/temperature are quenched. It is within this region that very high diffusion/alloying occurs and has been observed in the gold plated powders. Anomalous increases of gold diffusion into 304 stainless steel have been observed via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and EDAX measurements. Values exceeding 1200 m/sec have been measured and correlated to the powder sizes, size distribution and packing density, concomitant with sample container strains ranging from 2.0% to 26%.

  4. A non-thermal axially symmetric radio wake towards the Galactic centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad; Bally, John

    1987-01-01

    A highly unusual radio source lying within 1 deg of the Galactic center has been discovered whose 'cometary' morphology suggests that it is a wake produced by a radio source moving supersonically with respect to the ambient interstellar medium. Maps of the source are shown, and its characteristics are discussed. Two possible models which might explain the wake are suggested.

  5. Numerical relativity for D dimensional axially symmetric space-times: Formalism and code tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Witek, Helvi; Sperhake, Ulrich; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Nerozzi, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    The numerical evolution of Einstein’s field equations in a generic background has the potential to answer a variety of important questions in physics: from applications to the gauge-gravity duality, to modeling black hole production in TeV gravity scenarios, to analysis of the stability of exact solutions, and to tests of cosmic censorship. In order to investigate these questions, we extend numerical relativity to more general space-times than those investigated hitherto, by developing a framework to study the numerical evolution of D dimensional vacuum space-times with an SO(D-2) isometry group for D≥5, or SO(D-3) for D≥6. Performing a dimensional reduction on a (D-4) sphere, the D dimensional vacuum Einstein equations are rewritten as a 3+1 dimensional system with source terms, and presented in the Baumgarte, Shapiro, Shibata, and Nakamura formulation. This allows the use of existing 3+1 dimensional numerical codes with small adaptations. Brill-Lindquist initial data are constructed in D dimensions and a procedure to match them to our 3+1 dimensional evolution equations is given. We have implemented our framework by adapting the Lean code and perform a variety of simulations of nonspinning black hole space-times. Specifically, we present a modified moving puncture gauge, which facilitates long-term stable simulations in D=5. We further demonstrate the internal consistency of the code by studying convergence and comparing numerical versus analytic results in the case of geodesic slicing for D=5, 6.

  6. The modelling of symmetric airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Wendt, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to determine the dependence of vortex generator geometry and impinging flow conditions on shed vortex circulation and crossplane peak vorticity for one type of vortex generator. The vortex generator is a symmetric airfoil having a NACA 0012 cross-sectional profile. The geometry and flow parameters varied include angle-of-attack alfa, chordlength c, span h, and Mach number M. The vortex generators are mounted either in isolation or in a symmetric counter-rotating array configuration on the inside surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio is delta/R = 0. 17. Circulation and peak vorticity data are derived from crossplane velocity measurements conducted at or about 1 chord downstream of the vortex generator trailing edge. Shed vortex circulation is observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. With these parameters held constant, circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio AR. Shed vortex peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. Unlike circulation, however, peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at AR approx. 2.0 before falling off.

  7. Calculation of the Pressure Distribution on Bodies of Revolution in the Subsonic Flow of a Gas. Part 1; Axially Symmetrical Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilharz, Herbert; Hoelder, Ernst

    1947-01-01

    The present report concerns a method of computing the velocity and pressure distributions on bodies of revolution in axially symmetrical flow in the subsonic range. The differential equation for the velocity potential Phi of a compressible fluid motion is linearized tn the conventional manner, and then put in the form Delta(Phi) = 0 by affine transformation. The quantity Phi represents the velocity potential of a fictitious incompressible flow, for which a constant superposition of sources by sections is secured by a method patterned after von Karman which must comply with the boundary condition delta(phi)/delta(n) = 0 at the originally specified contour. This requirement yields for the "pseudo-stream function" psi a differential equation which must be fulfilled for as many points on the contour as source lengths are assumed. In this manner, the problem of defining the still unknown source intensities is reduced to the solution of an inhomogeneous equation system. The pressure distribution is then determined with the aid of Bernoulli's equation and adiabatic equation of state. Lastly, the pressure distributions in compressible and incompressible medium are compared on a model problem.

  8. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  9. Numerical solution of the hypersonic viscous-shock-layer equations for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over blunt axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations applicable to hypersonic laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over two-dimensional plane or axially symmetric blunt bodies are presented. The equations are solved by means of an implicit finite difference scheme, and the results are compared with a turbulent boundary layer analysis. The agreement between the two solution procedures is satisfactory for the region of flow where streamline swallowing effects are negligible. For the downstream regions, where streamline swallowing effects are present, the expected differences in the two solution procedures are evident.

  10. Generation of radially polarized high energy mid-infrared optical vortex by use of a passive axially symmetric ZnSe waveplate

    SciTech Connect

    Wakayama, Toshitaka Yonemura, Motoki; Oikawa, Hiroki; Sasanuma, Atsushi; Arai, Goki; Fujii, Yusuke; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Otani, Yukitoshi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu; Miura, Taisuke; Takahashi, Akihiko; Nakamura, Daisuke; Okada, Tatsuo

    2015-08-24

    We demonstrated the generation of the intense radially polarized mid-infrared optical vortex at a wavelength of 10.6 μm by use of a passive axially symmetric zinc selenide (ZnSe) waveplate with high energy pulse throughput. The phase of the radially polarized optical vortex with the degree of polarization of 0.95 was spirally distributed in regard to the angle. The converted laser beam energy of about 2.6 mJ per pulse was obtained at the input pulse energy of 4.9 mJ, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 56%.

  11. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim P.

    2016-09-28

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in pi^0 and 8-Be* decay.

  12. Left-right-symmetric model parameters: Updated bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.; Zralek, M. )

    1992-11-01

    Using the available updated experimental data, including the last results from the CERN {ital e}{sup +}{ital e{minus}} collider LEP and improved parity-violation results, we find new constraints on the parameters in the left-right-symmetric model in the case of light right-handed neutrinos.

  13. Radiative seesaw in left-right symmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong; Sarkar, Utpal

    2008-10-01

    There are some radiative origins for the neutrino masses in the conventional left-right symmetric models with the usual bidoublet and triplet Higgs scalars. These radiative contributions could dominate over the tree-level seesaw and could explain the observed neutrino masses.

  14. Multiscale numerical modeling of the spherically symmetric cryosurgery problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Shilnikov, K. E.

    2017-01-01

    The work is concerned with the numerical studying of the cryogenic biotissue destruction by a spherically symmetric tip. The multiscale bioheat transfer model is used for the describing of the biological solutions crystallization features. An explicit finite volume based approximation is applied for the numerical modeling of the processes taking place during the cryosurgery. The phase averaging method is applied as an computationally economic approach for the numerical modeling of the problem under study.

  15. The spherically symmetric Standard Model with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasin, H.; Böhmer, C. G.; Grumiller, D.

    2005-08-01

    Spherical reduction of generic four-dimensional theories is revisited. Three different notions of "spherical symmetry" are defined. The following sectors are investigated: Einstein-Cartan theory, spinors, (non-)abelian gauge fields and scalar fields. In each sector a different formalism seems to be most convenient: the Cartan formulation of gravity works best in the purely gravitational sector, the Einstein formulation is convenient for the Yang-Mills sector and for reducing scalar fields, and the Newman-Penrose formalism seems to be the most transparent one in the fermionic sector. Combining them the spherically reduced Standard Model of particle physics together with the usually omitted gravity part can be presented as a two-dimensional (dilaton gravity) theory.

  16. Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1996-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

  17. Target space pseudoduality in supersymmetric sigma models on symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarisaman, Mustafa

    We discuss the target space pseudoduality in supersymmetric sigma models on symmetric spaces. We first consider the case where sigma models based on real compact connected Lie groups of the same dimensionality and give examples using three dimensional models on target spaces. We show explicit construction of nonlocal conserved currents on the pseudodual manifold. We then switch the Lie group valued pseudoduality equations to Lie algebra valued ones, which leads to an infinite number of pseudoduality equations. We obtain an infinite number of conserved currents on the tangent bundle of the pseudo-dual manifold. Since pseudoduality imposes the condition that sigma models pseudodual to each other are based on symmetric spaces with opposite curvatures (i.e. dual symmetric spaces), we investigate pseudoduality transformation on the symmetric space sigma models in the third chapter. We see that there can be mixing of decomposed spaces with each other, which leads to mixings of the following expressions. We obtain the pseudodual conserved currents which are viewed as the orthonormal frame on the pullback bundle of the tangent space of G˜ which is the Lie group on which the pseudodual model based. Hence we obtain the mixing forms of curvature relations and one loop renormalization group beta function by means of these currents. In chapter four, we generalize the classical construction of pseudoduality transformation to supersymmetric case. We perform this both by component expansion method on manifold M and by orthonormal coframe method on manifold SO( M). The component method produces the result that pseudoduality transformation is not invertible at all points and occurs from all points on one manifold to only one point where riemann normal coordinates valid on the second manifold. Torsion of the sigma model on M must vanish while it is nonvanishing on M˜, and curvatures of the manifolds must be constant and the same because of anticommuting grassmann numbers. We obtain

  18. Shear-free axial model in massive Brans-Dicke gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Manzoor, Rubab

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the influences of dark energy on the shear-free axially symmetric evolution by considering self-interacting Brans-Dicke gravity as a dark energy candidate. We describe energy source of the model and derive all the effective dynamical variables as well as effective structure scalars. It is found that scalar field is one of the sources of anisotropy and dissipation. The resulting effective structure scalars help to study the dynamics associated with dark energy in any axial configuration. In order to investigate shear-free evolution, we formulate a set of governing equations along with heat transport equation. We discuss consequences of shear-free condition upon different SBD fluid models like dissipative non-geodesic and geodesic models. For dissipative non-geodesic case, the rotational distribution turns out to be the necessary and sufficient condition for radiating model. The dissipation depends upon inhomogeneous expansion. The geodesic model is found to be irrotational and non-radiating. The non-dissipative geodesic model leads to FRW model for positive values of the expansion parameter.

  19. A Model Rotor in Axial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Huang, S. S.; Abrego, A. I.

    2001-01-01

    A model rotor was mounted horizontally in the settling chamber of a wind tunnel to obtain performance and wake structure data under low climb conditions. The immediate wake of the rotor was carefully surveyed using 3-component particle image velocimetry to define the velocity and vortical content of the flow, and used in a subsequent study to validate a theory for the separate determination of induced and profile drag. Measurements were obtained for two collective pitch angles intended to render a predominately induced drag state and another with a marked increase in profile drag. A majority of the azimuthally directed vorticity in the wake was found to be concentrated in the tip vortices. However, adjacent layers of inboard vorticity with opposite sense were clearly present. At low collective, the close proximity of the tip vortex from the previous blade caused the wake from the most recent blade passage to be distorted. The deficit velocity component that was directed along the azimuth of the rotor blade was never more that 15 percent of the rotor tip speed, and except for the region of the tip vortex, appeared to have totally disappeared form the wake left by the previous blade.

  20. Velocity selection in the symmetric model of dendritic crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Angelo; Hong, Daniel C.; Langer, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    An analytic solution of the problem of velocity selection in a fully nonlocal model of dendritic crystal growth is presented. The analysis uses a WKB technique to derive and evaluate a solvability condition for the existence of steady-state needle-like solidification fronts in the limit of small under-cooling Delta. For the two-dimensional symmetric model with a capillary anisotropy of strength alpha, it is found that the velocity is proportional to (Delta to the 4th) times (alpha exp 7/4). The application of the method in three dimensions is also described.

  1. Modelling of partially-resolved oceanic symmetric instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Taylor, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    A series of idealized numerical models have been developed to investigate the effects of partially resolved symmetric instability (SI) in oceanic general circulation models. An analysis of the energetics of symmetric instability is used to argue that the mixed layer can be at least partially restratified even when some SI modes are absent due to either large horizontal viscosity or coarse model resolution. Linear stability analysis reveals that in the idealized models the amount of restratification can be predicted as a function of the grid spacing and viscosity. The models themselves are used to demonstrate these predictions and reveal three possible outcomes in steady-state: (1) incomplete restratification due to viscosity, (2) incomplete restratification due to resolution, and (3) excessive restratification due to anisotropy of the viscosity. The third outcome occurs even on a high-resolution isotropic grid and in two separate numerical models, and thus appears to be a sort of robust numerical feature. The three outcomes are used to recommend criteria that a successful SI parameterization should satisfy.

  2. A Symmetrized Basis for Transitions in the Heisenberg Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger; Nex, C. M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The spin-S Heisenberg model has 2S+1 states on each site, for which there are (2S+1)2 possible transitions between these states. For N sites there are (2S+1)N states and (2S+1)2N transitions between states. This rapid increase in the number of transitions with sites appears to limit calculations to just a few sites. However for transitions induced by spin-spin interactions, we construct a symmetrized basis which only grows as 2N-3, making possible computations for much larger systems. Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund.

  3. Winds from T Tauri stars. I - Spherically symmetric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf; Calvet, Nuria

    1990-01-01

    Line fluxes and profiles are computed for a sequence of spherically symmetric T Tauri wind models. The calculations indicate that the H-alpha emission of T Tauri stars arises in an extended and probably turbulent circumstellar envelope at temperatures above about 8000 K. The models predict that Mg II resonance line emission should be strongly correlated with H-alpha fluxes; observed Mg II/H-alpha ratios are inconsistent with the models unless extinction corrections have been underestimated. The models predict that most of the Ca II resonance line and IR triplet emission arises in dense layers close to the star rather than in the wind. H-alpha emission levels suggest mass loss rates of about 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr for most T Tauri stars, in reasonable agreement with independent analysis of forbidden emission lines. These results should be useful for interpreting observed line profiles in terms of wind densities, temperatures, and velocity fields.

  4. Theory of axially symmetric cusped focusing: numerical evaluation of a Bessoid integral by an adaptive contour algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, N. P.; Connor, J. N. L.; Curtis, P. R.; Hobbs, C. A.

    2000-07-01

    A numerical procedure for the evaluation of the Bessoid canonical integral J({x,y}) is described. J({x,y}) is defined, for x and y real, by eq1 where J0(·) is a Bessel function of order zero. J({x,y}) plays an important role in the description of cusped focusing when there is axial symmetry present. It arises in the diffraction theory of aberrations, in the design of optical instruments and of highly directional microwave antennas and in the theory of image formation for high-resolution electron microscopes. The numerical procedure replaces the integration path along the real t axis with a more convenient contour in the complex t plane, thereby rendering the oscillatory integrand more amenable to numerical quadrature. The computations use a modified version of the CUSPINT computer code (Kirk et al 2000 Comput. Phys. Commun. at press), which evaluates the cuspoid canonical integrals and their first-order partial derivatives. Plots and tables of J({x,y}) and its zeros are presented for the grid -8.0≤x≤8.0 and -8.0≤y≤8.0. Some useful series expansions of J({x,y}) are also derived.

  5. Mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric models

    DOE PAGES

    Berlin, Asher; Fox, Patrick J.; Hooper, Dan; ...

    2016-06-08

    Motivated by the recently reported diboson and dijet excesses in Run 1 data at ATLAS and CMS, we explore models of mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric theories. In this study, we calculate the relic abundance and the elastic scattering cross section with nuclei for a number of dark matter candidates that appear within the fermionic multiplets of left-right symmetric models. In contrast to the case of pure multiplets, WIMP-nucleon scattering proceeds at tree-level, and hence the projected reach of future direct detection experiments such as LUX-ZEPLIN and XENON1T will cover large regions of parameter space for TeV-scale thermal darkmore » matter. Decays of the heavy charged W' boson to particles in the dark sector can potentially shift the right-handed gauge coupling to larger values when fixed to the rate of the Run 1 excesses, moving towards the theoretically attractive scenario, gR = gL. Furthermore, this region of parameter space may be probed by future collider searches for new Higgs bosons or electroweak fermions.« less

  6. Mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Asher; Fox, Patrick J.; Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-06-08

    Motivated by the recently reported diboson and dijet excesses in Run 1 data at ATLAS and CMS, we explore models of mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric theories. In this study, we calculate the relic abundance and the elastic scattering cross section with nuclei for a number of dark matter candidates that appear within the fermionic multiplets of left-right symmetric models. In contrast to the case of pure multiplets, WIMP-nucleon scattering proceeds at tree-level, and hence the projected reach of future direct detection experiments such as LUX-ZEPLIN and XENON1T will cover large regions of parameter space for TeV-scale thermal dark matter. Decays of the heavy charged W' boson to particles in the dark sector can potentially shift the right-handed gauge coupling to larger values when fixed to the rate of the Run 1 excesses, moving towards the theoretically attractive scenario, gR = gL. Furthermore, this region of parameter space may be probed by future collider searches for new Higgs bosons or electroweak fermions.

  7. Mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Asher; Fox, Patrick J.; Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-06-08

    Motivated by the recently reported diboson and dijet excesses in Run 1 data at ATLAS and CMS, we explore models of mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric theories. In this study, we calculate the relic abundance and the elastic scattering cross section with nuclei for a number of dark matter candidates that appear within the fermionic multiplets of left-right symmetric models. In contrast to the case of pure multiplets, WIMP-nucleon scattering proceeds at tree-level, and hence the projected reach of future direct detection experiments such as LUX-ZEPLIN and XENON1T will cover large regions of parameter space for TeV-scale thermal dark matter. Decays of the heavy charged W{sup ′} boson to particles in the dark sector can potentially shift the right-handed gauge coupling to larger values when fixed to the rate of the Run 1 excesses, moving towards the theoretically attractive scenario, g{sub R}=g{sub L}. This region of parameter space may be probed by future collider searches for new Higgs bosons or electroweak fermions.

  8. Mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Asher; Fox, Patrick J.; Hooper, Dan; Mohlabeng, Gopolang

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by the recently reported diboson and dijet excesses in Run 1 data at ATLAS and CMS, we explore models of mixed dark matter in left-right symmetric theories. In this study, we calculate the relic abundance and the elastic scattering cross section with nuclei for a number of dark matter candidates that appear within the fermionic multiplets of left-right symmetric models. In contrast to the case of pure multiplets, WIMP-nucleon scattering proceeds at tree-level, and hence the projected reach of future direct detection experiments such as LUX-ZEPLIN and XENON1T will cover large regions of parameter space for TeV-scale thermal dark matter. Decays of the heavy charged W' boson to particles in the dark sector can potentially shift the right-handed gauge coupling to larger values when fixed to the rate of the Run 1 excesses, moving towards the theoretically attractive scenario, gR = gL. This region of parameter space may be probed by future collider searches for new Higgs bosons or electroweak fermions.

  9. Relativistic electromagnetic mass models in spherically symmetric spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal; Chatterjee, Vikram

    2016-10-01

    Under the static spherically symmetric Einstein-Maxwell spacetime of embedding class one we explore possibility of constructing electromagnetic mass model where mass and other physical parameters have purely electromagnetic origin (Lorentz in Proc. Acad. Sci. Amst. 6, 1904). This work is in continuation of our earlier investigation of Maurya et al. (Eur. Phys. J. C 75:389, 2015a) where we developed an algorithm and found out three new solutions of electromagnetic mass model. In the present work we consider different metric potentials ν and λ and have analyzed them in a systematic way. It is observed that some of the previous solutions related to electromagnetic mass model are nothing but special cases of the presently obtained generalized solution set. We further verify the solution set and especially show that these are extremely applicable in the case of compact stars.

  10. Cylindrically symmetric cosmological model of the universe in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Vadrevu, Samhita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have constructed the cosmological models of the universe in a cylindrically symmetric space time in two classes of f(R,T) gravity (Harko et al. in Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011). We have discussed two cases: one in the linear form and the other in the quadratic form of R. The matter is considered to be in the form of perfect fluid. It is observed that in the first case, the pressure and energy density remain the same, which reduces to a Zeldovich fluid. In the second case we have studied the quadratic function of f(R,T) gravity in the form f(R)=λ(R+R2) and f(T)=λ T. In the second case the pressure is in the negative domain and the energy density is in the positive domain, which confirms that the equation of state parameter is negative. The physical properties of the constructed models are studied.

  11. New mixing angles in the left-right symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Akira; Saito, Takesi

    2015-12-01

    In the left-right symmetric model neutral gauge fields are characterized by three mixing angles θ12,θ23,θ13 between three gauge fields Bμ,WLμ 3,WRμ 3, which produce mass eigenstates Aμ,Zμ,Zμ', when G =S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B-L×D is spontaneously broken down until U (1 )em . We find a new mixing angle θ', which corresponds to the Weinberg angle θW in the standard model with the S U (2 )L×U (1 )Y gauge symmetry, from these mixing angles. It is then shown that any mixing angle θi j can be expressed by ɛ and θ', where ɛ =gL/gR is a ratio of running left-right gauge coupling strengths. We observe that light gauge bosons are described by θ' only, whereas heavy gauge bosons are described by two parameters ɛ and θ'.

  12. Spherically symmetric Einstein-aether perfect fluid models

    SciTech Connect

    Coley, Alan A.; Latta, Joey; Leon, Genly; Sandin, Patrik E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl E-mail: lattaj@mathstat.dal.ca

    2015-12-01

    We investigate spherically symmetric cosmological models in Einstein-aether theory with a tilted (non-comoving) perfect fluid source. We use a 1+3 frame formalism and adopt the comoving aether gauge to derive the evolution equations, which form a well-posed system of first order partial differential equations in two variables. We then introduce normalized variables. The formalism is particularly well-suited for numerical computations and the study of the qualitative properties of the models, which are also solutions of Horava gravity. We study the local stability of the equilibrium points of the resulting dynamical system corresponding to physically realistic inhomogeneous cosmological models and astrophysical objects with values for the parameters which are consistent with current constraints. In particular, we consider dust models in (β−) normalized variables and derive a reduced (closed) evolution system and we obtain the general evolution equations for the spatially homogeneous Kantowski-Sachs models using appropriate bounded normalized variables. We then analyse these models, with special emphasis on the future asymptotic behaviour for different values of the parameters. Finally, we investigate static models for a mixture of a (necessarily non-tilted) perfect fluid with a barotropic equations of state and a scalar field.

  13. Finite difference seismic modeling of axial magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.; Dougherty, M.E.; Stephen, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors tested the feasibility of using finite difference methods to model seismic propagation at {approximately}10 Hx through a two-dimensional representation of an axial magma chamber with a thin, liquid lid. This technique produces time series of displacement or pressure at seafloor receivers to mimic a seismic refraction experiment and snapshots of P and S energy propagation. The results indicate that the implementation is stable for models with sharp velocity contrasts and complex geometries. The authors observe a high-energy, downward-traveling shear phase, observable only with borehole receivers, that would be useful in studying the nature and shape of magma chambers. The ability of finite difference methods to model high-order wave phenomena makes this method ideal for testing velocity models of spreading axes and for planning near-axis drilling of the East Pacific Rise in order to optimize the benefits from shear wave imaging of sub-axis structure.

  14. Arbitrary Symmetric Running Gait Generation for an Underactuated Biped Model

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Mohammad; Macnab, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates generating symmetric trajectories for an underactuated biped during the stance phase of running. We use a point mass biped (PMB) model for gait analysis that consists of a prismatic force actuator on a massless leg. The significance of this model is its ability to generate more general and versatile running gaits than the spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model, making it more suitable as a template for real robots. The algorithm plans the necessary leg actuator force to cause the robot center of mass to undergo arbitrary trajectories in stance with any arbitrary attack angle and velocity angle. The necessary actuator forces follow from the inverse kinematics and dynamics. Then these calculated forces become the control input to the dynamic model. We compare various center-of-mass trajectories, including a circular arc and polynomials of the degrees 2, 4 and 6. The cost of transport and maximum leg force are calculated for various attack angles and velocity angles. The results show that choosing the velocity angle as small as possible is beneficial, but the angle of attack has an optimum value. We also find a new result: there exist biped running gaits with double-hump ground reaction force profiles which result in less maximum leg force than single-hump profiles. PMID:28118401

  15. Dynamically Scaled Glottal Flow Through Symmetrically Oscillating Vocal Fold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, Lori; Baitinger, Andrew; Sherman, Erica; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy; Wei, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Experimental results derived from DPIV measurements in a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The 10x scale vocal fold model is a new design that incorporates key features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. This includes coupling of down/upstream rocking as well as the oscillatory open/close motions. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data will be shown. In this talk, effects associated with paralysis of one vocal fold will be discussed. This talk provides the baseline fluid dynamics for the vocal fold paralysis study presented in Sherman, et al. Supported by the NIH.

  16. Modeling scattering from azimuthally symmetric bathymetric features using wavefield superposition.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, John A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, an approach for modeling the scattering from azimuthally symmetric bathymetric features is described. These features are useful models for small mounds and indentations on the seafloor at high frequencies and seamounts, shoals, and basins at low frequencies. A bathymetric feature can be considered as a compact closed region, with the same sound speed and density as one of the surrounding media. Using this approach, a number of numerical methods appropriate for a partially buried target or facet problem can be applied. This paper considers the use of wavefield superposition and because of the azimuthal symmetry, the three-dimensional solution to the scattering problem can be expressed as a Fourier sum of solutions to a set of two-dimensional scattering problems. In the case where the surrounding two half spaces have only a density contrast, a semianalytic coupled mode solution is derived. This provides a benchmark solution to scattering from a class of penetrable hemispherical bosses or indentations. The details and problems of the numerical implementation of the wavefield superposition method are described. Example computations using the method for a simple scattering feature on a seabed are presented for a wide band of frequencies.

  17. Chirally symmetric O(1/N{sub c}) corrections to the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrasinovic, V.; Schulze, H.J.; Tegen, R.

    1995-03-01

    We develop an extended chirally symmetric self-consistent approximation scheme to the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, that corresponds to O(1/N{sub c}) corrections to the usual Hartree + random phase approximations. This scheme amounts to adding {open_quotes}meson cloud{close_quotes} contributions self-consistently to the quark self-energy and the meson polarization functions in a manner suggested by the weakly interacting nature of the quark and collective meson degrees of freedom of the NJL model in the large N{sub c} limit. We demonstrate explicitly that this scheme fulfills all the chiral symmetry theorems, namely the Goldstone theorem, the Goldberger-Treiman relation, and the conservation of the quark axial current. We explore the corrections to the quark self-energy and scalar condensate, as well as to the pion polarization function and the weak decay constant N{sub n}. The numerical evaluation of these corrections is presented and discussed. 23 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. A new series of short axially symmetrically and asymmetrically 1,3,6,8-tetrasubstituted pyrenes with two types of substituents: Syntheses, structures, photophysical properties and electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Tengfei; Xu, Lu; Han, Fangfang; Zhao, Yun; Ni, Zhonghai

    2017-01-01

    A new series of short axially symmetrically (4a and 4b) and asymmetrically (4c and 4d) 1,3,6,8-tetrasubstituted pyrene-based compounds with two phenyl moieties and two diphenylamine units on the pyrene core were designed and synthesized based on stepwise synthetic strategy. These compounds were structurally characterized and their photoelectric properties were investigated by spectroscopy, electrochemical and theoretical studies. The structures of 4a and 4b were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, indicating that the compounds are twisted by the peripheral substituents and the intermolecular π-π interactions have been efficiently interrupted. The four compounds exhibit high absolute fluorescence quantum yields (VF) in dichloromethane (83.31-88.45%) and moderate VFs in film states (20.78-38.68%). In addition, compounds 4a and 4b display relatively higher absolute VFs than those of 4c and 4d in film states. All the compounds exhibit high thermal stability with decomposition temperatures above 358 °C and the values of 4c and 4d are higher than 4a and 4b. Compounds 4a and 4b can form morphologically stable amorphous thin films with Tg values of 146 °C and 149 °C, respectively. However, there are no obvious Tg observed in compounds 4c and 4d. Electroluminescent devices using 4a and 4b as doped emission layer show promising device performance with low turn-on voltage (3.0 V), maximum brightness around 15100 cd/m2 and 16100 cd/m2, maximum luminance efficiency of 12.4 cd/A and 13.6 cd/A and maximum external quantum efficiency of 5.34% and 5.63%, respectively.

  19. Minimal left-right symmetric intersecting D-brane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Antoniadis, Ignatios; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lüst, Dieter; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes, with gauge bosons due to strings attached to stacks of D-branes and chiral matter due to strings stretching between intersecting D-branes. The left-handed and right-handed fermions transform as doublets under S p (1 )L and S p (1 )R, and so their masses must be generated by the introduction of Higgs fields in a bifundamental (2 ,2 ) representation under the two S p (1 ) gauge groups. For such D-brane configurations the left-right symmetry must be broken by Higgs fields in the doublet representation of S p (1 )R and therefore Majorana mass terms are suppressed by some higher physics scale. The left-handed and right-handed neutrinos pair up to form Dirac fermions which control the decay widths of the right-handed W' boson to yield comparable branching fractions into dilepton and dijet channels. Using the most recent searches at LHC13 Run II with 2016 data we constrain the (gR,mW') parameter space. Our analysis indicates that independent of the coupling strength gR, gauge bosons with masses mW'≳3.5 TeV are not ruled out. As the LHC is just beginning to probe the TeV scale, significant room for W' discovery remains.

  20. Modeling and minimizing CAPRI round 30 symmetrical protein complexes from CASP-11 structural models.

    PubMed

    El Houasli, Marwa; Maigret, Bernard; Devignes, Marie-Dominique; Ghoorah, Anisah W; Grudinin, Sergei; Ritchie, David W

    2017-03-01

    Many of the modeling targets in the blind CASP-11/CAPRI-30 experiment were protein homo-dimers and homo-tetramers. Here, we perform a retrospective docking-based analysis of the perfectly symmetrical CAPRI Round 30 targets whose crystal structures have been published. Starting from the CASP "stage-2" fold prediction models, we show that using our recently developed "SAM" polar Fourier symmetry docking algorithm combined with NAMD energy minimization often gives acceptable or better 3D models of the target complexes. We also use SAM to analyze the overall quality of all CASP structural models for the selected targets from a docking-based perspective. We demonstrate that docking only CASP "center" structures for the selected targets provides a fruitful and economical docking strategy. Furthermore, our results show that many of the CASP models are dockable in the sense that they can lead to acceptable or better models of symmetrical complexes. Even though SAM is very fast, using docking and NAMD energy minimization to pull out acceptable docking models from a large ensemble of docked CASP models is computationally expensive. Nonetheless, thanks to our SAM docking algorithm, we expect that applying our docking protocol on a modern computer cluster will give us the ability to routinely model 3D structures of symmetrical protein complexes from CASP-quality models. Proteins 2017; 85:463-469. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Symmetrical kinematics does not imply symmetrical kinetics in people with transtibial amputation using cycling model.

    PubMed

    Childers, W Lee; Kogler, Géza F

    2014-01-01

    People with amputation move asymmetrically with regard to kinematics (joint angles) and kinetics (joint forces and moments). Clinicians have traditionally sought to minimize kinematic asymmetries, assuming kinetic asymmetries would also be minimized. A cycling model evaluated locomotor asymmetries. Eight individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation pedaled with 172 mm-length crank arms on both sides (control condition) and with the crank arm length shortened to 162 mm on the amputated side (CRANK condition). Pedaling kinetics and limb kinematics were recorded. Joint kinetics, joint angles (mean and range of motion [ROM]), and pedaling asymmetries were calculated from force pedals and with a motion capture system. A one-way analysis of variance with tukey post hoc compared kinetics and kinematics across limbs. Statistical significance was set to p

  2. Geomorphological impact of an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Guala, M.

    2012-12-01

    MHK devices in river or tidal environments are expected to impact the local geomorphology in the short and long terms, yet to what extent is unknown. A series of experiments in the SAFL main channel were performed on an erodible sediment layer at the threshold of motion aimed at quantifying the local effect of an axial-flow turbine model on erosional and depositional processes. Full planimetric, time resolved measurements of bed elevations z = z(x, y, t) were obtained using a 2D sheet laser scanner mounted on a computer controlled data acquisition carriage. Measurement resolution was 2 mm x 2 mm in the streamwise (x) and spanwise (y) directions, and approximately 70 s temporally. Approximately 180 topographic scans were obtained in about 3.8 hours while simultaneously monitoring mean approach velocities using an acoustic Doppler profiler located approximately 2 rotor diameters, dT, upstream of the turbine. Three synchronized acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) located 6dT downstream of the turbine at locations coincident with the turbine axis of symmetry and at the lateral blade tips at hub height obtained instantaneous three component velocity measurements u, v, w in the wake of the turbine. The 1:10 scale axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine model operated at a constant tip speed ratio ωdT/2U = 6.3 while measuring instantaneous torque (ω is the rotor angular velocity and U is the mean incoming velocity at the hub height). The sediment layer consisted of coarse sand with mean diameter d50 = 1.8 mm. Using laser scanning measurements, the sediment layer was observed to be stable under the given hydraulic conditions (total discharge of Qw = 1.765 m3s-1 and water depth of h = 1.15 m) during the baseline case (no turbine), ensuring that the mean shear stress was below the critical value for the duration of the experiment. Maintaining the same flow conditions, three additional experiments were performed: a) effect of turbine support (base and tower) only, b) effect of

  3. Stationary spherically symmetric one-kink model in Saez-Ballester theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, M.; Reddy, D. R. K.; Rao, V. U. M.; Bhaskara Rao, M. P. V. V.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we consider stationary Spherically symmetric kink space-time in the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Saez and Ballester (Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986) in the presence of perfect fluid distribution. It is shown that spherically symmetric kink space-time does not accommodate perfect fluid distribution in this theory. Hence a vacuum model is obtained which is asymptotically flat. This model corresponds to a one kink metric in this theory. This can be considered as an analogue of usual spherically symmetric Schwarzschild case in this theory.

  4. Investigation of Structural Dynamics in a 2-Meter Square Solar Sail Model Including Axial Load Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Virgin, L. N.; Belvin, W. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a parameter study of the effect of boom axial loading on the global dynamics of a 2-meter solar sail scale model. The experimental model used is meant for building expertise in finite element analysis and experimental execution, not as a predecessor to any planned flight mission or particular design concept. The results here are to demonstrate the ability to predict and measure structural dynamics and mode shapes in the presence of axial loading.

  5. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  6. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  7. The Replica Symmetric Solution for Potts Models on d-Regular Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembo, Amir; Montanari, Andrea; Sly, Allan; Sun, Nike

    2014-04-01

    We establish an explicit formula for the limiting free energy density (log-partition function divided by the number of vertices) for ferromagnetic Potts models on uniformly sparse graph sequences converging locally to the d-regular tree for d even, covering all temperature regimes. This formula coincides with the Bethe free energy functional evaluated at a suitable fixed point of the belief propagation recursion on the d-regular tree, the so-called replica symmetric solution. For uniformly random d-regular graphs we further show that the replica symmetric Bethe formula is an upper bound for the asymptotic free energy for any model with permissive interactions.

  8. Model independent extraction of the axial mass parameter in CCQE anti neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebe, Heather

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation studies depend on a consistent value for the axial mass. For this reason, a model-independent extraction of this parameter from quasielastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering data is vital. While most studies employ a model-dependent extraction using the dipole model of the axial form factor, we present a model-independent description using the z expansion of the axial form factor. Quasielastic antineutrino scattering data on C-12 from the MiniBooNE experiment are analyzed using this model-independent description. The value found, mA = 0 .85-0 . 06 + 0 . 13 +/- 0 . 13 GeV, differs significantly from the value utilized by the MiniBooNE Collaboration, mA = 1 . 35 GeV. Advisor: Dr. Gil Paz Wayne State Univerity.

  9. A Symmetric Time-Varying Cluster Rate of Descent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    A model of the time-varying rate of descent of the Orion vehicle was developed based on the observed correlation between canopy projected area and drag coefficient. This initial version of the model assumes cluster symmetry and only varies the vertical component of velocity. The cluster fly-out angle is modeled as a series of sine waves based on flight test data. The projected area of each canopy is synchronized with the primary fly-out angle mode. The sudden loss of projected area during canopy collisions is modeled at minimum fly-out angles, leading to brief increases in rate of descent. The cluster geometry is converted to drag coefficient using empirically derived constants. A more complete model is under development, which computes the aerodynamic response of each canopy to its local incidence angle.

  10. Predicting the axial structure of the proton using a quark-diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxholm, Trevor M.; Hobbs, Timothy J.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2017-01-01

    The form factors of the proton typically measured via elastic electroweak scattering have long been a rich testing ground for models of nucleon structure. We explore the ability of a model based in a quark/spectator diquark picture to describe form factors in the electromagnetic sector, as well as to predict the form of the nucleon's axial current. Making use of a realistic spin decomposition and phenomenological vertex factors, we choose model parameters so as to fit experimental data on the electric and magnetic Sachs form factors, as well as the low-momentum isovector axial form factor. With the model we then predict the pseudoscalar form factor and extend axial form factor predictions to higher momenta, comparing our predictions to those of other frameworks and techniques. DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER-41014, NSF REU program.

  11. Republication of: New solutions to Einstein's equations of gravitation. B. Explicit determination of static, axially symmetric fields. By Rudolf Bach. With a supplement on the static two-body problem. By H. Weyl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Rudolf; Weyl, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    This is the English translation of the third of a series of 3 papers by Hermann Weyl (the third one jointly with Rudolf Bach), first published in 1917-1922, in which the authors derived and discussed the now-famous Weyl two-body static axially symmetric vacuum solution of Einstein's equations. The English translations of the other two papers are published alongside this one. The papers have been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Gernot Neugebauer, David Petroff and Bahram Mashhoon, and by a brief biography of R. Bach, written by H. Goenner.

  12. Symmetric model of compressible granular mixtures with permeable interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurel, Richard; Le Martelot, Sébastien; Tosello, Robert; Lapébie, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    Compressible granular materials are involved in many applications, some of them being related to energetic porous media. Gas permeation effects are important during their compaction stage, as well as their eventual chemical decomposition. Also, many situations involve porous media separated from pure fluids through two-phase interfaces. It is thus important to develop theoretical and numerical formulations to deal with granular materials in the presence of both two-phase interfaces and gas permeation effects. Similar topic was addressed for fluid mixtures and interfaces with the Discrete Equations Method (DEM) [R. Abgrall and R. Saurel, "Discrete equations for physical and numerical compressible multiphase mixtures," J. Comput. Phys. 186(2), 361-396 (2003)] but it seemed impossible to extend this approach to granular media as intergranular stress [K. K. Kuo, V. Yang, and B. B. Moore, "Intragranular stress, particle-wall friction and speed of sound in granular propellant beds," J. Ballist. 4(1), 697-730 (1980)] and associated configuration energy [J. B. Bdzil, R. Menikoff, S. F. Son, A. K. Kapila, and D. S. Stewart, "Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: A critical examination of modeling issues," Phys. Fluids 11, 378 (1999)] were present with significant effects. An approach to deal with fluid-porous media interfaces was derived in Saurel et al. ["Modelling dynamic and irreversible powder compaction," J. Fluid Mech. 664, 348-396 (2010)] but its validity was restricted to weak velocity disequilibrium only. Thanks to a deeper analysis, the DEM is successfully extended to granular media modelling in the present paper. It results in an enhanced version of the Baer and Nunziato ["A two-phase mixture theory for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in reactive granular materials," Int. J. Multiphase Flow 12(6), 861-889 (1986)] model as symmetry of the formulation is now preserved. Several computational examples are

  13. Optimal symmetric flight with an intermediate vehicle model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Kelley, H. J.; Cliff, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    Optimal flight in the vertical plane with a vehicle model intermediate in complexity between the point-mass and energy models is studied. Flight-path angle takes on the role of a control variable. Range-open problems feature subarcs of vertical flight and singular subarcs. The class of altitude-speed-range-time optimization problems with fuel expenditure unspecified is investigated and some interesting phenomena uncovered. The maximum-lift-to-drag glide appears as part of the family, final-time-open, with appropriate initial and terminal transient exceeding level-flight drag, some members exhibiting oscillations. Oscillatory paths generally fail the Jacobi test for durations exceeding a period and furnish a minimum only for short-duration problems.

  14. A symmetric approach to the massive nonlinear sigma model

    DOE PAGES

    Ferrari, Ruggero

    2011-09-28

    In the present study we extend to the massive case the procedure of divergences subtraction, previously introduced for the massless nonlinear sigma model (D = 4). Perturbative expansion in the number of loops is successfully constructed. The resulting theory depends on the Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking parameter v, on the mass m and on the radiative correction parameter Λ. Fermions are not considered in the present work. SU(2) Ⓧ SU(2) is the group used.

  15. A zonally symmetric model for volcanic influence upon atmospheric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of volcanic activity upon zonal wind flow in a model atmosphere are considered. A low latitude volcanic eruption could lower the tropospheric pole to equator temperature difference and thereby affect the atmospheric motions. When the temperature contrast decreases, the zonal wind velocities at high altitudes are reduced. To conserve angular momentum, the velocities in the lower atmosphere near the surface must increase, thus providing a momentum source for ocean currents. It is suggested that this momentum source may have played a role as a trigger for inducing the 1982-83 anomalous El Nino and possibly other climate changes.

  16. A zonally symmetric model for volcanic influence upon atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The effects of volcanic activity upon zonal wind flow in a model atmosphere are considered. A low latitude volcanic eruption could lower the tropospheric pole to equator temperature difference and thereby affect the atmospheric motions. When the temperature contrast decreases, the zonal wind velocities at high altitudes are reduced. To conserve angular momentum, the velocities in the lower atmosphere near the surface must increase, thus providing a momentum source for ocean currents. It is suggested that this momentum source may have played a role as a trigger for inducing the 1982-83 anomalous El Nino and possibly other climate changes.

  17. Modelling of steel fiber-reinforced concrete under multi-axial loads

    SciTech Connect

    Swaddiwudhipong, Somsak . E-mail: cvesomsa@nus.edu.sg; Seow, Puay Eng Constance

    2006-07-15

    Fifty-four plain concrete and steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) plate specimens containing 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% of hooked fibers were tested under biaxial compression. The experimental results obtained were used to verify a failure surface developed earlier by the authors for SFRC under multi-axial loads. An equation has also been proposed in this study to predict the strain at failure for SFRC under multi-axial loads, {epsilon} {sub ci}. The proposed failure criterion and equation to predict {epsilon} {sub ci} were incorporated into a constitutive model in a well-established finite-element software, ABAQUS. Experiments of SFRC plate specimens under multi-axial loads and beams under two-point load were modeled to illustrate the application of the failure surface to SFRC under varying load conditions. Good agreement between analytical and experimental results is observed.

  18. FAST Mast Structural Response to Axial Loading: Modeling and Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Templeton, Justin D.; Song, Kyongchan; Rayburn, Jeffery T.

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station s solar array wing mast shadowing problem is the focus of this paper. A building-block approach to modeling and analysis is pursued for the primary structural components of the solar array wing mast structure. Starting with an ANSYS (Registered Trademark) finite element model, a verified MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is established for a single longeron. This finite element model translation requires the conversion of several modeling and analysis features for the two structural analysis tools to produce comparable results for the single-longeron configuration. The model is then reconciled using test data. The resulting MSC.Nastran (Trademark) model is then extended to a single-bay configuration and verified using single-bay test data. Conversion of the MSC. Nastran (Trademark) single-bay model to Abaqus (Trademark) is also performed to simulate the elastic-plastic longeron buckling response of the single bay prior to folding.

  19. Spin Calogero models associated with Riemannian symmetric spaces of negative curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehér, L.; Pusztai, B. G.

    2006-09-01

    The Hamiltonian symmetry reduction of the geodesics system on a symmetric space of negative curvature by the maximal compact subgroup of the isometry group is investigated at an arbitrary value of the momentum map. Restricting to regular elements in the configuration space, the reduction generically yields a spin Calogero model with hyperbolic interaction potentials defined by the root system of the symmetric space. These models come equipped with Lax pairs and many constants of motion, and can be integrated by the projection method. The special values of the momentum map leading to spinless Calogero models are classified under some conditions, explaining why the BC models with two independent coupling constants are associated with SU(n+1,n)/S(U(n+1)×U(n)) as found by Olshanetsky and Perelomov. In the zero curvature limit our models reproduce rational spin Calogero models studied previously and similar models correspond to other (affine) symmetric spaces, too. The construction works at the quantized level as well.

  20. Masses of Axial-Vector Resonances in a Linear Sigma Model with N{sub f} = 3

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, Denis; Giacosa, Francesco; Kovacs, Peter; Wolf, Gyoergy

    2011-05-23

    We discuss an N{sub f} = 3 linear sigma model with vector and axial-vector mesons (extended Linear Sigma Model-eLSM). We present first results regarding the masses of axial-vector mesons determined from the extended model.

  1. Low-frequency intraseasonal variability in a zonally symmetric aquaplanet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Surajit; Sengupta, Debasis; Chakraborty, A.; Sukhatme, Jai; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-12-01

    We use the aquaplanet version of the community atmospheric model, with perpetual spring equinox forcing and zonally symmetric sea surface temperature (SST), to study tropical intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs). In the first two experiments, we specify zonally symmetric SST profiles that mimic observed climatological July and January SSTs as surface boundary conditions. In the January SST simulation, we find a zonal wavenumber 1 mode with dominant period of 60 days, moving east at about 6 m s-1. This mode, which resembles the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), is absent in the July SST case, although convectively coupled Kelvin waves are prominent in both experiments. To further investigate the influence of tropical SST on ISO and convectively coupled equatorial waves, we conduct experiments with idealised symmetric SST profiles having different widths of warm ocean centered at the equator. In the narrowest SST experiment, the variance of moist activity is predominantly in weather-scale Kelvin waves. When the latitudinal extent of warm SST is comparable to or larger than the equatorial Rossby radius, we find a dominant low frequency (50-80 days) eastward mode that resembles the MJO, as in the January SST experiment. We also find westward propagating waves with intraseasonal (30-120 days) periods and zonal wavenumber 1-3; the structure of these signals projects onto equatorially trapped Rossby waves with meridional mode numbers 1, 3 and 5, associated with convection that is symmetric about the equator. In addition, the model generates 30-80 days westward moving signals with zonal wavenumber 4-7, particularly in the narrow SST experiment. Although these waves are seen in the wavenumber-frequency spectra in the equatorial region, they have largest amplitude in the middle and high latitudes. Thus, our study shows that wider, meridionally symmetric SST profiles support a strong MJO-like eastward propagation, and even in an aquaplanet setting, westward propagating Rossby

  2. The transition from symmetric to baroclinic instability in the Eady model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, Megan A.; Taylor, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we explore the transition from symmetric instability to ageostrophic baroclinic instability in the Eady model; an idealised representation of a submesoscale mixed layer front. We revisit the linear stability problem considered by Stone (J Atmos Sci, 23, 390-400, (Stone 1966)), Stone (J Atmos Sci, 27, 721-726, (Stone 1970)), Stone (J Atmos Sci, 29, 419-426, (Stone 1972)) with a particular focus on three-dimensional `mixed modes' (which are neither purely symmetric or baroclinic) and find that these modes can have growth rates within just a few percent of the corresponding two-dimensional growth rate maximum. In addition, we perform very high resolution numerical simulations allowing an exploration of the transition from symmetric to baroclinic instability. Three-dimensional mixed modes represent the largest contribution to the turbulent kinetic energy during the transition period between symmetric and baroclinic instability. In each simulation, we see the development of sharp fronts with associated high rms vertical velocities of up to 30 mm s-1. Furthermore, we see significant transfer of energy to small scales, demonstrated by time-integrated mixing and energy dissipation by small-scale three-dimensional turbulence totalling about 30 % of the initial kinetic energy in all cases.

  3. Type-dependent stochastic Ising model describing the dynamics of a non-symmetric feedback module.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Navarrete, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    We study an alternative approach to model the dynamical behaviors of biological feedback loop, that is, a type-dependent spin system, this class of stochastic models was introduced by Fernández et. al [13], and are useful since take account to inherent variability of gene expression. We analyze a non-symmetric feedback module being an extension for the repressilator, the first synthetic biological oscillator, invented by Elowitz and Leibler [7]. We consider a mean-field dynamics for a type-dependent Ising model, and then study the empirical-magnetization vector representing concentration of molecules. We apply a convergence result from stochastic jump processes to deterministic trajectories and present a bifurcation analysis for the associated dynamical system. We show that non-symmetric module under study can exhibit very rich behaviours, including the empirical oscillations described by repressilator.

  4. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)).

  5. Radiation-Hydromagnetic Models of a Z-Pinch Implosion with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Terry, R.; Davis, J.; Velikovich, A. L.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental results on a 1MA pulser suggest that axial magnetic fields can stabilize z-pinch implosions and enhance the compression ratio(S. Sorokin and S. Chaikovsky, Dense Z-Pinches, AIP Conf. Proc. 299, p.83 (1993).). The present theoretical work calculates the effects of an axial magnetic field on the plasma and field profiles in an imploding z-pinch. The initial mass configuration is an annular shell of krypton. The 1-D simulation model includes: resistive diffusion (skin effect) for both the azimuthal and axial fields, ionization dynamics, and non-LTE radiation transport. Unlike the constant pulser current of self-similar models for the screw-pinch, a transmission line is used to model the circuit of a realistic ~10MA pulser. The implosion dynamics resulting from an axial field generated by a twisted return current cage will be compared with results due to an initial field from external Helmholtz coils. The dependence of the radiative performance on compression ratio, which in turn is a function of inital field strength or cage twist, will be discussed.

  6. Symmetric Fold/Super-Hopf Bursting, Chaos and Mixed-Mode Oscillations in Pernarowski Model of Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Haniyeh

    Pancreatic beta-cells produce insulin to regularize the blood glucose level. Bursting is important in beta cells due to its relation to the release of insulin. Pernarowski model is a simple polynomial model of beta-cell activities indicating bursting oscillations in these cells. This paper presents bursting behaviors of symmetric type in this model. In addition, it is shown that the current system exhibits the phenomenon of period doubling cascades of canards which is a route to chaos. Canards are also observed symmetrically near folds of slow manifold which results in a chaotic transition between n and n + 1 spikes symmetric bursting. Furthermore, mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) and combination of symmetric bursting together with MMOs are illustrated during the transition between symmetric bursting and continuous spiking.

  7. Momentos centrados en sistemas estelares a simetria axial.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Subirana, J.; Juan Zornoza, J. M.; Català Poch, M. A.

    Centered moments in the galactic plane have been analytically determined up to the fourth order for a non-stationary stellar system model with a distribution of peculiar velocities of the stars symmetric under point-axial transformations and equatorial plane reflexions. The obtained results explain satisfactorily the peculiar velocities distribution of the considered stellar samples in the solar neighborhood.

  8. Simulation on Residual Stress of Shot Peening Based on a Symmetrical Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, Cheng; HU, Jiacheng; GU, Zhenbiao; XU, Yangjian; WANG, Xiaogui

    2017-03-01

    The symmetrical cell model is widely used to study the residual stress induced by shot peening. However, the correlation between the predicted residual stresses and the shot peening coverage, which is a big challenge for the researchers of the symmetrical cell model, is still not established. Based on the dynamic stresses and the residual stresses outputted from the symmetrical cell model, the residual stresses corresponding to full coverage are evaluated by normal distribution analysis. The predicted nodal dynamic stresses with respect to four corner points indicate that the equi-biaxial stress state exists only for the first shot impact. Along with the increase of shot number, the interactions of multiple shot impacts make the fluctuation of the nodal dynamic stresses about an almost identical value more and more obvious. The mean values and standard deviations of the residual stresses gradually tend to be stable with the increase of the number of shot peening series. The mean values at each corner point are almost the same after the third peening series, which means that an equi-biaxial stress state corresponding to the full coverage of shot peening is achieved. Therefore, the mean values of the nodal residual stresses with respect to a specific transverse cross-section below the peened surface can be used to correlate the measured data by X-ray. The predicted residual stress profile agrees with the experimental results very well under 200% peening coverage. An effective correlation method is proposed for the nodal residual stresses predicted by the symmetrical cell model and the shot peening coverage.

  9. Rare top quark decays in Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2007-06-19

    We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t {yields} H0 + c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t {yields} c + {gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  10. Neutrinoless double beta decay in the left-right symmetric models for linear seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Pei-Hong

    2016-09-01

    In a class of left-right symmetric models for linear seesaw, a neutrinoless double beta decay induced by the left- and right-handed charged currents together will only depend on the breaking details of left-right and electroweak symmetries. This neutrinoless double beta decay can reach the experimental sensitivities if the right-handed charged gauge boson is below the 100TeV scale.

  11. Phenomenology of Friedberg-Lee Texture in Left-Right Symmetric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Min-Jie; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2008-08-01

    We consider that the Higgs triplet Yukawa coupling takes the Friedberg Lee texture, and the Higgs doublet Yukawa coupling simply identifies with the diagonal Yukawa coupling of charged lepton in the context of left-right symmetric model. In this scenario, the phenomenology, including effective neutrino masses, mixings, and thermal flavor-dependent leptogenesis and lepton flavor violation decays are studied. We investigate the combined constrain of the parameters in this scenario and test its consistency with present data.

  12. Simplifying numerical ray tracing for two-dimensional non circularly symmetric models of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Danilo A; Iskander, D Robert

    2015-12-01

    Ray tracing is a powerful technique to understand the light behavior through an intricate optical system such as that of a human eye. The prediction of visual acuity can be achieved through characteristics of an optical system such as the geometrical point spread function. In general, its precision depends on the number of discrete rays and the accurate surface representation of each eye's components. Recently, a method that simplifies calculation of the geometrical point spread function has been proposed for circularly symmetric systems [Appl. Opt.53, 4784 (2014)]. An extension of this method to 2D noncircularly symmetric systems is proposed. In this method, a two-dimensional ray tracing procedure for an arbitrary number of surfaces and arbitrary surface shapes has been developed where surfaces, rays, and refractive indices are all represented in functional forms being approximated by Chebyshev polynomials. The Liou and Brennan anatomically accurate eye model has been adapted and used for evaluating the method. Further, real measurements of the anterior corneal surface of normal, astigmatic, and keratoconic eyes were substituted for the first surface in the model. The results have shown that performing ray tracing, utilizing the two-dimensional Chebyshev function approximation, is possible for noncircularly symmetric models, and that such calculation can be performed with a newly created Chebfun toolbox.

  13. Evaluation of a Multi-Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent (MATT) Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.; Rudolphi, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding the response of the structural adhesives used in the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle, an extensive effort has been conducted to characterize in detail the failure properties of these adhesives. This effort involved the development of a failure model that includes the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature, and time. An understanding of the effects of these parameters on the failure of the adhesive is crucial to the understanding and prediction of the safety of the RSRM nozzle. This paper documents the use of this newly developed multi-axial, temperature, and time (MATT) dependent failure model for modeling failure for the adhesives TIGA 321, EA913NA, and EA946. The development of the mathematical failure model using constant load rate normal and shear test data is presented. Verification of the accuracy of the failure model is shown through comparisons between predictions and measured creep and multi-axial failure data. The verification indicates that the failure model performs well for a wide range of conditions (loading, temperature, and time) for the three adhesives. The failure criterion is shown to be accurate through the glass transition for the adhesive EA946. Though this failure model has been developed and evaluated with adhesives, the concepts are applicable for other isotropic materials.

  14. Gradient parameter and axial and field rays in the gradient-index crystalline lens model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. V.; Bao, C.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Rama, M. A.; Gómez-Reino, C.

    2003-09-01

    Gradient-index models of the human lens have received wide attention in optometry and vision sciences for considering how changes in the refractive index profile with age and accommodation may affect refractive power. This paper uses the continuous asymmetric bi-elliptical model to determine gradient parameter and axial and field rays of the human lens in order to study the paraxial propagation of light through the crystalline lens of the eye.

  15. Evolution of recombination rates in a multi-locus, haploid-selection, symmetric-viability model.

    PubMed

    Chasnov, J R; Ye, Felix Xiaofeng

    2013-02-01

    A fast algorithm for computing multi-locus recombination is extended to include a recombination-modifier locus. This algorithm and a linear stability analysis is used to investigate the evolution of recombination rates in a multi-locus, haploid-selection, symmetric-viability model for which stable equilibria have recently been determined. When the starting equilibrium is symmetric with two selected loci, we show analytically that modifier alleles that reduce recombination always invade. When the starting equilibrium is monomorphic, and there is a fixed nonzero recombination rate between the modifier locus and the selected loci, we determine analytical conditions for which a modifier allele can invade. In particular, we show that a gap exists between the recombination rates of modifiers that can invade and the recombination rate that specifies the lower stability boundary of the monomorphic equilibrium. A numerical investigation shows that a similar gap exists in a weakened form when the starting equilibrium is fully polymorphic but asymmetric.

  16. Experimental Constraints on Left-Right Symmetric Models from Muon Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Bayes, R.; Hillairet, A.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Faszer, W.; Gill, D. R.; Grossheim, A.; Gumplinger, P.; Henderson, R. S.; Hu, J.; Marshall, G. M.; Mischke, R. E.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Openshaw, R.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Sheffer, G.; Shin, B.; Bueno, J. F.; Hasinoff, M. D.

    2011-01-28

    The TWIST Collaboration has completed a new measurement of the energy-angle spectrum of positrons from the decay of highly polarized muons. A simultaneous measurement of the muon decay parameters {rho}, {delta}, and P{sub {mu}}{sup {pi}{xi}} tests the standard model in a purely leptonic process and provides improved limits for relevant extensions to the standard model. Specifically, for the generalized left-right symmetric model |(g{sub R}/g{sub L}){zeta}|<0.020 and (g{sub L}/g{sub R})m{sub 2}>578 GeV/c{sup 2}, both 90% C.L.

  17. Twofold and Fourfold Symmetric Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in a Model with Crystal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically study the twofold and fourfold symmetric anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effects of ferromagnets. We here use the two-current model for a system consisting of a conduction state and localized d states. The localized d states are obtained from a Hamiltonian with a spin-orbit interaction, an exchange field, and a crystal field. From the model, we first derive general expressions for the coefficient of the twofold symmetric term (C2) and that of the fourfold symmetric term (C4) in the AMR ratio. In the case of a strong ferromagnet, the dominant term in C2 is proportional to the difference in the partial densities of states (PDOSs) at the Fermi energy (EF) between the dɛ and dγ states, and that in C4 is proportional to the difference in the PDOSs at EF among the dɛ states. Using the dominant terms, we next analyze the experimental results for Fe4N, in which |C2| and |C4| increase with decreasing temperature. The experimental results can be reproduced by assuming that the tetragonal distortion increases with decreasing temperature.

  18. An improved computer model for prediction of axial gas turbine performance losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation model performs a rapid preliminary pitchline optimization of axial gas turbine annular flowpath geometry, as well as an initial estimate of blade profile shapes, given only a minimum of thermodynamic cycle requirements. No geometric parameters need be specified. The following preliminary design data are determined: (1) the optimum flowpath geometry, within mechanical stress limits; (2) initial estimates of cascade blade shapes; and (3) predictions of expected turbine performance. The model uses an inverse calculation technique whereby blade profiles are generated by designing channels to yield a specified velocity distribution on the two walls. Velocity distributions are then used to calculate the cascade loss parameters. Calculated blade shapes are used primarily to determine whether the assumed velocity loadings are physically realistic. Model verification is accomplished by comparison of predicted turbine geometry and performance with an array of seven NASA single-stage axial gas turbine configurations.

  19. The best model for the calculation of profile losses in the axial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, O. V.; Popov, G. M.; Kolmakova, D. A.; Novikova, Yu D.

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a method for evaluating the reliability of models for estimation of the energy losses in the blade rows of axial turbines, based on the statistical analysis of the deviation of the experimental data from the calculated. It was shown that these deviations are subjected to the normal distribution law and can be described by mathematical expectations μΔξ and standard deviation σΔξ. The values of profile losses were calculated by five well-known models for 170 different axial turbines cascades, representing the diversity of turbines used in aircraft GTE. The findings were compared with experimental data. Compared results were subjected to statistical analysis. It was found that the best model to describe the profile losses in axial turbines is a model that has been developed in Central Institute of Aviation Motors (Russia). With a probability of 95%, it allows the calculation of profile losses deviating from the actual values of losses by -8±84%.

  20. Experimental investigation of the flow in a simplified model of water lubricated axial thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2014-03-01

    In hydropower plants the axial thrust bearing takes up the hydraulic axial thrust of the runner and, in case of vertical shafts, the entire weight of all rotating masses. The use of water lubricated bearings can eliminate the oil leakage risk possibly contaminating the environment. A complex flow is generated by the smaller film thickness due to the lower viscosity of water compared with oil. Measurements on a simplified hydrostatic axial trust bearing model were accomplished for validating CFD analysis of water lubricated bearings. In this simplified model, fixed pads are implemented and the width of the gap was enlarged to create a higher resolution in space for the measurements. Most parts of the model were manufactured from acrylic glass to get optical access for measurement with PIV. The focus of these measurements is on the flow within the space between two pads. Additional to the PIV- measurement, the pressure on the wall of the rotating disk is captured by pressure transducers. The model bearing measurement results are presented for varied operating conditions.

  1. Spiral versus modulated collinear phases in the quantum axial next-nearest-neighbor Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oitmaa, J.; Singh, R. R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by the discovery of spiral and modulated collinear phases in several magnetic materials, we investigate the magnetic properties of Heisenberg spin S =1 /2 antiferromagnets in two and three dimensions, with frustration arising from second-neighbor couplings in one axial direction [the axial next-nearest-neighbor Heisenberg (ANNNH) model]. Our results clearly demonstrate the presence of an incommensurate spiral phase at T =0 in two dimensions, extending to finite temperatures in three dimensions. The crossover between Néel and spiral order occurs at a value of the frustration parameter considerably above the classical value 0.25, a sign of substantial quantum fluctuations. We also investigate a possible modulated collinear phase with a wavelength of four lattice spacings and find that it has substantially higher energy and hence is not realized in the model.

  2. Meson vacuum phenomenology in a three-flavor linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    We study scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons with nonstrange and strange quantum numbers in the framework of a linear sigma model with global chiral U(Nf)L×U(Nf)R symmetry. We perform a global fit of meson masses, decay widths, as well as decay amplitudes. The quality of the fit is, for a hadronic model that does not consider isospin-breaking effects, surprisingly good. We also investigate the question whether the scalar q¯q states lie below or above 1 GeV and find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as q¯q states. Additionally, we also describe the axial-vector resonances as q¯q states.

  3. Five dimensional spherically symmetric cosmological model in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Jaysudha, V.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the spherically symmetric space-time in five dimensions in Brans-Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961) theory of gravitation in the presence of perfect fluid distribution. A determinate solution of the highly non-linear field equations is presented using (i) relation between metric potentials and (ii) an equation of state which represents disordered radiation in five dimensional universe. The solution obtained describes five dimensional radiating model in Brans-Dicke theory. Some physical and kinematical properties of the model are also discussed.

  4. Five dimensional spherically symmetric minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Raju, P.; Sobhanbabu, K.

    2016-04-01

    Five dimensional spherically symmetric space-time filled with two minimally interacting fields; matter and holographic dark energy components is investigated in a scalar tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Brans and Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961). To obtain a determinate solution of the highly non-linear field equations we have used (i) a relation between metric potentials and (ii) an equation of state which represents disordered radiation in five dimensional universe. The solution obtained represents a minimally interacting and radiating holographic dark energy model in five dimensional universe. Some physical and Kinematical properties of the model are, also, studied.

  5. Attracted to de Sitter II: cosmology of the shift-symmetric Horndeski models

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Moruno, Prado; Nunes, Nelson J. E-mail: njnunes@fc.ul.pt

    2015-09-01

    Horndeski models with a de Sitter critical point for any kind of material content may provide a mechanism to alleviate the cosmological constant problem. Moreover, they could allow us to understand the current accelerated expansion of the universe as the result of the dynamical approach to the critical point when it is an attractor. We show that this critical point is indeed an attractor for the shift-symmetric subfamily of models with these characteristics. We study the cosmological scenario that results when considering radiation and matter content, and conclude that their background dynamics is compatible with the latest observational data.

  6. A mathematical model of the controlled axial flow divider for mobile machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukin, V. L.; Karelin, D. L.; Belousov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The authors give a mathematical model of the axial adjustable flow divider allowing one to define the parameters of the feed pump and the hydraulic motor-wheels in the multi-circuit hydrostatic transmission of mobile machines, as well as for example built features that allows to clearly evaluate the mutual influence of the values of pressure and flow on all input and output circuits of the system.

  7. An Incidence Loss Model for Wave Rotors with Axially Aligned Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1998-01-01

    A simple mathematical model is described to account for the losses incurred when the flow in the duct (port) of a wave rotor is not aligned with the passages. The model, specifically for wave rotors with axially aligned passages, describes a loss mechanism which is sensitive to incident flow angle and Mach number. Implementation of the model in a one-dimensional CFD based wave rotor simulation is presented. Comparisons with limited experimental results are consistent with the model. Sensitivity studies are presented which highlight the significance of the incidence loss relative to other loss mechanisms in the wave rotor.

  8. Cationic amphiphilic model networks based on symmetrical ABCBA pentablock terpolymers: synthesis, characterization, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Triftaridou, Aggeliki I; Vamvakaki, Maria; Patrickios, Costas S

    2007-05-01

    Eight isomeric networks based on equimolar terpolymers were synthesized using group transfer polymerization (GTP) and were characterized in terms of their swelling properties. Two hydrophilic monomers, the nonionic methoxy hexa(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (HEGMA) and the ionizable 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and a hydrophobic (nonionic) monomer, methyl methacrylate (MMA), were employed for the syntheses. 1,4-Bis(methoxytrimethylsiloxymethylene)cyclohexane (MTSMC) was used as the bifunctional GTP initiator, while ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) served as the cross-linker. Seven of the networks were model networks, six of which were based on the symmetrical pentablock terpolymers ABCBA, ACBCA, BACAB, BCACB, CBABC, and CABAC, whereas the seventh model network was based on the statistical terpolymer. The eighth network was a randomly cross-linked network based on the statistical terpolymer, prepared by the simultaneous quaterpolymerization of the three monomers and the cross-linker. The molecular weights and molecular weight distributions of the linear pentablock terpolymer precursors, as well as those of their homopolymer and ABA triblock copolymer precursors, were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) in tetrahydrofuran. The sol fraction of each network was measured and found to be relatively low. The aqueous degrees of swelling of all networks were found to increase at acidic pH due to the ionization of the DMAEMA tertiary amine units. The acidic degrees of swelling of the pentablock terpolymer networks were lower than those of their statistical counterparts due to microphase separation in the former type of networks, also confirmed by thermodynamic calculations and small-angle neutron scattering experiments.

  9. Improved Multi-Axial, Temperature and Time Dependent (MATT) Failure Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, D. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Macon, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    An extensive effort has recently been completed by the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle program to completely characterize the effects of multi-axial loading, temperature and time on the failure characteristics of three filled epoxy adhesives (TIGA 321, EA913NA, EA946). As part of this effort, a single general failure criterion was developed that accounted for these effects simultaneously. This model was named the Multi- Axial, Temperature, and Time Dependent or MATT failure criterion. Due to the intricate nature of the failure criterion, some parameters were required to be calculated using complex equations or numerical methods. This paper documents some simple but accurate modifications to the failure criterion to allow for calculations of failure conditions without complex equations or numerical techniques.

  10. Global aspects of the motion of the heliospheric termination shock: A gasdynamic spherically symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkiewicz, R.; Barnes, A.; Molvik, G. A.

    1996-07-01

    The heliospheric termination shock is expected to move in response to variation in upstream solar wind conditions. Using numerical techniques, we extend an earlier strictly one-dimensional (planar) analytic gasdynamic model of shock motion [Barnes, 1993] to spherically symmetric [Ratkiewicz et al., 1995], to investigate the qualitative features of global behavior of shock motion. The boundary conditions of the calculation are given by the solar wind parameters as a function of time on an inner spherical boundary, and a constant pressure (roughly simulating the effect of the local interstellar medium) on an outer boundary.

  11. Oscillating dark energy model in plane symmetric space-time with time periodic varying deceleration parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, M.; Jiang, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, an oscillating dark energy model is presented in an isotropic but inhomogeneous plane symmetric space-time by considering a time periodic varying deceleration parameter. We find three different types of new solutions which describe different scenarios of oscillating universe. The first two solutions show an oscillating universe with singularities. For the third one, the universe is singularity-free during the whole evolution. Moreover, the Hubble parameter oscillates and keeps positive which explores an interesting possibility to unify the early inflation and late time acceleration of the universe.

  12. Connecting Dirac and Majorana neutrino mass matrices in the minimal left-right symmetric model.

    PubMed

    Nemevšek, Miha; Senjanović, Goran; Tello, Vladimir

    2013-04-12

    Probing the origin of neutrino mass by disentangling the seesaw mechanism is one of the central issues of particle physics. We address it in the minimal left-right symmetric model and show how the knowledge of light and heavy neutrino masses and mixings suffices to determine their Dirac Yukawa couplings. This in turn allows one to make predictions for a number of high and low energy phenomena, such as decays of heavy neutrinos, neutrinoless double beta decay, electric dipole moments of charged leptons, and neutrino transition moments. We also discuss a way of reconstructing the neutrino Dirac Yukawa couplings at colliders such as the LHC.

  13. Magnetic moment of the majorana neutrino in the left-right symmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarkin, O. M. Boyarkina, G. G.

    2013-04-15

    Corrections to the neutrino magnetic dipole moment from the singly charged Higgs bosons h{sup ({+-})} and {delta}-tilde{sup (}{+-}) were calculated within the left-right symmetric model involving Majorana neutrinos. It is shown that, if the h{sup ({+-})} and {delta}-tilde{sup (}{+-}) bosons lie at the electroweak scale, the contributions from Higgs sector are commensurate with the contribution of charged gauge bosons or may even exceed it. The behavior of the neutrino flux inmatter and in amagnetic field was studied. It was found that resonance transitions between light and heavy neutrinos are forbidden.

  14. Dendritic sidebranching in the three-dimensional symmetric model in the presence of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    The time-dependent behavior of sidebranching deformations in the three-dimensional symmetric model of dendritic solidification is studied within a WKB approximation. Localized wave packets generated by pulses in the neighborhood of the tip are found to grow in amplitude and to spread and stretch as they move down the sides of the dendrite. This behavior is shown to imply that noise in the solidifying medium is selectively amplified in such a way as to produce a fluctuating train of sidebranches in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. A rough estimate indicates that purely thermal noise is probably not quite strong enough to fit the data.

  15. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part I: Axial length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of physical implications via the similarity between a nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam theory and a classical Rankine-Timoshenko (RT) beam theory. The nonlocal EB beam model, Eringen's model, is briefly reviewed and the classical RT beam theory is recast by the primary variables of the EB model. A careful comparison of these two models reveals that the scale parameter used to the Eringen's model has a strike resemblance to the shear flexibility in the RT model. This implies that the nonlocal model employed in literature consider the axial length scale effect only. In addition, the paradox for a cantilevered nano-beam subjected to tip shear force is clearly explained by finding appropriate displacement prescribed boundary conditions.

  16. Light sterile neutrino and dark matter in left-right symmetric models without a Higgs bidoublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish

    2016-10-01

    We present a class of left-right symmetric models where Dirac as well as Majorana mass terms of neutrinos can arise at the one-loop level in a scotogenic fashion: with dark matter particles going inside the loop. We show the possibility of naturally light right-handed neutrinos that can have interesting implications for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments as well as cosmology. Apart from a stable dark matter candidate stabilized by a remnant Z2 symmetry, one can also have a long-lived keV sterile neutrino dark matter in these models. This class of models can have very different collider signatures compared to the conventional left-right models.

  17. Effects of CDTT model on the dynamical instability of cylindrically symmetric collapsing stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwana Kausar, Hafiza

    2013-01-01

    We assume cylindrically symmetric stars which begin collapsing by dissipating energy in the form of heat flux. We wish to study the effects of Carroll-Duvvuri-Trodden-Turner (CDTT) model, f(R) = R+σμ4/R, on the range of dynamical instability. For this purpose, perturbation scheme is applied to all the metric functions, material functions and f(R) model to obtain the full set of dynamical equation which control the evolution of the physical variables at the surface of a star. It is found that instability limit involves adiabatic index Γ which depends on the density profile and immense terms of perturbed CDTT model. In addition, model is constrained by some requirement, e.g. positivity of physical quantities. We also reduce our results asymptotically as μ→0, being the GR results in both the Newtonian and post Newtonian regimes.

  18. A new model for spherically symmetric charged compact stars of embedding class 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal; Deb, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    In the present study we search for a new stellar model with spherically symmetric matter and a charged distribution in a general relativistic framework. The model represents a compact star of embedding class 1. The solutions obtained here are general in nature, having the following two features: first of all, the metric becomes flat and also the expressions for the pressure, energy density, and electric charge become zero in all the cases if we consider the constant A=0, which shows that our solutions represent the so-called `electromagnetic mass model' [17], and, secondly, the metric function ν (r), for the limit n tending to infinity, converts to ν (r)=C{r}2+ ln B, which is the same as considered by Maurya et al. [11]. We have investigated several physical aspects of the model and find that all the features are acceptable within the requirements of contemporary theoretical studies and observational evidence.

  19. Separation of variables in anisotropic models and non-skew-symmetric elliptic r-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, Taras

    2016-11-01

    We solve a problem of separation of variables for the classical integrable hamiltonian systems possessing Lax matrices satisfying linear Poisson brackets with the non-skew-symmetric, non-dynamical elliptic so(3)⊗ so(3) -valued classical r-matrix. Using the corresponding Lax matrices, we present a general form of the "separating functions" B(u) and A(u) that generate the coordinates and the momenta of separation for the associated models. We consider several examples and perform the separation of variables for the classical anisotropic Euler's top, Steklov-Lyapunov model of the motion of anisotropic rigid body in the liquid, two-spin generalized Gaudin model and "spin" generalization of Steklov-Lyapunov model.

  20. Plane Symmetric Cosmological Model with Quark and Strange Quark Matter in f ( R, T) Theory of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Pawar, D. D.

    2017-03-01

    We studied plane symmetric cosmological model in the presence of quark and strange quark matter with the help of f( R, T) theory. To decipher solutions of plane symmetric space-time, we used power law relation between scale factor and deceleration parameter. We considered the special law of variation of Hubble's parameter proposed by Berman ( Nuovo Cimento B74, 182, 1983) which yields constant deceleration parameter. We also discussed the physical behavior of the solutions by using some physical parameters.

  1. Heliospheric termination shock motion in response to LISM variations: Spherically symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkiewicz, R.; Barnes, A.; Spreiter, J. R.

    The unsteady spherically symmetric one-dimensional gasdynamic model appears to be a powerful tool in the investigation of the termination shock motion. Such a model has previously been used to examine the response of the heliospheric termination shock to variations in upstream solar wind conditions [Ratkiewicz et al., 1996]. In the current paper we apply the same model to study response of the shock to variations in the interstellar medium. The initial-boundary conditions for the unsteady calculations are given by the pressure as a function of time on an outer boundary either alone or with the density as a function of time on an inner boundary. The motion of the termination shock is caused by fluctuations in both solar wind and interstellar plasma parameters and has a rather complicated behavior, characterized by a sequence of perturbations that hit the termination shock and are reflected from the outer boundary.

  2. Derivation of a Model for Symmetric Lamellipodia with Instantaneous Cross-Link Turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelz, Dietmar; Schmeiser, Christian

    2010-12-01

    We start with a model for the actin-cytoskeleton in a symmetric lamellipodium (cp. Oelz et al. in Cell Adh Migr 2(2):117-126, 2008) which includes the description of the life-cycle of chemical bonds based on age-structured models. Based on the assumption that their average lifetime is actually small as compared to the time scale of the dynamics in which we are interested, we pass, after applying an appropriate scaling, to a limit where this average lifetime goes to zero. We obtain a gradient flow model and formulate a time step approximation scheme. We use it to construct solutions analytically, proving their local in time existence, and present a typical numerical solution based on this scheme.

  3. Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrogen cooled, turbine powered space weapon systems require a relatively simple, but reasonably accurate hydrogen gas expansion turbine model. Such a simplified turbine model would require little computational time and allow incorporation into system level computer programs while providing reasonably accurate volume/mass estimates. This model would then allow optimization studies to be performed on multiparameter space power systems and provide improved turbine mass and size estimates for the various operating conditions (when compared to empirical and power law approaches). An axial flow gas expansion turbine model was developed for these reasons and is in use as a comparative bench mark in space power system studies at Sandia. The turbine model is based on fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and material strength considerations, but is considered simplified because it does not account for design details such as boundary layer effects, shock waves, turbulence, stress concentrations, and seal leakage. Although the basic principles presented here apply to any gas or vapor axial flow turbine, hydrogen turbines are discussed because of their immense importance on space burst power platforms.

  4. 3D shape analysis of the brain's third ventricle using a midplane encoded symmetric template model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeil; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Gow, Alan J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Park, Jinah

    2016-01-01

    Background Structural changes of the brain's third ventricle have been acknowledged as an indicative measure of the brain atrophy progression in neurodegenerative and endocrinal diseases. To investigate the ventricular enlargement in relation to the atrophy of the surrounding structures, shape analysis is a promising approach. However, there are hurdles in modeling the third ventricle shape. First, it has topological variations across individuals due to the inter-thalamic adhesion. In addition, as an interhemispheric structure, it needs to be aligned to the midsagittal plane to assess its asymmetric and regional deformation. Method To address these issues, we propose a model-based shape assessment. Our template model of the third ventricle consists of a midplane and a symmetric mesh of generic shape. By mapping the template's midplane to the individuals’ brain midsagittal plane, we align the symmetric mesh on the midline of the brain before quantifying the third ventricle shape. To build the vertex-wise correspondence between the individual third ventricle and the template mesh, we employ a minimal-distortion surface deformation framework. In addition, to account for topological variations, we implement geometric constraints guiding the template mesh to have zero width where the inter-thalamic adhesion passes through, preventing vertices crossing between left and right walls of the third ventricle. The individual shapes are compared using a vertex-wise deformity from the symmetric template. Results Experiments on imaging and demographic data from a study of aging showed that our model was sensitive in assessing morphological differences between individuals in relation to brain volume (i.e. proxy for general brain atrophy), gender and the fluid intelligence at age 72. It also revealed that the proposed method can detect the regional and asymmetrical deformation unlike the conventional measures: volume (median 1.95 ml, IQR 0.96 ml) and width of the third

  5. Machine for fabricating axially symmetric concave aspherics.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, H

    1973-07-01

    A machine has been constructed for fabricating concave aspheric surfaces of diameter up to 200 mm and reference radius from 20 mm to 150 mm. The principle is to use a plastic-bonded silicon carbide wheel with a convex cutting surface, which is continually dressed by a diamond form dresser. The cam used for directing the grinding wheel is cut on a numerically controlled jig borer with a tool of the same diameter as the cam follower. In operation, the location of the diamond dresser is used to provide feedback corrections for the grinding wheel.

  6. Wave Propagation through Axially Symmetric Dielectric Shells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    1-8 2..2 Sc lr .o en i.. . . . . ..........eo oe e .eoe. o. eeeeo. oo....... 2 1 1.2 Baekground: Analytical Methods Based on Flat Sheet Appr oatei...Fields Near a Radome Consist of Constituent Waves. 1-2 - -t . -__-_-_-_-_-_-_..._._._._._._. 1.2 BACKGROUND: ANALYTICAL METHODS BASED ON FLAT SHEET...2.4.2. So A2 ikR x (4 ) = (K-1) E feik Cos2 dado dz (2-100) x 2 R2 o where = (aa - ap cos - zz’) R - 1 (2-101) and -11 = [6 (a+6p)-6 (a-6p)-a 1. (2

  7. Critical criterion for axial models of defects in as-grown n-type GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D.D.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E.

    1987-12-15

    Using the recently determined band-edge hydrostatic deformation potentials of GaAs we provide for the first time values for the change in the strength of the isotropic strain coupling of several defects upon electron emission. We further present uniaxial stress deep level transient spectroscopy data on EL2 and EL6 in as-grown n-type GaAs and obtain upper bounds for the axial deformation potentials. The ratio of the change in the isotropic strain-coupling strength to the change in the axial strain coupling for these defects is a critical criterion which must be satisfied by theoretical models that successfully describe axial defects.

  8. Engineering axially vascularized bone in the sheep arteriovenous-loop model.

    PubMed

    Boos, Anja M; Loew, Johanna S; Weigand, Annika; Deschler, Gloria; Klumpp, Dorothee; Arkudas, Andreas; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Gulle, Heinz; Kneser, Ulrich; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2013-08-01

    Treatment of complex bone defects in which vascular supply is insufficient is still a challenge. To overcome the limitations from autologous grafts, a sheep model has been established recently, which is characterized by the development of an independent axial vascularization of a bioartificial construct, permitting microsurgical transplantation. To engineer independently axially vascularized bone tissue in the sheep arteriovenous (AV)-loop model, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), without and in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), were harvested and directly autotransplanted in combination with β-tricalcium phosphate-hydroxyapatite (β-TCP-HA) granules into sheep in this study. After explantation after 12 weeks, histological and immunohistochemical evaluation revealed newly formed bone in both groups. An increased amount of bone area was obtained using directly autotransplanted MSCs with rhBMP-2 stimulation. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells were detected adjacent to the newly formed bone, revealing an active bone remodelling process. Directly autotransplanted MSCs can be found close to the β-TCP-HA granules and are contributing to bone formation. Over time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging confirmed the dense vascularization arising from the AV-loop. This study shows de novo engineering of independently axially vascularized transplantable bone tissue in clinically significant amounts, using directly autotransplanted MSCs and rhBMP-2 stimulation in about 12 weeks in the sheep AV-loop model. This strategy of engineering vascularized transplantable bone tissue could be possibly transferred to the clinic in the future in order to augment current reconstructive strategies.

  9. Formation of shatter cones by symmetric fracture bifurcation: Phenomenological modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Hergarten, Stefan; Kuhn, Thomas; Wilk, Jakob

    2016-08-01

    Several models of shatter cone formation require a heterogeneity at the cone apex of high impedance mismatch to the surrounding bulk rock. This heterogeneity is the source of spherically expanding waves that interact with the planar shock front or the following release wave. While these models are capable of explaining the overall conical shape of shatter cones, they are not capable of explaining the subcone structure and the diverging and branching striations that characterize the surface of shatter cones and lead to the so-called horse-tailing effect. Here, we use the hierarchical arrangement of subcone ridges of shatter cone surfaces as key for understanding their formation. Tracing a single subcone ridge from its apex downward reveals that each ridge branches after some distance into two symmetrically equivalent subcone ridges. This pattern is repeated to form new branches. We propose that subcone ridges represent convex-curved fracture surfaces and their intersection corresponds to the bifurcation axis. The characteristic diverging striations are interpreted as the intersection lineations delimiting each subcone. Multiple symmetric crack branching is the result of rapid fracture propagation that may approach the Raleigh wave speed. We present a phenomenological model that fully constructs the shatter cone geometry to any order. The overall cone geometry including apex angle of the enveloping cone and the degree of concavity (horse-tailing) is largely governed by the convexity of the subcone ridges. Straight cones of various apical angles, constant slope, and constant bifurcation angles form if the subcone convexity is low (30°). Increasing subcone convexity leads to a stronger horse-tailing effect and the bifurcation angles increase with increasing distance from the enveloping cone apex. The model predicts possible triples of enveloping cone angle, bifurcation angle, and subcone angle. Measurements of these quantities on four shatter cones from different

  10. Modeling the antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrational modes of aqueous carboxylate anions.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Catherine C R; Franks, George V; da Silva, Gabriel

    2015-01-05

    The infrared spectra of six aqueous carboxylate anions have been calculated at the M05-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory with the SMD solvent model, and validated against experimental data from the literature over the region of 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1); this region corresponds to the stretching modes of the carboxylate group, and is often interrogated when probing bonding of carboxylates to other species and surfaces. The anions studied here were formate, acetate, oxalate, succinate, glutarate and citrate. For the lowest energy conformer of each anion, the carboxylate moiety antisymmetric stretching peak was predicted with a mean signed error of only 4 cm(-1) using the SMD solvent model, while the symmetric peak was slightly overestimated. Performing calculations in vacuum and scaling was found to generally over-predict the antisymmetric vibrational frequencies and under predict the symmetric peak. Different conformers of the same anion were found to have only slightly different spectra in the studied region and the inclusion of explicit water molecules was not found to significantly change the calculated spectra when the implicit solvent model is used. Overall, the use of density functional theory in conjunction with an implicit solvent model was found to result in infra-red spectra that are the best reproduction of the features found experimentally for the aqueous carboxylate ions in the important 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1) region. The development of validated model chemistries for simulating the stretching modes of aqueous carboxylate ions will be valuable for future studies that investigate how carboxylate anions complex with multivalent metal cations and related species in solution.

  11. A multi-axial ferroelastic switching model using the homogenized energy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, William S.; Peng, Xiao

    2009-03-01

    A new constitutive modeling framework is presented to predict polarization reorientation from mechanical loading in ferroelectric materials. The modeling framework employs a homogenized energy approach to predict the reorientation of local polarization variants in response to multi-axial mechanical loading. Single crystal energy relations are given and integrated into a polycrystal model using a reduced order modeling technique that employs a set of stochastic parameters which accommodate material inhomogeneities. The homogenized energy approach provides a methodology that simplifies computations required to predict nonlinear polarization reorientation from applied stresses. The new formulation circumvents the need for large scale minimization problems of multi-well energy potentials and facilitates constitutive model integration into finite element codes and nonlinear control designs. The theory is presented, numerically implemented, and compared with experiments on lead zirconate titanate given in the literature.

  12. Nonlocal beam model for axial buckling of carbon nanotubes with surface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Gang; Yao, Xiao-Hu; Liang, Ying-Jing; Han, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Small-size effect and surface effect are two of the most specific intrinsic properties of nanostructures, both of which are of great significance to the related applications. In this letter, the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, together with surface elasticity and surface tension are implemented to investigate the buckling behavior of axially compressed carbon nanotubes. Explicit expression of solutions to the critical buckling loads corresponding to typical boundary conditions is presented. Through contrast to molecular dynamics results, it is vitally important to note that both small-size effect and surface effect have a profound consequence and should be taken into account thoroughly.

  13. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Parganlija, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-25

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  14. Modeling Improvements and Users Manual for Axial-flow Turbine Off-design Computer Code AXOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    An axial-flow turbine off-design performance computer code used for preliminary studies of gas turbine systems was modified and calibrated based on the experimental performance of large aircraft-type turbines. The flow- and loss-model modifications and calibrations are presented in this report. Comparisons are made between computed performances and experimental data for seven turbines over wide ranges of speed and pressure ratio. This report also serves as the users manual for the revised code, which is named AXOD.

  15. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  16. GPS Modeling and Analysis. Summary of Research: GPS Satellite Axial Ratio Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrad, Penina; Reeh, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    This report outlines the algorithms developed at the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research to model yaw and predict the axial ratio as measured from a ground station. The algorithms are implemented in a collection of Matlab functions and scripts that read certain user input, such as ground station coordinates, the UTC time, and the desired GPS (Global Positioning System) satellites, and compute the above-mentioned parameters. The position information for the GPS satellites is obtained from Yuma almanac files corresponding to the prescribed date. The results are displayed graphically through time histories and azimuth-elevation plots.

  17. Scalar mesons in a linear sigma model with (axial-)vector mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganlija, D.; Kovács, P.; Wolf, Gy.; Giacosa, F.; Rischke, D. H.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of the scalar mesons has been a subject of debate for many decades. In this work we look for qq states among the physical resonances using an extended Linear Sigma Model that contains scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons both in the non-strange and strange sectors. We perform global fits of meson masses, decay widths and amplitudes in order to ascertain whether the scalar qq states are below or above 1 GeV. We find the scalar states above 1 GeV to be preferred as qq states.

  18. Lepton flavor violating τ decays in the left-right symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeroyd, A. G.; Aoki, Mayumi; Okada, Yasuhiro

    2007-07-01

    The left-right symmetric extension of the standard model with Higgs isospin triplets can provide neutrino masses via a TeV scale seesaw mechanism. The doubly charged Higgs bosons HL±± and HR±± induce lepton flavor violating decays τ±→lll at tree level via a coupling which is related to the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata matrix (VMNS). We study the magnitude and correlation of τ±→lll and μ→eγ with specific assumptions for the origin of the large mixing in VMNS while respecting the stringent bound for μ→eee. It is also shown that an angular asymmetry for τ±→lll is sensitive to the relative strength of the HL±± and HR±± mediated contributions and provides a means of distinguishing models with doubly charged Higgs bosons.

  19. Large-scale flow phenomena in axial compressors: Modeling, analysis, and control with air injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Gregory Scott

    This thesis presents a large scale model of axial compressor flows that is detailed enough to describe the modal and spike stall inception processes, and is also amenable to dynamical systems analysis and control design. The research presented here is based on the model derived by Mezic, which shows that the flows are dominated by the competition between the blade forcing of the compressor and the overall pressure differential created by the compressor. This model describes the modal stall inception process in a similar manner as the Moore-Greitzer model, but also describes the cross sectional flow velocities, and exhibits full span and part span stall. All of these flow patterns described by the model agree with experimental data. Furthermore, the initial model is altered in order to describe the effects of three dimensional spike disturbances, which can destabilize the compressor at otherwise stable operating points. The three dimensional model exhibits flow patterns during spike stall inception that also appear in experiments. The second part of this research focuses on the dynamical systems analysis of, and control design with, the PDE model of the axial flow in the compressor. We show that the axial flow model can be written as a gradient system and illustrate some stability properties of the stalled flow. This also reveals that flows with multiple stall cells correspond to higher energy states in the compressor. The model is derived with air injection actuation, and globally stabilizing distributed controls are designed. We first present a locally optimal controller for the linearized system, and then use Lyapunov analysis to show sufficient conditions for global stability. The concept of sector nonlinearities is applied to the problem of distributed parameter systems, and by analyzing the sector property of the compressor characteristic function, completely decentralized controllers are derived. Finally, the modal decomposition and Lyapunov analysis used in

  20. Extended Hamiltonian Formalism of the Pure Space-Like Axial Gauge Schwinger Model. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakawaki, Y.; McCartor, G.

    2004-06-01

    Canonical methods are not sufficient to properly quantize space-like axial gauges. In this paper, we obtain guiding principles that allow for the construction of an extended Hamiltonian formalism for pure space-like axial gauge fields. To do so, we clarify the general role that residual gauge fields play in the space-like axial gauge Schwinger model. In all the calculations, we fix the gauge using the rule n•A=0, where n is a space-like constant vector, and we refer to its direction as x-. Then, to begin with, we construct a formulation in which the quantization surface is space-like but not parallel to the direction of n. The quantization surface has a parameter that allows us to rotate it, but when we do so, we keep the gauge fixing direction fixed. In that formulation, we can use canonical methods. We bosonize the model to simplify the investigation. We find that the inverse differentiation, (∂-)-1, is ill-defined whatever quantization coordinates we use, as long as the direction of n is space-like. We find that the physical part of the dipole ghost field includes infrared divergences. However, we also find that if we introduce residual gauge fields in such a way that the dipole ghost field satisfies the canonical commutation relations, then the residual gauge fields are determined so as to regularize the infrared divergences contained in the physical part. The propagators then take the form prescribed by Mandelstam and Leibbrandt. We make use of these properties to develop guiding principles that allow us to construct consistent operator solutions in the pure space-like case, in which the quantization surface is parallel to the direction of n, and canonical methods do not suffice.

  1. Modeling a Galfenol based stress sensor capable of sensing up to three axial stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weetman, Philip; Akhras, George

    2013-11-01

    A three dimensional rate equation model can be used to calculate the magnetization response in a Galfenol sample under the application of any or all components of stress (axial and shear) [P. Weetman and G. Akhras, J. Appl. Phys. 109, 043902 (2011)]. For a Galfenol based stress sensor, one is essentially interested in the inverse of that calculation: from magnetization measurements, determine which stresses are acting on the system. A conceptual design of a Galfenol based three dimensional dynamical sensor is presented. One assumes the time-varying magnetization and its time derivative in all three directions can be measured for different external magnetic bias fields at different points in time. It is shown that the rate equation model can be used to calculate all the stresses acting on the system from knowledge of the magnetization and the time derivative of magnetization. The necessary calculations are presented and then applied to a sample set of magnetization values, which were generated from a benchmarked sensing model that used up to three axial stresses.

  2. Nonlocal shear deformable shell model for postbuckling of axially compressed microtubules embedded in an elastic medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-Shen

    2010-06-01

    Buckling and postbuckling analysis is presented for axially compressed microtubules (MTs) embedded in an elastic matrix of cytoplasm. The microtubule is modeled as a nonlocal shear deformable cylindrical shell which contains small scale effects. The surrounding elastic medium is modeled as a Pasternak foundation. The governing equations are based on higher order shear deformation shell theory with a von Kármán-Donnell-type of kinematic nonlinearity and include the extension-twist and flexural-twist couplings. The thermal effects are also included and the material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent. The small scale parameter e (0) a is estimated by matching the buckling load from their vibrational behavior of MTs with the numerical results obtained from the nonlocal shear deformable shell model. The numerical results show that buckling load and postbuckling behavior of MTs are very sensitive to the small scale parameter e (0) a. The results reveal that the MTs under axial compressive loading condition have an unstable postbuckling path, and the lateral constraint has a significant effect on the postbuckling response of a microtubule when the foundation stiffness is sufficiently large.

  3. Hydrodynamic Model with Binary Particle Diameters to Predict Axial Voidage Profile in a CFB Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. J.; Zhang, H.; Yang, H. R.; Wu, Y. X.; Lu, J. F.; Yue, G. X.

    A hydrodynamic model with binary particle diameters was developed to better predict axial voidage profile in a CFB combustor. In the model, the CFB is regarded as a superposition of two sub-beds, a fast fluidized bed in the upper riser with a characteristic particle diameter of O.2mm and a bubbling fluidized bed or turbulent bed in the bottom riser with a characteristic particle diameter of 2mm. Furthermore, a variable critical particle diameter whose terminal velocity equals to the superficial gas velocity was employed to determine which flow regime the particle belongs to. The results show that binary particle diameter model has the advantages in describing wide particle diameter distribution while reducing the complexity of computation. The model was verified by the field data of voidage profile in a 300MW CFB boiler.

  4. Radiative Yukawa couplings in the simplest left-right symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Emidio; Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2017-02-01

    We revisit a recent solution to the flavor hierarchy problem based on the paradigm that Yukawa couplings are, rather than fundamental constants, effective low energy couplings radiatively generated by interactions in a hidden sector of the theory. In the present paper we show that the setup required by this scenario can be set by gauge invariance alone, provided that the standard model gauge group be extended to the left-right symmetric group of S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )Y. The simplest scheme in which Yukawa couplings are forbidden at the tree-level organises the right-handed fermions into doublets and presents an additional Higgs S U (2 )R doublet, responsible for the spontaneous breaking of the S U (2 )R gauge sector. The flavor and chiral symmetry breaking induced by the S U (2 )R breaking is transferred at the one-loop level to the standard model via the dynamics of the hidden sector, which effectively regulates the spread of the effective Yukawa couplings. The emerging left-right symmetric framework recovers additional appealing features typical of these models, allowing for instance to identify the hypercharges of the involved fermions with their B -L charges and offering a straightforward solution to the strong C P problem. The scheme gives rise to a distinguishing phenomenology that potentially can be tested at the LHC and future colliders through the same interactions that result in the radiative generation of Yukawa couplings, as well as by exploiting the properties of the additional S U (2 )R Higgs doublet.

  5. Development of an in vivo bone fatigue damage model using axial compression of the rabbit forelimb.

    PubMed

    Buettmann, Evan G; Silva, Matthew J

    2016-10-03

    Many nontraumatic fractures seen clinically in patients with metabolic bone disorders or on antiresorptive treatment show an increased incidence of microdamage accumulation and impaired intracortical remodeling. However, the lack of basal remodeling and Haversian bone in rodents limits their translatability in studying bone damage repair mechanisms. The work presented here demonstrates the development of the forelimb loading model in rabbits, the smallest mammal with intracortical Haversian remodeling. The forelimbs of post-mortem female New Zealand white rabbits were loaded in axial end compression to determine their basic monotonic and fatigue properties. Following time zero characterization, stress fractures were created in vivo and animals were allowed to recover for a period of two to five weeks. The rabbit forelimb when loaded in axial compression demonstrates a consistent mid-diaphyseal fracture location characterized by a local mixed compression-bending loading environment. Forelimb apparent stiffness, when fatigue loaded, demonstrates a progressive increase until macrocrack formation, at which time apparent stiffness rapidly declines until failure. Stress fractures in the rabbit ulna display robust periosteal expansion and woven bone formation two weeks following fracture. Subsequent healing at five weeks post-fracture is marked by woven bone densification, resorption and intracortical remodeling along the stress fracture line. The rabbit forelimb fatigue model is a promising new platform by which bone׳s response to damage may be studied.

  6. Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiharto; Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Abidin, Zainal

    2010-12-23

    Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

  7. Heavy neutrinos and lepton flavor violation in left-right symmetric models at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. P.; Deppisch, F. F.; Kittel, O.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2012-09-01

    We discuss lepton flavor violating processes induced in the production and decay of heavy right-handed neutrinos at the LHC. Such particles appear in left-right symmetrical extensions of the standard model as the messengers of neutrino mass generation, and can have masses at the TeV scale. We determine the expected sensitivity on the right-handed neutrino mixing matrix, as well as on the right-handed gauge boson and heavy neutrino masses. By comparing the sensitivity of the LHC with that of searches for low energy lepton flavor violating processes, we identify favorable areas of the parameter space to explore the complementarity between lepton flavor violating at low and high energies.

  8. Dynamical systems approach to relativistic spherically symmetric static perfect fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzle, J. Mark; Röhr, Niklas; Uggla, Claes

    2003-11-01

    We investigate relativistic spherically symmetric static perfect fluid models with barotropic equations of state that are asymptotically polytropic and linear at low and high pressures, respectively. We generalize standard work on Newtonian polytropes to a relativistic setting and to a much larger class of equations of state. This is accomplished by introducing dimensionless variables that are asymptotically homology invariant in the low pressure regime, which yields a reformulation of the field equations into a regular dynamical system on a three-dimensional compact state space. A global picture of the solution space is thus obtained which makes it possible to derive qualitative features and to prove theorems about mass radius properties. Moreover, the framework is also suited for numerical computations, as illustrated by several numerical examples, e.g., the ideal neutron gas and examples that involve phase transitions.

  9. Flow field visualization about external axial corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to visualize the flow field about external axial corners. The investigation was initiated to provide answers to questions about the inviscid flow pattern for continuing numerical investigations. Symmetrical and asymmetrical corner models were tested at a Reynolds number per meter of 60,700,000. Oil-flow and vapor-screen photographs were taken for both models at angle of attack and yaw. The paper presents the results of the investigation in the form of oil-flow photographs and the surrounding shock wave location obtained from the vapor screens.

  10. Analysis of axial-induction-based wind plant control using an engineering and a high-order wind plant model

    SciTech Connect

    Annoni, Jennifer; Gebraad, Pieter M. O.; Scholbrock, Andrew K.; Fleming, Paul A.; Wingerden, Jan-Willem van

    2015-08-14

    Wind turbines are typically operated to maximize their performance without considering the impact of wake effects on nearby turbines. Wind plant control concepts aim to increase overall wind plant performance by coordinating the operation of the turbines. This paper focuses on axial-induction-based wind plant control techniques, in which the generator torque or blade pitch degrees of freedom of the wind turbines are adjusted. The paper addresses discrepancies between a high-order wind plant model and an engineering wind plant model. Changes in the engineering model are proposed to better capture the effects of axial-induction-based control shown in the high-order model.

  11. Symmetrical Diphosphatetraazacyclooctatetraenes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-26

    aryl, alkyl, perfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkylether radcalsl Rf is selected from perfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkylether radicals 20 as represented by...process for synthesizing symmetrical diphosphatetraazacyclooctatetraenes by reacting perfluoroalkyl or perfluoroalkylether amidine with a...symmetrical diphosphatetraazacyclooctatetraene. The substituent Rf can he selected from perfluoroalkyl and pertluoroalkylether groups as represented hy the

  12. Numerical modeling of axi-symmetrical cold forging process by ``Pseudo Inverse Approach''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halouani, A.; Li, Y. M.; Abbes, B.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2011-05-01

    The incremental approach is widely used for the forging process modeling, it gives good strain and stress estimation, but it is time consuming. A fast Inverse Approach (IA) has been developed for the axi-symmetric cold forging modeling [1-2]. This approach exploits maximum the knowledge of the final part's shape and the assumptions of proportional loading and simplified tool actions make the IA simulation very fast. The IA is proved very useful for the tool design and optimization because of its rapidity and good strain estimation. However, the assumptions mentioned above cannot provide good stress estimation because of neglecting the loading history. A new approach called "Pseudo Inverse Approach" (PIA) was proposed by Batoz, Guo et al.. [3] for the sheet forming modeling, which keeps the IA's advantages but gives good stress estimation by taking into consideration the loading history. Our aim is to adapt the PIA for the cold forging modeling in this paper. The main developments in PIA are resumed as follows: A few intermediate configurations are generated for the given tools' positions to consider the deformation history; the strain increment is calculated by the inverse method between the previous and actual configurations. An incremental algorithm of the plastic integration is used in PIA instead of the total constitutive law used in the IA. An example is used to show the effectiveness and limitations of the PIA for the cold forging process modeling.

  13. Buckling of multi-walled silicon carbide nanotubes under axial compression via a molecular mechanics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Mirnezhad, M.; Rouhi, H.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the axial buckling behavior of multi-walled silicon carbide nanotubes (MWSiCNTs) based upon a molecular mechanics model. To this end, the mechanical properties of silicon carbide sheets are obtained according to the density functional theory within the framework of the generalized gradient approximation. Through establishing a linkage between the quantum mechanics and the molecular mechanics, the force constants of the total potential energy are obtained theoretically. A closed-form expression is proposed from which by knowing the chirality of the MWSiCNT, its critical buckling strain can be calculated as quickly and accurately as possible. The effects of chirality and number of walls on the critical buckling strain of MWSiCNTs are carefully investigated. It is concluded that with increasing the number of walls of nanotubes, their stability decreases. The effects of diameter and number of walls on the critical buckling strain of MWSiCNTs under axial load get more pronounced at lower diameters. Besides, it is found that the minimum critical buckling strain is related to nanotubes with chiral vectors.

  14. Optimal symmetric networks in terms of minimizing average shortest path length and their sub-optimal growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Li, Yanjun; Wu, Tie-Jun

    2009-04-01

    Homogeneous entangled networks characterized by small world, large girths, and no community structure have attracted much attention due to some of their favorable performances. However, the optimization algorithm proposed by Donetti et al. is very time-consuming and will lose its efficiency when the size of the target network becomes large. In this paper, an alternative optimization algorithm is provided to get optimal symmetric networks by minimizing the average shortest path length. It is shown that the synchronizability of a symmetric network is enhanced when the average shortest path length of the network is shortened as the optimization proceeds, which suggests that the optimal symmetric networks in terms of minimizing average shortest path length will be very close to those entangled networks. In order to overcome the time-consuming obstacle of the optimization algorithms proposed by us and Donetti et al., a growth model is proposed to get large scale sub-optimal symmetric networks. Numerical simulations show that the symmetric networks derived by our growth model will have small-world property, and besides, these networks will have many other similar favorable performances as entangled networks, e.g., robustness against errors and attacks, very good load balancing ability, and strong synchronizability.

  15. Efficient Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering by Symmetric Lamellar Periodic Structures at Normal Incidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    SYMMETRIZED MODAL-FIELD METHOD We are interested in a biaxial lamellar structure that is periodic along the x-direction. If a is the size of the primitive cell , then...structure must be symmetric about the center of each primitive cell . Thus if the origin in x is chosen to be at the center of one of the primitive cells

  16. On the mechanical modeling of the extreme softening/stiffening response of axially loaded tensegrity prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, Fernando; Carpentieri, Gerardo; Amendola, Ada

    2015-01-01

    We study the geometrically nonlinear behavior of uniformly compressed tensegrity prisms through fully elastic and rigid-elastic models. The given models predict a variety of mechanical behaviors in the regime of large displacements, including an extreme stiffening-type response, already known in the literature, and a newly discovered, extreme softening behavior. The latter may lead to a snap buckling event producing an axial collapse of the structure. The switching from one mechanical regime to another depends on the aspect ratio of the structure, the magnitude of the applied prestress, and the material properties of the constituent elements. We discuss potential mechanical and acoustic applications of such behaviors, which are related to the design and manufacture of tensegrity lattices and innovative metamaterials.

  17. Solvable model for solitons pinned to a parity-time-symmetric dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai; Malomed, Boris A.; Reoksabutr, Athikom

    2013-08-01

    We introduce the simplest one-dimensional nonlinear model with parity-time (PT) symmetry, which makes it possible to find exact analytical solutions for localized modes (“solitons”). The PT-symmetric element is represented by a pointlike (δ-functional) gain-loss dipole ˜δ'(x), combined with the usual attractive potential ˜δ(x). The nonlinearity is represented by self-focusing (SF) or self-defocusing (SDF) Kerr terms, both spatially uniform and localized. The system can be implemented in planar optical waveguides. For the sake of comparison, also introduced is a model with separated δ-functional gain and loss, embedded into the linear medium and combined with the δ-localized Kerr nonlinearity and attractive potential. Full analytical solutions for pinned modes are found in both models. The exact solutions are compared with numerical counterparts, which are obtained in the gain-loss-dipole model with the δ' and δ functions replaced by their Lorentzian regularization. With the increase of the dipole's strength γ, the single-peak shape of the numerically found mode, supported by the uniform SF nonlinearity, transforms into a double peak. This transition coincides with the onset of the escape instability of the pinned soliton. In the case of the SDF uniform nonlinearity, the pinned modes are stable, keeping the single-peak shape.

  18. Finite-time vortex singularity and Kolmogorov spectrum in a symmetric three-dimensional spiral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Ng, C. S.; Wang, Xiaogang

    1995-11-01

    A recent analytical model of three-dimensional Euler flows [Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 2196 (1992)] which exhibits a finite-time vortex singularity is developed further. The initial state is symmetric and contains a velocity null (stagnation point) which is collinear with two vorticity nulls. Under some assumptions, it is shown by asymptotic analysis of the Euler equation that the vorticity blows up at the stagnation point as inverse time in a locally self-similar manner. The spatial structure of the inviscid flow in the vicinity of the singularity involves disparate small scales. The effect of a small but finite viscosity is shown to arrest the formation of the singularity. The presence of spiral structure in the initial conditions leads naturally to the model developed by Lundgren [Phys. Fluids 25, 2193 (1982)] in which the gradual tightening of spirals by differential rotation provides a mechanism for transfer of energy to small spatial scales. It is shown by asymptotic analysis of the Navier-Stokes equation, that a time-average over the lifetime of the spiral vortex in the present model yields the Kolmogorov spectrum.

  19. Supersymmetric Model of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a 𝓟𝓣-Symmetric Double-delta Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Nikolas; Cartarius, Holger; Wunner, Günter

    2015-11-01

    The most important properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate subject to balanced gain and loss can be modelled by a Gross-Pitaevskii equation with an external 𝓟𝓣-symmetric double-delta potential. We study its linear variant with a supersymmetric extension. It is shown that both in the 𝓟𝓣-symmetric as well as in the 𝓟𝓣-broken phase arbitrary stationary states can be removed in a supersymmetric partner potential without changing the energy eigenvalues of the other state. The characteristic structure of the singular delta potential in the supersymmetry formalism is discussed, and the applicability of the formalism to the nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equation is analysed. In the latter case the formalism could be used to remove 𝓟𝓣-broken states introducing an instability to the stationary 𝓟𝓣-symmetric states.

  20. Particle capture in axial magnetic filters with power law flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasov, T.; Herdem, S.; Köksal, M.

    1999-05-01

    A theory of capture of magnetic particle carried by laminar flow of viscous non-Newtonian (power law) fluid in axially ordered filters is presented. The velocity profile of the fluid flow is determined by the Kuwabara-Happel cell model. For the trajectory of the particle, the capture area and the filter performance simple analytical expressions are obtained. These expressions are valid for particle capture processes from both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. For this reason the obtained theoretical results make it possible to widen the application of high-gradient magnetic filtration (HGMF) to other industrial areas. For Newtonian fluids the theoretical results are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental ones reported in the literature.

  1. Modeling of momentum transport of axially parallel turbulent flows in rod cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelen, Neele

    Problems and boundary conditions of the turbulent flow in heat exchangers, especially for nuclear fuel elements, are treated using mathematical models. Rod cascade flow and the physical fundamentals of turbulent flows are introduced. It is shown that the momentum transport phenomena can be separated into the radial and azimuthal directions. The geometrical characteristics of rod bundle geometries and a regression analysis are considered. The correlation coefficients for the wall parallel vortex viscosity are determined using a numerical optimization method. The order of magnitude of the secondary flow occurring perpendicularly to the main flow direction are determined to be 1 pct to 2 pct of the average axial velocity. The results obtained with the code VELASCO-BS are superior to those of previous codes. The azimuthal vortex viscosity is the decisive parameter, and secondary flow is not important for wall parallel momentum transport.

  2. Path-integral solution for a two-dimensional model with axial-vector-current--pseudoscalar derivative interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Botelho, L.C.L.

    1985-03-15

    We study a two-dimensional quantum field model with axial-vector-current--pseudoscalar derivative interaction using path-integral methods. We construct an effective Lagrangian by performing a chiral change in the fermionic variables leading to an exact solution of the model.

  3. Preclinical mouse models for assessing axial compression of long bones during exercise.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Brun, Julia; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this laboratory method is to describe two approaches for the investigation of bone responses to mechanical loading in mice in vivo. The first is running exercise, because it is easily translatable clinically, and the second is axial compression of the tibia, because it is precisely controllable. The effects of running exercise, and in general physical activity, on bone tissue have been shown to be both direct through mechanical loading (ground impact and muscle tension) and indirect through metabolic changes. Therefore, running exercise has been considered the most convenient preclinical model for demonstrating the general idea that exercise is good for bone health, either early in age for increasing peak bone mass or later in age by slowing down bone loss. However, numerous combinations of protocols have been reported, which makes it difficult to formulate a simple take-home message. This laboratory method also provides a detailed description of in vivo direct mechanical axial compression of the mouse tibia. The effects of mechanical loading depend on the force (strain), frequency, waveform and duration of application, and they range from bone anabolism with low bone remodeling, inducing lamellar bone accumulation, to bone catabolism with high bone remodeling, leading to microdamage, woven bone formation and bone loss. Direct in vivo loading models are extensively used to study mechanotransduction pathways, and contribute by this way to the development of new bone anabolism treatments. Although it is particularly difficult to assemble an internationally adopted protocol description, which would give reproducible bone responses, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing running exercise and direct in vivo mechanical loading in the laboratory.

  4. Preclinical mouse models for assessing axial compression of long bones during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Brun, Julia; Bonnet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this laboratory method is to describe two approaches for the investigation of bone responses to mechanical loading in mice in vivo. The first is running exercise, because it is easily translatable clinically, and the second is axial compression of the tibia, because it is precisely controllable. The effects of running exercise, and in general physical activity, on bone tissue have been shown to be both direct through mechanical loading (ground impact and muscle tension) and indirect through metabolic changes. Therefore, running exercise has been considered the most convenient preclinical model for demonstrating the general idea that exercise is good for bone health, either early in age for increasing peak bone mass or later in age by slowing down bone loss. However, numerous combinations of protocols have been reported, which makes it difficult to formulate a simple take-home message. This laboratory method also provides a detailed description of in vivo direct mechanical axial compression of the mouse tibia. The effects of mechanical loading depend on the force (strain), frequency, waveform and duration of application, and they range from bone anabolism with low bone remodeling, inducing lamellar bone accumulation, to bone catabolism with high bone remodeling, leading to microdamage, woven bone formation and bone loss. Direct in vivo loading models are extensively used to study mechanotransduction pathways, and contribute by this way to the development of new bone anabolism treatments. Although it is particularly difficult to assemble an internationally adopted protocol description, which would give reproducible bone responses, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing running exercise and direct in vivo mechanical loading in the laboratory. PMID:26788286

  5. Symmetric textures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization is extended to the quark masses in the deep ultraviolet, and an algorithm to derive symmetric textures which are compatible with existing data is developed. It is found that there are only five such textures.

  6. Symmetric textures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P.

    1993-04-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization is extended to the quark masses in the deep ultraviolet, and an algorithm to derive symmetric textures which are compatible with existing data is developed. It is found that there are only five such textures.

  7. Spherically symmetric solutions of a (4 + n)-dimensional Einstein Yang Mills model with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihaye, Yves; Hartmann, Betti

    2005-01-01

    We construct solutions of an Einstein Yang Mills system including a cosmological constant in 4 + n spacetime dimensions, where the n-dimensional manifold associated with the extra dimensions is taken to be Ricci flat. Assuming the matter and metric fields to be independent of the n extra coordinates, a spherical symmetric ansatz for the fields leads to a set of coupled ordinary differential equations. We find that for n > 1 only solutions with either one non-zero Higgs field or with all Higgs fields constant and zero gauge field function (corresponding to a Wu Yang-type ansatz) exist. We give the analytic solutions available in this model. These are 'embedded' Abelian solutions with a diverging size of the manifold associated with the extra n dimensions. Depending on the choice of parameters, these latter solutions either represent naked singularities or they possess a single horizon. We also present solutions of the effective four-dimensional Einstein Yang Mills Higgs-dilaton model, where the higher-dimensional cosmological constant induces a Liouville-type potential. The solutions are non-Abelian solutions with diverging Higgs fields, which exist only up to a maximal value of the cosmological constant.

  8. Perspectives for detecting lepton flavour violation in left-right symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Krauss, Manuel E.; Opferkuch, Toby; Porod, Werner

    2017-03-01

    We investigate lepton flavour violation in a class of minimal left-right symmetric models where the left-right symmetry is broken by triplet scalars. In this context we present a method to consistently calculate the triplet-Yukawa couplings which takes into account the experimental data while simultaneously respecting the underlying symmetries. Analysing various scenarios, we then calculate the full set of tree-level and one-loop contributions to all radiative and three-body flavour-violating fully leptonic decays as well as μ - e conversion in nuclei. Our method illustrates how these processes depend on the underlying parameters of the theory. To that end we observe that, for many choices of the model parameters, there is a strong complementarity between the different observables. For instance, in a large part of the parameter space, lepton flavour violating τ-decays have a large enough branching ratio to be measured in upcoming experiments. Our results further show that experiments coming online in the immediate future, like Mu3e and BELLE II, or longer-term, such as PRISM/PRIME, will probe significant portions of the currently allowed parameter space.

  9. Symmetrical gait descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunajewski, Adam; Dusza, Jacek J.; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The article presents a proposal for the description of human gait as a periodic and symmetric process. Firstly, the data for researches was obtained in the Laboratory of Group SATI in the School of Engineering of University of Valencia. Then, the periodical model - Mean Double Step (MDS) was made. Finally, on the basis of MDS, the symmetrical models - Left Mean Double Step and Right Mean Double Step (LMDS and RMDS) could be created. The method of various functional extensions was used. Symmetrical gait models can be used to calculate the coefficients of asymmetry at any time or phase of the gait. In this way it is possible to create asymmetry, function which better describes human gait dysfunction. The paper also describes an algorithm for calculating symmetric models, and shows exemplary results based on the experimental data.

  10. A zonally symmetric model for the monsoon-Hadley circulation with stochastic convective forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Chevrotière, Michèle; Khouider, Boualem

    2017-02-01

    Idealized models of reduced complexity are important tools to understand key processes underlying a complex system. In climate science in particular, they are important for helping the community improve our ability to predict the effect of climate change on the earth system. Climate models are large computer codes based on the discretization of the fluid dynamics equations on grids of horizontal resolution in the order of 100 km, whereas unresolved processes are handled by subgrid models. For instance, simple models are routinely used to help understand the interactions between small-scale processes due to atmospheric moist convection and large-scale circulation patterns. Here, a zonally symmetric model for the monsoon circulation is presented and solved numerically. The model is based on the Galerkin projection of the primitive equations of atmospheric synoptic dynamics onto the first modes of vertical structure to represent free tropospheric circulation and is coupled to a bulk atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. The model carries bulk equations for water vapor in both the free troposphere and the ABL, while the processes of convection and precipitation are represented through a stochastic model for clouds. The model equations are coupled through advective nonlinearities, and the resulting system is not conservative and not necessarily hyperbolic. This makes the design of a numerical method for the solution of this system particularly difficult. Here, we develop a numerical scheme based on the operator time-splitting strategy, which decomposes the system into three pieces: a conservative part and two purely advective parts, each of which is solved iteratively using an appropriate method. The conservative system is solved via a central scheme, which does not require hyperbolicity since it avoids the Riemann problem by design. One of the advective parts is a hyperbolic diagonal matrix, which is easily handled by classical methods for hyperbolic equations, while

  11. A zonally symmetric model for the monsoon-Hadley circulation with stochastic convective forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Chevrotière, Michèle; Khouider, Boualem

    2016-09-01

    Idealized models of reduced complexity are important tools to understand key processes underlying a complex system. In climate science in particular, they are important for helping the community improve our ability to predict the effect of climate change on the earth system. Climate models are large computer codes based on the discretization of the fluid dynamics equations on grids of horizontal resolution in the order of 100 km, whereas unresolved processes are handled by subgrid models. For instance, simple models are routinely used to help understand the interactions between small-scale processes due to atmospheric moist convection and large-scale circulation patterns. Here, a zonally symmetric model for the monsoon circulation is presented and solved numerically. The model is based on the Galerkin projection of the primitive equations of atmospheric synoptic dynamics onto the first modes of vertical structure to represent free tropospheric circulation and is coupled to a bulk atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. The model carries bulk equations for water vapor in both the free troposphere and the ABL, while the processes of convection and precipitation are represented through a stochastic model for clouds. The model equations are coupled through advective nonlinearities, and the resulting system is not conservative and not necessarily hyperbolic. This makes the design of a numerical method for the solution of this system particularly difficult. Here, we develop a numerical scheme based on the operator time-splitting strategy, which decomposes the system into three pieces: a conservative part and two purely advective parts, each of which is solved iteratively using an appropriate method. The conservative system is solved via a central scheme, which does not require hyperbolicity since it avoids the Riemann problem by design. One of the advective parts is a hyperbolic diagonal matrix, which is easily handled by classical methods for hyperbolic equations, while

  12. Scleral Cross-linking Using Riboflavin and Ultraviolet-A Radiation for Prevention of Axial Myopia in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Assaf; Kremer, Israel; Gal-Or, Orly; Livnat, Tami; Zigler, Arie; Bourla, Dan; Weinberger, Dov

    2016-04-03

    Myopic individuals, especially those with severe myopia, are at higher-than-normal risk of cataract, glaucoma, retinal detachment and chorioretinal abnormalities. In addition, pathological myopia is a common irreversible cause of visual impairment and blindness. Our study demonstrates the effect of scleral crosslinking using riboflavin and ultraviolet-A radiation on the development of axial myopia in a rabbit model. The axial length of the eyeball was measured by A-scan ultrasound in New Zealand white rabbits aged 13 days (male and female). The eye then underwent 360° conjunctival peritomy with scleral crosslinking, followed by tarsorrhaphy. Axial elongation was induced in 13 day-old New Zealand rabbits by suturing their right eye eyelids (tarsorrhaphy). The eyes were divided into quadrants, and every quadrant had two scleral irradiation zones, each with an area of 0.2 cm² and a radius of 4 mm. Crosslinking was performed by dropping 0.1% dextran-free riboflavin-5-phosphate onto the irradiation zones 20 sec before ultraviolet-A irradiation and every 20 sec during the 200 sec irradiation time. UVA radiation (370 nm) was applied perpendicular to the sclera at 57 mW/cm² (total UVA light dose, 57 J/cm²). Tarsorrhaphies were removed on day 55, followed by repeated axial length measurements. This study demonstrates that scleral crosslinking with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A radiation effectively prevents occlusion-induced axial elongation in a rabbit model.

  13. A generalized behavioral model for rotating short period comets with spectral orbital elements and axial orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Salvail, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized model for short period comets is developed which integrates in a fairly rigorous manner the isolation history of regions on rotating comets with specified axial orientation and the complex feedback processes involving heat, gas and dust transport, dust mantle development and coma opacity. Attention is focused on development, reconfiguration and partial or complete launching of dust mantles and the reciprocal effects of these three processes on ice surface temperature and gas and dust production. The dust mantle controls the H2O flux not only by its effect on the temperature at the ice interface but (dominantly) by its dynamic stability which strongly influences vapor diffusivity. The model includes the effects of latitude, rotation and spin axis orientation are included and applied to an initially homogeneous sphere of H2O ice and silicate using the orbital parameters of comet Encke. Numerous variations of the model, using combinations of grain size distribution, dust-to-ice ratio, latitude and spin axis orientation, are presented and discussed. Resulted for a similar nonrotating, constant Sun orientation models are also included.

  14. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the two-scale spherically symmetric Jagla ramp model of anomalous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Angell, C. Austen; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2006-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the Jagla model of a liquid which consists of particles interacting via a spherically symmetric two-scale potential with both repulsive and attractive ramps. This potential displays anomalies similar to those found in liquid water, namely expansion upon cooling and an increase of diffusivity upon compression, as well as a liquid-liquid (LL) phase transition in the region of the phase diagram accessible to simulations. The LL coexistence line, unlike in tetrahedrally coordinated liquids, has a positive slope, because of the Clapeyron relation, corresponding to the fact that the high density phase (HDL) is more ordered than low density phase (LDL). When we cool the system at constant pressure above the critical pressure, the thermodynamic properties rapidly change from those of LDL-like to those of HDL-like upon crossing the Widom line. The temperature dependence of the diffusivity also changes rapidly in the vicinity of the Widom line, namely the slope of the Arrhenius plot sharply increases upon entering the HDL domain. The properties of the glass transition are different in the two phases, suggesting that the less ordered phase is fragile, while the more ordered phase is strong, which is consistent with the behavior of tetrahedrally coordinated liquids such as water silica, silicon, and BeF2 .

  15. Theoretical constraints on masses of heavy particles in Left-Right symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabortty, J.; Gluza, J.; Jeliński, T.; Srivastava, T.

    2016-08-01

    Left-Right symmetric models with general gL ≠gR gauge couplings which include bidoublet and triplet scalar multiplets are studied. Possible scalar mass spectra are outlined by imposing Tree-Unitarity, and Vacuum Stability criteria and also using the bounds on neutral scalar masses MHFCNC which assure the absence of Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC). We are focusing on mass spectra relevant for the LHC analysis, i.e., the scalar masses are around TeV scale. As all non-standard heavy particle masses are related to the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the right-handed triplet (vR), the combined effects of relevant Higgs potential parameters and MHFCNC regulate the lower limits of heavy gauge boson masses. The complete set of Renormalization Group Evolutions for all couplings are provided at the 1-loop level, including the mixing effects in the Yukawa sector. Most of the scalar couplings suffer from the Landau poles at the intermediate scale Q ∼106.5 GeV, which in general coincides with violation of the Tree-Unitarity bounds.

  16. Heliospheric Termination Shock Motion Due to Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Upstream Conditions: Spherically Symmetric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratkiewicz, R.; Barnes, A.; Molvik, G. A.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale fluctuations in the solar wind plasma upstream of the heliospheric termination shock (TS) will cause inward and outward motions of the shock. Using numerical techniques, we extend an earlier strictly one-dimensional (planar) analytic gas dynamic model to spherical symmetry to investigate the features of global behavior of shock motion. Our starting point is to establish a steady numerical solution of the gasdynamic equations describing the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. We then introduce disturbances of the solar wind dynamic pressure at an inner boundary, and follow the subsequent evolution of the system, especially the motion of the termination shock. Our model solves spherically symmetric gasdynamic equations as an initial-boundary value problem. The equations in conservative form are solved using a fully implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) upwind scheme with Roe-type Riemann solver. Boundary conditions are given by the solar wind parameters on an inner spherical boundary, where they are allowed to vary with time for unsteady calculations, and by a constant pressure (roughly simulating the effect of the local interstellar medium) on an outer boundary. We find that immediately after the interaction, the shock moves with speeds given by the earlier analogous analytic models. However, as the termination shock propagates it begins to slow down, seeking a new equilibrium position. In addition, the disturbance transmitted through the TS, either a shock or rarefaction wave, will encounter the heliopause boundary and be reflected back. The reflected signal will encounter the TS, causing it to oscillate. The phenomenon may be repeated for a number of reflections, resulting in a "ringing" of the outer heliosphere.

  17. Higgs mass, superconnections, and the TeV-scale left-right symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ufuk; Minic, Djordje; Sun, Chen; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the physical implications of formulating the Standard Model (SM) in terms of the superconnection formalism involving the superalgebra s u (2 /1 ). In particular, we discuss the prediction of the Higgs mass according to the formalism and point out that it is ˜170 GeV , in clear disagreement with experiment. To remedy this problem, we extend the formalism to the superalgebra s u (2 /2 ), which extends the SM to the left-right symmetric model (LRSM) and accommodates a ˜126 GeV Higgs boson. Both the SM in the s u (2 /1 ) case and the LRSM in the s u (2 /2 ) case are argued to emerge at ˜4 TeV from an underlying theory in which the spacetime geometry is modified by the addition of a discrete extra dimension. The formulation of the exterior derivative in this model space suggests a deep connection between the modified geometry, which can be described in the language of noncommutative geometry, and the spontaneous breaking of the gauge symmetries. The implication is that spontaneous symmetry breaking could actually be geometric/quantum gravitational in nature. The nondecoupling phenomenon seen in the Higgs sector can then be reinterpreted in a new light as due to the mixing of low energy (SM) physics and high energy physics associated with quantum gravity, such as string theory. The phenomenology of a TeV scale LRSM is also discussed, and we argue that some exciting discoveries may await us at the LHC, and other near-future experiments.

  18. Modeling and Performance Improvement of the Constant Power Regulator Systems in Variable Displacement Axial Piston Pump

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    An irregular performance of a mechanical-type constant power regulator is considered. In order to find the cause of an irregular discharge flow at the cut-off pressure area, modeling and numerical simulations are performed to observe dynamic behavior of internal parts of the constant power regulator system for a swashplate-type axial piston pump. The commercial numerical simulation software AMESim is applied to model the mechanical-type regulator with hydraulic pump and simulate the performance of it. The validity of the simulation model of the constant power regulator system is verified by comparing simulation results with experiments. In order to find the cause of the irregular performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator system, the behavior of main components such as the spool, sleeve, and counterbalance piston is investigated using computer simulation. The shape modification of the counterbalance piston is proposed to improve the undesirable performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator. The performance improvement is verified by computer simulation using AMESim software. PMID:24282389

  19. Modeling and performance improvement of the constant power regulator systems in variable displacement axial piston pump.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Jong Shik

    2013-01-01

    An irregular performance of a mechanical-type constant power regulator is considered. In order to find the cause of an irregular discharge flow at the cut-off pressure area, modeling and numerical simulations are performed to observe dynamic behavior of internal parts of the constant power regulator system for a swashplate-type axial piston pump. The commercial numerical simulation software AMESim is applied to model the mechanical-type regulator with hydraulic pump and simulate the performance of it. The validity of the simulation model of the constant power regulator system is verified by comparing simulation results with experiments. In order to find the cause of the irregular performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator system, the behavior of main components such as the spool, sleeve, and counterbalance piston is investigated using computer simulation. The shape modification of the counterbalance piston is proposed to improve the undesirable performance of the mechanical-type constant power regulator. The performance improvement is verified by computer simulation using AMESim software.

  20. Parametric modeling and stagger angle optimization of an axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. X.; Zhang, C. H.; Liu, Y.; Y Zheng, S.

    2013-12-01

    Axial flow fans are widely used in every field of social production. Improving their efficiency is a sustained and urgent demand of domestic industry. The optimization of stagger angle is an important method to improve fan performance. Parametric modeling and calculation process automation are realized in this paper to improve optimization efficiency. Geometric modeling and mesh division are parameterized based on GAMBIT. Parameter setting and flow field calculation are completed in the batch mode of FLUENT. A control program is developed in Visual C++ to dominate the data exchange of mentioned software. It also extracts calculation results for optimization algorithm module (provided by Matlab) to generate directive optimization control parameters, which as feedback are transferred upwards to modeling module. The center line of the blade airfoil, based on CLARK y profile, is constructed by non-constant circulation and triangle discharge method. Stagger angles of six airfoil sections are optimized, to reduce the influence of inlet shock loss as well as gas leak in blade tip clearance and hub resistance at blade root. Finally an optimal solution is obtained, which meets the total pressure requirement under given conditions and improves total pressure efficiency by about 6%.

  1. Algebraic stress model for axial flow in a bare rod-bundle

    SciTech Connect

    de Lemos, M.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of predicting transport properties for momentum and heat across the boundaries of interconnected channels has been the subject of many investigations. In the particular case of axial flow through rod-bundles, transport coefficients for channel faces aligned with rod centers are known to be considerably higher than those calculated by simple isotropic theories. And yet, it was been found that secondary flows play only a minor role in this overall transport, being turbulence highly enhanced across that hypothetical surface. In order to numerically predict the correct amount of the quantity being transported, the approach taken by many investigators was then to artificially increase the diffusion coefficient obtained via a simple isopropic theory (usually the standard k-epsilon model) and numerically match the correct experimentally observed mixing rates. The present paper reports an attempt to describe the turbulent stresses by means of an Algebraic Stress Model for turbulence. Relative turbulent kinetic energy distribution in all three directions are presented and compared with experiments in a square lattice. The strong directional dependence of transport terms are then obtained via a model for the Reynolds stresses. The results identify a need for a better representation of the mean-flow field part of the pressure-strain correlation term.

  2. Development of a new free wake model considering a blade vane interaction for a low noise axial fan planform optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyungki; Sun, Hyosung; Lee, Soogab

    2006-03-01

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) is an essential part for low noise axial fan design since various parameters, such as flow rate, efficiency, noise etc., should be considered. For this reason, Response Surface Method (RSM) design technique is adopted as an axial fan design method. RSM has an advantage of choosing objective functions and constraint conditions unrestrictedly on a design space. However, RSM needs a lot of independent variables to construct a proper response surface. Thus an efficient and accurate flow analysis tool is indispensable for optimization. In an axial fan, the discrete (commonly called Blade-Passage-Frequency) components are usually dominant in the noise spectrum. Especially the blade-guide vane interaction is one of most important noise sources. In order to predict this noise component efficiently at the design stage, a new free wake model named Finite Vortex Element (FVE) is devised to simulate this blade-guide vane interaction, which is very difficult to analyze numerically in a conventional free wake model. In this new free wake model, the blade-wake-guide vane interaction is described by cutting a vortex filament when the filament collides with a guide vane. This FVE model is compared with a conventional curved vortex methodology and verified by a comparison with measured data to show its effectiveness and validity. Then FVE model is coupled with RSM to implement a low noise axial fan blade optimization. Using this method, a reduction of 8 dB(A) at 2 m from fan hub in the overall noise level is achieved while the flow rate and the efficiency are maintained as the values of the baseline blade, which implies that FVE wake model coupled with RSM is very effective methodology for MDO problems such as a low noise axial fan design.

  3. Qualitative breakdown of the noncrossing approximation for the symmetric one-channel Anderson impurity model at all temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sposetti, C. N.; Manuel, L. O.; Roura-Bas, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Anderson impurity model is studied by means of the self-consistent hybridization expansions in its noncrossing (NCA) and one-crossing (OCA) approximations. We have found that for the one-channel spin-1 /2 particle-hole symmetric Anderson model, the NCA results are qualitatively wrong for any temperature, even when the approximation gives the exact threshold exponents of the ionic states. Actually, the NCA solution describes an overscreened Kondo effect, because it is the same as for the two-channel infinite-U single-level Anderson model. We explicitly show that the NCA is unable to distinguish between these two very different physical systems, independently of temperature. Using the impurity entropy as an example, we show that the low-temperature values of the NCA entropy for the symmetric case yield the limit Simp(T =0 ) →ln√{2 }, which corresponds to the zero temperature entropy of the overscreened Kondo model. Similar pathologies are predicted for any other thermodynamic property. On the other hand, we have found that the OCA approach lifts the artificial mapping between the models and restores correct properties of the ground state, for instance, a vanishing entropy at low enough temperatures Simp(T =0 ) →0 . Our results indicate that the very well known NCA should be used with caution close to the symmetric point of the Anderson model.

  4. Hydrodynamics and sediment transport in a meandering channel with a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Craig; Kozarek, Jessica; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Guala, Michele

    2016-02-01

    An investigation into the interactions between a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine (rotor diameter, dT = 0.15 m) and the complex hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes within a meandering channel was carried out in the Outdoor StreamLab research facility at the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. This field-scale meandering stream with bulk flow and sediment discharge control provided a location for high spatiotemporally resolved measurements of bed and water surface elevations around the model turbine. The device was installed within an asymmetric, erodible channel cross section under migrating bed form and fixed outer bank conditions. A comparative analysis between velocity and topographic measurements, with and without the turbine installed, highlights the local and nonlocal features of the turbine-induced scour and deposition patterns. In particular, it shows how the cross-section geometry changes, how the bed form characteristics are altered, and how the mean flow field is distorted both upstream and downstream of the turbine. We further compare and discuss how current energy conversion deployments in meander regions would result in different interactions between the turbine operation and the local and nonlocal bathymetry compared to straight channels.

  5. Modeling of thermo-mechanical fatigue and damage in shape memory alloy axial actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert W.; Hartl, Darren J.; Chemisky, Yves; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and energy industries have seen the potential benefits of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as solid state actuators. Thus far, however, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components or over-designed due to a lack of understanding regarding how SMAs undergo thermomechanical or actuation fatigue and the inability to accurately predict failure in an actuator during use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the actuation fatigue response of Nickel-Titanium-Hafnium (NiTiHf) axial actuators and, in turn, use this characterization to predict failure and monitor damage in dogbone actuators undergoing various thermomechanical loading paths. Calibration data was collected from constant load, full cycle tests ranging from 200-600MPa. Subsequently, actuator lifetimes were predicted for four additional loading paths. These loading paths consisted of linearly varying load with full transformation (300-500MPa) and step loads which transition from zero stress to 300-400MPa at various martensitic volume fractions. Thermal cycling was achieved via resistive heating and convective cooling and was controlled via a state machine developed in LabVIEW. A previously developed fatigue damage model, which is formulated such that the damage accumulation rate is general in terms of its dependence on current and local stress and actuation strain states, was utilized. This form allows the model to be utilized for specimens undergoing complex loading paths. Agreement between experiments and simulations is discussed.

  6. Finite element modelling of process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischkorn, J.; Kebriaei, R.; Reese, S.; Moll, H.; Theisen, W.; Husmann, T.; Meier, H.

    2011-05-01

    The process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings represents a new hybrid production technique applied in the manufacturing of large ring-shaped work pieces with functional layers. It is thought to break some limitations that come along with the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which is used nowadays to apply the powdery layer material onto the rolled substrate ring. Within the new process the compaction of the layer material is integrated into the ring rolling and HIP becomes dispensable. Following this approach the rolling of such compound rings brings up some new challenges. The volume of a solid ring stays nearly constant during the rolling. This behaviour can be exploited to determine the infeed of the rollers needed to reach the desired ring shape. Since volume consistency cannot be guaranteed for the rolling of a compound ring the choice of appropriate infeed of the rollers is still an open question. This paper deals with the finite element (FE) simulation of this new process. First, the material model that is used to describe the compaction of the layer material is shortly reviewed. The main focus of the paper is then put on a parameterized FE ring rolling model that incorporates a control system in order to stabilize the process. Also the differences in the behaviour during the rolling stage between a compound and a solid ring will be discussed by means of simulation results.

  7. Finite element modelling of process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings

    SciTech Connect

    Frischkorn, J.; Kebriaei, R.; Reese, S.; Moll, H.; Theisen, W.; Husmann, T.; Meier, H.

    2011-05-04

    The process-integrated powder coating by radial axial rolling of rings represents a new hybrid production technique applied in the manufacturing of large ring-shaped work pieces with functional layers. It is thought to break some limitations that come along with the hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which is used nowadays to apply the powdery layer material onto the rolled substrate ring. Within the new process the compaction of the layer material is integrated into the ring rolling and HIP becomes dispensable. Following this approach the rolling of such compound rings brings up some new challenges. The volume of a solid ring stays nearly constant during the rolling. This behaviour can be exploited to determine the infeed of the rollers needed to reach the desired ring shape. Since volume consistency cannot be guaranteed for the rolling of a compound ring the choice of appropriate infeed of the rollers is still an open question. This paper deals with the finite element (FE) simulation of this new process. First, the material model that is used to describe the compaction of the layer material is shortly reviewed. The main focus of the paper is then put on a parameterized FE ring rolling model that incorporates a control system in order to stabilize the process. Also the differences in the behaviour during the rolling stage between a compound and a solid ring will be discussed by means of simulation results.

  8. Diffuse light propagation in a turbid medium with varying refractive index: Monte Carlo modeling in a spherically symmetrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Shendeleva, Margarita L; Molloy, John A

    2006-09-20

    We report on the development of Monte Carlo software that can model media with spatially varying scattering coefficient, absorption, and refractive index. The varying refractive index is implemented by calculating curved photon paths in the medium. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with analytical solutions obtained using the diffusion approximation. The model under investigation is a scattering medium that contains a spherically symmetrical inclusion (inhomogeneity) created by variation in optical properties and having no sharp boundaries. The following steady-state cases are considered: (a) a nonabsorbing medium with a spherically symmetrical varying refractive index, (b) an inclusion with varying absorption and scattering coefficients and constant refractive index, and (c) an inclusion with varying absorption, scattering, and refractive index. In the latter case it is shown that the interplay between the absorption coefficient and the refractive index may create the effect of a hidden inclusion.

  9. Interaction between an axial-flow model hydrokinetic turbine and an erodible channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Craig; Musa, Mirko; Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Guala, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to examine the effect of relatively large-scale bedforms on the performance of a model axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine. The turbine rotor, dT = 0 . 15 m, was attached to a miniature DC motor, and allowed for voltage data acquisition at 200 Hz along with 3D hub-height inflow velocity, Uhub, approximately 7dT upstream of the turbine. Spatio-temporal bed elevations were acquired along three longitudinal sections and at least one transverse transect within the flume providing the temporally-averaged scour and deposition patterns characterizing the turbine near-field region. Turbine-turbine interaction was investigated under aligned configurations in the streamwise direction with variable spacing both in clear water scour and live bed transport conditions. Effects from both migrating bedforms and the upstream turbine were observed in the long-term and short-term voltage fluctuations of the downstream turbine. Combined measurements of inflow velocity, bed topography and turbine voltage were used to obtain joint statistics and correlations, which provided an indication of the variability in environmental exposure and performance that hydrokinetic turbines will encounter in natural erodible rivers.

  10. WITHDRAWN: Modeling of Transient Phenomena in an Axial Flow Blood Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Houston

    2005-11-01

    A fully implantable axial flow Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has been developed with a magnetically suspended impeller (LEV-VAD). The LEV-VAD's flow path design provides a single pass blood path with minimal turbulence. The pump design included the extensive use of CFD modeling and experimental validation under steady-state flow conditions. This CFD study explores transient flow phenomena in the pump simulating in vivo flow conditions. The LEV-VAD operates under transient conditions due to the pulsatile inlet flow rate induced by the patient's native heart and the spinning of the impeller. This study considered: (1) Time varying boundary conditions (TVBC); (2) Stationary-rotating blades interaction or transient sliding interfaces (TSI). The LEV-VAD performance and pressure-flow correlations were investigated under transient flow conditions. The fluid forces acting on the impeller were calculated to facilitate the suspension system and motor design. The transient simulations illustrate the LEV-VAD's response to dynamic flow conditions and demonstrated the ability to deliver flows from 2 to 10 LPM at rotational speeds varying from 5,000 to 8,000 RPM for physiological pressures corresponding to adult CHF patients.

  11. Waveform modeling of the seismic response of a mid-ocean ridge axial melt sill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Stephen, R. A.; Canales, J. Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Seismic reflections from axial magma lens (AML) are commonly observed along many mid-ocean ridges, and are thought to arise from the negative impedance contrast between a solid, high-speed lid and the underlying low-speed, molten or partially molten (mush) sill. The polarity of the AML reflection (P AML P) at vertical incidence and the amplitude vs offset (AVO) behavior of the AML reflections (e.g., P AML P and S-converted P AML S waves) are often used as a diagnostic tool for the nature of the low-speed sill. Time-domain finite difference calculations for two-dimensional laterally homogeneous models show some scenarios make the interpretation of melt content from partial-offset stacks of P- and S-waves difficult. Laterally heterogeneous model calculations indicate diffractions from the edges of the finite-width AML reducing the amplitude of the AML reflections. Rough seafloor and/or a rough AML surface can also greatly reduce the amplitude of peg-leg multiples because of scattering and destructive interference. Mid-crustal seismic reflection events are observed in the three-dimensional multi-channel seismic dataset acquired over the RIDGE-2000 Integrated Study Site at East Pacific Rise (EPR, cruise MGL0812). Modeling indicates that the mid-crustal seismic reflection reflections are unlikely to arise from peg-leg multiples of the AML reflections, P-to-S converted phases, or scattering due to rough topography, but could probably arise from deeper multiple magma sills. Our results support the identification of Marjanović et al. (Nat Geosci 7(11):825-829, 2014) that a multi-level complex of melt lenses is present beneath the axis of the EPR.

  12. Reactive control of subsonic axial fan noise in a duct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Choy, Y S; Huang, L; Cheng, L

    2014-10-01

    Suppressing the ducted fan noise at low frequencies without varying the flow capacity is still a technical challenge. This study examines a conceived device consisting of two tensioned membranes backed with cavities housing the axial fan for suppression of the sound radiation from the axial fan directly. The noise suppression is achieved by destructive interference between the sound fields from the axial fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from the membrane via vibroacoustics coupling. A two-dimensional model with the flow effect is presented which allows the performance of the device to be explored analytically. The air flow influences the symmetrical behavior and excites the odd in vacuo mode response of the membrane due to kinematic coupling. Such an asymmetrical effect can be compromised with off-center alignment of the axial fan. Tension plays an important role to sustain the performance to revoke the deformation of the membrane during the axial fan operation. With the design of four appropriately tensioned membranes covered by a cylindrical cavity, the first and second blade passage frequencies of the axial fan can be reduced by at least 20 dB. The satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory demonstrates that its feasibility is practical.

  13. Gradient-index crystalline lens model: A new method for determining the paraxial properties by the axial and field rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, María. Angeles; Pérez, María. Victoria; Bao, Carmen; Flores-Arias, María. Teresa; Gómez-Reino, Carlos

    2005-05-01

    Gradient-index (GRIN) models of the human lens have received wide attention in optometry and vision sciences for considering the effect of inhomogeneity of the refractive index on the optical properties of the lens. This paper uses the continuous asymmetric bi-elliptical model to determine analytically cardinal elements, magnifications and refractive power of the lens by the axial and field rays in order to study the paraxial light propagation through the human lens from its GRIN nature.

  14. Axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieper, Joachim; Braun, Jürgen; Dougados, Maxime; Baeten, Dominique

    2015-07-09

    The term axial spondyloarthritis covers both non-radiographic disease and radiographic disease (also known as ankylosing spondylitis). Some studies have been performed to investigate the prevalence of axial spondyloarthritis, although most are limited to patients with radiographic disease. A strong genetic association has been shown between axial spondyloarthritis and human leukocyte antigen-B27 (HLA-B27), but the pathogenetic role of HLA-B27 has not yet been clarified. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-17, IL-23 and downstream pathways also seem to be important - based on the good results of therapies directed against these molecules - but their exact role in the inflammatory process is also not yet clear. Elucidating the interaction between osteoproliferation and inflammation will be crucial for the prevention of long-term structural damage of the bone. The development of new criteria for classification, diagnosis and screening of patients with axial spondyloarthritis will enable earlier intervention for this chronic inflammatory disease. MRI has become an important tool for the early detection of axial spondyloarthritis. NSAIDs and TNF blockers are effective therapies, including in the early non-radiographic stage. Therapeutic blockade of IL-17 or IL-23 seems to be a promising new treatment option. Tools for measuring quality of life in axial spondyloarthritis have become relevant to assess the impact that the disease has on patients. These diagnostic and therapeutic advances will continue to change the management of axial spondyloarthritis, and new insights into the disease pathogenesis will hopefully accelerate this process. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/51b1af.

  15. A prediction model for the vortex shedding noise from the wake of an airfoil or axial flow fan blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Chung, M. K.; Kim, Y.-H.

    1993-06-01

    An analytical model is presented for predicting the vortex shedding noise generated from the wake of axial flow fan blades. The downstream wake of a fan blade is assumed to be dominated by the von Karman vortex street, and the strength and the shedding frequency of the wake vortex are determined from the wake structure model. The fluctuating pressure and lift on the blade surface, which are induced from the vortices in the wake, are analyzed by incorporating the wake model for the von Karman vortex street with thin airfoil theory. The predicted vortex shedding frequency and the overall sound pressure level compare favorably with the measured results for the vortex shedding noise from axial flow fans.

  16. Calculation of symmetric and asymmetric vortex seperation on cones and tangent ogives based on discrete vortex models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, S.; Lan, C. Edward

    1988-01-01

    An inviscid discrete vortex model, with newly derived expressions for the tangential velocity imposed at the separation points, is used to investigate the symmetric and asymmetric vortex separation on cones and tangent ogives. The circumferential locations of separation are taken from experimental data. Based on a slender body theory, the resulting simultaneous nonlinear algebraic equations in a cross-flow plane are solved with Broyden's modified Newton-Raphson method. Total force coefficients are obtained through momentum principle with new expressions for nonconical flow. It is shown through the method of function deflation that multiple solutions exist at large enough angles of attack, even with symmetric separation points. These additional solutions are asymmetric in vortex separation and produce side force coefficients which agree well with data for cones and tangent ogives.

  17. Combining symmetry-separated and bent-bond spin-coupled models of cylindrically symmetric multiple bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penotti, Fabio E.; Cooper, David L.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the symmetry properties of spin-coupled (or full generalised valence bond) wavefunctions for C2H2 and N2. The symmetry-separated (σ,π) and bent-bond (ω) solutions are totally symmetric only in the D4h and D3h subgroups of D∞h, respectively. Two fairly different strategies are explored for imposing full cylindrical symmetry, with one of them (small nonorthogonal configuration interaction calculations involving rotated versions of the wavefunction) turning out to be somewhat preferable on energetic grounds to the other one (application of additional spin constraints to a single spatial configuration). It is also shown that mixing together the cylindrically symmetric symmetry-separated and bent-bond spin-coupled models leads to relatively small energy improvements unless the valence orbitals in each type of configuration are reoptimised.

  18. Mathematical modelling of the beam under axial compression force applied at any point - the buckling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnucka-Blandzi, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The study is devoted to stability of simply supported beam under axial compression. The beam is subjected to an axial load located at any point along the axis of the beam. The buckling problem has been desribed and solved mathematically. Critical loads have been calculated. In the particular case, the Euler's buckling load is obtained. Explicit solutions are given. The values of critical loads are collected in tables and shown in figure. The relation between the point of the load application and the critical load is presented.

  19. Modelling of melt motion in a Czochralski crystal puller with an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjellming, L. N.; Walker, J. S.

    1986-12-01

    The use of matched asymptotic expansions provide analytical solutions for the bulk flow in a Czochralski crystal puller in a strong axial magnetic field. Treating the crystal as a slight electrical conductor alters the radial and axial flows driven by centrifugal pumping. The motion due to buoyancy and thermocapillarity are found by considering the temperature as a known function and solving the non-linear heat equation numerically for different magnetic field strengths and melt depths. This note presents a summary of the analysis and results that are detailed in two papers.

  20. A compact quantum correction model for symmetric double gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Edward Namkyu; Shin, Yong Hyeon; Yun, Ilgu

    2014-11-07

    A compact quantum correction model for a symmetric double gate (DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated. The compact quantum correction model is proposed from the concepts of the threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM}) and the gate capacitance (C{sub g}) degradation. First of all, ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} induced by quantum mechanical (QM) effects is modeled. The C{sub g} degradation is then modeled by introducing the inversion layer centroid. With ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} and the C{sub g} degradation, the QM effects are implemented in previously reported classical model and a comparison between the proposed quantum correction model and numerical simulation results is presented. Based on the results, the proposed quantum correction model can be applicable to the compact model of DG MOSFET.

  1. A mathematical model for estimating the axial stress of the common carotid artery wall from ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Saberi, Hajir; Sharif-Kashani, Shervin

    2016-08-01

    Clarifying the complex interaction between mechanical and biological processes in healthy and diseased conditions requires constitutive models for arterial walls. In this study, a mathematical model for the displacement of the carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction is defined providing a satisfactory representation of the axial stress applied to the arterial wall. The proposed model was applied to the carotid artery wall motion estimated from ultrasound image sequences of 10 healthy adults, and the axial stress waveform exerted on the artery wall was extracted. Consecutive ultrasonic images (30 frames per second) of the common carotid artery of 10 healthy subjects (age 44 ± 4 year) were recorded and transferred to a personal computer. Longitudinal displacement and acceleration were extracted from ultrasonic image processing using a block-matching algorithm. Furthermore, images were examined using a maximum gradient algorithm and time rate changes of the internal diameter and intima-media thickness were extracted. Finally, axial stress was estimated using an appropriate constitutive equation for thin-walled tubes. Performance of the proposed model was evaluated using goodness of fit between approximated and measured longitudinal displacement statistics. Values of goodness-of-fit statistics indicated high quality of fit for all investigated subjects with the mean adjusted R-square (0.86 ± 0.08) and root mean squared error (0.08 ± 0.04 mm). According to the results of the present study, maximum and minimum axial stresses exerted on the arterial wall are 1.7 ± 0.6 and -1.5 ± 0.5 kPa, respectively. These results reveal the potential of this technique to provide a new method to assess arterial stress from ultrasound images, overcoming the limitations of the finite element and other simulation techniques.

  2. Spectral properties of the Preisach hysteresis model with random input. II. Universality classes for symmetric elementary loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radons, Günter

    2008-06-01

    The Preisach model with symmetric elementary hysteresis loops and uncorrelated input is treated analytically in detail. It is shown that the appearance of long-time tails in the output correlations is a quite general feature of this model. The exponent η of the algebraic decay t-η , which may take any positive value, is determined by the tails of the input and the Preisach density. We identify the system classes leading to identical algebraic tails. These results imply the occurrence of 1/f noise for a large class of hysteretic systems.

  3. Experimental Verification of a Microbuckling Model for the Axial Compressive Failure of High Performance Polymer Fibers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-05

    mesophase pitch . This fiber is stretched during the graphitization process to improve orientation and therefore axial modulus 22 ,23. Graphite fibers are...with the beam bending technique. However, the compressive strengths of similar pitch -based graphite fibers were calculated by other workers who used

  4. Molecular Modeling of the Axial and Circumferential Elastic Moduli of Tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, A. S.; Layton, B. E.

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules play a number of important mechanical roles in almost all cell types in nearly all major phylogenetic trees. We have used a molecular mechanics approach to perform tensile tests on individual tubulin monomers and determined values for the axial and circumferential moduli for all currently known complete sequences. The axial elastic moduli, in vacuo, were found to be 1.25 GPa and 1.34 GPa for α- and β-bovine tubulin monomers. In the circumferential direction, these moduli were 378 MPa for α- and 460 MPa for β-structures. Using bovine tubulin as a template, 269 homologous tubulin structures were also subjected to simulated tensile loads yielding an average axial elastic modulus of 1.10 ± 0.14 GPa for α-tubulin structures and 1.39 ± 0.68 GPa for β-tubulin. Circumferentially the α- and β-moduli were 936 ± 216 MPa and 658 ± 134 MPa, respectively. Our primary finding is that that the axial elastic modulus of tubulin diminishes as the length of the monomer increases. However, in the circumferential direction, no correlation exists. These predicted anisotropies and scale dependencies may assist in interpreting the macroscale behavior of microtubules during mitosis or cell growth. Additionally, an intergenomic approach to investigating the mechanical properties of proteins may provide a way to elucidate the evolutionary mechanical constraints imposed by nature upon individual subcellular components. PMID:18621829

  5. Enlargement of the Axial Length and Altered Ultrastructural Features of the Sclera in a Mutant Lumican Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanzheng; Zhang, Fengju; Zhao, Yanyan; Sun, Mingshen; Tao, Jun; Liang, Yanchuang; Ma, Ling; Yu, Yanqiu; Wang, Jianhua; Hao, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Lumican (LUM) is a candidate gene for myopia in the MYP3 locus. In this study, a mutant lumican (L199P) transgenic mouse model was established to investigate the axial length changes and ultrastructural features of the sclera. The mouse model was established by pronuclear microinjection. Transgenic mice and wild-type B6 mice were killed at eight weeks of age. Gene expression levels of LUM and collagen type I (COL1) in the sclera were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the protein levels were assessed by Western blot analysis. Ocular axial lengths were measured on the enucleated whole eye under a dissecting microscope. Ultrastructural features of collagen fibrils in the sclera were examined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lumican and collagen type I were both elevated at the transcriptional and protein levels. The mean axial length of eyes in the transgenic mice was significantly longer than that in the wild-type mice (3,231.0 ± 11.2 μm (transgenic group) vs 3,199.7 ± 11.1 μm (controls), p<0.05 =). Some ultrastructural changes were observed in the sclera of the transgenic mice under TEM, such as evident lamellar disorganizations and abnormal inter-fibril spacing. The average collagen fibril diameter was smaller than that in their wild-type counterparts. These results indicate that the ectopic mutant lumican (L199P) may induce enlargement of axial lengths and abnormal structures and distributions of collagen fibrils in mouse sclera. This transgenic mouse model can be used for the mechanistic study of myopia. PMID:27711221

  6. Determination of the axial and circumferential mechanical properties of the skin tissue using experimental testing and constitutive modeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Haghighatnama, Maedeh; Haghi, Afsaneh Motevalli

    2015-01-01

    The skin, being a multi-layered material, is responsible for protecting the human body from the mechanical, bacterial, and viral insults. The skin tissue may display different mechanical properties according to the anatomical locations of a body. However, these mechanical properties in different anatomical regions and at different loading directions (axial and circumferential) of the mice body to date have not been determined. In this study, the axial and circumferential loads were imposed on the mice skin samples. The elastic modulus and maximum stress of the skin tissues were measured before the failure occurred. The nonlinear mechanical behavior of the skin tissues was also computationally investigated through a suitable constitutive equation. Hyperelastic material model was calibrated using the experimental data. Regardless of the anatomic locations of the mice body, the results revealed significantly different mechanical properties in the axial and circumferential directions and, consequently, the mice skin tissue behaves like a pure anisotropic material. The highest elastic modulus was observed in the back skin under the circumferential direction (6.67 MPa), while the lowest one was seen in the abdomen skin under circumferential loading (0.80 MPa). The Ogden material model was narrowly captured the nonlinear mechanical response of the skin at different loading directions. The results help to understand the isotropic/anisotropic mechanical behavior of the skin tissue at different anatomical locations. They also have implications for a diversity of disciplines, i.e., dermatology, cosmetics industry, clinical decision making, and clinical intervention.

  7. Circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution for scalar transmissibility functions. Part II: Probabilistic model and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wang-Ji; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2016-12-01

    In Part I of this study, some new theorems, corollaries and lemmas on circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution have been mathematically proved. This part II paper is dedicated to providing a rigorous treatment of statistical properties of raw scalar transmissibility functions at an arbitrary frequency line. On the basis of statistics of raw FFT coefficients and circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution, explicit closed-form probabilistic models are established for both multivariate and univariate scalar transmissibility functions. Also, remarks on the independence of transmissibility functions at different frequency lines and the shape of the probability density function (PDF) of univariate case are presented. The statistical structures of probabilistic models are concise, compact and easy-implemented with a low computational effort. They hold for general stationary vector processes, either Gaussian stochastic processes or non-Gaussian stochastic processes. The accuracy of proposed models is verified using numerical example as well as field test data of a high-rise building and a long-span cable-stayed bridge. This study yields new insights into the qualitative analysis of the uncertainty of scalar transmissibility functions, which paves the way for developing new statistical methodologies for modal analysis, model updating or damage detection using responses only without input information.

  8. Exact solution of the one-dimensional super-symmetric t-J model with unparallel boundary fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Cao, Junpeng; Yang, Wen-Li; Shi, Kangjie; Wang, Yupeng

    2014-04-01

    The exact solution of the one-dimensional super-symmetric t-J model under generic integrable boundary conditions is obtained via the Bethe ansatz methods. With the coordinate Bethe ansatz, the corresponding R-matrix and K-matrices are derived for the second eigenvalue problem associated with spin degrees of freedom. It is found that the second eigenvalue problem can be transformed into that of the transfer matrix of the inhomogeneous XXX spin chain, which allows us to obtain the spectrum of the Hamiltonian and the associated Bethe ansatz equations by the off-diagonal Bethe ansatz method.

  9. A new modeling of the initial buildup evolution on a wire in an axial HGMF filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, V.; Murariu, V.; Rotariu, O.; Rezlescu, N.

    1996-10-01

    The buildup differential equations are solved for a single wire in the axial HGMF configuration. A new equation for the deposit contour surface at different moments for the initial buildup process is obtained. In addition, a limitation is obtained for the deposit surface, considering the balance between the magnetic force and the hydrodynamic erosion force. From this, the saturation accumulation radius is obtained in terms of the Reynolds' number for a particle and the {v m}/{v 0} ratio.

  10. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  11. Axial superchargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1944-01-01

    Improvements, however, have been attained which permit a shortening of the structure without any impairment of the efficiency. The axial supercharger has a better efficiency and a simpler design than the radial supercharger. The relatively narrow range in which it operates satisfactorily should not be a very disturbing factor for practical flight problems. The length of this type of supercharger may be reduced considerably if some impairment in the efficiency is permitted.

  12. A Reactive-Transport Model Describing Methanogen Growth and Methane Production in Diffuse Flow Vents at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is an important mode of metabolism in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Diffuse vent fluids often show a depletion in hydrogen with a corresponding increase in methane relative to pure-mixing of end member fluid and seawater, and genomic surveys show an enrichment in genetic sequences associated with known methanogens. However, because we cannot directly sample the subseafloor habitat where these organisms are living, constraining the size and activity of these populations remains a challenge and limits our ability to quantify the role they play in vent biogeochemistry. Reactive-transport modeling may provide a useful tool for approaching this problem. Here we present a reactive-transport model describing methane production along the flow-path of hydrothermal fluid from its high temperature end-member to diffuse venting at the seafloor. The model is set up to reflect conditions at several diffuse vents in the Axial Seamount. The model describes the growth of the two dominant thermophilic methanogens, Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus, observed at Axial seamount. Monod and Arrhenius constants for Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were obtained for the model using chemostat and bottle experiments at varying temperatures. The model is used to investigate the influence of different mixing regimes on the subseafloor populations of these methanogens. By varying the model flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations, and fitting to observed hydrogen and methane concentrations in the venting fluid, the subseafloor biomass, fluid residence time, and methane production rate can be constrained.

  13. Modeling pressure drop using generalized scaffold characteristics in an axial-flow bioreactor for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Podichetty, Jagdeep T; Bhaskar, Prasana R; Khalf, Abdurizzagh; Madihally, Sundararajan V

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this study was to better understand how analytical permeability models based on scaffold architecture can facilitate a non-invasive technique to real time monitoring of pressure drop in bioreactors. In particular, we evaluated the permeability equations for electrospun and freeze dried scaffolds via pressure drop comparison in an axial-flow bioreactor using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and experimentation. The polycaprolactone-cellulose acetate fibers obtained by co-axial electrospinning technique and Chitosan-Gelatin scaffolds prepared using freeze-drying techniques were utilized. Initially, the structural properties (fiber size, pore size and porosity) and mechanical properties (elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) of scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline at 37 °C were evaluated. The CFD simulations were performed by coupling fluid flow, described by Brinkman equation, with structural mechanics using a moving mesh. The experimentally obtained pressure drop values for both 1 mm thick and 2 mm thick scaffolds agreed with simulation results. To evaluate the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on pressure drop, CFD predictions were extended to a broad range of permeabilities spanning synthetic scaffolds and tissues, elastic moduli, and Poisson's ratio. Results indicated an increase in pressure drop with increase in permeability. Scaffolds with higher elastic modulus performed better and the effect of Poisson's ratio was insignificant. Flow induced deformation was negligible in axial-flow bioreactor. In summary, scaffold permeabilities can be calculated using scaffold microarchitecture and can be used in non-invasive monitoring of tissue regeneration.

  14. PT-symmetric kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Souza Dutra, A. de; Santos, V. G. C. S. dos; Amaro de Faria, A. C. Jr.

    2007-06-15

    Some kinks for non-Hermitian quantum field theories in 1+1 dimensions are constructed. A class of models where the soliton energies are stable and real are found. Although these kinks are not Hermitian, they are symmetric under PT transformations.

  15. Anisotropic matter in cosmology: locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi I and VII o models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, David

    2016-05-01

    We examine the behaviour of homogeneous, anisotropic space-times, specifically the locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi types I and VII o in the presence of anisotropic matter. By finding an appropriate constant of the motion, and transforming the equations of motion we are able to provide exact solutions in the presence of perfect fluids with anisotropic pressures. The solution space covers matter consisting of a single perfect fluid which satisfies the weak energy condition and is rich enough to contain solutions which exhibit behaviour which is qualitatively distinct from the isotropic sector. Thus we find that there is more ‘matter that matters’ close to a homogeneous singularity than the usual stiff fluid. Example metrics are given for cosmologies whose matter sources are magnetic fields, relativistic particles, cosmic strings and domain walls.

  16. Symmetric space property and an inverse scattering formulation of the SAS Einstein--Maxwell field equations

    SciTech Connect

    Eris, A.; Guerses, M.; Karasu, A.

    1984-05-01

    We formulate stationary axially symmetric (SAS) Einstein--Maxwell fields in the framework of harmonic mappings of Riemannian manifolds and show that the configuration space of the fields is a symmetric space. This result enables us to embed the configuration space into an eight-dimensional flat manifold and formulate SAS Einstein--Maxwell fields as a sigma-model. We then give, in a coordinate free way, a Belinskii--Zakharov type of an inverse scattering transform technique for the field equations supplemented by a reduction scheme similar to that of Zakharov--Mikhailov and Mikhailov--Yarimchuk.

  17. Communication: Note on detailed balance in symmetrical quasi-classical models for electronically non-adiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William H. Cotton, Stephen J.

    2015-04-07

    It is noted that the recently developed symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) treatment of the Meyer-Miller (MM) model for the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic dynamics provides a good description of detailed balance, even though the dynamics which results from the classical MM Hamiltonian is “Ehrenfest dynamics” (i.e., the force on the nuclei is an instantaneous coherent average over all electronic states). This is seen to be a consequence of the SQC windowing methodology for “processing” the results of the trajectory calculation. For a particularly simple model discussed here, this is shown to be true regardless of the choice of windowing function employed in the SQC model, and for a more realistic full classical molecular dynamics simulation, it is seen to be maintained correctly for very long time.

  18. PT-symmetric strings

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo; Fernández, Francisco M.; Garcia, Javier; Gutierrez, German

    2014-04-15

    We study both analytically and numerically the spectrum of inhomogeneous strings with PT-symmetric density. We discuss an exactly solvable model of PT-symmetric string which is isospectral to the uniform string; for more general strings, we calculate exactly the sum rules Z(p)≡∑{sub n=1}{sup ∞}1/E{sub n}{sup p}, with p=1,2,… and find explicit expressions which can be used to obtain bounds on the lowest eigenvalue. A detailed numerical calculation is carried out for two non-solvable models depending on a parameter, obtaining precise estimates of the critical values where pair of real eigenvalues become complex. -- Highlights: •PT-symmetric Hamiltonians exhibit real eigenvalues when PT symmetry is unbroken. •We study PT-symmetric strings with complex density. •They exhibit regions of unbroken PT symmetry. •We calculate the critical parameters at the boundaries of those regions. •There are exact real sum rules for some particular complex densities.

  19. LIGHT SCATTERING: Axial and diffusion models of the laser pulse propagation in a highly-scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Danilov, Arsenii A.; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M.; Vorob'ev, Nikolai S.

    2004-06-01

    The propagation of laser radiation through a layer of a highly-scattering medium (HSM) is considered on the basis of two theoretical models: a nonstationary axial (two-flux) model and a nonstationary diffusion model. Analytic expressions for the temporal distributions of the photons of an ultrashort laser pulse transmitted through the HSM are presented. Experimental temporal distributions are used to obtain the parameters of models corresponding to an HSM, to determine the theoretical temporal distributions, and to compare them with the experimental curves. These two theoretical models are compared quantitatively for the first time. Their advantages and drawbacks that must be considered in the development of HSM transmission optical tomography are pointed out.

  20. Turbine modeling technique to generate off-design performance data for both single and multistage axial-flow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    This technique is applicable to larger axial flow turbines which may or may not incorporate variable geometry in the first stage stator. A user specified option will also permit the calculation of design point cooling flow levels and the corresponding change in turbine efficiency. The modeling technique was incorporated into a time sharing computer program in order to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and example cases, it is suitable as a user's manual.

  1. Cortical and trabecular bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model.

    PubMed

    Weatherholt, Alyssa M; Fuchs, Robyn K; Warden, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    The mouse tibial axial compression loading model has recently been described to allow simultaneous exploration of cortical and trabecular bone adaptation within the same loaded element. However, the model frequently induces cortical woven bone formation and has produced inconsistent results with regards to trabecular bone adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model, with the ultimate goal of revealing a load that simultaneously induced lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation. Adult (16 weeks old) female C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three load magnitude groups (5, 7 and 9N), and had their right tibia axially loaded using a continuous 2-Hz haversine waveform for 360 cycles/day, 3 days/week for 4 consecutive weeks. In vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to longitudinally assess midshaft tibia cortical bone adaptation, while ex vivo micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to assess both midshaft tibia cortical and proximal tibia trabecular bone adaptation. A dose response to loading magnitude was observed within cortical bone, with increasing load magnitude inducing increasing levels of lamellar cortical bone adaptation within the upper two thirds of the tibial diaphysis. Greatest cortical bone adaptation was observed at the midshaft where there was a 42% increase in estimated mechanical properties (polar moment of inertia) in the highest (9N) load group. A dose response to load magnitude was not clearly evident within trabecular bone, with only the highest load (9N) being able to induce measureable adaptation (31% increase in trabecular bone volume fraction at the proximal tibia). The ultimate finding was that a load of 9N (engendering a tensile strain of 1833 με on medial surface of the midshaft tibia) was able to simultaneously induce measurable lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation

  2. Modeling, measurement, and 3-D equilibrium reconstruction of the bootstrap current in the Helically Symmetric Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J. C.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Hanson, J. D.

    2014-09-15

    The bootstrap current for three electron cyclotron resonance heated plasma scenarios in a quasihelically symmetric stellarator (the Helically Symmetric Experiment) are analyzed and compared to a neoclassical transport code PENTA. The three conditions correspond to 50 kW input power with a resonance that is off-axis, 50 kW on-axis heating and 100 kW on-axis heating. When the heating location was moved from off-axis to on-axis with 50 kW heating power, the stored energy and the extrapolated steady-state current were both observed to increase. When the on-axis heating power was increased from 50 kW to 100 kW, the stored energy continued to increase while the bootstrap current slightly decreased. This trend is qualitatively in agreement with the calculations which indicate that a large positive electric field for the 100 kW case was driving the current negative in a small region close to the magnetic axis and accounting for the decrease in the total integrated current. This trend in the calculations is only observed to occur when momentum conservation between particle species is included. Without momentum conservation, the calculated bootstrap current increases monotonically. We show that the magnitude of the bootstrap current as calculated by PENTA agrees better with the experiment when momentum conservation between plasma species is included in the calculation. The total current was observed in all cases to flow in a direction to unwind the transform, unlike in a tokamak in which the bootstrap current adds to the transform. The 3-D inductive response of the plasma is simulated to predict the evolution of the current profile during the discharge. The 3-D equilibrium reconstruction code V3FIT is used to reconstruct profiles of the plasma pressure and current constrained by measurements with a set of magnetic diagnostics. The reconstructed profiles are consistent with the measured plasma pressure profile and the simulated current profile when the

  3. Comparing EAM Potentials to Model Slip Transfer of Sequential Mixed Character Dislocations Across Two Symmetric Tilt Grain Boundaries in Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuozhi; Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; McDowell, David L.

    2017-03-01

    Slip transfer via sequential pile-up dislocations across grain boundaries (GBs) plays an important role in plastic deformation in polycrystalline face-centered cubic (FCC) metals. In this work, large scale concurrent atomistic-continuum (CAC) method simulations are performed to address the slip transfer of mixed character dislocations across GBs in FCC Ni. Two symmetric tilt GBs, a Σ3{111} coherent twin boundary (CTB) and a Σ11{113} symmetric tilt GB (STGB), are investigated using five different fits to the embedded-atom method (EAM) interatomic potential to assess the variability of predicted dislocation-interface reaction. It is shown that for the Σ3 CTB, two of these potentials predict dislocation transmission while the other three predict dislocation absorption. In contrast, all five fits to the EAM potential predict that dislocations are absorbed by the Σ11 STGB. Simulation results are examined in terms of several slip transfer criteria in the literature, highlighting the complexity of dislocation/GB interactions and the significance of multiscale modeling of the slip transfer process.

  4. Investigation of Quantum Correlations for A S = 1/2 Ising-Heisenberg Model on a Symmetrical Diamond Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizi, E.; Eftekhari, H.

    2014-10-01

    We consider quantum correlations for a S = 1/2 Ising-Heisenberg model of a symmetrical diamond chain. First, we compare concurrence, quantum discord and 1-norm geometric quantum discord of an ideal diamond chain (Jm = 0) in the absence of magnetic field. The results show no simple ordering relations between these quantum correlations, so that quantum discord may be smaller or larger than the 1-norm geometric quantum discord, this observation contradicts the previous result provided by F. M. Paula [1]. Symmetrical behaviour of quantum correlation versus ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic coupling constant J is considerable. The effect of external magnetic field B and temperature dependence is also considered. Furthermore, we study quantum discord and geometric measure of quantum discord with the effect of next nearest neighbour interaction between nodal Ising sites for a generalized diamond chain (Jm ≠ 0), and we observe coexistence of phases with different values of magnetic field for quantum correlations. Moreover, entanglement sudden death occurs while quantum discord, 1-norm geometric quantum discord and geometric measure of quantum discord are immune from sudden death.

  5. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  6. A new extended diffusion model for rotational motion of symmetric-top molecules in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascombe, J.; Besnard, M.; Maraval, P.

    1982-11-01

    In this paper, we present first a model called partially relaxed rotation model (PRR), to treat the reorientation motion of a symmetric top which rotates freely around its molecular axis with a tumbling motion relaxed according to a characteristic time τ 1. We show that this model can easily be extended to develop a 2τ model where both tumbling and spinning motion around the molecular axis are relaxed with a second characteristic time τ 2. As limiting cases one can obtain from the 2τ model, the Gordon-McClung and PRR models. Next, we illustrate the PPR and 2τ models by calculating Raman and infrared rotational spectral densities of liquid cyclopropane at room temperature. We also discuss in the PRR model the influence of the characteristic relaxation time τ 1, on the Raman rotational profile Î21( overlineν) Finally, we emphasize on the example of room-temperature liquid cyclopropane, the advantage of the PRR model to treat a E″ degenerated Raman profile with negligible Coriolis vibrational-rotational interaction. bl

  7. Unusual Yang-Lee edge singularity in the one-dimensional axial-next-to-nearest-neighbor Ising model.

    PubMed

    Dalmazi, D; Sá, F L

    2010-11-01

    We show here for the one-dimensional spin-1/2 axial-next-to-nearest-neighbor Ising model in an external magnetic field that the linear density of Yang-Lee zeros may diverge with critical exponent σ=-2/3 at the Yang-Lee edge singularity. The necessary condition for this unusual behavior is the triple degeneracy of the transfer-matrix eigenvalues. If this condition is absent we have the usual value σ=-1/2 . Analogous results have been found in the literature in the spin-1 Blume-Emery-Griffths model and in the three-state Potts model in a magnetic field with two complex components. Our results support the universality of σ=-2/3 which might be a one-dimensional footprint of a tricritical version of the Yang-Lee edge singularity possibly present also in higher-dimensional spin models.

  8. Percolation in sign-symmetric random fields: topological aspects and numerical modeling

    PubMed

    Milovanov; Zimbardo

    2000-07-01

    The topology of percolation in random scalar fields psi(x) with sign symmetry [i.e., that the statistical properties of the functions psi(x) and -psi(x) are identical] is analyzed. Based on methods of general topology, we show that the zero set psi(x)=0 of the n-dimensional (n>/=2) sign-symmetric random field psi(x) contains a (connected) percolating subset under the condition |nablapsi(x)| not equal0 everywhere except in domains of negligible measure. The fractal geometry of percolation is analyzed in more detail in the particular case of the two-dimensional (n=2) fields psi(x). The improved Alexander-Orbach conjecture [Phys. Rev. E 56, 2437 (1997)] is applied analytically to obtain estimates of the main fractal characteristics of the percolating fractal sets generated by the horizontal "cuts," psi(x)=h, of the field psi(x). These characteristics are the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the set, D, and the index of connectivity, straight theta. We advocate an unconventional approach to studying the geometric properties of fractals, which involves methods of homotopic topology. It is shown that the index of connectivity, straight theta, of a fractal set is the topological invariant of this set, i.e., it remains unchanged under the homeomorphic deformations of the fractal. This issue is explicitly used in our study to find the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the single isolevels of the field psi(x), as well as the related geometric quantities. The results obtained are analyzed numerically in the particular case when the random field psi(x) is given by a fractional Brownian surface whose topological properties recover well the main assumptions of our consideration.

  9. Development of an accurate molecular mechanics model for buckling behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial compression.

    PubMed

    Safaei, B; Naseradinmousavi, P; Rahmani, A

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, an analytical solution based on a molecular mechanics model is developed to evaluate the elastic critical axial buckling strain of chiral multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). To this end, the total potential energy of the system is calculated with the consideration of the both bond stretching and bond angular variations. Density functional theory (DFT) in the form of generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is implemented to evaluate force constants used in the molecular mechanics model. After that, based on the principle of molecular mechanics, explicit expressions are proposed to obtain elastic surface Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the single-walled carbon nanotubes corresponding to different types of chirality. Selected numerical results are presented to indicate the influence of the type of chirality, tube diameter, and number of tube walls in detailed. An excellent agreement is found between the present numerical results and those found in the literature which confirms the validity as well as the accuracy of the present closed-form solution. It is found that the value of critical axial buckling strain exhibit significant dependency on the type of chirality and number of tube walls.

  10. Mini hemoreliable axial flow LVAD with magnetic bearings: part 3: modeling of demo-magnetic bearing and verification.

    PubMed

    Goldowsky, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses my previous work on aerospace magnetic bearings during the 1970s and 1980s. Modeling of the magnetic field in the bearing is discussed and stiffness test data are provided, which verifies the model. An LVAD this small was made possible by the use of axial field fringing ring magnetic bearings that are much stronger than the radial field bearings currently used in turbo pumps. The analytical design of a first prototype bearing is discussed in detail that is mainly of interest to bearing designers. Modeling was accurately done without finite element analysis (FEA), which readily provided design insights not easily obtained through FEA. This bearing was not meant to satisfy all specifications of a blood pump. The next prototype, to be reported at the 2001 ASAIO conference, will meet these specifications.

  11. Crustal Anisotropy Across Eastern Tibet and Surroundings Modeled as a Depth-Dependent Tilted Hexagonally Symmetric Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiayi; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Shen, W.; Wang, Weitao

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYTwo types of surface wave anisotropy are observed regularly by seismologists but are only rarely interpreted jointly: apparent radial anisotropy, which is the difference in propagation speed between horizontally and vertically polarized waves inferred from Love and Rayleigh waves, and apparent azimuthal anisotropy, which is the directional dependence of surface wave speeds (usually Rayleigh waves). We show that a new data set of Love and Rayleigh wave isotropic phase speeds and Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy observed within and surrounding eastern Tibet can be explained simultaneously by <span class="hlt">modeling</span> the crust as a depth-dependent tilted hexagonally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> (THS) medium. We specify the THS medium with depth-dependent hexagonally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> elastic tensors tilted and rotated through dip and strike angles and estimate these quantities using a Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion to produce a 3-D <span class="hlt">model</span> of the crust and uppermost mantle on a 0.5°x0.5° spatial grid. In the interior of eastern Tibet and in the Yunnan-Guizhou plateau, we infer a steeply dipping THS upper crustal medium overlying a shallowly dipping THS medium in the middle-to-lower crust. Such vertical stratification of anisotropy may reflect a brittle to ductile transition in which shallow fractures and faults control upper crustal anisotropy and the crystal preferred orientation of anisotropic (perhaps micaceous) minerals governs the anisotropy of the deeper crust. In contrast, near the periphery of the Tibetan Plateau the anisotropic medium is steeply dipping throughout the entire crust, which may be caused by the reorientation of the symmetry axes of deeper crustal anisotropic minerals as crustal flows are rotated near the borders of Tibet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H41F0900S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.H41F0900S"><span>Full-scale Testing and Numerical <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> oF <span class="hlt">Axial</span> and Lateral Soil Pipe Interaction in Deepwater</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sarraf Joshaghani, M.; M Raheem, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>A thorough understanding of the behavior of deep sea pipes is crucial for off-shore oil & gas industry. During the service life, network of oil and gas pipelines that connect the floating platforms to the subsea wells in deepwater undergo significant changes in temperature and pressure resulting in high shears, strains and movement. These pipelines laid on the very soft seabed become susceptible to large movement and lateral buckling resulting in global instability of the entire system. Hence, it is of paramount importance to address the aforementioned issues through combined numerical <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and experimental study of various conditions in the field. <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> this behavior needs to take into account the complex interactions between pipe, water, and soil (which, in this case, will be a saturated porous media). Physical experiments can be challenging as the undrained shear strength is very low of the order of 0.01 kPa. In this research, we have performed large-scale experiments as well as numerical <span class="hlt">modeling</span>. Several full-scale <span class="hlt">models</span> have been designed and constructed to investigate the behavior of various types of pipes (steel, plastic) on the simulated clayey sea bed (undrained shear strength ranged from 0.01 kPa to 0.11 kPa). <span class="hlt">Axial</span> and lateral pipe soil interactions have been characterized, and appropriate mitigation solutions for <span class="hlt">axial</span> walking and lateral buckling have been proposed. On the numerical <span class="hlt">modeling</span> front, the pipe-soil behavior is simulated using the Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian (CEL) and Arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810011935','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810011935"><span>Application of the line-spring <span class="hlt">model</span> to a cylindrical shell containing a circumferential or <span class="hlt">axial</span> part-through crack</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>An approximate solution was obtained for a cylindrical shell containing a part-through surface crack. It was assumed that the shell contains a circumferential or <span class="hlt">axial</span> semi-elliptic internal or external surface crack and was subjected to a uniform membrane loading or a uniform bending moment away from the crack region. A Reissner type theory was used to account for the effects of the transverse shear deformations. The stress intensity factor at the deepest penetration point of the crack was tabulated for bending and membrane loading by varying three dimensionless length parameters of the problem formed from the shell radius, the shell thickness, the crack length, and the crack depth. The upper bounds of the stress intensity factors are provided by the results of the elasticity solution obtained from the axisymmetric crack problem for the circumferential crack, and that found from the plane strain problem for a circular ring having a radial crack for the <span class="hlt">axial</span> crack. The line-spring <span class="hlt">model</span> gives the expected results in comparison with the elasticity solutions. Results also compare well with the existing finite element solution of the pressurized cylinder containing an internal semi-elliptic surface crack.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNuM..475..200C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNuM..475..200C"><span>A phase-field approach to <span class="hlt">model</span> multi-<span class="hlt">axial</span> and microstructure dependent fracture in nuclear grade graphite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chakraborty, Pritam; Sabharwall, Piyush; Carroll, Mark C.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>The fracture behavior of nuclear grade graphites is strongly influenced by underlying microstructural features such as the character of filler particles, and the distribution of pores and voids. These microstructural features influence the crack nucleation and propagation behavior, resulting in quasi-brittle fracture with a tortuous crack path and significant scatter in measured bulk strength. This study uses a phase-field method to <span class="hlt">model</span> the microstructural and multi-<span class="hlt">axial</span> fracture in H-451, a historic variant of nuclear graphite that provides the basis for an idealized study on a legacy grade. The representative volume elements are constructed from randomly located pores with random size obtained from experimentally determined log-normal distribution. The representative volume elements are then subjected to simulated multi-<span class="hlt">axial</span> loading, and a reasonable agreement of the resulting fracture stress with experiments is obtained. Quasi-brittle stress-strain evolution with a tortuous crack path is also observed from the simulations and is consistent with experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10107058','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10107058"><span><span class="hlt">Models</span> of fragmentation phenomena based on the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> group S{sub n} and combinational analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mekjian, A.Z.; Lee, S.J.</p> <p>1991-01-29</p> <p>Various <span class="hlt">models</span> for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these <span class="hlt">models</span> are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6091012','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6091012"><span><span class="hlt">Models</span> of fragmentation phenomena based on the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> group S sub n and combinational analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mekjian, A.Z. . Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Lee, S.J. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)</p> <p>1991-01-29</p> <p>Various <span class="hlt">models</span> for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these <span class="hlt">models</span> are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTJE..33..353G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTJE..33..353G"><span>Study of the Standard k-ɛ <span class="hlt">Model</span> for Tip Leakage Flow in an <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Compressor Rotor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gao, Yanfei; Liu, Yangwei; Zhong, Luyang; Hou, Jiexuan; Lu, Lipeng</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The standard k-ɛ <span class="hlt">model</span> (SKE) and the Reynolds stress <span class="hlt">model</span> (RSM) are employed to predict the tip leakage flow (TLF) in a low-speed large-scale <span class="hlt">axial</span> compressor rotor. Then, a new research method is adopted to "freeze" the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of the flow field derived from the RSM, and obtain the turbulent viscosity using the Boussinesq hypothesis. The Reynolds stresses and mean flow field computed on the basis of the frozen viscosity are compared with the results of the SKE and the RSM. The flow field in the tip region based on the frozen viscosity is more similar to the results of the RSM than those of the SKE, although certain differences can be observed. This finding indicates that the non-equilibrium turbulence transport nature plays an important role in predicting the TLF, as well as the turbulence anisotropy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23410307','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23410307"><span>Time-dependent Monte Carlo simulations of critical and Lifshitz points of the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-next-nearest-neighbor Ising <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>da Silva, Roberto; Alves, Nelson; Drugowich de Felício, Jose Roberto</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In this work, we study the critical behavior of second-order points, specifically the Lifshitz point (LP) of a three-dimensional Ising <span class="hlt">model</span> with <span class="hlt">axial</span> competing interactions [the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-next-nearest-neighbor Ising (ANNNI) <span class="hlt">model</span>], using time-dependent Monte Carlo simulations. We use a recently developed technique that helps us localize the critical temperature corresponding to the best power law for magnetization decay over time: <M>(m(0)=1)~t(-β/νz), which is expected of simulations starting from initially ordered states. We obtain original results for the dynamic critical exponent z, evaluated from the behavior of the ratio F(2)(t)=<M(2)>(m(0)=0)/<M>(2)(m(0)=1)~t(3/z), along the critical line up to the LP. We explore all the critical exponents of the LP in detail, including the dynamic critical exponent θ that characterizes the initial slip of magnetization and the global persistence exponent θ(g) associated with the probability P(t) that magnetization keeps its signal up to time t. Our estimates for the dynamic critical exponents at the Lifshitz point are z=2.34(2) and θ(g)=0.336(4), values that are very different from those of the three-dimensional Ising <span class="hlt">model</span> (the ANNNI <span class="hlt">model</span> without the next-nearest-neighbor interactions at the z axis, i.e., J(2)=0), i.e., z≈2.07 and θ(g)≈0.38. We also present estimates for the static critical exponents β and ν, obtained from extended time-dependent scaling relations. Our results for static exponents are in good agreement with previous works.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SMaS...24d5003W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SMaS...24d5003W"><span><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> and optimization of adjustable multifrequency <span class="hlt">axially</span> polarized multilayer composite cylindrical transducer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Jianjun; Shi, Zhifei; Song, Gangbing</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>A novel adjustable multifrequency <span class="hlt">axially</span> polarized multilayer composite cylindrical transducer is developed in this paper. The transducer is composed of two parts: an actuator part and a sensor part. Each part is considered as a multilayer piezoelectric/elastic composite structure. The actuator part is utilized to actuate the transducer, while the senor part is used to adjust its dynamic characteristics through connecting to an external electric resistance. Based on the plane stress assumption, the radial vibration of this new kind of transducer is analyzed, and its input electric admittance is derived analytically. Comparisons with the earlier works are conducted to validate the theoretical solution. Furthermore, numerical analysis is performed to study the effects of the external electric resistance on the transducer’s dynamic characteristics, such as resonance and anti-resonance frequencies, as well as the corresponding electromechanical coupling factor. Numerical results show that the multifrequency cylindrical transducer can be designed through adjusting the external electric resistance and the ratio of piezoelectric layer numbers between the actuator part and the sensor part. In addition, the optimized transducer can be proposed at the matching electric resistance. The proposed cylindrical transducer plays an important role in designing the cymbal transducer, which can be used in underwater sound projectors and ultrasonic radiators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17902863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17902863"><span>Asymmetric airflow and vibration induced by the Coanda effect in a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> of the vocal folds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tao, Chao; Zhang, Yu; Hottinger, Daniel G; Jiang, Jack J</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">model</span> constructed from Navier-Stokes equations and a two-mass vocal fold description is proposed in this study. The composite <span class="hlt">model</span> not only has the capability to describe the aerodynamics in a vibratory glottis but also can be used to study the vocal fold vibration under the driving of the complex airflow in the glottis. Numerical simulations show that this <span class="hlt">model</span> can predict self-oscillations of the coupled glottal aerodynamics and vocal fold system. The Coanda effect could occur in the vibratory glottis even though the vocal folds have left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> prephonatory shape and tissue properties. The Coanda effect causes the asymmetric flow in the glottis and the difference in the driving force on the left and right vocal folds. The different pressures applied to the left and right vocal folds induce their displacement asymmetry. By using various lung pressures (0.6-2.0 kPa) to drive the composite <span class="hlt">model</span>, it was found that the asymmetry of the vocal fold displacement is increased from 1.87% to 11.2%. These simulation results provide numerical evidence for the presence of asymmetric flow in the vibratory glottis; moreover, they indicate that glottal aerodynamics is an important factor in inducing the asymmetric vibration of the vocal folds.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20779349','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20779349"><span>Optical trapping of a spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> sphere in the ray-optics regime: a <span class="hlt">model</span> for optical tweezers upon cells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated <span class="hlt">model</span> for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a <span class="hlt">model</span> for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this <span class="hlt">model</span> shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this <span class="hlt">model</span> provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SSEle.111..196A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SSEle.111..196A"><span>Compact <span class="hlt">model</span> for short-channel <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> double-gate junctionless transistors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ávila-Herrera, F.; Cerdeira, A.; Paz, B. C.; Estrada, M.; Íñiguez, B.; Pavanello, M. A.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>In this work a compact analytical <span class="hlt">model</span> for short-channel double-gate junctionless transistor is presented, considering variable mobility and the main short-channel effects as threshold voltage roll-off, series resistance, drain saturation voltage, channel shortening and saturation velocity. The threshold voltage shift and subthreshold slope variation is determined through the minimum value of the potential in the channel. Only eight <span class="hlt">model</span> parameters are used. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is physically-based, considers the total charge in the Si layer and the operating conditions in both depletion and accumulation. <span class="hlt">Model</span> is validated by 2D simulations in ATLAS for channel lengths from 25 nm to 500 nm and for doping concentrations of 5 × 1018 and 1 × 1019 cm-3, as well as for Si layer thickness of 10 and 15 nm, in order to guarantee normally-off operation of the transistors. The <span class="hlt">model</span> provides an accurate continuous description of the transistor behavior in all operating regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SSEle..69...55P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SSEle..69...55P"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> unified compact <span class="hlt">model</span> of short-channel double-gate MOSFETs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Papathanasiou, K.; Theodorou, C. G.; Tsormpatzoglou, A.; Tassis, D. H.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Bucher, M.; Ghibaudo, G.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>An explicit charge-based unified compact drain current <span class="hlt">model</span> for lightly doped or undoped DG MOSFETs is proposed. It takes into account the short-channel effects, the subthreshold slope degradation, the drain-induced barrier lowering and the channel length modulation effects. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is valid and continuous in all regimes of operation and it has been validated by developing a Verilog-A code and comparing the <span class="hlt">model</span> results of transfer and output characteristics with simulation results exhibiting an average error of about 3%. The efficient solution of the Lambert W function for the inversion charge and the symmetry of the <span class="hlt">model</span> make it suitable for circuit simulation and allow fast and accurate simulations of the transistor characteristics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6709389','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6709389"><span>Shear-free spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> inhomogeneous cosmological <span class="hlt">model</span> with heat flow and bulk viscosity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Deng, Y.; Mannheim, P.D. )</p> <p>1990-07-15</p> <p>An exact solution to the Einstein equations with a shear-free imperfect-fluid source is obtained. The solution approaches a locally flat Robertson-Walker one in the large-{ital t} limit and thus serves as a viable candidate for a realistic cosmological <span class="hlt">model</span>. The <span class="hlt">model</span> built out of this solution is found to be free of horizon, entropy, and flatness problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCrGr.385...88A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JCrGr.385...88A"><span><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of <span class="hlt">axial</span> vibrational control technique for CdTe VGF crystal growth under controlled cadmium partial pressure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Avetissov, I.; Kostikov, V.; Meshkov, V.; Sukhanova, E.; Grishechkin, M.; Belov, S.; Sadovskiy, A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A VGF growth setup assisted by <span class="hlt">axial</span> vibrations of baffle submerged into CdTe melt with controlled Cd partial pressure was designed. An influence of baffle shape on flow velocity map, temperature distribution in CdTe melt and interface shape of growing crystal was analyzed by numerical simulation and physical <span class="hlt">modeling</span>. To produce the desirable shape of crystal melt interface we slant under different angles vertical generatrix in a cylindrical disk and made chasing on faceplates of a disk. It was ascertained that a disk with conical generatrix formed more intensive convective flows from a faceplate with larger diameter. It was shown that at CdTe VGF crystal growth rate about 10 mm/h application of AVC technique made it possible to produce convex interface for 2 in. crystal diameter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920007853','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920007853"><span>Aircraft ground test and subscale <span class="hlt">model</span> results of <span class="hlt">axial</span> thrust loss caused by thrust vectoring using turning vanes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Johnson, Steven A.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The NASA-Dryden F/A-18 high alpha research vehicle was modified to incorporate three independently controlled turning vanes located aft of the primary nozzle of each engine to vector thrust for pitch and yaw control. Ground measured <span class="hlt">axial</span> thrust losses were compared with the results from a 14.25 pct. cold jet <span class="hlt">model</span> for single and dual vanes inserted up to 25 degs into the engine exhaust. Data are presented for nozzle pressure ratios of 2.0 and 3.0 and nozzle exit areas of 253 and 348 sq in. The results indicate that subscale nozzle test results properly predict trends but underpredict the full scale results by approx. 1 to 4.5 pct. in thrust loss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptEn..55c5105W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016OptEn..55c5105W"><span>Hybrid optimization methodology of variable densities mesh <span class="hlt">model</span> for the <span class="hlt">axial</span> supporting design of wide-field survey telescope</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Hairen; Lou, Zheng; Qian, Yuan; Zheng, Xianzhong; Zuo, Yingxi</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The optimization of a primary mirror support system is one of the most critical problems in the design of large telescopes. Here, we propose a hybrid optimization methodology of variable densities mesh <span class="hlt">model</span> (HOMVDMM) for the <span class="hlt">axial</span> supporting design, which has three key steps: (1) creating a variable densities mesh <span class="hlt">model</span>, which will partition the mirror into several sparse mesh areas and several dense mesh areas; (2) global optimization based on the zero-order optimization method for the support of primary mirror with a large tolerance; (3) based on the optimization results of the second step, further optimization with first-order optimization method in dense mesh areas by a small tolerance. HOMVDMM exploits the complementary merits of both the zero- and first-order optimizations, with the former in global scale and the latter in small scale. As an application, the <span class="hlt">axial</span> support of the primary mirror of the 2.5-m wide-field survey telescope (WFST) is optimized by HOMVDMM. These three designs are obtained via a comparative study of different supporting points including 27 supporting points, 39 supporting points, and 54 supporting points. Their residual half-path length errors are 28.78, 9.32, and 5.29 nm. The latter two designs both meet the specification of WFST. In each of the three designs, a global optimization value with high accuracy will be obtained in an hour on an ordinary PC. As the results suggest, the overall performance of HOMVDMM is superior to the first-order optimization method as well as the zero-order optimization method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4374808','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4374808"><span>Discrete Imaging <span class="hlt">Models</span> for Three-Dimensional Optoacoustic Tomography using Radially <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Expansion Functions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wang, Kun; Schoonover, Robert W.; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Optoacoustic tomography (OAT), also known as photoacoustic tomography, is an emerging computed biomedical imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms that are based on discrete imaging <span class="hlt">models</span> are actively being developed for OAT due to their ability to improve image quality by incorporating accurate <span class="hlt">models</span> of the imaging physics, instrument response, and measurement noise. In this work, we investigate the use of discrete imaging <span class="hlt">models</span> based on Kaiser-Bessel window functions for iterative image reconstruction in OAT. A closed-form expression for the pressure produced by a Kaiser-Bessel function is calculated, which facilitates accurate computation of the system matrix. Computer-simulation and experimental studies are employed to demonstrate the potential advantages of Kaiser-Bessel function-based iterative image reconstruction in OAT. PMID:24770921</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24770921','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24770921"><span>Discrete imaging <span class="hlt">models</span> for three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography using radially <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> expansion functions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Kun; Schoonover, Robert W; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Optoacoustic tomography (OAT), also known as photoacoustic tomography, is an emerging computed biomedical imaging modality that exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms that are based on discrete imaging <span class="hlt">models</span> are actively being developed for OAT due to their ability to improve image quality by incorporating accurate <span class="hlt">models</span> of the imaging physics, instrument response, and measurement noise. In this work, we investigate the use of discrete imaging <span class="hlt">models</span> based on Kaiser-Bessel window functions for iterative image reconstruction in OAT. A closed-form expression for the pressure produced by a Kaiser-Bessel function is calculated, which facilitates accurate computation of the system matrix. Computer-simulation and experimental studies are employed to demonstrate the potential advantages of Kaiser-Bessel function-based iterative image reconstruction in OAT.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21516827','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21516827"><span>Anti-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spin-orbit force in the effective interaction for the shell <span class="hlt">model</span> and its effect on nuclear structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tsunoda, N.; Shimizu, N.; Otsuka, T.; Suzuki, T.</p> <p>2011-05-06</p> <p>Anti-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spin-orbit force (ALS) in the effective interaction for the shell <span class="hlt">model</span> and its effect on nuclear structure is discussed. We investigate possible origins of the ALS and the effects on the level schemes of several nuclei.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22634732','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22634732"><span>Thermal entanglement of a spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg <span class="hlt">model</span> on a <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> diamond chain.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ananikian, N S; Ananikyan, L N; Chakhmakhchyan, L A; Rojas, Onofre</p> <p>2012-06-27</p> <p>The entanglement quantum properties of a spin-1/2 Ising-Heisenberg <span class="hlt">model</span> on a <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> diamond chain were analyzed. Due to the separable nature of the Ising-type exchange interactions between neighboring Heisenberg dimers, calculation of the entanglement can be performed exactly for each individual dimer. Pairwise thermal entanglement was studied in terms of the isotropic Ising-Heisenberg <span class="hlt">model</span> and analytical expressions for the concurrence (as a measure of bipartite entanglement) were obtained. The effects of external magnetic field H and next-nearest neighbor interaction J(m) between nodal Ising sites were considered. The ground state structure and entanglement properties of the system were studied in a wide range of coupling constant values. Various regimes with different values of ground state entanglement were revealed, depending on the relation between competing interaction strengths. Finally, some novel effects, such as the two-peak behavior of concurrence versus temperature and coexistence of phases with different values of magnetic entanglement, were observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CG.....89..232M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CG.....89..232M"><span>Spatial turning bands simulation of anisotropic non-linear <span class="hlt">models</span> of coregionalization with <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> cross-covariances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marcotte, D.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The turning bands method (TBM) is a commonly used method of simulation for large Gaussian fields, its O(N) complexity being unsurpassed (N denotes the number of points to simulate). TBM can be implemented either in the spatial or the spectral domains. In the multivariate anisotropic case, spatial versions of TBM are currently available only for the linear <span class="hlt">model</span> of coregionalization (LMC). For anisotropic non-LMC with <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> covariances only the spectral version is currently available. The spectral domain approach can be slow in the case of non-differentiable covariances due to the numerous frequencies to sample. Here a derivation of the equations is provided for simulating the anisotropic non-LMC directly in the spatial domain and the method is illustrated with two synthetic examples. The approach allows the specification of many different direct and cross-covariance components, each with possibly different geometric anisotropies and different <span class="hlt">model</span> types. The complexity of the new multivariate approach remains O(N). Hence, a case of two variables defining an anisotropic non-LMC is simulated over one billion points in less than one hour on a desktop computer. These results help enlarge the scope of application of the TBM. The method can be easily implemented in any existing TBM program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPhA...50f5002C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPhA...50f5002C"><span>The replica <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> solution for orthogonally constrained Heisenberg <span class="hlt">model</span> on Bethe lattice</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Concetti, Francesco</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>In this paper, we study the thermodynamic properties of a system of D-components classical Heisenberg spins lying on the vertices of a random regular graph, with an unconventional first neighbor non-random interaction J{{≤ft({{\\mathbf{S}}i}\\centerdot {{\\mathbf{S}}k}\\right)}2} . We can consider this <span class="hlt">model</span> as a continuum version of anti-ferromagnetic D-states Potts <span class="hlt">model</span>. We compute the paramagnetic free energy, using a new approach, presented in this paper for the first time, based on the replica method. Through the linear stability analysis, we obtain an instability line on the temperature-connectivity plane that provides a bound to the appearance of a phase transition. We also argue about the character of the instability observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA162262','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA162262"><span>Time Series <span class="hlt">Models</span> with a Specified <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Non-Normal Marginal Distribution.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1985-09-01</p> <p>processes with a specified non-Normal - marginal distribution, Gastwirth and Wolff [Ref.13] had derived a solution to the linear additive first-order...of Lewis, Orav and Uribe [Ref. 15]. The least squares estimation theory is derived around the concept of a linearized residual. Asymptotic properties...linear process of Gastwirth and Wolff [Ref. 13], called the LAR(1) process. The LDAR(1) <span class="hlt">model</span> produces an {X I sequence using then first-order</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22454540','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22454540"><span>Order g{sup 2} susceptibilities in the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> phase of the Standard <span class="hlt">Model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bödeker, D.; Sangel, M.</p> <p>2015-04-23</p> <p>Susceptibilities of conserved charges such as baryon minus lepton number enter baryogenesis computations, since they provide the relationship between conserved charges and chemical potentials. Their next-to-leading order corrections are of order g, where g is a generic Standard <span class="hlt">Model</span> coupling. They are due to soft Higgs boson exchange, and have been calculated recently, together with some order g{sup 2} corrections. Here we compute the complete g{sup 2} contributions. Close to the electroweak crossover the soft Higgs contribution is of order g{sup 2}, and is determined by the non-perturbative physics at the magnetic screening scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991PhRvB..44..390B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991PhRvB..44..390B"><span>Critical bifurcation point of the openZ(5)-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spin <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bonnier, B.</p> <p>1991-07-01</p> <p>The critical behavior of the general isotropic, ferromagnetic two-dimensional spin system with openZ(5) symmetry is studied with use of high-temperature expansions of its mass gap. On the basis of these expansions we propose a simple analytic representation of the mass gap which naturally reproduces all the different phase transitions exhibited by this <span class="hlt">model</span> (first order and second order of the Ising and of the Kosterlitz-Thouless types). In addition, the bifurcation point where the soft phases originate is clearly identified with the Fateev-Zamolodchikov value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDE29002H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..DFDE29002H"><span>Lattice Boltzmann <span class="hlt">Models</span> for Flows with <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Symmetry and Mass and Momentum Sources without Cubic Velocity Errors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hajabdollahi, Farzaneh; Premnath, Kannan</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Three-dimensional flows with <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry arise in numerous applications, which can be solved more efficiently on a two-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system with appropriate source terms. Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is a promising recent development in CFD. However, existing LB <span class="hlt">models</span> are not Galilean invariant (GI) due to the degeneracy of the resulting third-order longitudinal moments, which leads to cubic velocity truncation errors. This can lead to anisotropic stress tensor with velocity-dependent viscosities and numerical instability under high shear even with finer grids. In this investigation, we develop a new radius-weighted LB <span class="hlt">model</span> for axisymmetric flows using a non-orthogonal moment basis with an extended moment equilibria and restore GI on standard lattices. Also, as another related example, we consider flows with mass and momentum sources, which are important in various contexts, including acoustics, reacting flows and flows undergoing phase change. To handle such problems, we develop a new LB <span class="hlt">model</span> by incorporating sources in its zeroth and first order moments, with extended moment equilibria to eliminate the cubic velocity errors. Both the resulting new <span class="hlt">models</span> will be validated for benchmark problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850012866','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850012866"><span>Optimal <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> flight studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Weston, A. R.; Menon, P. K. A.; Bilimoria, K. D.; Cliff, E. M.; Kelley, H. J.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Several topics in optimal <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> flight of airbreathing vehicles are examined. In one study, an approximation scheme designed for onboard real-time energy management of climb-dash is developed and calculations for a high-performance aircraft presented. In another, a vehicle <span class="hlt">model</span> intermediate in complexity between energy and point-mass <span class="hlt">models</span> is explored and some quirks in optimal flight characteristics peculiar to the <span class="hlt">model</span> uncovered. In yet another study, energy-<span class="hlt">modelling</span> procedures are re-examined with a view to stretching the range of validity of zeroth-order approximation by special choice of state variables. In a final study, time-fuel tradeoffs in cruise-dash are examined for the consequences of nonconvexities appearing in the classical steady cruise-dash <span class="hlt">model</span>. Two appendices provide retrospective looks at two early publications on energy <span class="hlt">modelling</span> and related optimal control theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94c5008M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94c5008M"><span>Perturbativity and mass scales in the minimal left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>The scalar sector of the minimal left-right <span class="hlt">model</span> at TeV scale is revisited in light of the large quartic coupling needed for a heavy flavor-changing scalar. The stability and perturbativity of the effective potential is discussed and merged with constraints from low-energy processes. Thus, the perturbative level of the left-right scale is sharpened. Lower limits on the triplet scalars are also derived: The left-handed triplet is bounded by oblique parameters, while the doubly charged right-handed component is limited by the h →γ γ , Z γ decays. Current constraints disfavor their detection as long as WR is within the reach of the LHC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1383..484D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1383..484D"><span>Ductile Fracture of AHSS Sheets under Multi-<span class="hlt">axial</span> Loading: Experiments and <span class="hlt">Modeling</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dunand, M.; Mohr, D.</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>Fracture experiments on TRIP-assisted steel sheets covering a wide range of stress states (from shear to equibiaxial tension) are performed to create a comprehensive experimental database to calibrate and evaluate the shear-modified Gurson <span class="hlt">model</span> (Nielsen and Tvergaard, 2010) and the Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC) fracture <span class="hlt">model</span> (Bai and Wierzbicki, 2010). The experimental program includes notched tensile tests as well as fracture experiments on butterfly-shaped specimens under combined tension and shear loading. Both phenomenological fracture <span class="hlt">models</span> are physics-inspired and take the effect of the first and third stress tensor invariants into account in predicting the onset of ductile fracture. The MMC <span class="hlt">model</span> is based on the assumption that the initiation of fracture is determined by a critical stress state, while the shear-modified Gurson <span class="hlt">model</span> assumes void growth as the governing mechanism. The <span class="hlt">model</span> accuracy is quantified based on the predictions of the displacements to fracture for experiments which have not been used for calibration. It is found that the MMC <span class="hlt">model</span> predictions agree well with all experiments (less than 4% error), while less accurate predictions are observed for the shear-modified Gurson <span class="hlt">model</span>. A comparison of plots of the strain to fracture as a function of the stress triaxiality and the normalized third invariant reveals significant differences between the two <span class="hlt">models</span> except within the vicinity of stress states that have been used for calibration.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15011593','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15011593"><span>DIVIMP <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of the Toroidally-<span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> Injection of 13CH4 into the Upper SOL of DIII-D</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>McLean, A G; Elder, J D; Stangeby, P C; Allen, S L; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Lisgo, S; Nagy, A; Wampler, W R; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Whyte, D G</p> <p>2004-12-03</p> <p>As part of a study of carbon-tritium co-deposition, we carried out an experiment on DIII-D involving a toroidally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> injection of {sup 13}CH{sub 4} at the top of a LSN discharge. A Monte Carlo code, DIVIMP-HC, which includes molecular breakup of hydrocarbons, was used to <span class="hlt">model</span> the region near the puff. The interpretive analysis indicates a parallel flow in the SOL of M{sub l} {approx} 0.4 directed toward the inner divertor. The CH{sub 4} is ionized in the periphery of the SOL and so the particle confinement time, {tau}{sub c}, is not high, only {approx}5 ms, and about 4X lower than if the CH{sub 4} were ionized at the separatrix. For such a wall injection location, however, most of the CH{sub 4} gets ionized to C{sup +}, C{sup ++}, etc., and is efficiently transported along the SOL to the inner divertor, trapping hydrogen by co-deposition there.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920061203&hterms=LTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DLTE','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920061203&hterms=LTE&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DLTE"><span>Spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>, expanding, non-LTE <span class="hlt">model</span> atmospheres for novae during their early stages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hauschildt, P. H.; Wehrse, R.; Starrfield, S.; Shaviv, G.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>In the continuum and line-blanketed <span class="hlt">models</span> presented here, nova atmospheres are characterized by a very slow decrease of density with increasing radius. This feature leads to very large geometrical extensions so that there are large temperature differences between the inner and outer parts of the line-forming regions. The theoretical spectra show a large IR excess and a small Balmer jump which may be either in absorption or in emission. For the parameters considered (effective temperature of about 10 exp 4 K, L = 2 x 10 exp 4 solar luminosities, outer boundary density of about 3 x 10 exp -15 g cm exp -3, mass-loss rate of 10 exp -5 solar masses/yr), most lines are in absorption. The effects of changes in the abundances of the heavy elements on the emergent spectra are discussed. The strong unidentified features observed in ultraviolet spectra of novae are found in actuality to be regions of transparency within the Fe 'forest'. Ultraviolet spectra obtained from the IUE archives are displayed, and spectral synthesis of these spectra is done using the theoretical atmospheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JThSc..23..103D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JThSc..23..103D"><span><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of the double leakage and leakage spillage flows in <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow compressors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Du, Hui; Yu, Xianjun; Liu, Baojie</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">model</span> to predict the double leakage and tip leakage leading edge spillage flows was developed. This <span class="hlt">model</span> was combined by a TLV trajectory <span class="hlt">model</span> and a TLV diameter <span class="hlt">model</span> and formed as a function of compressor one-dimensional design parameters, i.e. the compressor massflow coefficient, ϕ and compressor loading coefficient, Ψ, and some critical blade geometrical parameters, i.e. blade solidity, σ, stagger angle, β S , blade chord length, C, and blade pitch length, S. By using this <span class="hlt">model</span>, the double leakage and tip leakage leading edge spillage flow could be predicted even at the compressor preliminary design process. Considering the leading edge spillage flow usually indicates the inception of spike-type stall, i.e. the compressor is a tip critical design, this <span class="hlt">model</span> could also be used as a tool to choose the critical design parameters for designers. At last, some experimental data from literature was used to validate the <span class="hlt">model</span> and the results proved that the <span class="hlt">model</span> was reliable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JThSc..19..300Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JThSc..19..300Y"><span>Application and comparison of SST <span class="hlt">model</span> in numerical simulation of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> compressors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yin, Song; Jin, Donghai; Gui, Xingmin; Zhu, Fang</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>The shear-stress transport (SST) turbulence <span class="hlt">model</span> is incorporated into Navier-Stokes equations to simulate a turbomachinery flowfield. A staggered finite volume method is used to make the mean flow equations and turbulence <span class="hlt">model</span> equations strongly coupled and enhance the stability of the numerical computation. The implicit treatment of the source terms is applied to the SST <span class="hlt">model</span>. A steady state solution is obtained using five-stage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme with local time stepping and residual smoothing to accelerate convergence. The wall distance d, a key parameter in the SST <span class="hlt">model</span>, is solved by a partial differential equation. The validations of the code are conducted on rotor 37, wp11 at design and off-design conditions by comparison with measurements and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence <span class="hlt">model</span>. The flow within the tip is calculated with a multi-block grid.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21408048','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21408048"><span>Separating expansion from contraction in spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> with a perfect fluid: Generalization of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff condition and application to <span class="hlt">models</span> with a cosmological constant</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mimoso, Jose P.; Le Delliou, Morgan; Mena, Filipe C.</p> <p>2010-06-15</p> <p>We investigate spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> perfect-fluid spacetimes and discuss the existence and stability of a dividing shell separating expanding and collapsing regions. We perform a 3+1 splitting and obtain gauge invariant conditions relating the intrinsic spatial curvature of the shells to the Misner-Sharp mass and to a function of the pressure that we introduce and that generalizes the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equilibrium condition. We find that surfaces fulfilling those two conditions fit, locally, the requirements of a dividing shell, and we argue that cosmological initial conditions should allow its global validity. We analyze the particular cases of the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi dust <span class="hlt">models</span> with a cosmological constant as an example of a cold dark matter <span class="hlt">model</span> with a cosmological constant ({Lambda}-CDM <span class="hlt">model</span>) and its generalization to contain a central perfect-fluid core. These <span class="hlt">models</span> provide simple but physically interesting illustrations of our results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19670185','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19670185"><span>Dynamic <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and identification of an <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow ventricular assist device.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moscato, Francesco; Danieli, Guido A; Schima, Heinrich</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>An accurate characterization of the hemodynamic behavior of ventricular assist devices (VADs) is of paramount importance for proper <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of the heart-pump interaction and the validation of control strategies. This paper describes an advanced test bench, which is able to generate complex hydraulic loads, and a procedure to characterize rotary blood pump performance in a pulsatile environment. Special focus was laid on <span class="hlt">model</span> parameter identifiability in the frequency domain and the correlation between dynamic and steady-state <span class="hlt">models</span>. Twelve combinations of different flow/head/speed signals, which covered the clinical VAD working conditions, were generated for the pump characterization. Root mean square error (RMSE) between predicted and measured flow was used to evaluate the VAD <span class="hlt">model</span>. The found parameters were then validated with broadband random signals. In the experiments the optimization process always successfully converged. Even in the most demanding dynamic conditions the RMSE was 7.4 ml/sec and the absolute error never exceeded 24.9 ml/sec. Validity ranges for the identified VAD <span class="hlt">model</span> were: flow 0-180 ml/sec; head 0-120 mmHg; speed 7.5-12.5 krpm. In conclusion, a universal test bench and a characterization procedure to describe the hydrodynamic properties of rotary blood pumps were established. For a particular pump, a reliable mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> was identified that correctly reproduced the relationship between instantaneous VAD flow, head and impeller speed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MSSP...52..465T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MSSP...52..465T"><span>An optimal <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of multidimensional wave digital filtering network for free vibration analysis of <span class="hlt">symmetrically</span> laminated composite FSDT plates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tseng, Chien-Hsun</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>The technique of multidimensional wave digital filtering (MDWDF) that builds on traveling wave formulation of lumped electrical elements, is successfully implemented on the study of dynamic responses of <span class="hlt">symmetrically</span> laminated composite plate based on the first order shear deformation theory. The philosophy applied for the first time in this laminate mechanics relies on integration of certain principles involving <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and simulation, circuit theory, and MD digital signal processing to provide a great variety of outstanding features. Especially benefited by the conservation of passivity gives rise to a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) for the issue of numerical stability of a MD discrete system. Adopting the augmented Lagrangian genetic algorithm, an effective optimization technique for rapidly achieving solution spaces of NLP <span class="hlt">models</span>, numerical stability of the MDWDF network is well received at all time by the satisfaction of the Courant-Friedrichs-Levy stability criterion with the least restriction. In particular, optimum of the NLP has led to the optimality of the network in terms of effectively and accurately predicting the desired fundamental frequency, and thus to give an insight into the robustness of the network by looking at the distribution of system energies. To further explore the application of the optimum network, more numerical examples are engaged in efforts to achieve a qualitative understanding of the behavior of the laminar system. These are carried out by investigating various effects based on different stacking sequences, stiffness and span-to-thickness ratios, mode shapes and boundary conditions. Results are scrupulously validated by cross referencing with early published works, which show that the present method is in excellent agreement with other numerical and analytical methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvB..90n4410S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvB..90n4410S"><span>Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> next-nearest-neighbor Ising <span class="hlt">model</span> in two dimensions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shirakura, T.; Matsubara, F.; Suzuki, N.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The spin structure of an <span class="hlt">axial</span> next-nearest-neighbor Ising (ANNNI) <span class="hlt">model</span> in two dimensions (2D) is a renewed problem because different Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods predicted different spin orderings. The usual equilibrium simulation predicts the occurrence of a floating incommensurate (IC) Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) type phase, which never emerges in non-equilibrium relaxation (NER) simulations. In this paper, we first examine previously published results of both methods, and then investigate a higher transition temperature Tc1 between the IC and paramagnetic phases. In the usual equilibrium simulation, we calculate the chain magnetization on larger lattices (up to 512×512 sites) and estimate Tc1≈1.16J with frustration ratio κ (≡-J2/J1)=0.6. We examine the nature of the phase transition in terms of the Binder ratio gL of spin overlap functions and the correlation-length ratio ξ /L. In the NER simulation, we observe the spin dynamics in equilibrium states by means of an autocorrelation function and also observe the chain magnetization relaxations from the ground and disordered states. These quantities exhibit an algebraic decay at T ≲1.17J. We conclude that the two-dimensional ANNNI <span class="hlt">model</span> actually admits an IC phase transition of the KT type.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21995643','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21995643"><span>An experimental study of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow dynamics in an <span class="hlt">axial</span> blood pump <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hu, Qi-Hui; Li, Jing-Yin; Zhang, Ming-Yuan; Zhu, Xian-Ran</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The head curves of a 1.5:1 new <span class="hlt">axial</span> blood pump <span class="hlt">model</span> were measured using five working fluids at five rotational speeds. The working fluids were water, a 39wt% aqueous glycerin solution (GS), and three aqueous xanthan gum solutions (XGSs) with different concentrations. The flow velocities and shear stresses in the mechanical clearance between the casing and rotor were investigated using a laser Doppler velocimeter and hot-film sensor. At every rotational speed, the experiment in which viscous GS was used in the pump <span class="hlt">model</span> showed a head curve lower than that obtained using water, whereas the head obtained using viscoelastic XGS was higher than that generated using water. A maximum difference of 65.8% between the heads measured in the 0.06% XGS and GS experiments was detected. The higher head produced by the XGS may have originated from the drag-reduction effect of XGS viscoelasticity. The measurements showed that a reverse washout flow at a velocity of 0.05-0.11m/s occurs in the clearance. This reverse washout flow is crucial to preventing flow stagnation and accompanying thrombus formation. The wall shear stress and the Taylor number of the rotating Couette-like flow in the clearance both indicated that it is a turbulent flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001APS..DPPRP1110M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001APS..DPPRP1110M"><span>1D <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of the Initial Stage of Wire Explosions and 2D <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> of the m=0 Sausage Instability With Sheared <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Makhin, Volodymyr; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Bauer, Bruno; Lindemuth, Irvin; Sheehey, Peter</p> <p>2001-10-01</p> <p>1D <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of the initial state of wire explosions (“cold start” with updated SESAME tables) was examined using 1D version of the Eulerian Magnetohydrodynamic Radiative Code (MHRDR). Simulations were carried out for two regimes: with (black body radiative <span class="hlt">model</span>) and without radiative losses. Results of the simulations revealed strong dependence of the time of explosion and expansion speed of the wire on the implemented radiative <span class="hlt">model</span>. This shows that it is necessary to accurately include radiative losses to <span class="hlt">model</span> “cold start” wire explosions. 2D <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of the m=0 sausage instability with sheared <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow. The MHRDR simulations were used to obtain the growth rate of the m=0 sausage instability in plasma column with initial Bennett equilibrium profile with and without shear flow. These growth rates appeared to be in good agreement with growth rates calculated from the linearized MHD equations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JGRE..122..383O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JGRE..122..383O"><span>Testing the <span class="hlt">axial</span> dipole hypothesis for the Moon by <span class="hlt">modeling</span> the direction of crustal magnetization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oliveira, J. S.; Wieczorek, M. A.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Orbital magnetic field data show that portions of the Moon's crust are strongly magnetized, and paleomagnetic data of lunar samples suggest that Earth strength magnetic fields could have existed during the first several hundred million years of lunar history. The origin of the fields that magnetized the crust are not understood and could be the result of either a long-lived core-generated dynamo or transient fields associated with large impact events. Core dynamo <span class="hlt">models</span> usually predict that the field would be predominantly dipolar, with the dipole axis aligned with the rotation axis. We test this hypothesis by <span class="hlt">modeling</span> the direction of crustal magnetization using a global magnetic field <span class="hlt">model</span> of the Moon derived from Lunar Prospector and Kaguya magnetometer data. We make use of a <span class="hlt">model</span> that assumes that the crust is unidirectionally magnetized. The intensity of magnetization can vary with the crust, and the best fitting direction of magnetization is obtained from a nonnegative least squares inversion. From the best fitting magnetization direction we obtain the corresponding north magnetic pole predicted by an internal dipolar field. Some of the obtained paleopoles are associated with the current geographic poles, while other well-constrained anomalies have paleopoles at equatorial latitudes, preferentially at 90° east and west longitudes. One plausible hypothesis for this distribution of paleopoles is that the Moon possessed a long-lived dipolar field but that the dipole was not aligned with the rotation axis as a result of large-scale heat flow heterogeneities at the core-mantle boundary.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyE...44..764R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyE...44..764R"><span>Atomistic finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> for <span class="hlt">axial</span> buckling and vibration analysis of single-layered graphene sheets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rouhi, S.; Ansari, R.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In this article, an atomistic <span class="hlt">model</span> is developed to study the buckling and vibration characteristics of single-layered graphene sheets (SLGSs). By treating SLGSs as space-frame structures, in which the discrete nature of graphene sheets is preserved, they are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> using three-dimensional elastic beam elements for the bonds. The elastic moduli of the beam elements are determined via a linkage between molecular mechanics and structural mechanics. Based on this <span class="hlt">model</span>, the critical compressive forces and fundamental natural frequencies of single-layered graphene sheets with different boundary conditions and geometries are obtained and then compared. It is indicated that the compressive buckling force decreases when the graphene sheet aspect ratio increases. At low aspect ratios, the increase of aspect ratios will result in a significant decrease in the critical buckling load. It is also indicated that increasing aspect ratio at a given side length results in the convergence of buckling envelops associated with armchair and zigzag graphene sheets. The influence of boundary conditions will be studied for different geometries. It will be shown that the influence of boundary conditions is not significant for sufficiently large SLGSs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhyE...43...58A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhyE...43...58A"><span>Atomistic finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> for <span class="hlt">axial</span> buckling of single-walled carbon nanotubes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>An atomistic finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> is developed to study the buckling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes with different boundary conditions. By treating nanotubes as space-frame structures, in which the discrete nature of nanotubes is preserved, they are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> using three-dimensional elastic beam elements for the bonds and point mass elements for the atoms. The elastic moduli of the beam elements are determined via a linkage between molecular mechanics and structural mechanics. Based on this <span class="hlt">model</span>, the critical compressive forces of single-walled carbon nanotubes with different boundary conditions, geometries as well as chiralities are obtained and then compared. It is indicated that at low aspect ratios, the critical buckling load of nanotubes decreases considerably with increasing aspect ratios, whereas at higher aspect ratios, buckling load slightly decreases as the aspect ratio increases. It is also indicated that increasing aspect ratio at a given radius results in the convergence of buckling envelops associated with armchair and zigzag nanotubes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MMTA...43.2669J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MMTA...43.2669J"><span><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> the <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Mechanical Response of Amorphous Fe45Ni45Mo7B3 Honeycombs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jayakumar, Balaji; Hanan, Jay C.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>The high yield strength and elastic modulus of metallic glasses suggests they could perform an important role in structural applications. To produce materials with a high strength-to-weight ratio and excellent mechanical energy absorption, it is advantageous to form amorphous alloys as cellular solids. Using the elastic properties of slip cast amorphous Fe45Ni45Mo7B3 ribbons, a metallic glass honeycomb was manufactured with a unique manufacturing approach. First, prototypes were manufactured with a porosity of 97 pct, a cell wall thickness of 0.03 mm, and a cell size of 3 mm. Experimentally measured mechanical properties were reasonably similar to analytical <span class="hlt">models</span>. This suggests that a three-times improvement in the yield strength along the out-of-plane direction is achievable when compared with crystalline aluminum honeycombs. An analytical <span class="hlt">model</span> was developed to predict the relative density and the compressive stress ( σ {3/ * }) in the out-of-plane ( X 3) direction of the "teardrop" cellular structure. The predictions are validated by initial experimental results and compare well with existing analytical <span class="hlt">models</span> for hexagonal cellular materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyE...44.1832F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyE...44.1832F"><span>Stability analysis of nanocones under external pressure and <span class="hlt">axial</span> compression using a nonlocal shell <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Fotouhi, M. M.; Haddadpour, H.</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>A nonlocal continuum shell <span class="hlt">model</span> is developed to study the stability of nanocones under combined loading: external pressure and compression force. The nonlinear governing equations of motion of nanocone are obtained using Hamilton's principle and the external loads are considered as prestress. Based on Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory the small-scale effect is accounted in the governing equations of motion. To obtain the critical loads, the equations are solved using Galerkin technique and the effect of small-scale parameter and geometry on the stability of nanocone is studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mallow&id=EJ720496','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mallow&id=EJ720496"><span>Prior Distributions on <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Groups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gupta, Jayanti; Damien, Paul</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Fully and partially ranked data arise in a variety of contexts. From a Bayesian perspective, attention has focused on distance-based <span class="hlt">models</span>; in particular, the Mallows <span class="hlt">model</span> and extensions thereof. In this paper, a class of prior distributions, the "Binary Tree," is developed on the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> group. The attractive features of the class are: it…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17849441','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17849441"><span>Dll3 and Notch1 genetic interactions <span class="hlt">model</span> <span class="hlt">axial</span> segmental and craniofacial malformations of human birth defects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Loomes, Kathleen M; Stevens, Stacey A; O'Brien, Megan L; Gonzalez, Dorian M; Ryan, Matthew J; Segalov, Michelle; Dormans, Nicholas J; Mimoto, Mizuho S; Gibson, Joshua D; Sewell, William; Schaffer, Alyssa A; Nah, Hyun-Duck; Rappaport, Eric F; Pratt, Stephen C; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Kusumi, Kenro</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>Mutations in the Notch1 receptor and delta-like 3 (Dll3) ligand cause global disruptions in <span class="hlt">axial</span> segmental patterning. Genetic interactions between members of the notch pathway have previously been shown to cause patterning defects not observed in single gene disruptions. We examined Dll3-Notch1 compound mouse mutants to screen for potential gene interactions. While mice heterozygous at either locus appeared normal, 30% of Dll3-Notch1 double heterozygous animals exhibited localized, segmental anomalies similar to human congenital vertebral defects. Unexpectedly, double heterozygous mice also displayed statistically significant reduction of mandibular height and decreased length of the [corrected] maxillary hard palate. Examination of somite-stage embryos and perinatal anatomy and histology did not reveal any organ defects, so we used microarray-based analysis of Dll3 and Notch1 mutant embryos to identify gene targets that may be involved in notch-regulated segmental or craniofacial development. Thus, Dll3-Notch1 double heterozygous mice <span class="hlt">model</span> human congenital scoliosis and craniofacial disorders.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94a4016C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94a4016C"><span>Radially excited <span class="hlt">axial</span> mesons and the enigmatic Zc and Zb in a coupled-channel <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Coito, Susana</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>The enigmatic charged states Zc(3900 ), Zc(4020 ), Zc(4050 ), Zb(10610 ), and Zb(10650 ) are studied within a coupled-channel Schrödinger <span class="hlt">model</span>, where radially excited quark-antiquark pairs, with the same angular momenta and isospin as the a1(1260 ) and b1(1235 ), are strongly coupled to their Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decay channels D D¯*+D ¯D* and D*D¯*, or B B¯*+B ¯B* and B*B¯*, in S and D waves. Poles, matching the experimental mass and width of the above states, are found by varying only two free parameters. From the wave-function analysis of each resonance, the probability of each of the components contributing to the coupled system is estimated, and predictions can be made for the relative decay fractions among the coupled open-charm or open-bottom decay channels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91g4025C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..91g4025C"><span>Light <span class="hlt">axial</span> vector mesons</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Kan; Pang, Cheng-Qun; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector states, we study whether the observed <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector states can be categorized into the conventional <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector meson family. In this paper we carry out an analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mesons, which are valuable for further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mesons.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5014279','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5014279"><span>Chaos in <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> potentials with octupole deformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Heiss, W.D.; Nazmitdinov, R.G.; Radu, S. Departamento de Fisica Teorica C-XI, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid )</p> <p>1994-04-11</p> <p>Classical and quantum mechanical results are reported for the single particle motion in a harmonic oscillator potential which is characterized by a quadrupole deformation and an additional octupole deformation. The chaotic character of the motion is strongly dependent on the quadrupole deformation in that for a prolate deformation virtually no chaos is discernible while for the oblate case the motion shows strong chaos when the octupole term is turned on.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA082378','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA082378"><span>Wave Propagation through <span class="hlt">Axially-Symmetric</span> Dielectric Shells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1980-02-01</p> <p>estimating the amplitude and phase of guided waves excited on finite dielectric slabs by incident plane waves. The procedure is based onj the moment...8217 ’ " ] cos2 ,0 dado dz, (4-69) x2 2 where = (ao - ap’ cos0 -zz’) (4-70) and [...1 [6 (+6p)-6 (a-6p)-a -1 . (4-71) After doing the integrals, we have</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA800273','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA800273"><span>The <span class="hlt">Axially</span> <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Potential Flow About Elognated Bodies of Revolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1951-08-01</p> <p>Another exact method, based on a distribution of vorticity over the surface of the body, is being developed by )r. Vandry of the Admiralty Re- search...34Ecoulement potentiel autour d’un corps de revolution," Colloques Internationaux du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, XIV, Mithodes de Calcul dans</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.464..410M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MNRAS.464..410M"><span>Convection in <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> accretion discs with microscopic transport coefficients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malanchev, K. L.; Postnov, K. A.; Shakura, N. I.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The vertical structure of stationary thin accretion discs is calculated from the energy balance equation with heat generation due to microscopic ion viscosity η and electron heat conductivity κ, both depending on temperature. In the optically thin discs it is found that for the heat conductivity increasing with temperature, the vertical temperature gradient exceeds the adiabatic value at some height, suggesting convective instability in the upper disc layer. There is a critical Prandtl number, Pr = 4/9, above which a Keplerian disc become fully convective. The vertical density distribution of optically thin laminar accretion discs as found from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation cannot be generally described by a polytrope but in the case of constant viscosity and heat conductivity. In the optically thick discs with radiation heat transfer, the vertical disc structure is found to be convectively stable for both absorption-dominated and scattering-dominated opacities, unless a very steep dependence of the viscosity coefficient on temperature is assumed. A polytropic-like structure in this case is found for Thomson scattering-dominated opacity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26238020','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26238020"><span>Tetrapod <span class="hlt">axial</span> evolution and developmental constraints; Empirical underpinning by a mouse <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Woltering, Joost M; Duboule, Denis</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The tetrapod vertebral column has become increasingly complex during evolution as an adaptation to a terrestrial life. At the same time, the evolution of the vertebral formula became subject to developmental constraints acting on the size of the cervical and thoraco-lumbar regions. In the course of our studies concerning the evolution of Hox gene regulation, we produced a transgenic mouse <span class="hlt">model</span> expressing fish Hox genes, which displayed a reduced number of thoraco-lumbar vertebrae and concurrent sacral homeotic transformations. Here, we analyze this mutant stock and conclude that the ancestral, pre-tetrapodial Hox code already possessed the capacity to induce vertebrae with sacral characteristics. This suggests that alterations in the interpretation of the Hox code may have participated to the evolution of this region in tetrapods, along with potential modifications of the HOX proteins themselves. With its reduced vertebral number, this mouse stock violates a previously described developmental constraint, which applies to the thoraco-lumbar region. The resulting offset between motor neuron morphology, vertebral patterning and the relative positioning of hind limbs illustrates that the precise orchestration of the Hox-clock in parallel with other ontogenetic pathways places constraints on the evolvability of the body plan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4678112','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4678112"><span>Tetrapod <span class="hlt">axial</span> evolution and developmental constraints; Empirical underpinning by a mouse <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Woltering, Joost M.; Duboule, Denis</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The tetrapod vertebral column has become increasingly complex during evolution as an adaptation to a terrestrial life. At the same time, the evolution of the vertebral formula became subject to developmental constraints acting on the size of the cervical and thoraco-lumbar regions. In the course of our studies concerning the evolution of Hox gene regulation, we produced a transgenic mouse <span class="hlt">model</span> expressing fish Hox genes, which displayed a reduced number of thoraco-lumbar vertebrae and concurrent sacral homeotic transformations. Here, we analyze this mutant stock and conclude that the ancestral, pre-tetrapodial Hox code already possessed the capacity to induce vertebrae with sacral characteristics. This suggests that alterations in the interpretation of the Hox code may have participated to the evolution of this region in tetrapods, along with potential modifications of the HOX proteins themselves. With its reduced vertebral number, this mouse stock violates a previously described developmental constraint, which applies to the thoraco-lumbar region. The resulting offset between motor neuron morphology, vertebral patterning and the relative positioning of hind limbs illustrates that the precise orchestration of the Hox-clock in parallel with other ontogenetic pathways places constraints on the evolvability of the body plan. PMID:26238020</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GGG....17..199H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GGG....17..199H"><span>Compositional variation and 226Ra-230Th <span class="hlt">model</span> ages of <span class="hlt">axial</span> lavas from the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 8°48'S</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Haase, K. M.; Brandl, P. A.; Devey, C. W.; Hauff, F.; Melchert, B.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Kokfelt, T. F.; Paulick, H.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We present geological observations and geochemical data for the youngest volcanic features on the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 8°48'S that shows seismic evidence for a thickened crust and excess magma formation. Young lava flows with high sonar reflectivity cover about 14 km2 in the <span class="hlt">axial</span> rift and were probably erupted from two <span class="hlt">axial</span> volcanic ridges each of about 3 km in length. Three different lava units occur along an about 11 km long portion of the ridge, and lavas from the northern <span class="hlt">axial</span> volcanic ridge differ from those of the southern <span class="hlt">axial</span> volcanic ridge and surrounding lava flows. Basalts from the <span class="hlt">axial</span> rift flanks and from a pillow mound within the young flows are more incompatible element depleted than those from the young volcanic field. Lavas from this volcanic area have 226Ra-230Th disequilibria <span class="hlt">model</span> ages of 1000 and 4000 years whereas the older lavas from the rift flank and the pillow mound, but also some of the lava field, are older than 8000 years. Glasses from the northern and southern ends of the southern lava unit indicate up to 100°C cooler magma temperatures than in the center and increased assimilation of hydrothermally altered material. The compositional heterogeneity on a scale of 3 km suggests small magma batches rising vertically from the mantle to the surface without significant lateral flow and mixing. The observations on the 8°48'S lava field support the <span class="hlt">model</span> of low-frequency eruptions from single ascending magma batches that has been developed for slow spreading ridges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11457072','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11457072"><span>Assessment of the existence of hyper-long <span class="hlt">axial</span> Co(II)-N bonds in cobinamide B(12) <span class="hlt">models</span> by using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trommel, J S; Warncke, K; Marzilli, L G</p> <p>2001-04-11</p> <p>Protein control of cobalt-<span class="hlt">axial</span> nitrogen ligand bond length has been proposed to modulate the reactivity of vitamin B(12) coenzyme during the catalytic cycle of B(12)-dependent enzymes. In particular, hyper-long Co-N bonds may favor homolytic cleavage of the trans-cobalt-carbon bond in the coenzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies point to hyper-long bonds in two B(12) holoenzymes; however, mixed redox and ligand states in the crystals thwart clear conclusions. Since EPR theory predicts an increase in Co(II) hyperfine splitting as donation from the <span class="hlt">axial</span> N-donor ligand decreases, EPR spectroscopy could clarify the X-ray results. However, the theory is apparently undermined by the similar splitting reported for the 2-picoline (2-pic) and pyridine (py) adducts of Co(II) cobinamide (Co(II)Cbi(+)), adducts thought to have long and normal Co-N <span class="hlt">axial</span> bond lengths, respectively. Cobinamides, with the B(12) 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole loop removed, are excellent B(12) <span class="hlt">models</span>. We studied Co(II)Cbi(+) adducts of unhindered 4-substituted pyridines (4-X-py's) in ethylene glycol to separate orbital size effects from Co-N <span class="hlt">axial</span> distance effects on these splittings. The linear increase in splitting with the decrease in 4-X-py basicity found is consistent with the theoretically predicted increase in unpaired electron spin density as <span class="hlt">axial</span> N lone pair donation to Co(II) decreases. No adduct (and hence no hyper-long Co(II)-N <span class="hlt">axial</span> bond) was formed even by 8 M 2-pic, if the 2-pic was purified by a novel Co(III)-affinity distillation procedure designed to remove trace nitrogenous ligand impurities present in 2-pic distilled in the regular manner. Adducts formed by impurities in 2-pic and other hindered pyridines misled previous investigators into attributing results to adducts with long Co-N bonds. We find that many 2-substituted py's known to form adducts with simple synthetic Co <span class="hlt">models</span> do not bind Co(II)Cbi(+). Thus, the equatorial corrin ring sterically impedes binding, making Co</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1548...75C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1548...75C"><span>A simple <span class="hlt">model</span> of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> manner</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chavanis, Pierre-Henri</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p> evolution of the universe. The early universe is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by a polytrope n = + 1 and the late universe by a polytrope n = -1. Furthermore, the cosmological constant Λ in the late universe plays a role similar to the Planck constant ℏ in the early universe. The mathematical formulae in the early and in the late universe are then strikingly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>. We interpret the cosmological constant as a fundamental constant of Nature describing the "cosmophysics" just like the Planck constant describes the "microphysics". The Planck density and the cosmological density represent fundamental upper and lower bounds differing by 122 orders of magnitude. The cosmological constant "problem" may be a false problem. Finally, we show that our <span class="hlt">model</span> admits a scalar field interpretation based on a quintessence field or a tachyon field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22218296','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22218296"><span>A simple <span class="hlt">model</span> of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> manner</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chavanis, Pierre-Henri</p> <p>2013-07-23</p> <p>CDM <span class="hlt">model</span> for t≫t{sub P} and completes it by incorporating a phase of early inflation for t < 23.3t{sub P} in a very natural manner. Furthermore, it reveals a nice 'symmetry' between the early and the late evolution of the universe. The early universe is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by a polytrope n=+ 1 and the late universe by a polytrope n=−1. Furthermore, the cosmological constant Λ in the late universe plays a role similar to the Planck constant ℏ in the early universe. The mathematical formulae in the early and in the late universe are then strikingly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>. We interpret the cosmological constant as a fundamental constant of Nature describing the 'cosmophysics' just like the Planck constant describes the 'microphysics'. The Planck density and the cosmological density represent fundamental upper and lower bounds differing by 122 orders of magnitude. The cosmological constant 'problem' may be a false problem. Finally, we show that our <span class="hlt">model</span> admits a scalar field interpretation based on a quintessence field or a tachyon field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95a4009R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95a4009R"><span>Flipped versions of the universal 3-3-1 and the left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> in [S U (3 )]3 : A comprehensive approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rodríguez, Oscar; Benavides, Richard H.; Ponce, William A.; Rojas, Eduardo</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>By considering the 3-3-1 and the left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> as low-energy effective theories of the S U (3 )C⊗S U (3 )L⊗S U (3 )R (for short [S U (3 )]3 ) gauge group, alternative versions of these <span class="hlt">models</span> are found. The new neutral gauge bosons of the universal 3-3-1 <span class="hlt">model</span> and its flipped versions are presented; also, the left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> and its flipped variants are studied. Our analysis shows that there are two flipped versions of the universal 3-3-1 <span class="hlt">model</span>, with the particularity that both of them have the same weak charges. For the left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span>, we also found two flipped versions; one of them is new in the literature and, unlike those of the 3-3-1, requires a dedicated study of its electroweak properties. For all the <span class="hlt">models</span> analyzed, the couplings of the Z' bosons to the standard <span class="hlt">model</span> fermions are reported. The explicit form of the null space of the vector boson mass matrix for an arbitrary Higgs tensor and gauge group is also presented. In the general framework of the [S U (3 )]3 gauge group, and by using the LHC experimental results and EW precision data, limits on the Z' mass and the mixing angle between Z and the new gauge bosons Z' are obtained. The general results call for very small mixing angles in the range 1 0-3 radians and MZ'>2.5 TeV .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94i5016M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..94i5016M"><span>Neutrino jets from high-mass WR gauge bosons in TeV-scale left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mitra, Manimala; Ruiz, Richard; Scott, Darren J.; Spannowsky, Michael</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We reexamine the discovery potential at hadron colliders of high-mass right-handed (RH) gauge bosons WR—an inherent ingredient of left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> (LRSM). We focus on the regime where the WR is very heavy compared to the heavy Majorana neutrino N , and we investigate an alternative signature for WR→N decays. The produced neutrinos are highly boosted in this mass regime. Subsequently, their decays via off-shell WR bosons to jets, i.e., N →ℓ±jj, are highly collimated, forming a single neutrino jet (jN). The final-state collider signature is then ℓ±jN, instead of the widely studied ℓ±ℓ±j j . Present search strategies are not sensitive to this hierarchical mass regime due to the breakdown of the collider signature definition. We take into account QCD corrections beyond next-to-leading order (NLO) that are important for high-mass Drell-Yan processes at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For the first time, we evaluate WR production at NLO with threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm (NNLL) matched to the threshold-improved parton distributions. With these improvements, we find that a WR of mass MWR=3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and mass ratio of (mN/MWR)<0.1 can be discovered with a 5 - 6 σ statistical significance at 13 TeV after 10 (100 )[2000 ] fb-1 of data. Extending the analysis to the hypothetical 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), 5 σ can be obtained for WR masses up to MW R=15 (30 ) with approximately 100 fb-1 (10 ab-1 ). Conversely, with 0.9 (10 )[150 ] fb-1 of 13 TeV data, MWR<3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and (mN/MWR)<0.1 can be excluded at 95% C.L.; with 100 fb-1 (2.5 ab-1 ) of 100 TeV data, MW R<22 (33 ) TeV can be excluded.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......175M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......175M"><span>Analysis of thin-walled cylindrical composite shell structures subject to <span class="hlt">axial</span> and bending loads: Concept development, analytical <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and experimental verification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mahadev, Sthanu</p> <p></p> <p>Continued research and development efforts devoted in recent years have generated novel avenues towards the advancement of efficient and effective, slender laminated fiber-reinforced composite members. Numerous studies have focused on the <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and response characterization of composite structures with particular relevance to thin-walled cylindrical composite shells. This class of shell configurations is being actively explored to fully determine their mechanical efficacy as primary aerospace structural members. The proposed research is targeted towards formulating a composite shell theory based prognosis methodology that entails an elaborate analysis and investigation of thin-walled cylindrical shell type laminated composite configurations that are highly desirable in increasing number of mechanical and aerospace applications. The prime motivation to adopt this theory arises from its superior ability to generate simple yet viable closed-form analytical solution procedure to numerous geometrically intense, inherent curvature possessing composite structures. This analytical evaluative routine offers to acquire a first-hand insight on the primary mechanical characteristics that essentially govern the behavior of slender composite shells under typical static loading conditions. Current work exposes the robustness of this mathematical framework via demonstrating its potential towards the prediction of structural properties such as <span class="hlt">axial</span> stiffness and bending stiffness respectively. Longitudinal ply-stress computations are investigated upon deriving the global stiffness matrix <span class="hlt">model</span> for composite cylindrical tubes with circular cross-sections. Additionally, this work employs a finite element based numerical technique to substantiate the analytical results reported for cylindrically shaped circular composite tubes. Furthermore, this concept development is extended to the study of thin-walled, open cross-sectioned, curved laminated shells that are geometrically</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26789835','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26789835"><span>A mass transfer <span class="hlt">model</span> for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: <span class="hlt">axial</span> dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer <span class="hlt">model</span> considering both <span class="hlt">axial</span> dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This <span class="hlt">model</span> predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams <span class="hlt">model</span> and Thomas <span class="hlt">model</span>, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The <span class="hlt">axial</span> dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, <span class="hlt">axial</span> dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvA..89c0102L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvA..89c0102L"><span>PT restoration via increased loss and gain in the PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Aubry-André <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liang, Charles H.; Scott, Derek D.; Joglekar, Yogesh N.</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>In systems with "balanced loss and gain," the PT symmetry is broken by increasing the non-Hermiticity or the loss-gain strength. We show that finite lattices with oscillatory, PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> potentials exhibit unexpected PT-symmetry breaking and restoration. We obtain the PT phase diagram as a function of potential periodicity, which also controls the location complex eigenvalues in the lattice spectrum. We show that the sum of PT potentials with nearby periodicities leads to PT-symmetry restoration, where the system goes from a PT-broken state to a PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> state as the average loss-gain strength is increased. We discuss the implications of this transition for the propagation of a light in an array of coupled waveguides.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28117740','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28117740"><span>A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with <span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> Bended Spring Plates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong</p> <p>2017-01-22</p> <p>To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce <span class="hlt">axial</span> strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics <span class="hlt">model</span> and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7-20 Hz range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5298777','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5298777"><span>A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with <span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> Bended Spring Plates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce <span class="hlt">axial</span> strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics <span class="hlt">model</span> and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7–20 Hz range. PMID:28117740</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27107032','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27107032"><span>Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> of the cervical spine to geometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Numerous finite element <span class="hlt">models</span> of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> assumption on the predicted motion by finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element <span class="hlt">models</span> of the cervical spine C2-C7. One <span class="hlt">model</span> was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span>), whereas the other was <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> (<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span>) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both <span class="hlt">models</span>-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> and <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> were 1.5° <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> were 1.6° <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA473572','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA473572"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> Waterjet (AxWJ) <span class="hlt">Model</span> 5662: Hull Resistance and <span class="hlt">Model</span>-Scale Powering with LDV Nozzle Design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2007-09-01</p> <p>6 M odel-Scale Rotor Forces: Ship Propulsion Point As Tested ........................................ 6 M odel-Scale Rotor Forces: Over and Under...Propulsion ................................................. 7 <span class="hlt">Model</span>-Scale Rotor Forces: Estimated At Corrected Ship Propulsion Point...hull. The largest increase was measured at 30 knots, where the LDV nozzles increased the PE by 4.9%. <span class="hlt">Model</span>-Scale Rotor Forces: Ship Propulsion Point</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4753482','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4753482"><span>Reciprocal and unidirectional scattering of parity-time <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jin, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, G.; Song, Z.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Parity-time symmetry is of great interest. The reciprocal and unidirectional features are intriguing besides the symmetry phase transition. Recently, the reciprocal transmission, unidirectional reflectionless and invisibility are intensively studied. Here, we show the reciprocal reflection/transmission in -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> system is closely related to the type of symmetry, that is, the <span class="hlt">axial</span> (reflection) symmetry leads to reciprocal reflection (transmission). The results are further elucidated by studying the scattering of rhombic ring form coupled resonators with enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The nonreciprocal phase shift induced by the magnetic flux and gain/loss break the parity and time-reversal symmetry but keep the parity-time symmetry. The reciprocal reflection (transmission) and unidirectional transmission (reflection) are found in the <span class="hlt">axial</span> (reflection) -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> ring centre. The explorations of symmetry and asymmetry from symmetry may shed light on novel one-way optical devices and application of -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> metamaterials. PMID:26876806</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ChPhB..25c8502Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ChPhB..25c8502Y"><span>Two-dimensional <span class="hlt">models</span> of threshold voltage and subthreshold current for <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> double-material double-gate strained Si MOSFETs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yan-hui, Xin; Sheng, Yuan; Ming-tang, Liu; Hong-xia, Liu; He-cai, Yuan</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The two-dimensional <span class="hlt">models</span> for <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> double-material double-gate (DM-DG) strained Si (s-Si) metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) are presented. The surface potential and the surface electric field expressions have been obtained by solving Poisson’s equation. The <span class="hlt">models</span> of threshold voltage and subthreshold current are obtained based on the surface potential expression. The surface potential and the surface electric field are compared with those of single-material double-gate (SM-DG) MOSFETs. The effects of different device parameters on the threshold voltage and the subthreshold current are demonstrated. The analytical <span class="hlt">models</span> give deep insight into the device parameters design. The analytical results obtained from the proposed <span class="hlt">models</span> show good matching with the simulation results using DESSIS. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376099, 11235008, and 61205003).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9342039','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9342039"><span>Archenteron precursor cells can organize secondary <span class="hlt">axial</span> structures in the sea urchin embryo.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Benink, H; Wray, G; Hardin, J</p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>Local cell-cell signals play a crucial role in establishing major tissue territories in early embryos. The sea urchin embryo is a useful <span class="hlt">model</span> system for studying these interactions in deuterostomes. Previous studies showed that ectopically implanted micromeres from the 16-cell embryo can induce ectopic guts and additional skeletal elements in sea urchin embryos. Using a chimeric embryo approach, we show that implanted archenteron precursors differentiate autonomously to produce a correctly proportioned and patterned gut. In addition, the ectopically implanted presumptive archenteron tissue induces ectopic skeletal patterning sites within the ectoderm. The ectopic skeletal elements are bilaterally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>, and flank the ectopic archenteron, in some cases resulting in mirror-image, <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> skeletal elements. Since the induced patterned ectoderm and supernumerary skeletal elements are derived from the host, the ectopic presumptive archenteron tissue can act to 'organize' ectopic <span class="hlt">axial</span> structures in the sea urchin embryo.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/382800','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/382800"><span>Vibration of <span class="hlt">axially</span> loaded circular arches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.</p> <p>1996-11-01</p> <p>The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of <span class="hlt">axially</span> loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of <span class="hlt">axially</span> loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> and anti <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhA...47M5401C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhA...47M5401C"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> hyperbolic monopoles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cockburn, Alexander</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>Hyperbolic monopole solutions can be obtained from circle-invariant ADHM data if the curvature of hyperbolic space is suitably tuned. Here we give explicit ADHM data corresponding to <span class="hlt">axial</span> hyperbolic monopoles in a simple, tractable form, as well as expressions for the <span class="hlt">axial</span> monopole fields. The data is deformed into new one-parameter families preserving dihedral and twisted-line symmetries. In many cases explicit expressions are presented for their spectral curves and rational maps of both Donaldson and Jarvis type.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506927','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21506927"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> continued fractions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat</p> <p>2010-11-11</p> <p>Explicit formulae for continued fractions with <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.109z1802C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.109z1802C"><span>Search for Heavy Neutrinos and WR Bosons with Right-Handed Couplings in a Left-Right <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span> in pp Collisions at s=7TeV</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Results are presented from a search for heavy, right-handed muon neutrinos, Nμ, and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> extensions of the standard <span class="hlt">model</span>. The analysis is based on a 5.0fb-1 sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence is observed for an excess of events over the standard <span class="hlt">model</span> expectation. For <span class="hlt">models</span> with exact left-right symmetry, heavy right-handed neutrinos are excluded at 95% confidence level for a range of neutrino masses below the WR mass, dependent on the value of MWR. The excluded region in the two-dimensional (MWR, MNμ) mass plane extends to MWR=2.5TeV.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22356790','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22356790"><span>Inducing chaos by breaking <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry in a black hole magnetosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kopáček, O.; Karas, V.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>While the motion of particles near a rotating, electrically neutral (Kerr), and charged (Kerr-Newman) black hole is always strictly regular, a perturbation in the gravitational or the electromagnetic field generally leads to chaos. The transition from regular to chaotic dynamics is relatively gradual if the system preserves <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry, whereas non-axisymmetry induces chaos more efficiently. Here we study the development of chaos in an oblique (electro-vacuum) magnetosphere of a magnetized black hole. Besides the strong gravity of the massive source represented by the Kerr metric, we consider the presence of a weak, ordered, large-scale magnetic field. An <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> consisting of a rotating black hole embedded in an aligned magnetic field is generalized by allowing an oblique direction of the field having a general inclination with respect to the rotation axis of the system. The inclination of the field acts as an additional perturbation to the motion of charged particles as it breaks the <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry of the system and cancels the related integral of motion. The <span class="hlt">axial</span> component of angular momentum is no longer conserved and the resulting system thus has three degrees of freedom. Our primary concern within this contribution is to find out how sensitive the system of bound particles is to the inclination of the field. We employ the method of the maximal Lyapunov exponent to distinguish between regular and chaotic orbits and to quantify their chaoticity. We find that even a small misalignment induces chaotic motion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25396272','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25396272"><span>Mechanical circulatory support of a univentricular Fontan circulation with a continuous <span class="hlt">axial</span>-flow pump in a piglet <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wei, Xufeng; Sanchez, Pablo G; Liu, Yang; Li, Tieluo; Watkins, A Claire; Wu, Zhongjun J; Griffith, Bartley P</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Despite the significant contribution of the Fontan procedure to the therapy of complex congenital heart diseases, many patients progress to failure of their Fontan circulation. The use of ventricular assist devices to provide circulatory support to these patients remains challenging. In the current study, a continuous <span class="hlt">axial</span>-flow pump was used to support a univentricular Fontan circulation. A modified Fontan circulation (atrio-pulmonary connection) was constructed in six Yorkshire piglets (8-14 kg). A Dacron conduit (12 mm) with two branches was constructed to serve as a complete atrio-pulmonary connection without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. The Impella pump was inserted into the conduit through an additional Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft in five animals. Hemodynamic data were collected for 6 hours under the supported Fontan circulation. The control animal died after initiating the Fontan circulation independent of resuscitation. Four pump supported animals remained hemodynamically stable for 6 hours with pump speeds between 18,000 rpm and 22,000 rpm (P1-P3). Oxygen saturation was maintained between 95% and 100%. Normal organ perfusion was illustrated by blood gas analysis and biochemical assays. A continuous <span class="hlt">axial</span>-flow pump can be used for temporal circulatory support to the failing Fontan circulation as "bridge" to heart transplantation or recovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MolPh.113.3826G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MolPh.113.3826G"><span>Optimised polychromatic field-mediated suppression of H-atom tunnelling in a coupled <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> double well: two-dimensional malonaldehyde <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ghosh, Subhasree; Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Chaudhury, Pinaki</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The cis-cis isomerisation motion of malonaldehyde can be <span class="hlt">modelled</span> as a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> double well coupled with an asymmetric double well, which includes the effect of the cis-trans out-of-plane motion on the cis-cis motion. We have presented an effective method for having control over the tunnelling dynamics of the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> double well which is coupled with the asymmetric double well by monitoring tunnelling splitting. When a suitable external field is allowed to interact with the system, the tunnelling splitting gets modified. As the external time perturbation is periodic in nature, the Floquet theory can be applied to calculate the quasi-energies of the perturbed system and hence the tunnelling splitting. The Floquet analysis is coupled with a stochastic optimiser in order to minimise the tunnelling splitting, which is related to slowering of the tunnelling process. The minimisation has been done by one of the stochastic optimisers, simulated annealing. Optimisation has been performed on the parameters which define the external polychromatic field, such as intensities and frequencies of the components of the polychromatic field. With the optimised sets of parameters, we have followed the dynamics of the system and have found suppression of tunnelling which is manifested by a much higher tunnelling time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/862152','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/862152"><span>BWR <span class="hlt">AXIAL</span> PROFILE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>J. Huffer</p> <p>2004-09-28</p> <p>The purpose of this calculation is to develop <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiles for estimating the <span class="hlt">axial</span> variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for <span class="hlt">axially</span> varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for <span class="hlt">axially</span> varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' reactivity. The magnitude of the reactivity change due to ''end effect'' is dependent on the initial assembly enrichment, the assembly average burnup, and the particular <span class="hlt">axial</span> profile characterizing the burnup distribution. The set of bounding <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiles should incorporate multiple BWR core designs and provide statistical confidence (95 percent confidence that 95 percent of the population is bound by the profile) that end nodes are conservatively represented. The profiles should also conserve the overall burnup of the fuel assembly. More background on BWR <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiles is provided in Attachment I.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015mgm..conf.1880S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015mgm..conf.1880S"><span>Hamiltonian Dynamics in Extended Phase Space for Gravity and its Consistency with Lagrangian Formalism: a Generalized Spherically <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">Model</span> as AN Example</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shestakova, Tatyana P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Among theoretical issues in General Relativity the problem of constructing its Hamiltonian formulation is still of interest. The most of attempts to quantize Gravity are based upon Dirac generalization of Hamiltonian dynamics for system with constraints. At the same time there exists another way to formulate Hamiltonian dynamics for constrained systems guided by the idea of extended phase space. We have already considered some features of this approach in the previous MG12 Meeting by the example of a simple isotropic <span class="hlt">model</span>. Now we apply the approach to a generalized spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> which imitates the structure of General Relativity much better. In particular, making use of a global BRST symmetry and the Noether theorem, we construct the BRST charge that generates correct gauge transformations for all gravitational degrees of freedom.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866763','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866763"><span>Measuring <span class="hlt">axial</span> pump thrust</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic <span class="hlt">axial</span> thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The <span class="hlt">axial</span> thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the <span class="hlt">axial</span> force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7067452','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7067452"><span>Measuring <span class="hlt">axial</span> pump thrust</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.</p> <p>1988-11-08</p> <p>An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic <span class="hlt">axial</span> thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The <span class="hlt">axial</span> thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the <span class="hlt">axial</span> force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ScChD..59.2037L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ScChD..59.2037L"><span>New method for determining central <span class="hlt">axial</span> orientation of flux rope embedded within current sheet using multipoint measurements</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, ZhaoYu; Chen, Tao; Yan, GuangQing</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>A new method for determining the central <span class="hlt">axial</span> orientation of a two-dimensional coherent magnetic flux rope (MFR) via multipoint analysis of the magnetic-field structure is developed. The method is devised under the following geometrical assumptions: (1) on its cross section, the structure is left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>; (2) the projected structure velocity is vertical to the line of symmetry. The two conditions can be naturally satisfied for cylindrical MFRs and are expected to be satisfied for MFRs that are flattened within current sheets. The <span class="hlt">model</span> test demonstrates that, for determining the <span class="hlt">axial</span> orientation of such structures, the new method is more efficient and reliable than traditional techniques such as minimum-variance analysis of the magnetic field, Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction, and the more recent method based on the cylindrically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> assumption. A total of five flux transfer events observed by Cluster are studied using the proposed approach, and the application results indicate that the observed structures, regardless of their actual physical properties, fit the assumed geometrical <span class="hlt">model</span> well. For these events, the inferred <span class="hlt">axial</span> orientations are all in excellent agreement with those obtained using the multi-GS reconstruction technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20860490','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20860490"><span>Proof of the existence of the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-to-planar channeling transition in a simple crystal <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Saenz, A. W.</p> <p>2006-06-15</p> <p>Consider a fast nonrelativistic, positively charged particle (ion) traversing a crystal, assumed to be simple cubic and monatomic for simplicity. Let the Cartesian coordinates X{sub 1},X{sub 2},X{sub 3} be parallel to the crystal axes, and {eta}{sub i} be the initial value of the component of the particle's momentum vector along X{sub i}. If vertical bar {eta}{sub 3} vertical bar is sufficiently large compared to vertical bar {eta}{sub 1} vertical bar, vertical bar{eta}{sub 2} vertical bar, then (under mild technical assumptions) the ion's motion is well approximated for a long time by a solution of the equations of motion (EOM) of the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-continuum Hamiltonian H, obtained from the ion's nonrelativistic Hamiltonian H by replacing the potential V(X{sub 1},X{sub 2},X{sub 3}), describing its interaction with the atoms of the crystal, by its average V(X{sub 1},X{sub 2}) over X{sub 3}. Furthermore, if vertical bar {eta}{sub 2} vertical bar, vertical bar {eta}{sub 3} vertical bar are sufficiently large compared with vertical bar {eta}{sub 1} vertical bar, vertical bar {eta}{sub 2} vertical bar, respectively, then to a good approximation its motion is given, again for a long time, by a solution of the EOM of the planar continuum Hamiltonian H, obtained from H by replacing V(X{sub 1},X{sub 2}) by its average V(X{sub 1}) over X{sub 2}. We define motions of the first (respectively, second) type as <span class="hlt">axial</span> (respectively, planar) channeling. In this paper, the transition from the first to the second kind of motion, occurring when the crystal is suitably rotated, is discussed in a mathematically rigorous way by using an improved version of first-order single-phase averaging theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTP...55.2139S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTP...55.2139S"><span>An Unbroken <span class="hlt">Axial</span>-Vector Current Conservation Law</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mass say in favor of an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..APR.T1034S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..APR.T1034S"><span>An Unbroken <span class="hlt">Axial</span>-Vector Current Conservation Law</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sharafiddinov, Rasulkhozha S.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The mass, energy and momentum of the neutrino of a true flavor have an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector nature. As a consequence, the left-handed truly neutral neutrino in an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector field of emission can be converted into a right-handed one and vice versa. This predicts the unidenticality of masses, energies and momenta of neutrinos of the different components. Recognizing such a difference in masses, energies, momenta and accepting that the left-handed <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector neutrino and the right-handed antineutrino of true neutrality refer to long-lived C-odd leptons, and the right-handed truly neutral neutrino and the left-handed <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector antineutrino are of short-lived fermions of C-oddity, we would write a new CP-even Dirac equation taking into account the flavor <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mass, energy and momentum matrices. Their presence explains the spontaneous mirror symmetry violation, confirming that an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector current conservation law has never violated. They reflect the availability of a mirror Minkowski space in which a neutrino is characterized by left as well as by right space-time coordinates. Therefore, it is not surprising that whatever the main purposes experiments about a quasielastic <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mass say in favor of an <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector mirror Minkowski space-time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JPhA...42D4017I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JPhA...42D4017I"><span>Braids, shuffles and <span class="hlt">symmetrizers</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Isaev, A. P.; Ogievetsky, O. V.</p> <p>2009-07-01</p> <p>Multiplicative analogues of the shuffle elements of the braid group rings are introduced; in local representations they give rise to certain graded associative algebras (b-shuffle algebras). For the Hecke and BMW algebras, the (anti)-<span class="hlt">symmetrizers</span> have simple expressions in terms of the multiplicative shuffles. The (anti)-<span class="hlt">symmetrizers</span> can be expressed in terms of the highest multiplicative 1-shuffles (for the Hecke and BMW algebras) and in terms of the highest additive 1-shuffles (for the Hecke algebras). The spectra and multiplicities of eigenvalues of the operators of the multiplication by the multiplicative and additive 1-shuffles are examined. Dedicated to the memory of Aleosha Zamolodchikov.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000121251','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000121251"><span>Planned <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chato, David J.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study <span class="hlt">axial</span> reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned <span class="hlt">axial</span> reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are <span class="hlt">modelled</span> using computational fluid dynamics. These <span class="hlt">models</span> show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6439667','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6439667"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> static mixer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sandrock, H.E.</p> <p>1982-05-06</p> <p>Static <span class="hlt">axial</span> mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The <span class="hlt">axial</span> mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA225705','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA225705"><span>Computerised <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Tomography (CAT)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-06-01</p> <p>OF COMPUTERISED <span class="hlt">AXIAL</span> TOMOGRAPHY Paragraph 1.1 ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT AND MARKET OF CAT Paragraph 1.2 EQUIPMENT Chapter 2 OPERATIONAL PRINCIPLE OF A CT...DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPUTERISED <span class="hlt">AXIAL</span> TOMOGRAPHY 1.1 Origin, development and marketing of the CAT The origin of the CAT goes back to 1961 when...count on wide commercial possibilities, in the international market . In particular, EMI entered, very forcefully, the American market , always</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090011264','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090011264"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> Halbach Magnetic Bearings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Axial</span> Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/763169','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/763169"><span>Review of <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.</p> <p>2000-03-01</p> <p>This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on <span class="hlt">axial</span> burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform <span class="hlt">axial</span> burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). <span class="hlt">Axial</span> <span class="hlt">modeling</span> studies, efforts related to the development of <span class="hlt">axial</span>-profile databases, and the determination of bounding <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16256987','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16256987"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> myopia induced by a monocularly-deprived facemask in guinea pigs: A non-invasive and effective <span class="hlt">model</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lu, Fan; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhao, Hailan; Wang, Ruiqing; Jia, Ding; Jiang, Liqin; Xie, Ruozhong; Qu, Jia</p> <p>2006-04-01</p> <p>This study evaluated the efficacy of a facemask, a non-invasive and potentially more reliable method, in inducing <span class="hlt">axial</span> myopia in guinea pigs. Thirty-six animals were randomly assigned to 3 groups: MDF (monocularly-deprived facemask, n=6), lid-suture (eyelids sutured monocularly, n=24) and normal control (free of form deprivation, n=6). All the groups underwent biometric measurement (refraction, corneal curvature and <span class="hlt">axial</span> length) prior to the experiment. All animals in the MDF group underwent biometric measurement at each of the 4 timepoints (2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of form deprivation). In the lid-sutured group, the animals were randomly assigned to 4 subgroups (n=6 each) and each subgroup underwent biometric measurement at one of the timepoints matching those of the MDF group. In the normal control group, all animals underwent biometric measurement at each of the timepoints matching those of the 2 experimental groups. Placement of a facemask on an animal took approximately 10 sec and all the facemasks remained in place at all timepoints. The procedure of lid-suture took at least 20 min for an animal and rupture of the sutures occurred in 50% of the animals after 4 weeks. The MDF eyes developed myopia from -2.21+/-2.11D (Mean+/-s.d.) at 2 weeks to -4.38+/-2.14 at 8 weeks (p<0.05 at all timepoints, compared to the contralateral eyes) with a lengthening of the vitreous chamber from 0.17+/-0.05 mm at 2 weeks to 0.29+/-0.12 mm at 8 weeks (p<0.01 at all timepoints, compared to the contralateral eyes). The lid-sutured eyes developed myopia from -2.38+/-1.21D at 2 weeks to -4.75+/-1.39D at 8 weeks (p<0.05 at all timepoints, compared to the contralateral eyes) with a lengthening of the vitreous chamber from 0.13+/-0.02 mm at 2 weeks to 0.30+/-0.10 mm at 8 weeks (p<0.05 at 2, 4, 8 weeks, but >0.05 at 6 weeks, compared to the contralateral eyes) and an increase in the radius of the corneal curvature (0.20+/-0.07 mm at 4 weeks, p<0.01; 0.17+/-0.05 mm at 8 weeks, p<0</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95a4020Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvD..95a4020Y"><span>Role of σ exchange in the γ p →ϕ p process and scaling with the f1 <span class="hlt">axial</span> vector meson from a Reggeized <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yu, Byung-Geel; Kim, Hungchong; Kong, Kook-Jin</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We investigate the role driven by the scalar meson σ exchange in the photoproduction of the vector meson ϕ (1020 ) off a proton by using a Reggeized <span class="hlt">model</span>. Based on the π0(135 )+σ (500 )+f2(1270 ) +Pomeron exchanges, we demonstrate that the σ exchange plays the role to reproduce the bump structure at the forward angle in the differential cross section as well as the peaking behavior in the total cross section observed in the CLAS Collaboration. We also discuss the possible observation of the scaled cross section s7d σ /d t at the production angle θ =9 0 ° from the CLAS data. It is found that the <span class="hlt">axial</span> vector meson f1(1285 ) exchange with the trajectory αf 1(t )=0.028 t +0.9 ±0.2 arising from the <span class="hlt">axial</span> anomaly of the QCD vacuum plays the role to clarify the scaling up to 5 GeV.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2290947','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2290947"><span>The mouse ileal lipid-binding protein gene: a <span class="hlt">model</span> for studying <span class="hlt">axial</span> patterning during gut morphogenesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Normal, chimeric-transgenic, and transgenic mice have been used to study the <span class="hlt">axial</span> patterns of ileal lipid-binding protein gene (Ilbp) expression during and after completion of gut morphogenesis. Ilbp is initially activated in enterocytes in bidirectional wave that expands proximally in the ileum and distally to the colon during late gestation and the first postnatal week. This activation occurs at the same time that a wave of cytodifferentiation of the gut endoderm is completing its unidirectional journey from duodenum to colon. The subsequent contraction of Ilbp's expression domain, followed by its reexpansion from the distal to proximal ileum, coincides with a critical period in gut morphogenesis (postnatal days 7-28) when its proliferative units (crypts) form, establish their final stem cell hierarchy, and then multiply through fission. The wave of reactivation is characterized by changing patterns of Ilbp expression: (a) at the proximal most boundary of the wave, villi contain a mixed population of scattered ileal lipid- binding protein (ILBP)-positive and ILBP-negative enterocytes derived from the same monoclonal crypt; (b) somewhat more distally, villi contain vertical coherent stripes of wholly ILBP-positive enterocytes derived from monoclonal crypts and adjacent, wholly ILBP-negative stripes of enterocytes emanating from other monoclonal crypts; and (c) more distally, all the enterocytes on a villus support Ilbp expression. Functional mapping studies of Ilbp's promoter in transgenic mice indicate that nucleotides -145 to +48 contain cis-acting elements sufficient to produce an appropriately directed distal-to-proximal wave of Ilbp activation in the ileum, to maintain an appropriate <span class="hlt">axial</span> distribution of monophenotypic wholly reporter-positive villi in the distal portion of the ileum, as well as striped and speckled villi in the proximal portion of its expression domain, and to correctly support reporter production in villus-associated ileal enterocytes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4528585','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4528585"><span>Walking dynamics are <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> (enough)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ankaralı, M. Mert; Sefati, Shahin; Madhav, Manu S.; Long, Andrew; Bastian, Amy J.; Cowan, Noah J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Many biological phenomena such as locomotion, circadian cycles and breathing are rhythmic in nature and can be <span class="hlt">modelled</span> as rhythmic dynamical systems. Dynamical systems <span class="hlt">modelling</span> often involves neglecting certain characteristics of a physical system as a <span class="hlt">modelling</span> convenience. For example, human locomotion is frequently treated as <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> about the sagittal plane. In this work, we test this assumption by examining human walking dynamics around the steady state (limit-cycle). Here, we adapt statistical cross-validation in order to examine whether there are statistically significant asymmetries and, even if so, test the consequences of assuming bilateral symmetry anyway. Indeed, we identify significant asymmetries in the dynamics of human walking, but nevertheless show that ignoring these asymmetries results in a more consistent and predictive <span class="hlt">model</span>. In general, neglecting evident characteristics of a system can be more than a <span class="hlt">modelling</span> convenience—it can produce a better <span class="hlt">model</span>. PMID:26236826</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRB..120.1053K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRB..120.1053K"><span>Variability of seismic source spectra, estimated stress drop, and radiated energy, derived from cohesive-zone <span class="hlt">models</span> of <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> and asymmetrical circular and elliptical ruptures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaneko, Y.; Shearer, P. M.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Large variability of earthquake stress drops and scaled energy has been commonly reported in the literature, but it is difficult to assess how much of this variability is caused by underlying physical source processes rather than simply observational uncertainties. Here we examine a variety of dynamically realistic rupture scenarios for circular and elliptical faults and investigate to what extent the variability in seismically estimated stress drops and scaled energy comes from differences in source geometry, rupture directivity, and rupture speeds. We numerically simulate earthquake source scenarios using a cohesive-zone <span class="hlt">model</span> with the small-scale yielding limit, where the solution approaches a singular crack <span class="hlt">model</span> with spontaneous healing of slip. Compared to <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> circular source <span class="hlt">models</span>, asymmetrical <span class="hlt">models</span> result in larger variability of estimated corner frequencies and scaled energy over the focal sphere. The general behavior of the spherical averages of corner frequencies and scaled energy in the subshear regime extends to the supershear regime, although shear Mach waves generated by the propagation of supershear rupture lead to much higher corner frequency and scaled energy estimates locally. Our results suggest that at least a factor of 2 difference in the spherical average of corner frequencies is expected in observational studies simply from variability in source characteristics almost independent of the actual stress drops, translating into a factor of 8 difference in estimated stress drops. Furthermore, radiation efficiency estimates derived from observed seismic spectra should not be directly interpreted as describing rupture properties unless there are independent constraints on rupture speed and geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AIPC..613.1069Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AIPC..613.1069Z"><span>On the development of co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> miniature pulse tube coolers for space applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Y.; Liang, J. T.; Zhu, W. Q.; Cai, J. H.; Ju, Y. L.</p> <p>2002-05-01</p> <p>Cryocoolers for cooling infrared sensors in space applications require high reliability, long lifetime, low power and minimum weight. In this paper we report work on a miniature pulse tube cooler specifically designed for such applications. A series of engineering <span class="hlt">model</span> co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> miniature pulse tube coolers with a flexure bearing linear compressor of 1 cc swept volume have been designed and fabricated in our laboratory. A theoretical <span class="hlt">model</span> is established based on the analyses of thermodynamic and hydrodynamic behaviors of oscillatory flows in regenerator, for performance prediction, optimization and as a rough guide in the early stages of system design. An experimental apparatus, including a hot wire anemometer, has been set up to study the flow resistance of regenerators under oscillatory flow conditions. The co-<span class="hlt">axial</span>, multi-bypass, and <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nozzle structure has been used in the coolers. We will present here the performance of two sizes of coolers with 9 mm and 8 mm diameter of cold fingers. The 9 mm cooler currently provides 500 mW net cooling power at 80 K with input power of 47 W, and the 8 mm cooler, provides 450 mW at 80 K with 51 W input power with a 65% efficient compressor. The cold fingers of our co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> pulse tube coolers have the similar size of miniature Stirling coolers and are the only one that could meet the geometry specifications of the Standard Advance Dewar Assembly (SADA) for thermal imaging systems in most military applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5300629','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5300629"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> modular torsatron</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Rome, J.A.; Harris, J.H.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A fusion reactor device is provided in which the magnetic fields for plasma confinement in a toroidal configuration is produced by a plurality of <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> modular coils arranged to form a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> modular torsatron referred to as a symmotron. Each of the identical modular coils is helically deformed and comprise one field period of the torsatron. Helical segments of each coil are connected by means of toroidally directed windbacks which may also provide part of the vertical field required for positioning the plasma. The stray fields of the windback segments may be compensated by toroidal coils. A variety of magnetic confinement flux surface configurations may be produced by proper modulation of the winding pitch of the helical segments of the coils, as in a conventional torsatron, winding the helix on a noncircular cross section and varying the poloidal and radial location of the windbacks and the compensating toroidal ring coils.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27436963','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27436963"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> waterbomb origami.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Yan; Feng, Huijuan; Ma, Jiayao; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The traditional waterbomb origami, produced from a pattern consisting of a series of vertices where six creases meet, is one of the most widely used origami patterns. From a rigid origami viewpoint, it generally has multiple degrees of freedom, but when the pattern is folded <span class="hlt">symmetrically</span>, the mobility reduces to one. This paper presents a thorough kinematic investigation on <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> folding of the waterbomb pattern. It has been found that the pattern can have two folding paths under certain circumstance. Moreover, the pattern can be used to fold thick panels. Not only do the additional constraints imposed to fold the thick panels lead to single degree of freedom folding, but the folding process is also kinematically equivalent to the origami of zero-thickness sheets. The findings pave the way for the pattern being readily used to fold deployable structures ranging from flat roofs to large solar panels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RSPSA.47250846C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RSPSA.47250846C"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> waterbomb origami</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Yan; Feng, Huijuan; Ma, Jiayao; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The traditional waterbomb origami, produced from a pattern consisting of a series of vertices where six creases meet, is one of the most widely used origami patterns. From a rigid origami viewpoint, it generally has multiple degrees of freedom, but when the pattern is folded <span class="hlt">symmetrically</span>, the mobility reduces to one. This paper presents a thorough kinematic investigation on <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> folding of the waterbomb pattern. It has been found that the pattern can have two folding paths under certain circumstance. Moreover, the pattern can be used to fold thick panels. Not only do the additional constraints imposed to fold the thick panels lead to single degree of freedom folding, but the folding process is also kinematically equivalent to the origami of zero-thickness sheets. The findings pave the way for the pattern being readily used to fold deployable structures ranging from flat roofs to large solar panels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007CQGra..24.2253F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007CQGra..24.2253F"><span>Static cylindrically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spacetimes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fjällborg, Mikael</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>We prove the existence of static solutions to the cylindrically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Einstein Vlasov system, and we show that the matter cylinder has finite extension in two of the three spatial dimensions. The same results are also proved for a quite general class of equations of state for perfect fluids coupled to the Einstein equations, extending the class of equations of state considered by Bicak et al (2004 Class. Quantum Grav.21 1583). We also obtain this result for the Vlasov Poisson system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1167405','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1167405"><span>An attempt to calibrate and validate a simple ductile failure <span class="hlt">model</span> against <span class="hlt">axial</span>-torsion experiments on Al 6061-T651</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei -Yang</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity <span class="hlt">model</span> with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the <span class="hlt">model</span> was com- pared against <span class="hlt">axial</span>-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material <span class="hlt">model</span> and interpreting the results of said <span class="hlt">model</span> are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity <span class="hlt">model</span> before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.145n4108C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.145n4108C"><span>A new <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> quasi-classical <span class="hlt">model</span> for electronically non-adiabatic processes: Application to the case of weak non-adiabatic coupling</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cotton, Stephen J.; Miller, William H.</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Previous work has shown how a <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> quasi-classical (SQC) windowing procedure can be used to quantize the initial and final electronic degrees of freedom in the Meyer-Miller (MM) classical vibronic (i.e, nuclear + electronic) Hamiltonian, and that the approach provides a very good description of electronically non-adiabatic processes within a standard classical molecular dynamics framework for a number of benchmark problems. This paper explores application of the SQC/MM approach to the case of very weak non-adiabatic coupling between the electronic states, showing (as anticipated) how the standard SQC/MM approach used to date fails in this limit, and then devises a new SQC windowing scheme to deal with it. Application of this new SQC <span class="hlt">model</span> to a variety of realistic benchmark systems shows that the new <span class="hlt">model</span> not only treats the weak coupling case extremely well, but it is also seen to describe the "normal" regime (of electronic transition probabilities ≳ 0.1) even more accurately than the previous "standard" <span class="hlt">model</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JMP....58c3503A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JMP....58c3503A"><span>N≥ 𝟐 <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> superpolynomials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alarie-Vézina, L.; Lapointe, L.; Mathieu, P.</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The theory of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> functions has been extended to the case where each variable is paired with an anticommuting one. The resulting expressions, dubbed superpolynomials, provide the natural N =1 supersymmetric version of the classical bases of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> functions. Here we consider the case where more than one independent anticommuting variable is attached to each ordinary variable. First, the N =2 super-version of the monomial, elementary, homogeneous <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> functions, as well as the power sums, is constructed systematically (using an exterior-differential formalism for the multiplicative bases), these functions being now indexed by a novel type of superpartitions. Moreover, the scalar product of power sums turns out to have a natural N =2 generalization which preserves the duality between the monomial and homogeneous bases. All these results are then generalized to an arbitrary value of N . Finally, for N =2 , the scalar product and the homogeneous functions are shown to have a one-parameter deformation, a result that prepares the ground for the yet-to-be-defined N =2 Jack superpolynomials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..GECMW6073K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016APS..GECMW6073K"><span>A self-consistent global <span class="hlt">model</span> of surface wave discharges with cylindrical or co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> structures: Ar or O2 fed with continuous or pulse-modulated power input</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kemaneci, Efe; Mitschker, Felix; Rudolph, Marcel; Szeremley, Daniel; Eremin, Denis; Awakowicz, Peter; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>A series of cylindrical and co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> surface wave discharges fed with either argon or oxygen is <span class="hlt">modelled</span> by a zero-dimensional global <span class="hlt">modelling</span> approach. Compared to a recent study of the cylindrical surface-wave discharges, a self-consistent estimation of the edge-to-center ratios are analytically defined and extended to include the co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> structures. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data of the considered discharges for continuous and pulse-modulated power input and a good agreement is obtained. Deutsch Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung via PluTO+.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26247105','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26247105"><span>Accurate Characterization of Ion Transport Properties in Binary <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Electrolytes Using In Situ NMR Imaging and Inverse <span class="hlt">Modeling</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sethurajan, Athinthra Krishnaswamy; Krachkovskiy, Sergey A; Halalay, Ion C; Goward, Gillian R; Protas, Bartosz</p> <p>2015-09-17</p> <p>We used NMR imaging (MRI) combined with data analysis based on inverse <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of the mass transport problem to determine ionic diffusion coefficients and transference numbers in electrolyte solutions of interest for Li-ion batteries. Sensitivity analyses have shown that accurate estimates of these parameters (as a function of concentration) are critical to the reliability of the predictions provided by <span class="hlt">models</span> of porous electrodes. The inverse <span class="hlt">modeling</span> (IM) solution was generated with an extension of the Planck-Nernst <span class="hlt">model</span> for the transport of ionic species in electrolyte solutions. Concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and transference numbers were derived using concentration profiles obtained from in situ (19)F MRI measurements. Material properties were reconstructed under minimal assumptions using methods of variational optimization to minimize the least-squares deviation between experimental and simulated concentration values with uncertainty of the reconstructions quantified using a Monte Carlo analysis. The diffusion coefficients obtained by pulsed field gradient NMR (PFG-NMR) fall within the 95% confidence bounds for the diffusion coefficient values obtained by the MRI+IM method. The MRI+IM method also yields the concentration dependence of the Li(+) transference number in agreement with trends obtained by electrochemical methods for similar systems and with predictions of theoretical <span class="hlt">models</span> for concentrated electrolyte solutions, in marked contrast to the salt concentration dependence of transport numbers determined from PFG-NMR data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22105701','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22105701"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> grading of inert matrix fuels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and <span class="hlt">axial</span> power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that <span class="hlt">axial</span> grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to <span class="hlt">model</span> the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an <span class="hlt">axial</span> grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the <span class="hlt">axial</span> direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16381069','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16381069"><span>The sigmoidally transformed cosine curve: a mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> for circadian rhythms with <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> non-sinusoidal shapes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marler, Matthew R; Gehrman, Philip; Martin, Jennifer L; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia</p> <p>2006-11-30</p> <p>We introduce a family of non-linear transformations of the traditional cosine curve used in the <span class="hlt">modelling</span> of biological rhythms. The non-linear transformation is the sigmoidal family, represented here by three family members: the Hill function, the anti-logistic function, and the arctangent function. These transforms add two additional parameters that must be estimated, in addition to the acrophase, MESOR, and amplitude (and period in some applications), but the estimated curves have shapes requiring many more than two additional harmonics to achieve the same fit when <span class="hlt">modelled</span> by harmonic regression. Particular values of the additional parameters can yield rectangular waves, narrow pulses, wide pulses, and for rectangular waves (representing alternating 'on' and 'off' states) the times of onset and offset (hence duration, as when <span class="hlt">modelling</span> the duration of the large night-time melatonin secretory epoch). We illustrate the sigmoidally transformed cosine curves, and compare them to harmonic regression <span class="hlt">modelling</span>, in a sample of eight activity recordings made on patients in a nursing home.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=model+AND+missing+AND+data&pg=6&id=EJ749043','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=model+AND+missing+AND+data&pg=6&id=EJ749043"><span>Maximum Likelihood Methods in Treating Outliers and <span class="hlt">Symmetrically</span> Heavy-Tailed Distributions for Nonlinear Structural Equation <span class="hlt">Models</span> with Missing Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Sik-Yum; Xia, Ye-Mao</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>By means of more than a dozen user friendly packages, structural equation <span class="hlt">models</span> (SEMs) are widely used in behavioral, education, social, and psychological research. As the underlying theory and methods in these packages are vulnerable to outliers and distributions with longer-than-normal tails, a fundamental problem in the field is the…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=188326&keyword=skull&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78685559&CFTOKEN=48873356','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=188326&keyword=skull&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78685559&CFTOKEN=48873356"><span>Altered <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Skeletal Development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">axial</span> skeleton is routinely examined in standard developmental toxicity bioassays and has proven to be sensitive to a wide variety of chemical agents. Dysmorphogenesis in the skull, vertebral column and ribs has been described in both human populations and in laboratory anima...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4367312','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4367312"><span>Validation of a CFD <span class="hlt">Model</span> by Using 3D Sonic Anemometers to Analyse the Air Velocity Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Fans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>García-Ramos, F. Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A. Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) <span class="hlt">model</span> of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two <span class="hlt">axial</span> fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD <span class="hlt">model</span> was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The <span class="hlt">model</span> was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD <span class="hlt">model</span> were not significantly different from the measured values. PMID:25621611</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880016621','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880016621"><span>A study of the dynamics of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> atmosphere-ocean <span class="hlt">model</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Charney, J. G.; Kalnay, E.; Schneider, E.; Shukla, J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A numerical <span class="hlt">model</span> of the circulation of a coupled axisymmetric atmosphere-ocean system was constructed to investigate the physical factors governing the location and intensity of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) over oceans and over land. The results of several numerical integrations are presented to illustrate the interaction of the individual atmospheric and oceanic circulations. It is shown that the ITCA cannot be located at the equator because the atmosphere-ocean system is unstable for lateral displacements of the ITCA from an equilibrium position at the equator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26ES...49c2016B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26ES...49c2016B"><span>Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Flow in an <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Rotor and Impeller for Large Storage Pump</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bosioc, A. I.; Muntean, S.; Draghici, I.; Anton, L. E.</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In hydropower systems among hydropower plants there are integrated pumping stations (PS). In order to ensure higher flow rate, the pumps have constructive differences besides regular. Consequently, the complex shape of the suction-elbow with <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> inlet generates an unsteady flow which is ingested by impeller. These phenomena's also generate stronger unsteady flow conditions, such as stall, wakes, turbulence and pressure fluctuations, which affect the overall mechanical behaviour of the pump with vibration, noise and radial and <span class="hlt">axial</span> forces on the rotor. Alternatively, an <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotor can be installed in front of the impeller. In this case, the flow non-uniformity will be decreased and the static pressure will be increased at the impeller inlet. Consequently, the efficiency behaviour practically remains unchanged while the cavitational behaviour is improved. From the assembly between <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotor and centrifugal impeller, the <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotor usually works in cavitation and is often replaced. The paper investigates experimentally and numerically the comparison between pump impeller without and with <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotor hydrodynamics taking into account the flow given by the <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> suction elbow. Full three-dimensional turbulent numerical investigation of the <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> suction elbow, with <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotor and without, pump impeller and volute are performed. The hydrodynamic analysis confirms that once the <span class="hlt">axial</span> rotor is mounted in front of the pump impeller increase the static pressure and the incidence angle is improved at the inlet of the pump impeller.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3634166','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3634166"><span>Skew-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Random Effect <span class="hlt">Models</span> with Application to a Preventive Cohort Study: Improving Outcomes in Low Back Pain Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mansourian, Marjan; Mahdiyeh, Zahra; Park, Jongbae J; Haghjooyejavanmard, Shaghayegh</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: To investigate the respective contribution of various biologic and psychosocial factors, especially Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) as a main outcome, in the natural history of acute low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate the impact of this condition on HRQOL. Methods: In a prospective cohort study For 24 weeks, 150 patients were assessed at an outpatient clinic in Korea consulting for low back and confirmed disc herniation duration at inclusion and treated with treatment package comprised of herbal medicines, acupuncture, bee venom acupuncture, and a Korean version of spinal manipulation (Chuna). Study participants were evaluated at baseline and every 4 weeks for 24 weeks. Low back intensity levels were measured on a visual analog scale (0-10), back function was evaluated with the Oswestry Disability Index (0-100), disability assessed by HRQOL assessed by the short form 36 health survey (0-100 in 8 different sub-categories). Results: Out of 150 patients, 128 completed the 24 weeks of traditional therapy. Patients reported improvements SF-36 outcome measures. At the completion of the study, low back pain scores improved by a mean of 3.3 (95% CI = 2.8 to 3.8). According to the results of our <span class="hlt">modeling</span>, low back intensity level, back function and BMI measures had significant effects on quality of life during study. Interpreting the coefficients of <span class="hlt">modeling</span>, the impact of the decreasing acute LBP episode on HRQOL by VAS and ODI outcomes, was high and important. Conclusions: This study highlights the large contribution of integrative package therapy as an effective preventive method for improving LBP patient's HRQOL. PMID:23626884</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4564843','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4564843"><span>The Robust Assembly of Small <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Nanoshells</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wagner, Jef; Zandi, Roya</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Highly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nanoshells are found in many biological systems, such as clathrin cages and viral shells. Many studies have shown that <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> shells appear in nature as a result of the free-energy minimization of a generic interaction between their constituent subunits. We examine the physical basis for the formation of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> shells, and by using a minimal <span class="hlt">model</span>, demonstrate that these structures can readily grow from the irreversible addition of identical subunits. Our <span class="hlt">model</span> of nanoshell assembly shows that the spontaneous curvature regulates the size of the shell while the mechanical properties of the subunit determine the symmetry of the assembled structure. Understanding the minimum requirements for the formation of closed nanoshells is a necessary step toward engineering of nanocontainers, which will have far-reaching impact in both material science and medicine. PMID:26331253</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26331253','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26331253"><span>The Robust Assembly of Small <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Nanoshells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wagner, Jef; Zandi, Roya</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Highly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nanoshells are found in many biological systems, such as clathrin cages and viral shells. Many studies have shown that <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> shells appear in nature as a result of the free-energy minimization of a generic interaction between their constituent subunits. We examine the physical basis for the formation of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> shells, and by using a minimal <span class="hlt">model</span>, demonstrate that these structures can readily grow from the irreversible addition of identical subunits. Our <span class="hlt">model</span> of nanoshell assembly shows that the spontaneous curvature regulates the size of the shell while the mechanical properties of the subunit determine the symmetry of the assembled structure. Understanding the minimum requirements for the formation of closed nanoshells is a necessary step toward engineering of nanocontainers, which will have far-reaching impact in both material science and medicine.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSV...393..133S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JSV...393..133S"><span>Wave propagation in <span class="hlt">axially</span> moving periodic strings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an <span class="hlt">axially</span> moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively <span class="hlt">models</span> various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and <span class="hlt">axial</span> motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the <span class="hlt">axially</span> moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers. This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus, for such structures, by frequency band-gaps it is proposed to understand frequency ranges in which the primary component of the compound wave attenuates. Such frequency band-gaps can be present for a moving periodic string, but only if its <span class="hlt">axial</span> velocity is lower than the transverse wave speed, and, the higher the <span class="hlt">axial</span> velocity, the narrower the frequency band-gaps. The revealed effects could be of potential importance for applications, e.g. they indicate that due to spatial inhomogeneity, oscillations of <span class="hlt">axially</span> moving periodic chains always involve a multitude of frequencies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830008510','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19830008510"><span>Cracked shells under skew-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> loading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lelale, F.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for <span class="hlt">axially</span> and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5341263','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5341263"><span>Use of additional fission sources or scattering sources to <span class="hlt">model</span> inward <span class="hlt">axial</span> leakages in fast-reactor analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.</p> <p>1981-10-01</p> <p>When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, bucklings are normally used to <span class="hlt">model</span> leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. If the net leakage for a given energy group is outward (positive), the buckling is positive, and buckling methods work well. However, if the new leakage for a given energy group is inward (negative), the buckling is negative and can lead to numerical instabilities (oscillations in the iterative flux calculation). This report discusses two equivalent nonbuckling methods to <span class="hlt">model</span> inward leakages. One method (the chi/sub g/ method) <span class="hlt">models</span> these incoming neutrons by additional fission sources. The other method (the ..sigma../sub s/(1 ..-->.. g) method) <span class="hlt">models</span> them by increased downscatter sources. The derivation of the two methods is shown, and the flux spectra obtained by their use are compared with those obtained from two-dimensional (RZ) calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...07..022B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JHEP...07..022B"><span>Charged lepton flavour violcxmation and neutrinoless double beta decay in left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> with type I+II seesaw</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borah, Debasish; Dasgupta, Arnab</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We study the new physics contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) half-life and lepton flavour violation (LFV) amplitude within the framework of the minimal left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> (MLRSM). Considering all possible new physics contributions to 0 νββ and charged lepton flavour violation μ → eγ , μ → 3 e in MLRSM, we constrain the parameter space of the <span class="hlt">model</span> from the requirement of satisfying existing experimental bounds. Assuming the breaking scale of the left-right symmetry to be O (1) TeV accessible at ongoing and near future collider experiments, we consider the most general type I+II seesaw mechanism for the origin of tiny neutrino masses. Choosing the relative contribution of the type II seesaw term allows us to calculate the right handed neutrino mass matrix as well as Dirac neutrino mass matrix as a function of the <span class="hlt">model</span> parameters, required for the calculation of 0νββ and LFV amplitudes. We show that such a general type I+II seesaw structure results in more allowed parameter space compared to individual type I or type II seesaw cases considered in earlier works. In particular, we show that the doubly charged scalar masses M Δ are allowed to be smaller than the heaviest right handed neutrino mass M N from the present experimental bounds in these scenarios which is in contrast to earlier results with individual type I or type II seesaw showing M Δ > M N .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1769m0018S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1769m0018S"><span>Realistic <span class="hlt">modelling</span> of the tool kinematics of radial-<span class="hlt">axial</span> ring rolling machines in finite element simulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schwich, Gideon; Jenkouk, Vahid; Hirt, Gerhard</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>For simulating metal forming processes by means of Finite Element programs it is required to define all tool motions beforehand. This is one of the major difficulties of the conventional Finite Elements Analysis (FEA) for simulating ring rolling processes, since in reality the motions are controlled by closed-loop control systems according to current sensor values. A solution is given by integrating control algorithms into the Finite Element <span class="hlt">model</span>. In a previous publication the authors have presented a method in which the algorithms of an industrial control system of ring rolling machines are coupled with the Finite Element <span class="hlt">model</span>. Although this approach enables <span class="hlt">modelling</span> with realistic kinematic conditions, it has the major drawback that the algorithms of the used control are not disclosed to the users. Hence, it will not be possible to modify the controller for new processes and process optimization. In this paper, therefore, a set of reasonable and simple control algorithms is introduced, which can be used as basis for further improvements of existing control algorithms of ring rolling. The developed approach considers all relevant sensors of ring rolling machines. Using the developed <span class="hlt">model</span> a ring rolling simulations is carried out and compared to the corresponding experimental results. The results show very good agreement in terms of the ring geometry and the machine loads.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010OptLT..42.1014C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010OptLT..42.1014C"><span>All-optical <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> ternary logic gate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chattopadhyay, Tanay</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> ternary number (radix=3) has three logical states (1¯, 0, 1). It is very much useful in carry free arithmetical operation. Beside this, the logical operation using this type of number system is also effective in high speed computation and communication in multi-valued logic. In this literature all-optical circuits for three basic <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> ternary logical operations (inversion, MIN and MAX) are proposed and described. Numerical simulation verifies the theoretical <span class="hlt">model</span>. In this present scheme the different ternary logical states are represented by different polarized state of light. Terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) based interferometric switch has been used categorically in this manuscript.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990087378&hterms=buckling&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dbuckling','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990087378&hterms=buckling&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dbuckling"><span>Elastic Buckling of Laminated Plates Under Varying <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Stresses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Badir, A.; Hu, H.</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The elastic buckling load of simply supported rectangular composite plates subjected to a second degree parabolic variation of <span class="hlt">axial</span> stresses in the longitudinal direction is calculated using analytical methods. The variation of <span class="hlt">axial</span> stresses is equilibrated by nonuniform shear stresses along the plate edges and transverse normal stresses. Numerical results are reported for three different cases: (1) orthotropic plates, (2) <span class="hlt">symmetrically</span> laminated plates with multiple generally orthotropic layers exhibiting coupling between normal moments and twist, and twisting moment and normal curvatures, and (3) unsymmetrically laminated plates. Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to calculate the buckling load. An approximate solution using "reduced bending stiffness" is adopted for unsymmetrically laminated plates. The influence of the aspect ratio is examined, and the results are compared with plates subjected to uniform <span class="hlt">axial</span> stresses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1315..475P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1315..475P"><span>Investigation of Aluminum-Copper Tube Hydroforming with <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Feeding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Parto D., M.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.; Liaghat, Gh.; Naeini, H. Moslemi; Panahizadeh R., V.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Hydroforming of a two-layered Aluminum-Copper tube is investigated numerically and experimentally. Pressure is applied through a nonlinear path along with <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> <span class="hlt">axial</span> feeding. ABAQUS/Explicit commercial code is used for finite element simulation of the process. ASTM C11000 Copper alloy is used as inner layer and ASTM AA1050A Aluminum alloy is used as outer layer. The simulation results show that the part can be successfully formed under internal pressure of 40 MPa with 8 mm <span class="hlt">axial</span> displacement. Stress distributions on both inner and outer tubes are compared and maximum thinning on their wall is also discussed. Different friction conditions are applied on the process using different coefficients of friction and their effects are investigated on thinning percentage of inner and outer tubes and also on <span class="hlt">axial</span> feeding. It is observed that finite element results are in good agreement with experimental results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1769q0046I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1769q0046I"><span><span class="hlt">Modeling</span> the kinematics of multi-<span class="hlt">axial</span> composite laminates as a stacking of 2D TIF plies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ibañez, Ruben; Abisset-Chavanne, Emmanuelle; Chinesta, Francisco; Huerta, Antonio</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Thermoplastic composites are widely considered in structural parts. In this paper attention is paid to sheet forming of continuous fiber laminates. In the case of unidirectional prepregs, the ply constitutive equation is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as a transversally isotropic fluid, that must satisfy both the fiber inextensibility as well as the fluid incompressibility. When the stacking sequence involves plies with different orientations the kinematics of each ply during the laminate deformation varies significantly through the composite thickness. In our former works we considered two different approaches when simulating the squeeze flow induced by the laminate compression, the first based on a penalty formulation and the second one based on the use of Lagrange multipliers. In the present work we propose an alternative approach that consists in <span class="hlt">modeling</span> each ply involved in the laminate as a transversally isotropic fluid - TIF - that becomes 2D as soon as incompressibility constraint and plane stress assumption are taken into account. Thus, composites laminates can be analyzed as a stacking of 2D TIF <span class="hlt">models</span> that could eventually interact by using adequate friction laws at the inter-ply interfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10593693','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10593693"><span>Myocardial mechanics, energetics, and hemodynamics during intraaortic balloon and transvalvular <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow hemopump support with a bovine <span class="hlt">model</span> of ischemic cardiac dysfunction.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marks, J D; Pantalos, G M; Long, J W; Kinoshita, M; Everett, S D; Olsen, D B</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Unlike the mechanisms of intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) support, the mechanisms by which transvalvular <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow Hemopump (HP) support benefit dysfunctional myocardium are less clearly understood. To help elucidate these mechanisms, hemodynamic, metabolic, and mechanical indexes of left ventricular function were measured during conditions of control, ischemic dysfunction, IABP support, and HP support. A large animal (calf) <span class="hlt">model</span> of left ventricular dysfunction was created with multiple coronary ligations. Peak intraventricular pressure increased with HP support and decreased with IABP support. Intramyocardial pressure (an indicator of intramyocardial stress), time rate of pressure change (an indicator of contractility), and left ventricular myocardial oxygen consumption decreased with IABP and HP support. Left ventricular work decreased with HP support and increased with IABP support. During HP support, indexes of wall stress, work, and contractility, all primary determinants of oxygen consumption, were reduced. During IABP support, indexes of wall stress and contractility were reduced and external work increased. These changes were attributed primarily to changes in ventricular preload, and geometry for HP support, and to a reduction in afterload for IABP support. These findings support the hypothesis that both HP and IABP support reduce intramyocardial stress development and the corresponding oxygen consumption, although via different mechanisms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JEMat..46.1163I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JEMat..46.1163I"><span>The Effects of Self-Discharge on the Performance of <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Electric Double-Layer Capacitors and Active Electrolyte-Enhanced Supercapacitors: Insights from <span class="hlt">Modeling</span> and Simulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ike, Innocent S.; Sigalas, Iakovos; Iyuke, Sunny E.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The effects of self-discharge on the performance of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and active electrolyte-enhanced supercapacitors were examined by incorporating self-discharge into electrochemical capacitor <span class="hlt">models</span> during charging and discharging. The sources of self-discharge in capacitors were side reactions or redox reactions and several impurities and electric double-layer (EDL) instability. The effects of self-discharge during capacitor storage was negligible since it took a fully charged capacitor a minimum of 14.0 days to be entirely discharged by self-discharge in all conditions studied, hence self-discharge in storage condition can be ignored. The first and second charge-discharge cycle energy efficiencies η_{{{{E}}1}} and η_{{{{E}}2}} of a capacitor of electrode effective conductivity α1 = 0.05 S/cm with only EDL instability self-discharge with current density J_{{VR}} = 1.25 × 10-3 A/cm2 were 72.33% and 72.34%, respectively. Also, energy efficiencies η_{{{{E}}1}} and η_{{{{E}}2}} of a similar capacitor with both side reactions and redox reactions and EDL instability self-discharges with current densities J_{{VR}} = 0.00125 A/cm2 and J_{{{{VR}}1}} = 0.0032 A/cm2 were 38.13% and 38.14% respectively, compared with 84.24% and 84.25% in a similar capacitor without self-discharge. A capacitor with only EDL instability self-discharge and that with both side reactions and redox reactions and EDL instability self-discharge lost 9.73 Wh and 28.38 Wh of energy, respectively, through self-discharge during charging and discharging. Hence, EDLCs charging and discharging time is significantly dependent on the self-discharge rate which are too large to be ignored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002871&hterms=microsoft+corporation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmicrosoft%2Bcorporation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940002871&hterms=microsoft+corporation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dmicrosoft%2Bcorporation"><span>PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF <span class="hlt">AXIAL</span> FLOW TURBINES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Glassman, A. J.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of <span class="hlt">axial</span>-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span>, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat <span class="hlt">model</span>, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4248283','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4248283"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> Plane Optical Microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present <span class="hlt">axial</span> plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780008374','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780008374"><span><span class="hlt">Axially</span> grooved heat pipe study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>A technology evaluation study on <span class="hlt">axially</span> grooved heat pipes is presented. The state-of-the-art is reviewed and present and future requirements are identified. Analytical <span class="hlt">models</span>, the Groove Analysis Program (GAP) and a closed form solution, were developed to facilitate parametric performance evaluations. GAP provides a numerical solution of the differential equations which govern the hydrodynamic flow. The <span class="hlt">model</span> accounts for liquid recession, liquid/vapor shear interaction, puddle flow as well as laminar and turbulent vapor flow conditions. The closed form solution was developed to reduce computation time and complexity in parametric evaluations. It is applicable to laminar and ideal charge conditions, liquid/vapor shear interaction, and an empirical liquid flow factor which accounts for groove geometry and liquid recession effects. The validity of the closed form solution is verified by comparison with GAP predictions and measured data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23915959','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23915959"><span>Non-rigid response of the trunk to dynamic <span class="hlt">axial</span> loading: an evaluation of current <span class="hlt">modelling</span> assumptions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McGill, S M; Thorstensson, A; Norman, R W</p> <p>1989-02-01</p> <p>Most biomechanical <span class="hlt">models</span> of the trunk and limb system represent the segments as rigid links joined with pins. The implication of this simplifying assumption is that dynamic loads applied to the body are instantaneously transmitted through the linkage with no distortion of the applied force-time waveform. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this assumption was justifiable for loads applied to the hands or shoulders and transmitted through the trunk to the bottom of the pelvis. If not, the intent was to find a transfer function relating load inputs applied to the top of the trunk and outputs measured at the bottom of the trunk. Loads were manually applied to a force transducer attached to a shoulder yoke or to a hand-held loading pan mounted on three subjects. The subjects sat both erect and slouched and also varied the trunk stiffness by voluntarily changing trunk muscle activation. Subjects sat on a rigid steel stool mounted on a force plate from which force outputs were recorded. In addition, a few case studies were performed; some trials utilized light impacts by a hammer to the transducer mounted on the crown of the bare head and in other trials the body was in a standing (lifting) posture. The results indicated that the mechanical response is indeed time dependent. For applied forces with a rise time less than 20 ms (hammer impact) the trunk system reduced the magnitude of the force peaks by up to 40%. However, for applied loads with rise times from about 30 to 300 ms the peak output force was larger than the applied force peak. This was due to inertial effects of the upper body mass as it 'rebounded' from the applied load. During these conditions of biologically generated applied forces, the output could be reasonably reconstructed by processing the input signal through a Butterworth second order low pass filter with a cutoff frequency of 7·5 Hz, a gain and in some cases, a shift in time up to 20 ms. The assumption of rigid body segments in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10196790','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10196790"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> focusing of energy from a hypervelocity impact on earth</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Boslough, M.B.; Chael, E.P.; Trucano, T.G.; Crawford, D.A.</p> <p>1994-12-01</p> <p>We have performed computational simulations to determine how energy from a large hypervelocity impact on the Earth`s surface would couple to its interior. Because of the first-order <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry of both the impact energy source and the stress-wave velocity structure of the Earth, a disproportionate amount of energy is dissipated along the axis defined by the impact point and its antipode (point opposite the impact). For a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> and homogeneous Earth <span class="hlt">model</span>, all the impact energy that is radiated as seismic waves into the Earth at a given takeoff angle (ray parameter), independent of azimuthal direction, is refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Material on or near the axis of symmetry experiences more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere, and therefore experiences more irreversible heating. The focusing is most intense in the upper mantle, within the asthenosphere, where seismic energy is most effectively converted to heat. For a sufficiently energetic impact, this mechanism might generate enough local heating to create an isostatic instability leading to uplift, possibly resulting in rifting, volcanism, or other rearrangement of the interior dynamics of the planet. These simulations demonstrate how hypervelocity impact energy can be transported to the Earth`s interior, supporting the possibility of a causal link between large impacts on Earth and major internally-driven geophysical processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhA...47p5302L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhA...47p5302L"><span>{PT}-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> optical superlattices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Longhi, Stefano</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>The spectral and localization properties of {PT}-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> optical superlattices, either infinitely extended or truncated at one side, are theoretically investigated, and the criteria that ensure a real energy spectrum are derived. The analysis is applied to the case of superlattices describing a complex ( {PT}-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span>) extension of the Harper Hamiltonian in the rational case.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA604022','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA604022"><span>Representation of Fuzzy <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Relations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1986-03-19</p> <p>Std Z39-18 REPRESENTATION OF FUZZY <span class="hlt">SYMMETRIC</span> RELATIONS L. Valverde Dept. de Matematiques i Estadistica Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Avda...REPRESENTATION OF FUZZY <span class="hlt">SYMMETRIC</span> RELATIONS L. "Valverde* Dept. de Matematiques i Estadistica Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya Avda. Diagonal, 649</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23228917','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23228917"><span>Are <span class="hlt">axial</span> and radial flow chromatography different?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M</p> <p>2013-01-04</p> <p>Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared <span class="hlt">axial</span> and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical <span class="hlt">models</span> we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between <span class="hlt">axial</span> and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=52827','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=52827"><span>Tensor species and <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> functions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Méndez, M</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>An equivariant representation of the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> group Sn (equivariant representation from here on) is defined as a particular type of tensor species. For any tensor species R the characteristic generating function of R is defined in a way that generalizes the Frobenius characters of representations of the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> groups. If R is an equivariant representation, then the characteristic is a homogeneous <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> function. The combinatorial operations on equivariant representations correspond to formal operations on the respective characteristic functions. In particular, substitution of equivariant representations corresponds to plethysm of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> functions. Equivariant representations are constructed that have as characteristic the elementary, complete, and Schur functions. Bijective proofs are given for the formulas that connect them with the monomial <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> functions. PMID:11607233</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21032461','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21032461"><span>Conformally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> traversable wormholes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Boehmer, Christian G.; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.</p> <p>2007-10-15</p> <p>Exact solutions of traversable wormholes are found under the assumption of spherical symmetry and the existence of a nonstatic conformal symmetry, which presents a more systematic approach in searching for exact wormhole solutions. In this work, a wide variety of solutions are deduced by considering choices for the form function, a specific linear equation of state relating the energy density and the pressure anisotropy, and various phantom wormhole geometries are explored. A large class of solutions impose that the spatial distribution of the exotic matter is restricted to the throat neighborhood, with a cutoff of the stress-energy tensor at a finite junction interface, although asymptotically flat exact solutions are also found. Using the 'volume integral quantifier', it is found that the conformally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> phantom wormhole geometries may, in principle, be constructed by infinitesimally small amounts of averaged null energy condition violating matter. Considering the tidal acceleration traversability conditions for the phantom wormhole geometry, specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity are also deduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030064213','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030064213"><span>Investigations on Experimental Impellers for <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Blowers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Encke, W.</p> <p>1947-01-01</p> <p>A selection of measurements obtained on experimental impellers for <span class="hlt">axial</span> blowers will be reported. In addition to characteristic curves plotted for low and for high peripheral velocities, proportions and blade sections for six different blower <span class="hlt">models</span> and remarks on the design of blowers will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23509385','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23509385"><span>Complex PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yan, Zhenya</p> <p>2013-04-28</p> <p>The complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nonlinear wave <span class="hlt">models</span> have drawn much attention in recent years since the complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> extensions of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation were presented in 2007. In this review, we focus on the study of the complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nonlinear Schrödinger equation and Burgers equation. First of all, we briefly introduce the basic property of complex symmetry. We then report on exact solutions of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations (known as the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates) with several complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> potentials. Finally, some complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> extension principles are used to generate some complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> nonlinear wave equations starting from both -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> (e.g. the KdV equation) and non- -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> (e.g. the Burgers equation) nonlinear wave equations. In particular, we discuss exact solutions of some representative ones of the complex -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Burgers equation in detail.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21486092','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21486092"><span>Improper hydrogen bonded cyclohexane C-Hax···Yax contacts: theoretical predictions and experimental evidence from 1H NMR spectroscopy of suitable <span class="hlt">axial</span> cyclohexane <span class="hlt">models</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kolocouris, Antonios; Zervos, Nikolaos; De Proft, Frank; Koch, Andreas</p> <p>2011-06-03</p> <p>C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts are a textbook prototype of steric hindrance in organic chemistry. The nature of these contacts is investigated in this work. MP2/6-31+G(d,p) calculations predicted the presence of improper hydrogen bonded C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts of different strength in substituted cyclohexane rings. To support the theoretical predictions with experimental evidence, several synthetic 2-substituted adamantane analogues (1-24) with suitable improper H-bonded C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts of different strength were used as <span class="hlt">models</span> of a substituted cyclohexane ring. The (1)H NMR signal separation, Δδ(γ-CH(2)), within the cyclohexane ring γ-CH(2)s is raised when the MP2/6-31+G(d,p) calculated parameters, reflecting the strength of the H-bonded C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contact, are increased. In molecules with enhanced improper H-bonded contacts C-H(ax)···Y(ax), like those having sterically crowded contacts (Y(ax) = t-Bu) or contacts including considerable electrostatic attractions (Y(ax) = O-C or O═C) the calculated DFT steric energies of the γ-<span class="hlt">axial</span> hydrogens are considerably reduced reflecting their electron cloud compression. The results suggest that the proton H(ax) electron cloud compression, caused by the C-H(ax)···Y(ax) contacts, and the resulting increase in Δδ(γ-CH(2)) value can be effected not just from van der Waals spheres compression, but more generally from electrostatic attraction forces and van der Waals repulsion, both of which are improper H-bonding components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790013200','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19790013200"><span>GEOS <span class="hlt">axial</span> booms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schmidt, G. K.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>A booms and mechanisms subsystem was designed, developed, and qualified for the geostationary scientific satellite GEOS. Part of this subsystem consist of four <span class="hlt">axial</span> booms consisting of one pair of 1 m booms and one pair of 2.5 m booms. Each of these booms is carrying one bird cage electric field sensor. Alignment accuracy requirements led to a telescopic type solution. Deployment is performed by pressurized nitrogen. At deployment in orbit two of these booms showed some anomalies and one of these two deployed only about 80%. Following this malfunction a detailed failure investigation was performed resulting in a design modification of some critical components as release mechanism, guide sleeves of the telescopic elements, and pressure system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T41B..10C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.T41B..10C"><span>From mode I cracking to dilatancy, shear, and compaction banding: Constraints from axisymmetric and poly-<span class="hlt">axial</span> experiments and numerical <span class="hlt">models</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chemenda, A. I.; Jorand, C.; Petit, J.; Nguyen, S.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Dilatancy bands were recently obtained in conventional axisymmetric extension tests on a synthetic physical rock analogue (granular, frictional, cohesive and dilatant) material GRAM1 at a relatively low mean stress σ within range σd < σ < σs , where σd and σs are experimentally constrained values (Chemenda et al., JGR, 2011). The walls of the opened bands have plumose morphology defined by the decohesion pattern of the material within the band, which have a complex 3-D structure. At σ < σd , the sample rupture occurs through mode I cracking and results in smooth fracture surfaces. With σ increase at σ > σs , the bands become inclined to σ1 , resulting in dilatant shear and then in compactive shear bands that have an irregular structure and geometry at a micro-scale. Pure compaction bands were not obtained (at least not evidenced) in the extension tests, but they were generated in the GRAM1 compression tests as previously in the porous rocks. At lower pressure in the compression tests were obtained compactive shear and dilatant shear bands as well as <span class="hlt">axial</span> splitting fractures that could be originated as dilatancy bands. We also present results from poly-<span class="hlt">axial</span> tests conducted with material GRAM2 that have slightly different properties than GRAM1. The parallelepiped GRAM2 samples are first subject to the isotropic stress σ0 and then to the uniaxial unloading under plane-strain conditions. At some stage of this process, the sample loses stability and is affected by regular networks of localization bands/fractures whose spacing depends on the loading conditions. The band type changes with the initial mean stress σ0 in the same way as in the above axisymmetric tests where normally only one band is formed. The angle ψ between the bands and σ1 direction continuously increases with σ0 . At sufficiently low σ0 , ψ = 0, which corresponds to the dilatancy bands. Their borders bear plumose features very similar to those on natural joint surfaces. Different</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005E%26PSL.233..247T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005E%26PSL.233..247T"><span>Inclination flattening and the geocentric <span class="hlt">axial</span> dipole hypothesis [rapid communication</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tauxe, Lisa</p> <p>2005-05-01</p> <p>William Gilbert first articulated what has come to be known as the geocentric <span class="hlt">axial</span> dipole hypothesis. The GAD hypothesis is the principle on which paleogeographic reconstructions rely to constrain paleolatitude. For decades, there have been calls for permanent non-dipole contributions to the time-averaged field. Recently, these have demanded large contributions of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> octupole, which, if valid, would call into question the general utility of the GAD hypothesis. In the process of geological recording of the geomagnetic field, "Earth filters" distort the directions. Many processes, for example, sedimentary inclination flattening and random tilting, can lead to a net shallowing of the observed direction. Therefore, inclinations that are shallower than expected from GAD can be explained by recording biases, northward transport, or non-dipole geomagnetic fields. Using paleomagnetic data from the last 5 million years from well-constrained lava flow data allows the construction of a statistical geomagnetic field <span class="hlt">model</span>. Such a <span class="hlt">model</span> can predict not only the average expected direction for a given latitude, but also the shape of the distribution of directions produced by secular variation. The elongation of predicted directions varies as a function of latitude (from significantly elongate in the up/down direction at the equator to circularly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> at the poles). Sedimentary inclination flattening also works in a predictable manner producing elongations that are stretched side to side and the degree of flattening depending on the inclination of the applied field and a "flattening factor" f. The twin tools of the predicted elongation/inclination relationship characteristic of the geomagnetic field for the past 5 million years and the distortion of the directions predicted from sedimentary inclination flattening allows us to find the flattening factor that yields corrected directions with an elongation and average inclination consistent with the statistical field</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18177598','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18177598"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> disease in psoriatic arthritis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gladman, Dafna D</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>The definition of <span class="hlt">axial</span> disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of <span class="hlt">axial</span> disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvA..88f3840P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvA..88f3840P"><span>Integrability of PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> dimers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pickton, J.; Susanto, H.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The coupled discrete linear and Kerr nonlinear Schrödinger equations with gain and loss describing transport on dimers with parity-time (PT)-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> potentials are considered. The <span class="hlt">model</span> is relevant among others to experiments in optical couplers and proposals on Bose-Einstein condensates in PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> double-well potentials. It is known that the <span class="hlt">models</span> are integrable. Here, the integrability is exploited further to construct the phase portraits of the system. A pendulum equation with a linear potential and a constant force for the phase difference between the fields is obtained, which explains the presence of unbounded solutions above a critical threshold parameter. The behavior of all solutions of the system, including changes in the topological structure of the phase plane, is then discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JRPC...12.1070K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JRPC...12.1070K"><span>Compressive strength of <span class="hlt">axially</span> loaded composite cylinders</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kollar, Laszlo P.; Springer, George C.; Spingarn, Jay; McColskey, J. D.</p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p>Tests were performed to measure the failure loads of <span class="hlt">axially</span> compressed glass-fiber-reinforced and graphite-fiber-reinforced composite cylinders. The data were compared with the results of a previous <span class="hlt">model</span>, which was based on a three-dimensional stress analysis and the Tsai-Wu quadratic first-ply failure criterion. This <span class="hlt">model</span> predicted the failure loads for glass-fiber-reinforced composites with good accuracy, but less accurately for failure loads of graphite-epoxy composites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880019546','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880019546"><span>The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine <span class="hlt">model</span>. Volume 3: Heat transfer data tabulation 65 percent <span class="hlt">axial</span> spacing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>This is Volume 3 - Heat Transfer Data Tabulation (65 percent <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Spacing) of a combined experimental and analytical program which was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approximately 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine <span class="hlt">model</span> configured in both single stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermocouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first-stator/rotor <span class="hlt">axial</span> spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1108414','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1108414"><span>Clean measurements of the nucleon <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Deur, Alexandre P.</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q^2 dependence of the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector form factor g_a(Q^2). It can be measured <span class="hlt">model</span>-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g_a(Q^2). If g_a(Q^2) follows a dipole form, the <span class="hlt">axial</span> mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q^2 mapping of g_a between 0.01</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5102452','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5102452"><span>Scleral Cross-Linking Using Riboflavin UVA Irradiation for the Prevention of Myopia Progression in a Guinea Pig <span class="hlt">Model</span>: Blocked <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Extension and Altered Scleral Microstructure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wang, Bingjie; Lin, Xiao; Wu, Yi; Liu, Hong; Qu, Xiaomei; Dai, Jinhui; Zhou, Xingtao; Zhou, Hao</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Purpose To develop methods of collagen cross-linking (CXL) in the sclera for the treatment of progressive myopia and to investigate the biomechanical and histological changes that occur in as a result. Methods Twenty 14-day-old guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups: the cross-linking group (CL, n = 8), non cross-linking group (NCL, n = 8), and control group (n = 4). The scleras of the right eyes of the guinea pigs in the CL group were surgically exposed and riboflavin was dropped onto the irradiation zone for 20 seconds prior to ultraviolet-A (UVA) irradiation. The same procedure was conducted on the NCL group but without UVA irradiation. No procedure was conducted on the control group. The right eyes of the guinea pigs in the CL and NCL groups were then fitted with -10.00DS optics for six weeks. Retinoscopy and the <span class="hlt">axial</span> lengths (AXL) were measured at baseline, and at the second, fourth and sixth weeks post-treatment in all three groups. All animal subjects were euthanized after the sixth week and then biomechanical and histopathological examinations of the scleras were conducted. Results The mean AXL of the NCL group was longer than both the control and CL groups at six weeks (P = 0.001). The mean refractive error in the NCL group was statistically significantly more negative than both the control and the CL groups at six weeks (P = 0.001). The scleral collagen fiber arrangements of the CL and control groups were denser and more regularly distributed than the NCL group. Ultimate stress of the sclera was lowest in the NCL group, followed by the CL then the control group (P<0.05). Ultimate strain (%) of the sclera was lowest in the CL group followed by the NCL and then the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that scleral CXL using riboflavin UVA irradiation effectively prevents the progression of myopia by increasing scleral biomechanical strength in a guinea pig <span class="hlt">model</span>. PMID:27829051</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ArRMA.205..239U','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ArRMA.205..239U"><span>Decay Structure for <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Hyperbolic Systems with Non-<span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Relaxation and its Application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ueda, Yoshihiro; Duan, Renjun; Kawashima, Shuichi</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>This paper is concerned with the decay structure for linear <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> hyperbolic systems with relaxation. When the relaxation matrix is <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>, the dissipative structure of the systems is completely characterized by the Kawashima-Shizuta stability condition formulated in Umeda et al. (Jpn J Appl Math 1:435-457, 1984) and Shizuta and Kawashima (Hokkaido Math J 14:249-275, 1985) and we obtain the asymptotic stability result together with the explicit time-decay rate under that stability condition. However, some physical <span class="hlt">models</span> which satisfy the stability condition have non-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> relaxation term (for example, the Timoshenko system and the Euler-Maxwell system). Moreover, it had been already known that the dissipative structure of such systems is weaker than the standard type and is of the regularity-loss type (see Duan in J Hyperbolic Differ Equ 8:375-413, 2011; Ide et al. in Math <span class="hlt">Models</span> Meth Appl Sci 18:647-667, 2008; Ide and Kawashima in Math <span class="hlt">Models</span> Meth Appl Sci 18:1001-1025, 2008; Ueda et al. in SIAM J Math Anal 2012; Ueda and Kawashima in Methods Appl Anal 2012). Therefore our purpose in this paper is to formulate a new structural condition which includes the Kawashima-Shizuta condition, and to analyze the weak dissipative structure for general systems with non-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> relaxation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1238805','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1238805"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> gap rotating electrical machine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>None</p> <p>2016-02-23</p> <p>Direct drive rotating electrical machines with <span class="hlt">axial</span> air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an <span class="hlt">axial</span> air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the <span class="hlt">axial</span> air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22499022','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22499022"><span>Study of <span class="hlt">axial</span> magnetic effect</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Braguta, Victor; Chernodub, M. N.; Goy, V. A.; Landsteiner, K.; Ulybyshev, M.</p> <p>2016-01-22</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the <span class="hlt">axial</span> (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..DPPUP8067H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..DPPUP8067H"><span>Plasma Control in <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Mirror Machines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Horton, W.; Rowan, W. L.; Alvarado, Igor; Fu, X. R.; Beklemishev, A. D.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>Plasma confinement in the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> rotating mirror plasma at the Budker Institute shows enhanced confinement with high electron temperatures with end plates biasing. Improved confinement is achieved by biasing end plate cells in the expansion tanks so as to achieve an inward pointing radial electric field. The negative potential well produces vortex plasma rotation similar to that in the negative potential well of Ohmic heated tokamaks. This plasma state has similarity with the lower turbulence level regimes documented in the Helimak where negative biasing of the end plates produces an inward radial electric field. To understand this vortex confinement we carry out 3D simulations with nonlinear partial differential equations for the electric potential and density in plasmas with an <span class="hlt">axially</span> localized region of unfavorable and favorable magnetic curvature. The simulations show that the plasma density rapidly adjusts to be higher in the region of favorable curvature regions and remains relatively well confined while rapidly rotating. The results support the concept of using plasma-biasing electrodes in large expander tanks to achieve enhanced mirror plasma confinement. Supported by US-DoE grant to UT, LANL and the Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22369940','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22369940"><span>Stability analysis of restricted non-static <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sharif, M.; Bhatti, M. Zaeem Ul Haq E-mail: mzaeem.math@gmail.com</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>This paper aims to investigate the instability of very restricted class of non-static <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spacetime with anisotropic matter configuration. The perturbation scheme is established for the Einstein field equations and conservation laws. The instability range in the Newtonian and post-Newtonian regions are explored by constructing the collapse equation in this scenario. It is found that the adiabatic index plays an important role in the stability analysis which depends upon the physical parameters i.e., energy density and anisotropic pressure of the fluid distribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17915093','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17915093"><span>Appropriate management of <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>LaSalle, Sean P; Deodhar, Atul A</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>The management of <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis includes a structured baseline assessment of the disease and follow-up of treatment efficacy using validated instruments. The treatment will depend on the severity and predominant manifestations of the disease. The cornerstone of management remains physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs such as sulfasalazine have shown efficacy only in treating peripheral arthritis, whereas thalidomide and pamidronate have shown some efficacy in treating <span class="hlt">axial</span> inflammation. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents are an efficacious option for treating signs and symptoms of <span class="hlt">axial</span> disease, peripheral arthritis, and enthesitis, and for improving functional outcomes. They have not shown efficacy in reducing radiographic progression in <span class="hlt">axial</span> disease. Recent evidence suggests that the new bone formation in ankylosing spondylitis may be due to upregulation of Wnt signaling in the osteoblastic pathway secondary to low serum DKK-1 levels, which are further suppressed by tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25166000','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25166000"><span>Might <span class="hlt">axial</span> myofascial properties and biomechanical mechanisms be relevant to ankylosing spondylitis and <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Masi, Alfonse T</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Ankylosing spondylitis and <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthropathy have characteristic age- and sex-specific onset patterns, typical entheseal lesions, and marked heritability, but the integrative mechanisms causing the pathophysiological and structural alterations remain largely undefined. Myofascial tissues are integrated in the body into webs and networks which permit transmission of passive and active tensional forces that provide stabilizing support and help to control movements. <span class="hlt">Axial</span> myofascial hypertonicity was hypothesized as a potential excessive polymorphic trait which could contribute to chronic biomechanical overloading and exaggerated stresses at entheseal sites. Such a mechanism may help to integrate many of the characteristic host, pathological, and structural features of ankylosing spondylitis and <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis. Biomechanical stress and strain were recently documented to correlate with peripheral entheseal inflammation and new bone formation in a murine <span class="hlt">model</span> of spondyloarthritis. Ankylosing spondylitis has traditionally been classified by the modified New York criteria, which require the presence of definite radiographic sacroiliac joint lesions. New classification criteria for <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis now include patients who do not fulfill the modified New York criteria. The male-to-female sex ratios clearly differed between the two patient categories - 2:1 or 3:1 in ankylosing spondylitis and 1:1 in non-radiographic <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis - and this suggests a spectral concept of disease and, among females, milder structural alterations. Magnetic resonance imaging of active and chronic lesions in ankylosing spondylitis and <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis reveals complex patterns, usually interpreted as inflammatory reactions, but shows similarities to acute degenerative disc disease, which attributed to edema formation following mechanical stresses and micro-damage. A basic question is whether mechanically induced microinjury and immunologically mediated</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060043925&hterms=mixtures&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmixtures','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060043925&hterms=mixtures&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dmixtures"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> normal mixtures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Turmon, Michael</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>We consider mixture density estimation under the symmetry constraint x = Az for an orthogonal matrix A. This distributional constraint implies a corresponding constraint on the mixture parameters. Focusing on the gaussian case, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to enforce the constraint and show results for <span class="hlt">modeling</span> of image feature vectors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA626651','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA626651"><span>Twin-<span class="hlt">Axial</span> Wire Antenna</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-08-06</p> <p>08-2015 Publication Twin-<span class="hlt">Axial</span> Wire Antenna David A. Tonn Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St., Code 00L, Bldg 102T...Approved for Public Release Distribution is unlimited Attorney Docket No. 300030 1 of 10 TWIN-<span class="hlt">AXIAL</span> WIRE ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST...2 of 10 length of the antenna wire . This creates a high pass filter in the antenna and prevents current flow in the VLF/LF bands. [0005] U.S</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCAP...12..038N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JCAP...12..038N"><span>Dissipative <span class="hlt">axial</span> inflation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Notari, Alessio; Tywoniuk, Konrad</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an <span class="hlt">axial</span> term phi/fγ F ~F, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density ρR, which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta k smaller than the cutoff fγ, including the backreaction numerically. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if fγ is smaller than the field excursion phi0 by about a factor of at least Script O (20), there is a friction effect which turns on before the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of perturbations, scalars and tensors. Such oscillations have a period of 4-5 efolds and an amplitude which is typically less than a few percent and decreases linearly with fγ. We also stress that the curvature perturbation on uniform density slices should be sensitive to slow-roll parameters related to ρR rather than dot phi2/2 and we discuss the existence of friction terms acting on the perturbations, although we postpone a calculation of the power spectrum and of non-gaussianity to future work and we simply define and compute suitable slow roll parameters. Finally we stress that this scenario may be realized in the axion case, if the coupling 1/fγ to U(1) (photons) is much larger than the coupling 1/fG to non-abelian gauge fields (gluons), since the latter sets the range of the potential and therefore the maximal allowed phi0~ fG.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24364904','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24364904"><span>Differential occupation of <span class="hlt">axial</span> morphospace.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ward, Andrea B; Mehta, Rita S</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The postcranial system is composed of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> and appendicular skeletons. The <span class="hlt">axial</span> skeleton, which consists of serially repeating segments commonly known as vertebrae, protects and provides leverage for movement of the body. Across the vertebral column, much numerical and morphological diversity can be observed, which is associated with <span class="hlt">axial</span> regionalization. The present article discusses this basic diversity and the early developmental mechanisms that guide vertebral formation and regionalization. An examination of vertebral numbers across the major vertebrate clades finds that actinopterygian and chondrichthyan fishes tend to increase vertebral number in the caudal region whereas Sarcopterygii increase the number of vertebrae in the precaudal region, although exceptions to each trend exist. Given the different regions of <span class="hlt">axial</span> morphospace that are occupied by these groups, differential developmental processes control the <span class="hlt">axial</span> patterning of actinopterygian and sarcopterygian species. It is possible that, among a variety of factors, the differential selective regimes for aquatic versus terrestrial locomotion have led to the differential use of <span class="hlt">axial</span> morphospace in vertebrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvE..95c2114T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvE..95c2114T"><span>Stochastic thermodynamics for Ising chain and <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> exclusion process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Toral, R.; Van den Broeck, C.; Escaff, D.; Lindenberg, Katja</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>We verify the finite-time fluctuation theorem for a linear Ising chain in contact with heat reservoirs at its ends. Analytic results are derived for a chain consisting of two spins. The system can be mapped onto a <span class="hlt">model</span> for particle transport, namely, the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> exclusion process in contact with thermal and particle reservoirs. We modify the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> exclusion process to represent a thermal engine and reproduce universal features of the efficiency at maximum power.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18279819','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18279819"><span>Wetting on <span class="hlt">axially</span>-patterned heterogeneous surfaces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Ruiz-Cabello, F J Montes; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, M A</p> <p>2008-05-19</p> <p>Contact angle variability, leading to errors in interpretation, arises from various sources. Contact angle hysteresis (history-dependent wetting) and contact angle multiplicity (corrugation of three-phase contact line) are irrespectively the most frequent causes of this uncertainty. Secondary effects also derived from the distribution of chemical defects on solid surfaces, and so due to the existence of boundaries, are the known "stick/jump-slip" phenomena. Currently, the underlying mechanisms in contact angle hysteresis and their connection to "stick/jump-slip" effects and the prediction of thermodynamic contact angle are not fully understood. In this study, <span class="hlt">axial</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> of smooth heterogeneous surface were chosen in order to mitigate contact angle multiplicity. For each <span class="hlt">axial</span> pattern, advancing, receding and equilibrium contact angles were predicted from the local minima location of the system free energy. A heuristic <span class="hlt">model</span>, based on the local Young equation for spherical drops on patch-wise <span class="hlt">axial</span> patterns, was fruitfully tested from the results of free-energy minimization. Despite the very simplistic surface <span class="hlt">model</span> chosen in this study, it allowed clarifying concepts usually misleading in wetting phenomena.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GReGr..47.1840B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GReGr..47.1840B"><span>Spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> thick branes cosmological evolution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bernardini, A. E.; Cavalcanti, R. T.; da Rocha, Roldão</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> time-dependent solutions for the 5D system of a scalar field canonically coupled to gravity are obtained and identified as an extension of recent results obtained by Ahmed et al. (JHEP 1404:061. arXiv:1312.3576 [hep-th], 2014). The corresponding cosmology of <span class="hlt">models</span> with regularized branes generated by such a 5D scalar field scenario is also investigated. It has been shown that the anisotropic evolution of the warp factor and consequently the Hubble like parameter are both driven by the radial coordinate on the brane, which leads to an emergent thick brane-world scenario with spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> time dependent warp factor. Meanwhile, the separability of variables depending on fifth dimension, , which is exhibited by the equations of motion, allows one to recover the extra dimensional profiles obtained in Ahmed et al. (2014), namely the extra dimensional part of the scale (warp) factor and the scalar field dependence on . Therefore, our results are mainly concerned with the time dependence of a spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> warp factor. Besides evincing possibilities for obtaining asymmetric stable brane-world scenarios, the extra dimensional profiles here obtained can also be reduced to those ones investigated in Ahmed et al. (2014).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..106a2030R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..106a2030R"><span>Compensator configurations for load currents' <span class="hlt">symmetrization</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rusinaru, D.; Manescu, L. G.; Dinu, R. C.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>This paper approaches aspects regarding the mitigation effects of asymmetries in 3-phase 3-wire networks. The measure consisting in connecting of load current <span class="hlt">symmetrization</span> devices at the load coupling point is presented. A time-variation of compensators parameters is determined as a function of the time-recorded electrical values. The general sizing principle of the load current <span class="hlt">symmetrization</span> reactive components is based on a simple equivalent <span class="hlt">model</span> of the unbalanced 3-phase loads. By using these compensators a certain control of the power components transits is ensured in the network. The control is based on the variations laws of the compensators parameters as functions of the recorded electrical values: [B] = [T]·[M]. The link between compensator parameters and measured values is ensured by a transformation matrix [T] for each operation conditions of the supply network. Additional conditions for improving of energy and efficiency performance of the compensator are considered: i.e. reactive power compensation. The compensator sizing algorithm was implemented into a MATLAB environment software, which generate the time-evolution of the parameters of load current <span class="hlt">symmetrization</span> device. The input data of application takes into account time-recording of the electrical values. By using the compensator sizing software, some results were achieved for the case of a consumer connected at 20 kV busbar of a distribution substation, during 24 hours measurement session. Even the sizing of the compensators aimed some additional network operation aspects (power factor correction) correlated with the total or major load <span class="hlt">symmetrizations</span>, the harmonics aspects of the network values were neglected.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1039310','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1039310"><span>Description of <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Detail for ROK Fuel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Trellue, Holly R; Galloway, Jack D</p> <p>2012-04-20</p> <p>For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an <span class="hlt">axial</span> burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of <span class="hlt">modeling</span> the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the <span class="hlt">axial</span> gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 <span class="hlt">axial</span> points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each <span class="hlt">axial</span> zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 <span class="hlt">axial</span> zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must <span class="hlt">model</span> it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different <span class="hlt">axial</span> zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which <span class="hlt">axial</span> zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total <span class="hlt">axial</span> zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MPLA...3250053R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MPLA...3250053R"><span>Conformally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> relativistic star</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rahaman, Farook; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Sardar, Iftikar Hossain; Chakraborty, Koushik</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>We investigate whether compact stars having Tolman-like interior geometry admit conformal symmetry. Taking anisotropic pressure along the two principal directions within the compact object, we obtain physically relevant quantities such as transverse and radial pressure, density and redshift function. We study the equation of state (EOS) for the matter distribution inside the star. From the relation between pressure and density function of the constituent matter, we explore the nature and properties of the interior matter. The redshift function and compactness parameter are found to be physically reasonable. The matter inside the star satisfies the null, weak and strong energy conditions. Finally, we compare the masses and radii predicted from the <span class="hlt">model</span> with corresponding values in some observed stars.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7170082','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7170082"><span>Synthesis of a <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> dithiirane</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Allakverdiev, M.A.; Farzaliev, V.M.; Mamedov, C.I.</p> <p>1986-04-01</p> <p>The reaction of p-xylene with epichlorohydrin in the presence of aluminum chloride gave 1,4-dimethyl-2,5-bis(1-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) benzene, which serves as the starting compound for the synthesis of the corresponding <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> dithiirane.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA093300','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA093300"><span>Supercritical Flow Past <span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> Airfoils.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1980-12-01</p> <p>about quasi-elliptic airfoil sections. The method was later extended by Boerstoel [1967] to present a catalog of solutions for certain body shapes. Bauer...Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems, Springer- Verlag, New York, 1972. Boerstoel , J. W., "A Survey of <span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> Transonic Potential</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95d5118M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95d5118M"><span>Particle-vortex <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> liquid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mulligan, Michael</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed by Breznay et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 280 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1522435113] to exhibit particle-vortex <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> electrical response, and the nearby metallic phase discovered earlier by Mason and Kapitulnik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5341] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to a (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> response does not require the introduction of disorder; rather, it results when the Dirac fermions exhibit vanishing Hall effect. The theory predicts approximately equal (diagonal) thermopower and Nernst signal with a deviation parameterized by the measured electrical Hall response at the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> point.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8765E..0PC','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8765E..0PC"><span>Tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> tactile sensing element</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Castellanos-Ramos, Julián.; Navas-González, Rafael; Vidal-Verdú, F.</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>A 13 x 13 square millimetre tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> taxel is presented which is suitable for some medical applications, for instance in assistive robotics that involves contact with humans or in prosthetics. Finite Element Analysis is carried out to determine what structure is the best to obtain a uniform distribution of pressure on the sensing areas underneath the structure. This structure has been fabricated in plastic with a 3D printer and a commercial tactile sensor has been used to implement the sensing areas. A three axis linear motorized translation stage with a tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> precision force sensor is used to find the parameters of the linear regression <span class="hlt">model</span> and characterize the proposed taxel. The results are analysed to see to what extent the goal has been reached in this specific implementation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22072320','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22072320"><span>Hamiltonian magnetohydrodynamics: Helically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> formulation, Casimir invariants, and equilibrium variational principles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Andreussi, T.; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.</p> <p>2012-05-15</p> <p>The noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to construct variational principles for continuously <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> equilibrium configurations of magnetized plasma, including flow. In particular, helical symmetry is considered, and results on <span class="hlt">axial</span> and translational symmetries are retrieved as special cases of the helical configurations. The symmetry condition, which allows the description in terms of a magnetic flux function, is exploited to deduce a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> form of the noncanonical Poisson bracket of MHD. Casimir invariants are then obtained directly from the Poisson bracket. Equilibria are obtained from an energy-Casimir principle and reduced forms of this variational principle are obtained by the elimination of algebraic constraints.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26627793','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26627793"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> foundation on sound radiation from a submarine hull structure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Chenyang; Su, Jinpeng; Wang, Jian; Hua, Hongxing</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The effects of a passive noise control method for suppressing sound radiation from a submarine hull structure are investigated. The control method is realized by <span class="hlt">symmetrizing</span> the foundation about the horizontal plane. The coupled finite element method and boundary element method are adopted to compute the acoustic characteristics of the submerged hull. From the numerical results, the <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> foundation has advantages in sound radiation reduction when the hull is subjected to the <span class="hlt">axial</span> load, but has little influences in the vertical and transverse load cases. Using the modal decomposition technique, the contributions of each individual mode to the sound radiation are analyzed to reveal the mechanism of the control method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10322E..3OW','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017SPIE10322E..3OW"><span>The research on flow pulsation characteristics of <span class="hlt">axial</span> piston pump</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Bingchao; Wang, Yulin</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The flow pulsation is an important factor influencing the <span class="hlt">axial</span> piston pump performance. In this paper we implement <span class="hlt">modeling</span> and simulation of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> piston pump with AMESim software to explore the flow pulsation characteristics under various factors . Theory analysis shows the loading pressure, angular speed, piston numbers and the accumulator impose evident influence on the flow pulsation characteristics. This simulation and analysis can be used for reducing the flow pulsation rate via properly setting the related factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJC....83.2354A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJC....83.2354A"><span>Synthesis of controllers for <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ameur Abid, Chiheb; Zouari, Belhassen</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>This article deals with supervisory control problem for coloured Petri (CP) nets. Considering a CP-net, we build a condensed version of the ordinary state-space, namely the symbolic reachability graph (SRG). This latter graph allows to cope with state-space explosion problem for <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> systems. The control specification can be expressed in terms of either forbidden states or forbidden sequences of transitions. According to these specifications, we derive the controller by applying the theory of regions on the basis of the SRG. Thanks to expressiveness power of CP-nets, the obtained controller to be connected to the plant <span class="hlt">model</span> is reduced to one single place.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...510991H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NatSR...510991H"><span>Bessel beam CARS of <span class="hlt">axially</span> structured samples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of <span class="hlt">axially</span> structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an <span class="hlt">axially</span> layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26046671','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26046671"><span>Bessel beam CARS of <span class="hlt">axially</span> structured samples.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen</p> <p>2015-06-05</p> <p>We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of <span class="hlt">axially</span> structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an <span class="hlt">axially</span> layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS53A1763H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMOS53A1763H"><span>Turbulence Effects of <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hill, C.; Chamorro, L. P.; Neary, V. S.; Morton, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Axial</span> flow hydrokinetic turbines provide a method for extracting the kinetic energy available in unidirectional (river), bidirectional (tidal) and marine currents; however, a deep understanding of the wake dynamics, momentum recovery, geomorphologic effects, and ecological interaction with these hydrokinetic turbines is required to guarantee their economical and environmental viability. The St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) at the University of Minnesota (UMN) has performed physical <span class="hlt">modeling</span> experiments using a 1:10 scale <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow tidal turbine in the SAFL Main Channel, a 2.75m x 1.8m x 80m open channel test facility. A sophisticated control system allows synchronous measurements of turbine torque and rotational speed along with high resolution 3-D velocity measurements within the channel. Using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), high resolution 3-D velocity profile data were collected up to 15 turbine diameters downstream of the turbine location. These data provide valuable information on the wake characteristics (turbulence, Reynolds stresses, etc.) resulting from a rotating <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow hydrokinetic machine. Regions of high turbulence and shear zones that persist in the near wake regions are delineated along with the velocity deficit and momentum recovery within the wake downstream of the device. Synchronous ADV data shed light on the rotational and meandering characteristics of the wake and its potential impacts on the local geomorphology and hydrodynamic environment. This dataset on single hydrokinetic turbine flow characteristics is the basis for further work on the optimal arrangement and performance environment for arrays of similar hydrokinetic devices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4457012','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4457012"><span>Bessel beam CARS of <span class="hlt">axially</span> structured samples</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Heuke, Sandro; Zheng, Juanjuan; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We report about a Bessel beam CARS approach for <span class="hlt">axial</span> profiling of multi-layer structures. This study presents an experimental implementation for the generation of CARS by Bessel beam excitation using only passive optical elements. Furthermore, an analytical expression is provided describing the generated anti-Stokes field by a homogeneous sample. Based on the concept of coherent transfer functions, the underling resolving power of <span class="hlt">axially</span> structured geometries is investigated. It is found that through the non-linearity of the CARS process in combination with the folded illumination geometry continuous phase-matching is achieved starting from homogeneous samples up to spatial sample frequencies at twice of the pumping electric field wave. The experimental and analytical findings are <span class="hlt">modeled</span> by the implementation of the Debye Integral and scalar Green function approach. Finally, the goal of reconstructing an <span class="hlt">axially</span> layered sample is demonstrated on the basis of the numerically simulated modulus and phase of the anti-Stokes far-field radiation pattern. PMID:26046671</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvL.117k4101N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvL.117k4101N"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> States Requiring System Asymmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Spontaneous synchronization has long served as a paradigm for behavioral uniformity that can emerge from interactions in complex systems. When the interacting entities are identical and their coupling patterns are also identical, the complete synchronization of the entire network is the state inheriting the system symmetry. As in other systems subject to symmetry breaking, such <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> states are not always stable. Here, we report on the discovery of the converse of symmetry breaking—the scenario in which complete synchronization is not stable for identically coupled identical oscillators but becomes stable when, and only when, the oscillator parameters are judiciously tuned to nonidentical values, thereby breaking the system symmetry to preserve the state symmetry. Aside from demonstrating that diversity can facilitate and even be required for uniformity and consensus, this suggests a mechanism for convergent forms of pattern formation in which initially asymmetric patterns evolve into <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> ones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMP....53j3506G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMP....53j3506G"><span>Growth of heat trace coefficients for locally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gilkey, P.; Miatello, R. J.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>We study the asymptotic behavior of the heat trace coefficients an as n → ∞ for the scalar Laplacian in the context of locally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces. We show that if a locally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> space is <span class="hlt">modeled</span> on a noncompact type <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> space X = G/K such that G has one conjugacy class of Cartan subgroups then these coefficients are O(C^n/n!) for some C > 0. In contrast, we prove that for even dimensional locally rank 1-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces, one has |an| ≈ C'n . n! for some C' > 0. We conjecture this is the growth for general noncompact type <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces unless all Cartan subgroups in G are conjugate. These spaces also have the distinguishing property that the Huygens principle for the shifted wave equation holds (n odd). These examples show that growth estimates conjectured by Berry and Howls ["High orders of the Weyl expansion for quantum billiards: Resurgence of periodic orbits and the Stokes phenomenon," Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 527-555 (1994), 10.1098/rspa.1994.0154] are sharp. We also construct examples of locally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces which are not irreducible, which are not flat, and so that only a finite number of the an is non-zero.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTP...55.1211M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTP...55.1211M"><span>Spherically <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Solutions of Light Galileon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Momeni, D.; Houndjo, M. J. S.; Güdekli, E.; Rodrigues, M. E.; Alvarenga, F. G.; Myrzakulov, R.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>We have been studied the <span class="hlt">model</span> of light Galileon with translational shift symmetry ϕ → ϕ + c. The matter Lagrangian is presented in the form {L}_{φ }= -η (partial φ )2+β G^{μ ν }partial _{μ }φ partial _{ν }φ . We have been addressed two issues: the first is that, we have been proven that, this type of Galileons belong to the modified matter-curvature <span class="hlt">models</span> of gravity in type of f(R,R^{μ ν }T_{μ ν }m). Secondly, we have been investigated exact solution for spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> geometries in this <span class="hlt">model</span>. We have been found an exact solution with singularity at r = 0 in null coordinates. We have been proven that the solution has also a non-divergence current vector norm. This solution can be considered as an special solution which has been investigated in literature before, in which the Galileon's field is non-static (time dependence). Our scalar-shift <span class="hlt">symmetrized</span> Galileon has the simple form of ϕ = t, which it is remembered by us dilaton field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840009550','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840009550"><span>A pressurized cylindrical shell with a fixed end which contains an <span class="hlt">axial</span> part-through or through crack</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>A cylindrical shell having a very stiff and plate or a flange is considered. It is assumed that near the end the cylinder contains an <span class="hlt">axial</span> flaw which may be <span class="hlt">modeled</span> as a part through surface crack or a through crack. The effect of the end constraining on the stress intensity factor which is the main fracture mechanics parameter is studied. The applied loads acting on the cylinder are assumed to be axisymmetric. Thus the crack problem under consideration is <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> with respect to the plane of the crack and consequently only the Mode 1 stress intensity factors are nonzero. With this limitation, the general perturbation problem for a cylinder with a built in end containing an <span class="hlt">axial</span> crack is considered. Reissner's shell theory is used to formulate the problem. The part through crack problem is treated by using a line spring <span class="hlt">model</span>. In the case of a crack tip terminating at the fixed end it is shown that the integral equations of the shell problem has the same generalized Cauchy kernel as the corresponding plane stress elasticity problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21834961','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21834961"><span>Radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes subjected to <span class="hlt">axial</span> pressure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lei, Xiao-Wen; Ni, Qing-Qing; Shi, Jin-Xing; Natsuki, Toshiaki</p> <p>2011-08-11</p> <p>In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the radial breathing mode (RBM) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subjected to <span class="hlt">axial</span> pressure is presented based on an elastic continuum <span class="hlt">model</span>. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are described as an individual elastic shell and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are considered to be two shells coupled through the van der Waals force. The effects of <span class="hlt">axial</span> pressure, wave numbers and nanotube diameter on the RBM frequency are investigated in detail. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experiment, calculation and simulation. Our results show that the RBM frequency is linearly dependent on the <span class="hlt">axial</span> pressure and is affected by the wave numbers. We concluded that RBM frequency can be used to characterize the <span class="hlt">axial</span> pressure acting on both ends of a CNT.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007OptL...32..527J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007OptL...32..527J"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> field shaping under high-numerical-aperture focusing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jabbour, Toufic G.; Kuebler, Stephen M.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>Kant reported [J. Mod. Optics47, 905 (2000)] a formulation for solving the inverse problem of vector diffraction, which accurately <span class="hlt">models</span> high-NA focusing. Here, Kant's formulation is adapted to the method of generalized projections to obtain an algorithm for designing diffractive optical elements (DOEs) that reshape the <span class="hlt">axial</span> point-spread function (PSF). The algorithm is applied to design a binary phase-only DOE that superresolves the <span class="hlt">axial</span> PSF with controlled increase in <span class="hlt">axial</span> sidelobes. An 11-zone DOE is identified that <span class="hlt">axially</span> narrows the PSF central lobe by 29% while maintaining the sidelobe intensity at or below 52% of the peak intensity. This DOE could improve the resolution achievable in several applications without significantly complicating the optical system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACPD...1133325L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACPD...1133325L"><span>Improvement of aerosol optical depth retrieval from MODIS spectral reflectance over the global ocean using new aerosol <span class="hlt">models</span> archived from AERONET inversion data and tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> ellipsoidal dust database data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, J.; Kim, J.; Yang, P.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>New over-ocean aerosol <span class="hlt">models</span> are developed by integrating extensive AERONET inversion data and a database of the optical properties of tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> ellipsoidal dust particles. These <span class="hlt">models</span> allow more accurate retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for high AOD cases. Spectral AOD, single scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function, which are used to calculate a lookup table (LUT), are archived by combining inversion data from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometers and single-scattering properties from the tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> ellipsoidal dust database. The aerosol <span class="hlt">models</span> are categorized from the AERONET data using the fine-mode fraction (FMF) at 550 nm and the SSA at 440 nm to resolve a variety of aerosol types throughout the globe. For each aerosol <span class="hlt">model</span>, the changes in aerosol optical properties (AOP) are included as functions of AOD. Comparisons of AODs between AERONET and MODIS for the period from 2003 to 2010 show that the new aerosol <span class="hlt">models</span> improve correlation compared to the MODIS Collection 5 products with a Pearson coefficient of 0.93 and a regression slope of 0.99 compared to 0.92 and 0.85, respectively, for the MODIS operational algorithm. Moreover, use of the new algorithms increases the percentage of data within an expected error of ± (0.03 + 0.05 × AOD) from 62 to 64% overall and from 39 to 51% for high AOD cases (AOD > 0.3). Errors in the retrieved AOD are characterized further with respect to the Ångström exponent (AE), scattering angle (Θ), and air mass factor (AMF). Overall, the new aerosol <span class="hlt">models</span> reduce systematic errors in AOD retrieval compared with the Collection 5 data due to realistic AOP assumptions. In particular, the scattering angle dependence of the retrieved AOD for dust cases is significantly mitigated due to improved treatment of the nonsphericity of dust particles by the new algorithm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27607622','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27607622"><span>Whispering gallery resonators with broken <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry: Theory and experiment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fürst, J; Sturman, B; Buse, K; Breunig, I</p> <p>2016-09-05</p> <p><span class="hlt">Axial</span> symmetry is the cornerstone for theory and applications of high-Q optical whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). Nevertheless, research on birefringent crystalline material persistently pushes towards breaking this symmetry. We show theoretically and experimentally that the effect of broken <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry, caused by optical anisotropy, is modest for the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of the WGR modes. Thus, the most important equatorial whispering gallery modes can be quantitatively described and experimentally identified. At the same time, the effect of broken <span class="hlt">axial</span> symmetry on the light field distribution of the whispering gallery modes is typically very strong. This qualitatively modifies the phase-matching for the χ<sup>(2)</sup> nonlinear processes and enables broad-band second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation. The effect of weak geometric ellipticity in nominally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> WGRs is also considered. Altogether our findings pave the way for an extensive use of numerous birefringent (uniaxial and biaxial) crystals with broad transparency window and large χ<sup>(2)</sup> coefficients in nonlinear optics with WGRs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA018078','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA018078"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span>-Centrifugal Compressor Program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1975-10-01</p> <p>We also wish to thank Robert Langworthy of the Eustis Directorate for his timely assistance and constructive guidance. 3, INj TABLE OF CONTENTS Page...34 PREFACE 3 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS ..................... 7 LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 INTRODUCTIONB...Blow Test. 132 <span class="hlt">Axial</span> IGV Blow Test . . . . . . . . ........... 141 PMIZ ?crn AM BLANK-NOT 1=43D TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued Centrifugal Compressor</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750003129','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750003129"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> pumps for propulsion systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Huppert, M. C.; Rothe, K.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The development of <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow hydrogen pumps is examined. The design features and the performance data obtained during the course of the development programs are discussed. The problems created by the pump characteristics are analyzed. Graphs of four stage pump performance for various turbine blade configurations are developed. The characteristics and performance of a variety of pumps are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/804596','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/804596"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> structure of the nucleon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Veronique Bernard; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Ulf-G Meissner</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>We review the current status of experimental and theoretical understanding of the <span class="hlt">axial</span> nucleon structure at low and moderate energies. Topics considered include (quasi)elastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering, charged pion electroproduction off nucleons and ordinary as well as radiative muon capture on the proton.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750003126','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750003126"><span>Calculation of flow distribution in large radius ratio stages of <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow turbines and comparison of theory and experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Herzog, J.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A method of calculating stage parameters and flow distribution of <span class="hlt">axial</span> turbines is described. The governing equations apply to space between the blade rows and are based on the assumption of rotationally <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span>, compressible, adiabatic flow conditions. Results are presented for stage design and flow analysis calculations. Theoretical results from the calculation system are compared with experimental data from low pressure steam turbine tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1155813','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1155813"><span>Electroweak Baryogenesis in R-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Supersymmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fok, R.; Kribs, Graham D.; Martin, Adam; Tsai, Yuhsin</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>We demonstrate that electroweak baryogenesis can occur in a supersymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> with an exact R-symmetry. The minimal R-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> supersymmetric <span class="hlt">model</span> contains chiral superfields in the adjoint representation, giving Dirac gaugino masses, and an additional set of "R-partner" Higgs superfields, giving R-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> \\mu-terms. New superpotential couplings between the adjoints and the Higgs fields can simultaneously increase the strength of the electroweak phase transition and provide additional tree-level contributions to the lightest Higgs mass. Notably, no light stop is present in this framework, and in fact, we require both stops to be above a few TeV to provide sufficient radiative corrections to the lightest Higgs mass to bring it up to 125 GeV. Large CP-violating phases in the gaugino/higgsino sector allow us to match the baryon asymmetry of the Universe with no constraints from electric dipole moments due to R-symmetry. We briefly discuss some of the more interesting phenomenology, particularly of the of the lightest CP-odd scalar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880020420','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880020420"><span>The effects of inlet turbulence and rotor/stator interactions on the aerodynamics and heat transfer of a large-scale rotating turbine <span class="hlt">model</span>. Volume 2: Heat transfer data tabulation. 15 percent <span class="hlt">axial</span> spacing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Dring, R. P.; Blair, M. F.; Joslyn, H. D.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to examine the effects of inlet turbulence on airfoil heat transfer. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale (approx 5X engine), ambient temperature, rotating turbine <span class="hlt">model</span> configured in both single stage and stage-and-a-half arrangements. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using low-conductivity airfoils with miniature thermcouples welded to a thin, electrically heated surface skin. Heat transfer data were acquired for various combinations of low or high inlet turbulence intensity, flow coefficient, first-stator/rotor <span class="hlt">axial</span> spacing, Reynolds number and relative circumferential position of the first and second stators. Aerodynamic measurements obtained as part of the program include distributions of the mean and fluctuating velocities at the turbine inlet and, for each airfoil row, midspan airfoil surface pressures and circumferential distributions of the downstream steady state pressures and fluctuating velocities. Analytical results include airfoil heat transfer predictions produced using existing 2-D boundary layer computation schemes and an examination of solutions of the unsteady boundary layer equations. The results are reported in four separate volumes, of which this is Volume 2: Heat Transfer Data Tabulation; 15 Percent <span class="hlt">Axial</span> Spacing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140002332','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140002332"><span>Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an <span class="hlt">Axially</span> <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Solenoid</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20823835','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20823835"><span>Acoustic-emissive memory effect in coal samples under triaxial <span class="hlt">axial-symmetric</span> compression</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shkuratnik, V.L.; Filimonov, Y.L.; Kuchurin, S.V.</p> <p>2006-05-15</p> <p>The experimental data are presented for production and manifestation of the Kaiser effect in coal samples subjected to triaxial loading by the Karman scheme in the first cycle and to various loading modes in the second cycle. The Kaiser effect is identified with the help of a deformation memory effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6306279','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6306279"><span>Use of <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> electrostatic fields for ion-beam focussing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Colton, E.; Kelly, J.C.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The 1/r electric field obtained between charged coaxial cylindrical electrodes is useful for focusing hollow ion beams in ion-microprobe and ion- implantation applications. The focusing strengths are mass-independent at nonrelativistic energies. Focused-particle densities can be enhanced by using a diverging-converging pair to flatten the dependence of focal length on incoming-beam radius. Transport of 425-keV and 1-MeV protons has been simulated and results are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21470857','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21470857"><span>On alternative methods for measuring the radius and propagation ratio of <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> laser beams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dementjev, Aleksandr S; Jovaisa, A; Silko, Galina; Ciegis, Raimondas</p> <p>2005-11-30</p> <p>Based on the developed efficient numerical methods for calculating the propagation of light beams, the alternative methods for measuring the beam radius and propagation ratio proposed in the international standard ISO 11146 are analysed. The specific calculations of the alternative beam propagation ratios M{sub i}{sup 2} performed for a number of test beams with a complicated spatial structure showed that the correlation coefficients c{sub i} used in the international standard do not establish the universal one-to-one relation between the alternative propagation ratios M{sub i}{sup 2} and invariant propagation ratios M{sub {sigma}}{sup 2} found by the method of moments. (laser beams)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11046480','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11046480"><span>Anomalous, quasilinear, and percolative regimes for magnetic-field-line transport in <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> turbulence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zimbardo; Veltri; Pommois</p> <p>2000-02-01</p> <p>We studied a magnetic turbulence axisymmetric around the unperturbed magnetic field for cases having different ratios l( ||)/l( perpendicular). We find, in addition to the fact that a higher fluctuation level deltaB/B(0) makes the system more stochastic, that by increasing the ratio l( ||)/l( perpendicular) at fixed deltaB/B(0), the stochasticity increases. It appears that the different transport regimes can be organized in terms of the Kubo number R=(deltaB/B(0))(l( ||)/l( perpendicular)). The simulation results are compared with the two analytical limits, that is the percolative limit and the quasilinear limit. When R<1 weak chaos, closed magnetic surfaces, and anomalous transport regimes are found. When R approximately 1 the diffusion regime is Gaussian, and the quasilinear scaling of the diffusion coefficient D( perpendicular) approximately (deltaB/B(0))(2) is recovered. Finally, for R>1 the percolation scaling of the diffusion coefficient D( perpendicular) approximately (deltaB/B(0))(0.7) is obtained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11800124','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11800124"><span>Numerical analysis of the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> hybrid transducer ultrasonic motor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Satonobu, J; Friend, J R; Nakamura, K; Ueha, S</p> <p>2001-11-01</p> <p>In this paper, operation of a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> hybrid transducer ultrasonic motor with output produced by two rotors connected together via a driveshaft is numerically analyzed and compared with the traditional asymmetric hybrid transducer motor design that produces its output from only one rotor. A one-dimensional finite element <span class="hlt">model</span> for torsional vibration in the stator and a Coulomb friction <span class="hlt">model</span> for rotor/stator contact associated with the longitudinal vibration of the motor are introduced. The calculation results demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> design is capable of performance comparable with the traditional asymmetric design when an optimum static spring force in the rotor/stator contact interface is applied during operation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820034301&hterms=engine+water&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dengine%2Bwater','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820034301&hterms=engine+water&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dengine%2Bwater"><span>Water ingestion into jet engine <span class="hlt">axial</span> compressors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Tsuchiya, T.; Murthy, S. N. B.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">axial</span> flow compressor has been tested with water droplet ingestion under a variety of conditions. The results illustrate the manner in which the compressor pressure ratio, efficiency and surging characteristics are affected. A <span class="hlt">model</span> for estimating the performance of a compressor during water ingestion has been developed and the predictions obtained compare favorably with the test results. It is then shown that with respect to five droplet-associated nonlinearly-interacting processes (namely, droplet-blade interactions, blade performance changes, centrifugal action, heat and mass transfer processes and droplet break-up), the initial water content and centrifugal action play the most dominant roles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17394369','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17394369"><span>Mechanical instabilities of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes under cyclic <span class="hlt">axial</span> compression.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yap, Hsao W; Lakes, Roderic S; Carpick, Robert W</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>Individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes with a range of aspect ratios are subjected to cyclic <span class="hlt">axial</span> compression to large strains using atomic force microscopy. Distinct elastic buckling and post-buckling phenomena are observed reproducibly and are ascribed to Euler, asymmetric shell buckling (i.e., kinking), and <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> shell buckling. These show agreement with continuum theories that range from approximate to remarkable. Shell buckling yields reproducible incremental negative stiffness in the initial post-buckled regime.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22560328','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22560328"><span><span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> quadratic Hamiltonians with pseudo-Hermitian matrix representation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fernández, Francisco M.</p> <p>2016-06-15</p> <p>We prove that any <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Hamiltonian that is a quadratic function of the coordinates and momenta has a pseudo-Hermitian adjoint or regular matrix representation. The eigenvalues of the latter matrix are the natural frequencies of the Hamiltonian operator. When all the eigenvalues of the matrix are real, then the spectrum of the <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Hamiltonian is real and the operator is Hermitian. As illustrative examples we choose the quadratic Hamiltonians that <span class="hlt">model</span> a pair of coupled resonators with balanced gain and loss, the electromagnetic self-force on an oscillating charged particle and an active LRC circuit. -- Highlights: •<span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> quadratic operators are useful <span class="hlt">models</span> for many physical applications. •Any such operator exhibits a pseudo-Hermitian matrix representation. •Its eigenvalues are the natural frequencies of the Hamiltonian operator. •The eigenvalues may be real or complex and describe a phase transition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820018835','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820018835"><span>Cracked shells under skew-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> loading. [Reissner theory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Delale, F.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>The general problem of a shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and anti-plane elasticity solutions. Results are given for <span class="hlt">axially</span> and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform in-plane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The problem is formulated for specially orthostropic materials, therefore, the effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20617750','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20617750"><span>[<span class="hlt">Axial</span> spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nordström, Dan; Kauppi, Markku</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Current classification criteria for ankylosing spondylitis do not allow diagnosis before radiographic changes are visible in sacroiliacal joints. The the new <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthropathy (SpA) criteria include <span class="hlt">axial</span> SpA without radiographic changes as well as established ankylosing spondylitis, recognizing them as a continuum of the same disease. This is of major importance as the burden of early SpA is comparable to that of later stage disease. Diagnosis relies on inflammatory MRI findings which is the most significant change compared to earlier criteria. Emerging data on the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha blocking therapies already in early but also in established disease have given new promising alternatives for treatment of this often very cumbersome disease, that rarely responds to classic DMARDs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430988','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430988"><span>Minimal Left-Right <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Dark Matter.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heeck, Julian; Patra, Sudhanwa</p> <p>2015-09-18</p> <p>We show that left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">models</span> can easily accommodate stable TeV-scale dark matter particles without the need for an ad hoc stabilizing symmetry. The stability of a newly introduced multiplet either arises accidentally as in the minimal dark matter framework or comes courtesy of the remaining unbroken Z_{2} subgroup of B-L. Only one new parameter is introduced: the mass of the new multiplet. As minimal examples, we study left-right fermion triplets and quintuplets and show that they can form viable two-component dark matter. This approach is, in particular, valid for SU(2)×SU(2)×U(1) <span class="hlt">models</span> that explain the recent diboson excess at ATLAS in terms of a new charged gauge boson of mass 2 TeV.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhLB..443..276S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhLB..443..276S"><span>Special <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> quark mass matrices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Silva-Marcos, J. I.</p> <p>1998-12-01</p> <p>We give a procedure to construct a special class of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> quark mass matrices near the democratic limit of equal Yukawa couplings for each sector. It is shown that within appropriate weak-bases, the requirements of symmetry and arg[det(M)]=0 are very strong conditions, that necessarily lead to a Cabibbo angle given by Vus=sqrt(md/ms), and to Vcb~ms/mb, in first order. In addition, we prove that the recently classified ansätze, which also reproduce these mixing matrix relations, and which were based on the hypothesis of the Universal Strength for Yukawa couplings, where all Yukawa couplings have equal moduli while the flavour dependence is only in their phases, are, in fact, particular cases of the generalized <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> quark mass matrix ansätze we construct here. In an excellent numerical example, the experimental values on all quark mixings and masses are accommodated, and the CP violation phase parameter is shown to be crucially dependent on the values of mu and Vus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22280685','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22280685"><span>Clean measurements of the nucleon <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Deur, A.</p> <p>2013-11-07</p> <p>We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q{sup 2} dependence of the <span class="hlt">axial</span>-vector form factor g{sub a}(Q{sup 2}). It can be measured <span class="hlt">model</span>-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g{sub a}(Q{sup 2}). If g{sub a}(Q{sup 2}) follows a dipole form, the <span class="hlt">axial</span> mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q{sup 2} mapping of g{sub a} between 0.01 <Q{sup 2}< 0.04 GeV{sup 2}. 60 days of beam can yield 14 data points with a subpercent statistical and point to point uncorrelated uncertainties on each point. Such an experiment may also allow to measure the free-neutron magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n}. The experiment employs the usual techniques of electron-nucleon scattering and presents no special difficulty. Higher energy extensions are possible. They could yield measurements of g{sub a}(Q{sup 2}) up to Q{sup 2}=3 GeV{sup 2} and the possibility to access other form factors, such as the almost unknown pseudoscalar form factor g{sub P}. However, the experiments become much more challenging as soon as beam energies pass the pion production threshold.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6358E..4RB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6358E..4RB"><span>Research on the dq coordinate transform in the six-phase double star windings shifted by 30° synchronous generators with <span class="hlt">axial</span> magnetic field</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bian, Xiangnan; Ma, Qishuang</p> <p>2006-11-01</p> <p>As an intermediate frequency power source, the double star windings shifted by 30° synchronous generator with <span class="hlt">axial</span> magnetic field (DSWAMF) is widely used in the different areas. Using the generalized inverse, the transformation matrix of double windings synchronous generators with two Y-connected 3-phase <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> windings displaced in turn by 30° from rotating to stationary axes is proposed. With the transformation matrix, the state-space <span class="hlt">model</span> of the generators is established. Obtained the relation of interconnection, and optimize the parameter. The kind of machine is simulated by finite element method (FEM), mutual inductance of the simulation is similar to theory. The generator mathematical <span class="hlt">model</span> is established, the internal parameter of this kind of generator can be obtained easily with transformation matrix.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JSV...328..467M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JSV...328..467M"><span>Stability and free vibration analyses of an orthotropic singly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> Timoshenko beam-column with generalized end conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Monsalve-Cano, J. F.; Darío Aristizábal-Ochoa, J.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The stability and free vibration analyses (i.e., buckling, natural frequencies and modal shapes) of an orthotropic singly <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> 3D Timoshenko beam-column with generalized boundary conditions (i.e., with bending and torsional semirigid restraints and lateral bracings as well as lumped masses at both ends) subjected to an eccentric end <span class="hlt">axial</span> load are presented in a classical manner. The five governing equations of dynamic equilibrium (i.e., two transverse shear equations, two bending moment equations and pure torsional moment equation) are sufficient to determine the natural frequencies and the corresponding modal shapes of the beam-column in the two principal planes of bending and torsion about its longitudinal axis. The proposed <span class="hlt">model</span> includes the coupling effects among: (1) the deformations due to bending, shear and pure torsion; (2) inertias (translational, rotational and torsional) of all masses considered; (3) eccentric <span class="hlt">axial</span> loads applied at the ends, and (4) restraints at the supports (bending, torsional and lateral bracings at both ends of the member). However, the effects of <span class="hlt">axial</span> deformations and warping torsion produced by the <span class="hlt">axial</span> load are not included; consequently the proposed <span class="hlt">model</span> is not capable of capturing the phenomena of torsional buckling or combined lateral bending-torsional buckling. The proposed analytical <span class="hlt">model</span> indicates that the stability and dynamic response of beam-columns are highly sensitive to the coupling effects, particularly in members with both ends free to rotate. The natural frequencies and modal shapes can be determined from the eigenvalues of a full 4×4 matrix for vibration in the plane of symmetry (using the uncoupled equations of transverse force and moment equilibrium at both ends) and from a full 6×6 matrix for the coupled shear-bending-torsional vibration (using the coupled equations of transverse shear, bending and torsional moment equilibrium at both ends). Also, it is shown that the proposed method reproduces the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23368549','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23368549"><span>Search for heavy neutrinos and W(R) bosons with right-handed couplings in a left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> <span class="hlt">model</span> in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=7  TeV.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Aguilo, E; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Vilela Pereira, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Costanza, F; Dammann, D; Diez Pardos, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Glushkov, I; Gunnellini, P; Habib, S; Hauk, J; Hellwig, G; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Krämer, M; Krücker, D; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Marienfeld, M; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; 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Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Vaughan, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kunori, S; Kwan, S; Leonidopoulos, C; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Park, M; Remington, R; Rinkevicius, A; Sellers, P; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Vodopiyanov, I; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bai, Y; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Lacroix, F; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Duru, F; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tinti, G; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Krajczar, K; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wenger, E A; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Cooper, S I; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Nash, D; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Boulahouache, C; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Rose, K; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Sengupta, S; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Roh, Y; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Florez, C; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Belknap, D; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Palmonari, F; Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J</p> <p>2012-12-28</p> <p>Results are presented from a search for heavy, right-handed muon neutrinos, N(μ), and right-handed W(R) bosons, which arise in the left-right <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> extensions of the standard <span class="hlt">model</span>. The analysis is based on a 5.0  fb(-1) sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence is observed for an excess of events over the standard <span class="hlt">model</span> expectation. For <span class="hlt">models</span> with exact left-right symmetry, heavy right-handed neutrinos are excluded at 95% confidence level for a range of neutrino masses below the W(R) mass, dependent on the value of M(W(R)). The excluded region in the two-dimensional (M(W(R)), M(N(μ)) mass plane extends to M(W(R))=2.5  TeV.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26798943','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26798943"><span>Golimumab for treatment of <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rios Rodriguez, Valeria; Poddubnyy, Denis</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Axial</span> spondyloarthritis comprises two forms: nonradiographic (nonradiographic <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis) and radiographic (better known as ankylosing spondylitis), which are often considered as two stages of one disease. Historically, all currently available TNF-α inhibitors were first investigated in ankylosing spondylitis and later on in nonradiographic <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis. This year, EMA has granted golimumab approval for the treatment of active nonradiographic <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis based on the recently published data from the GO-AHEAD study. This article summarizes recent data on efficacy and safety of golimumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis and nonradiographic <span class="hlt">axial</span> spondyloarthritis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GReGr..48..148S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GReGr..48..148S"><span>Conformally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> traversable wormholes in f( G) gravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sharif, M.; Fatima, H. Ismat</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We discuss non-static conformally <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> traversable wormholes for spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spacetime using the <span class="hlt">model</span> f(G)=α Gn, where n>0 and α is an arbitrary constant. We investigate wormhole solutions by taking two types of shape function and found that physically realistic wormholes exist only for even values of n. We also check the validity of flare-out condition, required for wormhole construction, for the shape functions deduced from two types of equation of state. It is found that this condition is satisfied by these functions in all cases except phantom case with non-static conformal symmetry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JaJAP..45.7471K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JaJAP..45.7471K"><span>Rotating <span class="hlt">Symmetrical</span> Piezoelectric Microactuators for Magnetic Head Drives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kurihara, Kazuaki; Hida, Masaharu; Umemiya, Shigeyoshi; Kondo, Masao; Koganezawa, Shinji</p> <p>2006-09-01</p> <p>A unique piezoelectric microactuator for the head-slider drive dual-stage actuator systems in magnetic disk drives has been developed. This microactuator is based on a rotating <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> structure and a <span class="hlt">symmetrical</span> operation. The piezoelectric actuator elements used in the system have a simple rectangular multilayered structure. A prototype <span class="hlt">model</span> with pico slider and head suspension has been tested to demonstrate 0.86 μm displacement at a dc applied voltage of 30 V and observed main resonant frequency of over 20 kHz. No fluctuation in flying height was observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003CQGra..20.4885R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003CQGra..20.4885R"><span>Spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> black-hole entropy without brick walls</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ren, Zhao; Yue-Qin, Wu; Li-Chun, Zhang</p> <p>2003-11-01</p> <p>Properties of the thermal radiation of black holes are discussed using a new equation of state density motivated by the generalized uncertainty relation in quantum gravity. There is no burst at the last stage of emission from a spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> black hole. When the new equation of state density is used to investigate the entropy of a bosonic field and fermionic field outside the horizon of a static spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> black hole, the divergence that appears in the brick-wall <span class="hlt">model</span> is removed without any cutoff. The entropy proportional to the horizon area is derived from the contribution from the vicinity of the horizon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22068625','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22068625"><span>Bound states of PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> separable potentials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bender, Carl M.; Jones, Hugh F.</p> <p>2011-09-15</p> <p>All of the PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> potentials that have been studied so far have been local. In this paper, nonlocal PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> separable potentials of the form V(x,y)=i{epsilon}[U(x)U(y)-U(-x)U(-y)], where U(x) is real, are examined. Two specific <span class="hlt">models</span> are examined. In each case, it is shown that there is a parametric region of the coupling strength {epsilon} for which the PT symmetry of the Hamiltonian is unbroken and the bound-state energies are real. The critical values of {epsilon} that bound this region are calculated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..760..800P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhLB..760..800P"><span>Possible origin of transition from <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> to asymmetric fission</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Paşca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>The charged distributions of fragments produced in the electromagnetic-induced fission of the even-even isotopes of Rn, Ra, Th, and U are described within an improved scission-point <span class="hlt">model</span> and compared with the available experimental data. The three-equal-peaked charge distributions are predicted for several fissioning nuclei with neutron number N = 136. The possible explanation of the transition from a <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> fission mode to an asymmetric one around N ∼ 136 is presented. The excitation energy dependencies of the asymmetric and <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> fission modes are anticipated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JMP....40.6558I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JMP....40.6558I"><span>Cosmological and spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> solutions with intersecting p-branes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ivashchuk, V. D.; Melnikov, V. N.</p> <p>1999-12-01</p> <p>Multidimensional <span class="hlt">model</span> describing the cosmological evolution and/or spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> configuration with n+1 Einstein spaces in the theory with several scalar fields and forms is considered. When electro-magnetic composite p-brane ansatz is adopted, n ``internal'' spaces are Ricci-flat, one space M0 has a nonzero curvature, and all p-branes do not ``live'' in M0, a class of exact solutions is obtained if certain block-orthogonality relations on p-brane vectors are imposed. A subclass of spherically <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> solutions (containing nonextremal p-brane black holes) is considered. Post-Newtonian parameters are calculated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RvMaP..2850006B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RvMaP..2850006B"><span>Integrability and vesture for harmonic maps into <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beheshti, Shabnam; Tahvildar-Zadeh, Shadi</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>After formulating the notion of integrability for <span class="hlt">axially</span> <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> harmonic maps from ℝ3 into <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> spaces, we give a complete and rigorous proof that, subject to some mild restrictions on the target, all such maps are integrable. Furthermore, we prove that a variant of the inverse scattering method, called vesture (dressing) can always be used to generate new solutions for the harmonic map equations starting from any given solution. In particular, we show that the problem of finding N-solitonic harmonic maps into a non-compact Grassmann manifold SU(p,q)/S(U(p) × U(q)) is completely reducible via the vesture (dressing) method to a problem in linear algebra which we prove is solvable in general. We illustrate this method, and establish its agreement with previously known special cases, by explicitly computing a 1-solitonic harmonic map for the two cases (p = 1,q = 1) and (p = 2,q = 1) and showing that the family of solutions obtained in each case contains respectively the Kerr family of solutions to the Einstein vacuum equations, and the Kerr-Newman family of solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations in the hyperextreme sector of the corresponding parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15014290','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15014290"><span>SYMTRAN - A Time-dependent <span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Tandem Mirror Transport Code</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Hua, D; Fowler, T</p> <p>2004-06-15</p> <p>A time-dependent version of the steady-state radial transport <span class="hlt">model</span> in <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> tandem mirrors in Ref. [1] has been coded up and first tests performed. Our code, named SYMTRAN, is an adaptation of the earlier SPHERE code for spheromaks, now modified for tandem mirror physics. Motivated by Post's new concept of kinetic stabilization of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> mirrors, it is an extension of the earlier TAMRAC rate-equation code omitting radial transport [2], which successfully accounted for experimental results in TMX. The SYMTRAN code differs from the earlier tandem mirror radial transport code TMT in that our code is focused on axisymmetric tandem mirrors and classical diffusion, whereas TMT emphasized non-ambipolar transport in TMX and MFTF-B due to yin-yang plugs and non-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> transitions between the plugs and axisymmetric center cell. Both codes exhibit interesting but different non-linear behavior.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930022393','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930022393"><span><span class="hlt">Axial</span> and torsional fatigue behavior of a cobalt-base alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>In order to develop elevated temperature multiaxial fatigue life prediction <span class="hlt">models</span> for the wrought cobalt-base alloy, Haynes 188, a multiaxial fatigue data base is required. To satisfy this need, an elevated temperature experimental program on Haynes 188 consisting of <span class="hlt">axial</span>, torsional, inphase and out of phase <span class="hlt">axial</span>-torsional fatigue experiments was designed. Elevated temperature <span class="hlt">axial</span> and torsional fatigue experiments were conducted under strain control on thin wall tubular specimens of Haynes 188 in air. Test results are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24880423','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24880423"><span>Magnetic field uniformity of the practical tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> Helmholtz coils systems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beiranvand, R</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>In this paper, effects of the assembly misalignments and the manufacturing mismatches on the magnetic field uniformity of a practical tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> Helmholtz coils system have been <span class="hlt">modeled</span> mathematically. These undesired effects regularly occur in any practical tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> Helmholtz coils system. To confirm the mathematical calculations, a tri-<span class="hlt">axial</span> Helmholtz coils system has been constructed and the uniformity of its magnetic field has been measured under different conditions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the mathematical analyses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21528836','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21528836"><span>Probabilistic cloning of three <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> states</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jimenez, O.; Bergou, J.; Delgado, A.</p> <p>2010-12-15</p> <p>We study the probabilistic cloning of three <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> states. These states are defined by a single complex quantity, the inner product among them. We show that three different probabilistic cloning machines are necessary to optimally clone all possible families of three <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> states. We also show that the optimal cloning probability of generating M copies out of one original can be cast as the quotient between the success probability of unambiguously discriminating one and M copies of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> states.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLA..379.1213Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLA..379.1213Y"><span>Topological phase in a non-Hermitian PT <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yuce, C.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>In this work, we consider a tight binding lattice with two non-Hermitian impurities. The system is described by a non-Hermitian generalization of the Aubry-Andre <span class="hlt">model</span>. We show that there exists topologically nontrivial edge states for the system in the PT <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870014964','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19870014964"><span>Flow-separation patterns on <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> forebodies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Keener, Earl R.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Flow-visualization studies of ogival, parabolic, and conical forebodies were made in a comprehensive investigation of the various types of flow patterns. Schlieren, vapor-screen, oil-flow, and sublimation flow-visualization tests were conducted over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg. to 88 deg., over a Reynolds-number range from 0.3X10(6) to 2.0X10(6) (based on base diameter), and over a Mach number range from 0.1 to 2. The principal effects of angle of attack, Reynolds number, and Mach number on the occurrence of vortices, the position of vortex shedding, the principal surface-flow-separation patterns, the magnitude of surface-flow angles, and the extent of laminar and turbulent flow for <span class="hlt">symmetric</span>, asymmetric, and wake-like flow-separation regimes are presented. It was found that the two-dimensional cylinder analogy was helpful in a qualitative sense in analyzing both the surface-flow patterns and the external flow field. The oil-flow studies showed three types of primary separation patterns at the higher Reynolds numbers owing to the influence of boundary-layer transition. The effect of angle of attack and Reynolds number is to change the <span class="hlt">axial</span> location of the onset and extent of the primary transitional and turbulent separation regions. Crossflow inflectional-instability vortices were observed on the windward surface at angles of attack from 5 deg. to 55 deg. Their effect is to promote early transition. At low angles of attack, near 10 deg., an unexpected laminar-separation bubble occurs over the forward half of the forebody. At high angles of attack, at which vortex asymmetry occurs, the results support the proposition that the principal cause of vortex asymmetry is the hydrodynamic instability of the inviscid flow field. On the other hand, boundary-layer asymmetries also occur, especially at transitional Reynolds numbers. The position of asymmetric vortex shedding moves forward with increasing angle of attack and with increasing Reynolds number, and moves</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..94d0101G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvA..94d0101G"><span>PT -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> slowing down of decoherence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gardas, Bartłomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We investigate P T -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> quantum systems ultraweakly coupled to an environment. We find that such open systems evolve under P T -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span>, purely dephasing and unital dynamics. The dynamical map describing the evolution is then determined explicitly using a quantum canonical transformation. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of why P T -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> dephasing-type interactions lead to a critical slowing down of decoherence. This effect is further exemplified with an experimentally relevant system, a P T -<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> qubit easily realizable, e.g., in optical or microcavity experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1345161-pt-symmetric-slowing-down-decoherence','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1345161-pt-symmetric-slowing-down-decoherence"><span>PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> slowing down of decoherence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Gardas, Bartlomiej; Deffner, Sebastian; Saxena, Avadh Behari</p> <p>2016-10-27</p> <p>Here, we invesmore » tigate PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> quantum systems ultraweakly coupled to an environment. We find that such open systems evolve under PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span>, purely dephasing and unital dynamics. The dynamical map describing the evolution is then determined explicitly using a quantum canonical transformation. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of why PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> dephasing-type interactions lead to a critical slowing down of decoherence. This effect is further exemplified with an experimentally relevant system, a PT-<span class="hlt">symmetric</span> qubit easily realizable, e.g., in optical or microcavity experiments.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1739b0012Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1739b0012Z"><span>Computing <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> colorings of the dihedral group</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zelenyuk, Yuliya</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>A symmetry on a group G is a mapping G ∋ x ↦ gx-1 g ∈ G, where g ∈ G. A subset A ⊆ G is <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> if it is invariant under some symmetry, that is, A = gA-1g. The notion of symmetry has interesting relations to enumerative combinatorics. A coloring is <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> if χ(gx-1g) = χ(x) for some g ∈ G. We discuss an approach how to compute the number of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> r-colorings for any finite group. Using this approach we derive the formula for the number of <span class="hlt">symmetric</span> r-colorings of the dihedral group D3.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PThPh.126..115T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PThPh.126..115T"><span>On the Color-Singlet States in Many-Quark <span class="hlt">Model</span> with the su(4)-Algebraic Structure. I --- Color-<span class="hlt">Symmetric</span> Form ---</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tsue, Y.; Providência, C.; Providência, J. D.; Yamamura, M.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>In the modified Bonn quark <span class="hlt">model</span> in which quark-pairing and particle-hole interactions are included, color-singlet states are examined in addition to the color-neutral quark-triplet state by a method of boson realization. The region which consists of single-quarks, quark pairs and quark triplets is analyzed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17624564','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17624564"><span>Microbubbling by co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> electrohydrodynamic atomization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Farook, U; Stride, E; Edirisinghe, M J; Moaleji, R</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>The preparation of microbubble suspensions is an important feature of medical engineering research. Recently, co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> electrohydrodynamic atomization was used in our laboratory for the first time to prepare microbubble suspensions. In this paper, using a <span class="hlt">model</span> glycerol-air system, we investigate in detail the characteristics of this microbubbling process. Modes of microbubbling are elucidated with respect to applied voltage and liquid and air flow rates. Thus, a parametric plot is constructed to identify a liquid and gas flow rate regime, which allows continuous microbubbling. This map provides a basis for the selection of a suitable combination of liquid and gas flow rates particularly in relation to yield and bubble size. The mechanism of microbubbling in microfluidic systems is compared with that of microbubbling by co-<span class="hlt">axial</span> electrohydrodynamic atomization to identify the advantages and the limiting factors of the latter. Stability of microbubbles prepared by this method in terms of variation of diameter as a function of time is compared with previous literature on the dissolution of microbubbles with an air core and suggests the need for further work to stabilize the bubbles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920015089','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920015089"><span>Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing <span class="hlt">axial</span> deformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>A method is described to <span class="hlt">model</span> the dynamics of tapered <span class="hlt">axial</span> bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed <span class="hlt">models</span> are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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