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Sample records for aya cancers meetingedit

  1. Social Media and the Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Patient with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Perales, Miguel-Angel; Drake, Emily K; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Wood, William A

    2016-12-01

    Over 70,000 adolescent and young adults (AYA) aged 15 to 39 years are diagnosed with cancer each year in the US. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has identified AYA cancer patients as a unique population. The most common cancers in this age group include tumors typically seen in pediatric patients such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and brain tumors, as well as cancers more typically seen in adult patients such as breast cancer and melanoma. In addition, some cancers have their highest incidence in AYA patients, such as Hodgkin Lymphoma, testicular cancer, and bone tumors. AYA patients face additional unique issues due to their age, not just questions about treatment choices due to lack of data but also questions about fertility, relationships, loss of autonomy, and interruptions in school/work with potentially significant financial complications. This age group also has very high rates of social media usage with up to 90 % of adults aged 18 to 29 using social networking sites. In this review, we will describe the use of social media in AYAs with cancer and highlight some of the online resources for AYAs.

  2. Who Treats Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer? A Report from the AYA HOPE Study.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Helen M; Harlan, Linda C; Schmidt, Susanne; Keegan, Theresa H M; Lynch, Charles F; Kent, Erin E; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Schwartz, Stephen M; Chu, Roland L; Keel, Gretchen; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2015-09-01

    Physicians play a critical role in delivering effective treatment and enabling successful transition to survivorship among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. However, with no AYA cancer medical specialty, information on where and by whom AYAs with cancer are treated is limited. Using the National Cancer Institute's population-based AYA HOPE Study, 464 AYAs aged 15-39 at diagnosis treated by 903 physicians were identified. Differences in physician and hospital characteristics were examined by age at diagnosis and cancer type (germ cell cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphocytic leukemia [ALL], and sarcoma) using chi-square tests. Treating physicians were predominately 51-64 years old, male, United States-trained in non-pediatric specialties, and in group practices within large metropolitan areas. Older patients were less often treated by pediatric physicians (p < 0.01) and more likely to be treated by United States-trained physicians without research/teaching responsibilities and in hospitals without residency programs (p < 0.05). The majority of the few pediatricians (n = 44) treated ALL patients. Physicians with research/teaching responsibilities and those based in medical schools were more likely to treat patients with ALL and sarcoma compared with other cancer types (p < 0.01). Of HL patients, 73% were treated at a cancer center compared with 56% of patients with germ cell cancer (p < 0.01), while ALL (85%) and sarcoma (87%) patients were more likely to be treated in hospitals with residency programs (p < 0.01). Most AYAs with cancer were treated by non-pediatric physicians in community settings, although physician characteristics varied significantly by patient cancer type and age at diagnosis.

  3. What do adolescents and young adults want from cancer resources? Insights from a Delphi panel of AYA patients.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christabel K; Zebrack, Brad

    2017-01-01

    Cancer treatment programs and community-based support organizations are increasingly producing information and support resources geared to adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs); however, systematically-derived knowledge about user preferences for these resources is lacking. The primary purpose of this study was to generate findings from informed AYA cancer patients that resource developers can use to create products consistent with AYAs' expressed preferences for information and support. Utilizing a modified Delphi technique, AYA cancer patients identified barriers to optimal AYA cancer care, cancer resources that address their needs, and specific characteristics of cancer resources they find helpful. The Delphi panel consisted of a convenience sample of 21 patients aged 18-39 years, who were diagnosed with cancer between ages 15-39 and were no more than 8 years out from cancer treatment at the time of the study. Survey data were collected in three consecutive and iterative rounds over the course of 6 months in 2015. Findings indicated that AYA patients prefer resources that reduce feelings of loneliness, create a sense of community or belonging, and provide opportunities to meet other AYA patients. Among the top barriers to optimal cancer care, AYAs identified a lack of cancer care providers specializing in AYA care, a lack of connection to an AYA patient community, and their own lack of ability to navigate the health system. Participants also described aspects of cancer information and supportive care resources that they believe address AYAs' concerns. Information derived from this study will help developers of cancer information and support resources to better reach their intended audience. From the point of view of AYA cancer patients, optimal cancer care and utilization of information and support resources requires that cancer support programs foster meaningful connections among AYA patients. Results also suggest that patient resources should equip

  4. Contraception: the Need for Expansion of Counsel in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Fridgen, Olivia; Sehovic, Ivana; Bowman, Meghan L; Reed, Damon; Tamargo, Christina; Vadaparampil, Susan; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-02-15

    Little is known about oncology provider recommendations regarding best practices in contraception use during cancer treatment and through survivorship for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. This review examined the literature to identify related studies on contraception recommendations, counseling discussions, and methods of contraception in the AYA oncology population. A literature review was conducted using PubMed, including all peer-reviewed journals with no publication date exclusions. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using combinations of the following phrases or keywords: "oncology OR cancer" AND "contraception, family planning, contraceptive devices, contraceptive agents, intrauterine devices OR IUD, vaccines, spermatocidal agents, postcoital, immunologic, family planning, vasectomy, tubal ligation, sterilization" AND "young adult OR adolescent" AND "young adult AND adolescent". Reviewers assessed articles using the "Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies" which considers: (1) selection bias; (2) study design; (3) confounders; (4) blinding; (5) data collection methods; and (6) withdrawals and dropouts. A total of five articles were included and all studies were quantitative. Results showed no consistent recommendations among providers, references to guidelines, or methods of contraceptive types. Provider guidelines for discussions with AYA patients should be expanded to provide comprehensive, consistent, and quality cancer care in the AYA population.

  5. Cancer negatively impacts on sexual function in adolescents and young adults: The Aya Hope study.

    PubMed

    Wettergren, Lena; Kent, Erin E; Mitchell, Sandra A; Zebrack, Brad; Lynch, Charles F; Rubenstein, Mara B; Keegan, Theresa H M; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Parsons, Helen M; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2016-05-30

    This cohort study examined the impact of cancer on sexual function and intimate relationships in adolescents and young adults (AYAs). We also explored factors predicting an increased likelihood that cancer had negatively affected these outcomes. Participants (n = 465, ages 15-39) in the Adolescent and Young Adult Health Outcomes and Patient Experience (AYA HOPE) study completed two surveys approximately 1 and 2 years post cancer diagnosis. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors negatively affected by perceptions of sexual function at 2 years post-diagnosis. Forty-nine percent of AYAs reported negative effects on sexual function at one year post cancer diagnosis and 70% of those persisted in their negative perceptions two years after diagnosis. Those reporting a negative impact at two years were more likely to be 25 years or older (OR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.44-4.42), currently not raising children (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.06-3.08), experiencing fatigue (OR, .99; 95% CI, .975-.998) and more likely to report that their diagnosis has had a negative effect on physical appearance (OR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.97-4.81). Clinical factors and mental health were not significant predictors of negative effects on sexual function. Many AYAs diagnosed with cancer experience a persistent negative impact on sexual life up to two years following diagnosis. The findings underscore the need to develop routine protocols to assess sexual function in AYAs with cancer and to provide comprehensive management in the clinical setting. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The relationship between posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zebrack, Brad; Kwak, Minyoung; Salsman, John; Cousino, Melissa; Meeske, Kathleen; Aguilar, Christine; Embry, Leanne; Block, Rebecca; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Theories of posttraumatic growth suggest that some degree of distress is necessary to stimulate growth; yet, investigations of the relationship between stress and growth following trauma are mixed. This study aims to understand the relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic growth in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. 165 AYA patients aged 14-39 years at diagnosis completed standardized measures of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth at 12 months following diagnosis. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing and regression were used to examine linear and curvilinear relationships between posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth. No significant relationships between overall posttraumatic stress severity and posttraumatic growth were observed at 12-month follow-up. However, curvilinear relationships between re-experiencing (a posttraumatic stress symptom) and two of five posttraumatic growth indicators (New Possibilities, Personal Strengths) were observed. Findings suggest that re-experiencing is associated with some aspects of posttraumatic growth but not others. Although re-experiencing is considered a symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder, it also may represent a cognitive process necessary to achieve personal growth for AYAs. Findings call into question the supposed psychopathological nature of re-experiencing and suggest that re-experiencing, as a cognitive process, may be psychologically adaptive. Opportunities to engage family, friends, cancer survivors, or health care professionals in frank discussions about fears, worries, or concerns may help AYAs re-experience cancer in a way that enhances their understanding of what happened to them and contributes to positive adaptation to life after cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Psychosocial outcomes and interventions among cancer survivors diagnosed during adolescence and young adulthood (AYA): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Marie; McDonnell, Glynnis; DeRosa, Antonio; Schuler, Tammy; Philip, Errol; Peterson, Lisa; Touza, Kaitlin; Jhanwar, Sabrina; Atkinson, Thomas M.; Ford, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A cancer diagnosis during adolescence or young adulthood (AYA; defined as ages 15–39) generates unique medical and psychosocial needs as developmental milestones are simultaneously impacted. Past research highlights that AYAs’ experiences and psychosocial outcomes are different, and more research and attention is needed. We aimed to identify and synthesize literature regarding psychosocial outcomes, unique needs, and existing psychosocial interventions pertaining to individuals diagnosed with cancer exclusively during AYA, and to highlight areas for future research. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science, and PsycINFO (via OVID). Grey literature was searched using key term variations and combinations. Overall, 15,301 records were assessed by two independent reviewers, with 38 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Results Data synthesis of the 38 articles was organized by four main themes based on quality of life and survivorship: physical well-being (7 studies), psychological well-being (8 studies), social well-being (9 studies), and survivorship care (14 studies). The paucity of studies for such broad inclusion criteria highlights that this population is often combined or subsumed under other age groups, missing needs unique to these AYAs. Conclusions AYA cancer survivors’ experiences are nuanced, with interacting variables contributing to post-treatment outcomes. AYAs require age-appropriate and flexible care, informational needs and treatment-related education that foster autonomy for long-term survivorship, as well as improved follow-up care and psychological outcomes. Implications for Cancer Survivors By incorporating these findings into practice, the informational and unmet needs of AYAs can be addressed effectively. Education and programming is lacking specific and general subject matter specific to AYAs, incorporating ranging needs at different treatment stages. PMID

  8. Impact of the AYA HOPE Comorbidity Index on Assessing Health Care Service Needs and Health Status among Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Prasad, Pinki K; Landry, Ian; Harlan, Linda C; Parsons, Helen M; Lynch, Charles F; Smith, Ashley W; Hamilton, Ann S; Keegan, Theresa H M

    2015-12-01

    Existing comorbidity indices were not developed for adolescent and young adults (AYA) 15 to 39 years of age. The aim of this study was to assess impact of comorbidities on health care service needs and health status among AYA cancer survivors using the newly developed AYA HOPE comorbidity index in comparison with the existing indices. Data on comorbid conditions were obtained from medical records and service needs and health status were from a survey of AYA cancer survivors. Prevalence of comorbidities was based on the AYA HOPE index. Charlson and NCI indices were compared. Multivariable logistic regression was used. Of the 485 patients, 14.6% had ≥2 comorbidities based on the AYA HOPE Index. Prevalence of mental illness and obesity/overweight, which were not included in existing indices, were 8.2% and 5.8%, respectively. Prevalence of cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and neurologic conditions were higher with the AYA HOPE Index than the other two indices. Forty percent of AYA patients reported service needs, particularly for mental health services (25.2%) and support groups (17.7%). Having ≥2 comorbidities on the AYA index was associated with higher mental health service needs [OR, 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.82] adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Comorbidities were associated with fair/poor self-reported health status. The AYA HOPE Index is a more comprehensive comorbidity index for AYA cancer patients than existing indices, and the number of comorbidities is associated with service needs and health status. The AYA HOPE index could identify patients' additional service needs early in therapy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. The relationship between post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zebrack, Brad; Kwak, Minyoung; Salsman, John; Cousino, Melissa; Meeske, Kathleen; Aguilar, Christine; Embry, Leanne; Block, Rebecca; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Objective Theories of posttraumatic growth suggest that some degree of distress is necessary to stimulate growth; yet investigations of the relationship between stress and growth following trauma are mixed. This study aims to understand the relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic growth in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. Method 165 AYA patients aged 14–39 years at diagnosis completed standardized measures of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth at 12 months following diagnosis. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing and regression were used to examine linear and curvilinear relationship between posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth. Results No significant relationships between overall posttraumatic stress severity and posttraumatic growth were observed at 12-month follow-up. However, curvilinear relationships between re-experiencing (a posttraumatic stress symptom) and two of five posttraumatic growth indicators (New possibilities, Personal strengths) were observed. Conclusion Findings suggest that re-experiencing is associated with some aspects of posttraumatic growth but not others. Although re-experiencing is considered a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder, it also may represent a cognitive process necessary to achieve personal growth for AYAs. Findings call into question the supposed psychopathological nature of re-experiencing and suggest that re-experiencing, as a cognitive process, may be psychologically adaptive. Opportunities to engage family, friends, cancer survivors, or health care professionals in frank discussions about fears, worries, or concerns may help AYAs re-experiencing cancer in a way that enhances their understanding of what happened to them and contributes to positive adaptation to life after cancer. PMID:24916740

  10. Young and Uninsured: Insurance Patterns of Recently Diagnosed Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors in the AYA HOPE Study

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Helen; Schmidt, Susanne; Harlan, Linda; Kent, Erin; Lynch, Charles; Smith, Ashley; Keegan, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Young adults have historically been the least likely to have health insurance in the United States. Previous studies of childhood cancer survivors found lower rates of insurance and less access to medical care compared to siblings; however, no studies have examined continuity of insurance after cancer diagnosis in adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Methods Using the AYA Health Outcomes and Patient Experience study, a cohort of 465 15-39 year-olds from participating Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registries, we evaluated changes in and sponsors of health insurance coverage after diagnosis, coverage of doctor-recommended tests, and factors associated with lack of insurance post-diagnosis using chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression. Results Over 25% (n=118) of AYA cancer survivors experienced some period without insurance up to 35 months post-diagnosis. Insurance rates were high in the initial year after diagnosis (6-14 months; 93.3%) but decreased substantially at follow-up (15-35 months; 85.2%). The most common sponsor of health insurance was employer/school-coverage (43.7%). Multivariable analysis indicated that older survivors (25-39 vs. 15-19; Odds Ratio (OR): 3.35, p<0.01) and those with less education (high school or less vs. college graduate; OR: 2.80, p<0.01) were more likely to experience a period without insurance after diagnosis. Furthermore, >20% of survivors indicated there were doctor-recommended tests/treatments not covered by insurance, but >80% received them regardless of coverage. Discussion Insurance rates decrease with time since diagnosis in AYA cancer survivors. Future studies should examine how new policies under the Affordable Care Act extend access and insurance coverage beyond initial treatment. PMID:24899580

  11. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Work-Related Issues of Adolescent and Young Adult(AYA)Cancer Survivors - Tips for Supporting Them in and out of Hospitals].

    PubMed

    Araki, Yuko; Takahashi, Miyako

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer treatment have steadily improved the overall survival rate, and enhancing the quality of life of cancer survivors is the challenge faced at present. One of the major topics in studies on cancer survivors is work-related issues, and the government has been focusing on improving the circumstances of the working population and children. In 2015, the Cancer Control Accelerating Plan set adolescent and young adult(AYA)cancer survivors as the top priority for this plan. Work-related issues of AYA cancer survivors are highly individualized and complicated, mainly because of three characteristics: 1 ) Cancer treatments and/or outpatient follow-ups are accompanied by major life-stage transitions, 2 ) Treatments are prone to be nonstandardized in "rare cancers" or "advanced-stage cancers" and 3 ) Achieving economic independence is difficult because of high medical costs. This article provides some tips for medical professionals working in hospitals on how to support AYA cancer survivors along with their main responsibilities. It also provides an overview of online and offline resources available for supporting this population.

  13. Online group-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: A multicenter randomised controlled trial of Recapture Life-AYA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    modality are highlighted, and the role of both peer and caregiver support in enhancing the effectiveness of this skills-based intervention is also discussed. The innovative videoconferencing delivery method Recapture Life uses has the potential to address the geographic and psychological isolation of adolescents and young adults as they move toward cancer survivorship. It is expected that teaching AYAs coping skills as they resume their normal lives after cancer may have long-term implications for their quality of life. Trial Registration ACTRN12610000717055 PMID:22862906

  14. Online group-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: a multicenter randomised controlled trial of Recapture Life-AYA.

    PubMed

    Sansom-Daly, Ursula M; Wakefield, Claire E; Bryant, Richard A; Butow, Phyllis; Sawyer, Susan; Patterson, Pandora; Anazodo, Antoinette; Thompson, Kate; Cohn, Richard J

    2012-08-03

    peer and caregiver support in enhancing the effectiveness of this skills-based intervention is also discussed. The innovative videoconferencing delivery method Recapture Life uses has the potential to address the geographic and psychological isolation of adolescents and young adults as they move toward cancer survivorship. It is expected that teaching AYAs coping skills as they resume their normal lives after cancer may have long-term implications for their quality of life. ACTRN12610000717055.

  15. Overcoming psychosocial and developmental barriers to blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) in an adolescent/young adult (AYA) transgender patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khazal, Sajad; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kapoor, Neena; Mahadeo, Kris M

    2014-11-01

    Adolescents/young adults (AYAs) afflicted with cancer face unique barriers to potentially standard curative therapies, such as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT). Transgender AYAs face additional barriers and there is a dearth of published literature regarding their oncology-related experience. We present the case of an AYA male-to-female (MTF) transgender patient on cross-sex hormone therapy, with a history of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) and significant psychosocial barriers, which initially served as a barrier to BMT at two different centers; we modified our standard consent and education process and was able to successfully proceed with BMT and subsequently cure her CML. Despite unique challenges, AYA and transgender patients with significant psychosocial barriers may achieve successful outcomes with BMT. Research is needed regarding guidelines for cross-sex hormone therapy administration for patients undergoing BMT and other issues, which may be unique to the transgender experience.

  16. Adolescent and young adult (AYA) lymphoma survivors report lower health-related quality of life compared to a normative population: results from the PROFILES registry.

    PubMed

    Husson, Olga; Prins, Judith B; Kaal, Suzanne E J; Oerlemans, Simone; Stevens, Wendy B; Zebrack, Bradley; van der Graaf, Winette T A; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2017-02-01

    Trying to simultaneously achieve developmental milestones and cope with a life-threatening disease may place adolescents and young adults (AYAs) at risk for impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL) later in life. The aim of this study was to examine differences in HRQoL between AYA lymphoma survivors and a normative population and to determine sociodemographic, clinical and long-term symptom-related factors associated with HRQoL. This study was part of a longitudinal, population-based survey among lymphoma survivors diagnosed between 1999 and 2012. The AYA survivor sample (18-39 years at time diagnosis) was compared to a sex- and age-matched normative population on HRQoL (EORTC-QLQ-C30) and psychological distress (HADS). Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with HRQoL among survivors. One hundred and ninety-eight AYA lymphoma survivors (58%) responded to the study invitation. Compared to an age- and sex-matched normative population (N = 380), significantly and clinically relevant poorer HRQoL was observed for AYA lymphoma survivors in seven specific domains of HRQoL: physical, role, cognitive, emotional, social functioning, fatigue and financial difficulties (all p < 0.05). In addition, AYA lymphoma survivors less often had a spouse/partner and more often had a lower educational level compared to the normative population. Linear regression analyses showed that being unemployed, female gender, having one or more comorbid conditions, high levels of fatigue and psychological distress were most strongly associated with HRQoL. These findings identify specific domains of life in which cancer has a significant and long-term impact for AYA lymphoma survivors. Future investigations are needed to identify and test administrations and timing of psychosocial support interventions having potential to reduce long-term late effects in specific HRQoL domains and promote function and adaptability after cancer treatment.

  17. Image compression with QM-AYA adaptive binary arithmetic coder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joe-Ming; Langdon, Glen G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Q-coder has been reported in the literature, and is a renorm-driven binary adaptive arithmetic coder. A similar renorm-driven coder, the QM coder, uses the same approach with an initial attack to more rapidly estimate the statistics in the beginning, and with a different state table. The QM coder is the adaptive binary arithmetic coder employed in the JBIG and JPEG image compression algorithms. The QM-AYA arithmetic coder is similar to the QM coder, with a different state table, that offers balanced improvements to the QM probability estimation for the less skewed distributions. The QM-AYA performs better when the probability estimate is near 0.5 for each binary symbol. An approach for constructing effective index change tables for Q-coder type adaptation is discussed.

  18. Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: Summary of an Institute of Medicine Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Beaupin, Lynda K.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Fasciano, Karen; Ganz, Patricia A.; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Hudson, Melissa M.; Nevidjon, Brenda; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Rechis, Ruth; Richardson, Lisa C.; Seibel, Nita L.; Smith, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death in adolescents and young adults (AYAs). This population faces many short- and long-term health and psychosocial consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment, but many programs for cancer treatment, survivorship care, and psychosocial support do not focus on the specific needs of AYA cancer patients. Recognizing this health care disparity, the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a public workshop to examine the needs of AYA patients with cancer. Workshop participants identified many gaps and challenges in the care of AYA cancer patients and discussed potential strategies to address these needs. Suggestions included ways to improve access to care for AYAs, to deliver cancer care that better meets the medical and psychosocial needs of AYAs, to develop educational programs for providers who care for AYA cancer survivors, and to enhance the evidence base for AYAs with cancer by facilitating participation in research. PMID:25568146

  19. Supporting Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Oncology Provider Perceptions of Adolescent and Young Adult Unmet Needs.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Anne C; Fowler, Brynn; Warner, Echo L; Pannier, Samantha T; Fair, Douglas; Spraker-Perlman, Holly; Yancey, Jeff; Bott, Brad; Reynolds, Carolyn; Randall, R Lor

    2017-06-12

    Few studies have assessed oncology providers' perceptions of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients' unmet needs. In this statewide survey (N = 91), we found that most providers recognize the financial, insurance, and late effects needs of their AYA cancer patients. However, employment, education, behavioral health, sexuality, and social and family issues were endorsed by less than half of providers as areas where AYAs needed assistance. Few providers felt that their AYA cancer patients had unmet needs for these same concerns. Educational efforts are needed to improve providers' awareness of the impact of cancer for AYA cancer patients.

  20. [Cancer and Career? - A Qualitative Study of Job Status of Young Adult Cancer Survivors].

    PubMed

    Mentschke, Lisa; Leuteritz, Katja; Daneck, Lisa; Breuer, Nora; Sender, Annekathrin; Friedrich, Michael; Nowe, Erik; Stöbel-Richter, Yve; Geue, Kristina

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of cancer on work and education for AYA. Collect information about AYA's return to work/return to study. Methods: 18 AYA (10 female) aged 18 to 39 (m=27 years) at time of diagnosis completed a semi-structured interview. Qualitative content analysis was used to generate results. Results: 11 of 18 AYA had already returned to work/study. Flexible structures and emotional support of colleagues and managers were reported being helpful. 10 AYA planed or had already reduced job tasks, hours of work or further education. This was mostly compelled by physical disabilities due to cancer or treatment. Most AYA asked for more support within the social insurance system. Conclusions: Cancer often leads to changes in work or education. More social and vocational counseling to support AYA's rehabilitation process seems to be necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Square Pegs, Round Hole? Ensuring Fit in the AYAO Spectrum for Adolescents and Young Adults with Genetic Risk for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Mary L.; Smith, Kristin N.; Young, A. Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a case example of a young woman at genetic risk for future cancer. We discuss psychosocial challenges that adolescents and young adults (AYAs) may share with their cancer survivor peers, and describe an example of psychosocial care. A scientific foundation denoting the needs of AYAs at risk for heritable cancers is lacking, and it is unknown if these AYAs receive adequate support services. This is a call to action for practitioners and researchers to engage in initiatives that assure these AYAs have access to valuable support and more clearly mark their place within the spectrum of AYA oncology. PMID:24066273

  2. Using Appearance-Based Messages to Increase Sun Protection in Adolescent Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study of Ultraviolet Light Photography.

    PubMed

    Recklitis, Christopher J; Bakan, Jennifer; Werchniak, Andrew E; Mahler, Heike

    2017-09-01

    Despite risk for secondary skin cancers, many adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors do not practice recommended sun protection (SP). Ultraviolet light photography (UVP), which demonstrates the negative impact of sun exposure on physical appearance, has been shown to increase SP in community AYA samples. This study of 58 AYA cancer survivors demonstrates that UVP is acceptable and not distressing to this population. Follow-up data on 23 AYAs demonstrated that those given UVP significantly improve their SP behaviors, while those receiving standard educational materials do not. Results demonstrate UVP is a promising tool for increasing SP in AYA survivors.

  3. AYA-Myeloma: Real-World, Single-Center Experience Over Last 5 Years.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Saini, Neha; Chauhan, Pooja; Sharma, Tanya; Khadwal, Alka; Prakash, Gaurav; Varma, Neelam; Lad, Deepesh; Varma, Subhash; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2017-08-22

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is considered as a disease of the old with the reported median age of 60-70 years. The disease occurred a decade earlier in the Indian subcontinent. The literature on MM in adolescents and young adult (AYA) is limited. We studied the disease characteristics and outcomes of the AYA-MM in the real-world setting. It is a retrospective single-center study conducted at a tertiary care center from North India. Records of all consecutive patients with AYA-MM (15-39 years of age) who were managed from January 1, 2010, to December 30, 2015, were reviewed. Survival was assessed from the date of start of treatment to the last follow-up date or death due to any cause. A total of 415 patients managed for MM were included in the study. The frequency of the AYA-MM was 9.6% (40/415) of whom 5 patients were younger than 30 years. There was male preponderance with a median age of the patients being 38 years. The main presenting features were bone pain (55%), fatigue (45%), extramedullary plasmacytomas (20%), and infections (12%) and referral from the peripheral hospital as renal dysfunction (58%). On the evaluation of patients, hypercalcemia, renal impairment, anemia, and lytic lesions were seen in 24.32%, 30%, 52.5%, and 59.25% of patients, respectively. The majority had the high-risk disease (International Staging System [ISS]-III: 75%). Only 22.5% patients were transplanted. The 3-year median overall survival of the study population was 80.21%. AYA-MM patients have a higher prevalence of extramedullary disease and high-risk disease.

  4. Introduction to Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer researchers, advocates, and a cancer survivor introduce the topic of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers, covering distinct aspects of cancer in these patients and research questions to answer.

  5. In vivo dose response and in vitro mechanistic analysis of enhanced immunoglobulin A production by Lactobacillus plantarum AYA.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yosuke; Yoshida, Hikaru; Ogita, Tasuku; Okita, Kimiko; Fukudome, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Takuya; Tanabe, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) mediates the mucosal immune system, which provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Lactobacillus plantarum AYA increases the IgA level of Peyer's patch (PP) cells, but the recommended amount of consumption and the mechanism of action remains unclear. Better understanding of these is essential to development of L. plantarum AYA for use in functional foods. Therefore, we investigated the dose-response effect (in vivo) and mechanism (in vitro) of IgA enhancement induced by L. plantarum AYA. In the small intestine of the mice fed a diet containing 0.03% or 0.3% of L. plantarum AYA powder for 4 weeks, the IgA levels were significantly increased. Thus, it is suggested that the recommended amount of consumption of L. plantarum AYA is about 0.72 mg per day. In addition, the bacterial cell wall fraction significantly enhanced the IgA production level of murine PP cells in the in vitro assay. The ability of whole cells and the cell wall fraction to enhance IgA levels was significantly inhibited by an anti-Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) antibody, which suggests that the cell wall fraction of L. plantarum AYA increases the IgA level via TLR-2. These findings indicate that L. plantarum AYA is a potential functional food source that maintains mucosal immunity.

  6. In vivo dose response and in vitro mechanistic analysis of enhanced immunoglobulin A production by Lactobacillus plantarum AYA

    PubMed Central

    KIKUCHI, Yosuke; YOSHIDA, Hikaru; OGITA, Tasuku; OKITA, Kimiko; FUKUDOME, Shin-ichi; SUZUKI, Takuya; TANABE, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) mediates the mucosal immune system, which provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Lactobacillus plantarum AYA increases the IgA level of Peyer’s patch (PP) cells, but the recommended amount of consumption and the mechanism of action remains unclear. Better understanding of these is essential to development of L. plantarum AYA for use in functional foods. Therefore, we investigated the dose-response effect (in vivo) and mechanism (in vitro) of IgA enhancement induced by L. plantarum AYA. In the small intestine of the mice fed a diet containing 0.03% or 0.3% of L. plantarum AYA powder for 4 weeks, the IgA levels were significantly increased. Thus, it is suggested that the recommended amount of consumption of L. plantarum AYA is about 0.72 mg per day. In addition, the bacterial cell wall fraction significantly enhanced the IgA production level of murine PP cells in the in vitro assay. The ability of whole cells and the cell wall fraction to enhance IgA levels was significantly inhibited by an anti-Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2) antibody, which suggests that the cell wall fraction of L. plantarum AYA increases the IgA level via TLR-2. These findings indicate that L. plantarum AYA is a potential functional food source that maintains mucosal immunity. PMID:26221576

  7. Breast cancer in adolescent and young adult women.

    PubMed

    Gewefel, Hanan; Salhia, Bodour

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancy among adolescent and young adult (AYA) women, accounting for approximately 14% of all AYA cancer diagnoses and 7% of all breast cancer. Breast cancer in AYA women is believed to represent a more biologically aggressive disease, but aside from commonly known hereditary predispositions, little is still known about the underlying molecular genetic causes. This review examines the current trends of breast cancer in AYA women as they relate to clinical, social, genetic, and molecular pathologic characteristics. We highlight existing trends, treatment and imaging approaches, and health burdens as they relate to breast cancer in AYA women and provide a discussion on ways to help improve the overall management of this breast cancer cohort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  9. Influencing referral of adolescents and young adults with cancer to sites with higher rates of trial enrollment.

    PubMed

    Albritton, Karen H; Coccia, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) have lower rates of clinical trial enrollment than younger or older patients with cancer. Multiple approaches to change policy and practice need to be used to improve this statistic. This article examines the option of increasing referral to 3 types of centers that are known to have relatively higher rates of enrollment of AYAs: pediatric cancer centers, AYA oncology programs, and National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers. There are reasonable challenges to changing referral patterns, and more research, as well as education of those diagnosing AYAs, is required. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Models of Cancer Survivorship Care for Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kinahan, Karen E.; Sanford, Stacy; Sadak, Karim T.; Salsman, John M.; Danner-Koptik, Karina; Didwania, Aarati

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To review the literature on adolescent and young adult (AYA) oncology, discuss survivorship models of care, and focus on the unique needs of AYA patients with transition of care from treatment to survivorship. Data Sources Peer-reviewed literature, workshop summaries, clinical practice guidelines. Conclusion Advancements have been made for AYAs with regard to identifying risk factors from cancer treatment and the need for ongoing follow-up care. Survivors face several unique care transitions. Several models of survivorship care are available for AYAs. Implications for Nursing Practice The responsibilities of survivorship care for AYA patients fall on clinical providers, researchers, the government, advocacy groups as well as the survivors and families themselves. Nurses must remain cognizant and educated on AYA survivorship issues. PMID:26210203

  11. Clinical research participation among adolescent and young adults at an NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and affiliated pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Stacy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Snyder, Mallory A; Reichek, Jennifer; Salsman, John M

    2017-05-01

    Minimal clinical trial participation among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer limits scientific progress and ultimately their clinical care and outcomes. These analyses examine the current state of AYA clinical research participation at a Midwestern comprehensive cancer center and affiliated pediatric hospital to advise program development and increase availability of trials and AYA participation. Enrollment is examined across all diagnoses, the entire AYA age spectrum (15-39), and both cancer therapeutic and supportive care protocols. his study was a retrospective review of electronic medical records via existing databases and registries for all AYAs. Data were collected for AYAs seen by an oncologist at the adult outpatient cancer center or at the pediatric hospital between the years 2010 and 2014. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were conducted to characterize this sample. In the pediatric setting, 42.3% of AYAs were enrolled in a study compared to 11.2% in the adult setting. Regression analyses in the pediatric setting revealed that AYAs with private insurance or Caucasian race were more likely to participate. Within the adult setting, ethnicity, race, insurance, and diagnosis were associated with study participation; 54.8% of study enrollments were for cancer therapeutic and 43.4% for supportive care studies. These results are comparable to previously published data and support the need for new local and national AYA initiatives to increase the availability of and enrollment in therapeutic clinical trials. The same is true for supportive care studies which play a crucial role in improving quality of life.

  12. Adult Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Valérie; Marples, Maria; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of cancer seen in young people changes with increasing age, transitioning from childhood- to adult-type cancer in adolescence and the third decade. The risk factors, presentation and biology of cancer in young adults differ from those in the older adult population. Factors of particular significance in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) include genetic predisposition to adult-type cancer, diagnostic uncertainty, long-term morbidity and considerations of fertility. New systemic therapies are being introduced that can prolong life and even increase the chance of cure, but the impact on AYAs is uncertain, as these patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the management of AYAs with 3 of the most common cancers affecting adults, when they emerge in the AYA populations, and therefore are currently met by medical oncologists - breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Health Literacy in Adolescents and Young Adults: Perspectives from Australian Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Merry; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M; Wakefield, Claire E; McGill, Brittany C; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    Health literacy is a critical determinant of health and an emerging public health concern. Little is known about the health literacy of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) or about the ability of young patients to communicate health needs and critically evaluate information. We used qualitative methods to investigate the three aspects of health literacy (functional, communicative, and critical) in Australian AYA cancer survivors. Forty Australian AYA cancer survivors, aged 15-29 either at diagnosis or recruitment, participated in semistructured interviews. Participants were asked about sources of information and ability to understand information, communicate questions, and critically evaluate the validity, reliability, and relevancy of information to their situation. Self-reported adherence levels and advice for AYA-specific care was also obtained. Interviews were coded and analyzed for emergent themes using QSR NVivo 10. Almost all AYAs named their doctor as the primary source of information. Most AYAs reported no difficulties with understanding, communicating, or assessing relevancy of information. Conversely, few AYAs reported confidence in assessment of validity and reliability of information. The doctor-patient relationship appeared to be an influential factor in all aspects of health literacy. AYAs frequently reported having a good understanding and communication around health information; however, few AYAs described engaging in critical evaluations of this information. The potential impact of the doctor-patient relationship across several domains of health literacy suggests that more focus could be placed on promoting health literacy at physician, community, and societal levels, in addition to promoting individual skills.

  14. Comparison of cancer survival trends in the United States of adolescents and young adults with those in children and older adults.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Theresa H M; Ries, Lynn A G; Barr, Ronald D; Geiger, Ann M; Dahlke, Deborah Vollmer; Pollock, Bradley H; Bleyer, W Archie

    2016-04-01

    With prior reports indicating a lack of progress in survival improvement in older adolescents and young adults (AYAs) aged 15 to 39 years with cancer compared with both younger and older patients with cancer, the current analysis provides an update of survival trends of cancers among AYAs, children, and older adults. Data from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database for 13 regions were used to ascertain survival trends of the 34 most frequent cancers diagnosed in AYAs compared with children and older adults. As of 2002 through 2006, the 5-year relative survival rate for all invasive cancers in AYAs was 82.5% (standard error, 0.2%). In AYAs, 14 cancers demonstrated evidence of a statistically significant improvement in their 5-year relative survival since 1992. Survival improved less in AYAs than in children for acute myeloid leukemia and medulloblastoma. Fourteen cancers had survival improvements that were found to be less in AYAs compared with older adults, including hepatic carcinoma, acute myeloid leukemia, high-grade astrocytoma, acute lymphocytic leukemia, pancreatic carcinoma, low-grade astrocytoma, gastric carcinoma, renal carcinoma, cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, Hodgkin lymphoma, ovarian cancer, fibromatous sarcoma, other soft tissue sarcoma, and thyroid carcinoma. Improvements in the survival of several cancer types that occur frequently in AYAs are encouraging. However, survival does not appear to be improving to the same extent in AYAs as in children or older adults for several cancers. Further investment in exploring the distinct biology of tumors in this age group, and of their hosts, must be a priority in AYA oncology. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Increased risk of second malignant neoplasms in adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jean S; DuBois, Steven G; Coccia, Peter F; Bleyer, Archie; Olin, Rebecca L; Goldsby, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe the incidence and characteristics of secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors compared with those in younger and older cancer survivors. Children aged ≤ 14 years, AYAs aged 15 to 39, and older adults aged ≥ 40 years at the time of primary diagnosis who were reported as cancer survivors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program between 1973 and 2011 were compared in this population-based analysis. The primary analysis was the risk that an SMN would occur ≥ 5 years after the original diagnosis for patients who had the more common AYA cancers (leukemia, lymphoma, testicular malignancy, ovarian malignancy, melanoma, and cancers of the thyroid, breast, soft tissue, or bone). The standardized incidence ratio (SIR), absolute excess risk (AER), and cumulative incidence of SMN for the selected cancers were assessed. The risk of SMN for the entire cohort also was analyzed. Of the 148,558 AYA survivors who were diagnosed with a selected cancer, 7384 developed an SMN 5 years after their original diagnosis. The SIRs (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were 1.58 (95% CI, 1.55-1.62) for AYAs, 4.26 (95% CI, 3.77-4.80) for children, and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.09-1.11) for older adults, and the AERs were 22.9, 16.6, and 14.7, respectively. The cumulative incidence of SMN at 30 years was 13.9% for the AYA group. The most common SMNs in AYAs were breast cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, genital cancers, and melanoma. AYAs who had received radiation therapy had a higher cumulative incidence of SMN. AYAs who survive cancer for more than 5 years have a higher relative risk of SMN compared with the general population and have a higher absolute risk of SMN compared with younger or older cancer survivors. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  16. Augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Therapy in Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Rytting, Michael E; Thomas, Deborah A; O'Brien, Susan M; Ravandi-Kashani, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias J; Franklin, Anna R; Kadia, Tapan M; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval G.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Konopleva, Marina Y; Cortes, Jorge E; Borthakur, Gautham; Garris, Rebecca; Cardenas-Turanzas, Maria; Schroeder, Kurt; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Various trials report improved outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with pediatric- based regimens. This prompted the investigation of the pediatric Augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (ABFM) regimen in AYA patients. Results were compared with the hyper–fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, Adriamycin and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD) regimen in a similar population. Methods Eighty-five patients age 12 to 40 years with Philadelphia chromosome- (Ph) negative ALL were treated with ABFM from 10/2006 through 4/2012. Their outcome was compared to 71 historical AYA patients treated with hyper-CVAD from our institution. Patient and disease characteristics, as well as status of minimal residual disease (MRD), were analyzed for their impact on outcomes. Results The complete remission (CR) rate with ABFM was 94%. The 3-year complete remission duration (CRD) and overall survival (OS) rates were 70% and 74%, respectively. The 3-year CRD and OS were 72% and 85%, respectively, with age ≤ 21 years, and 69% and 60%, respectively, with age 21-40 years. Initial white blood cell count was an independent predictive factor of OS and CRD. The MRD status on Day 29 and Day 84 of therapy were also predictive of long-term outcomes. Severe regimen toxicities included transient hepatotoxicity in 35-39%, pancreatitis in 11%, osteonecrosis in 11%, and thrombosis in 22%. The 3-year OS rate was 74% with ABFM versus 71% with hyper-CVAD; the 3-year CRD rate was 70% with ABFM versus 66% with hyper-CVAD. Conclusion ABFM was tolerable in AYA patients with ALL but was not associated with significant improvements in CRD and OS compared with hyper-CVAD. PMID:25042398

  17. Weight-Related Correlates of Psychological Dysregulation in Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Females with Severe Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gowey, Marissa A.; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Becnel, Jennifer; Peugh, James; Mitchell, James E.; Zeller, Meg H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Severe obesity is the fastest growing pediatric subgroup of excess weight levels. Psychological dysregulation (i.e., impairments in regulating cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral processes) has been associated with obesity and poorer weight loss outcomes. The present study explored associations of dysregulation with weight-related variables among adolescent and young adult (AYA) females with severe obesity. Methods Fifty-four AYA females with severe obesity (MBMI=48.71 kg/m2; Mage=18.29, R=15–21 years; 59.3% White) completed self-report measures of psychological dysregulation and weight-related constructs including meal patterns, problematic eating behaviors, and body and weight dissatisfaction, as non-surgical comparison participants in a multi-site study of adolescent bariatric surgery outcomes. Pearson and bivariate correlations were conducted and stratified by age group to analyze associations between dysregulation subscales (affective, behavioral, cognitive) and weight-related variables. Results Breakfast was the most frequently skipped meal (consumed 3–4 times/week). Eating out was common (4–5 times/week) and mostly occurred at fast-food restaurants. Evening hyperphagia (61.11%) and eating in the absence of hunger (37.04%) were commonly endorsed, while unplanned eating (29.63%), a sense of loss of control over eating (22.22%), eating beyond satiety (22.22%), night eating (12.96%), and binge eating (11.11%) were less common. Almost half of the sample endorsed extreme weight dissatisfaction. Dysregulation was associated with most weight-related attitudes and behaviors of interest in young adults but select patterns emerged for adolescents. Conclusions Higher levels of psychological dysregulation are associated with greater BMI, problematic eating patterns and behaviors, and body dissatisfaction in AYA females with severe obesity. These findings have implications for developing novel intervention strategies for severe obesity in AYAs that may

  18. Quality of life in adolescent and young adult cancer patients: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gonçalves, Vânia; Sehovic, Ivana; Bowman, Meghan L; Reed, Damon R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors experience many unique challenges and quality of life (QoL) effects that persist beyond cancer diagnosis and treatment. Due to continuous improvements in technology and cancer treatments resulting in improved survival rates, the identification of late effects, survivorship issues, and QoL is moving to the forefront of cancer research. The goal of this systematic review was to identify key psychosocial factors impacting QoL in AYA oncology populations. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using combinations of these phrases or keywords: “adolescent and young adult or AYA” AND “health outcomes OR quality of life OR psychology” AND “neoplasm OR cancer OR oncology”. A total of 35 articles were included in this review. Studies were classified into two categories: AYA perceptions and stakeholder perceptions. Results AYA cancer survivors were more likely to have “worse” or impaired QoL compared with the general population, regardless of other demographic factors. AYAs described both positive and negatives experiences with their medical care, the educational information received, and the supportive care services. Although health care professionals were likely to underestimate or misjudge the health preferences and support needs of AYAs, these perceptions varied across disciplines and levels of experience. Conclusion The literature is lacking in sufficient evidence-based interventions to improve QoL in AYA cancer populations. Further, the tools to adequately measure QoL in this population are also unsatisfactory. The literature, however, consistently shows agreement regarding the unique needs of this population, indicating a trend toward health care standardization within age ranges or life stages. We suggest the need for AYA-specific programs in health care institutions that comprise a multidisciplinary team that addresses all the unique medical and QoL needs of AYAs. PMID

  19. What determines the outcomes for adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on cooperative group protocols? A comparison of Children's Cancer Group and Cancer and Leukemia Group B studies.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy; La, Mei; Sanford, Ben; Bloomfield, Clara D; Vardiman, James W; Gaynon, Paul; Larson, Richard A; Nachman, James

    2008-09-01

    We performed a retrospective comparison of presenting features, planned treatment, complete remission (CR) rate, and outcome of 321 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 16 to 20 years with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who were treated on consecutive trials in either the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) or the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) from 1988 to 2001. CR rates were identical, 90% for both CALGB and CCG AYAs. CCG AYAs had a 63% event-free survival (EFS) and 67% overall survival (OS) at 7 years in contrast to the CALGB AYAs, in which 7-year EFS was only 34% (P < .001; relative hazard rate [RHR] = 2.2) and OS was 46% (P < .001; RHR = 1.9). While CALGB AYAs aged 16 to 17 years achieved similar outcomes to all CCG AYAs with a 7-year EFS of 55%, the EFS for 18- to 20-year-old CALGB patients was only 29%. Comparison of the regimens showed that CCG AYAs received earlier and more intensive central nervous system prophylaxis and higher cumulative doses of nonmyelosuppressive agents. There were no differences in outcomes of those who reached maintenance therapy on time compared with those who were delayed. Based on these observations, a prospective study for AYAs with ALL using the more successful approach of the CCG has been initiated.

  20. Low Enrollment of Adolescents and Young Adults Onto Cancer Trials: Insights From the Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Michael E.; O’Mara, Ann M.; Seibel, Nita L.; Dickens, David S.; Langevin, Anne-Marie; Pollock, Brad H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stagnant outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYAs; 15 to 39 years old) with cancer are partly attributed to poor enrollment onto clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) was developed to improve clinical trial participation in the community setting, where AYAs are most often treated. Further, many CCOP sites had pediatric and medical oncologists with collaborative potential for AYA recruitment and care. For these reasons, we hypothesized that CCOP sites enrolled proportionately more AYAs than non-CCOP sites onto Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials. Methods: For the 10-year period 2004 through 2013, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention database was queried to evaluate enrollments into relevant COG studies. The proportional enrollment of AYAs at CCOP and non-CCOP sites was compared and the change in AYA enrollment patterns assessed. All sites were COG member institutions. Results: Although CCOP sites enrolled a higher proportion of patients in cancer control studies than non-CCOP sites (3.5% v 1.8%; P < .001), they enrolled a lower proportion of AYAs (24.1% v 28.2%, respectively; P < .001). Proportional AYA enrollment at CCOP sites decreased during the intervals 2004 through 2008 and 2009 through 2013 (26.7% v 21.7%; P < .001). Conclusion: Despite oncology practice settings that might be expected to achieve otherwise, CCOP sites did not enroll a larger proportion of AYAs in clinical trials than traditional COG institutions. Our findings suggest that the CCOP (now the NCI Community Oncology Research Program) can be leveraged for developing targeted interventions for overcoming AYA enrollment barriers. PMID:27026648

  1. Weight-related correlates of psychological dysregulation in adolescent and young adult (AYA) females with severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Gowey, Marissa A; Reiter-Purtill, Jennifer; Becnel, Jennifer; Peugh, James; Mitchell, James E; Zeller, Meg H

    2016-04-01

    Severe obesity is the fastest growing pediatric subgroup of excess weight levels. Psychological dysregulation (i.e., impairments in regulating cognitive, emotional, and/or behavioral processes) has been associated with obesity and poorer weight loss outcomes. The present study explored associations of dysregulation with weight-related variables among adolescent and young adult (AYA) females with severe obesity. Fifty-four AYA females with severe obesity (MBMI = 48.71 kg/m(2); Mage = 18.29, R = 15-21 years; 59.3% White) completed self-report measures of psychological dysregulation and weight-related constructs including meal patterns, problematic eating behaviors, and body and weight dissatisfaction, as non-surgical comparison participants in a multi-site study of adolescent bariatric surgery outcomes. Pearson and bivariate correlations were conducted and stratified by age group to analyze associations between dysregulation subscales (affective, behavioral, cognitive) and weight-related variables. Breakfast was the most frequently skipped meal (consumed 3-4 times/week). Eating out was common (4-5 times/week) and mostly occurred at fast-food restaurants. Evening hyperphagia (61.11%) and eating in the absence of hunger (37.04%) were commonly endorsed, while unplanned eating (29.63%), a sense of loss of control over eating (22.22%), eating beyond satiety (22.22%), night eating (12.96%), and binge eating (11.11%) were less common. Almost half of the sample endorsed extreme weight dissatisfaction. Dysregulation was associated with most weight-related attitudes and behaviors of interest in young adults but select patterns emerged for adolescents. Higher levels of psychological dysregulation are associated with greater BMI, problematic eating patterns and behaviors, and body dissatisfaction in AYA females with severe obesity. These findings have implications for developing novel intervention strategies for severe obesity in AYAs that may have a multidimensional

  2. Distress and adjustment among adolescents and young adults with cancer: an empirical and conceptual review

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer must simultaneously navigate the challenges associated with their cancer experience, whilst striving to achieve a number of important developmental milestones at the cusp of adulthood. The disruption caused by their cancer experience at this critical life-stage is assumed to be responsible for significant distress among AYAs living with cancer. The quality and severity of psychological outcomes among AYAs remain poorly documented, however. This review examined the existing literature on psychological outcomes among AYAs living with cancer. All psychological outcomes (both distress and positive adjustment) were included, and AYAs were included across the cancer trajectory, ranging from newly-diagnosed patients, to long-term cancer survivors. Four key research questions were addressed. Section 1 answered the question, “What is the nature and prevalence of distress (and other psychological outcomes) among AYAs living with cancer?” and documented rates of clinical distress, as well as evidence for the trajectory of this distress over time. Section 2 examined the individual, cancer/treatment-related and socio-demographic factors that have been identified as predictors of these outcomes in this existing literature. Section 3 examined current theoretical models relevant to explaining psychological outcomes among AYAs, including developmental models, socio-cognitive and family-systems models, stress-coping frameworks, and cognitive appraisal models (including trauma and meaning making models). The mechanisms implicated in each model were discussed, as was the existing evidence for each model. Converging evidence implicating the potential role of autobiographical memory and future thinking systems in how AYAs process and integrate their cancer experience into their current sense of self and future goals are highlighted. Finally, Section 4 addressed the future of psycho-oncology in understanding and conceptualizing

  3. Disparities in Adolescent and Young Adult Survival After Testicular Cancer Vary by Histologic Subtype: A Population-Based Study in California 1988–2010

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, Mahasin; Srinivas, Sandy; Keegan, Theresa H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among adolescent and young adult (AYA) men 15–39 years of age. This study aims to determine whether race/ethnicity and/or neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) contribute independently to survival of AYAs with testicular cancer. Methods: Data on 14,249 eligible AYAs with testicular cancer diagnosed in California between 1988 and 2010 were obtained from the population-based California Cancer Registry. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine overall and testicular cancer-specific survival and survival for the seminoma and nonseminoma histologic subtypes according to race/ethnicity, census-tract level neighborhood SES, and other patient and clinical characteristics. Results: Compared with White AYAs, Hispanic AYAs had worse overall and testicular cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07–1.37) and Black AYAs had worse overall survival (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.01–1.97), independent of neighborhood SES and other demographic and clinical factors. Racial/ethnic disparities in survival were more pronounced for nonseminoma than for seminoma. AYAs residing in middle and low SES neighborhoods experienced worse survival across both histologic subtypes independent of race/ethnicity and other factors, while improvements in survival over time were more pronounced for seminoma. Longer time to treatment was also associated with worse survival, particularly for AYAs with nonseminoma. Conclusion: Among AYAs, race/ethnicity, and neighborhood SES are independently associated with survival after testicular cancer. Variation in disparities by histologic type according to demographic factors, year of diagnosis, and time to treatment may reflect differences in prognosis and extent of treatment for the two histologies. PMID:26812451

  4. Comparison of survival at adult versus pediatric treatment centers for rare pediatric tumors in an adolescent and young adult (AYA) population in the State of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cash, Thomas; Qayed, Muna; Ward, Kevin C; Mertens, Ann C; Rapkin, Louis

    2015-03-01

    The type of treatment center where 15-21-year-old adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with rare pediatric tumors achieve their best clinical outcome is unknown. We performed a retrospective analysis using the Georgia Cancer Registry (GCR) of 15-21-year old patients with a malignant, rare pediatric tumor diagnosed during the period from 2000-2009. Patients were identified as being treated at one of five Georgia pediatric cancer centers or at an adult center. Data were analyzed for 10 year overall survival, patient characteristics associated with death, and patient characteristics present at diagnosis associated with choice of treatment center. There was a total of 479 patients in our final study population, of which 379 (79.1%) were treated at an adult center and 100 (20.9%) were treated at a pediatric center. Patients treated at an adult center had a 10 year overall survival of 86% compared to 85% for patients treated at a pediatric center (P = 0.31). Race and poverty were not significantly associated with death. Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (OR = 7.38; 95% CI = 2.30-23.75) and 'other carcinomas' (OR = 2.64; 95% CI = 1.25-5.60) were more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Patients with higher-stage disease (OR = 4.24; 95% CI = 1.71-10.52) and higher poverty (OR = 2.32; 95% CI = 1.23-4.37) were also more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Our data suggest that there is no difference in survival for 15-21-year old patients with rare pediatric tumors when treated at an adult or pediatric center. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparison of Survival at Adult versus Pediatric Treatment Centers for Rare Pediatric Tumors in an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Population in the State of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Thomas; Qayed, Muna; Ward, Kevin C.; Mertens, Ann C.; Rapkin, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background The type of treatment center where 15-21-year-old adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with rare pediatric tumors achieve their best clinical outcome is unknown. Procedure We performed a retrospective analysis using the Georgia Cancer Registry (GCR) of 15-21-year-old patients with a malignant, rare pediatric tumor diagnosed during the period from 2000-2009. Patients were identified as being treated at one of five Georgia pediatric cancer centers or at an adult center. Data were analyzed for 10-year overall survival, patient characteristics associated with death, and patient characteristics present at diagnosis associated with choice of treatment center. Results There was a total of 479 patients in our final study population, of which 379 (79.1%) were treated at an adult center and 100 (20.9%) were treated at a pediatric center. Patients treated at an adult center had a 10-year overall survival of 86% compared to 85% for patients treated at a pediatric center (p= 0.31). Race and poverty were not significantly associated with death. Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (OR=7.38; 95% CI=2.30 – 23.75) and ‘other carcinomas’ (OR=2.64; 95% CI=1.25 – 5.60) were more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Patients with higher-stage disease (OR=4.24; 95% CI=1.71 – 10.52) and higher poverty (OR=2.32; 95% CI=1.23 – 4.37) were also more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Conclusion Our data suggest that there is no difference in survival for 15-21-year-old patients with rare pediatric tumors when treated at an adult or pediatric center. PMID:25393593

  6. Being Young and Getting Cancer: Development of a Questionnaire Reflecting the Needs and Experiences of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Cecilie Dyg; Petersen, Gitte Stentebjerg; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Graugaard, Christian; Winther, Jeanette Falck; Gudmundsdottir, Thorgerdur; Ahrensberg, Jette; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Boisen, Kirsten A; Olsen, Pia Riis; Heerdegen, Anne Christine I Stender; Sonnenschein, Emilie Sofia; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of nonaccidental deaths among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). In Denmark, there are substantial gaps in knowledge concerning how AYAs with cancer perceive their diagnostic and therapeutic trajectory and report health-related outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the development of a questionnaire targeting AYAs with cancer aiming to evaluate treatment and survivorship from the perspective of the patients. Identification of themes and development of items included in the questionnaire were based on a synthesis of literature and qualitative interviews with AYAs in an iterative process involving both a professional advisory panel and a youth panel. During the development process, items were validated through cognitive interviews. The final questionnaire contained 151 closed- and open-ended items divided into 6 sections regarding: (1) "Time before treatment," (2) "Being told about your illness," (3) "Being a young patient," (4) "Your treatment," (5) "Receiving help living with and after Cancer," and (6) "How are you feeling today?." One hundred one items were specifically developed for this study, while 50 were standardized validated indexes. The questionnaire combined different types of items such as needs, preferences, experiences, and patient-reported outcomes. This is one of few developed questionnaires aiming to evaluate the perspective of AYAs with cancer through their whole cancer trajectory. Results from the questionnaire survey are intended for quality improvements and research in AYA cancer care. The study highlights the importance of an extensive patient involvement in all steps of a questionnaire development process.

  7. Survival of European adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer in 2000-07: population-based data from EUROCARE-5.

    PubMed

    Trama, Annalisa; Botta, Laura; Foschi, Roberto; Ferrari, Andrea; Stiller, Charles; Desandes, Emmanuel; Maule, Milena Maria; Merletti, Franco; Gatta, Gemma

    2016-07-01

    Data from EUROCARE have consistently shown lower survival for adolescents and young adults (AYAs; aged 15-24 years) than for children (0-14 years) for most cancers that affect both groups, and modest survival improvements up to 2000-02. AYAs have longer survival than that of adults for most cancers. We used the latest definition of AYAs (aged 15-39 years) and provided estimates of 5-year relative survival for European AYAs with cancer diagnosed in 2000-07, compared with children and adults (40-69 years) with cancer, and assessed survival improvements over time. We analysed data from population-based cancer registries of 27 European countries participating in EUROCARE-5. We used the so-called complete method to estimate 5-year, population-weighted relative survival for 19 cancers affecting AYAs and children, and for 27 cancers affecting AYAs and adults. We assessed relative-survival differences between children versus AYAs, and between AYAs versus adults, using the Z test. We used the period approach to estimate 5-year relative survival over time for children and AYAs, and used a generalised linear model to model survival time trends (1999-2007) and to assess the significance of changes over time. We analysed 56 505 cancer diagnoses in children, 312 483 in AYAs, and 3 567 383 in adults. For all cancers combined, survival improved over time for AYAs (from 79% [95% CI 78·1-80·5] in 1999-2002 to 82% [81·1-83·3] in 2005-07; p<0·0001) and children (from 76% [74·7-77·1] to 79% [77·2-79·4]; p<0·0001). Survival improved significantly in children and AYAs for acute lymphoid leukaemia (p<0·0001) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (p<0·0001 in AYAs and p=0·023 in children). Survival improved significantly in AYAs only for CNS tumours (p=0·0046), astrocytomas (p=0·040), and malignant melanomas (p<0·0001). Survival remained significantly worse in AYAs than in children for eight important cancers: acute lymphoid leukaemias, acute myeloid leukaemias, Hodgkin

  8. [Usefulness of social and educational approach in adolescents and young adults with cancer: The Lille team's experience].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Julie; Delbarre-Philippart, Marie; Bricout, Hélène; Lervat, Cyril; Carbonnelle, Guillaume; Leblond, Pierre; Defachelles, Anne-Sophie; Penel, Nicolas; Sudour-Bonnange, Hélène

    2016-12-01

    Within the second "Cancer plan" 2009-2013, the French national institute of cancer (INCa) recommended the implementation of programs dedicated to adolescents and youngs adults (AYA) with cancer. In this context and in parallel to the specific medical care developed for AYA, the Oscar-Lambret center created a psycho-social-educational team including among others a social worker (SW) and a special educational teacher (SET), offering multidisciplinary qualifications and views. The social approach, realized as a pair by SW-SET, takes into account every aspect of each AYA (family, academic, career/professional, personal, cultural aspects…). We expose the first 2 years' experience of this special program for AYA through diagnosis to remission time. For this period, 164 AYA were seen by the social professionals, with a total of 602 consultations in the unit. The number of these consultations depended on the needs of AYA and their family. Nevertheless, only 10 AYA required no further intervention (6.1 %). The study highlights that the social interventions are most frequently about scolarity, work and disability recognition. These 2 years of experience of the SW-SET team offered a way to reflect upon our values and our culture, and on the role of the social worker in a medical setting. Each AYA has a personal story, which affects significantly the way to overcome the challenges that come with the disease. Our findings underscore the need for AYA with cancer to have access to personalized supportive care, encouraging them in pursing their personal goals and rewarding themselves. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Reimagining care for adolescent and young adult cancer programs: Moving with the times.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abha A; Papadakos, Janet K; Jones, Jennifer M; Amin, Leila; Chang, Eugene K; Korenblum, Chana; Santa Mina, Daniel; McCabe, Lianne; Mitchell, Laura; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2016-04-01

    Literature regarding the development of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer programs has been dominantly informed by pediatric centers and practitioners. However, the majority of young adults are seen and treated at adult cancer centers, in which cancer volumes afford the development of innovative supportive care services. Although the supportive care services in adult cancer centers are helpful to AYAs, some of the most prominent and distinct issues faced by AYAs are not adequately addressed through these services alone. This article describes how the AYA Program at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre has collaborated with existing supportive care services in addition to supplying its own unique services to meet the comprehensive needs of AYAs in the domains of: symptom management (sexuality and fatigue), behavior modification (return to work and exercise), and health services (advanced cancer and survivorship). These collaborations are augmented by patient education interventions and timely referrals. The objective of this article was to assist other centers in expanding existing services to address the needs of AYA patients with cancer.

  10. Global assessment of cancer incidence and survival in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Bleyer, Archie; Ferrari, Andrea; Whelan, Jeremy; Barr, Ronald D

    2017-02-28

    In high-income countries, cancer remains the commonest cause of disease-related death in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) despite survival improvements. With more than 1,000,000 new diagnoses of cancer in AYAs annually worldwide, and their number of life-years affected by cancer being greatest of all ages, the global burden of cancer in AYAs exceeds that in all other ages. In low- and middle-income countries, where the great majority of the world's 3 billion AYAs reside, the needs of those with cancer have been identified and demand attention. Unique to the age group but universal, the psychosocial challenges they face are the utmost across life's spectrum. This lead-off article of a new series in Pediatric Blood and Cancer on AYA oncology attempts to assess the global status of this emerging discipline. The review includes the changing incidence and survival of the common cancers in AYAs-there is no other age group with a similar array of malignancies-and the specific challenges to quality and quantity of life that compromise their lives.

  11. [Cancer in adolescents and young adults in France: Epidemiology and pathways of care].

    PubMed

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Lacour, Brigitte; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-12-01

    In adolescents and young adults (AYA), cancers are rare but represent the third significant cause of death. The aim of this paper was to investigate epidemiological data and pathways of care of AYA in France. During the 2000-2008 period, overall age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) were 254.1/10(6) in 15-24-year-olds. The most frequently diagnosed cancers in male AYA were malignant gonadal germ-cell tumors and Hodgkin's lymphoma, and were melanoma, thyroid carcinoma and Hodgkin's disease in females. The ASR appeared stable over time. During the 2000-2004 period, the 5-year overall survival for all cancers was 81.8%, with differences between genders and age groups: 78.8% for males and 85.2% for females; 78.5% in 15-19-year-olds and 84.3% in 20-24-year-olds. Survival has significantly improved over time. During the 2006-2007 period, the pathways of care for French adolescent patients with cancer were heterogeneous: 82% were treated in an adult environment, 27% were included in clinical studies, and in 54% of cases the management decisions were taken in the context of a multidisciplinary team. Studies looking at management of AYA with cancer have shown a wide disparity and a lack of collaboration between adult oncologists and pediatric oncologist. An AYA cancer multidisciplinary interest group has been created to determine priorities and coordinate efforts to improve AYA cancer services and care.

  12. Health behaviors, quality of life, and psychosocial health among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancers.

    PubMed

    Warner, Echo L; Nam, Gina E; Zhang, Yingying; McFadden, Molly; Wright, Jennifer; Spraker-Perlman, Holly; Kinney, Anita Y; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-04-01

    Survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer may engage in unhealthy lifestyles (e.g., smoking), potentially heightening their risk for long-term health problems. We assessed health behaviors and constructs including quality of life (QOL) and psychosocial well-being among survivors of AYA cancer compared to the general population. We used 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to evaluate health behaviors for survivors of AYA cancer compared to AYAs without cancer. Multivariable regressions assessed health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking, physical inactivity, and low fruit/vegetable intake) by sex and age between AYA survivors and controls, and among survivors to determine the effects of demographic, QOL, psychosocial, and cancer factors on behaviors. A greater proportion of female survivors of AYA cancer smoked than controls (currently aged 20-39: 27 vs. 14.3%, respectively; currently aged 40-64: 29.3 vs. 18.4%, respectively). Generally, survivors and controls were non-adherent to national health behavior guidelines. Uninsured survivors were at greater risk of smoking vs. insured (females, Relative Risk (RR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43-1.90; males, RR = 2.62, 95% CI 1.71-4.02). Poor social/emotional support was associated with smoking (RR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.07-1.48) among female survivors and was associated with low fruit/vegetable intake among male (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.23) and female (RR= 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19) survivors. Female survivors >10 years from diagnosis had higher risk of smoking (RR = 1.26-1.91, all p < 0.01) than survivors 5-10 years from diagnosis. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors are common in survivors of AYA cancer. AYA survivors require health behavior support.

  13. Research challenges in adolescent and young adult cancer survivor research.

    PubMed

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2011-05-15

    Every year in Canada and the United States, about 26,000 adolescent and young adults (AYA) between ages 15 and 29 years are diagnosed with cancer. Although the majority of AYA cancer patients will survive their primary cancer, many will develop serious health problems or die prematurely secondary to their curative cancer therapy. Much is known about the long-term health outcomes after adolescent cancer. In contrast, there remain substantial gaps in our understanding of the long-term outcomes after most young adult cancers. To optimize the health and quality of life of AYA cancer survivors and improve upon curative cancer therapy, it is essential to further investigate the long-term outcomes of this population. Before embarking upon this endeavor, it is important for the investigator and the funding agency to be cognizant about some of the unique challenges in research of AYA cancer survivors. To this end, the authors present a brief overview of some of the key research challenges, discuss the strengths and limitations of using available AYA cohorts and databases, and highlight potential future directions.

  14. Sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll: caring for adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sue; Davies, Simon; Palmer, Susan; Plaster, Meg

    2010-11-10

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are a distinct group whose needs have been poorly addressed within health care systems. This imbalance is being addressed in some countries, and this growing specialty is now receiving the recognition it requires in order to develop further. This article discusses some of the psychosocial issues of AYAs and, with reference to the phrase of sex, drugs, and rock and roll, highlights the various rites of passage that young people experience. It also discusses how services and professionals can work alongside AYAs, enabling them to feel a part of the process by providing age-appropriate environment and expertise.

  15. Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivorship Educational Programming: A Qualitative Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vollmer Dahlke, Deborah; Fair, Kayla; Hong, Yan Alicia; Kellstedt, Debra; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-02-10

    This program evaluation considers the need for increased professional and patient education for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivorship. Due to the high incidence of late effects of cancer treatment among AYA cancer survivors, knowledge sharing and communications are needed throughout the transition from cancer care into community care. AYA survivors are likely to need developmentally appropriate psychosocial care as well as extensive follow-on surveillance by physicians who are educated and aware of the likely chronic conditions and late effects that may occur in these patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts for Adolescent and Young Adults (ACCESS AYA) programming. The intent of the ACCESS AYA program was to build health literacy around AYA survivorship issues and to stimulate improved communications between survivors and health care providers. This paper addresses the central research question of "How did the ACCESS AYA program increase health literacy, communications, and understanding among AYA survivors and providers?" The primarily qualitative evaluation included a brief introductory survey of participant awareness and effectiveness of the ACCESS AYA project serving as a recruitment tool. Survey respondents were invited to participate in in-depth interviews based on interview guides tailored to the different stakeholder groups. The evaluation used the Atlas Ti qualitative database and software for coding and key word analyses. Interrater reliability analyses were assessed using Cohen kappa analysis with Stata 12.1 (StataCorp LLC) software. The key themes, which included survivor wellbeing, health care professional education, cancer advocates role and education, hospital and community-based resources, and the role of societal support, are presented in a concept map. The interrater reliability scores (ranging from 1 to minus 1) were .893 for first cycle coding and .784

  16. Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivorship Educational Programming: A Qualitative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Kayla; Hong, Yan Alicia; Kellstedt, Debra; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-01-01

    Background This program evaluation considers the need for increased professional and patient education for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivorship. Due to the high incidence of late effects of cancer treatment among AYA cancer survivors, knowledge sharing and communications are needed throughout the transition from cancer care into community care. AYA survivors are likely to need developmentally appropriate psychosocial care as well as extensive follow-on surveillance by physicians who are educated and aware of the likely chronic conditions and late effects that may occur in these patients. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of the After Cancer Care Ends, Survivorship Starts for Adolescent and Young Adults (ACCESS AYA) programming. The intent of the ACCESS AYA program was to build health literacy around AYA survivorship issues and to stimulate improved communications between survivors and health care providers. This paper addresses the central research question of “How did the ACCESS AYA program increase health literacy, communications, and understanding among AYA survivors and providers?” Methods The primarily qualitative evaluation included a brief introductory survey of participant awareness and effectiveness of the ACCESS AYA project serving as a recruitment tool. Survey respondents were invited to participate in in-depth interviews based on interview guides tailored to the different stakeholder groups. The evaluation used the Atlas Ti qualitative database and software for coding and key word analyses. Interrater reliability analyses were assessed using Cohen kappa analysis with Stata 12.1 (StataCorp LLC) software. Results The key themes, which included survivor wellbeing, health care professional education, cancer advocates role and education, hospital and community-based resources, and the role of societal support, are presented in a concept map. The interrater reliability scores (ranging from 1 to minus 1

  17. Oral Administration of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain AYA Enhances IgA Secretion and Provides Survival Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Yosuke; Kunitoh-Asari, Ayami; Hayakawa, Katsuyuki; Imai, Shinjiro; Kasuya, Kenji; Abe, Kimio; Adachi, Yu; Fukudome, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic microbacteria and viruses. This defense system, to a large extent, is mediated by the actions of secretory IgA. In this study, we screened 140 strains of lactic acid bacteria for induction of IgA production by murine Peyer’s patch cells. We selected one strain and named it Lactobacillus plantarum AYA. We found that L. plantarum AYA-induced production of IL-6 in Peyer’s patch dendritic cells, with this production promoting IgA+ B cells to differentiate into IgA-secreting plasma cells. We also observed that oral administration of L. plantarum AYA in mice caused an increase in IgA production in the small intestine and lung. This production of IgA correlated strongly with protective ability, with the treated mice surviving longer than the control mice after lethal influenza virus infection. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the L. plantarum AYA strain which enhances mucosal IgA production and provides protection against respiratory influenza virus infection. PMID:24466081

  18. Oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum strain AYA enhances IgA secretion and provides survival protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yosuke; Kunitoh-Asari, Ayami; Hayakawa, Katsuyuki; Imai, Shinjiro; Kasuya, Kenji; Abe, Kimio; Adachi, Yu; Fukudome, Shin-Ichi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system provides the first line of defense against inhaled and ingested pathogenic microbacteria and viruses. This defense system, to a large extent, is mediated by the actions of secretory IgA. In this study, we screened 140 strains of lactic acid bacteria for induction of IgA production by murine Peyer's patch cells. We selected one strain and named it Lactobacillus plantarum AYA. We found that L. plantarum AYA-induced production of IL-6 in Peyer's patch dendritic cells, with this production promoting IgA(+) B cells to differentiate into IgA-secreting plasma cells. We also observed that oral administration of L. plantarum AYA in mice caused an increase in IgA production in the small intestine and lung. This production of IgA correlated strongly with protective ability, with the treated mice surviving longer than the control mice after lethal influenza virus infection. Our data therefore reveals a novel immunoregulatory role of the L. plantarum AYA strain which enhances mucosal IgA production and provides protection against respiratory influenza virus infection.

  19. Unmet adolescent and young adult cancer survivors information and service needs: A population-based cancer registry study

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Lichtensztajn, Daphne Y.; Kato, Ikuko; Kent, Erin E.; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; West, Michelle M.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Zebrack, Brad; Bellizzi, Keith M.; Smith, Ashley W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We described unmet information and service needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (15-39 years of age) and identified sociodemographic and health-related factors associated with these unmet needs. Methods We studied 523 AYAs recruited from 7 population-based cancer registries, diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, germ cell cancer or sarcoma in 2007-08. Participants completed surveys a median of 11 months from diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to estimate associations between unmet (information and service) needs and sociodemographic and health-related factors. Results More than half of AYAs had unmet information needs relating to their cancer returning and cancer treatments. AYAs needing services, but not receiving them, ranged from 29% for in-home nursing to 75% for a support group. The majority of AYAs who needed a pain management expert, physical/occupational therapist, mental health worker or financial advice on paying for health care did not receive services. In multivariable analyses, older participants, men, participants of non-White race/ethnicity, and participants who reported less than excellent general health, or fair/poor quality of care were more likely to report unmet information needs. Factors associated with both unmet service and information needs included physical health or emotional problems interfering with social activities or having ≥ 3 physical treatment-related symptoms. Conclusions Recently diagnosed AYA cancer survivors have substantial unmet information needs varying by demographic and health-related factors. Implications for Cancer Survivors We identified subgroups of AYA cancer survivors with high unmet needs that can be targeted for interventions and referrals. PMID:22457219

  20. What are the needs of adolescents and young adults after a cancer treatment? A Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Galán, S; de la Vega, R; Tomé Pires, C; Racine, M; Solé, E; Jensen, M P; Miró, J

    2017-03-01

    Advances in the early detection of cancer and the development of more effective treatments have resulted in a larger number of adolescents and young adults (AYAs), becoming cancer survivors. However, knowledge regarding their needs and if those needs are adequately addressed remains limited. The aims of this study were to: (1) better understand the needs of AYAs after cancer treatment; (2) analyse the importance of those needs; (3) determine which needs are not adequately addressed; and (4) test the hypothesis that AYA cancer survivors have different needs than adult survivors. Twenty-nine health oncology professionals, 17 AYA survivors and 12 relatives of AYA survivors participated in the Delphi study. The needs identified could be classified into six categories, and all were rated as highly important by all participants. The category perceived as least adequately addressed across the three groups was 'Counselling and psychological support.' The findings provide important new information regarding the needs of AYA cancer survivors that can inform the development of interventions to improve the quality of life of these individuals.

  1. Model of Care for Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: The Youth Project in Milan

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Chiara; Veneroni, Laura; Silva, Matteo; Casanova, Michela; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Massimino, Maura; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Ferrari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer form a particular group of patients with unique characteristics, who inhabit a so-called “no man’s land” between pediatric and adult services. In the last 10 years, the scientific oncology community has started to pay attention to these patients, implementing dedicated programs. A standardized model of care directed toward patients in this age range has yet to be developed and neither the pediatric nor the adult oncologic systems perfectly fit these patients’ needs. The Youth Project of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori in Milan, dedicated to AYA with pediatric-type solid tumors, can be seen as a model of care for AYA patients, with its heterogeneous multidisciplinary staff and close cooperation with adult medical oncologists and surgeons. Further progress in the care of AYA cancer patients is still needed to improve their outcomes. PMID:27606308

  2. Cancer in adolescents and young adults (15-29 years): a population-based study in the Netherlands 1989-2009.

    PubMed

    Aben, Katja K; van Gaal, Carlijn; van Gils, Nienke A; van der Graaf, Winette T; Zielhuis, Gerhard A

    2012-09-01

    Cancer among adolescents and young adults (AYAs; 15-29 years old) is relatively rare but its incidence is increasing worldwide. To define the extent and nature of the AYA patients, this population-based study was performed to explore trends in cancer incidence, survival and risk of second primary cancers in AYAs. Data from all AYAs diagnosed with cancer between 1989 and 2009 were obtained from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Age-standardized incidence rates with estimated annual percentage of change (EAPC) and five-year relative survival rates were calculated. Relative survival was used as a good approximation of cause-specific survival. All analyses were stratified by gender, five-year age group and calendar period. In addition, Standardized Incidence Ratios were determined to evaluate the risk of second primary cancers. 23 161 AYAs were diagnosed with cancer between 1989 and 2009. Since 1989 the cancer incidence has increased significantly from 28 to 43 per 100 000 person years in males (EAPC: 1.9) and from 30 to 40 per 100 000 person years in females (EAPC: 1.4). The most frequently diagnosed cancers in male AYAs included testicular cancer, melanoma and Hodgkin's disease, whereas in females melanoma, breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease were the most frequently occurring cancers. Five-year relative survival rates were 80% and 82% for males and females, respectively. Over time, the five-year relative survival increased from 74% to 86% and from 79% to 86% in males and females, respectively. The risk of developing a second primary cancer was increased three to six times in males and two to five times in females, depending on rules for counting second primary cancers. Although the overall survival has improved over time, the progress made in AYAs for specific cancers is still less compared to improvements made in children and adults. This and the increasing incidence and high risk of second primary cancers warrants further research.

  3. Contributors and Inhibitors of Resilience Among Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Wharton, Claire; Gordon, Karen; Jones, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Self-perceived resilience may enable coping and mitigate poor psychosocial outcomes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer. In order to inform the development of resilience-promoting interventions, we aimed to: (1) describe AYA patient-reported resilience and (2) identify AYA patient-reported contributors and inhibitors of resilience. Methods: The “Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer” study was a prospective longitudinal mixed-methods study. Consecutive Caucasian patients aged 14–25 years old enrolled 14–60 days following their diagnosis of cancer and completed one-on-one semi-structured interviews both at the time of enrollment and 3–6 months later. Constant comparative analyses identified salient themes describing modifiable contributors and inhibitors to patient-perceived resilience. Results: Seventeen patients (85% of those approached) enrolled in the study. The mean age was 17 years (SD=2.6) and 53% were female. All patient definitions of resilience inferred an ability to handle adversity. Five themes emerged as predominant contributors or inhibitors of resilience: (1) stress and coping; (2) goals, purpose, and planning; (3) optimism; (4) gratitude and meaning; and (5) connection and belonging. Merged analyses suggested that AYA resilience was a balance that may be enabled by promoting certain skills. Conclusion: AYA patients with cancer perceive resilience as a balance. Learned skills in stress management, goal-setting, and benefit-finding may empower AYAs during their cancer experience, in turn improving long-term psychosocial outcomes. PMID:25969794

  4. Preferences for support services among adolescents and young adults with cancer or a blood disorder: a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Stephen; King, Madeleine; Ewing, Jane; Smith, Narelle; Kenny, Patricia

    2012-10-01

    Life-threatening illnesses in young people are traumatic for patients and their families. Support services can help patients and families deal with various non-medical impacts of diagnosis, disease and treatment. The aim of this study was to determine which types of support are most valued by adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer or blood disorders and their families. A discrete choice experiment (DCE). Separate experiments were conducted with AYA and their carers. Completed surveys were returned by 83 patients and 78 carers. AYA preferred emotional support for themselves (either by counsellors and/or peers), emotional support for their family, financial support and assistance returning to school/work over services relating to cultural and spiritual needs. Covariate analysis indicated female AYA were more likely than males to prefer emotional support, while males were more likely to prefer assistance returning to work/school. Carers preferred emotional support for their AYA and assistance returning to school/work. Like AYA, they were indifferent about services relating to cultural and spiritual needs. Providing the types of support services that people prefer should maximise effectiveness. This study suggests that AYA patients require support services that included financial aid, assistance returning to work/study, emotional support for themselves and for their family. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unique characteristics of adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast cancer, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tricoli, James V; Seibel, Nita L; Blair, Donald G; Albritton, Karen; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2011-04-20

    Each year in the United States, nearly 70 000 individuals between the ages of 15 and 40 years are diagnosed with cancer. Although overall cancer survival rates among pediatric and older adult patients have increased in recent decades, there has been little improvement in survival of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients since 1975 when collected data became adequate to evaluate this issue. In 2006, the AYA Oncology Progress Review Group made recommendations for addressing the needs of this population that were later implemented by the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance. One of their overriding questions was whether the cancers seen in AYA patients were biologically different than the same cancers in adult and/or pediatric patients. On June 9-10, 2009, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Lance Armstrong Foundation (LAF) convened a workshop in Bethesda, MD, entitled "Unique Characteristics of AYA Cancers: Focus on Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL), Breast Cancer and Colon Cancer" that aimed to examine the current state of basic and translational research on these cancers and to discuss the next steps to improve their prognosis and treatment.

  6. Cancer incidence and survival in adolescents and young adults in France, 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Desandes, Emmanuel; Lacour, Brigitte; Belot, Aurélien; Molinie, Florence; Delafosse, Patricia; Tretarre, Brigitte; Velten, Michel; Sauleau, Erik-André; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Ganry, Olivier; Bara, Simona; Grosclaude, Pascale; Troussard, Xavier; Bouvier, Véronique; Brugieres, Laurence; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to describe cancer incidence (2000-2008) and survival (2000-2004) in France in adolescents and young adults (AYA). All cases of cancer diagnosed in 15-24 years, recorded by all French population-based registries (14% of the French population), over the 2000-2008 period, were included. Incidence change over time was described with the conventional annual percentage change (cAPC). The survival of cases diagnosed (2000-2004) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 1022 in adolescents and 1396 in young adults were diagnosed. Overall incidence rates were 219.4/10(6) in 15-19 year olds and 293.1/10(6) in 20-24 year olds. The most frequently diagnosed cancers in male AYA were malignant gonadal germ-cell tumors and Hodgkin's disease, and were melanoma, thyroid carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease in females. The age-standardized rates appeared stable over time in AYA, with a cAPC of +2.0% (P = 0.68). The 5-year overall survival for all cancers was different between genders and age groups, with 78.8% (95%CI: 75.6-82.0) for males and 85.2% (95%CI: 82.2-88.1) for females (P = 0.01), and 78.5% (95%CI: 75.0-82.1) in 15-19 year olds and 84.3% (95% CI: 81.6-87.0) in 20-24 year olds (P = 0.02). Noteworthy, the frequency and the distribution of tumor types in AYA are unique and different from the observed at any other age group. Survival in French AYA has improved over time. Epidemiological data might reflect major trends in the risk factors and preventive interventions. Thus, further research into etiology of cancers affecting AYA should become key priorities for cancer control among AYA.

  7. Tailoring the delivery of cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult patients displaying strong emotions: An observational study of two cases.

    PubMed

    Korsvold, Live; Lie, Hanne Cathrine; Mellblom, Anneli Viktoria; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Finset, Arnstein

    2016-01-01

    Delivering the bad news of a cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who display strong emotions is particularly challenging not the least because AYAs are at a vulnerable developmental stage. Due to the lack of research on how to personalize the delivery of bad news to AYA patients' emotions we report a case study of the communicative behavior of oncologists in two such consultations to describe the complexity of the phenomena at study. We audio-recorded and transcribed consultations where oncologists delivered cancer diagnoses to nine AYAs aged 12-25 years. Two of these patients displayed particularly strong emotional behavior (anger, fear, and sadness) and were chosen as cases. An interpretative analysis in three steps was applied to investigate the oncologists' communicative behavior when delivering bad news. The focus was on how the oncologists responded to the strong but different emotional behaviors of the AYAs. We also related the oncologists' communicative behavior to elements from a widely used protocol for delivering bad news. We found that the oncologists applied five communication strategies: elicit patient perspective, provide information, respond to patient's expression of emotion (acknowledging and containing emotions), encourage commitment to treatment, and provide hope. The findings illustrate how oncologists' communicative behavior may be tailored to individual expressions of emotions in AYA cancer patients.

  8. Tailoring the delivery of cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult patients displaying strong emotions: An observational study of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Korsvold, Live; Lie, Hanne Cathrine; Mellblom, Anneli Viktoria; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Finset, Arnstein

    2016-01-01

    Delivering the bad news of a cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who display strong emotions is particularly challenging not the least because AYAs are at a vulnerable developmental stage. Due to the lack of research on how to personalize the delivery of bad news to AYA patients’ emotions we report a case study of the communicative behavior of oncologists in two such consultations to describe the complexity of the phenomena at study. We audio-recorded and transcribed consultations where oncologists delivered cancer diagnoses to nine AYAs aged 12–25 years. Two of these patients displayed particularly strong emotional behavior (anger, fear, and sadness) and were chosen as cases. An interpretative analysis in three steps was applied to investigate the oncologists’ communicative behavior when delivering bad news. The focus was on how the oncologists responded to the strong but different emotional behaviors of the AYAs. We also related the oncologists’ communicative behavior to elements from a widely used protocol for delivering bad news. We found that the oncologists applied five communication strategies: elicit patient perspective, provide information, respond to patient's expression of emotion (acknowledging and containing emotions), encourage commitment to treatment, and provide hope. The findings illustrate how oncologists’ communicative behavior may be tailored to individual expressions of emotions in AYA cancer patients. PMID:27125477

  9. Development and assessment of a novel Arxula adeninivorans androgen screen (A-YAS) assay and its application in analysis of cattle urine.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Torsten; Knaust, Jacqueline; Kaiser, Christian; Körner, Martina; Hettwer, Karina; Uhlig, Steffen; Simon, Kirsten; Baronian, Keith; Kunze, Gotthard

    2014-08-15

    The novel A-YAS assay for the detection of androgenic activity in liquid samples such as urine has been developed and assessed. The assay is based on transgenic Arxula adeninivorans yeast cells as the bio-component. The cells were engineered to co-express the human androgen receptor (hAR) gene and the inducible phytase reporter gene (phyK, derived from Klebsiella sp. ASR1), under the control of an Arxula derived glucoamylase (GAA) promoter, which had been modified by the insertion of hormone-responsive elements (HREs). The Arxula transformation/expression platform Xplor®2 was used to select stable mitotic resistance marker free transformants and the most suitable cells were characterized for performance as a sensor bio-component. The assay is easy-to-use, fast (6-25 h) and is currently the most sensitive yeast-based androgen screen with an EC50, limit of detection and of quantification values for 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) of 277.1±53.0, 56.5±4.1 and 76.5±6.7 ng L(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the assay allows the determination of androgenic and anti-androgenic activity of various compounds such as naturally occurring androgens and estrogens, pharmaceuticals and biocides. The robustness of the A-YAS assay enables it to be used for analysis of complex samples such as urine. The results of the analysis of a number of cattle urine samples achieved by the A-YAS assay correlate well with GC-MS analysis of the same samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring psychosocial support online: a content analysis of messages in an adolescent and young adult cancer community.

    PubMed

    Love, Brad; Crook, Brittani; Thompson, Charee M; Zaitchik, Sarah; Knapp, Jessica; Lefebvre, Leah; Jones, Barbara; Donovan-Kicken, Erin; Eargle, Emily; Rechis, Ruth

    2012-10-01

    The increased usage of online cancer support groups as a resource for health-related information and social support has sparked numerous discussions about the role of online support in healthcare. However, little is known about the role of social-networking groups focused on supporting adolescents and young adults (AYAs) dealing with cancer. The current investigation report findings from a content analysis designed to explore how AYAs use an online support group to meet their psychosocial needs. Overall, members of the community focused on exchanging emotional and informational support, coping with difficult emotions through expression, describing experiences of being an AYA dealing with cancer through language (metaphors), enacting identity through evaluations of the new normal (life with and after cancer), and communicating membership as an AYA with cancer. This study highlights the unique needs of the AYA cancer community and offers a preliminary roadmap for practitioners, and network members, such as family and friends, to attempt to meet the needs of this unique community.

  11. Outcomes and metrics: measuring the impact of a comprehensive adolescent and young adult cancer program.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Mark; Klassen, Anne; Gafni, Amiram; McBride, Mary L; Albritton, Karen

    2011-05-15

    Against a background of poorly coordinated provision of holistic care to the adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer population, the Canadian National Task Force on Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, which is supported by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and the C17 network, convened a workshop to formulate the components of a systematic approach to care for this age group. Because such a program will deflect scarce resources, it must be validated and justified by reproducible metrics. A subgroup of experts was convened, comprising attendees at the AYA workshop, including AYA cancer survivors. A substantial number of key, feasible, and consistent metrics were identified and are systematized, justified, and presented in this article. Prioritization from within this range will be necessary. © 2011 American Cancer Society

  12. Impact of breast cancer subtypes on 3-year survival among adolescent and young adult women.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Theresa H M; Press, David J; Tao, Li; DeRouen, Mindy C; Kurian, Allison W; Clarke, Christina A; Gomez, Scarlett L

    2013-01-01

    Young women have poorer survival after breast cancer than do older women. It is unclear whether this survival difference relates to the unique distribution of hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-defined molecular breast cancer subtypes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) women aged 15 to 39 years. The purpose of our study was to examine associations between breast cancer subtypes and short-term survival in AYA women, as well as to determine whether the distinct molecular subtype distribution among AYA women explains the unfavorable overall breast cancer survival statistics reported for AYA women compared with older women. Data for 5,331 AYA breast cancers diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 were obtained from the California Cancer Registry. Survival by subtype (triple-negative; HR+/HER2-; HR+/HER2+; HR-/HER2+) and age-group (AYA versus 40- to 64-year-olds) was analyzed with Cox proportional hazards regression with follow-up through 2010. With up to 6 years of follow-up and a mean survival time of 3.1 years (SD = 1.5 years), AYA women diagnosed with HR-/HER + and triple-negative breast cancer experienced a 1.6-fold and 2.7-fold increased risk of death, respectively, from all causes (HR-/HER + hazard ratio: 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10 to 2.18; triple-negative HR: 2.75; 95% CI, 2.06 to 3.66) and breast cancer (HR-/HER + hazard ratio: 1.63; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.36; triple-negative hazard ratio: 2.71; 95% CI, 1.98 to 3.71) than AYA women with HR+/HER2- breast cancer. AYA women who resided in lower socioeconomic status neighborhoods, had public health insurance, and were of Black, compared with White, race/ethnicity experienced worse survival. This race/ethnicity association was attenuated somewhat after adjusting for breast cancer subtypes (hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.82). AYA women had similar all-cause and breast cancer-specific short-term survival as older women for all breast cancer subtypes and across all

  13. Impact of breast cancer subtypes on 3-year survival among adolescent and young adult women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Young women have poorer survival after breast cancer than do older women. It is unclear whether this survival difference relates to the unique distribution of hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-defined molecular breast cancer subtypes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) women aged 15 to 39 years. The purpose of our study was to examine associations between breast cancer subtypes and short-term survival in AYA women, as well as to determine whether the distinct molecular subtype distribution among AYA women explains the unfavorable overall breast cancer survival statistics reported for AYA women compared with older women. Methods Data for 5,331 AYA breast cancers diagnosed between 2005 and 2009 were obtained from the California Cancer Registry. Survival by subtype (triple-negative; HR+/HER2-; HR+/HER2+; HR-/HER2+) and age-group (AYA versus 40- to 64-year-olds) was analyzed with Cox proportional hazards regression with follow-up through 2010. Results With up to 6 years of follow-up and a mean survival time of 3.1 years (SD = 1.5 years), AYA women diagnosed with HR-/HER + and triple-negative breast cancer experienced a 1.6-fold and 2.7-fold increased risk of death, respectively, from all causes (HR-/HER + hazard ratio: 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10 to 2.18; triple-negative HR: 2.75; 95% CI, 2.06 to 3.66) and breast cancer (HR-/HER + hazard ratio: 1.63; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.36; triple-negative hazard ratio: 2.71; 95% CI, 1.98 to 3.71) than AYA women with HR+/HER2- breast cancer. AYA women who resided in lower socioeconomic status neighborhoods, had public health insurance, and were of Black, compared with White, race/ethnicity experienced worse survival. This race/ethnicity association was attenuated somewhat after adjusting for breast cancer subtypes (hazard ratio, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.82). AYA women had similar all-cause and breast cancer-specific short-term survival as older women

  14. Social well-being among adolescents and young adults with cancer: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Warner, Echo L; Kent, Erin E; Trevino, Kelly M; Parsons, Helen M; Zebrack, Bradley J; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-04-01

    A cancer diagnosis during adolescence or young adulthood may negatively influence social well-being. The existing literature concerning the social well-being of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer was reviewed to identify gaps in current research and highlight priority areas for future research. A systematic review of the scientific literature published in English from 2000 through 2014 was performed. Eligible studies included patients and survivors diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 39 years that reported on social well-being domains in the City of Hope Cancer Survivor Quality of Life Model. Each article was reviewed for relevance using a standardized template. A total of 253 potential articles were identified. After exclusions, a final sample of 26 articles identified domains of social well-being that are believed to be understudied among AYAs with cancer: 1) educational attainment, employment, and financial burden; 2) social relationships; and 3) supportive care. Articles were read in their entirety, single coded, and summarized according to domain. AYAs with cancer report difficulties related to employment, educational attainment, and financial stability. They also report problems with the maintenance and development of peer and family relationships, intimate and marital relationships, and peer support. Supportive services are desired among AYAs. Few studies have reported results in reference to comparison samples or by cancer subtypes. Future research studies on AYAs with cancer should prioritize the inclusion of underserved AYA populations, more heterogeneous cancer samples, and comparison groups to inform the development of supportive services. Priority areas for potential intervention include education and employment reintegration, and social support networks. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. A Review of Health Behaviors in Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survivors: Toward Prevention of Second Primary Cancer.

    PubMed

    Carretier, Julien; Boyle, Helen; Duval, Sarah; Philip, Thierry; Laurence, Valérie; Stark, Dan P; Berger, Claire; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Fervers, Béatrice

    2016-06-01

    Survival of children and adolescents and young adults (AYAs) treated for cancer has increased with improved treatments. However, there is still an increased risk of second primary cancer (SPC) in the long term compared with the same-age population, especially related to treatments. The follow-up of this population and the prevention of SPC are important issues. Therefore, this study aimed to review the available literature on cancer risk factors (lifestyle and occupational exposures) in children and AYAs previously treated for cancer in order to identify interventions that might be implemented to improve healthy behaviors in this population. PubMed was searched using the following terms: "cancer[Tiab] AND young adult[Tiab] or teen[Tiab] or childhood[Tiab] AND prevention[Tiab] AND survivors[Meshterm]." Twenty-seven articles were included. Children and AYA survivors of cancer have similar risk behaviors to their peers regarding tobacco, diet, and sun exposure. However, they have lower physical activity. Few studies on prevention strategies in this population were identified. Results of available studies remain inconclusive. No publications were found on occupational exposure and risk of second cancer. Children and AYAs treated for cancer are a population at risk and require specific effective prevention strategies.

  16. Depression in adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Eliza M; Rosenstein, Donald L

    2015-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are at risk for depression due to disruptions in their developmental trajectory, greater physical symptom burden, and increased likelihood of developing aggressive disease. Rates of depression and other psychological disorders are substantially higher in AYAs with cancer when compared with older adults. Psychiatrists caring for these patients must consider the age-appropriate developmental context of these patients along with familial and medical factors that may influence the presentation and treatment of depression. Previous research suggests that psychosocial interventions specifically designed for AYA patients are promising, but studies of psychopharmacology treatments for depression are lacking. There is a pressing need for prospective studies and controlled clinical trials that evaluate the optimal strategies for treating depression in this patient group.

  17. Depression in adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eliza M.; Rosenstein, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer are at risk for depression due to disruptions in their developmental trajectory, greater physical symptom burden, and increased likelihood of developing aggressive disease. Rates of depression and other psychological disorders are substantially higher in AYAs with cancer when compared with older adults. Psychiatrists caring for these patients must consider the age-appropriate developmental context of these patients along with familial and medical factors that may influence the presentation and treatment of depression. Previous research suggests that psychosocial interventions specifically designed for AYA patients are promising, but studies of psychopharmacology treatments for depression are lacking. There is a pressing need for prospective studies and controlled clinical trials that evaluate the optimal strategies for treating depression in this patient group. PMID:26246791

  18. Relationship between sleep problems and psychological outcomes in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and controls.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Lauren; Kazak, Anne E; Li, Yimei; Hobbie, Wendy; Ginsberg, Jill; Butler, Eliana; Schwartz, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    How cancer history and distress relate to sleep outcomes of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is unclear. The current study compares AYA cancer survivors to controls on indicators of sleep and fatigue; examines the concurrent association between psychological status, sleep, and fatigue; and investigates the lagged relationship between sleep and fatigue problems with psychological functioning. AYA cancer survivors (n = 167) and controls (n = 170), ages 16 to 30, completed measures at a survivorship clinic/primary care visit (time 1) and 2 months later (time 2). Participants completed questions about sleep quality, quantity, sleep medication use, self-reports of sleep problems, and fatigue in addition to measures of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). There were no differences in sleep quantity or quality between survivors and controls, but survivors reported significantly more fatigue. Within groups, AYAs with self-reported sleep and fatigue problems reported significantly higher depression, anxiety, and PTS symptoms. Controlling for baseline depression, sleep, and fatigue problems at time 1 significantly predicted depression at time 2 in survivors but not in controls. This study offers important insight into the psychological functioning of childhood cancer survivors and prospectively describes sleep and fatigue as risk factors for poor psychological functioning in survivors. These findings support screening for sleep problems in AYA survivors as these difficulties are closely related to mental health functioning.

  19. Social Well-Being Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Echo L.; Kent, Erin E.; Trevino, Kelly M.; Parsons, Helen M.; Zebrack, Brad J.; Kirchhoff, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A cancer diagnosis during adolescence or young adulthood may negatively influence social well-being. The existing literature concerning the social well-being of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer was reviewed to identify gaps in current research and highlight priority areas for future research. METHODS A systematic review of the scientific literature published in English from 2000 through 2014 was performed. Eligible studies included patients and survivors diagnosed between the ages of 15 to 39 years that reported on social well-being domains in the City of Hope Cancer Survivor Quality of Life Model. Each article was reviewed for relevance using a standardized template. A total of 253 potential articles were identified. After exclusions, a final sample of 26 articles identified domains of social well-being that are believed to be understudied among AYAs with cancer: 1) educational attainment, employment, and financial burden; 2) social relationships; and 3) supportive care. Articles were read in their entirety, single coded, and summarized according to domain. RESULTS AYAs with cancer report difficulties related to employment, educational attainment, and financial stability. They also report problems with the maintenance and development of peer and family relationships, intimate and marital relationships, and peer support. Supportive services are desired among AYAs. Few studies have reported results in reference to comparison samples or by cancer subtypes. CONCLUSIONS Future research studies on AYAs with cancer should prioritize the inclusion of underserved AYA populations, more heterogeneous cancer samples, and comparison groups to inform the development of supportive services. Priority areas for potential intervention include education and employment reintegration, and social support networks. PMID:26848713

  20. How do young adults with cancer perceive social support? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Nora; Sender, Annekathrin; Daneck, Lisa; Mentschke, Lisa; Leuteritz, Katja; Friedrich, Michael; Nowe, Erik; Stöbel-Richter, Yve; Geue, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    The social support of adolescents and young adults (AYA) has been studied very little. 18 interviews were conducted and evaluated with content analysis (inter-rater reliability = 0.87). All of the young adult cancer patients interviewed reported having received social support from at least two people (family, friends, and/or partner). Forms of emotional and instrumental support were more often reported than informational support. 12 participants described having received nonhelpful support, especially in areas of dealing with their situation, limited social participation, and distancing of friends. The participants considered social exchanges with other young adult cancer patients an important source of social support. AYA cancer patient networking should be improved.

  1. Cancer Incidence and Survival among Adolescents and Young Adults in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Kyeong; Park, Hyeon Jin; Oh, Chang-Mo; Jung, Kyu-Won; Shin, Hee Young; Park, Byung Kiu; Won, Young-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Korea, cancer is the third leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). However, cancer incidence and survival trends among AYAs (15–29 years) have never been studied in Korea. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the incidence and relative survival rates and their trends among AYAs in Korea. Materials and Methods Cancer incidence data from 1999–2010 were obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). Each cancer was classified into subgroups according to the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) AYA site recode. Percent distributions, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates per million, and annual percent changes (APCs) were calculated for AYAs according to sex. Five-year relative survival rates were estimated for cases diagnosed between 1993 and 2010 and followed up to 2011. Results The age-standardized incidence rates of all cancers combined were 196.4 and 367.8 per million for males and females, respectively (male-to-female (M/F) ratio: 0.5). The age-standardized incidence rates increased from 208.7 per million in 1999 to 396.4 per million in 2010, and the APC was 6.3% (P<0.001). The five most common cancers among AYAs were thyroid carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and acute myeloid leukemia. In males, the 5-year relative survival rate improved, from 46.5% in 1993–1995 to 75.9% in 2006–2010. In females, the 5-year relative survival rate also improved, from 66.7% in 1993–1995 to 89.1% in 2006–2010. Conclusions Our study showed increases in cancer incidence and improvements in the 5-year relative survival rate among Korean AYAs. This study also provides additional data regarding temporal and geographic trends in cancer that may enhance future efforts to identify factors affecting cancer incidence and responses to treatment among AYAs. PMID:24789075

  2. The Meaning of Surviving Cancer for Latino adolescents and emerging young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Barbara L.; Volker, Deborah L.; Vinajeras, Yolanda; Butros, Linda; Fitchpatrick, Cynthia; Rossetto, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Background Adolescents and young adult (AYA) survivors of cancer are an understudied population with unique developmental and medical needs that extend well beyond their active treatment. Survivors diagnosed as AYAs may experience both physical and emotional late effects. In particular, the experiences of Latino cancer survivors have not been explored. Objective The purpose of this study was to conduct interviews with AYA Latino cancer survivors to inform professionals working with these survivors. Design A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was selected based on the focus on experiences and meanings of Latino adolescents’ cancer survivorship. Phenomenology allows for understanding the subjective meaning and lived experience of populations that are understudied or marginalized. In-depth interviews were conducted with participants Participants Latino AYAs between the ages of 14–21 who were all post treatment. Results Interviews revealed seven themes regarding the experience and meaning of survivorship for this population: gratitude, humor/positive attitude, empathy for younger children with cancer, god and faith, cancer happens for a reason/cancer changed my life/, familial support, and staff relationships. Conclusions Latino adolescent and young adult cancer survivors develop meaning out of unique cancer experiences. Programs need to be developed specifically to address Latino adolescents and young adult survivors of cancer. PMID:19926975

  3. Recent developments in supporting adolescent and young adult siblings of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Pandora; Medlow, Sharon; McDonald, Fiona E J

    2015-07-01

    The psychosocial needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) siblings of cancer patients are easily overlooked. Accordingly, the evidence base informing short and long-term outcomes for these young people is sparse. This review provides an overview of recent research highlighting the experiences, unmet needs and psychosocial issues of AYA siblings, together with recent interventions. The reviewed studies bring focus to the range of informational and supportive care needs that typically remain unmet in AYA siblings. The limited number of interventions designed specifically for this group not only appear to have positive results but also underscore the need for effective risk stratification preintervention and tailoring of interventions to the specific needs of participants. AYA siblings of cancer patients display a range of psychosocial symptoms that can be ameliorated with age-appropriate information and targeted intervention programs. Limited research suggests that the majority of unmet needs for AYA siblings seem to occur during the acute phases of the brother or sister's initial diagnosis, treatment and relapse. Further research is required on siblings' long-term psychosocial assessment and management, bereavement, family systems, the impact of the cancer experience on siblings' personality and identity, and the development and evaluation of tailored psychosocial interventions. Policy research is also required to identify opportunities for expanding established healthcare systems to include sibling support.

  4. Spending on Hospital Care and Pediatric Psychology Service Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Meghan E; Peugh, James L; Brown, Gabriella A; Pai, Ahna L H

    2017-02-26

    To examine the relationship between need-based pediatric psychology service use and spending on hospital care among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Billing data were obtained from 48 AYAs with cancer receiving need-based pediatric psychology services and a comparison cohort of 48 AYAs with cancer not receiving services. A factorial analysis of covariance examined group differences in spending for hospital care. Pending significant findings, a multivariate analysis of covariance was planned to examine the relationship between need-based pediatric psychology service use and spending for inpatient admissions, emergency department (ED) visits, and outpatient visits. Spending for hospital care was higher among AYAs receiving need-based pediatric psychology services than in the comparison cohort ( p < .001, ωPartial2 = .11 ). Group differences were driven by significantly higher spending for inpatient admissions and ED visits among AYAs receiving need-based pediatric psychology services. The behavioral and psychosocial difficulties warranting need-based pediatric psychology services may predict higher health care spending.

  5. Cancer-related information needs and cancer’s impact on control over life influence health-related quality of life among adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeRouen, Mindy C.; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Tao, Li; Bellizzi, Keith M.; Lynch, Charles F.; Parsons, Helen M.; Kent, Erin E.; Keegan, Theresa H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) diagnosed with cancer between 15 and 39 years of age often report need for greater amounts of cancer-related information and perceive that cancer has had a negative impact on control over their life. We examined whether unmet information need and perceived control over life are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods We examined data from 484 AYA cancer survivors recruited from population-based cancer registries in 2007–2008. Participants completed surveys a median of 11 months after diagnosis. Multivariable linear regression analyses estimated associations of unmet cancer-related information needs and impact of cancer on control over life on HRQOL (SF-12). Results Two-thirds of AYAs reported an intermediate or high level of unmet information need, and half (47%) reported a negative impact of cancer on control. Greater unmet information need was associated with lower overall mental and physical HRQOL and lower levels of all HRQOL subscales except vitality. A negative impact on control over life was associated with lower overall mental HRQOL as well as lower HRQOL across all subscales (all p <0.05). In multivariable analyses, perceived control and unmet information need were independently associated with HRQOL (p-values for interaction >0.1). Conclusions AYA patients with cancer have high levels of unmet cancer-related information needs and perceived negative impact of cancer on control over life; both were independently associated with lower HRQOL. Addressing unmet information needs among AYA cancer survivors and finding ways to increase their sense of control may help improve HRQOL in this understudied population. PMID:25611943

  6. Validation of a Health Literacy Measure for Adolescents and Young Adults Diagnosed with Cancer.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Fiona E J; Patterson, Pandora; Costa, Daniel S J; Shepherd, Heather L

    2016-03-01

    Health literacy can influence long-term health outcomes. This study aimed to validate an adapted version of the Functional, Communicative and Critical Health Literacy measure for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients and survivors (N = 105; age 12-24 years). Exploratory factor analysis was used to validate the measure, and indicated that a slightly modified item structure better fit the results. Furthermore, item response theory analysis highlighted location and discrimination parameter differences among items. Acceptability of the measure was high. This is the first validation of a health literacy measure among AYAs with an illness such as cancer.

  7. Cancer-Related Disclosure Among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Marie E; Shuk, Elyse M; Conway, Francine P; Ford, Jennifer S

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) employ self-disclosure in normative social interactions and in promoting identity development. Disclosure is associated with numerous psychological and physical benefits. Little research has examined how AYA cancer survivors diagnosed during adolescence disclose their cancer history. Methods: Using a qualitative design, this study explored cancer-related disclosures among survivors (N=26) 16-24 years old at study (M=19.6 years), 14-18 years old at diagnosis (M=15.6 years), and currently at least 6 months post-treatment (M=3.2 years). Semi-structured interview guides were developed and used. Disclosure-related topics included survivorship communications and others' responses to AYAs' disclosure of their cancer experiences. Results: Grounded theory and thematic content analysis guided analyses, with an inductive data-driven approach. Three themes and eight subthemes emerged: "it depends" decision-making processes (don't ask/don't tell, shared experience, relationship potential), perceptions of others' responses (perceived apprehension, positive responses), and methods of disclosure (verbal, written, behavioral). No thematic differences were found by gender or age, although females reported greater frequency of disclosures. Conclusion: Disclosure emerged as a nuanced and complex process. "It depends" decision-making processes were most frequently endorsed, consistent with developmental complexities of this age group. This reflects social and psychological changes and highlights unique challenges for AYA survivors. This also reflects the importance of peers and social interactions as variables that influence disclosure. In the context of AYA cancer survivorship, understanding ways in which disclosure may bolster or hinder social support can assist survivors, clinicians, and families navigate survivorship. Implications for future research are discussed.

  8. Cancer-Related Disclosure Among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Marie E.; Shuk, Elyse M.; Conway, Francine P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) employ self-disclosure in normative social interactions and in promoting identity development. Disclosure is associated with numerous psychological and physical benefits. Little research has examined how AYA cancer survivors diagnosed during adolescence disclose their cancer history. Methods: Using a qualitative design, this study explored cancer-related disclosures among survivors (N=26) 16–24 years old at study (M=19.6 years), 14–18 years old at diagnosis (M=15.6 years), and currently at least 6 months post-treatment (M=3.2 years). Semi-structured interview guides were developed and used. Disclosure-related topics included survivorship communications and others' responses to AYAs' disclosure of their cancer experiences. Results: Grounded theory and thematic content analysis guided analyses, with an inductive data-driven approach. Three themes and eight subthemes emerged: “it depends” decision-making processes (don't ask/don't tell, shared experience, relationship potential), perceptions of others' responses (perceived apprehension, positive responses), and methods of disclosure (verbal, written, behavioral). No thematic differences were found by gender or age, although females reported greater frequency of disclosures. Conclusion: Disclosure emerged as a nuanced and complex process. “It depends” decision-making processes were most frequently endorsed, consistent with developmental complexities of this age group. This reflects social and psychological changes and highlights unique challenges for AYA survivors. This also reflects the importance of peers and social interactions as variables that influence disclosure. In the context of AYA cancer survivorship, understanding ways in which disclosure may bolster or hinder social support can assist survivors, clinicians, and families navigate survivorship. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:25276496

  9. Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients With Cancer: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Husson, Olga; Zebrack, Brad J; Block, Rebecca; Embry, Leanne; Aguilar, Christine; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2017-02-20

    Purpose To examine changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and its predictors during the first 2 years after initial cancer diagnosis in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer. Patients and Methods A multicenter, longitudinal, prospective study was conducted among a diverse sample of AYA patients with cancer ages 15 to 39 years. One hundred seventy-six patients (75% response) completed a self-report measure of HRQoL (Short Form-36 [SF-36]) within the first 4 months after diagnosis and again 12 and 24 months later. Linear mixed models with random intercepts and slopes estimated changes in QoL. Results Recently diagnosed AYA patients with cancer had significantly worse physical component scale (PCS) scores (38.7 v 52.8; P < .001) and mental component scale (MCS) scores (42.9 v 48.9; P < .001) when compared with population norms. Significant improvements in PCS and MCS scores from baseline to 24-month follow-up were observed; however, these increases were largest during the first 12 months. At the 24-month follow-up, AYA patients still had significantly lower PCS scores (48.0 v 52.8; P < .001) and MCS scores (45.8 v 48.9; P = .002) when compared with population norms. Multivariable analyses revealed that improvements in PCS and MCS scores were primarily a function of being off-treatment and being involved in school or work. PCS but not MCS scores were worse for AYA patients diagnosed with cancers with poorer prognoses. Conclusion Although HRQoL improved over time, it was still compromised 24 months after primary diagnosis. Given relatively little observed improvement in HRQoL during the 12- to 24-month period after diagnosis, AYA patients may benefit from supportive care interventions administered during the second year after diagnosis.

  10. Barriers to follow-up care among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer.

    PubMed

    Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Zamora, Eduardo R; Wu, Yelena P; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2017-02-01

    Though the need for risk-based follow-up care for survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer has been documented, survivors often report forgoing recommended care due to cost. We sought to understand whether additional barriers to follow-up care exist for AYA survivors. We recruited survivors who were diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 15 and 39 using the Utah Cancer Registry (UCR). Overall, 28 survivors participated in 6 focus groups held between March and May 2015 in Salt Lake City and St. George, UT. Focus group discussions focused on the reasons survivors may or may not attend recommended medical visits after completing therapy. Survivors reported myriad barriers to follow-up medical visits, including lack of clear provider recommendation, fear of recurrent cancer diagnosis, wishing to move on with life, competing life responsibilities due to work and children, and not perceiving the need for a visit due to lack of symptoms. Though cost likely plays a major part in follow-up care adherence for survivors of AYA cancer, in our focus groups, participants indicated there were many other psychosocial and logistic barriers to care. Such factors play an important role in the day-to-day lives of survivors and are critical in medical decision-making. Several factors impede follow-up care adherence for survivors of AYA cancer that are amenable to interventions, including clearer provider recommendations, flexible appointment times, and childcare availability in clinics.

  11. Cancer-related information needs and cancer's impact on control over life influence health-related quality of life among adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    DeRouen, Mindy C; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Tao, Li; Bellizzi, Keith M; Lynch, Charles F; Parsons, Helen M; Kent, Erin E; Keegan, Theresa H M

    2015-09-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) diagnosed with cancer between 15 and 39 years of age often report need for greater amounts of cancer-related information and perceive that cancer has had a negative impact on control over their life. We examined whether unmet information need and perceived control over life are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). We examined data from 484 AYA cancer survivors recruited from population-based cancer registries in 2007-2008. Participants completed surveys a median of 11 months after diagnosis. Multivariable linear regression analyses estimated associations of unmet cancer-related information needs and impact of cancer on control over life on HRQOL (SF-12). Two-thirds of AYAs reported an intermediate or high level of unmet information need, and half (47%) reported a negative impact of cancer on control. Greater unmet information need was associated with lower overall mental and physical HRQOL and lower levels of all HRQOL subscales except vitality. A negative impact on control over life was associated with lower overall mental HRQOL as well as lower HRQOL across all subscales except general health perceptions (all p <0.05). In multivariable analyses, perceived control and unmet information need were independently associated with HRQOL (p-values for interaction >0.1). Adolescent and young adult patients with cancer have high levels of unmet cancer-related information needs and perceived negative impact of cancer on control over life; both were independently associated with lower HRQOL. Addressing unmet information needs among AYA cancer survivors and finding ways to increase their sense of control may help improve HRQOL in this understudied population. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Pediatric advance care planning (pACP) for teens with cancer and their families: Design of a dyadic, longitudinal RCCT.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Katherine B; Watson, Anne E; Wang, Jichuan; Okonkwo, Obianuju C; Lyon, Maureen E

    2017-08-24

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) in the United States. Parents of AYAs with life-threatening illnesses have expressed the desire to talk to their children about end of life (EOL) care, yet, like caregivers of adult patients, struggle to initiate this conversation. Building Evidence for Effective Palliative/End of Life Care for Teens with Cancer is a longitudinal, randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of FAmily CEntered disease-specific advance care planning (ACP) for teens with cancer (FACE-TC). A total of 130 dyads (260 subjects) composed of AYAs 14-20years old with cancer and their family decision maker (≥18years old) will be recruited from pediatric oncology programs at Akron Children's Hospital and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Dyads will be randomized to either the FACE-TC intervention or Treatment as Usual (TAU) control. FACE-TC intervention dyads will complete three 60-minute ACP sessions held at weekly intervals. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18months post-intervention by a blinded research assistant (RA). The effects of FACE-TC on patient-family congruence in treatment preferences, quality of life (QOL), and advance directive completion will be analyzed. FACE-TC is an evidenced-based and patient-centered intervention that considers QOL and EOL care according to the AYA's representation of illness. The family is involved in the ACP process to facilitate shared decision making, increase understanding of the AYA's preferences, and make a commitment to honor the AYA's wishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Determining research priorities for adolescent and young adult cancer in Australia.

    PubMed

    Medlow, S; Patterson, P

    2015-07-01

    The Australian Youth Cancer Service (YCS) is part of a growing international movement to provide advocacy and better targeted health-care services for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. One of the key initiatives of the YCS is to determine and implement priorities within Australian AYA cancer research. The YCS used the value-weighting online survey technique of allocating 100 hypothetical units of funding across pre-determined topics of research in order to determine Australian consumers' and health professionals' AYA cancer research priorities. A total of 101 participants (26 consumers and 75 health professionals) took part in the online survey. Biomedical and Clinical Medicine Research was allocated the greatest proportion of available funding. A number of priority populations were also identified, although these were distributed across pre-treatment and post-treatment stages. The preferences of consumers and health professionals to invest available AYA cancer research funds in Biomedical and Clinical Medicine Research will be an important consideration in guiding the Australian YCS decision-making process in the immediate future. 'Prevention, screening and early detection' was also an important research funding target, along with survivorship populations.

  14. Preliminary development and psychometric evaluation of an unmet needs measure for adolescents and young adults with cancer: the Cancer Needs Questionnaire - Young People (CNQ-YP).

    PubMed

    Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Carey, Mariko; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; D'Este, Catherine; Shakeshaft, Anthony

    2012-01-30

    Adolescents and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors may have unique physical, psychological and social needs due to their cancer occurring at a critical phase of development. The aim of this study was to develop a psychometrically rigorous measure of unmet need to capture the specific needs of this group. Items were developed following a comprehensive literature review, focus groups with AYAs, and feedback from health care providers, researchers and other professionals. The measure was pilot tested with 32 AYA cancer survivors recruited through a state-based cancer registry to establish face and content validity. A main sample of 139 AYA cancer patients and survivors were recruited through seven treatment centres and invited to complete the questionnaire. To establish test-retest reliability, a sub-sample of 34 participants completed the measure a second time. Exploratory factor analysis was performed and the measure was assessed for internal consistency, discriminative validity, potential responsiveness and acceptability. The Cancer Needs Questionnaire - Young People (CNQ-YP) has established face and content validity, and acceptability. The final measure has 70 items and six factors: Treatment Environment and Care (33 items); Feelings and Relationships (14 items); Daily Life (12 items); Information and Activities (5 items); Education (3 items); and Work (3 items). All domains achieved Cronbach's alpha values greater than 0.80. Item-to-item test-retest reliability was also high, with all but four items reaching weighted kappa values above 0.60. The CNQ-YP is the first multi-dimensional measure of unmet need which has been developed specifically for AYA cancer patients and survivors. The measure displays a strong factor structure, and excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. However, the small sample size has implications for the reliability of the statistical analyses undertaken, particularly the exploratory factor analysis. Future studies with a

  15. Advance Care Planning Discussions with Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients Admitted to a Community Palliative Care Service: A Retrospective Case-Note Audit.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sophie; Hughes, Rachel; Pickstock, Sarah; Auret, Kirsten

    2017-08-02

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer are a cohort requiring specialized healthcare models to address unique cognitive and physical challenges. Advance care planning (ACP) discussions likely warrant age-appropriate adaptation, yet, there is little Australian research data available to inform best practice for this group. The goal of this work is to inform future models of ACP discussions for AYA. Retrospective medical record audit of AYA patients and an adult comparison group, diagnosed with a malignancy and referred to a community hospice service, in Western Australia, in the period between January 1, 2012 and December 1, 2015. Information was collected regarding end-of-life care discussions, documentation of agreed plan of care, and care received. Twenty-seven AYA and 37 adult medical records were reviewed. Eighteen (66.7%) AYA patients died at home, compared with 19 (51.4%) adults (p = 0.028). Desire to pursue all available oncological therapies, including clinical trials, was documented for 14 (51.9%) AYA patients compared with 9 (24.3%) of the adult group (p = 0.02). Eleven AYA patients (40.7%) received chemotherapy during the last month of life compared with two (5.4%) adults (p = 0.001). The results indicate that end-of-life care preferences for this unique cohort may differ from those of the adult population and need to be captured and understood. An ACP document incorporating a discussion regarding goals of care, preferred location of care, preference for place of death, and consent to future intervention, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation and prompts for review, could assist in pursuing this objective.

  16. Using plain language skills to create an educational brochure about sperm banking for adolescent and young adult males with cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Kim; Wizowski, Lindsay; Duckworth, JoAnn; Cassano, Jane; Hahn, Shirley Ann; Neal, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Writing in plain language makes it easier for patients to read, understand, and make informed decisions about sperm banking. Greater attention to the issue and properly designed educational brochures for use by nurses in oncology and reproductive health is of evident importance but of unknown impact. A multidisciplinary clinical team followed an evidence-based, patient-centered approach to develop "plain language" patient education materials about sperm banking for adolescent and young adult (AYA) males with cancer. A patient education booklet was produced and implemented as part of the planned patient education for AYA male oncology patients at McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton Health Sciences, in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The patient education booklet for use by health professionals as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion with AYA males has been produced with the hope that it will contribute to better informed decision making regarding sperm banking and increased use of this technology for fertility preservation.

  17. Adolescent and young adult oncology patients: Disparities in access to specialized cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Elysia; Keegan, Theresa; Johnston, Emily E; Haile, Robert; Sanders, Lee; Saynina, Olga; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-07-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) ages 15 to 39 years with cancer continue to experience disparate survival outcomes compared with their younger and older counterparts. This may be caused in part by differential access to specialized cancer centers (SCCs), because treatment at SCCs has been associated with improved overall survival. The authors examined social and clinical factors associated with AYA use of SCCs (defined as Children's Oncology Group-designated or National Cancer Institute-designated centers). A retrospective, population-based analysis was performed on all hospital admissions of AYA oncology patients in California during 1991 through 2014 (n = 127,250) using the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses examined the contribution of social and clinical factors on always receiving care from an SCC (vs sometimes or never). Results are presented as adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Over the past 20 years, the percentage of patients always receiving inpatient care at an SCC increased over time (from 27% in 1991 to 43% in 2014). In multivariable regression analyses, AYA patients were less likely to always receive care from an SCC if they had public insurance (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.62-0.66), were uninsured (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.46-0.56), were Hispanic (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.85-0.91), lived > 5 miles from an SCC, or had a diagnosis other than leukemia and central nervous system tumors. Receiving care at an SCC was influenced by insurance, race/ethnicity, geography, and tumor type. Identifying the barriers associated with decreased SCC use is an important first step toward improving outcomes in AYA oncology patients. Cancer 2017;123:2516-23. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Impact of a teen weekend on the social support needs of adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Stegenga, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents are particularly vulnerable to the psychosocial stressors of a cancer diagnosis because of the unique expectations of their developmental stage. Their developing autonomy and self-image place them at increased risk for negative outcomes related to cancer diagnosis. One response to the developmental and supportive care needs of adolescents with cancer (AYA) was the development of a teen weekend, named Teenapalooza by participants, which was intended to provide a social outlet for AYA to spend time with other AYA. Teens engaged in activities together and spent the night at a centrally located venue supervised by trained medical and child life staff. It became apparent to staff that Teenapalooza was providing more than fun and an opportunity to spend time with other AYA to participants. However, the mechanisms of support were poorly understood. A convenience sample of 9 prior Teenapalooza participants, aged 14 to 17 years, participated in qualitative interviews to better understand these mechanisms so that future interventions could build on this supportive framework.

  19. A review of mobile applications to help adolescent and young adult cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wesley, Kimberly M; Fizur, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review research articles utilizing mobile applications with adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. Materials and methods We identified articles via online searches and reference lists (eg, PsycInfo, PubMed). Articles were reviewed by two study team members for target population, stated purpose, technological utilization, sample size, demographic characteristics, and outcome data. Strengths and weaknesses of each study were described. Results Of 19 identified manuscripts, six met full inclusion criteria for this review (four smartphone applications and two tablet applications). One additional article that included an application not specific to oncology but included AYA patients with cancer within the target sample was also reviewed. Uses of these applications included symptom tracking, pain management, monitoring of eating habits following bone marrow transplant, monitoring of mucositis, and improving medication management. Utility results from pilot studies are presented. Conclusion Mobile applications are growing in number and increasingly available to AYAs with and without chronic illness. These applications may prove useful in helping to support AYAs throughout their cancer treatment and beyond. However, few applications provide empirical data supporting their utility. Numerous strengths and benefits of these applications include increased accessibility to educational resources and self-management strategies, more frequent physical and emotional symptom tracking, and increased access to peer support. Despite these strengths, numerous limitations are identified, highlighting the need for future research in this area. PMID:26316835

  20. A review of mobile applications to help adolescent and young adult cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Kimberly M; Fizur, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    To review research articles utilizing mobile applications with adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. We identified articles via online searches and reference lists (eg, PsycInfo, PubMed). Articles were reviewed by two study team members for target population, stated purpose, technological utilization, sample size, demographic characteristics, and outcome data. Strengths and weaknesses of each study were described. Of 19 identified manuscripts, six met full inclusion criteria for this review (four smartphone applications and two tablet applications). One additional article that included an application not specific to oncology but included AYA patients with cancer within the target sample was also reviewed. Uses of these applications included symptom tracking, pain management, monitoring of eating habits following bone marrow transplant, monitoring of mucositis, and improving medication management. Utility results from pilot studies are presented. Mobile applications are growing in number and increasingly available to AYAs with and without chronic illness. These applications may prove useful in helping to support AYAs throughout their cancer treatment and beyond. However, few applications provide empirical data supporting their utility. Numerous strengths and benefits of these applications include increased accessibility to educational resources and self-management strategies, more frequent physical and emotional symptom tracking, and increased access to peer support. Despite these strengths, numerous limitations are identified, highlighting the need for future research in this area.

  1. Clinical Trial Participation and Time to Treatment Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: Does Age at Diagnosis or Insurance Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Helen M.; Harlan, Linda C.; Seibel, Nita L.; Stevens, Jennifer L.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Because adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer have experienced variable improvement in survival over the past two decades, enhancing the quality and timeliness of cancer care in this population has emerged as a priority area. To identify current trends in AYA care, we examined patterns of clinical trial participation, time to treatment, and provider characteristics in a population-based sample of AYA patients with cancer. Methods Using the National Cancer Institute Patterns of Care Study, we used multivariate logistic regression to evaluate demographic and provider characteristics associated with clinical trial enrollment and time to treatment among 1,358 AYA patients with cancer (age 15 to 39 years) identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Results In our study, 14% of patients age 15 to 39 years had enrolled onto a clinical trial; participation varied by type of cancer, with the highest participation in those diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (37%) and sarcoma (32%). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that uninsured, older patients and those treated by nonpediatric oncologists were less likely to enroll onto clinical trials. Median time from pathologic confirmation to first treatment was 3 days, but this varied by race/ethnicity and cancer site. In multivariate analyses, advanced cancer stage and outpatient treatment alone were associated with longer time from pathologic confirmation to treatment. Conclusion Our study identified factors associated with low clinical trial participation in AYA patients with cancer. These findings support the continued need to improve access to clinical trials and innovative treatments for this population, which may ultimately translate into improved survival. PMID:21931022

  2. Sociodemographic Disparities in Quality of Life for Survivors of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Spraker-Perlman, Holly L.; McFadden, Molly; Warner, Echo L.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Wright, Jennifer; Kinney, Anita Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Survivors of cancer diagnosed during adolescence and young adulthood (AYA; aged 15–39) may experience quality of life (QOL) limitations; however, little is known about QOL for AYA survivors who are now middle-aged or among racial/ethnic minority survivors. We evaluated QOL outcomes for AYA cancer survivors relative to a non-cancer comparison group by gender, race/ethnicity, and current age. Methods: Using the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data, we identified 8375 individuals diagnosed with cancer while aged 15–39 years old and 334,759 controls. Participants were currently ≥20 years of age. QOL was measured using four items from the Center for Disease Control's Healthy Days Measure (general health, number of days of poor physical and mental health, and activity limitation days). Multivariable regressions compared these measures for survivors and controls by gender, race/ethnicity, and age, and among survivors to determine cancer-related factors associated with poor QOL. Results: Survivors were more likely to report fair/poor general health than controls (relative risk=1.92; 95% confidence interval: 1.77–2.10; p<0.001). QOL limitations existed by gender and race/ethnicity for survivors. Approximately 30% of survivors currently in their 40s, 50s, and early 60s were in poor health, compared to less than 20% of same-aged controls (both p<0.001). Of survivors with two or more cancers, 41.0% reported poor health, compared to 26.2% with one cancer (p<0.001). Conclusion: AYA cancer survivors have worse QOL compared to the general population and these limitations persist across gender, race/ethnicity, and age. Targeted interventions are essential for improving AYA cancer survivors' health status. PMID:24940530

  3. Nursing care for adolescents and young adults with cancer: literature review.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Juliet; Schwartz-Attias, Irit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients belonging to the adolescent and young adult (AYA) age group have unique and very specific needs, which require special attention from the caring staff. The difficulty in maintaining the personal and professional development at this age is both natural and normal. Adding to this, coping with a life-threatening disease turns this stage in life into a period with many dilemmas and challenges of quite a complex nature. AYA patients have to deal with issues above and beyond the disease itself, which create a very complex coping picture. On top of that, prognosis for this age group has not improved in recent years, unlike the situation in other age groups like children and adults. The literature on this subject is extensive and comprehensive. However, most of the papers on this subject are very specific and narrow in their approach, each dealing with a specific topic. In this article, we bring together many different papers which make a wide and comprehensive picture of the subject of AYAs coping with cancer, coupled with recommendations for the caring staff. In this review we focus on the various aspects of the disease and treatments in AYAs, based on the conceptual model of quality of life proposed by Ferrell and colleagues [Cancer Nurs 1992;15:153-160; Cancer Nurs 1992;15:247-253], including physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects. From the psychological standpoint, most of the papers discuss the negative aspects; however, in this article we try to include some articles from the positive psychology school of thought. From our findings it is apparent that there is an opportunity and need to further explore research in this regard. It is apparent that taking a unique approach to AYA cancer patients is needed in order to deal with the unique needs of this age group. This article aims at putting a framework around this issue, with actionable recommendations for the caring staff.

  4. The importance of assessing priorities of reproductive health concerns among adolescent and young adult patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Devin; Klosky, James L; Reed, Damon R; Termuhlen, Amanda M; Shannon, Susan V; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-08-01

    Visions for the future are a normal developmental process for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with and without cancer, and these visions often include expectations of sexual and romantic relationships. AYA cancer survivors indicate reproductive health is an issue of great importance and more attention is needed in the health care setting throughout the cancer experience, beginning at diagnosis. Various practice guidelines are predominately focused on fertility; are intended to influence survivorship care plans; and do not encompass the broad scope of reproductive health that includes romantic partnering, friendships, body image, sexuality, sexual identity, fertility, contraception, and more. Although interventions to reduce reproductive health-related sequelae from treatment are best approached as an evolving process, practitioners are not certain of the priorities of these various reproductive health content areas. Strategies incongruent with the reproductive health priorities of AYAs will likely thwart adequate follow-up care and foster feelings of isolation from the treatment team. Research is needed to identify these priorities and ensure discussions of diverse content areas. This review explored various domains of reproductive health and emphasized how understanding the priorities of the AYA cancer cohort will guide future models of care.

  5. Delay in surgical treatment and survival after breast cancer diagnosis in young women by race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erlyn C; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer in women between the ages of 15 and 39 years (adolescents and young adults [AYAs]) constitutes 5% to 6% of all breast cancer cases in the United States. Breast cancer in AYA women has a worse prognosis than in older women. Five-year survival rates are lowest for AYA women, and only a few studies have examined the impact of delay in treatment, race/ethnicity, and other socioeconomic factors on survival in AYA women. To examine the impact of treatment delay time (TDT), race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, insurance status, cancer stage, and age on the survival from breast cancer among AYA women. This is a retrospective case-only study of 8860 AYA breast cancer cases diagnosed from 1997 to 2006 using the California Cancer Registry database. Treatment delay time was defined as the number of weeks between the date of diagnosis and date of definitive treatment. Kaplan-Meier estimation was used to generate survival curves, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was performed to assess the association of TDT with survival while accounting for covariates (age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, insurance status, cancer stage [American Joint Committee on Cancer], tumor markers, and treatment). Five-year survival rates for breast cancer as influenced by host factors, tumor factors, and TDT. Treatment delay time more than 6 weeks after diagnosis was significantly different (P < .001) between racial/ethnic groups (Hispanic, 15.3% and African American, 15.3% compared with non-Hispanic white, 8.1%). Women with public or no insurance (17.8%) compared with those with private insurance (9.5%) and women with low socioeconomic status (17.5%) compared with those with high socioeconomic status (7.7%) were shown to have TDT more than 6 weeks. The 5-year survival in women who were treated by surgery and had TDT more than 6 weeks was 80% compared with 90% (P = .005) in those with TDT less than 2 weeks. In multivariate analysis, longer TDT, estrogen

  6. Spiritual well-being and spiritual distress predict adjustment in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Park, Crystal L; Cho, Dalnim

    2017-09-01

    Spirituality is related to many aspects of cancer survivors' physical and psychological adjustment. Given their unique developmental issues, spiritual issues may be especially important to adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors, yet little research has been conducted on spirituality with AYA survivors. The present study examines how two aspects of spirituality, spiritual well-being (comprising faith and meaning/peace), and spiritual struggle relate to later post-cancer adjustment. At Time 1 (T1), 120 AYA survivors completed questionnaires on spirituality and adjustment (fear of recurrence, post-traumatic stress symptoms, perceived post-traumatic growth, psychological distress, and health-related quality of life). Eighty-three of these participants also completed these questionnaires at Time 2 (T2), one year later. Our sample reported fairly low spiritual well-being (meaning/peace, faith) and spiritual struggle. As expected, T1 spiritual well-being was positively correlated with some aspects of psychological adjustment at T2, whereas T1 spiritual struggle was inversely correlated with T2 psychological adjustment. Both dimensions of T1 spiritual well-being, but not struggle, were positively associated with perceived T2 posttraumatic growth. In general, T1 spiritual well-being and struggle correlated with T2 psychological adjustment even when demographics and cancer-related variables were controlled. These results suggest that while spirituality is not important to all AYA survivors, both spiritual well-being and struggle have important associations with adjustment and may warrant clinical attention. Future research is needed to more fully understand the role of spirituality in AYA survivors' adjustment in more depth. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Quantifying treatment delays in adolescents and young adults with cancer at McGill University

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Stavrides-Eid, M.; Baig, A.; Cardoso, M.; Rho, Y.S.; Shams, W.M.; Mamo, A.; Kavan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since the end of the 1980s, the magnitude of survival prolongation or mortality reduction has not been the same for adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer as for their older and younger counterparts. Precise reasons for those observations are unknown, but the differences have been attributed in part to delays in diagnosis and treatment. In 2003 at the Jewish General Hospital, we developed the first Canadian multidisciplinary aya oncology clinic to better serve this unique patient population. The aim of the present study was to develop an approach to quantify diagnosis delays in our aya patients and to study survival in relation to the observed delay. Methods: In a retrospective chart review, we collected information about delays, treatment efficacy, and obstacles to treatment for patients seen at our aya clinic. Results: From symptom onset, median time to first health care contact was longer for girls and young women (62 days) than for boys and young men (6 days). Median time from symptom onset to treatment was 173 days; time from first health care contact to diagnosis was the largest contributor to that duration. Delays in diagnosis were shorter for patients who initially presented to the emergency room, but compared with patients whose first health contact was of another type, patients presenting to the emergency room were 3 times more likely to die from their disease. Conclusions: Delays in diagnosis are frequently reported in ayas with cancer, but the duration of the delay was unrelated to survival in our sample. Application of this approach to larger prospective samples is warranted to better understand the relation between treatment delay and survival in ayas—and in other cancer patient groups. PMID:26715885

  8. Prevalence and predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms in adolescent and young adult cancer survivors: a 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minyoung; Zebrack, Brad J; Meeske, Kathleen A; Embry, Leanne; Aguilar, Christine; Block, Rebecca; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Li, Yun; Butler, Melissa; Cole, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) have been identified as a meaningful indicator of distress in cancer survivors. Distinct from young adult survivors of childhood cancer, young people diagnosed with cancer as adolescents and young adults (AYAs) face unique psychosocial issues; however, there is little published research of PTSS in the AYA population. This study examines prevalence and predictors of PTSS among AYAs with cancer. As part of a longitudinal study of AYAs with cancer, 151 patients aged 15-39 years completed mailed surveys at 6 and 12 months post-diagnosis. Severity of PTSS was estimated at 6 and 12 months post-diagnosis. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to investigate the predictive effects of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics on changes in PTSS over time. At 6 and 12 months, respectively, 39% and 44% of participants reported moderate to severe levels of PTSS; 29% had PTSS levels suggestive of post-traumatic stress disorder. No significant differences in severity of PTSS between 6 and 12 months were observed. Regression analyses suggested that a greater number of side effects were associated with higher levels of PTSS at 6 months. Currently receiving treatment, having surgical treatment, diagnosis of a cancer type with a 90-100% survival rate, remaining unemployed/not in school, and greater PTSS at 6 months were associated with higher levels of PTSS at 12 months. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were observed as early as 6 months following diagnosis and remained stable at 12-month follow-up. The development of early interventions for reducing distress among AYA patients in treatment is recommended. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The Associations of Age and Ethnicity on Substance Use Behaviors of Adolescent and Young Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Maritza E; Sender, Leonard; Torno, Lilibeth; Fortier, Michelle A

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between age and ethnicity on the development of substance use behaviors among Hispanic and non-Hispanic White (NHW) adolescent and young adult (AYA) childhood cancer survivors. Participants were recruited from a single institution through the CHOC Children's Hospital Cancer Registry and included 55 Hispanic and 61 NHW AYA childhood cancer survivors, ages 12 to 33 years (Mean age ± SD: 19 ± 4.2). Smoking, alcohol, and drug use were measured using the Child Health Illness Profile - Adolescent Edition. Hispanic AYA survivors were less likely to be medically insured and reported lower household income than their NHW counterparts (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). After controlling for socioeconomic differences and gender, age and ethnicity were significant predictors of substance use among AYA survivors. Hispanic survivors reported less lifetime use of cigarette smoking compared with NHW survivors (OR 0.17, 95% CI, 0.03-0.80). Older age, for both Hispanic and NHW survivors, was found to be a risk factor for lifetime substance use and current alcohol/hard liquor consumption and binge drinking (P < 0.05). Young adult childhood cancer survivors and NHW survivors are at greatest risk for developing substance use behaviors. The frequency of substance use among AYA survivors appears to increase as they transition into adulthood. These findings emphasize the need to improve long-term health behavior screening and develop effective interventions on reducing substance use behaviors in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Symptoms and Symptom Clusters Identified by Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer Using a Symptom Heuristics App.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne M; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Stegenga, Kristin; Linder, Lauri A

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience multiple distressing symptoms during treatment. Because the typical approach to symptom assessment does not easily reflect the symptom experience of individuals, alternative approaches to enhancing communication between the patient and provider are needed. We developed an iPad-based application that uses a heuristic approach to explore AYAs' cancer symptom experiences. In this mixed-methods descriptive study, 72 AYAs (13-29 years old) with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy used the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) to create images of the symptoms and symptom clusters they experienced from a list of 30 symptoms. They answered open-ended questions within the C-SCAT about the causes of their symptoms and symptom clusters. The images generated through the C-SCAT and accompanying free-text data were analyzed using descriptive, content, and visual analyses. Most participants (n = 70) reported multiple symptoms (M = 8.14). The most frequently reported symptoms were nausea (65.3%), feeling drowsy (55.6%), lack of appetite (55.6%), and lack of energy (55.6%). Forty-six grouped their symptoms into one or more clusters. The most common symptom cluster was nausea/eating problems/appetite problems. Nausea was most frequently named as the priority symptom in a cluster and as a cause of other symptoms. Although common threads were present in the symptoms experienced by AYAs, the graphic images revealed unique perspectives and a range of complexity of symptom relationships, clusters, and causes. Results highlight the need for a tailored approach to symptom management based on how the AYA with cancer perceives his or her symptom experience.

  11. Nursing young people with cancer: What is "different" about it?

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sue; Soanes, Louise

    2016-12-01

    Nursing Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with cancer is a relatively new specialty, with much work having been undertaken across Europe. As this evolving specialty develops, nurses are required to develop networks, learn from each other and help to shape services across countries. Describing the cancer journey, this paper looks at the literature and, merging it with over 20years of experience, describes 'what is different' about looking after this group of young people. Looking at the specific issues about caring for AYA, including those issues that are pertinent in this age range: i.e. education/employment, fertility, body image, peers, family relationships, it discusses the development of specific services for this cohort of patients; one that is centred around the young person and their friends and families. Taking into account the need to develop multidisciplinary teams, it also highlights the needs of nurses who work in these teams, the education, skills and attributes needed to develop gold standard services for these challenging young people. The further development of nursing networks internationally is urged in order to share practice and expertise, nurture teams and bring the AYA with cancer into sharp focus.

  12. Perceptions of masculinity and self-image in adolescent and young adult testicular cancer survivors: implications for romantic and sexual relationships.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Melissa Y; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Ott, Mary A; Brames, Mary J; Einhorn, Lawrence H

    2011-07-01

    To examine adolescent and young adult (AYA) testicular cancer survivors' subjective understanding of the impact of cancer in adolescence and young adulthood, with a particular emphasis on romantic and sexual relationships. Twenty-one AYA testicular cancer survivors, aged 18 to 34 years, were recruited from outpatient testicular cancer follow-up clinics and completed a semi-structured qualitative interview that assessed the impact of testicular cancer on their romantic and sexual relationships. Four themes were identified that reflected survivors' understanding of the impact of cancer in adolescence and young adulthood: (1) embarrassment leads to delays in care-seeking, (2) testicular cancer makes you feel different from others, (3) being different from others makes you damaged goods, and (4) cancer disclosure is difficult. As these themes represent important components of being in a romantic/sexual relationship, either currently or in the future, AYA testicular cancer survivors would benefit from the development of tailored interventions focused on improving these relevant domains. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Perceptions of Masculinity and Self-Image in Adolescent and Young Adult Testicular Cancer Survivors: Implications for Romantic and Sexual Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Melissa Y.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Ott, Mary A.; Brames, Mary J.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine adolescent and young adult (AYA) testicular cancer survivors’ subjective understanding of the impact of cancer in adolescence and young adulthood, with a particular emphasis on romantic and sexual relationships. Methods Twenty-one AYA testicular cancer survivors, aged 18 to 34 years, were recruited from outpatient testicular cancer follow-up clinics and completed a semi-structured qualitative interview that assessed the impact of testicular cancer on their romantic and sexual relationships. Results Four themes were identified that reflected survivors’ understanding of the impact of cancer in adolescence and young adulthood: (1) embarrassment leads to delays in care-seeking, (2) testicular cancer makes you feel different from others, (3) being different from others makes you damaged goods, and (4) cancer disclosure is difficult. Conclusions As these themes represent important components of being in a romantic/sexual relationship, either currently or in the future, AYA testicular cancer survivors would benefit from the development of tailored interventions focused on improving these relevant domains. PMID:20878864

  14. Fertility Issues in Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Catherine; Shuk, Elyse

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Many adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors place great importance on fertility. This study explored AYAs' discussions of fertility in the context of discussing their survivorship experiences. Methods: Secondary analyses of a qualitative study of young adult survivors of adolescent cancers (“AYA survivors”) was performed using semistructured individual interviews and focus groups. Analyses were conducted using grounded theory using thematic content analysis with an inductive data-driven approach. Results: Participants (n = 43) were 16–24 years old, diagnosed with cancer between ages 14 and 18 years, and were at least 6 months post-treatment. Before treatment, 5 males banked sperm and no females preserved fertility. More males (50%) than females (39%) reported uncertainty about their fertility. Three major categories emerged from the data: fertility concerns, emotions raised when discussing fertility, and strategies used to manage fertility concerns. Fertility concerns focused on dating/partner reactions, health risks, and what potential infertility would mean for their life narrative. Emotions included distress, feeling overwhelmed and hopeful/wishful thinking. Females were more likely to feel distressed and overwhelmed than males. Strategies to manage concerns included acceptance/“making do,” desire to postpone concerns, and reliance on assisted reproductive technology. Conclusions: Most AYAs in our study reported a number of reproductive concerns and fertility-related distress after treatment, which may affect other areas of psychosocial functioning. Females may be more at-risk for distress than males, particularly in situations of uncertainty and limited knowledge. Future work should explore how to best incorporate fertility-related informational and support services more fully into survivorship care. Implications for survivorship care are discussed. PMID:26812452

  15. Treatment of cancer in adolescents and young adults: is affordability a concern?

    PubMed

    Gafni, Amiram

    2011-05-15

    Progress in the treatment of cancers in young people has resulted in an increasing success rate in curing the different forms of malignant diseases. The mission of the CPAC/C(17) Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with cancer is to ensure prompt, equitable access to the best care; establish research priorities to optimize health outcomes and health-related quality of life; and mitigate current disparities of care through advances in treatment, education, and research. Although these goals are important, the mission statement seems to ignore an important factor: "affordability," or the ability to achieve these goals due to scarcity of resources. In this article, the role of economics in helping decision makers decide on resource allocation is discussed. Also described is the economic basis for the healthcare problem; the inability of the current methodology of cost-effectiveness to provide information that can help improve resource allocation in health; and how economics should be used to promote efficient use of healthcare resources. The author argued that "affordability" should be recognized in the mission statement. Recognizing "affordability" means recognizing the need to justify the transfer (or allocation) of additional resources to AYA cancer, which requires demonstration that the value of what is gained from the use of these resources in AYA cancer exceeds the value of what is forgone by using them elsewhere. This will also require making explicit the values or equity criteria to which society subscribes. © 2011 American Cancer Society

  16. Promoting the Shared-Care Model for Adolescent and Young Adults With Cancer: Optimizing Referrals and Care Coordination With Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, Karen E; Kircher, Sheetal; Altman, Jessica; Rademaker, Alfred; Salsman, John M; Didwania, Aarati; O'Brien, Bridget; Patel, Alpa C; Sanford, Stacy D

    2017-01-01

    The "shared-care model" for patients with cancer involves care coordination between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncologists, with the goal of optimizing survivorship care. However, a high proportion of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors do not have a PCP. Study objectives were to increase the percentage of AYAs with a PCP documented in the electronic medical record (EMR) via the use of a best practice advisory (BPA) or "stopgap" intervention; to increase communication between providers by the number of routed clinic notes; and to assess oncology providers' attitudes/beliefs about the model and intervention. Data were collected for the 6 months before implementation of the BPA to determine the percentage of AYAs with a PCP and the number of notes routed to providers (time point 1 [T1]). The same data were collected at time point 2 (T2) after the BPA had been implemented for 6 months. Oncology providers participated in an education video module and an online survey at T1 and a survey at T2. At T1, 47.1% of 756 AYAs had a documented PCP in the EMR. At T2, the percentage increased to 55.1% (P<.002). The number of routed notes did not change significantly from T1 to T2. Providers that completed the intervention survey agreed/strongly agreed that the shared-care model is a desirable model of care (T1 = 86%; T2 = 93%) and that a BPA is useful for facilitating PCP referrals (T1 = 76%; T2 = 39%). This BPA is feasible for increasing the percentage of AYAs with a PCP documented in the EMR and could potentially lead to increased PCP referral and communication among providers for the benefit of long-term survivorship care. Providers generally agree with the shared-care model; however, the BPA implementation requires modification. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  17. Insurance status and distant-stage disease at diagnosis among adolescent and young adult patients with cancer aged 15 to 39 years: National Cancer Data Base, 2004 through 2010.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Anthony S; Lerro, Catherine C; Barr, Ronald D

    2014-04-15

    The percentage of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer (those aged 15-39 years) diagnosed at a distant stage of disease did not significantly change between 1975 and 2004. It has been hypothesized that a lack of health insurance may be a significant risk factor for a diagnosis of distant-stage disease among AYA patients, but to the authors' knowledge this has not been examined in a national sample. The National Cancer Data Base, a hospital-based cancer registry, was used to obtain data regarding incident cancer cases among patients aged 15 years to 39 years who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2010. After all exclusions, a total of 285,448 cases were available for analysis; all AYA cancer sites were included. A retrospective study was conducted to assess the association between insurance status and stage of disease at diagnosis. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, facility type, ZIP code-based income and education levels, and US Census region, it was found that among males, uninsured patients were 1.51 times more likely to be diagnosed at a distant stage of disease compared with patients with private insurance (95% confidence interval, 1.46-1.55). Among females, the effect of insurance was stronger, with uninsured patients found to be 1.86 times more likely to be diagnosed at a distant stage (95% confidence interval, 1.79-1.94). The effect of insurance status was substantially stronger for malignancies that are more amenable to early detection (melanoma, thyroid carcinoma, breast carcinoma, genitourinary carcinoma), and substantially weaker for those that are less amenable to early detection (lung carcinoma, adrenocortical carcinoma, Wilms tumor). In a large national sample of AYA patients with cancer, insurance status was found to be a strong independent risk factor for distant-stage disease at the time of diagnosis. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  18. Disparities in location of death of adolescents and young adults with cancer: A longitudinal, population study in California.

    PubMed

    Rajeshuni, Nitya; Johnston, Emily E; Saynina, Olga; Sanders, Lee M; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-07-12

    Patients with a terminal illness should have access to their chosen location of death. Cancer is the leading cause of non-accidental death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs; those aged 15-39 years). Although surveys have suggested that a majority of these patients prefer a home death, to the authors' knowledge, little is known regarding their barriers to accessing their preferred location of death. As a first step, the authors sought to determine, across a large population, 20-year trends in the location of death among AYA patients with cancer. Using the Vital Statistics Death Certificate Database of the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the authors performed a retrospective, population-based analysis of California patients with cancer aged 15 to 39 years who died between 1989 and 2011. Sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with hospital death were examined using multivariable logistic regression. Of 30,573 AYA oncology decedents, 57% died in a hospital, 33% died at home, and 10% died in other locations (eg, hospice facility or nursing facility). Between 1989 and 1994, hospital death rates decreased from 68.3% to 53.6% and at-home death rates increased from 16.8% to 35.5%. Between 1995 and 2011, these rates were stable. Those individuals who were more likely to die in a hospital were those aged <30 years, of minority race, of Hispanic ethnicity, who lived ≤10 miles from a specialty center, and who had a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma. Overall, the majority of AYA cancer deaths occurred in a hospital, with a 5-year shift to more in-home deaths that abated after 1995. In-hospital deaths were more common among younger patients, patients of minority race/ethnicities, and those with a leukemia or lymphoma diagnosis. Further study is needed to determine whether these rates and disparities are consistent with patient preferences. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Body Image Discomfort of Adolescent and Young Adult Hematologic Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Zucchetti, Giulia; Bellini, Simona; Bertolotti, Marina; Bona, Francesca; Biasin, Eleonora; Bertorello, Nicoletta; Tirtei, Elisa; Fagioli, Franca

    2017-01-23

    This study focuses on body image discomfort (BID) of 50 adolescent and young adult (AYA) hematologic cancer survivors (age range 15-23; 52% males). The study results were obtained through data from a self-report questionnaire: the Body Uneasiness Test. Findings differed according to gender: a greater proportion of females were in the Risk category of impaired body image than males (χ(2) = 5.258, p < 0.05). No significant body image differences were found according to the type of diagnosis or to the length of survival. To manage survivors' BIDs and to improve their quality of life, assessing BID in AYA cancer survivors is important for identifying those who might be in need of additional supportive care or a program.

  20. Empowerment in adolescents and young adults with cancer: Relationship with health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Kaal, Suzanne E J; Husson, Olga; van Duivenboden, Saskia; Jansen, Rosemarie; Manten-Horst, Eveliene; Servaes, Petra; Prins, Judith B; van den Berg, Sanne W; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2017-10-15

    The difficulties adolescents and young adults (AYAs) encounter during a cancer experience may result in a reduction in or absence of empowerment. The aims of the current study were to assess levels of empowerment and associated (demographic, clinical, or psychological) factors and examine the association between empowerment and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among AYA patients with cancer. Patients aged 18 to 35 years at time of cancer diagnosis and who were seen by 1 of the members of the specialized multidisciplinary AYA team of the Radboud University Medical Center were invited to complete questionnaires regarding empowerment; HRQOL; and sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics (autonomy, coping, unmet social support needs, and psychological distress). A total of 83 AYA patients completed the questionnaires. The mean age of the participants at the time of diagnosis was 27.5 years. The vast majority had been treated with chemotherapy (86%), had a more advanced stage of disease, and had completed treatment at the time of participation (74%). The mean empowerment level was 154.1 (standard deviation, 17.8) with a range of 114 to 200. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the autonomy subscales of self-awareness (β = .35), capacity for managing new situations (β = .19), and social support (β = .35) were found to be positively associated with empowerment. Coping difficulties (β = -.19) were found to be negatively associated with empowerment. Empowerment was independently associated with physical (β = .31), psychological (β = .50), social (β = .39), religious (β = .33), and total HRQOL (β = .52; all P<.01). Low levels of empowerment were associated with low levels of autonomy and social support, female sex, and coping difficulties among AYA patients with cancer. Recognizing these patients as candidates for empowerment interventions ultimately could help to improve HRQOL in late adolescence and young adulthood. Cancer 2017

  1. Adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes following treatment of adolescent and young adult cancer: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Haggar, Fatima A; Pereira, Gavin; Preen, David; Holman, C D'Arcy; Einarsdottir, Kristjana

    2014-01-01

    To investigate obstetric and perinatal outcomes among female survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancers and their offspring. Using multivariate analysis of statewide linked data, outcomes of all first completed pregnancies (n = 1894) in female survivors of AYA cancer diagnosed in Western Australia during the period 1982-2007 were compared with those among females with no cancer history. Comparison pregnancies were matched by maternal age-group, parity and year of delivery. Compared with the non-cancer group, female survivors of AYA cancer had an increased risk of threatened abortion (adjusted relative risk 2.09, 95% confidence interval 1.51-2.74), gestational diabetes (2.65, 2.08-3.57), pre-eclampsia (1.32, 1.04-1.87), post-partum hemorrhage (2.83, 1.92-4.67), cesarean delivery (2.62, 2.22-3.04), and maternal postpartum hospitalization>5 days (3.01, 1.72-5.58), but no excess risk of threatened preterm delivery, antepartum hemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes, failure of labor to progress or retained placenta. Their offspring had an increased risk of premature birth (<37 weeks: 1.68, 1.21-2.08), low birth weight (<2500 g: 1.51, 1.23-2.12), fetal growth restriction (3.27, 2.45-4.56), and neonatal distress indicated by low Apgar score (<7) at 1 minute (2.83, 2.28-3.56), need for resuscitation (1.66, 1.27-2.19) or special care nursery admission (1.44, 1.13-1.78). Congenital abnormalities and perinatal deaths (intrauterine or ≤7 days of birth) were not increased among offspring of survivors. Female survivors of AYA cancer have moderate excess risks of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes arising from subsequent pregnancies that may require additional surveillance or intervention.

  2. Post-Traumatic Growth and Resilience in Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Greup, Suzanne R; Kaal, Suzanne E J; Jansen, Rosemarie; Manten-Horst, Eveliene; Thong, Melissa S Y; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Prins, Judith B; Husson, Olga

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the literature on post-traumatic growth (PTG) and resilience among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. A literature search in Embase, PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Cinahl was carried out. Thirteen articles met the pre-defined inclusion criteria. Qualitative interview studies showed that AYA cancer patients report PTG and resilience: PTG is described by AYA cancer patients in terms of benefit finding, including changing view of life and feeling stronger and more confident, whereas resilience is described as a balance of several factors, including stress and coping, goals, optimism, finding meaning, connection, and belonging. Quantitative studies showed that sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were not associated with PTG. Enduring stress was negatively, and social support positively, associated with PTG. Symptom distress and defensive coping were negatively and adaptive cognitive coping was positively associated with resilience. Both PTG and resilience were positively associated with satisfaction with life and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Resilience was found to be a mediator in the relationship between symptom distress and HRQoL. Two interventions aiming to promote resilience, a stress management and a therapeutic music video-intervention, were not successful in significantly increasing overall resilience. Most AYA cancer patients report at least some PTG or resilience. Correlates of PTG and resilience, including symptom distress, stress, coping, social support, and physical activity, provide further insight to improve the effectiveness of interventions aimed at promoting these positive outcomes and potentially buffer negative outcomes.

  3. Initial Evaluation of an Electronic Symptom Diary for Adolescents with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Faith; Coll, Beatriz; Kletter, Richard; Zeltzer, Paul; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background The delivery of optimal care depends on accurate communication between patients and clinicians regarding untoward symptoms. Documentation of patients’ symptoms necessitates reliance on memory, which is often imprecise. We developed an electronic diary (eDiary) for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer to record symptoms. Objective The purpose of this paper is to describe the utility of an eDiary designed for AYAs with cancer, including dependability of the mobile application, the reasons for any missing recorded data, patients’ adherence rates to daily symptom queries, and patients’ perceptions of the usefulness and acceptability of symptom data collection via mobile phones. Methods Our team developed an electronic symptom diary based on interviews conducted with AYAs with cancer and their clinicians. This diary included daily severity ratings of pain, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and sleep. The occurrence of other selected physical sequelae was assessed daily. Additionally, patients selected descriptors of their mood. A 3-week trial of the eDiary was conducted with 10 AYA cancer patients. Mobile phones with service plans were loaned to patients who were instructed to report their symptoms daily. Patients completed a brief questionnaire and were interviewed to elicit their perceptions of the eDiary and any technical difficulties encountered. Results Overall adherence to daily symptom reports exceeded 90%. Young people experienced few technical difficulties and reported benefit from daily symptom reports. Symptom occurrence rates were high and considerable inter- and intra-patient variability was noted in symptom and mood reports. Conclusions We demonstrated the utility of an eDiary that may contribute insight into patients’ symptom patterns to promote effective symptom management. PMID:23612521

  4. Methylnaltrexone for Opioid-Induced Constipation in Children and Adolescents and Young Adults with Progressive Incurable Cancer at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Flerlage, Jamie E; Baker, Justin N

    2015-07-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is common among children and adolescents and young adults (AYA) with progressive incurable cancer. Although methylnaltrexone is a successful treatment for OIC in adult cancer patients, no case series has established its safety and efficacy in pediatric cancer patients. The aim of the study was to describe the safety and efficacy of methylnaltrexone use for OIC in children and AYA with progressive incurable cancer at the end of life in the inpatient and outpatient settings. We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of children and AYA with progressive incurable cancer who received methylnaltrexone at our institution from May 2008 to June 2013. Pharmacy data were reviewed for each patient and a chart review was performed for documentation of laxation and side effects. Of the 9 patients (age range: 17 months to 21 years) with progressive incurable cancer who developed OIC, 7 (78%) had laxation after methylnaltrexone administration (0.15 mg/kg/dose). Of these 7 patients, 5 (71%) had laxation with the first dose, and 5 (71%) who responded had a continued response to repeated doses. The longest a patient regularly received methylnaltrexone was 9 months. Of 5 patients with intraabdominal disease, 4 (80%) had laxation. There were no negative side effects in any of the patients. Also, there was no increase in pain either qualitatively or by pain score. Methylnaltrexone appears to be safe and efficacious in treating OIC in children and AYA with progressive incurable cancer. Methylnaltrexone was tolerated in both the inpatient and outpatient settings and with repeated dosing.

  5. Kids, Adolescents, and Young Adult Cancer Study—A Methodologic Approach in Cancer Epidemiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Link, Nancy J.; Maurer, Eva; Largent, Joan; Kent, Erin; Morris, Rebecca A.; Sender, Leonard S.; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2009-01-01

    Advances have been made in treatment and outcomes for pediatric cancer. However adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer have not experienced similar relative improvements. We undertook a study to develop the methodology necessary for epidemiologic cancer research in these age groups. Our goal was to create the Kids, Adolescents, and Young Adults Cancer (KAYAC) project to create a resource to address research questions relevant to this population. We used a combination of clinic and population-based ascertainment to enroll 111 cases aged 0–39 for this methodology development study. The largest groups of cancer types enrolled include: breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, and melanoma. The overall participation rate is 69.8% and varies by age and tumor type. The study included patients, mothers, and fathers. The methods used to establish this resource are described, and the values of the resource in studies of childhood and young adult cancer are outlined. PMID:20445801

  6. Adolescents and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Impact of Care at Specialized Cancer Centers on Survival Outcome.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Julie; Sun, Can-Lan; Wyatt, Laura; Stock, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita

    2017-03-01

    Background: Adolescents and young adults (AYA; 15-39 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) experience inferior survival when compared with children. Impact of care at NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCC) or Children's Oncology Group sites (COG) on survival disparities remains unstudied.Methods: Using the Los Angeles cancer registry, we identified 1,870 ALL or AML patients between 1 and 39 years at diagnosis. Cox regression analyses assessed risk of mortality; younger age + CCC/COG served as the referent group. Logistic regression was used to determine odds of care at CCC/COG, adjusting for variables above.Results: ALL outcome: AYAs at non-CCC/COG experienced inferior survival (15-21 years: HR = 1.9, P = 0.005; 22-29 years: HR = 2.6, P < 0.001; 30-39 years: HR = 3.0, P < 0.001). Outcome at CCC/COG was comparable between children and young AYAs (15-21 years: HR = 1.3, P = 0.3; 22-29 years: HR = 1.2, P = 0.2) but was inferior for 30- to 39-year-olds (HR = 3.4, P < 0.001). AML outcome: AYAs at non-CCC/COG experienced inferior outcome (15-21 years: HR = 1.8, P = 0.02; 22-39 years: HR = 1.4, P = 0.06). Outcome at CCC/COG was comparable between children and 15- to 21-year-olds (HR = 1.3, P = 0.4) but was inferior for 22- to 39-year-olds (HR = 1.7, P = 0.05). Access: 15- to 21-year-olds were less likely to use CCC/COG than children (P < 0.001). In 22- to 39-year-olds, public/uninsured (ALL: P = 0.004; AML<0.001), African American/Hispanics (ALL: P = 0.03), and 30- to 39-year-olds (ALL: P = 0.03) were less likely to use CCC/COG.Conclusions: Poor survival in AYAs with ALL and AML is mitigated by care at CCC/COG. Barriers to CCC/COG care include public/uninsured, and African American/Hispanic race/ethnicity.Impact: Care at CCC/COG explains, in part, inferior outcomes in AYAs with ALL and AML. Key sociodemographic factors serve as barriers to care at specialized centers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 312-20.

  7. Attitudes Toward Cancer Clinical Trial Participation in Young Adults with a History of Cancer and a Healthy College Student Sample: A Preliminary Investigation.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, Timothy J; Kent, Erin E; Montoya, Michael J; Sender, Leonard S; Morris, Rebecca A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) aged 15-39 at diagnosis have very low cancer clinical trial accrual rates. To date, no studies have examined attitudes toward clinical trial participation in this age range to determine if certain individuals are less likely to enroll if offered participation. The current study assessed attitudes toward participation using the Cancer Treatment Subscale of the Attitudes toward Cancer Trials Scales. Methods: Data were collected from a sample of leukemia and lymphoma survivors (n=99) and a healthy college student sample (n=397). Following a principal components analysis, two subscales-Personal Barriers/Safety and Personal Benefits-were retained for analysis. Results: In the cancer survivor group, only 14 (13.3%) reported being offered participation in a cancer clinical trial, and only 8 of those 14 (7.6% of survivors) participated. Responses from leukemia and lymphoma survivors revealed no significant relationships between age, gender, race/ethnicity, clinical trial participation, insurance status, or social class with Personal Benefits or Personal Barriers/Safety. Healthy college females had more negative Personal Barriers/Safety attitudes compared to males after adjusting for race/ethnicity and social class (p=0.01), but no associations were present when examining Personal Benefits as an outcome. Conclusion: This preliminary investigation suggests that drivers of attitudes toward clinical trial participation in AYAs are not well understood and may impact cancer trial participation. Future work should focus on defining attitudes toward cancer clinical trials in the AYA population and developing interventions to increase awareness, knowledge, and positive attitudes toward participating in cancer research.

  8. Cancer in adolescents and young adults, Kingston and St Andrew, Jamaica, 1988-2007.

    PubMed

    Gibson, T N; Hanchard, B; Waugh, N; McNaughton, D

    2013-01-01

    To determine the distribution of malignancies in adolescents and young adults (AYA; 15 to 29 years) in Jamaica. All cases of malignancies diagnosed in AYA in the period 1988-2007, were extracted from the files of the Jamaica Cancer Registry. For each case, age, gender and diagnosis were recorded and the diagnoses categorized according to the recently proposed diagnostic groups for cancers in AYA. The data were used to calculate incidence rates and relative frequencies. Among males, the age-specific incidence rate for the oldest age group (25-29 years) was higher than that recorded for each of the younger groups. In females, there was a progressive increase in incidence with increasing age. The age-standardized rates (ASRs) per million were 131.4 (males) and 226.1 (females). In males, the highest ASRs (per million) were those for lymphoma (34.7), carcinoma (29.3) and soft tissue sarcoma (17.2), and in females, carcinoma (121.6), lymphoma (31.4) and germ cell and trophoblastic neoplasms (14.6). Lymphoma was the commonest diagnosis in younger males, and ranked second to carcinoma in the oldest. Carcinoma and lymphoma were the commonest and second commonest diagnoses, respectively, among all three age groups in females, with carcinomas accounting for progressively greater proportions of tumours with increasing age. The incidence of malignancy in AYA in Jamaica is higher in females than in males. In both genders, increasing age is accompanied by increasing incidence and a shift from non-epithelial to epithelial malignancies. This shift occurs at an earlier age in females.

  9. The reality of hospitalisation: stories from family members of their hospital experience for adolescents and young adults living with and dying from cancer.

    PubMed

    Barling, Janet A; Stevens, John A; Davies, Kierrynn M

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and Young Adults (AYAs) with cancer are being disadvantaged within the present health care system. Some of the factors identified as leading to this disadvantage include medical issues specific to AYAs with cancer, delay in diagnosis, fragmented services, lack of access to clinical trials and psychosocial life stage issues. A major study investigated the experience that accompanies the stages of diagnosis, treatment, dying and death of an AYA from the perspective of family members. This paper discusses the major theme of the reality of hospitalisation. Narrative inquiry was the methodology for this study. The participants were a self-selected purposeful sample of 26 family members. Open-ended interviews were conducted to obtain a story of the experience of having an AYA family member live with and die of cancer. A meta-narrative of the family member's experience was developed by NVivo8. In amongst the mass of data this study produced, a major theme to emerge was the experience 'of the reality of hospitalisation'. Within this theme issues regarding: The place of treatment; the hospital experience; not fitting in; and, confronting illness and death were revealed. While on the whole the cancer was treated with state of the art medicine, the experiences of the hospitalisation repeated consistently throughout this narrative reveals a failure to meet the higher order needs specific to adolescents and young adults and their families As a result this cohort were exposed to a landscape which did not facilitate a therapeutic experience, as well as would be expected for children and older adults.

  10. Feasibility and acceptability of an iPad application to explore symptom clusters in adolescents and young adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Linder, Lauri A; Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne; Stegenga, Kristin; Woods, Nancy F

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a computer-based symptom cluster heuristics tool designed to explore symptom clusters experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. The Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) is a newly developed iPad application, which combines graphical images and free text responses in an innovative heuristics approach to explore symptoms and symptom clusters. Seventy-two AYAs (13-29 years of age) with cancer at five institutions across the US completed the C-SCAT 24-96 hours after the initial chemotherapy dose in a chemotherapy cycle. All participants completed the C-SCAT successfully in a mean of 25 minutes, with 74% reporting that the final image was an accurate or very accurate representation of their symptom experience. Little clarification/coaching was necessary while completing the C-SCAT. Few technical problems were encountered. Participants judged the C-SCAT questions to be clear and endorsed ease of following instructions, typing, and drawing. The C-SCAT demonstrated feasibility and acceptability. With refinement based on study results, the C-SCAT has potential to: (a) empower AYAs to communicate their symptom experience and partner with providers in their care; (b) improve symptom management and ameliorate distress; and (c) translate to use with other highly symptomatic populations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Age Conundrum: A Scoping Review of Younger Age or Adolescent and Young Adult as a Risk Factor for Clinical Distress, Depression, or Anxiety in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael J; David, Victoria; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2015-12-01

    This scoping review was conducted to understand the extent, range, and nature of current research on adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer and distress, depression, and anxiety (DDA). This information is necessary to find and aggregate valuable data on the AYA population embedded in generalized studies of DDA. Keyword searches of six relevant electronic databases identified 2156 articles, with 316 selected for abstract review and 40 for full text review. Full-text reviews and data extraction resulted in 34 studies being included, which ranged widely in design, sample size, age-range categorization, analysis methods, DDA measurement tool, overall study rigor, and quality of evidence. Studies very seldom reported using theory to guide their age categorization, with only four studies giving any rationale for their age-group definitions. All 34 studies found a significant association between at least one DDA construct and the younger age group relative to the older age groups at some point along the cancer trajectory. However, age as an independent risk factor for DDA is still unclear, as the relationship could be confounded by other age-related factors. Despite the wide range of definitions and effect sizes in the studies included in this review, one thing is clear: adolescents and young adults, however defined, are a distinct group within the cancer population with an elevated risk of DDA. Widespread adoption of a standard AYA age-range definition will be essential to any future meta-analytical psycho-oncology research in this population.

  12. The Age Conundrum: A Scoping Review of Younger Age or Adolescent and Young Adult as a Risk Factor for Clinical Distress, Depression, or Anxiety in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    David, Victoria; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2015-01-01

    This scoping review was conducted to understand the extent, range, and nature of current research on adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer and distress, depression, and anxiety (DDA). This information is necessary to find and aggregate valuable data on the AYA population embedded in generalized studies of DDA. Keyword searches of six relevant electronic databases identified 2156 articles, with 316 selected for abstract review and 40 for full text review. Full-text reviews and data extraction resulted in 34 studies being included, which ranged widely in design, sample size, age-range categorization, analysis methods, DDA measurement tool, overall study rigor, and quality of evidence. Studies very seldom reported using theory to guide their age categorization, with only four studies giving any rationale for their age-group definitions. All 34 studies found a significant association between at least one DDA construct and the younger age group relative to the older age groups at some point along the cancer trajectory. However, age as an independent risk factor for DDA is still unclear, as the relationship could be confounded by other age-related factors. Despite the wide range of definitions and effect sizes in the studies included in this review, one thing is clear: adolescents and young adults, however defined, are a distinct group within the cancer population with an elevated risk of DDA. Widespread adoption of a standard AYA age-range definition will be essential to any future meta-analytical psycho-oncology research in this population. PMID:26697266

  13. [Which approach of therapeutic education (TE) for adolescents and young adults with cancer? Experience from the TE working group of "Go-AJA"].

    PubMed

    Corradini, Nadège; Dagorne, Loïc; Retailleau, Marielle; Rédini, Françoise; Sudour-Bonnange, Hélène; Gofti-Laroche, Leila; Le Rhun, Anne; Gaspar, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic education (TE) is a practice developed over 40 years at an international level to give people with chronic illness the skills necessary to help them better manage their disease. The lengthening survival time of cancer patients as well as changes in the patient-caregiver relationship have contributed to the development of TE in oncologic diseases. Every year in France, about 1900 adolescents and young adults (15-25 years old) are diagnosed with cancer which is the second leading cause of death in this age group. The observed survival rates for these patients are lower when compared with children's. Some of the hypotheses put forward to explain this difference include a lack of constancy in care and a non-following treatment, as failure to adhere to therapies is common in this age group. "Go-AJA", an interdisciplinary national organization established in 2012, aims to improve the quality of care and treatment results for AYA living with cancer. Therapeutic education for AYA in oncology is an active working group of "Go-AJA" and intends to draw recommendations and to improve adapted communication on different education topics. Elaboration and preparation of TE programs by skilled multidisciplinary teams engaged in interactive educational actions is the first and most crucial step. The TE "Go-AJA" working group has federated pediatric and adult oncologists, nurses, psychologists, TE professionals, and resource patients, thanks to the commitment of professionals from the 8 national teams supported by the National Cancer Institute. Physical meetings and conference calls were organized from 2012 to 2015 to construct TE tools and programs for AYA with cancer. A competence referential was built and adapted to AYA population with cancer, after focused groups organized in 2 main oncology centers with on-therapy sarcoma patients and members of the multidisciplinary TE working group. Tools were validated and adapted to adolescents or young adults with cancer, to

  14. A Fitbit and Facebook mHealth intervention for promoting physical activity among adolescent and young adult childhood cancer survivors: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jason A; Baker, K Scott; Moreno, Megan A; Whitlock, Kathryn; Abbey-Lambertz, Mark; Waite, Alan; Colburn, Trina; Chow, Eric J

    2017-06-15

    Physical activity (PA) may be important for preventing chronic diseases for adolescent and young adult (AYA) childhood cancer survivors. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of PA interventions for AYA survivors are sparse, but necessary to determine effective programs for increasing PA among this population. Thus, we conducted a pilot RCT, testing the feasibility of a mobile health (mHealth) intervention to promote PA among AYA survivors. We recruited 14- to 18-year-olds who were ≥1-year post cancer therapy from Seattle Children's Hospital. The 10-week intervention consisted of a wearable PA-tracking device (Fitbit Flex) and a peer-based virtual support group (Facebook group). Research staff helped set step goals and awarded badges weekly. Controls received usual care. Baseline assessments occurred before randomization and follow-up assessments occurred during weeks 8-10 of the intervention period. Feasibility criteria are defined below. Qualitative interviews assessed acceptability. Exploratory outcomes included PA, quality of life, and motivation for PA. All feasibility criteria were met: we recruited 60 survivors, intervention participants wore the Fitbit on the majority (71.5%) of intervention days, and ≥90% of all participants completed questionnaires. Qualitative data confirmed intervention acceptability. Exploratory analyses found no significant adjusted group differences for change in moderate-to-vigorous PA (4.4 vs. 5.0 min/day; P = 0.92) or sedentary time (-4.5 vs. 1.0 min/day; P = 0.73), comparing intervention subjects to controls. Some modest differences were found for select subscales of quality of life and motivation for PA. This mHealth PA intervention was feasible and acceptable to AYA childhood cancer survivors and warrants a fully powered RCT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Does consumption of tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis in adolescents and young adults with cancer affect the use of analgesics during hospitalizations?].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, A; Boyle, H; Moreaux, J; Guillot, L; Chvetzoff, G; Charbonnel, J-F; Marec-Berard, P

    2016-04-01

    The specificities of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) aged 15-25 years with cancer are now well recognized. Dedicated care was initiated in 2012 in France under the leadership of the INCa (National Cancer Institute). Research on supportive care and particularly pain management are still rare. This study aimed to evaluate the consumption of toxic substances (tobacco, cannabis, alcohol) in AYAs with cancer as well as its progression during the month following the diagnosis and to analyze its influence on opioid analgesic prescriptions during treatment. This is a prospective study including all new patients aged 15-25 years in two centers between January and June 2013. Data on consumption of psychoactive substances were obtained during an individual interview with a questionnaire. National surveys were used to compare this cohort with the general population. Data on opioid treatments were collected from the computerized prescription software and computerized patient record. Thirty-seven AYAs were eligible and 30 were included; 67% of them were male and the median age was 18.7 years. The questionnaire on tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis consumption at diagnosis was well accepted. Consumption profiles were comparable to the general population. Changes in behavior were observed during the 1st month after diagnosis, with a decrease or cessation of consumption, particularly among young people. This study showed differences in the use and requirements for opioid analgesics during hospitalization according to these consumption data. Prevention and support for AYAs who are regular consumers of toxic substances must be organized during initial care in oncology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Adolescent and Young Adult Patient Engagement and Participation in Survey-Based Research: A Report From the "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer" Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Bona, Kira; Wharton, Claire M; Bradford, Miranda; Shaffer, Michele L; Wolfe, Joanne; Baker, Kevin Scott

    2016-04-01

    Conducting patient-reported outcomes research with adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is difficult due to low participation rates and high attrition. Forty-seven AYAs with newly diagnosed cancer at two large hospitals were prospectively surveyed at the time of diagnosis and 3-6 and 12-18 months later. A subset participated in 1:1 semistructured interviews. Attrition prompted early study closure at one site. The majority of patients preferred paper-pencil to online surveys. Interview participants were more likely to complete surveys (e.g., 93% vs. 58% completion of 3-6 month surveys, P = 0.02). Engaging patients through qualitative methodologies and using patient-preferred instruments may optimize future research success.

  17. Development of a text messaging system to improve receipt of survivorship care in adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Casillas, Jacqueline; Goyal, Anju; Bryman, Jason; Alquaddoomi, Faisal; Ganz, Patricia A; Lidington, Emma; Macadangdang, Joshua; Estrin, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and examine the acceptability, feasibility, and usability of a text messaging, or Short Message Service (SMS), system for improving the receipt of survivorship care for adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of childhood cancer. Researchers developed and refined the text messaging system based on qualitative data from AYA survivors in an iterative three-stage process. In stage 1, a focus group (n = 4) addressed acceptability; in stage 2, key informant interviews (n = 10) following a 6-week trial addressed feasibility; and in stage 3, key informant interviews (n = 23) following a 6-week trial addressed usability. Qualitative data were analyzed using a constant comparative analytic approach exploring in-depth themes. The final system includes programmed reminders to schedule and attend late effect screening appointments, tailored suggestions for community resources for cancer survivors, and messages prompting participant feedback regarding the appointments and resources. Participants found the text messaging system an acceptable form of communication, the screening reminders and feedback prompts feasible for improving the receipt of survivorship care, and the tailored suggestions for community resources usable for connecting survivors to relevant services. Participants suggested supplementing survivorship care visits and forming AYA survivor social networks as future implementations for the text messaging system. The text messaging system may assist AYA survivors by coordinating late effect screening appointments, facilitating a partnership with the survivorship care team, and connecting survivors with relevant community resources. The text messaging system has the potential to improve the receipt of survivorship care.

  18. Dental Care for Survivors of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer: Special Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Fair, Douglas; Wright, Jennifer; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-06-01

    Oral health is important for quality of life, but may be undermanaged for survivors of cancer. We examine dental care use and barriers among long-term survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer in comparison to individuals without a history of cancer. The 2008-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) identified 1216 individuals diagnosed with cancer at AYA ages (15-39 years), who were at least 5 years from diagnosis. A comparison group was matched using age, sex, and other factors. We evaluated self-reported dental visits in the previous 12 months, and inability and delay in receiving necessary dental care among survivors and the comparison group. Furthermore, individual factors associated with dental care use were identified using multivariable logistic regressions. Of survivors, 60.86% reported no dental visits in the previous year compared to 51.96% of the comparison individuals (p < 0.001). Survivors were more likely to report inability (10.71% vs. 6.29%, p = 0.001) and delay (8.12% vs. 4.45%, p = 0.001) in getting necessary dental care than the comparison group. Notably, survivors without dental insurance were more likely to report inability and delay. Female survivors were more likely to use dental care than males (odds ratio = 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.15-2.71, p = 0.01). Hispanic survivors, those diagnosed at younger ages, and uninsured survivors were less likely to have at least one dental visit. Survivors of AYA cancer need timely surveillance to manage late effects, including dental complications. Yet, these survivors, particularly those who are uninsured, delay dental care more often than individuals from the general population. Survivor-specific interventions are needed to reduce dental care barriers.

  19. Hacking the hospital environment: young adults designing youth-friendly hospital rooms together with young people with cancer experiences.

    PubMed

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne; Thomsen, Stine Legarth; Matthiesen, Simon Meggers; Hjerming, Maiken; Hertz, Pernille Grarup

    2015-12-09

    There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon). Students in architecture, design, engineering, communication and anthropology participated (27 young adults) - forming eight groups. Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with current or former cancer experience participated as sparring partners. We provided workspace and food during the weekend. The groups presented their products to a jury and relevant stakeholders. The groups created eight unique design concepts. The young designers were extremely flexible listening to ideas and experiences from the young patients, which led to common features including individual and flexible design, privacy in two-bed wardrooms and social contact with other hospitalized AYA. The winning project included an integrated concept for both wardrooms and the AYA day room, including logos and names for the rooms and an 'energy wall' in the day room. A hackathon event was an effective mode of youth participation. The design concepts and ideas were in line with current evidence regarding pleasing hospital environment and youth-friendly inpatient facilities and may be applicable to other young patients.

  20. Cancer in adolescents and young adults: Who remains at risk of poor social functioning over time?

    PubMed

    Husson, Olga; Zebrack, Bradley J; Aguilar, Christine; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2017-07-15

    The objective of the current study was to examine social functioning among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) within the first 2 years after a cancer diagnosis and compare their scores with population norms and identify trajectories of social functioning over time and its correlates. A multicenter, longitudinal study was conducted among 215 AYA patients with cancer aged 14 to 39 years. A total of 141 patients completed a self-report measure of social functioning within the first 4 months of diagnosis and again at 12 months and 24 months later. AYA patients with cancer were found to have significantly worse social functioning scores around the time of diagnosis (52.0 vs 85.1; P<.001), at the 12-month follow-up (73.1 vs 85.1; P<.001), and at the 24-month follow-up (69.2 vs 85.1; P<.001) when compared with population norms. Significant improvements in social functioning from baseline to the 12-month follow-up were observed; however, social functioning levels remained stable thereafter. Among participants, 9% demonstrated consistently high/normal social functioning, 47% demonstrated improved social functioning, 13% were found to have worsening social functioning, and 32% demonstrated consistently low social functioning. AYA patients with cancer who had consistently low social functioning were more often off treatment at the time of follow-up, reported more physical symptoms and higher levels of distress at baseline and follow-up, and perceived less social support at baseline compared with the other 3 groups. Although improved over time, social functioning still was found to be compromised 24 months after the primary diagnosis. Nearly one-third of these patients remain at risk of poor social functioning. Reducing physical symptoms and psychological distress and enhancing social support by interventions during the period after treatment may potentially help these young survivors to better reintegrate into society. Cancer 2017;123:2743-51. © 2017 American Cancer Society

  1. Hope, distress, and later quality of life among Adolescent and Young Adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Bradford, Miranda C; Bona, Kira; Shaffer, Michele L; Wolfe, Joanne; Baker, K Scott; Lau, Nancy; Yi-Frazier, Joyce

    2017-09-21

    We aimed to explore the predictive value of screening for distress alone, hope alone, or a combination of both. In a multi-center prospective study, 37 English-speaking Adolescents and Young Adults (AYAs) with cancer and 40 parents completed validated instruments at diagnosis ("baseline") and 3-6 months later ("follow-up"). Correlated regression models described associations. Within each instrument, baseline and follow-up scores were associated. However, only a composite hope/distress score predicted all three patient-centered outcomes. Multi-dimensional screens incorporating positive and negative psychosocial constructs may predict patient-centered outcomes better than isolated, single-construct instruments.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthy Diet and Exercise Among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Implications for Behavioral Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yelena P; Yi, Jaehee; McClellan, Jessica; Kim, Jonghee; Tian, Tian; Grahmann, Bridget; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Holton, Avery; Wright, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    This study uses qualitative methods to identify barriers to and facilitators of exercise and healthy eating among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (survivors currently aged 18-39 years and diagnosed with cancer anytime in their lives), as reported by survivors and their primary supporters. Survivors (M(age) = 27.6 years, SD = 6.6 years) had completed active cancer therapy. Survivors and supporters (i.e., nominated by survivors as someone who was a main source of support) attended separate focus group sessions (five survivor focus groups, five supporter focus groups) and were asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire assessing demographic and cancer history and engagement in exercise and healthy eating. In total, 25 survivors and 19 supporters participated. The three overarching themes identified were barriers to exercise and healthy eating (e.g., lack of resources, negative thoughts and feelings, negative social and environmental influences), facilitators of exercise and healthy eating (e.g., cognitive motivators, tools for health behavior implementation, social relationships), and intervention implications (e.g., informational needs, desire for social support). AYA cancer survivors and their supporters identified barriers to and facilitators of healthy lifestyle behaviors, which should be considered when designing interventions to improve the long-term health of survivors.

  3. Barriers and Facilitators of Healthy Diet and Exercise Among Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: Implications for Behavioral Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jaehee; McClellan, Jessica; Kim, Jonghee; Tian, Tian; Grahmann, Bridget; Kirchhoff, Anne C.; Holton, Avery; Wright, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study uses qualitative methods to identify barriers to and facilitators of exercise and healthy eating among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (survivors currently aged 18–39 years and diagnosed with cancer anytime in their lives), as reported by survivors and their primary supporters. Methods: Survivors (Mage = 27.6 years, SD = 6.6 years) had completed active cancer therapy. Survivors and supporters (i.e., nominated by survivors as someone who was a main source of support) attended separate focus group sessions (five survivor focus groups, five supporter focus groups) and were asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire assessing demographic and cancer history and engagement in exercise and healthy eating. Results: In total, 25 survivors and 19 supporters participated. The three overarching themes identified were barriers to exercise and healthy eating (e.g., lack of resources, negative thoughts and feelings, negative social and environmental influences), facilitators of exercise and healthy eating (e.g., cognitive motivators, tools for health behavior implementation, social relationships), and intervention implications (e.g., informational needs, desire for social support). Conclusion: AYA cancer survivors and their supporters identified barriers to and facilitators of healthy lifestyle behaviors, which should be considered when designing interventions to improve the long-term health of survivors. PMID:26697268

  4. End-of-Life Intensity for Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: A Californian Population-Based Study That Shows Disparities.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Emily E; Alvarez, Elysia; Saynina, Olga; Sanders, Lee; Bhatia, Smita; Chamberlain, Lisa J

    2017-08-22

    Cancer is the leading cause of nonaccidental death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). High-intensity end-of-life care is expensive and may not be consistent with patient goals. However, the intensity of end-of-life care for AYA decedents with cancer-especially the effect of care received at specialty versus nonspecialty centers-remains understudied. We conducted a retrospective, population-based analysis with the California administrative discharge database that is linked to death certificates. The cohort included Californians age 15 to 39 years who died between 2000 and 2011 with cancer. Intense end-of-life interventions included readmission, admission to an intensive care unit, intubation in the last month of life, and in-hospital death. Specialty centers were defined as Children's Oncology Group centers and National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Of the 12,938 AYA cancer decedents, 59% received at least one intense end-of-life care intervention, and 30% received two or more. Patients treated at nonspecialty centers were more likely than those at specialty-care centers to receive two or more intense interventions (odds ratio [OR], 1.46; 95% CI, 1.32 to 1.62). Sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with two or more intense interventions included minority race/ethnicity (Black [OR, 1.35, 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.56]; Hispanic [OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.36]; non-Hispanic white: reference), younger age (15 to 21 years [OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19 to 1.56; 22 to 29 years [OR,1.26; 95% CI,1.14 to 1.39]; ≥ 30 years: reference), and hematologic malignancies (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.41 to 1.66; solid tumors: reference). Thirty percent of AYA cancer decedents received two or more high-intensity end-of-life interventions. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, hospitalization in a nonspecialty center was associated with high-intensity end-of-life care. Additional research is needed to determine if these disparities are

  5. Correlates of self-efficacy for disease management in adolescent/young adult cancer survivors: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Herts, Kate L; Khaled, Mona M; Stanton, Annette L

    2017-03-01

    The primary objective of this review was to summarize the literature regarding factors associated with self-efficacy for disease management (SEDM) in cross-sectional studies and the efficacy/effectiveness of psychosocial interventions that are designed to improve SEDM in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors. The secondary aim was to assess the quality of included studies. We conducted a systematic review using PsycINFO and PubMed to identify studies for review. Eligible studies were conducted in AYA cancer survivors ages 15 to 39; included a measure of SEDM assessed as an outcome or in a cross-sectional analysis; and were published in a peer-reviewed, English-language journal. From the 2,910 records screened, 7 cross-sectional studies and 4 intervention studies met criteria for inclusion. Eleven of the 12 SEDM measures in the studies were author-constructed, limiting the ability to draw conclusions across studies. All cross-sectional studies met at least 21 of 26 relevant quality assessment criteria, and intervention studies met between 4 and 11 of 14 criteria. Cross-sectional findings indicate that SEDM is positively associated with health-promoting behaviors and inversely related to physical and mental health problems. The intervention studies demonstrated that behavioral and educational interventions have the potential to increase SEDM. Directions for research include the need for validated measures of SEDM for AYA cancer survivors, as well as interventions that target both the health care team's and the patient's role in promoting SEDM. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Complete prevalence of malignant primary brain tumors registry data in the United States compared with other common cancers, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Adah S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Kruchko, Carol; Rogers, Lisa; Peereboom, David M.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2016-12-29

    Complete prevalence proportions illustrate the burden of disease in a population. Here, this study estimates the 2010 complete prevalence of malignant primary brain tumors overall and by Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) histology groups, and compares the brain tumor prevalence estimates to the complete prevalence of other common cancers as determined by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) by age at prevalence (2010): children (0–14 y), adolescent and young adult (AYA) (15–39 y), and adult (40+ y).

  7. Complete prevalence of malignant primary brain tumors registry data in the United States compared with other common cancers, 2010

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Adah S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Kruchko, Carol; ...

    2016-12-29

    Complete prevalence proportions illustrate the burden of disease in a population. Here, this study estimates the 2010 complete prevalence of malignant primary brain tumors overall and by Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) histology groups, and compares the brain tumor prevalence estimates to the complete prevalence of other common cancers as determined by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) by age at prevalence (2010): children (0–14 y), adolescent and young adult (AYA) (15–39 y), and adult (40+ y).

  8. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    PubMed Central

    Ramphal, R.; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; De Pauw, S.; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D.; Wilkins, K.; Rogers, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Many of the recommendations can nevertheless be applied universally. These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer and build on outcomes from two international workshops held by that group. PMID:27330350

  9. A randomized controlled pilot trial of a Web-based resource to improve cancer knowledge in adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Steele, Jeanne; Mertens, Ann; Neglia, Joseph P

    2016-11-01

    This study examined cancer knowledge in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors and pilot tested a Web-based resource to provide individually tailored information regarding cancer treatment history, late effects risk, and resources. Fifty-two survivors (15-28 years old) who completed cancer treatment were recruited from the University of Minnesota oncology clinics. Participants were randomly assigned to receive access to personalized health history, late effects information, and resources via a password-protected Web portal or to standard of care (physician counseling) only. Participants completed surveys measuring cancer knowledge, health locus of control, and psychosocial well-being prior to randomization and approximately 1 year later. Overall, few participants accurately reported their chemotherapy history with detail (19% at baseline and 33% at follow-up), and many did not recognize that previous cancer treatments could impact future health (60% at baseline and 54% at follow-up). Among those randomized to the receive access to the website, utilization was very low, making it difficult to draw conclusions about efficacy. Nonetheless, these data suggest that offering tailored information through the Web was not more effective than standard of care at improving cancer knowledge. Anxiety and health beliefs were associated with cancer knowledge, including knowledge of steps survivors could take to mitigate late effects risks (p < 01). Knowledge gaps exist among AYA survivors regarding important aspects of their treatment histories and ongoing health risks. Offering purely educational information (either in person by providers or via the Web) does not appear to be enough to close this gap. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Cancer, adolescence, and their peers: "they'll give you a story".

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Maurizio; Truccolo, Ivana; Byther, Elena; Capone, Daniela; Elia, Caterina

    2014-09-01

    Following the model of other international oncology units, a framework was developed to create a special unit for adolescents and young adults (Youth Area) within a cancer research hospital in Italy by defining relevant parameters to improve personalized healthcare delivery and the reduction of the impact of the disease on 14-24 year old patients. The intervention became fully operational in 2007 and allows patients and their families to make decisions on their own care. The concept of "Youth Area" denotes an open model for society to put the patient back into the center of clinical care. We directly want to involve our adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients in participating in conferences so they themselves can send out a positive message to their healthy peers. Furthermore, activities centered on the normal development of AYA patients are encouraged. To highlight this innovative concept, the Youth Area has sponsored various published books. We believe that this intervention may represent an effective new tool for cancer patient care in young Italians.

  11. Reproductive health in the adolescent and young adult cancer patient: an innovative training program for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Hutchins, Nicole M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2013-03-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare. The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change.

  12. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare ManagementFamily HealthProcedures & DevicesHealthcare ManagementRelated TopicsCancer: Medical VocabularyRead Article >>Cancer: Medical Vocabulary Learn the definitions of various terms ...

  13. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  14. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer.

  15. Development and validation of the BRIGHTLIGHT Survey, a patient-reported experience measure for young people with cancer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachel M; Fern, Lorna A; Solanki, Anita; Hooker, Louise; Carluccio, Anna; Pye, Julia; Jeans, David; Frere-Smith, Tom; Gibson, Faith; Barber, Julie; Raine, Rosalind; Stark, Dan; Feltbower, Richard; Pearce, Susie; Whelan, Jeremy S

    2015-07-28

    Patient experience is increasingly used as an indicator of high quality care in addition to more traditional clinical end-points. Surveys are generally accepted as appropriate methodology to capture patient experience. No validated patient experience surveys exist specifically for adolescents and young adults (AYA) aged 13-24 years at diagnosis with cancer. This paper describes early work undertaken to develop and validate a descriptive patient experience survey for AYA with cancer that encompasses both their cancer experience and age-related issues. We aimed to develop, with young people, an experience survey meaningful and relevant to AYA to be used in a longitudinal cohort study (BRIGHTLIGHT), ensuring high levels of acceptability to maximise study retention. A three-stage approach was employed: Stage 1 involved developing a conceptual framework, conducting literature/Internet searches and establishing content validity of the survey; Stage 2 confirmed the acceptability of methods of administration and consisted of four focus groups involving 11 young people (14-25 years), three parents and two siblings; and Stage 3 established survey comprehension through telephone-administered cognitive interviews with a convenience sample of 23 young people aged 14-24 years. Stage 1: Two-hundred and thirty eight questions were developed from qualitative reports of young people's cancer and treatment-related experience. Stage 2: The focus groups identified three core themes: (i) issues directly affecting young people, e.g. impact of treatment-related fatigue on ability to complete survey; (ii) issues relevant to the actual survey, e.g. ability to answer questions anonymously; (iii) administration issues, e.g. confusing format in some supporting documents. Stage 3: Cognitive interviews indicated high levels of comprehension requiring minor survey amendments. Collaborating with young people with cancer has enabled a survey of to be developed that is both meaningful to young

  16. Racial and Socioeconomic Treatment Disparities in Adolescents and Young Adults with Stage II-III Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, David Y; Teng, Annabelle; Pedersen, Rose C; Tavangari, Farees R; Attaluri, Vikram; McLemore, Elisabeth C; Stern, Stacey L; Bilchik, Anton J; Goldfarb, Melanie R

    2017-02-01

    Stage II-III rectal cancer requires multidisciplinary cancer care, and adolescents and young adults (AYA, ages 15-39 years) often do not receive optimal cancer therapy. Overall, 3295 AYAs with clinical stage II-III rectal cancer were identified in the National Cancer Database. Factors associated with the receipt of adjuvant and surgical therapies, as well as overall survival (OS), were examined. The majority of patients were non-Hispanic White (72.0 %), male (57.5 %), and without comorbidities (93.8 %). A greater proportion of Black and Hispanic patients did not receive radiation (24.5 and 27.1 %, respectively, vs. 16.5 % for non-Hispanic White patients), surgery (22.4 % and 21.6 vs. 12.3 %), or chemotherapy (21.5 % and 24.1 vs. 14.7 %) compared with non-Hispanic White patients (all p < 0.05). After controlling for competing factors, Black (odds ratio [OR] 0.7, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.5-0.9) and Hispanic patients (OR 0.6, 95 % CI 0.4-0.9) were less likely to receive neoadjuvant chemoradiation compared with non-Hispanic White patients. Females, the uninsured, and those treated at a community cancer center were also less likely to receive neoadjuvant therapy. Having government insurance (OR 0.22, 95 % CI 010-0.49) was a predictor for not receiving surgery. Although 5-year OS was lower (p < 0.05) in Black (59.8 %) and Hispanic patients (65.9 %) compared with non-Hispanic White patients (74.9 %), on multivariate analysis race did not impact mortality. Not having surgery (hazard ratio [HR] 7.1, 95 % CI 2.8-18.2) had the greatest influence on mortality, followed by poorly differentiated histology (HR 3.0, 95 % CI 1.3-6.5), nodal positivity (HR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.9-3.6), no chemotherapy (HR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.03-3.6), no insurance (HR 1.7, 95 % CI 1.1-2.7), and male sex (HR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.1-2.0). There are racial and socioeconomic disparities in the treatment of stage II-III rectal cancer in AYAs, many of which impact OS. Interventions that can

  17. Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors' Valuation of Post-Treatment Recommended Care.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Zamora, Eduardo R; Spraker-Perlman, Holly; Boyle, Kevin J; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2017-03-01

    Examine whether survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer value recommended post-treatment care using focus groups and a willingness to pay (WTP) survey. WTP, a measure of value, indicates the dollar amount individuals are willing to pay to use a service. Participants were recruited through the Utah Cancer Registry. N = 28 survivors diagnosed with cancer at ages 15-39 and currently aged ≥18 participated in focus groups, and N = 4 in phone interviews (participation rate = 50%). All participants responded to a demographic survey and WTP questions based on one-time and monthly payments for annual visits. Focus group participants responded to an open-ended question on the value of follow-up care. Interval regressions identified factors associated with WTP. Qualitative analysis summarized themes for the open-ended question. Focus group participants reported valuing follow-up care as it brings peace of mind and helps them manage their health. Yet, 38% reported not having a cancer-related visit in the previous year. Only 27% and 43% of survivors agreed to pay any one-time and monthly payments, respectively. The monthly payment mean WTP was $41 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 31-84), equating to $494 annually, which is greater than the mean WTP for one-time payment ($362, 95% CI: 293-432, p < 0.001), suggesting that survivors may prefer monthly payments. Several factors, including being female and in better health, predicted higher WTP. Many AYA cancer survivors report not visiting their doctors annually for post-treatment care despite verbally valuing care. Models that demonstrate high quality and distribute costs over time should be evaluated to encourage survivors to receive recommended care.

  18. Patient-provider communication about the emotional cues and concerns of adolescent and young adult patients and their family members when receiving a diagnosis of cancer.

    PubMed

    Korsvold, Live; Mellblom, Anneli V; Lie, Hanne C; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Finset, Arnstein

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine how emotional cues/concerns are expressed and responded to in medical consultations with adolescent and young adults (AYA), an understudied patient group, at the time of cancer diagnosis. Nine consultations in which AYA patients aged 12-25 years were informed about their cancer diagnosis and treatment plans were audio recorded. Expressions of emotional cues/concerns and physicians' responses were identified and coded using The Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES). A total of 135 emotional cues/concerns (range: 2-26, median: 13) were identified. Cues or concerns that were expressed by patients and relatives following questions from physicians were more often explicit than patient-initiated cues/concerns. Questions about medical and practical issues could often be understood as ways of expressing emotional cues. When patients or relatives expressed less explicit verbal cues about underlying concerns, physicians often responded by presenting medical information without commenting on the emotional aspect indicated by the cue. The communication was dominated by information-giving, but the questions from patients and relatives and their responses to the information often had emotional connotations. Patients' requests for information may include an emotional aspect. These preliminary findings should be tested in a larger sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health Related Quality of Life, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Intervention Preferences of Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Hoda; Chandra, Joya; Paxton, Raheem J.; Ater, Joann L.; Urbauer, Diana; Cruz, Cody Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are at increased risk for poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and chronic health conditions -- both of which can be exacerbated by unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Developing a clearer understanding of the associations between HRQOL, lifestyle behaviors, and medical and demographic variables (e.g., age/developmental stage at time of diagnosis) is an important step toward developing more targeted behavioral interventions for this population. METHOD Cross-sectional questionnaires were completed by 170 CCSs who were diagnosed with leukemia, lymphoma, sarcoma, or a cancer of the central nervous system (CNS) and treated at a comprehensive cancer center between 1992 and 2007. Questionnaires addressed weight status, lifestyle behaviors, aspects of HRQOL, and intervention preferences. RESULTS Adolescent and young adult survivors (AYAs) and survivors of CNS tumors or lymphoma reported significantly (p<.05) poorer HRQOL across multiple domains compared to those diagnosed at an earlier age, survivors of leukemia or sarcoma, and healthy populations. A significant proportion also failed to meet national recommendations for dietary intakes (39–94%) and physical activity (65%). Female survivors reported poorer physical functioning and consumed less dietary fiber and fruits and vegetables than did male survivors. They also expressed the strongest interest in participating in diet and exercise interventions. CONCLUSION Findings support the premise that females, AYAs, and survivors of cancers of the CNS or lymphoma are “at risk” subgroups within the CCS population for poor dietary practices, sedentary behaviors, and poor HRQOL. Future research should focus on developing diet and PA interventions to improve HRQOL that target these groups. IMPLICATIONS FOR SURVIVORS Greater consideration of the role of gender, developmental stage, and the HRQOL challenges facing CCSs may help researchers to develop targeted behavioral interventions

  20. Mental distress and health care use among survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer: A cross-sectional analysis of the National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Avila, Jaqueline C; Mutambudzi, Miriam; Russell, Heidi; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Schwartz, Cindy L

    2017-03-01

    The current study was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of mental distress among survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer and a comparison group. A total of 875 AYA cancer survivors who were diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39 years and who were at least 5 years from their initial diagnosis were identified from the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Surveys. A comparison group was created. The Kessler nonspecific mental/psychological distress scale was used to examine none/low, moderate, and severe distress. The issues of whether individuals talked to mental health professionals within the previous year and if they could afford mental health care also were examined. Variables (ie, demographics, behavioral [eg, smoking status], comorbidity, and mental health visits) associated with distress among the 2 groups were identified using multinomial logistic regressions. Survivors reported mental distress more often than the comparison group (moderate: 23.2% vs 16.9%; and severe: 8.4% vs 3.0% [P<.001]). Survivors cited not being able to afford mental health care more often (6.4% vs 2.3%; P = .002). Moreover, 74.7% and 52.2% of survivors, respectively, with moderate and severe distress had not talked to a mental health professional. Contrary to the comparison group, survivors who were current smokers reported severe distress more often compared with nonsmokers (relative risk, 3.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.46-8.84 [P = .01]). Having public and no insurance versus private insurance and report of sleep-related trouble within the previous week were found to be associated with greater distress among survivors. AYA cancer survivors are more likely to demonstrate mental distress than individuals without cancer. Nevertheless, few survivors may be receiving professional mental health services. Survivors need greater access to mental health screening and counseling to address the current gaps in care delivery. Cancer 2017;123:869-78.

  1. A comparison of heterosexual and LGBTQ cancer survivors' outlooks on relationships, family building, possible infertility, and patient-doctor fertility risk communication.

    PubMed

    M Russell, Andrea; Galvin, Kathleen M; Harper, Maya M; Clayman, Marla L

    2016-10-01

    Little research about cancer-related infertility has examined the experiences and needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) cancer survivors. This research seeks to understand how LGBTQ survivors are similar to or different from heterosexual survivors with respect to cancer treatments' effects on relationships, plans for parenthood, and fertility preservation decision making. Semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with adolescent or young adult (AYA) cancer survivors (n = 56) were coded for themes. Interviews consisted of questions about pre- and post-diagnosis thoughts about relationships, parenthood, possible infertility, and how information about fertility risks was received. While LGBTQ (n = 22) and heterosexual (n = 34) survivors reported similar challenges when dating post-diagnosis, heterosexual survivors were more likely to report fertility concerns as affecting romantic relationships (p < .05). LGBTQ survivors seemed more open to raising non-biological children or not becoming a parent than heterosexual survivors. LGBTQ survivors generally reported being satisfied with or indifferent to the information that they were given regarding fertility loss, despite reporting receiving similar amounts of information as compared to heterosexual patients (p < .10). LGBTQ patients' views on relationships, parenthood, and family building seemed to result in less distress when faced with infertility. However, interventions facilitating information exchange about dating, fertility risks, and family building options may be valuable to LGBTQ and heterosexual cancer survivors. LGBTQ cancer survivors may display more adaptive coping with respect to relationships and fertility loss. Oncology professionals may want to proactively introduce positive coping strategies to reduce distress among AYA cancer survivors at risk for infertility.

  2. Patient-centered communication between adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and their healthcare providers: Identifying research gaps with a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jessica R; Standridge, Daniel; Lyons, Karen S; Elliot, Diane L; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Julian, Anne K; Weprin, Jennifer; Storksdieck, Martin; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2017-09-01

    To conduct a scoping literature review to identify practices or programs that promote AYA patient-centered communication. Between January and May of 2016, we applied standard scoping review methodology to systematically review articles. We considered peer-reviewed, English language articles written at any phase of intervention research. Both qualitative and quantitative studies were eligible, and no additional search restrictions were applied. We retained articles that included explicit or implicit outcomes for one of the six functions of patient-centered communication in cancer care. At least two independent reviewers assessed the articles. We screened a total of 4072 titles and abstracts, retaining 27 for full-text review. Ultimately, eight titles met the review's inclusion criteria. We categorized each publication by the action or setting used to improve patient-centered communication, resulting in five categories. Most studies were not included because they did not include a patient-centered communication outcome. This area of research is still emerging, as indicated by the small number of eligible studies and predominance of qualitative, descriptive, pilot, and feasibility studies with small sample sizes. Our results suggest a clear need to develop and evaluate interventions focused on improving patient-centered communication between AYA survivors and their healthcare providers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fitness, body composition and vascular health in adolescent and young adult survivors of paediatric brain cancer and cranial radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Long, Treya M; Rath, Shoshana R; Maroni, Tessa D; Wallman, Karen E; Atkinson, Helen C; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine H; Choong, Catherine S; Naylor, Louise H

    2017-09-20

    Background Survivors of paediatric brain cancer and/or cranial radiotherapy (CRT) are at an increased risk of developing serious comorbidities. Established risk factors for chronic disease include central obesity, endothelial abnormalities and diminished fitness. Objectives Here we characterised anthropometry, body composition, bone mineral density (BMD), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), endothelial function, muscular strength and endurance and aerobic fitness in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors. Methods Twenty survivors (10 male, 10 female; 20 ± 2 years) were compared with 19 matched controls. Muscular strength was assessed using three repetition maximum tests, while muscular endurance was determined as number of repetitions performed per minute. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) was assessed on a treadmill using a modified chronotropic protocol. Anthropometric measurements, HR and BP were taken using standard clinical protocols, while body composition and BMD were determined using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Endothelial function was measured using the flow mediated dilation technique. Results Survivors demonstrated deficits in muscular strength (latissimus dorsi pull-down, p = 0.020; bicep curl, p = 0.009), muscular endurance (squats, p = 0.012; sit-ups, p = 0.030; push-ups, p = 0.013), minute ventilation at peak exericse (p = 0.002) and VO2peak (L/min, p = 0.002; mL/kg/min, p = 0.008; mL/kg LBM/min, p = 0.010). Additionally, survivors had greater waist-to-hip ratios (p = 0.032), resting HR (p = 0.048) and higher percentage of total body (p = 0.017), central (p = 0.009) and peripheral (p = 0.032) fat. Lean body mass (p = 0.004) and BMD (p = 0.005) were lower in the survivor group. Conclusion AYA survivors of paediatric brain cancer and/or CRT exhibit altered body composition, increased resting HR and reduced BMD, muscular strength, muscular endurance and cardiorespiratory fitness compared to controls.

  4. Health care experiences of long-term survivors of adolescent and young adult cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Fluchel, Mark; Spraker-Perlman, Holly; Parmeter, Christopher F; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-09-01

    Evaluate health care access and experiences with care among long-term survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer relative to a comparison group in the USA. The 2008 to 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys identified 1163 survivors of cancer, diagnosed ages 15-39, current ages 20-64, who were at least 5 years after diagnosis. A comparison group without cancer was matched using age, sex, and other characteristics. Primary outcomes included having ≥1 visit to doctor's office/clinic in the previous year and perceived health care quality (0 = worst to 10 = best; categorized as low (0-4), intermediate (5-7), and high (8-10)). Other experience-related outcomes (e.g., having adequate time with providers and providers show respect) were also evaluated. Bivariate analyses compared these outcomes between survivors and the comparison group. Multivariable logistic regressions identified survivor-level factors associated with health care visits and quality. Survivors had ≥1 visit more often (82.1 vs. 75.8 %, p = 0.005) yet rated their health care quality lower (low or intermediate 30.7 vs. 23.6 %, p < 0.001) than the comparison group. Fewer survivors reported always having enough time with providers (41.7 vs. 54.6 %, p < 0.001) and that providers always show respect (57.5 vs. 67.7 %, p = 0.002). Uninsured survivors were less likely to have ≥1 visit (odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.17-0.40, p < 0.001) and rated their health care quality lower (OR = 0.25, 95 % CI 0.13-0.48, p < 0.001) than privately insured. Many other factors were associated with visits and quality. Survivors of AYA cancer reported more health care visits but worse health care experiences than individuals without cancer. Targeted interventions that may improve survivors' experiences with health care should be evaluated.

  5. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  6. A content analysis of emotional concerns expressed at the time of receiving a cancer diagnosis: An observational study of consultations with adolescent and young adult patients and their family members.

    PubMed

    Korsvold, Live; Mellblom, Anneli Viktoria; Finset, Arnstein; Ruud, Ellen; Lie, Hanne Cathrine

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the emotional concerns expressed by adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients in consultations when a diagnosis of cancer is delivered. Here, we investigated the content of such concerns and how health care providers respond to them. We audio-recorded nine consultations with AYA cancer patients (ages: 12-25 years) at the time of diagnosis. We have previously identified and coded 135 emotional concerns and the responses to these in the nine consultations using the Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES) framework. Here, we used qualitative content analysis to study these emotional concerns and categorize them according to overarching themes. We then quantitatively explored associations between the themes of the concerns and whether the responses to them varied according to their themes. We identified four themes for the content of concerns: "Side-effects/late-effects" (39%), "What happens in the near future/practical aspects" (16%), "Fear" (27%) and "Sadness" (17%) (e. g. crying, sighing or other sounds that expressed sadness). Health care providers' responses did not appear to vary according to the different themes of concerns, but typically consisted of providing medical information. The content analysis revealed that patients and family members expressed a wide range of emotional concerns. Health care providers tended to respond to the content-aspect of the concerns, but did rarely explicitly acknowledge the affective-aspect of the concerns. The effect of responses to patients' emotional concerns in the important first consultations about the cancer diagnosis and planned treatment should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical trial enrollment of adolescents and young adults with sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lara E; Janeway, Katherine A; Weiss, Aaron R; Chen, Yen-Lin E; Scharschmidt, Thomas J; Krailo, Mark; Glade Bender, Julia L; Kopp, Lisa M; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Schwartz, Gary K; Horvath, L Elise; Hawkins, Douglas S; Chuk, Meredith K; Reinke, Denise K; Gorlick, Richard G; Randall, R Lor

    2017-09-15

    More than half of all sarcomas occur in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) aged 15 to 39 years. After the publication of the AYA series in the April 1, 2016 issue of Cancer, several leaders in the field of sarcoma across disciplines gathered to discuss the status of sarcoma clinical research in AYAs. They determined that a focused effort to include the underrepresented and understudied AYA population in current and future sarcoma clinical trials is overdue. Trial enrichment for AYA-aged sarcoma patients will produce more meaningful results that better represent the disease's biology, epidemiology, and treatment environment. To address the current deficit, this commentary outlines changes believed to be necessary to expediently achieve an increase in the enrollment of AYAs in sarcoma clinical trials. Cancer 2017;123:3434-40. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms and Post-traumatic Growth in 223 Childhood Cancer Survivors: Predictive Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Tremolada, Marta; Bonichini, Sabrina; Basso, Giuseppe; Pillon, Marta

    2016-01-01

    With modern therapies and supportive care, survival rates of childhood cancer have increased considerably. However, there are long-term psychological sequelae of these treatments that may not manifest until pediatric survivors are into adulthood. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in young adult survivors of childhood cancer ranges from 6.2 to 22%; associated risk factors are young age at the assessment, female gender, low education level, and some disease-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate, in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of childhood cancer, the incidence and severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs), and to identify the risk factors and the associated post-traumatic growth (PTG) index. Participants were 223 AYA cancer survivors recruited during follow-up visits in the Oncohematology Clinic of the Department of Child and Woman's Health, University of Padua. Data were collected from self-report questionnaires on PTSS incidence, PTG mean score, perceived social support, and medical and socio-demographic factors. Ex-patients' mean age at the assessment was 19.33 years (SD = 3.01, 15-25), 123 males and 100 females, with a mean of years off-therapy of 9.64 (SD = 4.17). Most (52.5%) had survived an hematological disorder and 47.5% a solid tumor when they were aged, on average, 8.02 years (SD = 4.40). The main results indicated a moderate presence of clinical (≥9 symptoms: 9.4%) and sub-clinical PTSS (6-8 symptoms: 11.2%), with the avoidance criterion most often encountered. Re-experience symptoms and PTG mean score were significantly associated (r = 0.24; p = 0.0001). A hierarchical regression model (R (2) = 0.08; F = 1.46; p = 0.05) identified female gender (β = 0.16; p = 0.05) and less perceived social support (β = -0.43; p = 0.05) as risk factors to developing PTSS. Another hierarchical regression model assessed the possible predictors of the PTG total score (R (2) = 0.36; F = 9.1; p = 0.0001), with

  9. Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms and Post-traumatic Growth in 223 Childhood Cancer Survivors: Predictive Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tremolada, Marta; Bonichini, Sabrina; Basso, Giuseppe; Pillon, Marta

    2016-01-01

    With modern therapies and supportive care, survival rates of childhood cancer have increased considerably. However, there are long-term psychological sequelae of these treatments that may not manifest until pediatric survivors are into adulthood. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in young adult survivors of childhood cancer ranges from 6.2 to 22%; associated risk factors are young age at the assessment, female gender, low education level, and some disease-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate, in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors of childhood cancer, the incidence and severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSSs), and to identify the risk factors and the associated post-traumatic growth (PTG) index. Participants were 223 AYA cancer survivors recruited during follow-up visits in the Oncohematology Clinic of the Department of Child and Woman’s Health, University of Padua. Data were collected from self-report questionnaires on PTSS incidence, PTG mean score, perceived social support, and medical and socio-demographic factors. Ex-patients’ mean age at the assessment was 19.33 years (SD = 3.01, 15–25), 123 males and 100 females, with a mean of years off-therapy of 9.64 (SD = 4.17). Most (52.5%) had survived an hematological disorder and 47.5% a solid tumor when they were aged, on average, 8.02 years (SD = 4.40). The main results indicated a moderate presence of clinical (≥9 symptoms: 9.4%) and sub-clinical PTSS (6–8 symptoms: 11.2%), with the avoidance criterion most often encountered. Re-experience symptoms and PTG mean score were significantly associated (r = 0.24; p = 0.0001). A hierarchical regression model (R2 = 0.08; F = 1.46; p = 0.05) identified female gender (β = 0.16; p = 0.05) and less perceived social support (β = -0.43; p = 0.05) as risk factors to developing PTSS. Another hierarchical regression model assessed the possible predictors of the PTG total score (R2 = 0.36; F = 9.1; p = 0.0001), with

  10. Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer After Treatment Second Cancers After Colorectal Cancer Colorectal cancer survivors can be affected by a ... many of these cancers. Follow-up after colorectal cancer treatment After completing treatment for colorectal cancer, you ...

  11. Integrated Cancer Repository for Cancer Research

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-05

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  12. Assessing the Quality, Feasibility, and Efficacy of Electronic Patient Platforms Designed to Support Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: A Systematic Review Protocol.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Gemma; McCann, Lisa

    2017-01-17

    A range of innovative websites, mobile technologies, eHealth and mHealth platforms have emerged to support adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Previous reviews have identified these various applications and solutions, but no review has summarized the quality, feasibility, and efficacy of existing patient platforms (inclusive of websites, mobile technologies, mHealth and eHealth platforms) developed specifically for young people with cancer. This paper describes the design of a protocol to conduct a review of published studies or reports which describe or report on an existing platform designed specifically for AYAs who have had a cancer diagnosis. A search string was developed using a variety of key words and Medical Subject Heading and applied to bibliographic databases. General data (sample characteristics, patient platform development, design and, if applicable, pilot testing outcomes) will be extracted from reports and studies. Drawing on a previously developed coding schematic, the identified patient platforms will be coded for mode of delivery into (1) automated functions, (2) communicative functions, and (3) use of supplementary modes. An adapted version of the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS) will be used to assess the of quality of each identified patient platform. The methodological quality of included studies will be assessed using the Quality Assessment Criteria for Evaluating Primary Research Papers from a Variety of Fields (QualSyst). Both authors will independently screen eligible studies for final inclusion and will both be responsible for data extraction and appraisal. Data will be synthesized narratively to provide an overview of identified patient platforms. The review began in October 2016 and is currently in progress. The review paper will be submitted for peer-review and publication in the summer of 2017. This review will be unique in its focus on assessing, where possible, the quality and efficacy of patient platforms for

  13. Assessing the Quality, Feasibility, and Efficacy of Electronic Patient Platforms Designed to Support Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer: A Systematic Review Protocol

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Background A range of innovative websites, mobile technologies, eHealth and mHealth platforms have emerged to support adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Previous reviews have identified these various applications and solutions, but no review has summarized the quality, feasibility, and efficacy of existing patient platforms (inclusive of websites, mobile technologies, mHealth and eHealth platforms) developed specifically for young people with cancer. Objective This paper describes the design of a protocol to conduct a review of published studies or reports which describe or report on an existing platform designed specifically for AYAs who have had a cancer diagnosis. Methods A search string was developed using a variety of key words and Medical Subject Heading and applied to bibliographic databases. General data (sample characteristics, patient platform development, design and, if applicable, pilot testing outcomes) will be extracted from reports and studies. Drawing on a previously developed coding schematic, the identified patient platforms will be coded for mode of delivery into (1) automated functions, (2) communicative functions, and (3) use of supplementary modes. An adapted version of the Mobile App Rating Scale (MARS) will be used to assess the of quality of each identified patient platform. The methodological quality of included studies will be assessed using the Quality Assessment Criteria for Evaluating Primary Research Papers from a Variety of Fields (QualSyst). Both authors will independently screen eligible studies for final inclusion and will both be responsible for data extraction and appraisal. Data will be synthesized narratively to provide an overview of identified patient platforms. Results The review began in October 2016 and is currently in progress. The review paper will be submitted for peer-review and publication in the summer of 2017. Conclusions This review will be unique in its focus on assessing, where possible, the

  14. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org Cancer.Net -- www.cancer.net/coping- ...

  15. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer is, how cancer is tracked, and the economic impact of cancer in the United States. Lifetime ... Cancer? Cancer Surveillance Programs in the United States Economic Impact of Cancer Finding Cancer Information Learn how ...

  16. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Eye Cancer > Eye Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Eye Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... trained to treat intraocular cancer. Parts of the eye The eye is the organ that collects light ...

  17. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  18. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    OVARIAN CANCER Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  19. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - anus; Squamous cell carcinoma - anal; HPV - anal cancer ... Anal cancer can start anywhere in the anus. Where it starts determines the kind of cancer it is. Squamous cell carcinoma. This is the most common type of anal cancer. It ...

  20. Cancer Clusters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Clusters On This Page What is a cancer cluster? ... the number of cancer cases in the suspected cluster Many reported clusters include too few cancer cases ...

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  2. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  3. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  5. Psychosocial Strength Enhancing Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Akiko; Okamura, Jun; Ueda, Reiko; Sunami, Shosuke; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ogawa, Junko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore ways of enhancing psychosocial strengths in newly diagnosed and relapsed adolescents and young adults (AYAs) to improve their resilience. A descriptive case study was used. The adolescent resilience model (ARM) and the self-sustaining process model were applied as theories. The data were analyzed using pattern-matching logic. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 18 patients aged 12 to 24 years and discharged within 10 years. We found that the newly diagnosed and the relapsing AYAs developed the 5 strength factors of the ARM during and after treatment. Whether the individuals cultivated a positive attitude and sense of purpose early or late, the AYAs developed resilience eventually. A positive attitude and sense of purpose during the early phase of care may be essential for improving resilience. The AYAs benefited from the support of their parents, friends, and previous experience. Individualized support and social resources may be important to develop these strengths. Further research is needed to develop strengths and improve resilience in newly diagnosed AYAs.

  6. Gallbladder Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Gallbladder Cancer Chemotherapy for Gallbladder Cancer Palliative Therapy for Gallbladder Cancer Treatment Options Based on the Extent of Gallbladder Cancer ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  7. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  8. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  9. Adoption of pediatric-inspired acute lymphoblastic leukemia regimens by adult oncologists treating adolescents and young adults: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Muffly, Lori; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Shiraz, Parveen; Abrahão, Renata; McNeer, Jennifer; Stock, Wendy; Keegan, Theresa; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2017-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated superior outcomes for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are treated using pediatric versus adult therapeutic regimens. To the best of our knowledge, whether adult oncologists in the United States have adopted this approach to ALL in AYA patients is currently unknown. The objective of the current study was to provide a population-based description of ALL treatment patterns in AYA individuals over the past decade. Data regarding AYA patients aged 15 to 39 years and diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 while living in the Greater Bay Area were obtained from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry (GBACR). Treating facilities were designated as pediatric or adult centers; induction treatment regimens were abstracted from registry text data fields. Of 304 patients diagnosed in the GBACR catchment region, complete treatment data were available for 229 (75%). The location of care was identified for 296 patients (97%) treated at 31 unique centers. Approximately 70% of AYA patients received induction therapy at an adult treatment center. All AYA patients who were treated at pediatric centers received pediatric ALL regimens. Among AYA patients treated by adult oncologists with complete treatment data, none received a pediatric regimen before 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, while the US Adult Intergroup C10403 pediatric-inspired ALL protocol was open to accrual, 31% of AYA patients treated by adult oncologists received pediatric regimens. This rate fell to 21% from 2013 through 2014. Adult facilities treating ≥ 2 AYA patients with ALL per year captured in the GBACR were more likely to administer pediatric regimens than lower volume centers (P = .03). As of 2014, only a minority of AYA patients with ALL received pediatric ALL regimens at adult cancer centers. Cancer 2017;122-130. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  11. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common childhood cancers are leukemia , lymphoma , and brain cancer . As kids enter the teen years, osteosarcoma (bone ... With Cancer Adjust Leukemia Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Osteosarcoma Brain Tumors Cancer Center Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Balancing Academics and ...

  12. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, CT scan Ovarian cancer dangers Ovarian growth worries Uterus Ovarian cancer Ovarian cancer metastasis References Coleman ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  13. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  14. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Cancer What is Skin Cancer? Skin cancer is the most common type ... of approximately 9,480 Americans in 2013. Can Skin Cancer Be Treated? Most basal cell and squamous ...

  15. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  16. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2345 Phone Search Search Category Cancer A-Z Anal Cancer If you have anal cancer or are close to someone who does, ... cope. Here you can find out all about anal cancer, including risk factors, symptoms, how it is ...

  17. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer; Testicular neoplasm ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... Abnormal testicle development Exposure to certain chemicals ...

  18. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  19. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-13

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  20. Radon and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid ... does radon cause cancer? How many people develop lung cancer because of exposure to radon? How did scientists ...

  1. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  3. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-23

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  4. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  5. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  6. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  7. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... idea of what to expect in the future. Breast cancer stages range from 0 to IV. The higher the ... is based on many factors, including: Type of breast cancer Stage of the cancer (staging is a tool your ...

  8. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  9. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cancers in the United States. Cancer Home Kidney Cancer Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... work with the chemical trichloroethylene. What Are the Kidneys? The body has two kidneys, one on each ...

  10. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  11. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  12. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  13. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  14. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  15. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  16. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, ... the uterus. This type is also called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of uterine cancer include Abnormal vaginal ...

  17. Cancer Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  18. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  19. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a biopsy. Treatment varies, depending on your overall health and how advanced the cancer is. It might include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or biologic therapy. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  20. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rytting, Michael E; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2017-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population is a difficult clinical problem. The AYA population, generally regarded as patients aged 15 to 39 years, currently draws a good deal of attention, particularly in the area of therapy selection. The current trend is to treat this group of patients with leukemia regimens based on pediatric protocols, and results comparing pediatric approaches versus adult approaches to treatment are maturing. Results are pending from a large US trial in which pediatric-based treatment is given to AYA patients with ALL. In tandem with these new clinical trials, researchers have reported disease features in the AYA group that may explain some of the differences in response to treatment observed in the AYA population compared with the pediatric population. In addition, unique social factors in this age group add to the complexity of ALL therapy in the AYA population. AYA patients are developing independence and separating from their parents. They tend to be noncompliant. Young adults suffer from a lack of health care insurance and poor access to clinical trials, and have specific concerns regarding toxicities, in particular fertility. Cancer 2017;123:2398-403. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Cancer Treatment - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on cancer treatment research. Includes posts on new treatments for cancer and their effects, clinical trial results, and overcoming treatment resistance.

  3. Cancer Disparities - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Blog posts on cancer health disparities research—including factors that influence disparities, disparities-related research efforts, and diversity in the cancer research workforce—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  4. Cancer Technology - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    Blog posts on technologies that affect cancer research and care—including new technologies for detecting cancer, testing treatments, storing/analyzing data, and improving patient care—from NCI Cancer Currents.

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  6. Cancer Prevention - Cancer Currents Blog

    Cancer.gov

    A catalog of posts from NCI’s Cancer Currents blog on research related to cancer prevention. Includes posts on behavioral interventions and other ways to prevent cancer and prevention-related research programs.

  7. Outcomes in adolescents and young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma treated on US cooperative group protocols: An adult intergroup (E2496) and Children's Oncology Group (COG AHOD0031) comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Tara O; Parsons, Susan K; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Chen, Lu; Hong, Fangxin; Smith, Sonali M; McNeer, Jennifer L; Advani, Ranjana H; Gascoyne, Randy D; Constine, Louis S; Horning, Sandra; Bartlett, Nancy L; Shah, Bijal; Connors, Joseph M; Leonard, John I; Kahl, Brad S; Kelly, Kara M; Schwartz, Cindy L; Li, Hongli; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Friedman, Debra L; Gordon, Leo I; Evens, Andrew M

    2017-09-13

    There is no clear consensus between pediatric and adult providers about the treatment of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between 114 patients ages 17 to 21 years with HL who were treated on the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Intergroup adult E2496 study and 391 similarly patients ages 17 to 21 years with HL who were treated on the pediatric Children's Oncology Group (COG) AHOD0031 study. Comparing AYAs from the COG and E2496 studies, there were no significant differences in extralymphatic disease, anemia, or hypoalbuminemia. More AYAs in the E2496 trial had stage III and IV disease (63% vs 29%; P < .001) and B symptoms (63% vs 27%; P < .001), and fewer had bulk disease (33% vs 77%; P < .001). More AYAs on the COG trial received radiotherapy (76% vs 66%; P = .03), although in smaller doses. E2496 AYA The 5-year FFS and OS rates were 68% and 89%, respectively in the E2496 AYAs and 81% and 97%, respectively, in the COG AYAs, indicating a statistically superior compared in the COG AYAs (P = .001). In stratified multivariable analyses, E2496 AYAs had worse FFS than COG AYAs in all strata except patients who had stage I and II HL without anemia. Propensity score analysis (based on stage, anemia, and bulk disease) confirmed inferior FFS for E2496 AYAs compared with COG AYAs (P = .004). On the E2496 study, FFS was significantly divergent across age groups (P = .005), with inferior outcomes for those ages 17 to 21 years versus 22-44 years. There was no difference across age on the COG study. Younger AYA patients with HL appear to have better outcomes when treated on a pediatric trial than patients of similar age on an adult trial. Prospective studies examining these differences are warranted. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. Testicular Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  9. Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer High-Dose Chemotherapy and ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  10. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... they demand more and more of the body's nutrition. Cancer takes a person's strength, destroys organs and bones, and weakens the body's defenses against other illnesses. Cancer is uncommon in children, but can happen. The most common childhood cancers are leukemia , lymphoma , and brain cancer . As ...

  11. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer Overview Prostate cancer is cancer that occurs in the prostate — a small walnut-shaped gland in men that produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of ...

  12. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Anal cancer Overview Anal cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that occurs in the anal canal. The anal canal is a short tube at the end ... your rectum through which stool leaves your body. Anal cancer can cause signs and symptoms such as ...

  13. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecological cancer to prevent with ... HPV on a woman's cervix. Certain types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor will swab the cervix for cells. ...

  14. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  15. Gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 33 selections. Some of the titles are: The natural history of colorectal cancer; opportunities for intervention; Radiotherapy for early rectal cancer; Intraoperative irradiation for gastrointestinal cancers; Hepatocellular carcinoma; clinical presentation, etiology, and prevention; and Current issues in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

  16. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  17. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  18. Experiences of Parents and General Practitioners with End-of-Life Care in Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaal, Suzanne E J; Kuijken, Noortje M J; Verhagen, Constant A H H V M; Jansen, Rosemarie; Servaes, Petra; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to analyze the experiences of Dutch bereaved parents and general practitioners (GPs) with palliative care of AYAs (18-35 years) in the terminal stage. Fifteen parents and nine GPs involved with nine deceased AYAs filled out questionnaires and were interviewed by telephone, respectively. In general, the parents were satisfied with the emotional care they themselves received and the medical care that their child received. The GPs were very satisfied with the cooperation with the palliative team. Gaps are present in the areas of symptom control, communication between hospital professionals and parents, aftercare, and transition between hospital and GP.

  19. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  20. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  1. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  2. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  3. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H. Y.; Griffiths, T. R.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales. The most common presenting symptom is macroscopic haematuria. The management options for superficial and invasive bladder cancer depend on the stage at presentation. Most superficial bladder cancers are managed by transurethral resection and cytoscopic follow-up. The prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is less good. The role of chemical, radiotherapeutic and surgical intervention are discussed. PMID:9015464

  4. Endometrial cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy , and chemotherapy . Surgery to remove the uterus ( hysterectomy ) may be done in women with early stage ... uterine; Cancer - endometrial; Uterine corpus cancer Patient Instructions Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge ...

  5. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  6. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to control or reduce symptoms of kidney cancer that has spread to other areas of the body, such as the bones. No complementary and alternative therapies have been proved to successfully treat kidney cancer. ...

  7. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers that don't respond to hormone therapy. Biological therapy Biological therapy (immunotherapy) uses your body's immune system to fight cancer cells. One type of biological therapy called sipuleucel-T (Provenge) has been developed ...

  8. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... THERAPY Targeted treatment zeroes in on specific targets (molecules) in cancer cells. These targets play a role ... colon cancer. Some studies have reported that NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib) may help reduce the ...

  9. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Events Cancer Currents Blog All Press Releases 2017 ... Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History ...

  10. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  11. Eyelid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  12. Appendix Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  13. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and ...

  14. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and getting enough rest can help combat the stress and fatigue of cancer. There's no sure way to prevent ovarian cancer. But certain factors are associated with lower risk: Use of oral contraceptives, especially for more than 10 years Previous ...

  15. Throat Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cancerous tumors that develop in your throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx) or tonsils. Your throat is a muscular tube that begins behind your nose and ends in your neck. Throat cancer most often begins in the flat cells that ...

  16. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer often starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  17. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cell the cancer develops in. Examples include: Adenocarcinoma, the most common type of pancreatic cancer Other ... idea of what to expect. Treatment Treatment for adenocarcinoma depends on the stage of the tumor. Surgery ...

  18. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  19. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  20. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  1. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  2. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  3. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  4. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  6. Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  7. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  8. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  9. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  10. Cancer in Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Cancer Basics Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, ... section Cancer Basics Diagnosing Cancer Managing Your Care Financial Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, ...

  11. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  12. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... age 35, and having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a ...

  13. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cancer on the population and to develop strategies to address the challenges that cancer poses to the society at large. Statistical trends are also important for measuring the success of efforts to control and manage cancer. Statistics at a Glance: The ...

  14. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how early the cancer was diagnosed. Left untreated, breast cancer can spread to other parts of the body, including internal organs. This could cause serious health problems or be fatal. It is very important to get treatment as soon as possible.Living with cancer during ...

  15. Cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjili, Masoud H.; Payne, Kyle K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers utilize multiple mechanisms to overcome immune responses. Emerging evidence suggest that immunotherapy of cancer should focus on inducing and re-programming cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems rather than focusing solely on T cells. Recently, we have shown that such a multifaceted approach can improve immunotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:22720242

  16. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop the growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. This research includes finding ways to help your immune system ... the steps in the process that allow cancer cells to spread. Visit the Metastatic Cancer Research page to stay informed of ongoing research funded ...

  17. Cancer Triptych.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Sandra L

    2016-08-01

    The author uses personal narrative to show how the cold cloak of cancer covered her family during the polar vortex of 2013-2014. The use of a triptych form hinges together related themes of containment, coping, communicative responses, and social support after a cancer diagnosis. This narrative demonstrates the multiple responses and communicative coping strategies to a cancer diagnosis.

  18. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  19. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it.

  20. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  1. Racial disparities in the survival of American children, adolescents, and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Justine M; Keegan, Theresa H M; Tao, Li; Abrahão, Renata; Bleyer, Archie; Viny, Aaron D

    2016-09-01

    Race-based survival in children and adolescents with hematologic malignancies has been a national challenge for decades. Large-scale investigations of age- and race-based survival trends over time in these patients have not previously been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate whether race- and age-related differences in pediatric and adolescent and young adult (AYA) leukemia and lymphoma survival persist and to what extent these differences have changed over time. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, this study investigated the outcomes of black and white (1975-2012; n = 27,369) and white and Hispanic (1992-2012; n = 20,574) children (0-14 years old) and AYAs (15-39 years old) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Estimates of 5- and 10-year relative survival were compared over time. Trends showed a convergence of survival for white and black children with ALL but a divergence in survival for AYA patients. Hispanic children and AYAs both suffered inferior outcomes. Trends for AML revealed persistent survival differences between black and white children and suggested worsening disparities for AYAs. Survival trends in HL revealed sustained survival differences between black and white AYA patients, whereas no differences were found in Hispanic and white patient outcomes for AML or HL. Although survival for children and AYAs with ALL, AML, and HL has improved over the past 4 decades, differences persist between black, white, and Hispanic children and AYAs; survival disparities between black and white children with ALL have been nearly eliminated. Strategies aimed at identifying causality and reducing disparities are warranted. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2723-2730. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  2. Cancer interception.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Elizabeth H

    2011-06-01

    A common perception is that cancer risk reduction is passive, such as not smoking. However, advances in the understanding of cancer biology and in cancer treatment modalities suggest that it is now timely to consider anew cancer risk reduction by active, including pharmacologic, approaches. Risk avoidance approaches are certainly important, but other approaches are important as well, as exemplified by the irony that most new lung cancers occur in former smokers, or current avoiders. Cancer interception is the active way of combating cancer and carcinogenesis at earlier and earlier stages. A great challenge is to educate people that the development of cancers, like heart disease, typically takes years and accordingly can potentially be intercepted with risk-reducing agents in the same way that advanced cancers can be treated with drugs or that cardiovascular disease can be intercepted with antihypertensive and other risk-reducing drugs. The cancer biology behind cancer interception is increasingly solid. For example, hedgehog pathway studies of mutations in the patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) gene, which constitutively activates Smoothened (SMO), led to development of an oral SMO inhibitor active in advanced basal cell carcinoma and which, in very high-risk Gorlin syndrome patients (germ line PTCH1 mutation), is nearly completely clinically effective in intercepting basal cell neoplasia. Also, the oral immunomodulator lenalidomide, first found to be active in advanced, relapsed multiple myeloma, was highly effective in intercepting the precursor stage, high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma from progressing. These are but two exciting, recent examples of the many advances in cancer research that have created an optimal time to discover and implement cancer interception. The multifaceted roles of telomere maintenance in both fueling advanced cancers and, at early stages, keeping them at bay, also highlight how the growing knowledge of cancer biology opens avenues for cancer

  3. Health Literacy in Adolescents and Young Adults: An Updated Review.

    PubMed

    Sansom-Daly, Ursula M; Lin, Merry; Robertson, Eden G; Wakefield, Claire E; McGill, Brittany C; Girgis, Afaf; Cohn, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Health literacy is important for health outcomes in adults. However, little is known about the health literacy of adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The purpose of this study was to provide an updated systematic review examining health literacy among AYAs with and without chronic illness. Specifically, the review considered (1) what sources of health information AYAs use; (2) how well AYAs are able to understand, communicate, and critically evaluate health-related information; and (3) whether health literacy is associated with health behaviors and outcomes. A systematic search was conducted for literature published in peer-reviewed journals using Medline, Embase, and PsycINFO databases. Of 603 articles reviewed, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria, six of which examined health literacy in a chronic illness population. Studies reported high usage for information sources, though no clear links between source type and health literacy emerged. Adequate health literacy was reported in at least 60% of participants, though poor functional literacy was reported. Few studies explored communicative or critical health literacy; those that did indicated that AYAs experience challenges in these domains. Poorer health literacy was associated with some adverse health outcomes, such as obesity and smoking. For AYAs with a chronic illness, there were mixed findings between health literacy and medication adherence. Understanding the challenges AYAs face with regards to complex developing communicative and critical health literacy skills is crucial. Due to the paucity of research in this field, addressing health literacy across all AYAs will provide a valuable step in guiding research in AYAs with cancer.

  4. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  5. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain Control for Kidney Cancer Treatment ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  6. Cruciferous Vegetables and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  7. Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ... Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & Early Detection Treatment Cancer & Public Health ...

  8. Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Request Permissions Salivary Gland Cancer: Risk Factors Approved by the Cancer.Net ... f t k e P Types of Cancer Salivary Gland Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Salivary Gland Cancer ...

  9. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  10. Cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Dhanapal, Raghu; Saraswathi, Tr; Govind, Rajkumar N

    2011-09-01

    Cancer cachexia is a wasting syndrome characterized by weight loss, anorexia, asthenia and anemia. The pathogenicity of this syndrome is multifactorial, due to a complex interaction of tumor and host factors. The signs and symptoms of cachexia are considered as the prognostic parameters in cancer patients. This review gives an emphasis on the various mechanisms involved in cachexia and an insight into head and neck cancer cachexia.

  11. Haematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-07-27

    Essential facts Haematological malignancies are a diverse group of cancers that affect the blood, bone marrow and lymphatic systems. The main categories are lymphoma, leukaemia, myeloma, myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. In addition, there are subtypes of lymphoma and leukaemia, as well as more rare haematological cancers that have their own categories. There are also borderline conditions such as aplastic anaemia and other non-malignant bone marrow failure syndromes. The charity Bloodwise says 38,000 people in Britain are diagnosed every year with blood cancer or a related disorder, making it the country's fifth most common cancer.

  12. Improving Access to Standardized Fertility Preservation Information for Older Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Using a User-Centered Approach with Young Adult Patients, Survivors, and Partners to Refine Fertility Knowledge Transfer.

    PubMed

    Tam, Seline; Puri, Natasha; Stephens, Derek; Mitchell, Laura; Giuliani, Meredith; Papadakos, Janet; Gupta, Abha A

    2016-09-27

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients under 40 should be made aware of their fertility risks and preservation options throughout their care. However, discussions on fertility preservation (FP) do not routinely occur. With a dearth of FP resources, oncology providers may lack knowledge around FP. Thus, informational needs can be unmet, leading to anxiety and distress in patients. Provision of pertinent and timely information can help patients cope better with their diagnosis. FP pamphlets were developed for men and women with cancer. A cross-sectional in-house survey, using convenience sampling, evaluated the pamphlets' effectiveness and measured ease of understanding, acceptability, and perceived utility. Patients and partners were also asked to provide recommendations and complete the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) measuring health literacy level. This helps determine if health literacy influences perception of pamphlet effectiveness. All participants (n = 56) reviewed both pamphlets. Fifty-four participants (96 %) found the pamphlet for men useful, while 29 participants (52 %) improved their male fertility knowledge. The pamphlet for women was useful for 52 participants (93 %) and improved knowledge in 35 (63 %) of them. Although the majority of participants had adequate health literacy (98 %), there was insufficient sample diversity to determine if health literacy influenced the pamphlet's effectiveness. Participants indicated preference in receiving verbal (73 %) and written (66 %) information over watching videos or in-class education. They recommended including fertility clinics, financial resources, and statistics in the brochures. These FP pamphlets were concluded as effective in supporting patients in making FP decisions.

  13. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  14. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  15. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  16. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Prostate Cancer Key Points Prostate cancer is a disease in ...

  17. Cancer during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reproduction > Cancer During Pregnancy Request Permissions Cancer During Pregnancy Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... an oncologist . Types of cancers that occur during pregnancy The cancers that tend to occur during pregnancy ...

  18. Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Cancer > Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma). Use the menu below to choose ...

  19. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  20. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  1. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  2. Secondhand Smoke and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  3. National Cancer Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Research Cancer Genomics Research Research on Causes of ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  4. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  5. Cancer in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Differences Between Cancers in Adults and Children? Childhood cancers are often the result of DNA changes very ... cancers in adults and children. Key Statistics for Childhood Cancer The American Cancer Society's most recent estimates and ...

  6. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Childhood Cancers A cancer diagnosis is upsetting at any age, ... central nervous system (CNS) tumors , and lymphomas . Treating Childhood Cancer Children's cancers are not always treated like adult ...

  7. Ontario-wide Cancer TArgeted Nucleic Acid Evaluation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Breast Cancer; Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Melanoma; Gynecological Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Cancer; Gastrointestinal Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Rare Cancer; Unknown Primary Cancer

  8. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Oner; Dobruch, Jakub; Knowles, Margaret A; Burger, Maximilian; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Nielsen, Matthew E; Lotan, Yair

    2017-04-13

    Bladder cancer is a highly prevalent disease and is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and cost. Environmental or occupational exposures to carcinogens, especially tobacco, are the main risk factors for bladder cancer. Most bladder cancers are diagnosed after patients present with macroscopic haematuria, and cases are confirmed after transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT), which also serves as the first stage of treatment. Bladder cancer develops via two distinct pathways, giving rise to non-muscle-invasive papillary tumours and non-papillary (solid) muscle-invasive tumours. The two subtypes have unique pathological features and different molecular characteristics. Indeed, The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified genetic drivers of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) as well as subtypes of MIBC with distinct characteristics and therapeutic responses. For non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), intravesical therapies (primarily Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)) with maintenance are the main treatments to prevent recurrence and progression after initial TURBT; additional therapies are needed for those who do not respond to BCG. For localized MIBC, optimizing care and reducing morbidity following cystectomy are important goals. In metastatic disease, advances in our genetic understanding of bladder cancer and in immunotherapy are being translated into new therapies.

  9. Kangri cancer.

    PubMed

    Wani, Imtiaz

    2010-04-01

    Kangri cancer is a heat-induced skin carcinoma associated with the use of the Kangri. This Kangri, which is a traditional fire pot, is an ingenious mode of providing warmth. The Kangri is an earthenware container with an outer encasement of wickerwork that is filled with ignited coal inside for providing a source of heat in winter months. Its prolonged use may result in formation of erythema ab igne, a reticulate hypermelanosis with erythema, which may transform into cutaneous cancer. Currently, this skin cancer rarely is found in the Kashmir valley. Between 2003 and 2008, all those having Kangri cancer were studied. A 5-year study was conducted during which 17 patients who were documented with a Kangri cancer were treated. Sixteen patients had cancer on a thigh and 1 had cancer on the abdominal wall. All had an excision of the neoplasm. Histopathology documented squamous cell carcinoma in all patients. Kangri cancer still occurs in patients who live in remote areas of Kashmir where there is a chilling cold in winter months and have no modern and alternative cheap means of warming other than the Kangri. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Ernst J.; Grady, William M.; Lieberman, David; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sung, Joseph J.; Boelens, Petra G.; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer had a low incidence several decades ago. However, it has become a predominant cancer and now accounts for approximately 10% of cancer-related mortality in western countries. The ‘rise’ of colorectal cancer in developed countries can be attributed to the increasingly ageing population, unfavourable modern dietary habits and an increase in risk factors such as smoking, low physical exercise and obesity. New treatments for primary and metastatic colorectal cancer have emerged, providing additional options for patients; these treatments include laparoscopic surgery for primary disease, more-aggressive resection of metastatic disease (such as liver and pulmonary metastases), radiotherapy for rectal cancer and neoadjuvant and palliative chemotherapies. However, these new treatment options have had limited impact on cure rates and long-term survival. For these reasons, and the recognition that colorectal cancer is long preceded by a polypoid precursor, screening programmes have gained momentum. This Primer provides an overview of the current state of art knowledge on the epidemiology and mechanisms of colorectal cancer, as well as on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27189416

  11. Gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patrlj, Leonardo; Kopljar, Mario; Kliček, Robert; Kolovrat, Marijan; Loncar, Bozo; Busic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer involving gastrointestinal tract, but it is the most common malignancy of the biliary tract, accounting for 80-95% of biliary tract cancers. This tumor is a highly lethal disease with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5% and mean survival mere than 6 months. An early diagnosis is essential as this malignancy progresses silently with a late diagnosis. The percentage of patients diagnosed to have gallbladder cancer after simple cholecystectomy for presumed gallbladder stone disease is 0.5-1.5%. Patients with preoperative suspicion of gallbladder cancer should not be treated by laparoscopy. Epidemiological studies have identified striking geographic and ethnic disparities—inordinately high occurrence in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia, yet quite low elsewhere in the Americas and the world. Environmental triggers play a critical role in eliciting cancer developing in the gallbladder, best exemplified by cholelithiasis and chronic inflammation from biliary tract and parasitic infections. Improved imaging modalities and improved radical aggressive surgical approach in the last decade has improved outcomes and helped prolong survival in patients with gallbladder cancer. The overall 5-year survival for patients with gallbladder cancer who underwent R0 curative resection was from 21% to 69%. In the future, the development of potential diagnostic markers for disease will yield screening opportunities for those at risk either with ethnic susceptibility or known anatomic anomalies of the biliary tract. PMID:25392833

  12. Occupational cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, T.L.; Goldsmith, D.F.

    1986-09-01

    When cancer is possibly related to occupation, the family physician's task is to put the matter in perspective by educating the patient and carefully documenting the appearance of the tumor and the patient's work history. Occasionally, physicians are the first to recognize new associations between chemicals and cancer and can help to bring hazards under control.

  13. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  14. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  16. Vaginal Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Vaginal Cancer Vaginal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Vaginal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Vaginal Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  17. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  18. Oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Elizabeth C; Lagergren, Jesper; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Lordick, Florian; Shah, Manish A; Lagergren, Pernilla; Cunningham, David

    2017-07-27

    Oesophageal cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and is therefore a major global health challenge. The two major subtypes of oesophageal cancer are oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC), which are epidemiologically and biologically distinct. OSCC accounts for 90% of all cases of oesophageal cancer globally and is highly prevalent in the East, East Africa and South America. OAC is more common in developed countries than in developing countries. Preneoplastic lesions are identifiable for both OSCC and OAC; these are frequently amenable to endoscopic ablative therapies. Most patients with oesophageal cancer require extensive treatment, including chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and/or surgical resection. Patients with advanced or metastatic oesophageal cancer are treated with palliative chemotherapy; those who are human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive may also benefit from trastuzumab treatment. Immuno-oncology therapies have also shown promising early results in OSCC and OAC. In this Primer, we review state-of-the-art knowledge on the biology and treatment of oesophageal cancer, including screening, endoscopic ablative therapies and emerging molecular targets, and we discuss best practices in chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, surgery and the maintenance of patient quality of life.

  19. [Adolescent and Young Adults (AYAS) brain tumor national Web conference. On behalf of ANOCEF, GO-AJA and SFCE societies].

    PubMed

    Frappaz, Didier; Sunyach, Marie-Pierre; Le Rhun, Emilie; Blonski, Marie; Laurence, Valérie; Bonneville Levard, Alice; Loiseau, Hugues; Meyronnet, David; Callies, Arnaud; Laigle-Donadey, F; Faure Conter, Cecile

    2016-12-01

    The skills of adult versus pediatric neuro-oncologists are not completely similar though additive. Because the tumors and their protocols are different and the tolerance and expected sequelae are specific. Multidisciplinary meetings including adult and pediatric neuro-oncologists are warranted to share expertise. Since 2008, a weekly national web based conference was held in France. Any patient with the following criteria could be discussed: Adolescent and Young Adults aged between 15 and 25 years, and any adult with a pediatric type pathology, including medulloblastoma, germ cell tumors, embryonic tumors, ependymoma, pilocytic astrocytoma.

  20. Cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2010-05-01

    The veterinary oncology profession is uniquely able to contribute to the many advances that are imminent in immunotherapy. However, what works in a mouse will often not reflect the outcome in human patients with cancer. Therefore, comparative immunotherapy studies using veterinary patients may be better able to bridge murine and human studies. Many cancers in dogs and cats seem to be stronger models for their counterpart human tumors than presently available murine model systems. This author looks forward to the time when immunotherapy plays a significant role in the treatment and/or prevention of cancer in human and veterinary patients.

  1. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Visitor Information Search Search Home Cancer Types Stomach (Gastric) Cancer—Patient Version Health Professional Version Overview Gastric (stomach) cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ...

  2. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy: Uses light to burn abnormal tissue A hysterectomy (surgery to remove the uterus but not the ... for more advanced cervical cancer may include: Radical hysterectomy, which removes the uterus and much of the ...

  3. Cancer - penis

    MedlinePlus

    ... smelling substance under the foreskin History of genital warts , or human papillomavirus (HPV). Smoking. Injury to the ... common experiences and problems may help relieve the stress associated with diagnosis and treatment of cancer of ...

  4. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  5. Lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sputum test to look for cancer cells Thoracentesis (sampling of fluid buildup around the lung) In most ... quitting, talk with your provider. There are many methods to help you quit, from support groups to ...

  6. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow and multiply in an uncontrolled way. Normal body cells grow and divide over a period of time ... and environmental triggers can cause changes in the body's cells that push them into a cancerous state. For ...

  7. Cancer treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... a needle or probe placed in the tumor. Laser Therapy Laser therapy uses a very narrow, focused beam of light to destroy cancer cells. Laser therapy can be used to: Destroy tumors and precancerous ...

  8. Cancer Today

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of colon cancer in Tony Snow, White House Press Secretary, have helped to spur both public ... assisting more than 200,000 patients," says NCI's Dr. Niederhuber. "And much of that work is carried ...

  9. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  10. Mouth Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rich in fruits and vegetables. The vitamins and antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables may help reduce your risk of mouth cancer. Avoid excessive sun exposure to your lips. Protect the skin on your lips from the sun by staying ...

  11. Parathyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to parathyroid cancer: A drug called gallium nitrate, which lowers the calcium level in the blood ... Hypercalcemia Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Parathyroid gland removal Review Date 2/11/2016 Updated by: Todd ...

  12. Testis cancer.

    PubMed

    Sokoloff, Mitchell H; Joyce, Geoffrey F; Wise, Matthew

    2007-06-01

    We quantified the burden of testis cancer in the United States by identifying trends in its incidence, its treatment and the use of health care resources to estimate the economic impact of the disease. The analytical methods used to generate these results were described previously. The overall incidence of testis cancer in the United States increased 46% between 1975 and 2001. During the same period the ratio of seminoma to nonseminoma increased and there were fewer men presenting with stage II and III tumors. Survival rates increased successively, attaining the current level of 95.9%. Treatment patterns changed and active surveillance increased as a primary treatment modality. Overall hospitalization rates for men with testis cancer decreased from 1.8/100,000 in 1994 and 1.4/100,000 in 2000. Care for white men shifted to the outpatient setting, which did not occur for black men. The estimated annual expenditure for testis cancer for privately insured individuals between ages 18 and 54 years was $6,236. National estimates of annual medical expenditures placed the total cost of treatment at $21.8 million in 2000, representing an increase of 10% over the total in 1994. Of men with testis cancer 16% missed work for treatment of the disease with an average of 8.4 total hours of work missed. The cost of testis cancer is estimated at almost $21.8 million annually. It appears to be increasing with time despite a shift to active surveillance treatments and less hospitalization.

  13. Kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Linehan, W Marston; Rathmell, W Kimryn

    2012-01-01

    Over 65,000 Americans are diagnosed with kidney cancer each year and nearly 13,000 die of this disease. Kidney cancer is not a single disease, it is made up of a number of different types of cancer, each with a different histology, a different clinical course, responding differently to therapy and caused by a different gene. Study of the 13 genes that are known to cause kidney cancer has led to the understanding that kidney cancer is a metabolic disease. Recent discoveries of chromatin remodeling/histone modifying genes, such as PBRM1 and SETD2, have opened up new areas of intense interest in the study of the fundamental genetic basis of kidney cancer. New approaches to immunotherapy with agents such as the CTLA4 inhibitor, ipilumumab, have opened up promising new directions for clinical trials. A number of new agents targeting of VEGF receptor signaling and the mTOR pathways as well as novel approaches targeting HIF2 will hopefully provide the foundation for the development of effective forms of therapy for this disease.

  14. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  15. Oxaliplatin Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-24

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  16. What Is Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Kidney/Wilms Tumor Liver Cancer Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid ... Tumor Liver Cancer Lymphoma (Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma ...

  17. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  18. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  19. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  20. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... RESEARCHERS Research Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Research Network Explore all research programs View all stories NEWSLETTER ...

  1. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  2. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ... Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young ...

  3. Understanding Cancer Prognosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  4. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  5. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Cancer Screening Prevalence Among Adults with Disabilities Economic Evaluation of CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program State ... Cancer Screening Capacity in the United States The Economics of Breast Cancer in Younger Women in the ...

  6. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be similar to widespread ovarian cancer. Fallopian tube cancer This is another rare cancer that is ... to epithelial ovarian cancer. It begins in the tube that carries an egg from the ovary to ...

  7. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  8. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  9. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  10. Gallbladder Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer > Gallbladder Cancer: Overview Request Permissions Gallbladder Cancer: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 08/ ... as it grows. Looking for More of an Overview? If you would like additional introductory information, explore ...

  11. Learning about Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancers Spread 2000 News Release Learning About Skin Cancer What are the most common forms of skin ... years. What are the most common forms of skin cancer? Three types of skin cancer are the most ...

  12. Uterine Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Statistics for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal ( ... Skin Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer Home Uterine Cancer Statistics Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  13. What Is Stomach Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Stomach Cancer About Stomach Cancer What Is Stomach Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... normal structure and function of the stomach. The stomach After food is chewed and swallowed, it enters ...

  14. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, see Cancer Surgery . Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... of use state fundraising notices Site Comments © 2017 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society ...

  15. Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... are being studied in clinical trials. Avoiding risk factors and increasing protective factors may help prevent cancer. Avoiding cancer risk factors ... lower your risk of cancer. The following risk factors may increase the risk of liver cancer: Hepatitis ...

  16. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer screening Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Lung cancer screening is a process that's used to detect the presence ... with a high risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer screening is recommended for older adults who are longtime ...

  17. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  18. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  19. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier; 2014. Last Medical Review: June 1, 2016 Last Revised: August 18, 2016 Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Radiation for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Hormone ...

  20. Cancer Surgery: Physically Removing Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment and symptom relief. Robotic surgery. In robotic surgery, the surgeon sits away from the operating ... to maneuver surgical tools to perform the operation. Robotic surgery helps the surgeon operate in hard-to- ...

  1. The History and Accomplishments of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance.

    PubMed

    Mathews-Bradshaw, Beth; Johnson, Rebecca; Kaplan, Stuart; Craddock, Kelli; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    This article outlines the history, background, and accomplishments of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance. The LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance, a program of the Lance Armstrong Foundation, was developed as a vehicle for a strategic plan designed to implement the Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Progress Review Group (AYAO PRG) recommendations. The AYAO PRG was co-sponsored by Lance Armstrong Foundation and the National Cancer Institute (NCI); both LIVESTRONG and NCI provide strategic oversight and guidance to the Alliance. Highlights and accomplishments: The Alliance accomplishments include the publication of disease-specific retrospective analyses, funding of an AYA cohort study and biorepository proposal, publication of two position statements on guidelines for care of AYAs with cancer and training for AYA oncology health professionals, promotion of an international charter of rights for AYA cancer patients, creation and distribution of a survey to college health professionals, creation and implementation of a Cancer Centers Working Group and Institutional Review Board Toolkit, and continued growth and collaboration through an annual meeting. The growth and success of the Alliance has coincided with the growth of AYA oncology as a field. The collaborative environment of the Alliance draws together a diverse group of individuals united in the effort to increase survival rates and improve the quality of life for adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer.

  2. Durvalumab, Tremelimumab + Radiotherapy in Gynecologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Recurrent Gynecological Cancer; Metastatic Cervical Cancer; Metastatic Ovarian Cancer; Metastatic Vaginal Cancer; Metastatic Vulvar Cancer; Metastatic Endometrial Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

  3. Afatinib in Advanced Refractory Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Urethral Cancer; Ureter Cancer

  4. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  5. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is ...

  6. Vitamin D and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  7. How Are Childhood Cancers Found?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers in Adults and Children? Key Statistics for Childhood Cancer Cancers that Develop in Children Risk Factors and Causes of Childhood Cancer Can Childhood Cancers Be Prevented? Finding Cancer in ...

  8. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  9. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  10. Cancer immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Herberman, R.B. )

    1986-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Immunlogy of human T-cell leukemia/lymphonma (lymphotropic) viruses (the HTLV 'family'); Tumor specific antigens induced by mutagens and DNA hypomethylating agents: implications for the immunobiology of neoplasia; Destruction of tumor cells by macrophages: mechanisms of recognition and lysis and their regulation; Mechanisms of NK-cell mediated cytotoxicity; Role of natural killer (NK) cells in the control of tumor growth and metastatic spread; Monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer; preclinical models and investigations in humans; and Abnormalities in interleukin 2 production and response in cancer and possible therapeutic approaches.

  11. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Espejo Romero, H

    1991-01-01

    Gastric cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, is variable in incidence on the world. In this paper, there is a review of the epidemiology and the etiopathogenic factors of the disease: genetics, hereditary, immunologic and environmental and, also, of the so called precursor diseases: atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, gastric adenoma, gastrectomized patients, pernicious anemia and Menetrier's disease. There is an explanation about the changes of the gastric epithelium related both with the intestinal and diffuse type of adenocarcinoma; the anatomo-pathological notion of macroscopic advanced-Borrmann and early cancer-Japanese classification and the clinical and diagnostic procedures are included with the fundamentals of therapeutic management.

  12. Urologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G P

    1988-10-15

    Cancer prevention and risk reduction in patients with carcinomas of the urinary tract are most easily identified by smoking cessation. Recent assessments of patients with bladder carcinomas show a high percentage of active smokers. Urologic surgeons and those dealing with cancers of the genitourinary tract should recognize such an important factor. In other lifestyle guidelines, the American Cancer Society suggests that those who significantly reduce the fat content of their diet with weight reduction will generally reduce risk factors in a number of cancers, including prostate cancer. Many new diagnostic tests have been introduced since the 1980 conference. Transrectal ultrasonography as a preoperative staging technique has been received with some enthusiasm. Currently, a national program for the testing of the detection of prostate cancer by ultrasound compared with other physical examinations and marker antigens, such as prostate antigen, is underway. The evaluation of renal masses continues to be improved by the use of ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) scanning. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are believed to have added some improved assessment for particularly large tumors and the question of their vascular extension. Occasionally observed lesions of the adrenal gland without hormonal expression in patients continue to be noticed during evaluations for frequently unrelated diagnoses. The management of such lesions less than 3.5 cm in diameter is believed to be conservative based on their size. Preoperative staging of the bladder has improved with transurethral ultrasonography use and the follow-up with patients has developed more frequently with the widely available urinary cytology. Fine needle aspiration of the prostate gland, lymph nodes, and other urinary tumor masses is increasing in diagnostic use. Flow cytometry has been applied to all lesions of the urinary tract and continues to be a field of clinical investigation

  13. Penile Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter E.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Herr, Harry W.; Inman, Brant A.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michalski, Jeff; Pagliaro, Lance; Pal, Sumanta K.; Patterson, Anthony; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Pohar, Kamal S.; Porter, Michael P.; Richie, Jerome P.; Sexton, Wade J.; Shipley, William U.; Small, Eric J.; Trump, Donald L.; Wile, Geoffrey; Wilson, Timothy G.; Dwyer, Mary; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the penis represents approximately 0.5% of all cancers among men in the United States and other developed countries. Although rare, it is associated with significant disfigurement, and only half of the patients survive beyond 5 years. Proper evaluation of both the primary lesion and lymph nodes is critical, because nodal involvement is the most important factor of survival. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Penile Cancer provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this devastating disease based on evidence and expert consensus. PMID:23667209

  14. Cancer Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The patient shown is undergoing cancer radiation treatment in a hospital-like atmosphere but he is not in a hospital. The treatment room is at NASA's Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. It is a converted portion of the Center's cyclotron facility, originally designed for radiation studies related to nuclear propulsion for aircraft and spacecraft. Under an agreement between the Center and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the 50 million volt cyclotron is now being used to evaluate the effectiveness of "fast neutron" therapy in the treatment of cancerous tumors.

  15. Opening end-of-life discussions: how to introduce Voicing My CHOiCES™, an advance care planning guide for adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Sima; Pao, Maryland; Wiener, Lori

    2015-06-01

    Each year, more than 11,000 adolescents and young adults (AYAs), aged 15-34, die from cancer and other life-threatening conditions. In order to facilitate the transition from curative to end-of-life (EoL) care, it is recommended that EoL discussions be routine, begin close to the time of diagnosis, and continue throughout the illness trajectory. However, due largely to discomfort with the topic of EoL and how to approach the conversation, healthcare providers have largely avoided these discussions. We conducted a two-phase study through the National Cancer Institute with AYAs living with cancer or pediatric HIV to assess AYA interest in EoL planning and to determine in which aspects of EoL planning AYAs wanted to participate. These results provided insight regarding what EoL concepts were important to AYAs, as well as preferences in terms of content, design, format, and style. The findings from this research led to the development of an age-appropriate advance care planning guide, Voicing My CHOiCES™. Voicing My CHOiCES™: An Advanced Care Planning Guide for AYA became available in November 2012. This manuscript provides guidelines on how to introduce and utilize an advance care planning guide for AYAs and discusses potential barriers. Successful use of Voicing My CHOiCES™ will depend on the comfort and skills of the healthcare provider. The present paper is intended to introduce the guide to providers who may utilize it as a resource in their practice, including physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, psychiatrists, and psychologists. We suggest guidelines on how to: incorporate EoL planning into the practice setting, identify timepoints at which a patient's goals of care are discussed, and address how to empower the patient and incorporate the family in EoL planning. Recommendations for introducing Voicing My CHOiCES™ and on how to work through each section alongside the patient are provided.

  16. Cancer Biomarkers Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. The Physics of Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction to the cell; 2. The biology of cancer; 3. A modeling toolbox for cancer growth; 4. Vascular hydrodynamics and tumor angiogenesis; 5. Cancer stem cells and the population dynamics of tumors; 6. Biomechanics of cancer; 7. Cancer cell migration; 8. Chromosome and chromatin dynamics in cancer; 9. Control of tumor growth by the immune system; 10. Pharmacological approaches: old and new; 11. Outlook on the physics of cancer: a new interdisciplinary area; References; Index.

  18. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Institute, components of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse 1 NOHIC Way Bethesda, MD 20892-3500 1–866–232–4528 www. nidcr. ...

  19. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  20. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    You have two kidneys. They are fist-sized organs on either side of your backbone above your waist. The tubes inside filter and ... blood, taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney cancer forms in the lining of tiny tubes ...

  1. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  2. Cancer Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominiecki, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    University of Colorado's Virtual Student Fellowship available at and developed by Bakemeier, Richard F. This website is designed to give students applying for a fellowship an overview of basic topics in biology and how they are used by cancer researchers to develop new treatments.

  3. Occupational Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... number is expected to increase due to the growth and aging of the population, as well as reductions in childhood mortality and deaths from infectious diseases in developing countries(1). Cancer is the ... the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. Each different type ...

  4. Kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Wallen, Eric M; Pruthi, Raj S; Joyce, Geoffrey F; Wise, Matthew

    2007-06-01

    We quantified the burden of kidney cancer in the United States by identifying trends in the use of health care resources and estimating the economic impact of the disease. The analytical methods used to generate these results were described previously. The incidence of all stages of kidney cancer is increasing in America, particularly T1 disease. Rates are increasing more rapidly in the black than in the white population and survival is worse for black individuals at all stages of diagnosis. Total expenditures for kidney cancer were $401 million in 2000, representing a 46% increase from 1994. Approximately 85% of health care dollars spent on kidney cancer were for inpatient care with steady increases through the 1990s. Regarding treatment, more partial nephrectomies were performed in Medicare patients as the 1990s progressed. Health Care Cost and Utilization Project data showed an increase in the number of inpatient hospitalizations but this trend was not seen in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data set. Length of stay decreased from 1994 to 2000 in the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project database. The adoption of laparoscopic techniques began to appear in the Veterans Affairs data set in 2001 and it increased thereafter. Increasing trends in the incidence of and costs associated with kidney cancer have been apparent for more than 10 years. As the population ages and the prevalence of risk factors such as obesity and hypertension increases, the burden of disease will increase significantly. Consideration should be given to expanding tumor registries such as Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results. Treatment databases could better characterize the cost and effectiveness of treatment for metastatic disease and of trends in the adoption of laparoscopy.

  5. [Pancreatic cancer stem cell].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains dismal due to the resistance against conventional therapies. Metastasis and massive invasion toward surrounding organs hamper radical resection. Small part of entire cancer cells reveal resistance against chemotherapy or radiotherapy, increased tumorigenicity and migratory phenotype. These cells are called as cancer stem cells, as a counter part of normal stem cells. In pancreatic cancer, several cancer stem cell markers have been identified, which enabled detailed characterization of pancreatic cancer stem cells. Recent researches clarified that conventional chemotherapy itself could increase cancer cells with stem cell-phenotype, suggesting the necessity of cancer stem cell-targeting therapy. Based on these observations, pancreatic cancer stem cell-targeting therapies have been tested, which effectively eliminated cancer stem cell fraction and attenuated cancer progression in experimental models. Clinical efficacy of these therapies need to be evaluated, and cancer stem cell-targeting therapy will contribute to improve the prognosis of pancreatic cancer.

  6. After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... staffCancer: End-of-Life Issues for the CaregiverRead Article >>Cancer: End-of-Life Issues for the CaregiverJuly 2017June ... Started Related ArticlesUnderstanding Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening ... Cancer Screening ResultsIf you received abnormal cervical cancer screening ...

  7. Cancer and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rates by U.S. State Cancer Rates by Race/Ethnicity and Sex Cancer Trends by Race/Ethnicity and Sex Incidence Trends Among Men Mortality Trends ... Collection Tool for Cancer Registry Planning Anxiety and Depression Medicine Use Among Cancer Survivors Breast Cancer Rates ...

  8. Cancer and Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rates by U.S. State Cancer Rates by Race/Ethnicity and Sex Cancer Trends by Race/Ethnicity and Sex Incidence Trends Among Men Mortality Trends ... Collection Tool for Cancer Registry Planning Anxiety and Depression Medicine Use Among Cancer Survivors Breast Cancer Rates ...

  9. Engagement of Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-15

    End of Life; Advanced Cancer; Lung Neoplasm; Gastric Cancer; Colon Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Head and Neck Neoplasms; Rectum Cancer; Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Neoplasms; Liver Cancer; Cancer of Unknown Origin

  10. Cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The immune system is generally divided into 2 primary components: the innate immune response, and the highly specific but more slowly developing adaptive or acquired immune response. Immune responses can be further separated by whether they are induced by exposure to a foreign antigen (an "active" response) or whether they are transferred through serum or lymphocytes from an immunized individual (a "passive" response). The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should be able to discriminate between cancer and normal cells (ie, specificity), be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells (ie, sensitivity), and lastly be able to prevent recurrence of the tumor (ie, durability). Tumor immunology and immunotherapy is one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields at present.

  11. Preventing second cancers in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Krista L; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2008-03-01

    To provide a systematic review of the secondary prevention practices of cancer survivors guided by the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior. Articles published in peer-reviewed journals from 1996-2007. Despite their increased risk for second cancers, few cancer survivors maintain regular follow-up with a clinician knowledgeable of late effects. Cancer screening rates for cancer survivors are below optimal levels recommended for the general population. Multiple antecedents explain survivors' health practices. Few tested interventions are available to promote secondary prevention practices among cancer survivors. Cancer survivors are less likely to adopt secondary prevention practices than individuals without a cancer history. Nurses can encourage cancer survivors to adopt secondary prevention practices by providing positive reinforcement, support, and education. As more comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines for longitudinal care become available, nurses will be able to provide care to survivors with greater confidence and certainty.

  12. "Cancer tumor".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  13. How childhood cancers are different from adult cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000845.htm How childhood cancers are different from adult cancers To use the sharing features on this page, ... with cancer can be cured. Types of Childhood Cancers Cancer in children is rare, but some types ...

  14. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  15. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-05

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. 1985 Cancer Facts and Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information and statistical data about cancer are provided in seven categories. They include: (1) basic cancer data (considering how cancer works, trends in diagnosis and treatment, new cancer cases and deaths for 1985, and other areas); (2) major cancer sites (discussing lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, 5-year survival rates/trends…

  17. 1985 Cancer Facts and Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information and statistical data about cancer are provided in seven categories. They include: (1) basic cancer data (considering how cancer works, trends in diagnosis and treatment, new cancer cases and deaths for 1985, and other areas); (2) major cancer sites (discussing lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, 5-year survival rates/trends…

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer screening? • If I have had a hysterectomy, do I still need cervical cancer screening? • Are ... past 5 years. If I have had a hysterectomy, do I still need cervical cancer screening? If ...

  19. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  20. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  1. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  2. What Is Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancerous. As scientists have learned more about the molecular changes that lead to cancer, they have found ... cells of the original cancer usually have some molecular features in common, such as the presence of ...

  3. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  4. Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets the changes in cancer cells that help them grow, divide, and spread. Learn how targeted therapy works against cancer and about side effects that may occur.

  5. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related to Cancer Off-Label Drug Use in Cancer Treatment Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) CAM for Patients CAM for Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer On This Page What is photodynamic ...

  6. Cancer Prevention Overview (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  7. HPV and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... National Cancer Institute (NCI) looks at Human Papillomavirus trends in the United States. Selected References American Cancer ...

  8. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  9. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the fourth most common cancer in the world. The number of deaths from stomach cancer has ... risk of stomach cancer: Diet Not eating enough fresh fruits and vegetables is linked to an increased ...

  10. Symptoms of Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Related Links Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers Basic Information What Are the Risk Factors? What ... Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Uterine cancer may cause vaginal discharge or bleeding that is not normal for ...

  11. What Is Vaginal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are several types of vaginal cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma About 70 of every 100 cases of ... Our Volunteers More ACS Sites Bookstore Shop Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center ...

  12. SEER Cancer Stat Facts

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  13. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    HPV CANCER PREVENTION HPV VACCINE IS CANCER PREVENTION HPV vaccine protects against HPV types that most commonly cause ... professionals are the key to protecting adolescents from HPV cancers. VACCINATE YOUR 11-12 YEAR OLDS. www.cdc. ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  15. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  17. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  18. Living with Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute for Cancer Research website ( www.aicr.org ). Self-medication Many cancer patients medicate themselves with food and ... cancer. There is little research evidence that such self-medication can directly influence recurrence or cure. Patients should ...

  19. Cancer Nanotechnology Plan

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Nanotechnology Plan serves as a strategic document to the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer as well as a guiding document to the cancer nanotechnology and oncology fields, as a whole.

  20. What Are Cancer Disparities?

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the factors associated with cancer disparities, examples of how the cancer burden differs across certain population groups, and NCI actions to understand and reduce cancer disparities.

  1. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  2. HPV Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    HPV CANCER PREVENTION HPV VACCINE IS CANCER PREVENTION HPV vaccine protects against HPV types that most commonly cause ... professionals are the key to protecting adolescents from HPV cancers. VACCINATE YOUR 11-12 YEAR OLDS. www. cdc. ...

  3. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... your friends, your family, and the American Cancer Society help you take a step closer toward a ... DNA Offers Lung Cancer Clues An American Cancer Society grantee discovers a non-coding gene that may ...

  4. Testicular Cancer Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... my what?! Cancer AGAIN?! --- Our comments on the report linking testicular cancer treatments to secondary cancers... Faith and Spirituality --- Not carrying the load alone... Alternative Treatments? --- When all else fails? Spread the Word --- We have even created a, ...

  5. Your cancer care team

    MedlinePlus

    Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Nutrition during and after cancer treatment. Updated June 2016. www.eatright.org/resource/health/diseases-and-conditions/cancer/nutrition-during-and-after-cancer-treatment . Accessed July 15, ...

  6. Working during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... October 12, 2016. National Cancer Institute. Facing Forward: Life After Cancer Treatment. Updated May 2014. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/life-after-treatment.pdf . Accessed October 12, 2016. Review Date ...

  7. Tobacco and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Category Cancer A-Z What Causes Cancer? Tobacco and Cancer Get information on cigarette, cigar, and ... affects different groups of people. Read more How Tobacco and Smoking Affects Your Health Harmful Chemicals in ...

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors A risk factor is anything that affects ... these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer . Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking ...

  9. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... their doctors even knew they had it. Possible pre-cancerous conditions of the prostate Some research suggests that prostate cancer starts out as a pre-cancerous condition, although this is not yet known ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers . A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary ... will develop breast cancer . Some breast cancers that cluster in families are associated with inherited mutations in ...

  11. Cell Phones and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  12. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Prostate Cancer Key Points Prostate cancer is a disease in ...

  13. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  14. Renal pelvis or ureter cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis or ureter; Kidney cancer - renal pelvis; Ureter cancer ... Cancer can grow in the urine collection system, but it is uncommon. Renal pelvis and ureter cancers ...

  15. Types of Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is treated. The side effects are temporary. Alternative Names Phototherapy; Photochemotherapy; Photoradiation therapy; Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung ...

  17. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  18. Global cancer statistics, 2012.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Bray, Freddie; Siegel, Rebecca L; Ferlay, Jacques; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-03-01

    Cancer constitutes an enormous burden on society in more and less economically developed countries alike. The occurrence of cancer is increasing because of the growth and aging of the population, as well as an increasing prevalence of established risk factors such as smoking, overweight, physical inactivity, and changing reproductive patterns associated with urbanization and economic development. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, about 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million deaths occurred in 2012 worldwide. Over the years, the burden has shifted to less developed countries, which currently account for about 57% of cases and 65% of cancer deaths worldwide. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among males in both more and less developed countries, and has surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among females in more developed countries; breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among females in less developed countries. Other leading causes of cancer death in more developed countries include colorectal cancer among males and females and prostate cancer among males. In less developed countries, liver and stomach cancer among males and cervical cancer among females are also leading causes of cancer death. Although incidence rates for all cancers combined are nearly twice as high in more developed than in less developed countries in both males and females, mortality rates are only 8% to 15% higher in more developed countries. This disparity reflects regional differences in the mix of cancers, which is affected by risk factors and detection practices, and/or the availability of treatment. Risk factors associated with the leading causes of cancer death include tobacco use (lung, colorectal, stomach, and liver cancer), overweight/obesity and physical inactivity (breast and colorectal cancer), and infection (liver, stomach, and cervical cancer). A substantial portion of cancer cases and deaths could be prevented by broadly

  19. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  20. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  1. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  2. Ovarian Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Breast Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  4. Life After Cancer | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  6. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  7. Breast Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  9. Lung Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  10. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  11. Lung Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  12. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  13. Testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Peckham, M

    1988-01-01

    Testicular cancer, which predominantly occurs in young men, has become increasingly common; it is presently the most common malignancy in men aged 20-34. Despite a lack of knowledge of aetiology, empirical advances, particularly in the management of patients with advanced disease, have been dramatic. Prior to the development of effective chemotherapy in the 1970s, less than 10% of men with metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours were cured; nowadays approximately 90% of patients are potentially curable. The introduction of effective chemotherapy has led to a reappraisal of surgery and radiotherapy in the management of early stage disease and the introduction of a policy of surveillance in patients without evidence of metastases at the time of removal of the primary tumour. Following chemotherapy, surgery is required in approximately 25% of patients with advanced disease to excise residual masses, which in one-fifth of cases will show evidence of residual malignancy. In a proportion of patients, testicular cancer develops on a background of long-standing infertility, whereas in many men there is temporary oligospermia, despite a previous history of fertility. The majority of patients with prior evidence of spermatogenesis recover this function following chemotherapy and there is no evidence that children fathered by such patients have an increased risk of malformation. Despite physician optimism and excellent prospects for cure, significant psycho-social morbidity is associated with the diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer. Factors contributing to this are being identified and will lead, hopefully, to the minimisation of such problems by appropriate intervention.

  14. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  15. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research.

  16. Cancer Survivors Day | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    CCR Celebrates Cancer Survivors #NCSD2016 At the Center for Cancer Research, we are home to an extraordinary group of practicing physicians and scientists who passionately explore the boundaries of research to unlock the mysteries of cancer, a disease that touches nearly every American.

  17. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  18. Comparison of survival of adolescents and young adults with hematologic malignancies in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakata-Yamada, Kayo; Inoue, Masami; Ioka, Akiko; Ito, Yuri; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Miyashiro, Isao; Masaie, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Jun; Hino, Masayuki; Tsukuma, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    The survival gap between adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hematological malignancies persists in many countries. To determine to what extent it does in Japan, we investigated survival and treatment regimens in 211 Japanese AYAs (15-29 years) in the Osaka Cancer Registry diagnosed during 2001-2005 with hematological malignancies, and compared adolescents (15-19 years) with young adults (20-29 years). AYAs with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had a poor 5-year survival (44%), particularly young adults (29% vs. 64% in adolescents, p = 0.01). Additional investigation for patients with ALL revealed that only 19% of young adults were treated with pediatric treatment regimens compared with 45% of adolescents (p = 0.05). Our data indicate that we need to focus on young adults with ALL and to consider establishing appropriate cancer care system and guidelines for them in Japan.

  19. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Treatment Options for Testicular Cancer, by Type and Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating Testicular Cancer Surgery for Testicular Cancer Radiation Therapy for Testicular Cancer Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer High-Dose Chemotherapy ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  1. Accelerating Progress Against Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Investment in cancer research is making a difference, but we still must overcome disparities in cancer incidence and mortality, and expand research to detect cancers earlier and develop more effective, less-toxic treatments. NCI supports research studies and programs across the country that are working to further advance cancer, research, and clinical care.

  2. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Pertuzumab in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oh, Do-Youn; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and HER3 are altered in multiple tumor types, including gastrointestinal cancer. The HER2/HER3 dimer is crucial for HER2-mediated signaling in HER2-positive tumors. HER2-targeting agents, including trastuzumab, lapatinib, trastuzumab emtansine, and pertuzumab, have been approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, with trastuzumab also approved for the treatment of HER2-positive gastric cancer. Pertuzumab, a recombinant humanized immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 monoclonal antibody targeting HER-2, binds to the dimerization domain (extracellular domain II) of HER2, which leads to blocking of ligand-induced HER2 heterodimerization. It is under investigation in gastrointestinal cancers, including HER2-positive gastric cancer. In this review, the authors summarize the biology of HER2/HER3 and its alterations in gastrointestinal cancers. The authors focus specifically on the current status of development of pertuzumab in gastrointestinal cancers. The HER2/HER3 alteration in gastrointestinal cancers is quite interesting. In HER2-positive gastric cancer, the dual blockade of HER2 and HER3 using trastuzumab and pertuzumab is being tested in an international phase III trial, the JACOB study. This strategy may benefit HER2-positive gastric cancer patients more as in the case of HER2-positive breast cancer. In other gastrointestinal cancers, including biliary tract cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and colorectal cancer, there is huge room for the development of pertuzumab.

  4. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer

  5. Principles of Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Cancer screening has long been an important component of the struggle to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancer. Notwithstanding this history, many aspect of cancer screening remain poorly understood. This article presents a summary of basic principles of cancer screening that are relevant for researchers, clinicians and public health officials alike. PMID:26315516

  6. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... finding cancer before it causes symptoms ) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, ... Studies showed that screening a large number of people for stomach cancer using these tests did not decrease the risk of dying from stomach cancer. More studies are needed to ...

  7. Cancer and Tobacco Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 in 10 of all cancer deaths. Problem People are still dying from cancers caused by tobacco use. People who ... Getting screened for cancer can lead to fewer people getting or dying from some tobacco-related cancers (cervix, colorectal, and ...

  8. Principles of Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pinsky, Paul F

    2015-10-01

    Cancer screening has long been an important component of the struggle to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality from cancer. Notwithstanding this history, many aspects of cancer screening remain poorly understood. This article presents a summary of basic principles of cancer screening that are relevant for researchers, clinicians, and public health officials alike.

  9. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  10. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  12. Heredity of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rapola, J

    1980-01-01

    Hereditary factors are linked with cancer in four ways: by the association of specific chromosomal abnormalities with certain types of cancer, the increase of cancer incidence in some hereditary disorders, the increase of susceptibility to cancer in certain genotypes, and by direct inheritance of some rare malignant neoplasms.

  13. What Is Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Kidney Cancer About Kidney Cancer What Is Kidney Cancer? Kidney cancer is a cancer that starts ... and spread, see What Is Cancer? About the kidneys To understand more about kidney cancer, it helps ...

  14. Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis Breast cancer is sometimes ... cancer screening is so important. Learn more. Can Breast Cancer Be Found Early? Breast cancer is sometimes found ...

  15. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  16. Cancer Biomarkers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"175","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400","style":"width: 400px; height: 266px;","class":"i | Research to identify, develop and validate biomarkers for early cancer detection and risk assessment.

  17. Menopause and Cancers.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Levine, Nanci F; Nevadunsky, Nicole S

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a disease of aging, and therefore is more prevalent after menopause. Menopausal symptoms resulting from cancer treatments are an important survivorship issue in cancer care. This article reviews the preventive strategies, utilization of health resources, and management of menopausal symptoms after cancer treatment. Preventive screening as informed by genetic and lifestyle risk, and lifestyle modification, may mitigate the risk of cancer and cancer mortality. Despite potential benefits to quality of life, hormone replacement is rarely prescribed to survivors of gynecologic malignancies. Special considerations are needed for the treatment and supportive care of menopausal symptoms in cancer survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. OBESITY IN CANCER SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Niyati; Chandran, Urmila; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2013-01-01

    Although obesity is a well known risk factor for several cancers, its role on cancer survival is poorly understood. We conducted a systematic literature review to assess the current evidence evaluating the impact of body adiposity on the prognosis of the three most common obesity-related cancers: prostate, colorectal, and breast. We included 33 studies of breast cancer, six studies of prostate cancer, and eight studies of colorectal cancer. We note that the evidence over-represents breast cancer survivorship research and is sparse for prostate and colorectal cancers. Overall, most studies support a relationship between body adiposity and site-specific mortality or cancer progression. However, most of the research was not specifically designed to study these outcomes and, therefore, several methodological issues should be considered before integrating their results to draw conclusions. Further research is urgently warranted to assess the long-term impact of obesity among the growing population of cancer survivors. PMID:22540252

  20. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  1. Lung cancer screening update

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Samjot Singh; Loewen, Gregory; Jayaprakash, Vijayvel; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality globally and the American cancer society estimates approximately 226,160 new cases and 160,340 deaths from lung cancer in the USA in the year 2012. The majority of lung cancers are diagnosed in the later stages which impacts the overall survival. The 5-year survival rate for pathological st age IA lung cancer is 73% but drops to only 13% for stage IV. Thus, early detection through screening and prevention are the keys to reduce the global burden of lung cancer. This article discusses the current state of lung cancer screening, including the results of the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial, the consideration of implementing computed tomography screening, and a brief overview of the role of bronchoscopy in early detection and potential biomarkers that may aid in the early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:23599684

  2. Endometrial cancer: Not your grandmother's cancer.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Jessica N; Temkin, Sarah M; Mackay, Helen J

    2016-09-15

    Worldwide, the incidence of endometrial carcinoma (EC) is rapidly increasing, and the highest disease burden is reported in North America and Western Europe. Although the prognosis remains good for patients with are diagnosed with early stage EC, for those with recurrent or metastatic disease, the options are few, and the median overall survival is short. It is imperative to gain a greater understanding of all aspects of EC, limit its effect on scarce health care resources and, more importantly, prevent this cancer from significantly impacting future generations of women. An exciting new era of endometrial cancer research and clinical management has begun that incorporates biologically and clinically relevant genomic and clinicopathologic parameters. Continued collaborative research efforts and funding are essential if we are to advance our understanding of this disease and improve clinical outcomes. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2787-2798. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.

    1997-03-01

    The study of second cancer risk after radiotherapy provides a unique opportunity to study carcinogenesis since large groups of humans are deliberately exposed to substantial doses of radiation in order to cure disease. Detailed radiotherapy records for cancer patients allow precise quantification of organ dose, and population-based cancer registries are frequently available to provide access to large groups of patients who are closely followed for long periods. Moreover, cancer patients treated with surgery alone (no radiation) are frequently available to serve as a non-irradiated comparison group. New information can be provided on relatively insensitive organs, and low dose exposures in the range of scientific interest are received by organs outside the radiation treatment fields. This paper will review several recently completed studies that characterize the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Emphasis will be given to studies providing new information on the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced leukemia, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  4. Cancer and the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Wendy S

    2015-04-03

    A host's microbiota may increase, diminish, or have no effect at all on cancer susceptibility. Assigning causal roles in cancer to specific microbes and microbiotas, unraveling host-microbiota interactions with environmental factors in carcinogenesis, and exploiting such knowledge for cancer diagnosis and treatment are areas of intensive interest. This Review considers how microbes and the microbiota may amplify or mitigate carcinogenesis, responsiveness to cancer therapeutics, and cancer-associated complications.

  5. Cancer and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Wendy S.

    2017-01-01

    A host’s microbiota may increase, diminish, or have no effect at all on cancer susceptibility. Assigning causal roles in cancer to specific microbes and microbiotas, unraveling host-microbiota interactions with environmental factors in carcinogenesis, and exploiting such knowledge for cancer diagnosis and treatment are areas of intensive interest. This Review considers how microbes and the microbiota may amplify or mitigate carcinogenesis, responsiveness to cancer therapeutics, and cancer-associated complications. PMID:25838377

  6. Screening for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains three sections: Fundamentals of Screening, Screening Tests, and Screening for Specific Cancer Sites. Each section consists of several chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Principles of Screening and of the Evaluation of Screening Programs; Economic Aspects of Screening; Cervical Cytology; Screening Tests for Bladder Cancer; Fecal Occult Blood Testing; Screening for Cancer of the Cervix; Screening for Gastric Cancer; and Screening for Oral Cancer.

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  8. What if cancer comes back?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adenocarcinoma - recurrence; Lymphoma - recurrence; Tumor - recurrence; Leukemia - recurrence; Cancer - recurrence ... Cancer can come back if any cancer cells are left behind after treatment. This does not mean ...

  9. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozen, H

    1996-05-01

    For many years it has been apparent that transitional cell carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with two clinical forms that exhibit distinctly different prognoses. Approximately 20% of the tumors are invasive at presentation, which is associated with poor prognoses. The remaining carcinomas are superficial, and an excellent outcome can be expected in the majority of patients treated with local therapies. However, 20% of the latter will progress to muscle invasive disease during the follow-up. The problem is to identify those who will progress and to distinguish those tumors likely to respond to therapy. Genetic changes that identify the subgroups of these tumors may be the key issue. During the past decade, studies of human cancer have begun to yield molecular information on the identity of multiple genetic changes that underline development and progression. Attention was focused initially on oncogenes and more recently on tumor-suppressor genes.

  10. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  11. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-01-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research. PMID:22507219

  12. A new prospect in cancer therapy: targeting cancer stem cells to eradicate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Sha; Wang, An-Xin; Dong, Bing; Pu, Ke-Feng; Yuan, Li-Hua; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-12-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory, cancers can be initiated by cancer stem cells. This makes cancer stem cells prime targets for therapeutic intervention. Eradicating cancer stem cells by efficient targeting agents may have the potential to cure cancer. In this review, we summarize recent breakthroughs that have improved our understanding of cancer stem cells, and we discuss the therapeutic strategy of targeting cancer stem cells, a promising future direction for cancer stem cell research.

  13. Women and cancer.

    PubMed

    Stanley, K; Stjernswärd, J; Koroltchouk, V

    1987-01-01

    The primary cause of death in women in the world is cancer. In most developing countries cancer of the cervix is the most prevalent cancer. Breast cancer has this distinction in Latin America and the developed countries of North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. It is also the most prevalent cancer worldwide. The most common cancer in Japan and the Soviet Union is stomach cancer. Effective early detection programs can reduce both breast and cervical cancer mortality and also the degree and duration of treatment required. In Iceland, cervical cancer mortality declined 60% between the periods of 1959-1970 and 1975-1978. Programs consist of mammography, physician breast and self examination, and Pap smear. The sophisticated early detection equipment and techniques are expensive and largely located in urban areas, however, and not accessible to urban poor women and rural women, especially in developing countries. Tobacco smoking attributes to 80-90% of all lung cancer deaths worldwide and 30% of all cancer deaths. Passive smoking increases the risk of lung cancer to 25-35% in nonsmokers who breathe in tobacco smoke. Since smoking rates of women are skyrocketing, health specialists fear that lung cancer will replace cervical and breast cancers as the most common cancer in women worldwide in 20-30 years. Tobacco use also contributes to the high incidence of oral cancer in Southern and South Eastern Asia. For example, in India, incidence of oral cancer in women is 3-7 times higher than in developed countries with the smoking and chewing of tobacco in betel quid contributing. Techniques already exist to prevent 1/3 of all cancers. If cases can be discovered early enough and adequate treatment applied, another 1/3 of the cases can be cured. In those cases where the cancer cannot be cured, drugs can relieve 80-90% of the pain.

  14. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  15. Cancer in Children and Adolescents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    View a fact sheet that has statistics as well as information about types, causes, and treatments of cancers in children and adolescents in the United States. https://www.cancer.gov/types/childhood-cancers/child-adolescent-cancers-fact-sheet

  16. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  18. Cancer and soluble FAS.

    PubMed

    Abbasova, S G; Vysotskii, M M; Ovchinnikova, L K; Obusheva, M N; Digaeva, M A; Britvin, T A; Bahoeva, K A; Karabekova, Z K; Kazantzeva, I A; Mamedov, U R; Manuchin, I B; Davidov, M I

    2009-10-01

    A test system developed by the authors was used to measure serum concentrations of soluble Fas in patients with malignant and benign tumors of different location and morphology. Relationships between soluble Fas levels and the main clinical and morphological characteristics of cancer were evaluated. It is proven that the concentrations and incidence of detection of soluble Fas in the sera of patients with tumors are significantly higher than in normal subjects. No appreciable differences in the concentrations of soluble Fas were detected in malignant and benign tumors of the mammary gland, bones, ovaries, and adrenals. In thyroid cancer, soluble Fas levels were higher than in benign and hyperplastic processes in this organ. High level of soluble Fas is associated with late stages of the disease (ovarian cancer, cancer of the corpus uteri, adrenocortical and colorectal cancer) and with poor differentiation of the tumor (ovarian cancer and cancer of the corpus uteri), with local metastases (colorectal and adrenocortical cancer), and with tumor invasion into the myometrial tissue, intestinal wall, and adjacent tissues (cancer of the corpus uteri and colorectal cancer). A significantly high level of soluble Fas was detected in colorectal and adrenocortical cancer in the presence of at least 2 local metastases. Soluble Fas levels depended on tumor histogenesis in malignant and benign ovarian tumors. High concentration of soluble Fas was detected in large tumors in patients with ovarian cancer, cancer of the corpus uteri, colorectal cancer, thyroid cancer and adenoma, and in adrenocortical cancer. Initially high levels of soluble Fas are characteristic of patients whose tumors are little sensitive to nonadjuvant radiotherapy. The overall 5-year survival of patients with low levels of soluble Fas is better in osteosarcoma, cancer of the corpus uteri, ovarian and adrenocortical cancer.

  19. Survival improvements in adolescents and young adults after myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Lee, Stephanie J; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Ballen, Karen K; Buchbinder, David K; Dehn, Jason; Freytes, Cesar O; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lemaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Szwajcer, David; Joffe, Steven; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15 to 40 years) with cancer have not experienced survival improvements to the same extent as younger and older patients. We compared changes in survival after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children (n = 981), AYAs (n = 1218), and older adults (n = 469) who underwent transplantation over 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995, 1996 to 2001, and 2002 to 2007. Five-year survival varied inversely with age group. Survival improved over time in AYAs and paralleled that seen in children; however, overall survival did not change over time for older adults. Survival improvements were primarily related to lower rates of early treatment-related mortality in the most recent era. For all cohorts, relapse rates did not change over time. A subset of 222 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 25 at 46 pediatric or 49 adult centers were also analyzed to describe differences by center type. In this subgroup, there were differences in transplantation practices among pediatric and adult centers, although HCT outcomes did not differ by center type. Survival for AYAs undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HCT for ALL improved at a similar rate as survival for children.

  20. Cancer stem cells and personalized cancer nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Gener, Petra; Rafael, Diana Fernandes de Sousa; Fernández, Yolanda; Ortega, Joan Sayós; Arango, Diego; Abasolo, Ibane; Videira, Mafalda; Schwartz, Simo

    2016-02-01

    Despite the progress in cancer treatment over the past years advanced cancer is still an incurable disease. Special attention is pointed toward cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapies, because this minor cell population is responsible for the treatment resistance, metastatic growth and tumor recurrence. The recently described CSC dynamic phenotype and interconversion model of cancer growth hamper even more the possible success of current cancer treatments in advanced cancer stages. Accordingly, CSCs can be generated through dedifferentiation processes from non-CSCs, in particular, when CSC populations are depleted after treatment. In this context, the use of targeted CSC nanomedicines should be considered as a promising tool to increase CSC sensitivity and efficacy of specific anti-CSC therapies.