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Sample records for azimuthally dependent transport

  1. Polarization Dependent Azimuthal Scattering From Tilted Fibre Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Robert Bruce

    Polarization sensitive mode coupling characteristics of tilted fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have been exploited to develop a number of useful devices including fibre polarimeters, gain flattening filters, spectrum analyzers, polarization dependent loss (PDL) compensators, reconfigurable optical add / drop multiplexers (ROADM), as well as interferometric, and surface plasmon based sensors. Recently it was demonstrated that a single grating structure could couple the light guided in a fibre to two azimuthally separated, polarization independent, radiated beams. However the reasons for such behaviour had not been fully explained, precluding the complete understanding, exploitation and optimization of this phenomenon. This thesis explains the mechanisms underlying such behaviour through a thorough analytical examination of an existing equation formulated with the Volume Current Method (VCM), quantifying the degree to which a tilted FBG's radiation field is directionally dependent on the phase matching characteristics of a grating's three-dimensional structure as well as the polarization dependent dipole response of the medium itself. Examination of the equation's parameter space, revealed the possibility of three-beam azimuthal responses as well, and resulted in some guidelines for the design and optimization of these devices. Experimental measurements of the out-tapped field are also provided, clearly confirming these theoretical findings and reporting the fabrication of a three-beam azimuthal response grating for the first time. Drawing upon these advances, an improved polarimeter design is proposed that samples more than four detected beams with only two tilted FBGs, theoretically resulting in average Stokes vector error reductions of roughly 20%, facilitating monitoring at lower signal to noise ratios (SNRs). Finally, this thesis undertakes an analysis and re-derivation of the VCM formulation itself, designed to expand its applicability to FBGs written with

  2. Distance and azimuthal dependence of ground-motion variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Jagdish Chandra; Mai, Paul Martin; Galis, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the near-field ground-motion variability by computing the seismic wavefield for five previously published kinematic rupture models of the M 7.3 1992 Landers earthquake, several simplified rupture models based on the Landers event, and a large M 7.8 scenario earthquake in Southern California. The ground motion simulations are accomplished by solving the elasto-dynamic equations of motion using a generalized finite-difference method. The simulated waveforms are calibrated against near-field strong-motion recordings for the Landers earthquake. We then analyze our simulation-based data-set of ground-motions, binned with respect to distance and azimuth to compute mean and standard deviation of peak ground velocity (PGV). We consider different 1D-velocity-density profiles for the Landers simulations, and a 3D heterogeneous Earth structure for the ShakeOut scenario, and for both cases we honor geometrical fault complexity. The ground-motion variability, σln(PGV), estimated from numerical simulations is higher in the near-field (Joyner-Boore distance RJB <20 km) compared to that associated with standard ground-motion prediction equations. We find that σln(PGV)decreases with increasing distance from the fault as a power law. The physical explanation of a large near-field σln(PGV)is the presence of strong directivity and rupture complexity. We also show that intra-event ground-motion variability is high in the rupture-propagation direction (both forward and backward directivity regions), but low in the direction perpendicular to rupture propagation for unilateral ruptures. We observe that the power-law decay of σln(PGV) is primarily controlled by slip heterogeneity. In addition, σln(PGV) as function of azimuth is sensitive to variations in both rupture speed and slip heterogeneity. We also find that the azimuthal dependence of mean, μln(PGV), can be approximated by a Cauchy-Lorentz function, which may potentially help in estimation of ground motion for

  3. Study of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations using reaction-plane-dependent balance functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; STAR Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    STAR has recently reported charge-dependent azimuthal correlations that are sensitive to the charge separation effect in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV. Qualitatively, these results agree with some of the theoretical predictions for local parity violation in heavy-ion collisions. However, a study using reaction-plane-dependent balance functions shows an alternative origin of this signal. The balance function, which measures the correlation between oppositely charged pairs, is sensitive to the mechanisms of charge formation and the subsequent relative diffusion of the balancing charges. The reaction-plane-dependent balance function measurements can be related to STAR's charge-dependent azimuthal correlations. We report reaction-plane-dependent balance functions for Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200, 62.4, 39, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV using the STAR detector. The model of Schlichting and Pratt incorporating local charge conservation and elliptic flow reproduces most of the three-particle azimuthal correlation results at 200 GeV. The experimental charge-dependent azimuthal charge correlations observed at 200 GeV can be explained in terms of local charge conservation and elliptic flow.

  4. Azimuthal dependence of the Garton-Tomkins orbit in crossed magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleasdale, C.; Lewis, R. A.; Bruno-Alfonso, A.

    2016-08-01

    Work on classical closed orbits in the diamagnetic Kepler problem is predominately focused on the chaos observed in the polar launch angle as opposed to the azimuthal launch angle. This is due to atomic systems, along with widely studied external-field geometries (parallel magnetic and electric fields or pure magnetic field), being uniform in azimuthal angle, rendering the azimuthal angle unimportant. In the case of crossed magnetic and electric fields, this is no longer the case, and closed orbits do present an azimuthal launch angle dependence. In atomic systems, due to their spherical symmetry, the electric-field orientation in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field does not affect the spectrum of orbits. However, in shallow n -type donors in anisotropic semiconductors such as silicon, the orientation of the external fields with respect to conduction-band valleys will be important. In this work we examine the Garton-Tomkins orbit in crossed magnetic and electric fields, and analyze how it and its harmonics' azimuthal dependencies behave through variation of the scaled field or scaled energy. At low scaled fields, harmonics have either twofold or fourfold azimuthal dependencies determined by the rotational symmetry of the individual harmonics. As the scaled field or scaled energy is increased, several harmonics undergo significant bifurcations, resulting in large azimuthal angular regions of essentially closed orbits, which will lead to strong resonances in experimental work.

  5. Azimuthal Asymmetries for eA/eN Semi-Inclusive DIS and Its Nuclear Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Kun

    2016-02-01

    We applied collinear expansion to the semi-inclusive deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon (nucleus) scattering process e + N(A) → e + q + X with both polarized beam and polarized target up to twist-3, and unpolarized process up to twist-4. The differential cross section and azimuthal asymmetries are expressed in terms of gauge invariant twist-3 and twist-4 TMD parton distribution/correlation functions. Measurements of such azimuthal asymmetries provide methods to study different spin and transverse momentum aspects of the partonic structure of nucleon. We further study the nuclear dependence of azimuthal asymmetries and adopt Gaussian ansatz for TMD distribution/correlation functions to estimat the semi-quantitive behaviour of the nuclear dependence. We predict the A-dependence of azimuthal asymmetries which can be tested in the planned EIC’s.

  6. Energy dependence of the freeze out eccentricity from azimuthally-dependent HBT analyses at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anson, Christopher; STAR Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Non-central heavy ion collisions at RHIC create an anisotropic participant zone of QCD matter under extreme conditions of energy and matter density. While this zone is initially out-of- plane-extended, pressure gradients cause the hot, dense medium to expand preferentially in plane. Over time, this expansion makes the shape more spherical, perhaps even becoming extended in the in-plane direction. The change in shape is determined by the expansion and freeze-out time scales which depend, in part, on the early pressure gradients. As a result, the freeze-out shape may provide a sensitive probe of the Equation of State of hot QCD matter. The recent RHIC Beam Energy Scan, which covered energies from √{sNN} of 7.7 to 39 GeV provides an opportunity to explore the energy dependence of the freeze out eccentricity. The new low energy data from STAR complements high statistics data sets at √{sNN} of 62.4 and 200 GeV. The dependence of the HBT radius parameters on azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane have been extracted. These dependences can be related to the freeze out eccentricity within the context of a blast wave model. We will present STAR's most recent results from azimuthally-dependent HBT analyses across a wide range of energies.

  7. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu to UU collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloczynski, John; Huang, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Xilin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-07-01

    We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation with the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.

  8. Constraining Poiseuille Flow in the Asthenosphere Using the Depth-Dependence of Azimuthal Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarov, S.; Conrad, C. P.

    2010-12-01

    Asthenospheric flow accommodates differential shear between plate motions and mantle flow (Couette flow) and hosts additional flow driven by horizontal pressure gradients (Poiseuille flow) that may be associated with mantle upwelling and subduction. The relative importance of Couette and Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere is poorly constrained. Pure Couette flow should produce a uniform orientation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth. However, observations show that azimuthal seismic anisotropy rotates with depth in many regions of the asthenosphere. To test whether these observations can be explained by the presence of Poiseuille flow, we employ a simple 1D Couette-Poiseuille flow model to compute the orientation of the strain axis, which approximates the orientation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. We explore analytic solutions to a family of Couette-Poiseuille models with constant, depth-dependent, Newtonian, and non-Newtonian rheologies. Our results reveal that the Couette-Poiseuille flow does induce rotation of seismic anisotropy with depth provided that the pressure gradient has a component transverse to plate motion. For depth-dependent viscosity, most of the rotation is accommodated in the less-viscous portion of the layer. Our findings suggest that Poiseuille flow can explain variations in the orientation of azimuthal seismic anistoropy as a function of depth in the asthenosphere. Moreover, by utilizing observed rotations of global azimuthal seismic anisotropy, it is possible to create a global map of pressure gradients in the asthenosphere, which can be used to quantify the driving forces for mantle convection and plate motions.

  9. Flavor dependent azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized semi-inclusive DIS at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, F.

    2014-01-01

    The azimuthal cosϕ h and cos2ϕ h modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the hermes experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a 4-Dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  10. Energy dependence of the freeze-out eccentricity from the azimuthal dependence of HBT at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anson, Christopher; STAR Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Non-central heavy-ion collisions create an out-of-plane-extended participant zone that expands toward a more round state as the system evolves. The recent RHIC beam energy scan at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} of 7.7, 11.5 and 39 GeV provides an opportunity to explore the energy dependence of the freeze-out eccentricity. The new low-energy data from STAR complement high statistics data sets at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} of 62.4 and 200 GeV. Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometry allows us to determine the size of pion-emitting source regions. The dependence of the HBT radius parameters on the azimuthal angle relative to the reaction plane has been extracted. These dependences can be related to the freeze-out eccentricity. The new results from STAR are consistent with a monotonically decreasing freeze-out eccentricity and constrain any minimum, suggested by previously available data, to lie in the range between 11.5 and 39 GeV. Of several models, UrQMD appears to best predict the STAR and AGS data.

  11. Saturated Fluctuations and Transport in Axial, Azimuthal Hybrid Hall Thruster Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Caleb; Aley, Jacob; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Simulation studies of Hall thrusters aimed at describing the global domain typically employ hybrid schemes instead of more expensive kinetic approaches. Such simulations are generally in the radial and axial coordinates, assuming axisymmetry in order to circumvent azimuthal dynamics. Cross-field electron transport is enhanced (in an ad-hoc manner) in order to sustain the plasma and produce simulation profiles in semi-quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. In this work we present results from an axial/azimuthal hybrid fluid-PIC model of Hall thrusters that treats the azimuthal dynamics self-consistently, without employing ad-hoc transport parameters. Unlike previous simulation efforts with this model, the current work has succeeded at obtaining fully saturated states at high voltage, resolving the longest (breathing mode) timescales in the system. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations predicted by the simulation will be presented. The latter are analyzed in terms of their frequency and propagation characteristics, as well as their contribution to transport. Linear stability theory is used to comment on the possible origin of the disturbances. Finally, the role of EXB flow shear on the potential regulation of fluctuation-induced electron transport is discussed. Caleb Dowdy, Jacob Aley and Eduardo Fernandez are supported by a grant from the II- VI Foundation.

  12. TRACING OUTFLOWS AND ACCRETION: A BIMODAL AZIMUTHAL DEPENDENCE OF Mg II ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.

    2012-11-20

    We report a bimodality in the azimuthal angle distribution of gas around galaxies as traced by Mg II absorption: halo gas prefers to exist near the projected galaxy major and minor axes. The bimodality is demonstrated by computing the mean azimuthal angle probability distribution function using 88 spectroscopically confirmed Mg II-absorption-selected galaxies [W{sub r} (2796) {>=} 0.1 A] and 35 spectroscopically confirmed non-absorbing galaxies [W{sub r} (2796) < 0.1 A] imaged with Hubble Space Telescope and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The azimuthal angle distribution for non-absorbers is flat, indicating no azimuthal preference for gas characterized by W{sub r} (2796) < 0.1 A. We find that blue star-forming galaxies clearly drive the bimodality while red passive galaxies may exhibit an excess along their major axis. These results are consistent with galaxy evolution scenarios where star-forming galaxies accrete new gas, forming new stars and producing winds, while red galaxies exist passively due to reduced gas reservoirs. We further compute an azimuthal angle dependent Mg II absorption covering fraction, which is enhanced by as much as 20%-30% along the major and minor axes. The W{sub r} (2796) distribution for gas along the major axis is likely skewed toward weaker Mg II absorption than for gas along the projected minor axis. These combined results are highly suggestive that the bimodality is driven by gas accreted along the galaxy major axis and outflowing along the galaxy minor axis. Adopting these assumptions, we find that the opening angle of outflows and inflows to be 100 Degree-Sign and 40 Degree-Sign , respectively. We find that the probability of detecting outflows is {approx}60%, implying that winds are more commonly observed.

  13. Fast azimuthally dependent model of the reflection of solar radiation by plane-parallel clouds.

    PubMed

    Davies, R

    1980-01-15

    A fast analytical model of the transfer of solar radiation in plane-parallel clouds is developed by extending the Eddington approximation to handle an azimuthally dependent radiance field. When compared with the more precise doubling method, the results from this approximate model show a typical accuracy of better than 3% for fluxes and 10% for intensities over a wide range of input parameters. This accuracy may deteriorate somewhat for small cloud thicknesses, large solar zenith angles, viewing angles close to the horizon, or viewing angles close to the solar azimuthal direction. The computational speed of the analytical model is, however, a few hundred times faster than that of the more precise models, which makes it well suited for applications involving iteration over spectral intervals, time intervals, or cloud populations.

  14. Constraining Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere using depth-dependence of azimuthal seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarov, Svetlana I.

    Asthenospheric flow accommodates differential shear between plate and mantle motions (Couette flow) and hosts additional flow driven by horizontal pressure gradients (Poiseuille flow) that may be associated with mantle upwelling and subduction. Determining the relative importance and spatial distribution of Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere could help discriminate among competing theories of asthenospheric origin and shed light on thermal history of the Earth. Large uncertainties in the flow field and rheological structure of the upper mantle have thus far hindered our ability to constrain the relative importance of Couette and Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere. We propose a new method to quantify Poiseuille flow in the asthenosphere using observations of the depth-dependence of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. In particular, we employ a simple one-dimensional Couette-Poiseuille flow model and analytically solve for the depth-profiles of the strain axis orientation in the asthenosphere, which approximates the orientation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy. We find that Couette-Poiseuille flow induces rotation of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth provided that the horizontal pressure gradient has a component transverse to plate motion. We then construct an algorithm that utilizes observed rotations of azimuthal seismic anisotropy with depth and analytical depth-profiles of the strain axis to invert for the horizontal pressure gradients everywhere in the asthenosphere. We test our method on the output of a global numerical mantle flow model. A comparison of our predicted pressure gradients with those computed directly from the numerical model shows a high degree of agreement, indicating that our method is robust. We show that our algorithm is stable, except for the case in which the component of the pressure gradient transverse to plate motion is close to zero. We establish that Poiseuille flow drives about 40% of the total flow velocity amplitude in the

  15. Azimuthal angle- and scanning pitch-dependent colorization of metals by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangbo; Qian, Jing; Bai, Feng; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Chengwei; Fan, Wenzhong; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Quanzhong

    2016-04-01

    We report the modification of optical properties of 304 stainless steel surfaces by femtosecond laser direct writing with different scanning pitches. Regularly arranged ripples with a spatial period of ~700 nm were obtained, rendering vivid structural colors when we illuminated the surface with white light. Diffraction spectra were generated to investigate the spectral properties of the structural colors. Results indicate that the diffraction maximum strongly depends on scanning pitch and azimuthal angle, but that the central wavelength is insensitive to both of them. The reflectance properties were also investigated. This study adds a new parameter, the scanning pitch, to the list of parameters in the production of controllable colorized metal, which may find a range of applications in color display, decoration, and so on.

  16. Azimuth-dependent Auger neutralization of He{sup +} on Ag(111) and (110) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Diego; Monreal, R. C.; Blanco, J. M.; Esaulov, V. A.

    2007-04-15

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the role played by s and d electrons in Auger neutralization processes of He{sup +} at Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces. We calculate crystal-lattice-site Auger neutralization rates as a function of the perpendicular distance between ions and surfaces. We find that the rate is very insensitive to the lateral position for large values of the perpendicular distance because the contribution of the delocalized s electrons dominates in this case. In contrast, the contribution of d electrons dominates at short perpendicular distances and the strong spatial localization of these electrons causes a similar strong dependence of the Auger rate with lateral position. We perform molecular dynamic simulations of scattered ion trajectories, which, used together with the Auger neutralization rates, allow us to obtain the theoretical ion fraction that we compare with our measurements. This parameter-free theory is able to reproduce the magnitude of the ion survival probability and its dependence with the azimuthal angle of incidence for both surfaces of Ag, thus showing the important role played by localized electrons in Auger neutralization of He.

  17. Azimuthal inhomogeneity of turbulence structure and its impact on intermittent particle transport in linear magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Itoh, K.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation component in the turbulence regime is found to be azimuthally localized at a phase of the global coherent modes in a linear magnetized plasma PANTA. Spatial distribution of squared bicoherence is given in the azimuthal cross section as an indicator of nonlinear energy transfer function from the global coherent mode to the turbulence. Squared bicoherence is strong at a phase where the turbulence amplitude is large. As a result of the turbulence localization, time evolution of radial particle flux becomes bursty. Statistical features such as skewness and kurtosis are strongly modified by the localized turbulence component, although contribution to mean particle flux profile is small.

  18. Hadronization scheme dependence of long-range azimuthal harmonics in high energy p + A reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2015-07-01

    We compare the distortion effects of three popular final-state hadronization schemes. We show how hadronization modifies the initial-state gluon correlations in high energy p + A collisions. The three models considered are (1) LPH: local parton-hadron duality, (2) CPR: collinear parton-hadron resonance independent fragmentation, and (3) LUND: color string hadronization. The strong initial-state azimuthal asymmetries are generated using the GLVB model for non-abelian gluon bremsstrahlung, assuming a saturation scale Qsat = 2 GeV. Long-range elliptic and triangular harmonics for the final hadron pairs are compared based on the three hadronization schemes. Our analysis shows that the process of hadronization causes major distortions of the partonic azimuthal harmonics for transverse momenta at least up to pT = 3 GeV. In particular, they appear to be greatly reduced for pT < 1 ÷ 2 GeV.

  19. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthula, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  20. Multiplicity dependence of two-particle azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdanikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, F.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bornschein, J.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Czopowicz, T. R.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; Erasmo, G. D.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Elwood, B. G.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, M.; Gheata, A.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, P. G.; Innocenti, G. M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, T.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, S.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kompaniets, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, R.; Ma, K.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martınez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nasar, M.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Da Silva, A. C. Oliveira; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauch, W.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, S.; Sharma, N.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Spacek, M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, A.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wielanek, D.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Xiang, C.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present the measurements of particle pair yields per trigger particle obtained from di-hadron azimuthal correlations in pp collisions at = 0 .9, 2.76, and 7 TeV recorded with the ALICE detector. The yields are studied as a function of the charged particle multiplicity. Taken together with the single particle yields the pair yields provide information about parton fragmentation at low transverse momenta, as well as on the contribution of multiple parton interactions to particle production. Data are compared to calculations using the PYTHIA6, PYTHIA8, and PHOJET event generators. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  2. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of secondary particles in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okorokov, V.; Parfenov, P.

    2016-02-01

    The P/CP symmetry breaking in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) could be realized via transitions between local fluctuations of gauge fields. Azimuthal correlations which characterize the asymmetry of the emitted charged particles with respect to the reaction plane in non-central nucleus-nucleus collisions are the promising tools for experimental study of local P/CP violation in the strong interactions. The preliminary estimations of correlators within the model of chiral magnetic effect are presented for types of nuclei and collision energies corresponded to RHIC and the LHC beams for two various nuclear densities, namely, for approach of the hard sphere and for the two-component Fermi model. Besides of the correlator estimations for the symmetric collisions, the preliminary results for magnetic field in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions are also shown.

  3. System Size and Beam Energy Dependence of Azimuthal Anisotropy from PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Issah, Michael; Cianciolo, Vince; Awes, Terry C; Efremenko, Yuri V; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We present azimuthal anisotropy measurements in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. Comparison between reaction plane and cumulant {upsilon}{sub 2} measurements in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV show that non-flow contributions, originating mainly from jets, influence the extracted {upsilon}{sub 2} for p{sub T} {approx}> 3.5 GeV/c. Number of constituent quark (NCQ) scaling of {upsilon}{sub 2}, when studied as a function of transverse kinetic energy KE{sub T}, is seen to hold for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV and for Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV for KE{sub T} {approx}< 1 GeV/c. Differential hexadecupole flow {upsilon}{sub 4} seems to exhibit scaling with integral {upsilon}{sub 2} for centrality {le} 40% as has been observed for differential {upsilon}{sub 2}.

  4. Detector-selection technique for Monte Carlo transport in azimuthally symmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, T.J.; Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.

    1982-01-01

    Many radiation transport problems contain geometric symmetries which are not exploited in obtaining their Monte Carlo solutions. An important class of problems is that in which the geometry is symmetric about an axis. These problems arise in the analyses of a reactor core or shield, spent fuel shipping casks, tanks containing radioactive solutions, radiation transport in the atmosphere (air-over-ground problems), etc. Although amenable to deterministic solution, such problems can often be solved more efficiently and accurately with the Monte Carlo method. For this class of problems, a technique is described in this paper which significantly reduces the variance of the Monte Carlo-calculated effect of interest at point detectors.

  5. Azimuthal velocity profiles in Rayleigh-stable Taylor-Couette flow and implied axial angular momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordsiek, Freja; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-07-01

    We present azimuthal velocity profiles measured in a Taylor-Couette apparatus, which has been used as a model of stellar and planetary accretion disks. The apparatus has a cylinder radius ratio of $\\eta = 0.716$, an aspect-ratio of $\\Gamma = 11.74$, and the plates closing the cylinders in the axial direction are attached to the outer cylinder. We investigate angular momentum transport and Ekman pumping in the Rayleigh-stable regime. The regime is linearly stable and is characterized by radially increasing specific angular momentum. We present several Rayleigh-stable profiles for shear Reynolds numbers $Re_S \\sim O(10^5) \\,$, both for $\\Omega_i > \\Omega_o > 0$ (quasi-Keplerian regime) and $\\Omega_o > \\Omega_i > 0$ (sub-rotating regime) where $\\Omega_{i,o}$ is the inner/outer cylinder rotation rate. None of the velocity profiles matches the non-vortical laminar Taylor-Couette profile. The deviation from that profile increased as solid-body rotation is approached at fixed $Re_S$. Flow super-rotation, an angular velocity greater than that of both cylinders, is observed in the sub-rotating regime. The velocity profiles give lower bounds for the torques required to rotate the inner cylinder that were larger than the torques for the case of laminar Taylor-Couette flow. The quasi-Keplerian profiles are composed of a well mixed inner region, having approximately constant angular momentum, connected to an outer region in solid-body rotation with the outer cylinder and attached axial boundaries. These regions suggest that the angular momentum is transported axially to the axial boundaries. Therefore, Taylor-Couette flow with closing plates attached to the outer cylinder is an imperfect model for accretion disk flows, especially with regard to their stability.

  6. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions. PMID:26705627

  7. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p↑+p at √{s }=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p↑+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η >0.5 , and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p +p collisions.

  8. Observation of Transverse Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Correlations of Charged Pion Pairs in p^{↑}+p at sqrt[s]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, W; Li, Z M; Li, Y; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Ma, L; Ma, R; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, X; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, G; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-12-11

    We report the observation of transverse polarization-dependent azimuthal correlations in charged pion pair production with the STAR experiment in p^{↑}+p collisions at RHIC. These correlations directly probe quark transversity distributions. We measure signals in excess of 5 standard deviations at high transverse momenta, at high pseudorapidities η>0.5, and for pair masses around the mass of the ρ meson. This is the first direct transversity measurement in p+p collisions.

  9. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  10. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-03-18

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v_{3}^{2}{2}=⟨cos3(ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2})⟩, where ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2} is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη=η_{1}-η_{2}. Nonzero v_{3}^{2}{2} is directly related to the previously observed large-Δη narrow-Δϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v_{3}^{2}{2} persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v_{3}^{2}{2} is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v_{3}^{2}{2} for central collisions shows a minimum near sqrt[s_{NN}]=20  GeV. PMID:27035295

  11. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chatterjee, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A I; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, X; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, X; Li, C; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, W; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Ma, L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McKinzie, S; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, A; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Smirnov, D; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, W; Xie, G; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, Q H; Xu, N; Xu, H; Xu, Z; Xu, J; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, J B; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-03-18

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au+Au collisions for energies ranging from sqrt[s_{NN}]=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v_{3}^{2}{2}=⟨cos3(ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2})⟩, where ϕ_{1}-ϕ_{2} is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δη=η_{1}-η_{2}. Nonzero v_{3}^{2}{2} is directly related to the previously observed large-Δη narrow-Δϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v_{3}^{2}{2} persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v_{3}^{2}{2} is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v_{3}^{2}{2} for central collisions shows a minimum near sqrt[s_{NN}]=20  GeV.

  12. Azimuthal plasma flow in the Kronian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, A.; Saur, J. S.; Krupp, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    We study the azimuthal plasma velocity in Saturn's magnetosphere between 3 and 13 Saturnian radii by analysing energetic particle injection events using data of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. During such events high energetic plasma is transported into the inner part of the magnetosphere. This transport may be evoked by the interchange instability which could be identified as the generation process of injections near Io in the Jovian system. Due to the magnetic drifts, the injected particles begin to disperse and leave an imprint in the electron as well as in the ion spectrograms of the MIMI data. The shape of these profiles strongly depends on the azimuthal velocity distribution of the magnetospheric plasma and the age of the injection event. Comparison of theoretically computed dispersion profiles with observed ones enables us to characterize the azimuthal flow of the plasma. The measured flow profile clearly shows that the plasma tends to subcorotate. Knowledge of the flow profile and the ages of each injection event enables us to calculate the location where the energetic particles were injected into the inner magnetosphere. The night and morning sector are favoured by injections.

  13. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-15

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ{sub 1}(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω{sub R}, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v{sub r}/ω{sub T}, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  14. Pseudorapidity and pt dependence of identified-particle azimuthal flow for √sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukova, Victoria

    2008-10-01

    The observation of a strong azimuthal flow signature at RHIC suggests rapid system equilibration leading to an almost perfect fluid state. The longitudinal extent of the flow behavior depends on the formation dynamics for this state and can be studied by measuring the pseudorapidity dependence of the second Fourier component (v2) of the azimuthal angular distribution. We report on a measurement of identified-particle v2 as a function of pt (0.5-2.0 GeV/c), centrality (0-50%), and pseudorapidity (0<=η<3.2) for √sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. The results are obtained using the BRAHMS spectrometers for particle identification (π, K, p) and the BRAHMS global detectors to determine the corresponding reaction-plane angles. Preliminary results for the Au+Au system have been reported earlier. Here we compare the final Au+Au results to new results obtained for the Cu+Cu system.

  15. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclearmodification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman,R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll,J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay,S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Gronstal, S.; Drosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.K.; et al.

    2003-06-18

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v{sub 2} and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R{sub CP} for kaons and lambdas ({Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}}) at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. In combination, the v{sub 2} and R{sub CP} particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p{sub T} {approx} 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K{sub S}{sup 0} and {Lambda} + {bar {Lambda}} v{sub 2} values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination.

  16. Gravity-dependent transport in industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1994-01-01

    Gravity-dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to address a broader range of microgravity phenomena and to develop new applications of microgravity. A number of important topics are identified and analyzed in detail. The present article describes results on coating flow, zeolite growth, and rotating electrochemical system.

  17. Landauer Approach to Time-Dependent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. Y.; Nash, P. L.

    Based upon the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, we present a time-dependent Landauer approach to transport through a mesoscopic system under an ac bias voltage. The system is modeled as an elastic scatterer coupled to large electron reservoirs through perfect conducting wires (leads). The chemical potentials of the reservoirs are driven apart by the bias and, consequently, current flows through the leads from one reservoir to another. We examine the nonequilibrium statistical processes of electrons in the leads. The electronic waves are quantized on the basis of orthonormal wave packets moving along the leads, scattered by the scatterer, and coupled to the reservoirs. The time for an electron to traverse the leads between the source and the drain reservoirs plus the phase delay time caused by the scatterer is found to be the relevant time scale in the time-dependent transport. The frequency dependence of the admittance is fully investigated.

  18. Gravity-Dependent Transport in Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, Simon; Kamotani, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    Gravity dependent transport phenomena in various industrial processes are investigated in order to indicate new directions for micro-gravity research that enhance the commercial success of the space program. The present article describes the commercialization possibilities of such topics associated with physicochemical transport phenomena. The topics are: coating flow, rotating electrochemical system, and convection in low Plandtl number fluids. The present study is directed to understand these phenomena, and to develop a knowledge base for their applications with emphasis to a micro-gravity environment.

  19. Azimuthal radiometric temperature measurements of wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of azimuthal view angle on the radiometric temperature of wheat canopies at various stages of development are investigated. Measurements of plant height, total leaf area index, green leaf area index and Feeks growth stage together with infrared radiometric temperature measurements at 12 azimuth intervals with respect to solar azimuth and at different solar zenith angles were obtained for four wheat canopies at various heights. Results reveal a difference on the order of 2 C between the temperatures measured at azimuths of 0 and 180 deg under calm wind conditions, which is attributed to the time-dependent transfer of heat between canopy component surfaces. The azimuthal dependence must thus be taken into account in the determination of radiometric temperatures.

  20. Azimuthal angular dependence of exchange bias in FeMn/Py bilayers with Ta/Cu hybrid underlayers: Effect of deposition sequence and sense of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Yeon; Choi, Hyeok-Cheol; You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the azimuthal angular dependent exchange bias of bottom-pinned Py(5nm)/FeMn(5nm) and top-pinned FeMn(5nm)/Py(5nm) bilayers prepared at the same deposition condition except deposition order by vector MOKE experiment. It was found that exchange biased (EB) direction is not collinear with an applied magnetic field during deposition. Second, the critical angle at which the phase of a transverse loop reverses is once (160° @CCW, 170 ~ 175° @CW) for Py/FeMn bilayer and twice (155 ~ 160°, 340 ~ 345° @CCW, 10 ~ 15°, 195-200° @CW) for FeMn/Py bilayer. Therefore, phase of transverse loop remains the same as the initial transverse loop or reverse after 360° rotation, depending on deposition sequence. Third, hysteresis is observed in the transverse magnetization component only if hysteresis loops are measured consecutively between cw and ccw directions over the angular range including the critical angle. This is considered to originate from thermally activated irreversible rearrangement of uncompensated AF spins via interface exchange coupling. Fourth, exchange bias field and coercivity of top-pinned FeMn/Py bilayers with Ta/Cu underlayers are enhanced compared with those of bottom-pinned Py/FeMn bilayers. This is in consistent with our previous results.

  1. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  2. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  3. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  4. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  5. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  6. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  7. 32 CFR 718.3 - Transportation of dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation of dependents. 718.3 Section 718... PERSONS ACT § 718.3 Transportation of dependents. (a) Whenever a person in active service is officially... and circumstances of the dependents and the destination to which transportation is requested. In...

  8. Centrality dependence of dihadron correlations and azimuthal anisotropy harmonics in PbPb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements from the CMS experiment at the LHC of dihadron correlations for charged particles produced in PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV are presented. The results are reported as a function of the particle transverse momenta (pt) and collision centrality over a broad range in relative pseudorapidity [Delta(eta)] and the full range of relative azimuthal angle [Delta(phi)]. The observed two-dimensional correlation structure in Delta(eta) and Delta(phi) is characterised by a narrow peak at (Delta(eta), Delta(phi)) approximately (0, 0) from jet-like correlations and a long-range structure that persists up to at least |Delta(eta)| = 4. An enhancement of the magnitude of the short-range jet peak is observed with increasing centrality, especially for particles of pt around 1-2 GeV/c. The long-range azimuthal dihadron correlations are extensively studied using a Fourier decomposition analysis. The extracted Fourier coefficients are found to factorise into a product of single-particle azimuthal anisotropies up to pt approximately 3-3.5 GeV/c for at least one particle from each pair, except for the second-order harmonics in the most central PbPb events. Various orders of the single-particle azimuthal anisotropy harmonics are extracted for associated particle pt of 1-3 GeV/c, as a function of the trigger particle pt up to 20 GeV/c and over the full centrality range.

  9. Observations of the azimuthal dependence of normal mode coupling below 4 mHz at the South Pole and its nearby stations: Insights into the anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao Gang

    2016-08-01

    Normal mode coupling pair 0S26-0T26 and 0S27-0T27 are significantly present at the South Pole station QSPA after the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku earthquake. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms responsible for the coupling pairs, I first investigate mode observations at 43 stations distributed along the polar great-circle path for the earthquake and observations at 32 Antarctic stations. I rule out the effect of Earth's rotation as well as the effect of global large-scale lateral heterogeneity, but argue instead for the effect of small-scale local azimuthal anisotropy in a depth extent about 300 km. The presence of quasi-Love waveform in 2-5 mHz at QSPA and its nearby stations confirms the predication. Secondly, I analyze normal mode observations at the South Pole location after 28 large earthquakes from 1998 to 2015. The result indicates that the presence of the mode coupling is azimuthal dependent, which is related to event azimuths in -46° to -18°. I also make a comparison between the shear-wave splitting measurements of previous studies and the mode coupling observations of this study, suggesting that their difference can be explained by a case that the anisotropy responsible for the mode coupling is not just below the South Pole location but located below region close to the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Furthermore, more signals of local azimuthal anisotropy in normal-mode observations at QSPA and SBA, such as coupling of 0S12-0T11 and vertical polarization anomaly for 0T10, confirms the existence of deep anisotropy close to TAM, which may be caused by asthenospheric mantle flow and edge convection around cratonic keel of TAM.

  10. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of 3-D distributions of NO2 and azimuth-dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope and describe a retrieval method to probe three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two-dimensional (2-D) multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4), and water vapor (H2O); nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and iodine monoxide (IO) are among other gases that can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has three modes of operation: mode 1 measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being north); mode 2 measures any set of azimuth angles (AAs) at constant elevation angle (EA) (almucantar scans); and mode 3 tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured and used to estimate mixing layer height (MLH). Horizontal distributions are then derived using MLH and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths and has a diurnal mean effective radius of 7.0 to 25 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1960 km2 can be sampled with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi-Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany, from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles and MLH of NO2; (b

  11. On the dependence of the efficiency of a 240 GHz high-power gyrotron on the displacement of the electron beam and on the azimuthal index

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Jelonnek, J.

    2014-01-15

    Two issues in the cavity design for a Megawatt-class, 240 GHz gyrotron are addressed. Those are first, the effect of a misaligned electron beam on the gyrotron efficiency and second, a possible azimuthal instability of the gyrotron. The aforementioned effects are important for any gyrotron operation, but could be more critical in the operation of Megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies above 200 GHz, which will be the anticipated requirement of DEMO. The target is to provide some basic trends to be considered during the refinement and optimization of the design. Self-consistent calculations are the base for simulations wherever possible. However, in cases for which self-consistent models were not available, fixed-field results are presented. In those cases, the conservative nature of the results should be kept in mind.

  12. Time-Dependent Thermal Transport Theory.

    PubMed

    Biele, Robert; D'Agosta, Roberto; Rubio, Angel

    2015-07-31

    Understanding thermal transport in nanoscale systems presents important challenges to both theory and experiment. In particular, the concept of local temperature at the nanoscale appears difficult to justify. Here, we propose a theoretical approach where we replace the temperature gradient with controllable external blackbody radiations. The theory recovers known physical results, for example, the linear relation between the thermal current and the temperature difference of two blackbodies. Furthermore, our theory is not limited to the linear regime and goes beyond accounting for nonlinear effects and transient phenomena. Since the present theory is general and can be adapted to describe both electron and phonon dynamics, it provides a first step toward a unified formalism for investigating thermal and electronic transport.

  13. Azimuthal Asymmetries in Meson Electroproduction at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasch, Delia

    2003-07-01

    The measurement of single-spin azimuthal asymmetries for pseudoscalar meson production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 27.6 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarised hydrogen and deuterium target is reported by the HERMES experiment. A significant target-spin asymmetry amplitude in the azimuthal distribution of charged and neutral pions and positively charged kaons relative to the lepton scattering plane has been observed. The dependence on the relevant kinematic variables which are the Bjorken variable x, the meson fractional energy z and the meson transverse momentum P⊥ has been investigated as well. The results are compared to predictions of model calculations which are base on a fragmentation function that varies with the transverse polarisation of the struck quark. In addition, data from the measurement of a single beam-spin azimuthal asymmetry in the electroproduction of positive pions in semi-inclusive and semi-exclusive deep-inelastic scattering will be presented.

  14. Azimuthal-Angle Dependence of Charged-Pion-Interferometry Measurements with Respect to Second- and Third-Order Event Planes in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Niida, T.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  15. Azimuthal-angle dependence of charged-pion-interferometry measurements with respect to second- and third-order event planes in Au+Au collisions at √[S(NN)]=200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E-J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niida, T; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2014-06-01

    Charged-pion-interferometry measurements were made with respect to the second- and third-order event plane for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV. A strong azimuthal-angle dependence of the extracted Gaussian-source radii was observed with respect to both the second- and third-order event planes. The results for the second-order dependence indicate that the initial eccentricity is reduced during the medium evolution, which is consistent with previous results. In contrast, the results for the third-order dependence indicate that the initial triangular shape is significantly reduced and potentially reversed by the end of the medium evolution, and that the third-order oscillations are largely dominated by the dynamical effects from triangular flow.

  16. The CU 2-dimensional MAX-DOAS instrument - Part 1: Retrieval of NO2 in 3 dimensions and azimuth dependent OVOC ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I.; Koenig, T.; Sinreich, R.; Thomson, D.; Volkamer, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present an innovative instrument telescope, and describe a retrieval method to probe 3-D distributions of atmospheric trace gases that are relevant to air pollution and tropospheric chemistry. The University of Colorado (CU) two dimensional (2-D) Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument measures nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO), oxygen dimer (O2-O2, or O4) and water vapor (H2O); also nitrous acid (HONO), bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO) among other gases can in principle be measured. Information about aerosols is derived through coupling with a radiative transfer model (RTM). The 2-D telescope has 3 modes of operation: (mode 1) measures solar scattered photons from any pair of elevation angle (-20° < EA < +90° or zenith; zero is to the horizon) and azimuth angle (-180° < AA < +180°; zero being North), (mode 2) measures any set of AA at constant EA (almucantar scans); and (mode 3) tracks the direct solar beam via a separate view port. Vertical profiles of trace gases are measured, and used to estimate planetary boundary layer height (PBL). Horizontal distributions are then derived using PBL and parameterization of RTM (Sinreich et al., 2013). NO2 is evaluated at different wavelengths (350, 450, and 560 nm), exploiting the fact that the effective path length varies systematically with wavelength. The area probed is constrained by O4 observations at nearby wavelengths, and has an effective radius of 7.5 to 20 km around the instrument location; i.e., up to 1250 km2 can be sampled near-instantaneously, and with high time resolution. The instrument was deployed as part of the Multi Axis DOAS Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) in Mainz, Germany from 7 June to 6 July 2013. We present first measurements (modes 1 and 2 only) and describe a four-step retrieval to derive (a) boundary layer vertical profiles of NO2 and PBL; (b) near-surface horizontal distributions

  17. Technology of optical azimuth transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Honggang; Hu, Chunsheng; Wang, Xingshu; Gao, Yang

    2012-11-01

    It often needs transfer a reference from one place to another place in aerospace and guided missile launching. At first, principles of several typical optical azimuth transmission methods are presented. Several typical methods are introduced, such as Theodolite (including gyro-theodolite) collimation method, Camera series method, Optical apparatus for azimuth method and polarization modulated light transmission method. For these typical azimuth transmission methods, their essential theories are elaborated. Then the devices, the application fields and limitations of these typical methods' are presented. Theodolite (including gyro-theodolite) collimation method is used in the ground assembly of spacecraft. Camera series method and optical apparatus for azimuth method are used in azimuth transmission between different decks of ship. Polarization modulated light transmission method is used in azimuth transmission of rocket and guided missile. At the last, the further developments of these methods are discussed.

  18. Particle-type dependence of azimuthal anisotropy and nuclear modification of particle production in Au+Au collisions at square root of sNN=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-02-01

    We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v(2) and the binary-collision scaled centrality ratio R(CP) for kaons and lambdas (Lambda+Lambda) at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root of s(NN)=200 GeV. In combination, the v(2) and R(CP) particle-type dependencies contradict expectations from partonic energy loss followed by standard fragmentation in vacuum. We establish p(T) approximately 5 GeV/c as the value where the centrality dependent baryon enhancement ends. The K(0)(S) and Lambda+Lambda v(2) values are consistent with expectations of constituent-quark-number scaling from models of hadron formation by parton coalescence or recombination. PMID:14995300

  19. [Riboflavin transport in cells of riboflavin-dependent yeast mutants].

    PubMed

    Sibirnyĭ, A A; Shavlovskiĭ, G M; Ksheminskaia, G P; Orlovskaia, A G

    1977-01-01

    Riboflavin was transported at a high rate into yeast cells of Pichia guilliermondii and Schwanniomyces occidentalis mutants capable of growth in a medium containing low concentrations of riboflavin, and having multiple susceptibility to some antibiotics and antimetabolites. Sucrose and sodium azide inhibited transport of riboflavin. Other riboflavin dependent mutants of Pichia guilliermondii, Pichia ohmeri, Torulopsis candida, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also growing in media containing low concentrations of riboflavin, were not capable of its active transport. PMID:329070

  20. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  1. Sodium-Dependent Phosphate Transporters in Osteoclast Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wagner, Carsten A.; Biber, Jürg; Hernando, Nati; Hofstetter, Willy

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated bone degrading cells. Phosphate is an important constituent of mineralized bone and released in significant quantities during bone resorption. Molecular contributors to phosphate transport during the resorptive activity of osteoclasts have been controversially discussed. This study aimed at deciphering the role of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters during osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Our studies reveal RANKL-induced differential expression of sodium-dependent phosphate transport protein IIa (NaPi-IIa) transcript and protein during osteoclast development, but no expression of the closely related NaPi-IIb and NaPi-IIc SLC34 family isoforms. In vitro studies employing NaPi-IIa-deficient osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclasts reveal that NaPi-IIa is dispensable for bone resorption and osteoclast differentiation. These results are supported by the analysis of structural bone parameters by high-resolution microcomputed tomography that yielded no differences between adult NaPi-IIa WT and KO mice. By contrast, both type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters Pit-1 and Pit-2 were abundantly expressed throughout osteoclast differentiation, indicating that they are the relevant sodium-dependent phosphate transporters in osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors. We conclude that phosphate transporters of the SLC34 family have no role in osteoclast differentiation and function and propose that Pit-dependent phosphate transport could be pivotal for bone resorption and should be addressed in further studies. PMID:25910236

  2. Sodium-dependent phosphate transporters in osteoclast differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Albano, Giuseppe; Moor, Matthias; Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wagner, Carsten A; Biber, Jürg; Hernando, Nati; Hofstetter, Willy; Bonny, Olivier; Fuster, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated bone degrading cells. Phosphate is an important constituent of mineralized bone and released in significant quantities during bone resorption. Molecular contributors to phosphate transport during the resorptive activity of osteoclasts have been controversially discussed. This study aimed at deciphering the role of sodium-dependent phosphate transporters during osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. Our studies reveal RANKL-induced differential expression of sodium-dependent phosphate transport protein IIa (NaPi-IIa) transcript and protein during osteoclast development, but no expression of the closely related NaPi-IIb and NaPi-IIc SLC34 family isoforms. In vitro studies employing NaPi-IIa-deficient osteoclast precursors and mature osteoclasts reveal that NaPi-IIa is dispensable for bone resorption and osteoclast differentiation. These results are supported by the analysis of structural bone parameters by high-resolution microcomputed tomography that yielded no differences between adult NaPi-IIa WT and KO mice. By contrast, both type III sodium-dependent phosphate transporters Pit-1 and Pit-2 were abundantly expressed throughout osteoclast differentiation, indicating that they are the relevant sodium-dependent phosphate transporters in osteoclasts and osteoclast precursors. We conclude that phosphate transporters of the SLC34 family have no role in osteoclast differentiation and function and propose that Pit-dependent phosphate transport could be pivotal for bone resorption and should be addressed in further studies.

  3. Azimuthally Sensitive Femtoscopy and {nu}2

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasik, Boris

    2006-04-11

    I investigate the correlation between spatial and flow anisotropy in determining the elliptic flow and azimuthal dependence of the HBT correlation radii in non-central nuclear collisions. It is shown that the correlation radii are in most cases dominantly sensitive to the anisotropy in space. In case of {nu}2, the correlation depends strongly on particle species. A procedure for disentangling the spatial and the flow anisotropy is proposed.

  4. A velocity-dependent anomalous radial transport model for (2-D, 2-V) kinetic transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodi, Kowsik; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Cohen, Ron; Rognlien, Tom

    2008-11-01

    Plasma turbulence constitutes a significant part of radial plasma transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This turbulent transport is modeled in the form of anomalous convection and diffusion coefficients in fluid transport codes. There is a need to model the same in continuum kinetic edge codes [such as the (2-D, 2-V) transport version of TEMPEST, NEO, and the code being developed by the Edge Simulation Laboratory] with non-Maxwellian distributions. We present an anomalous transport model with velocity-dependent convection and diffusion coefficients leading to a diagonal transport matrix similar to that used in contemporary fluid transport models (e.g., UEDGE). Also presented are results of simulations corresponding to radial transport due to long-wavelength ExB turbulence using a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. A BGK collision model is used to enable comparison with fluid transport codes.

  5. Azimuthal Anisotropy of π0 Production in Au+Au Collisions at sNN=200GeV: Path-Length Dependence of Jet Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'Yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M., Jr.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hanks, J.; Han, R.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; Heffner, M.; Hegyi, S.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; He, X.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Li, X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Oka, M.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; You, Z.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of π0 production for 1dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  6. Azimuthal anisotropy of π⁰ production in Au+Au collisions at sqrt((s)NN)=200  GeV: path-length dependence of jet quenching and the role of initial geometry.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hegyi, S; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Okada, K; Oka, M; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; You, Z; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2010-10-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of π⁰ production for 1dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  7. Azimuthal Anisotropy of pi Production in Au+Au Collisions at s_NN = 200 GeV: Path-length Dependence of Jet-Quenching and the Role of Initial Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Awes, Terry C; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Enokizono, Akitomo; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the azimuthal anisotropy of {pi}{sup 0} production for 1 < p{sub T} < 18 GeV/c for Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The observed anisotropy shows a gradual decrease for 3 {approx}< p {approx}< 7-10 GeV/c, but remains positive beyond 10 GeV/c. The magnitude of this anisotropy is underpredicted, up to at least {approx}10 GeV/c, by current perturbative QCD (PQCD) energy-loss model calculations. An estimate of the increase in anisotropy expected from initial-geometry modification due to gluon saturation effects and fluctuations is insufficient to account for this discrepancy. Calculations that implement a path-length dependence steeper than what is implied by current PQCD energy-loss models show reasonable agreement with the data.

  8. TonB-dependent transporters and their occurrence in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mirus, Oliver; Strauss, Sascha; Nicolaisen, Kerstin; von Haeseler, Arndt; Schleiff, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Background Different iron transport systems evolved in Gram-negative bacteria during evolution. Most of the transport systems depend on outer membrane localized TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs), a periplasma-facing TonB protein and a plasma membrane localized machinery (ExbBD). So far, iron chelators (siderophores), oligosaccharides and polypeptides have been identified as substrates of TBDTs. For iron transport, three uptake systems are defined: the lactoferrin/transferrin binding proteins, the porphyrin-dependent transporters and the siderophore-dependent transporters. However, for cyanobacteria almost nothing is known about possible TonB-dependent uptake systems for iron or other substrates. Results We have screened all publicly available eubacterial genomes for sequences representing (putative) TBDTs. Based on sequence similarity, we identified 195 clusters, where elements of one cluster may possibly recognize similar substrates. For Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we identified 22 genes as putative TBDTs covering almost all known TBDT subclasses. This is a high number of TBDTs compared to other cyanobacteria. The expression of the 22 putative TBDTs individually depends on the presence of iron, copper or nitrogen. Conclusion We exemplified on TBDTs the power of CLANS-based classification, which demonstrates its importance for future application in systems biology. In addition, the tentative substrate assignment based on characterized proteins will stimulate the research of TBDTs in different species. For cyanobacteria, the atypical dependence of TBDT gene expression on different nutrition points to a yet unknown regulatory mechanism. In addition, we were able to clarify a hypothesis of the absence of TonB in cyanobacteria by the identification of according sequences. PMID:19821963

  9. Position-dependent Effects of Polylysine on Sec Protein Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K.; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or “pause sites,” were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport. PMID:22367204

  10. On the energy-dependence of Hoechst 33342 transport by the ABC transporter LmrA.

    PubMed

    Venter, Henrietta; Velamakanni, Saroj; Balakrishnan, Lekshmy; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2008-02-15

    LmrA is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporter from Lactococcus lactis, and is a structural homologue of the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), the overexpression of which is associated with multidrug resistance in tumours. We recently observed that a truncated version of LmrA lacking the nucleotide-binding domain mediates a proton motive force-dependent ethidium transport reaction by catalyzing proton-ethidium symport. This finding raised the question whether proton motive force-dependent transport can also be observed for other drugs, and whether this reaction is also relevant for full-length LmrA. Furthermore, the observations on LmrA-MD raised the question whether ATP-dependent transport by LmrA in intact cells could be due to the activity of independent ABC transporters that might become upregulated in the lactococcal cells due to the overexpression of LmrA; the recently identified ABC multidrug transporter LmrCD was put forward as a possible candidate. Here, we investigated the energy coupling to the transport of the amphiphilic dye Hoechst 33342 in proteoliposomes containing purified LmrA. For this purpose, LmrA was obtained from lactococcal cells lacking the genomic lmrA and lmrCD genes, in which LmrA was expressed from a plasmid. To separate ATP-dependence from proton motive force-dependence, we also used mutant LmrA proteins, which were affected in their ability to hydrolyse ATP. Our studies in proteoliposomes demonstrate that LmrA can catalyze Hoechst 33342 transport independent of auxiliary proteins, in an ATP-dependent fashion and a transmembrane chemical proton gradient (interior acidic)-dependent fashion.

  11. SYMTRAN - A Time-dependent Symmetric Tandem Mirror Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D; Fowler, T

    2004-06-15

    A time-dependent version of the steady-state radial transport model in symmetric tandem mirrors in Ref. [1] has been coded up and first tests performed. Our code, named SYMTRAN, is an adaptation of the earlier SPHERE code for spheromaks, now modified for tandem mirror physics. Motivated by Post's new concept of kinetic stabilization of symmetric mirrors, it is an extension of the earlier TAMRAC rate-equation code omitting radial transport [2], which successfully accounted for experimental results in TMX. The SYMTRAN code differs from the earlier tandem mirror radial transport code TMT in that our code is focused on axisymmetric tandem mirrors and classical diffusion, whereas TMT emphasized non-ambipolar transport in TMX and MFTF-B due to yin-yang plugs and non-symmetric transitions between the plugs and axisymmetric center cell. Both codes exhibit interesting but different non-linear behavior.

  12. Azimuthal Frustration and Bundling in Columnar DNA Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Harreis, H. M.; Likos, C. N.; Löwen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between two stiff parallel DNA molecules is discussed using linear Debye-Hückel screening theory with and without inclusion of the dielectric discontinuity at the DNA surface, taking into account the helical symmetry of DNA. The pair potential furthermore includes the amount and distribution of counterions adsorbed on the DNA surface. The interaction does not only depend on the interaxial separation of two DNA molecules, but also on their azimuthal orientation. The optimal mutual azimuthal angle is a function of the DNA-DNA interaxial separation, which leads to azimuthal frustrations in an aggregate. On the basis of the pair potential, the positional and orientational order in columnar B-DNA assemblies in solution is investigated. Phase diagrams are calculated using lattice sums supplemented with the entropic contributions of the counterions in solution. A variety of positionally and azimuthally ordered phases and bundling transitions is predicted, which strongly depend on the counterion adsorption patterns. PMID:12770870

  13. Measurement of the Azimuthal Angle Dependence of Inclusive Jet Yields in Pb+Pb Collisions at sNN=2.76TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coelli, S.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Daniells, A. C.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. 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G.; McCubbin, N. A.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; Mclaughlan, T.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Meric, N.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Merritt, H.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Michal, S.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano Moya, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Mitsui, S.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, V.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molfetas, A.; Mönig, K.; Monini, C.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morange, N.; Morel, J.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, M.; Morii, M.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Morvaj, L.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Mueller, T.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagarkar, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagel, M.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Narayan, R.; Nash, M.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nguyen Thi Hong, V.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolics, K.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Brien, B. J.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakes, L. B.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, M. I.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Okamura, W.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Olchevski, A. G.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Paleari, C. P.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Papadelis, A.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pashapour, S.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Cavalcanti, T.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Piec, S. M.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinder, A.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Pohl, M.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Portell Bueso, X.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, J.; Price, L. E.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przybycien, M.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quilty, D.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radloff, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rao, K.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, T. C.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos Santos, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Saddique, A.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarrazin, B.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Tuna, A. N.; Turala, M.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of the variation of inclusive jet suppression as a function of relative azimuthal angle, Δϕ, with respect to the elliptic event plane provide insight into the path-length dependence of jet quenching. ATLAS has measured the Δϕ dependence of jet yields in 0.14nb-1 of sNN=2.76TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC for jet transverse momenta pT>45GeV in different collision centrality bins using an underlying event subtraction procedure that accounts for elliptic flow. The variation of the jet yield with Δϕ was characterized by the parameter, v2jet, and the ratio of out-of-plane (Δϕ˜π/2) to in-plane (Δϕ˜0) yields. Nonzero v2jet values were measured in all centrality bins for pT<160GeV. The jet yields are observed to vary by as much as 20% between in-plane and out-of-plane directions.

  14. Microfluidic-Enabled Liposomes Elucidate Size-Dependent Transdermal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Mariana; Vreeland, Wyatt N.; Quezado, Zenaide; Finkel, Julia C.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic synthesis of small and nearly-monodisperse liposomes is used to investigate the size-dependent passive transdermal transport of nanoscale lipid vesicles. While large liposomes with diameters above 105 nm are found to be excluded from deeper skin layers past the stratum corneum, the primary barrier to nanoparticle transport, liposomes with mean diameters between 31–41 nm exhibit significantly enhanced penetration. Furthermore, multicolor fluorescence imaging reveals that the smaller liposomes pass rapidly through the stratum corneum without vesicle rupture. These findings reveal that nanoscale liposomes with well-controlled size and minimal size variance are excellent vehicles for transdermal delivery of functional nanoparticle drugs. PMID:24658111

  15. Microtubule-dependent transport and dynamics of vimentin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Hookway, Caroline; Ding, Liya; Davidson, Michael W; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Danuser, Gaudenz; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2015-05-01

    We studied two aspects of vimentin intermediate filament dynamics-transport of filaments and subunit exchange. We observed transport of long filaments in the periphery of cells using live-cell structured illumination microscopy. We studied filament transport elsewhere in cells using a photoconvertible-vimentin probe and total internal reflection microscopy. We found that filaments were rapidly transported along linear tracks in both anterograde and retrograde directions. Filament transport was microtubule dependent but independent of microtubule polymerization and/or an interaction with the plus end-binding protein APC. We also studied subunit exchange in filaments by long-term imaging after photoconversion. We found that converted vimentin remained in small clusters along the length of filaments rather than redistributing uniformly throughout the network, even in cells that divided after photoconversion. These data show that vimentin filaments do not depolymerize into individual subunits; they recompose by severing and reannealing. Together these results show that vimentin filaments are very dynamic and that their transport is required for network maintenance.

  16. Microtubule-dependent transport and dynamics of vimentin intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hookway, Caroline; Ding, Liya; Davidson, Michael W.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Danuser, Gaudenz; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    We studied two aspects of vimentin intermediate filament dynamics—transport of filaments and subunit exchange. We observed transport of long filaments in the periphery of cells using live-cell structured illumination microscopy. We studied filament transport elsewhere in cells using a photoconvertible-vimentin probe and total internal reflection microscopy. We found that filaments were rapidly transported along linear tracks in both anterograde and retrograde directions. Filament transport was microtubule dependent but independent of microtubule polymerization and/or an interaction with the plus end–binding protein APC. We also studied subunit exchange in filaments by long-term imaging after photoconversion. We found that converted vimentin remained in small clusters along the length of filaments rather than redistributing uniformly throughout the network, even in cells that divided after photoconversion. These data show that vimentin filaments do not depolymerize into individual subunits; they recompose by severing and reannealing. Together these results show that vimentin filaments are very dynamic and that their transport is required for network maintenance. PMID:25717187

  17. Chloride transporter KCC2-dependent neuroprotection depends on the N-terminal protein domain.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Semtner, M; Meier, J C

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is a serious issue of neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy. Downregulation of the chloride transporter KCC2 in the epileptic tissue may not only affect regulation of the polarity of GABAergic synaptic transmission but also neuronal survival. Here, we addressed the mechanisms of KCC2-dependent neuroprotection by assessing truncated and mutated KCC2 variants in different neurotoxicity models. The results identify a threonine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation-resistant KCC2 variant with increased chloride transport activity, but they also identify the KCC2 N-terminal domain (NTD) as the relevant minimal KCC2 protein domain that is sufficient for neuroprotection. As ectopic expression of the KCC2-NTD works independently of full-length KCC2-dependent regulation of Cl(-) transport or structural KCC2 C-terminus-dependent regulation of synaptogenesis, our study may pave the way for a selective neuroprotective therapeutic strategy that will be applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26043076

  18. Azimuthal plasma flow in the Kronian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A. L.; Saur, J.; Krupp, N.; Roussos, E.; Mauk, B. H.; Rymer, A. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    We study the azimuthal plasma velocity in Saturn's magnetosphere between 3 and 13 Saturn radii (Rs) by analyzing energetic particle injection events using data of the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) onboard the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. Due to the magnetic drifts, the injected particles at various energies begin to disperse and leave an imprint in the electron as well as in the ion energy spectrograms of the MIMI instrument. The shape of these profiles strongly depends on the azimuthal velocity distribution of the magnetospheric plasma and the age of the injection event. Comparison of theoretically computed dispersion profiles with observed ones enables us to characterize the azimuthal flow of the plasma. The measured flow profile clearly shows that the plasma subcorotates with velocities as low as 80% of full corotation at radial distances between 8 Rs to 13 Rs. With knowledge of the flow profile and the ages of each injection event we can calculate the location where the energetic particles were injected into the inner magnetosphere. The night and morning sector of the Kronian magnetosphere are preferred regions for the generation of hot plasma injections.

  19. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  20. Temperature dependent electrical transport of disordered reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Narayanan, T. N.; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Talapatra, Saikat

    2014-06-01

    We report on the simple route for the synthesis of chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using ascorbic acid (a green chemical) as a reducing agent. Temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of rGO thin films have been studied in a wide range (50 K T 400 K) of temperature. Electrical conduction in rGO thin films was displayed in two different temperature regimes. At higher temperatures, Arrhenius-like temperature dependence of resistance was observed indicating a band gap dominating transport behavior. At lower temperatures, the rGO sample showed a conduction mechanism consistent with Mott's two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH). An unsaturated negative magnetoresistance (MR) was observed up to 3 T field. A decrease in negative MR at high temperatures is attributed to the phonon scattering of charge carriers.

  1. Strain-modulation of spin-dependent transport in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Zhen-Zhou Hou, Jin; Cheng, Yan-Fu; Li, Guan-Qiang

    2014-10-27

    We investigate strain modulation of the spin-dependent electron transport in a graphene junction using the transfer matrix method. As an analogy to optics, we define the modulation depth in the electron optics domain. Additionally, we discuss the transport properties and show that the modulation depth and the conductance depend on the spin-orbit coupling strength, the strain magnitude, the width of the strained area, and the energy of the incident electron. The conductances of the spin-down and spin-up electrons have opposite and symmetrical variations, which results in the analogous features of their modulation depths. The maximum conditions for both the modulation depth and the electron spin upset rate are also analyzed.

  2. TonB-dependent outer membrane transport: going for Baroque?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Michael C

    2005-08-01

    The import of essential organometallic micronutrients (such as iron-siderophores and vitamin B(12)) across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria proceeds via TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs). The TBDT couples to the TonB protein, which is part of a multiprotein complex in the plasma (inner) membrane. Five crystal structures of TBDTs illustrate clearly the architecture of the protein in energy-independent substrate-free and substrate-bound states. In each of the TBDT structures, an N-terminal hatch (or plug or cork) domain occludes the lumen of a 22-stranded beta barrel. The manner by which substrate passes through the transporter (the "hatch-barrel problem") is currently unknown. Solution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of various TonB domains indicate a striking structural plasticity of this protein. Thermodynamic, biochemical and bacteriological studies of TonB and TBDTs indicate further that existing structures do not yet capture critical energy-dependent and in vivo conformations of the transport cycle. The reconciliation of structural and non-structural experimental data, and the unambiguous experimental elucidation of a detailed molecular mechanism of transport are current challenges for this field. PMID:16039843

  3. Engineering interband transport by time-dependent disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Tayebirad, Ghazal; Mannella, Riccardo; Wimberger, Sandro

    2011-09-15

    We show how the evolution of atoms in a tilted lattice can be changed and controlled by phase noise on the lattice. Dependent on the characteristic parameters of the noise, the interband transport can be either suppressed or enhanced, which is of interest for very precise control in experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates. The effect of the noise on the survival probability in the ground band is summarized in a scaling plot, stressing the universality of our results.

  4. Field dependent spin transport of anisotropic Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, H.

    2016-04-01

    We have addressed the static spin conductivity and spin Drude weight of one-dimensional spin-1/2 anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain in the finite magnetic field. We have investigated the behavior of transport properties by means of excitation spectrum in terms of a hard core bosonic representation. The effect of in-plane anisotropy on the spin transport properties has also been studied via the bosonic model by Green's function approach. This anisotropy is considered for exchange constants that couple spin components perpendicular to magnetic field direction. We have found the temperature dependence of the spin conductivity and spin Drude weight in the gapped field induced spin-polarized phase for various magnetic field and anisotropy parameters. Furthermore we have studied the magnetic field dependence of static spin conductivity and Drude weight for various anisotropy parameters. Our results show the regular part of spin conductivity vanishes in isotropic case however Drude weight has a finite non-zero value and the system exhibits ballistic transport properties. We also find the peak in the static spin conductivity factor moves to higher temperature upon increasing the magnetic field at fixed anisotropy. The static spin conductivity is found to be monotonically decreasing with magnetic field due to increase of energy gap in the excitation spectrum. Furthermore we have studied the temperature dependence of spin Drude weight for different magnetic field and various anisotropy parameters.

  5. Binding-protein-dependent lactose transport in Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, J A; Cornish, A; Jones, C W

    1990-04-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter NCIB 11883 was grown in lactose-limited continuous culture at a dilution rate of 0.045/h. Washed cells transported [14C]lactose and [methyl-14C]beta-D-thiogalactoside, a nonmetabolisable analog of lactose, at similar rates and with similar affinities (Km for transport, less than 1 microM). Transport was inhibited to various extents by the uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, by unlabeled beta-galactosides and D-galactose, and by osmotic shock. The accumulation ratio for methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside was greater than or equal to 4,100. An abundant protein (molecular weight, 41,000) was purified from osmotic-shock fluid and shown by equilibrium dialysis to bind lactose and methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside, the former with very high affinity (binding constant, 0.14 microM). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this lactose-binding protein exhibited some homology with several other sugar-binding proteins from bacteria. Antiserum raised against the lactose-binding protein did not cross-react with two glucose-binding proteins from A. radiobacter or with extracts of other bacteria grown under lactose limitation. Lactose transport and beta-galactosidase were induced in batch cultures by lactose, melibiose [O-alpha-D-galactoside-(1----6)alpha-D-glucose], and isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside and were subject to catabolite repression by glucose, galactose, and succinate which was not alleviated by cyclic AMP. We conclude that lactose is transported into A. radiobacter via a binding protein-dependent active transport system (in contrast to the H+ symport and phosphotransferase systems found in other bacteria) and that the expression of this transport system is closely linked to that of beta-galactosidase.

  6. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K. Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-10-07

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12 H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  7. Two-dimensional time dependent Riemann solvers for neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Thomas A. . E-mail: tabrunn@sandia.gov; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-11-20

    A two-dimensional Riemann solver is developed for the spherical harmonics approximation to the time dependent neutron transport equation. The eigenstructure of the resulting equations is explored, giving insight into both the spherical harmonics approximation and the Riemann solver. The classic Roe-type Riemann solver used here was developed for one-dimensional problems, but can be used in multidimensional problems by treating each face of a two-dimensional computation cell in a locally one-dimensional way. Several test problems are used to explore the capabilities of both the Riemann solver and the spherical harmonics approximation. The numerical solution for a simple line source problem is compared to the analytic solution to both the P{sub 1} equation and the full transport solution. A lattice problem is used to test the method on a more challenging problem.

  8. PKCβ-dependent phosphorylation of the glycine transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Castrejon-Tellez, Vicente; Plenge, Fernando; Ramirez, Ivan; Miranda, Manuel

    2011-12-01

    The extracellular levels of the neurotransmitter glycine in the brain are tightly regulated by the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) and the clearance rate for glycine depends on its rate of transport and the levels of cell surface GlyT1. Over the years, it has been shown that PKC tightly regulates the activity of several neurotransmitter transporters. In the present work, by stably expressing three N-terminus GlyT1 isoforms in porcine aortic endothelial cells and assaying for [(32)P]-orthophosphate metabolic labeling, we demonstrated that the isoforms GlyT1a, GlyT1b, and GlyT1c were constitutively phosphorylated, and that phosphorylation was dramatically enhanced, in a time dependent fashion, after PKC activation by phorbol ester. The phosphorylation was PKC-dependent, since pre-incubation of the cells with bisindolylmaleimide I, a selective PKC inhibitor, abolished the phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation. Blotting with specific anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies did not yield any signal that could correspond to GlyT1 tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting that the phosphorylation occurs at serine and/or threonine residues. In addition, a 23-40%-inhibition on V(max) was obtained by incubation with phorbol ester without a significant change on the apparent Km value. Furthermore, pre-incubation of the cells with the selective PKCα/β inhibitor Gö6976 abolished the downregulation effect of phorbol ester on uptake and phosphorylation, whereas the selective PKCβ inhibitors (PKCβ inhibitor or LY333531) prevented the phosphorylation without affecting glycine uptake, defining a specific role of classical PKC on GlyT1 uptake and phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that conventional PKCα/β regulates the uptake of glycine, whereas PKCβ is responsible for GlyT1 phosphorylation.

  9. Identification of an erythroid ATP-dependent aminophospholipid transporter.

    PubMed

    Soupene, Eric; Kuypers, Frans A

    2006-05-01

    The asymmetric distribution of amino-containing phospholipids in plasma membranes is essential for the function and survival of mammalian cells. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is restricted to the inner leaflet of plasma membranes by an ATP-dependent transport process. Exposure of PS on the surface of cells serves as a binding site for haemostatic factors, triggers cell-cell interaction and recognition by macrophages and phospholipases. Exposure of PS on the red cell surface plays a significant role in sickle cell pathology. We report the identification of two different isoforms of the aminophospholipid translocase, Atp8a1, or flippase, in the murine red blood cell membrane.

  10. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  11. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  12. Diameter Dependence of the Transport Properties of Antimony Telluride Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, Yuri; Lee, Jin Sook; Park, Hongkun; Kim, Philip

    2010-03-01

    We report measurements of electronic, thermoelectric, and galvanometric properties of individual semimetallic single crystal antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) nanowires. Microfabricated heater and thermometer electrodes were used to probe the transport properties of the nanowires with diameters in the range of 22 - 95nm and temperatures in the range of 2 - 300K. Temperature dependent resistivity varies depending on nanowire diameter. Thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements indicate hole dominant diffusive thermoelectric generation, with an enhancement of the TEP for smaller diameter wires. The large surface-to-volume ratio of Sb2Te3 nanowires makes them an excellent platform to explore novel phenomena in this predicted topological insulator. We investigate mesoscopic magnetoresistance effects in magnetic fields both parallel and perpendicular to the nanowire axis.

  13. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sourav Karmakar, S. N.

    2015-10-15

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally.

  14. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; van Wees, B. J.; Banerjee, T.

    2014-12-01

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and chemically stable in all environments, unlike standard metal/semiconductor interfaces. We fabricate such interfaces with n-type Si at ambient conditions and find their electrical characteristics to be highly rectifying, with minimal reverse leakage current (<10-10 A) and rectification of more than 106. We extract Schottky barrier height of 0.69 eV for the exfoliated graphene and 0.83 eV for the CVD graphene devices at room temperature. The temperature dependent electrical characteristics suggest the influence of inhomogeneities at the graphene/n-Si interface. A quantitative analysis of the inhomogeneity in Schottky barrier heights is presented using the potential fluctuation model proposed by Werner and Güttler.

  15. Temperature dependence of angular momentum transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Lin, Weiwei; Chien, C. L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum transport in magnetic multilayered structures plays a central role in spintronic physics and devices. The angular momentum currents or spin currents are carried by either quasiparticles such as electrons and magnons, or by macroscopic order parameters such as local magnetization of ferromagnets. Based on the generic interface exchange interaction, we develop a microscopic theory that describes interfacial spin conductance for various interfaces among nonmagnetic metals, ferromagnetic insulators, and antiferromagnetic insulators. Spin conductance and its temperature dependence are obtained for different spin batteries including spin pumping, temperature gradient, and spin Hall effect. As an application of our theory, we calculate the spin current in a trilayer made of a ferromagnetic insulator, an antiferromagnetic insulator, and a nonmagnetic heavy metal. The calculated results on the temperature dependence of spin conductance quantitatively agree with the existing experiments.

  16. Anisotropic bias dependent transport property of defective phosphorene layer

    PubMed Central

    Umar Farooq, M.; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is receiving great research interests because of its peculiar physical properties. Nonetheless, no systematic studies on the transport properties modified due to defects have been performed. Here, we present the electronic band structure, defect formation energy and bias dependent transport property of various defective systems. We found that the defect formation energy is much less than that in graphene. The defect configuration strongly affects the electronic structure. The band gap vanishes in single vacancy layers, but the band gap reappears in divacancy layers. Interestingly, a single vacancy defect behaves like a p-type impurity for transport property. Unlike the common belief, we observe that the vacancy defect can contribute to greatly increasing the current. Along the zigzag direction, the current in the most stable single vacancy structure was significantly increased as compared with that found in the pristine layer. In addition, the current along the armchair direction was always greater than along the zigzag direction and we observed a strong anisotropic current ratio of armchair to zigzag direction. PMID:26198318

  17. Time-Dependent, Parallel Neutral Particle Transport Code System.

    2009-09-10

    Version 00 PARTISN (PARallel, TIme-Dependent SN) is the evolutionary successor to CCC-547/DANTSYS. The PARTISN code package is a modular computer program package designed to solve the time-independent or dependent multigroup discrete ordinates form of the Boltzmann transport equation in several different geometries. The modular construction of the package separates the input processing, the transport equation solving, and the post processing (or edit) functions into distinct code modules: the Input Module, the Solver Module, and themore » Edit Module, respectively. PARTISN is the evolutionary successor to the DANTSYSTM code system package. The Input and Edit Modules in PARTISN are very similar to those in DANTSYS. However, unlike DANTSYS, the Solver Module in PARTISN contains one, two, and three-dimensional solvers in a single module. In addition to the diamond-differencing method, the Solver Module also has Adaptive Weighted Diamond-Differencing (AWDD), Linear Discontinuous (LD), and Exponential Discontinuous (ED) spatial differencing methods. The spatial mesh may consist of either a standard orthogonal mesh or a block adaptive orthogonal mesh. The Solver Module may be run in parallel for two and three dimensional problems. One can now run 1-D problems in parallel using Energy Domain Decomposition (triggered by Block 5 input keyword npeg>0). EDD can also be used in 2-D/3-D with or without our standard Spatial Domain Decomposition. Both the static (fixed source or eigenvalue) and time-dependent forms of the transport equation are solved in forward or adjoint mode. In addition, PARTISN now has a probabilistic mode for Probability of Initiation (static) and Probability of Survival (dynamic) calculations. Vacuum, reflective, periodic, white, or inhomogeneous boundary conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering and inhomogeneous sources are permitted. PARTISN solves the transport equation on orthogonal (single level or block-structured AMR) grids in 1-D

  18. Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-02-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  19. Reprint of : Time dependent electronic transport in chiral edge channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.

    2016-08-01

    We study time dependent electronic transport along the chiral edge channels of the quantum Hall regime, focusing on the role of Coulomb interaction. In the low frequency regime, the a.c. conductance can be derived from a lumped element description of the circuit. At higher frequencies, the propagation equations of the Coulomb coupled edge channels need to be solved. As a consequence of the interchannel coupling, a charge pulse emitted in a given channel fractionalized in several pulses. In particular, Coulomb interaction between channels leads to the fractionalization of a charge pulse emitted in a given channel in several pulses. We finally study how the Coulomb interaction, and in particular the fractionalization process, affects the propagation of a single electron in the circuit. All the above-mentioned topics are illustrated by experimental realizations.

  20. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides.

    PubMed

    Dobritzsch, Melanie; Lübken, Tilo; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Blum, Elke; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Dräger, Birgit; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-02-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  1. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  2. High temperature dependence of thermal transport in graphene foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Sun, Yi; Xiao, Huying; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the decreased thermal property of carbon materials with temperature according to the Umklapp phonon scattering theory, highly porous free-standing graphene foam (GF) exhibits an abnormal characteristic that its thermal property increases with temperature above room temperature. In this work, the temperature dependence of thermal properties of free-standing GF is investigated by using the transient electro-thermal technique. Significant increase for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity from ˜0.3 to 1.5 W m-1 K-1 and ˜4 × 10-5 to ˜2 × 10-4 m2 s-1 respectively is observed with temperature from 310 K to 440 K for three GF samples. The quantitative analysis based on a physical model for porous media of Schuetz confirms that the thermal conductance across graphene contacts rather than the heat conductance inside graphene dominates thermal transport of our GFs. The thermal expansion effect at an elevated temperature makes the highly porous structure much tighter is responsible for the reduction in thermal contact resistance. Besides, the radiation heat exchange inside the pores of GFs improves the thermal transport at high temperatures. Since free-standing GF has great potential for being used as supercapacitor and battery electrode where the working temperature is always above room temperature, this finding is beneficial for thermal design of GF-based energy applications.

  3. High temperature dependence of thermal transport in graphene foam.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Sun, Yi; Xiao, Huying; Hu, Xuejiao; Yue, Yanan

    2015-03-13

    In contrast to the decreased thermal property of carbon materials with temperature according to the Umklapp phonon scattering theory, highly porous free-standing graphene foam (GF) exhibits an abnormal characteristic that its thermal property increases with temperature above room temperature. In this work, the temperature dependence of thermal properties of free-standing GF is investigated by using the transient electro-thermal technique. Significant increase for thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity from ∼0.3 to 1.5 W m(-1) K(-1) and ∼4 × 10(-5) to ∼2 × 10(-4) m(2) s(-1) respectively is observed with temperature from 310 K to 440 K for three GF samples. The quantitative analysis based on a physical model for porous media of Schuetz confirms that the thermal conductance across graphene contacts rather than the heat conductance inside graphene dominates thermal transport of our GFs. The thermal expansion effect at an elevated temperature makes the highly porous structure much tighter is responsible for the reduction in thermal contact resistance. Besides, the radiation heat exchange inside the pores of GFs improves the thermal transport at high temperatures. Since free-standing GF has great potential for being used as supercapacitor and battery electrode where the working temperature is always above room temperature, this finding is beneficial for thermal design of GF-based energy applications.

  4. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  5. Image charge dynamics in time-dependent quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myöhänen, Petri; Tuovinen, Riku; Korhonen, Topi; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of the electron-electron interaction between a molecular junction and the metallic leads in time-dependent quantum transport. We employ the recently developed embedded Kadanoff-Baym method [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.80.115107 80, 115107 (2009)] and show that the molecule-lead interaction changes substantially the transient and steady-state transport properties. We first show that the mean-field Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation does not capture the polarization effects responsible for the renormalization of the molecular levels neither in nor out of equilibrium. Furthermore, due to the time-local nature of the HF self-energy, there exists a region in parameter space for which the system does not relax after the switch-on of a bias voltage. These and other artifacts of the HF approximation disappear when including correlations at the second-Born or GW levels. Both these approximations contain polarization diagrams, which correctly account for the screening of the charged molecule. We find that by changing the molecule-lead interaction, the ratio between the screening and relaxation time changes, an effect which must be properly taken into account in any realistic time-dependent simulation. Another important finding is that while in equilibrium the molecule-lead interaction is responsible for a reduction of the highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap and for a substantial redistribution of the spectral weight between the main spectral peaks and the induced satellite spectrum, in the biased system it can have the opposite effect, i.e., it sharpens the spectral peaks and opens the HOMO-LUMO gap.

  6. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave

  7. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave

  8. Temperature Dependence of Lateral Charge Transport in Silicon Nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Scott, Shelley; Jacobson, Rb; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Savage, Donald; Eriksson, Mark; Lagally, Max

    2014-03-01

    Thin sheets of single-crystal silicon (nanomembranes), electrically isolated from a bulk substrate by a dielectric layer, are an exceptional tool for studying the electronic transport properties of surfaces in the absence of an extended bulk. Under UHV, we measure the conductivity, and a back gate allows us to look into the depletion region, where we can determine the minimum conductance. For hydrogen-terminated Si(001) NMs, for which the surface has no conductivity, the minimum conductance decreases with decreasing NM thickness (220-42nm), demonstrating the reduction in carriers for thinner NMs. For the clean Si(2 ×1)surface, mobile charge exists in the π* surface band. For thicknesses below 200nm surface conduction dominates, rendering the thickness independence of the minimum. We determine a surface charge mobility of ~50cm2V-1s-1. We have measured the temperature dependence of the conductance of a 42nm thick HF treated SiNM. The results show that the Fermi level is pinned 0.21 +/- 0 . 01 eV below the conduction band minimum, in agreement with XPS results. Supported by DOE.

  9. Spin-dependent heat transport and thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taehee

    In this thesis, thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations has been studied. In order to make different magnetic configurations, we developed a spin valve structure, which has high MR ratio and low saturation field. The high MR ratio was achieved using Co/Cu multilayer and 21A or 34A thick Cu layer. The low saturation field was obtained by implementing different coercivities of the successive ferromagnetic layers. For this purpose, Co/Cu/Cu tri-layered structure was used with the thicknesses of the Co layers; 15 A and 30 A. For the thermal conductivity measurement, a three-omega method was employed with a thermally isolated microscale rod. We fabricated the microscale rod using optical lithography and MEMS process. Then the rod was wire-bonded to a chip-carver for further electrical measurement. For the thermal conductivity measurement, we built the three-omega measurement system using two lock-in amplifiers and two differential amplifiers. A custom-made electromagnet was added to the system to investigate the impact of magnetic field. We observed titanic thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations of the Co/Cu/Co multilayer. The thermal conductivity change was closely correlated with that of the electric conductivity in terms of the spin orientation, but the thermal conductivity was much more sensitive than that of the electric conductivity. The relative thermal conductivity change was 50% meanwhile that of electric resistivity change was 8.0%. The difference between the two ratios suggests that the scattering mechanism for charge and heat transport in the Co/Cu/Co multilayer is different. The Lorentz number in Weidemann-Franz law is also spin-dependent. Thermal boundary resistance between metal and dielectrics was also studied in this thesis. The thermal boundary resistance becomes critical for heat transport in a nanoscale because the thermal boundary resistance can potentially determine overall heat transport

  10. “Magnifying-Glass” Azimuthal Map Projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, John P.

    1987-01-01

    For maps focusing on a region of interest, but including surrounding areas to provide a setting, new azimuthal projections have been developed with a 'magnifying-glass' effect. On two such projections, inside a circle bounding the region of interest is a standard Azimuthal Equidistant or Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area projection. Between this circle and an outer bounding circle azimuths remain true and the radial or area scale, respectively, remains constant, but at a reduced value. On four other projections, the inner portion is a standard azimuthal projection, which may be Stereographic, Gnomonic, or the above, but beyond this portion, the radial scale is gradually reduced to zero. Equivalents with rectangular boundaries are also available.

  11. Spin-dependent electron transport in nanoscale samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yaguang

    In this thesis, we describe the research in which we use metallic nanoparticles to explore spin-dependent electron transport at nanometer scale. Nanoscale samples were fabricated by using a state of the art electron beam lithography and shadow evaporation technique. We have investigated spin relaxation and decoherence in metallic grains as a function of bias voltage and magnetic field at low temperatures (down to ˜30mK). At low temperatures, the discrete energy levels within a metallic nanoparticle provides a new means to study the physics of the spin-polarized electron tunneling. We describe measurements of spin-polarized tunneling via discrete energy levels of single Aluminum grain. Spin polarized current saturates quickly as a function of bias voltage, which demonstrates that the ground state and the lowest excited states carry spin polarized current. The ratio of electron-spin relaxation time (T1) to the electron-phonon relaxation rate is in quantitative agreement with the Elliot-Yafet scaling, an evidence that spin-relaxation in Al grains is driven by the spin-orbit interaction. The spin-relaxation time of the low-lying excited states is T1 ≈ 0.7 mus and 0.1 mus in two samples, showing that electron spin in a metallic grain could be a potential candidate for quantum information research. We also present measurements of mesoscopic resistance fluctuations in cobalt nanoparticles at low temperature and study how the fluctuations with bias voltage, bias fingerprints, respond to magnetization-reversal processes. Bias fingerprints rearrange when domains are nucleated or annihilated. The domain wall causes an electron wave function-phase shift of ˜5 pi. The phase shift is not caused by the Aharonov-Bohm effect; we explain how it arises from the mistracking effect, where electron spins lag in orientation with respect to the moments inside the domain wall. The dephasing length at low temperatures is only 30 nm, which is attributed to the large magnetocrystalline

  12. Relative azimuth inversion by way of damped maximum correlation estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, A.T.; Edwards, J.D.; Hutt, C.R.; Shelly, F.

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal seismic data are utilized in a large number of Earth studies. Such work depends on the published orientations of the sensitive axes of seismic sensors relative to true North. These orientations can be estimated using a number of different techniques: SensOrLoc (Sensitivity, Orientation and Location), comparison to synthetics (Ekstrom and Busby, 2008), or by way of magnetic compass. Current methods for finding relative station azimuths are unable to do so with arbitrary precision quickly because of limitations in the algorithms (e.g. grid search methods). Furthermore, in order to determine instrument orientations during station visits, it is critical that any analysis software be easily run on a large number of different computer platforms and the results be obtained quickly while on site. We developed a new technique for estimating relative sensor azimuths by inverting for the orientation with the maximum correlation to a reference instrument, using a non-linear parameter estimation routine. By making use of overlapping windows, we are able to make multiple azimuth estimates, which helps to identify the confidence of our azimuth estimate, even when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low. Finally, our algorithm has been written as a stand-alone, platform independent, Java software package with a graphical user interface for reading and selecting data segments to be analyzed.

  13. Analytical solution for one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mathematical models describing contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media are often formulated as an advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent transport coefficients. In this work, a general analytical solution is presented for the linear, one-dimensional advection-di...

  14. Kinase-dependent Regulation of Monoamine Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of neurotransmission by the monoamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for normal nervous system function. Precise temporal and spatial control of this signaling in mediated in large part by the actions of monoamine transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT, respectively). These transporters act to recapture their respective neurotransmitters after release, and disruption of clearance and reuptake has significant effects on physiology and behavior and has been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To ensure adequate and dynamic control of these transporters, multiple modes of control have evolved to regulate their activity and trafficking. Central to many of these modes of control are the actions of protein kinases, whose actions can be direct or indirectly mediated by kinase-modulated protein interactions. Here, we summarize the current state of our understanding of how protein kinases regulate monoamine transporters through changes in activity, trafficking, phosphorylation state, and interacting partners. We highlight genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence for kinase-linked control of DAT, NET, and SERT and, where applicable, provide evidence for endogenous activators of these pathways. We hope our discussion can lead to a more nuanced and integrated understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters are controlled and may contribute to disorders that feature perturbed monoamine signaling, with an ultimate goal of developing better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27591044

  15. Development of Na/sup +/-dependent hexose transport in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.S.; Amsler, K.; Weiss, E.R.; Shaffer, C.

    1981-01-01

    The desriptions given here of experiments with LLC-PK/sub 1/ cell transport systems are more of a progress report than a definitive statement. The cells give great promise for exploring the differentiation of an important transport system, but a number of cell biological problems need resolution first. The kinetic analysis described suggests that the individual cells become fully, possibly terminally, differentiated and remain so. It is equally desirable to have a means of separating differentiated from undifferentiated cells, and to know the transport capacity of each. With these questions resolved, the use of modulators of the rate of differentiation, acceleration by inducers and inhibition by tumor promoters, gives obviously important experimental handles in exploring the underlying processes. The clones that have been derived so far add another dimension to the possibilities of this cell system, since the clones show different responses to the inducers and to TPA and these differences will be of value in sorting out mechanisms.

  16. PIN-Dependent Auxin Transport: Action, Regulation, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Adamowski, Maciek; Friml, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Auxin participates in a multitude of developmental processes, as well as responses to environmental cues. Compared with other plant hormones, auxin exhibits a unique property, as it undergoes directional, cell-to-cell transport facilitated by plasma membrane-localized transport proteins. Among them, a prominent role has been ascribed to the PIN family of auxin efflux facilitators. PIN proteins direct polar auxin transport on account of their asymmetric subcellular localizations. In this review, we provide an overview of the multiple developmental roles of PIN proteins, including the atypical endoplasmic reticulum-localized members of the family, and look at the family from an evolutionary perspective. Next, we cover the cell biological and molecular aspects of PIN function, in particular the establishment of their polar subcellular localization. Hormonal and environmental inputs into the regulation of PIN action are summarized as well. PMID:25604445

  17. On perturbative azimuthal asymmetry at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaeian, A. H.

    2008-10-13

    We investigate the azimuthal asymmetry of partons and photons produced at the initial stage of nuclear collisions at the RHIC energy originating from quark-nucleus collisions. In our approach, the azimuthal asymmetry results from the correlation between color dipole orientation and impact parameter of the collision. The asymmetry is sensitive to the rapid variation of the nuclear density at the nuclear periphery. We either introduce the color-dipole orientation into the improved Born approximation, or model the dipole partial amplitude which satisfies available DIS data. We conclude that the azimuthal asymmetry coming from these mechanisms can be sizable.

  18. A Modified Direct-Reading Azimuth Protractor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, William C.; Pugliese, Joseph M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the construction of a direct-reading azimuth protractor (DRAP) used for mapping fracture and joint-surface orientations in underground mines where magnetic disturbances affect typical geologic pocket transit. (SL)

  19. On time-dependent counting statistics of mesoscopic electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzig, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Full counting statistics (FCS) has emerged as a key concept to understand quantum transport in mesoscopic systems like heterostructures, quantum wires, and quantum dots. The knowlegde of the FCS not only enables to predict all measurable zero-frequency quantities accessible via charge detection, but also allows to identify the elementary transport events and the correlations between them. We demonstrate this concept for a standard quantum point contact between normal and/or superconducting leads under dc- and ac-bias. [M. Vanevic, Yu. V. Nazarov, W. Belzig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 076601 (2007)] Finally we address the question, how these concepts can be applied to time-resolved current measurements. [A. Bednorz and W. Belzig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 206803 (2008)

  20. Azimuthal spin asymmetries in light-cone constituent quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Boffi, S.; Pasquini, B.; Efremov, A. V.; Schweitzer, P.

    2009-05-01

    We present results for all leading-twist azimuthal spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering due to T-even transverse-momentum dependent parton distribution functions on the basis of a light-cone constituent quark model. Attention is paid to discuss the range of applicability of the model, especially with regard to the scale dependence of the observables and the transverse-momentum dependence of the distributions. We find good agreement with available experimental data and present predictions to be further tested by future CLAS, COMPASS, and HERMES data.

  1. Multifragment azimuthal correlation functions: Probes for reaction dynamics in collisions of intermediate energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, R.A.; Elmaani, A.; Lauret, J.; Li, T.; Bauer, W.; Craig, D.; Cronqvist, M.; Gualtieri, E.; Hannuschke, S.; Reposeur, T.; Vander Molen, A.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K.; Winfield, J.S.; Yee, J.; Yennello, S.; Nadasen, A.; Tickle, R.S.; Norbeck, E. National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 Department of Physics, University of Michigan at Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 Department of Physics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 )

    1993-03-01

    Multifragment azimuthal correlation functions have been measured as a function of beam energy and impact parameter for the Ar+Sc system ([ital E]/[ital A]=35 to 115 MeV). The observed azimuthal correlation functions---which do not require corrections for dispersion of the reaction plane---exhibit strong asymmetries which are dependent on impact parameter and beam energy. Rotational collective motion and flow seem to dominate the correlation functions at low beam energies. It is proposed that multifragment azimuthal correlation functions can provide a useful probe for intermediate energy heavy ion reaction dynamics.

  2. Spin Dependent Transport Properties of Metallic and Semiconducting Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.

    Present computing and communication devices rely on two different classes of technologies; information processing devices are based on electrical charge transport in semiconducting materials while information storage devices are based on orientation of electron spins in magnetic materials. A realization of a hybrid-type device that is based on charge as well as spin properties of electrons would perform both of these actions thereby enhancing computation power to many folds and reducing power consumptions. This dissertation focuses on the fabrication of such spin-devices based on metallic and semiconducting nanostructures which can utilize spin as well as charge properties of electrons. A simplified design of the spin-device consists of a spin injector, a semiconducting or metallic channel, and a spin detector. The channel is the carrier of the spin signal from the injector to the detector and therefore plays a crucial role in the manipulation of spin properties in the device. In this work, nanostructures like nanowires and nanostripes are used to function the channel in the spin-device. Methods like electrospinning, hydrothermal, and wet chemical were used to synthesize nanowires while physical vapor deposition followed by heat treatment in controlled environment was used to synthesis nanostripes. Spin-devices fabrication of the synthesized nanostructures were carried out by electron beam lithography process. The details of synthesis of nanostructures, device fabrication procedures and measurement techniques will be discussed in the thesis. We have successfully fabricated the spin-devices of tellurium nanowire, indium nanostripe, and indium oxide nanostripe and studied their spin transport properties for the first time. These spin-devices show large spin relaxation length compared to normal metals like copper and offer potentials for the future technologies. Further, Heusler alloys nanowires like nanowires of Co 2FeAl were synthesized and studied for electrical

  3. Transverse Spin Azimuthal Asymmetries in SIDIS at COMPASS: Multidimensional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsamyan, Bakur

    2016-02-01

    COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment operating at the SPS at CERN. Wide physics program of the experiment comprises study of hadron structure and spectroscopy with high energy muon and hadrons beams. As for the muon-program, one of the important objectives of the COMPASS experiment is the exploration of the transverse spin structure of the nucleon via spin (in)dependent azimuthal asymmetries in single-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons off transversely polarized target. For this purpose a series of measurements were made in COMPASS, using 160 GeV/c longitudinally polarized muon beam and transversely polarized 6LiD (in 2002, 2003 and 2004) and NH3 (in 2007 and 2010) targets. The experimental results obtained by COMPASS for unpolarized target azimuthal asymmetries, Sivers and Collins effects and other azimuthal observables play an important role in the general understanding of the three-dimensional nature of the nucleon. Giving access to the entire twsit-2 set of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions COMPASS data triggers constant theoretical interest and is being widely used in phenomenological analyses and global data fits. In this review main focus is given to the very recent results obtained by the COMPASS collaboration from first ever multi-dimensional extraction of transverse spin asymmetries.

  4. Azimuthal harmonics of color fields in a high energy nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental results have revealed a surprisingly rich structure of multiparticle azimuthal correlations in high energy proton-nucleus collisions. Final state collective effects can be responsible for many of the observed effects, but it has recently been argued that a part of these correlations are present already in the wavefunctions of the colliding particles. We evaluate the momentum space 2-particle cumulant azimuthal anisotropy coefficients vn { 2 }, n = 2 , 3 , 4 from fundamental representation Wilson line distributions describing the high energy nucleus. These would correspond to the flow coefficients in very forward proton-nucleus scattering. We find significant differences between Wilson lines from the MV model and from JIMWLK evolution. The magnitude and qualitative transverse momentum dependence of the vn { 2 } values suggest that the fluctuations present in the initial fields are a significant contribution to the observed anisotropies.

  5. Adenosine triphosphate-dependent copper transport in isolated rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, M; In 't Veld, G; van den Berg, G J; Müller, M; Kuipers, F; Vonk, R J

    1995-01-01

    The process of hepatobiliary copper (Cu) secretion is still poorly understood: Cu secretion as a complex with glutathione and transport via a lysosomal pathway have been proposed. The recent cloning and sequencing of the gene for Wilson disease indicates that Cu transport in liver cells may be mediated by a Cu transporting P-type ATPase. Biochemical evidence for ATP-dependent Cu transport in mammalian systems, however, has not been reported so far. We have investigated Cu transport in rat liver plasma membrane vesicles enriched in canalicular or basolateral membranes in the presence and absence of ATP (4 mM) and an ATP-regenerating system. The presence of ATP clearly stimulated uptake of radiolabeled Cu (64Cu, 10 microM) into canalicular plasma membrane vesicles and, to a lesser extent, also into basolateral plasma membrane vesicles. ATP-dependent Cu transport was dose-dependently inhibited by the P-type ATPase inhibitor vanadate, and showed saturation kinetics with an estimated Km of 8.6 microM and a Vmax of 6.9 nmol/min/mg protein. ATP-stimulated Cu uptake was similar in canalicular membrane vesicles of normal Wistar rats and those of mutant GY rats, expressing a congenital defect in the activity of the ATP-dependent canalicular glutathione-conjugate transporter (cMOAT). These studies demonstrate the presence of an ATP-dependent Cu transporting system in isolated plasma membrane fractions of rat liver distinct from cMOAT. PMID:7814642

  6. Healthy places, active transport and path dependence: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Melissa; Mateo-Babiano, Derlie; Minnery, John

    2014-12-01

    Children walking to school, people cycling to the shops or work and neighbours chatting in the street, these are some of the gauges of an active and healthy community that can be achieved through utilising good design principles. But are these principles being applied in urban developments or are policy-makers following a 'path dependent' trajectory that severely limits the best practice outcomes sought? This review examines current research on path dependence to determine how this concept advances our understanding of barriers to change in the built environment, active transport and healthy communities. An online database search of scholarly bibliographic records identified 22 relevant articles for a critical review of studies that evaluated path dependence in the urban and built environment literature with a focus on transport, urban planning and health. A thematic analysis of the articles showed that different types of path dependence have contributed to the dominance of policies and designs supporting car-based transport to the detriment of public transport and active transport modes, leading to sub-optimal development patterns becoming 'locked-in'. However, the outcomes for active transport and physical activity are not all dire, and path dependence theory does provide some guidance on changing policy to achieve better outcomes. This review suggests that path dependence is one of the best theoretical frameworks to help health promoters understand barriers to change and can provide insights into developing future successful public health interventions. Future studies could focus further on active transport, local neighbourhood development and physical activity.

  7. Stacking dependence of carrier transport properties in multilayered black phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, A; Audiffred, M; Heine, T; Niehaus, T A

    2016-02-24

    We present the effect of different stacking orders on carrier transport properties of multi-layer black phosphorous. We consider three different stacking orders AAA, ABA and ACA, with increasing number of layers (from 2 to 6 layers). We employ a hierarchical approach in density functional theory (DFT), with structural simulations performed with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the bandstructure, carrier effective masses and optical properties evaluated with the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA). The carrier transmission in the various black phosphorous sheets was carried out with the non-equilibrium green's function (NEGF) approach. The results show that ACA stacking has the highest electron and hole transmission probabilities. The results show tunability for a wide range of band-gaps, carrier effective masses and transmission with a great promise for lattice engineering (stacking order and layers) in black phosphorous. PMID:26809017

  8. Stacking dependence of carrier transport properties in multilayered black phosphorous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, A.; Audiffred, M.; Heine, T.; Niehaus, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the effect of different stacking orders on carrier transport properties of multi-layer black phosphorous. We consider three different stacking orders AAA, ABA and ACA, with increasing number of layers (from 2 to 6 layers). We employ a hierarchical approach in density functional theory (DFT), with structural simulations performed with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the bandstructure, carrier effective masses and optical properties evaluated with the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA). The carrier transmission in the various black phosphorous sheets was carried out with the non-equilibrium green’s function (NEGF) approach. The results show that ACA stacking has the highest electron and hole transmission probabilities. The results show tunability for a wide range of band-gaps, carrier effective masses and transmission with a great promise for lattice engineering (stacking order and layers) in black phosphorous.

  9. Stacking dependence of carrier transport properties in multilayered black phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, A; Audiffred, M; Heine, T; Niehaus, T A

    2016-02-24

    We present the effect of different stacking orders on carrier transport properties of multi-layer black phosphorous. We consider three different stacking orders AAA, ABA and ACA, with increasing number of layers (from 2 to 6 layers). We employ a hierarchical approach in density functional theory (DFT), with structural simulations performed with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the bandstructure, carrier effective masses and optical properties evaluated with the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA). The carrier transmission in the various black phosphorous sheets was carried out with the non-equilibrium green's function (NEGF) approach. The results show that ACA stacking has the highest electron and hole transmission probabilities. The results show tunability for a wide range of band-gaps, carrier effective masses and transmission with a great promise for lattice engineering (stacking order and layers) in black phosphorous.

  10. Microdrilling in steel using ultrashort pulsed laser beams with radial and azimuthal polarization.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Martin; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Michalowski, Andreas; Voss, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2010-10-11

    A linear to radial and/or azimuthal polarization converter (LRAC) has been inserted into the beam delivery of a micromachining station equipped with a picosecond laser system. Percussion drilling and helical drilling in steel have been performed using radially as well as azimuthally polarized infrared radiation at 1030 nm. The presented machining results are discussed on the basis of numerical simulations of the polarization-dependent beam propagation inside the fabricated capillaries.

  11. Azimuthal Asymmetries of the Drell-Yan Process in pA Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Hua

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the azimuthal asymmetries of the Drell-Yan process in nucleon-nucleus collisions at the low transverse momentum of the lepton pair. Within the transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization formalism, the nuclear effects of these azimuthal asymmetries can be from the gauge link of the TMD quark distribution. We estimate all these nuclear effects within the assumption that all the TMD parton distributions or correlations are in Gaussian forms.

  12. The spin-dependent transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons and new device design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yun; Wang, Xia; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Si-Cong; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2016-05-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we studied the electronic and transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons in different magnetic configurations. We designed the device based on zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbon and studied the spin-dependent transport properties, whose current-voltage curves show obvious spin-polarization and conductance plateaus. The interesting transport behaviours can be explained by the transport spectra under different magnetic configurations, which basically depends on the symmetry matching of the electrodes’ bandstructures. Simultaneously, spin Seebeck effect is also found in the device. Thus, according to the transport behaviours, zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons can be used as a dual spin filter diode, a molecule signal converter and a spin caloritronics device, which indicates that α-graphyne is a promising candidate for the future application in spintronics.

  13. The spin-dependent transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons and new device design.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yun; Wang, Xia; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Si-Cong; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2016-01-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we studied the electronic and transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons in different magnetic configurations. We designed the device based on zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbon and studied the spin-dependent transport properties, whose current-voltage curves show obvious spin-polarization and conductance plateaus. The interesting transport behaviours can be explained by the transport spectra under different magnetic configurations, which basically depends on the symmetry matching of the electrodes' bandstructures. Simultaneously, spin Seebeck effect is also found in the device. Thus, according to the transport behaviours, zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons can be used as a dual spin filter diode, a molecule signal converter and a spin caloritronics device, which indicates that α-graphyne is a promising candidate for the future application in spintronics. PMID:27180808

  14. The spin-dependent transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons and new device design

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yun; Wang, Xia; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Si-Cong; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2016-01-01

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we studied the electronic and transport properties of zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons in different magnetic configurations. We designed the device based on zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbon and studied the spin-dependent transport properties, whose current-voltage curves show obvious spin-polarization and conductance plateaus. The interesting transport behaviours can be explained by the transport spectra under different magnetic configurations, which basically depends on the symmetry matching of the electrodes’ bandstructures. Simultaneously, spin Seebeck effect is also found in the device. Thus, according to the transport behaviours, zigzag α-graphyne nanoribbons can be used as a dual spin filter diode, a molecule signal converter and a spin caloritronics device, which indicates that α-graphyne is a promising candidate for the future application in spintronics. PMID:27180808

  15. 14 CFR 171.315 - Azimuth monitor system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Azimuth monitor system requirements. 171... (MLS) § 171.315 Azimuth monitor system requirements. (a) The approach azimuth or back azimuth monitor... following procedure. The integral monitor alarm limit should be set to the angular equivalent of ±10 ft....

  16. Deterministic methods for time-dependent stochastic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Randal S

    2009-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving the time-dependent survival probability equation in general (lD/2D/3D) geometries using the multi group SNmethod. Although this equation was first formulated by Bell in the early 1960's, it has only been applied to stationary systems (for other than idealized point models) until recently, and detailed descriptions of numerical solution techniques are lacking in the literature. This paper presents such a description and applies it to a dynamic system representative of a figurative criticality accident scenario.

  17. Models of long-distance transport: how is carrier-dependent auxin transport regulated in the stem?

    PubMed

    Renton, Michael; Hanan, Jim; Ferguson, Brett J; Beveridge, Christine A

    2012-05-01

    • This paper presents two models of carrier-dependent long-distance auxin transport in stems that represent the process at different scales. • A simple compartment model using a single constant auxin transfer rate produced similar data to those observed in biological experiments. The effects of different underlying biological assumptions were tested in a more detailed model representing cellular and intracellular processes that enabled discussion of different patterns of carrier-dependent auxin transport and signalling. • The output that best fits the biological data is produced by a model where polar auxin transport is not limited by the number of transporters/carriers and hence supports biological data showing that stems have considerable excess capacity to transport auxin. • All results support the conclusion that auxin depletion following apical decapitation in pea (Pisum sativum) occurs too slowly to be the initial cause of bud outgrowth. Consequently, changes in auxin content in the main stem and changes in polar auxin transport/carrier abundance in the main stem are not correlated with axillary bud outgrowth. PMID:22443265

  18. Shape-dependent charge and spin transport through an electron waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yue; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2013-01-01

    We study electron transport in nanosized semiconductor waveguides of different shapes. The spin-dependent transport through these nonuniform nanostructures is investigated in the presence of spin-orbit coupling of the Rashba and Dresselhaus types. The resulting spin rotation strongly depends on the shape of the waveguide. The crossover from the classical motion to the tunneling regime can be controlled in the waveguide with narrowing by modulating the strength of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling.

  19. Azimuthal-spin-wave-mode-driven vortex-core reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-01-14

    We studied, by micromagnetic numerical calculations, asymmetric vortex-core reversals driven by the m = −1 and m = +1 azimuthal spin-wave modes' excitations in soft magnetic circular nano-disks. We addressed the similarities and differences between the asymmetric core reversals in terms of the temporal evolutions of the correlated core-motion speed, locally concentrated perpendicular gyrofield, and magnetization dip near the original vortex core. The criterion for the core reversals was found to be the magnetization dip that must reach the out-of-plane magnetization component, m{sub z} = −p, with the initial polarization p, where p = +1 (−1) for the upward (downward) core magnetization. The core-motion speed and the associated perpendicular gyrofield, variable and controllable with static perpendicular field, H{sub z}, applied perpendicularly to the disk plane, must reach their threshold values to meet the ultimate core-reversal criterion. Also, we determined the H{sub z} strength and direction dependence of the core-switching time and threshold exciting field strength required for the core reversals, whose parameters are essential in the application aspect. This work offers deeper insights into the azimuthal spin-wave-driven core-reversal dynamics as well as an efficient means of controlling the azimuthal-modes-driven core reversals.

  20. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGES

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  1. Comparative cation dependency of sugar transport by crustacean hepatopancreas and intestine.

    PubMed

    Duka, Ada; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is transported in crustacean hepatopancreas and intestine by Na(+)-dependent co-transport, while Na(+)-dependent D-fructose influx has only been described for the hepatopancreas. It is still unclear if the two sugars are independently transported by two distinct cation-dependent co-transporter carrier systems. In this study, lobster (Homarus americanus) hepatopancreas brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used to characterize, in detail, the cation-dependency of both D-[(3)H]-glucose and D-[(3)H]-fructose influxes, while in vitro perfused intestines were employed to determine the nature of cation-dependent sugar transport across this organ. Over the sodium concentration range of 0-100 mM, both [(3)H]-glucose and [(3)H]-fructose influxes (0.1 mM; 1 min uptakes) by hepatopancreatic BBMV were hyperbolic functions of [Na(+)]. [(3)H]-glucose and [(3)H]-fructose influxes by hepatopancreatic BBMV over a potassium concentration range of 15-100 mM were hyperbolic functions of [K(+)]. Both sugars displayed significant (p<0.01) Na(+)/K(+)-dependent and cation-independent uptake processes. Transepithelial 25 µM [(3)H]-glucose and [(3)H]-fructose fluxes across lobster intestine over luminal sodium and potassium concentration ranges of 0-50 mM and 5-100 mM, respectively, were hyperbolic functions of luminal [Na(+)] and [K(+)]. As with hepatopancreatic sugar transport, transepithelial intestinal sugar transport exhibited both significant (p<0.01) Na(+)/K(+)-dependent and cation-independent processes. Results suggest that both D-glucose and D-fructose are transported by a single SGLT-type carrier in each organ with sodium being the "preferred", high affinity, cation for both sugars in the hepatopancreas, and potassium being the "preferred", high affinity, cation for both sugars in the intestine. PMID:24950971

  2. Role of different scattering mechanisms on the temperature dependence of transport in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Amin, Kazi Rafsanjani; Modak, Ranjan; Singh, Amandeep; Mukerjee, Subroto; Bid, Aveek

    2015-01-01

    Detailed experimental and theoretical studies of the temperature dependence of the effect of different scattering mechanisms on electrical transport properties of graphene devices are presented. We find that for high mobility devices the transport properties are mainly governed by completely screened short range impurity scattering. On the other hand, for the low mobility devices transport properties are determined by both types of scattering potentials - long range due to ionized impurities and short range due to completely screened charged impurities. The results could be explained in the framework of Boltzmann transport equations involving the two independent scattering mechanisms. PMID:26608479

  3. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Diameter-dependent ion transport through the interior of isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wonjoon; Ulissi, Zachary W; Shimizu, Steven F E; Bellisario, Darin O; Ellison, Mark D; Strano, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Nanopores that approach molecular dimensions demonstrate exotic transport behaviour and are theoretically predicted to display discontinuities in the diameter dependence of interior ion transport because of structuring of the internal fluid. No experimental study has been able to probe this diameter dependence in the 0.5-2 nm diameter regime. Here we observe a surprising fivefold enhancement of stochastic ion transport rates for single-walled carbon nanotube centered at a diameter of approximately 1.6 nm. An electrochemical transport model informed from literature simulations is used to understand the phenomenon. We also observe rates that scale with cation type as Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+)>Na(+) and pore blocking extent as K(+)>Cs(+)>Na(+)>Li(+) potentially reflecting changes in hydration shell size. Across several ion types, the pore-blocking current and inverse dwell time are shown to scale linearly at low electric field. This work opens up new avenues in the study of transport effects at the nanoscale.

  5. Spin-dependent transport in a magnetic two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorchkova, I. P.; Kikkawa, J. M.; Samarth, N.; Awschalom, D. D.

    1998-07-01

    Magneto-transport and magneto-optical probes are used to interrogate spin-dependent transport in magnetic heterostructures wherein a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is exchange-coupled to local moments. At low temperatures, the significant s-d exchange-enhanced spin splitting in these “magnetic” 2DEGs is responsible for the observation of unusual transport properties such as a complete spin polarization of the gas at large Landau level filling factors and a pronounced, non-monotonic background magneto-resistance. Magneto-transport measurements of gated samples performed in a parallel field geometry are used to systematically study the variation of the magneto-resistance with sheet concentration, yielding new insights into the dependence of spin transport on the Fermi energy of the majority spin carriers.

  6. Mechanisms underlying azimuth selectivity in the auditory cortex of the pallid bat

    PubMed Central

    Razak, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on mechanisms underlying azimuth selectivity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of pallid bats. The pallid bat listens to prey-generated noise (5–35 kHz) to localize and hunt terrestrial prey. The region of A1 tuned between 5–35 kHz consists of two clusters of neurons distinguished by interaural intensity difference (IID) selectivity: binaurally inhibited (EI) and peaked. The first aim of this study was to use sequential dichotic/free-field stimulation to test the hypothesis that IID is the primary cue underlying azimuth selectivity in neurons tuned in the prey-generated noise frequency band. IID selectivity and ear directionality at the neuron’s characteristic frequency (CF) were used to predict azimuth selectivity functions. The predicted azimuth selectivity was compared with the actual azimuth selectivity from the same neurons. Prediction accuracy was similarly high for EI neurons and peaked neurons with low CF, whereas predictions were increasingly inaccurate with increasing CF among the peaked neurons. The second aim of this study was to compare azimuth selectivity obtained with noise and CF tones to determine the extent to which stimulus bandwidth influences azimuth selectivity in neurons with different binaural properties. The azimuth selectivity functions were similar for the two stimuli in the majority of EI neurons. A greater percentage of peaked neurons showed differences in their azimuth selectivity for noise and tones. This included neurons with multiple peaks when tested with tones and a single peak when tested with noise. Taken together, data from the two aims suggest that azimuth tuning of EI neurons is primarily dictated by IID sensitivity at CF. Peaked neurons, particularly those with high CF, may integrate IID sensitivity across frequency to generate azimuth selectivity for broadband sound. The data are consistent with those found in cat and ferret A1 in that binaurally facilitated neurons depend to a greater extent

  7. Multicomponent, multi-azimuth pre-stack seismic waveform inversion for azimuthally anisotropic media using a parallel and computationally efficient non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Mallick, Subhashis

    2015-02-01

    Consideration of azimuthal anisotropy, at least to an orthorhombic symmetry is important in exploring the naturally fractured and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Full waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data can, in principle, provide more robust estimates of subsurface elastic parameters and density than the inversion of single component (P wave) seismic data. In addition, azimuthally dependent anisotropy can only be resolved by carefully studying the multicomponent seismic displacement data acquired and processed along different azimuths. Such an analysis needs an inversion algorithm capable of simultaneously optimizing multiple objectives, one for each data component along each azimuth. These multicomponent and multi-azimuthal seismic inversions are non-linear with non-unique solutions; it is therefore appropriate to treat the objectives as a vector and simultaneously optimize each of its components such that the optimal set of solutions could be obtained. The fast non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA II) is a robust stochastic global search method capable of handling multiple objectives, but its computational expense increases with increasing number of objectives and the number of model parameters to be inverted for. In addition, an accurate extraction of subsurface azimuthal anisotropy requires multicomponent seismic data acquired at a fine spatial resolution along many source-to-receiver azimuths. Because routine acquisition of such data is prohibitively expensive, they are typically available along two or at most three azimuthal orientations at a spatial resolution where such an inversion could be applied. This paper proposes a novel multi-objective methodology using a parallelized version of NSGA II for waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic displacement data along two azimuths. By scaling the objectives prior to ranking, redefining the crowding distance as functions of the scaled objective and the model spaces, and varying

  8. Asymptotic analysis of the several competitive equations to solve the time-dependent neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, U.; Miller, W.F. Jr. |; Morel, J.E.

    1994-10-01

    Using conventional diffusion limit analysis, we asymptotically compare three competitive time-dependent equations (the telegrapher`s equation, the time-dependent Simplified P{sub 2} (SP{sub 2}) equation, and the time-dependent Simplified Evcn-Parity (SEP) equation). The time-dependent SP{sub 2} equation contains higher order asymptotic approximations of the time-dependent transport equation than the other equations in a physical regime in which the time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading order approximation. In addition, we derive the multigroup modified time-dependent SP{sub 2} equation from the multigroup time-dependent transport equation by means of an asymptotic expansion in which the multigroup time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading, order approximation. Numerical comparisons of the timedependent diffusion, the telegrapher`s, the time-dependent SP{sub 2}, and S{sub 8} solutions in 2-D X-Y geometry show that, in most cases, the SP{sub 2} solutions contain most of the transport corrections for the diffusion approximation.

  9. Energization of Radiation Belt Electrons by High and Low Azimuthal Mode Number Poloidal Mode ULF Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Brito, T.; Elkington, S. R.; Kress, B. T.; Liang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    CME-shock and CIR-driven geomagnetic storms are characterized by enhanced ULF wave activity in the magnetosphere. This enhanced ULF wave power produces both coherent and diffusive transport and energization, as well as pitch angle modification of radiation belt electrons in drift resonance with azimuthally propagating ULF waves. Recent observations of two CME-driven storms1,2 have suggested that poloidal mode waves with both low and high azimuthal mode number may be efficient at accelerating radiation belt electrons. We extend up to m = 50 the analysis of Ozeke and Mann3 who examined drift resonance for poloidal modes up to m = 40. We calculate radial diffusion coefficients for source population electrons in the 50 -500 keV range, and continued resonance with lower m-numbers at higher energies for ULF waves in the Pc 5, 0.4 - 10 mHz range. We use an analytic model for ULF waves superimposed on a compressed dipole, developed for equatorial plane studies by Elkington et al.4 and extended to 3D by Perry et al.4 Assuming a power spectrum which varies as ω-2, consistent with earlier observations, we find greater efficiency for radial transport and acceleration at lower m number where there is greater power for drift resonance at a given frequency. This assumption is consistent with 3D global MHD simulations using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry code which we have carried out for realistic solar wind driving conditions during storms. Coherent interaction with ULF waves can also occur at a rate which exceeds nominal radial diffusion estimates but is slower than prompt injection on a drift time scale. Depending on initial electron drift phase, some electrons are accelerated due to the westward azimuthal electric field Eφ, while others are decelerated by eastward Eφ, decreasing their pitch angle. A subset of trapped electrons are seen to precipitate to the atmosphere in 3D LFM simulations, showing modulation at the coherent poloidal mode ULF wave frequency in both simulations

  10. Azimuthally forced flames in an annular combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James; Mastorakos, Epaminondas

    2015-11-01

    Thermoacoustic instabilities are more likely to occur in lean burn combustion systems, making their adoption both difficult and costly. At present, our knowledge of such phenomena is insufficient to produce an inherently stable combustor by design, and therefore an improved understanding of these instabilities has become the focus of a significant research effort. Recent experimental and numerical studies have demonstrated that the symmetry of annular chambers permit a range of self-excited azimuthal modes to be generated in annular geometry, which can make the study of isolated modes difficult. While acoustic forcing is common in single flame experiments, no equivalent for forced azimuthal modes in an annular chamber have been demonstrated. The present investigation focuses on the novel application of acoustic forcing to a laboratory scale annular combustor, in order to generate azimuthal standing wave modes at a prescribed frequency and amplitude. The results focus on the ability of the method to isolate the mode of oscillation using experimental pressure and high speed OH* measurements. The successful excitation of azimuthal modes demonstrated represents an important step towards improving our fundamental understanding of this phenomena in practically relevant geometry.

  11. A NEW MONTE CARLO METHOD FOR TIME-DEPENDENT NEUTRINO RADIATION TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; O'Connor, Evan; Burrows, Adam; Dolence, Joshua C.; Loeffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik

    2012-08-20

    Monte Carlo approaches to radiation transport have several attractive properties such as simplicity of implementation, high accuracy, and good parallel scaling. Moreover, Monte Carlo methods can handle complicated geometries and are relatively easy to extend to multiple spatial dimensions, which makes them potentially interesting in modeling complex multi-dimensional astrophysical phenomena such as core-collapse supernovae. The aim of this paper is to explore Monte Carlo methods for modeling neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae. We generalize the Implicit Monte Carlo photon transport scheme of Fleck and Cummings and gray discrete-diffusion scheme of Densmore et al. to energy-, time-, and velocity-dependent neutrino transport. Using our 1D spherically-symmetric implementation, we show that, similar to the photon transport case, the implicit scheme enables significantly larger timesteps compared with explicit time discretization, without sacrificing accuracy, while the discrete-diffusion method leads to significant speed-ups at high optical depth. Our results suggest that a combination of spectral, velocity-dependent, Implicit Monte Carlo and discrete-diffusion Monte Carlo methods represents a robust approach for use in neutrino transport calculations in core-collapse supernovae. Our velocity-dependent scheme can easily be adapted to photon transport.

  12. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  13. Multiple sodium-dependent nucleoside transport systems in bovine renal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T C; Jarvis, S M

    1991-01-01

    Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transport was examined in bovine renal brush-border membrane vesicles. Two separate Na+/nucleoside cotransporters were shown to be present: (1) a system specific for purine nucleosides and uridine, designated as the N1 carrier, and (2) an Na(+)-dependent nucleoside transporter that accepts pyrimidine nucleosides, adenosine and analogues of adenosine, designated as the N2 system. Both systems exhibit a high affinity for nucleosides (apparent Km values approximately 10 microM), are insensitive to inhibition by facilitated-diffusion nucleoside transport inhibitors, are rheogenic and exhibit a high specificity for Na+. Na+ increases the affinity of the influx of guanosine and thymidine, nucleosides that serve as model permeants for the N1 and N2 nucleoside transporters respectively. The Na+/nucleoside coupling stoichiometry is consistent with 1:1 for both carriers. PMID:2001243

  14. Acoustic Efficiency of Azimuthal Modes in Jet Noise Using Chevron Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    The link between azimuthal modes in jet turbulence and in the acoustic sound field has been examined in cold, round jets. Chevron nozzles, however, impart an azimuthal structure on the jet with a shape dependent on the number, length and penetration angle of the chevrons. Two particular chevron nozzles, with 3 and 4 primary chevrons respectively, and a round baseline nozzle are compared at both cold and hot jet conditions to determine how chevrons impact the modal structure of the flow and how that change relates to the sound field. The results show that, although the chevrons have a large impact on the azimuthal shape of the mean axial velocity, the impact of chevrons on the azimuthal structure of the fluctuating axial velocity is small at the cold jet condition and smaller still at the hot jet condition. This is supported by results in the azimuthal structure of the sound field, which also shows little difference in between the two chevron nozzles and the baseline nozzle in the distribution of energy across the azimuthal modes measured.

  15. Simulation of Temperature-Dependent Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors with Various Degrees of Disorder.

    PubMed

    Heck, Alexander; Kranz, Julian J; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-07-12

    Different trends in the temperature dependence of the mobility can be observed in organic semiconductors, which constitutes a serious challenge for theoretical approaches. In this work, we apply an atomistic bottom-up simulation for the calculation of temperature-dependent mobilities of a broad selection of materials, ranging from single crystal to amorphous solid. We evaluate how well the method is able to distinguish temperature dependences of different materials and how the findings relate to experimental observations. The applied method is able to cover the full range of temperature dependencies from activated transport in amorphous materials to band-like transport in crystals. In well-characterized materials, we find good agreement with the experiment and a band-like temperature dependence. In less-ordered materials, we find discrepancies from the experiment that indicated that experimentally studied materials possess a higher degree of disorder than do the simulated defect-free morphologies. PMID:27224054

  16. Two electrical potential–dependent steps are required for transport by the Escherichia coli Tat machinery

    PubMed Central

    Bageshwar, Umesh K.; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2007-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway in Escherichia coli transports fully folded and assembled proteins across the energy-transducing periplasmic membrane. In chloroplasts, Tat transport requires energy input only from the proton motive force. To elucidate the mechanism and energetics of bacterial Tat protein transport, we developed an efficient in vitro transport assay using TatABC-enriched inverted membrane vesicles and the physiological precursor pre-SufI. We report transport efficiencies of 60–80% for nanomolar pre-SufI concentrations. Dissipation of the pH gradient does not reduce pre-SufI transport efficiency. Instead, pre-SufI transport requires at least two electrical potential (Δψ)–dependent steps that differ in both the duration and minimum magnitude of the required Δψ. The data are consistent with a model in which a substantial Δψ of short duration is required for an early transport step, and in which a small Δψ of long duration is necessary to drive a later transport step. PMID:17908913

  17. Structure-dependent water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes: toward selective gating upon temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kuiwen; Wu, Huiying

    2015-04-28

    Determining water structure in nanopores and its influence on water transport behaviour is of great importance for understanding and regulating the transport across nanopores. Here we report an ultrafast-slow flow transition phenomenon for water transport across nanopores of carbon nanotubes owing to the change in water structure in nanopores induced by temperature. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we show the dependence of water transport behaviours on water structures. Our results indicate that owing to the change in water structure in nanopores, water flux across nanopores with certain pore sizes decreases sharply (nearly 3 orders of magnitude) with the decreasing temperature. This phenomenon is very sensitive to the pore size. The threshold temperatures for the occurrence of the ultrafast-slow flow transition for water transport are also determined for various pore sizes. These findings suggest a novel protocol for selective gating of water and proton conduction across nanopores and temperature-controlled drug release.

  18. n value and Jc distribution dependence of AC transport current losses in HTS conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Jun; Sawai, Yusuke; Nakayama, Haruki; Tsukamoto, Osami; Miyagi, Daisuke

    2004-01-01

    Compared with LTS materials, HTS materials have some peculiarities affecting AC loss characteristics of the conductors. We measured the AC transport current losses in YBCO thin film coated conductors and a Bi2223/Ag sheathed tape. Comparing the measured data with analytical calculations, the dependence of the AC transport current losses on the n value and critical current density distributions are studied. It is shown that, considering the n values and Jc distributions, the peculiarities in the HTS materials can be taken into consideration and the transport current losses in HTS conductors can be calculated by the same analytical method used for LTS.

  19. Temperature dependence of antenna excitation transport in native photosystem I particles. [Electronic energy transport (EET)

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle, P.A.; Struve, W.S. )

    1991-05-16

    The temperature dependence of polarized photobleaching dynamics was investigated through 680-nm pump-probe experiments in the Chl a antenna of native photosystem 1 particles (Chl/P700 {approximately} 200) from spinach. The anisotropic decay time is lengthened by an order of magnitude (from {approximately}7 to {approximately}62 ps) when the temperature is reduced from 290 to 38 K; most of this increase occurs between 65 and 38 K. The occurrence of this transition temperature in the tens of kelvin reflects the participation of protein phonons in antenna EET. The isotopic decay kinetics are considerably less temperature sensitive, indicating that the anisotropic and isotropic decays stem from different energy-transfer processes with contrasting temperature dependence. The 38 K photobleaching spectrum at 5 ps exhibits considerably more weighting in the lower energy Chl a spectral forms than the room-temperature spectrum, suggesting that rapid spectral equilibration occurs in the photosystem 1 antenna. In light of the phonon frequency and electron-phonon coupling parameters determined in independent PSI-200 spectral hole-burning experiments, the quantitative temperature dependence int he anisotropic decay times is consistent with a theory for phonon-assisted EET in which the pertinent phonons are independent modes localized about the donor and acceptor chromophores.

  20. A transition in mechanisms of size dependent electrical transport at nanoscale metal-oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Jiechang; Nonnenmann, Stephen S.; Qin, Wei; Bonnell, Dawn A.

    2013-12-16

    As device miniaturization approaches nanoscale dimensions, interfaces begin to dominate electrical properties. Here the system archetype Au/SrTiO{sub 3} is used to examine the origin of size dependent transport properties along metal-oxide interfaces. We demonstrate that a transition between two classes of size dependent electronic transport mechanisms exists, defined by a critical size ε. At sizes larger than ε an edge-related tunneling effect proportional to 1/D (the height of the supported Au nanoparticle) is observed; interfaces with sizes smaller than ε exhibit random fluctuations in current. The ability to distinguish between these mechanisms is important to future developments in nanoscale device design.

  1. 2. DETAIL OF THEODOLITE PYLON NORTH OF AZIMUTH ALIGNMENT SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF THEODOLITE PYLON NORTH OF AZIMUTH ALIGNMENT SHED (BLDG. 775). - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Azimuth Alignment Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  2. Do waves carrying orbital angular momentum possess azimuthal linear momentum?

    PubMed

    Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M

    2013-09-01

    All beams are a superposition of plane waves, which carry linear momentum in the direction of propagation with no net azimuthal component. However, plane waves incident on a hologram can produce a vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum that seems to require an azimuthal linear momentum, which presents a paradox. We resolve this by showing that the azimuthal momentum is not a true linear momentum but the azimuthal momentum density is a true component of the linear momentum density.

  3. Nonlinear thermoelectric response due to energy-dependent transport properties of a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svilans, Artis; Burke, Adam M.; Svensson, Sofia Fahlvik; Leijnse, Martin; Linke, Heiner

    2016-08-01

    Quantum dots are useful model systems for studying quantum thermoelectric behavior because of their highly energy-dependent electron transport properties, which are tunable by electrostatic gating. As a result of this strong energy dependence, the thermoelectric response of quantum dots is expected to be nonlinear with respect to an applied thermal bias. However, until now this effect has been challenging to observe because, first, it is experimentally difficult to apply a sufficiently large thermal bias at the nanoscale and, second, it is difficult to distinguish thermal bias effects from purely temperature-dependent effects due to overall heating of a device. Here we take advantage of a novel thermal biasing technique and demonstrate a nonlinear thermoelectric response in a quantum dot which is defined in a heterostructured semiconductor nanowire. We also show that a theoretical model based on the Master equations fully explains the observed nonlinear thermoelectric response given the energy-dependent transport properties of the quantum dot.

  4. Temperature dependent electrical transport behavior of InN/GaN heterostructure based Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Sinha, Neeraj; Kalghatgi, A. T.

    2011-02-15

    InN/GaN heterostructure based Schottky diodes were fabricated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The temperature dependent electrical transport properties were carried out for InN/GaN heterostructure. The barrier height and the ideality factor of the Schottky diodes were found to be temperature dependent. The temperature dependence of the barrier height indicates that the Schottky barrier height is inhomogeneous in nature at the heterostructure interface. The higher value of the ideality factor and its temperature dependence suggest that the current transport is primarily dominated by thermionic field emission (TFE) other than thermionic emission (TE). The room temperature barrier height obtained by using TE and TFE models were 1.08 and 1.43 eV, respectively.

  5. Linear Approximation SAR Azimuth Processing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindquist, R. B.; Masnaghetti, R. K.; Belland, E.; Hance, H. V.; Weis, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A segmented linear approximation of the quadratic phase function that is used to focus the synthetic antenna of a SAR was studied. Ideal focusing, using a quadratic varying phase focusing function during the time radar target histories are gathered, requires a large number of complex multiplications. These can be largely eliminated by using linear approximation techniques. The result is a reduced processor size and chip count relative to ideally focussed processing and a correspondingly increased feasibility for spaceworthy implementation. A preliminary design and sizing for a spaceworthy linear approximation SAR azimuth processor meeting requirements similar to those of the SEASAT-A SAR was developed. The study resulted in a design with approximately 1500 IC's, 1.2 cubic feet of volume, and 350 watts of power for a single look, 4000 range cell azimuth processor with 25 meters resolution.

  6. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  7. Use of the azimuthal resistivity technique for determination of regional azimuth of transmissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, D.

    2010-01-01

    Many bedrock units contain joint sets that commonly act as preferred paths for the movement of water, electrical charge, and possible contaminants associated with production or transit of crude oil or refined products. To facilitate the development of remediation programs, a need exists to reliably determine regional-scale properties of these joint sets: azimuth of transmissivity ellipse, dominant set, and trend(s). The surface azimuthal electrical resistivity survey method used for local in situ studies can be a noninvasive, reliable, efficient, and relatively cost-effective method for regional studies. The azimuthal resistivity survey method combines the use of standard resistivity equipment with a Wenner array rotated about a fixed center point, at selected degree intervals, which yields an apparent resistivity ellipse from which joint-set orientation can be determined. Regional application of the azimuthal survey method was tested at 17 sites in an approximately 500 km2 (193 mi2) area around Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with less than 15m (50 ft) overburden above the dolomite. Results of 26 azimuthal surveys were compared and determined to be consistent with the results of two other methods: direct observation of joint-set orientation and transmissivity ellipses from multiple-well-aquifer tests. The average of joint-set trend determined by azimuthal surveys is within 2.5?? of the average of joint-set trend determined by direct observation of major joint sets at 24 sites. The average of maximum of transmissivity trend determined by azimuthal surveys is within 5.7?? of the average of maximum of transmissivity trend determined for 14 multiple-well-aquifer tests. Copyright ?? 2010 The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  8. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2015-09-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.

  9. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  10. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  11. Size-dependent control of colloid transport via solute gradients in dead-end channels.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangwoo; Um, Eujin; Sabass, Benedikt; Ault, Jesse T; Rahimi, Mohammad; Warren, Patrick B; Stone, Howard A

    2016-01-12

    Transport of colloids in dead-end channels is involved in widespread applications including drug delivery and underground oil and gas recovery. In such geometries, Brownian motion may be considered as the sole mechanism that enables transport of colloidal particles into or out of the channels, but it is, unfortunately, an extremely inefficient transport mechanism for microscale particles. Here, we explore the possibility of diffusiophoresis as a means to control the colloid transport in dead-end channels by introducing a solute gradient. We demonstrate that the transport of colloidal particles into the dead-end channels can be either enhanced or completely prevented via diffusiophoresis. In addition, we show that size-dependent diffusiophoretic transport of particles can be achieved by considering a finite Debye layer thickness effect, which is commonly ignored. A combination of diffusiophoresis and Brownian motion leads to a strong size-dependent focusing effect such that the larger particles tend to concentrate more and reside deeper in the channel. Our findings have implications for all manners of controlled release processes, especially for site-specific delivery systems where localized targeting of particles with minimal dispersion to the nontarget area is essential.

  12. Size-dependent control of colloid transport via solute gradients in dead-end channels

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sangwoo; Um, Eujin; Sabass, Benedikt; Ault, Jesse T.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Warren, Patrick B.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transport of colloids in dead-end channels is involved in widespread applications including drug delivery and underground oil and gas recovery. In such geometries, Brownian motion may be considered as the sole mechanism that enables transport of colloidal particles into or out of the channels, but it is, unfortunately, an extremely inefficient transport mechanism for microscale particles. Here, we explore the possibility of diffusiophoresis as a means to control the colloid transport in dead-end channels by introducing a solute gradient. We demonstrate that the transport of colloidal particles into the dead-end channels can be either enhanced or completely prevented via diffusiophoresis. In addition, we show that size-dependent diffusiophoretic transport of particles can be achieved by considering a finite Debye layer thickness effect, which is commonly ignored. A combination of diffusiophoresis and Brownian motion leads to a strong size-dependent focusing effect such that the larger particles tend to concentrate more and reside deeper in the channel. Our findings have implications for all manners of controlled release processes, especially for site-specific delivery systems where localized targeting of particles with minimal dispersion to the nontarget area is essential. PMID:26715753

  13. Characterization of the endogenous carnitine transport and expression of a rat renal Na(+)-dependent carnitine transport system in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, S; Hagenbuch, B; Carafoli, E; Krähenbühl, S

    1995-01-01

    L-Carnitine transport was characterized in Xenopus laevis oocytes before and after injection of mRNA isolated from rat renal cortex. Non-injected oocytes revealed endogenous Na(+)-dependent transport of L-carnitine. After injection of 15 ng of rat kidney mRNA, the Na(+)-dependent L-carnitine transport increased 2-3-fold, reaching maximal activity after 5-6 days. The expressed carnitine transport was maximal at pH 7.5, whereas the endogenous transport showed no clear maximum between pH 6.0 and 8.5. Kinetic analysis revealed apparent Km values for L-carnitine of 66 microM for the endogenous and 149 microM for the expressed transport. Trimethyl-lysine and D-carnitine inhibited both the endogenous and the expressed transport. In contrast, L-acetylcarnitine, L-isovalerylcarnitine, L-palmitoylcarnitine and butyrobetaine inhibited predominantly the expressed transport, whereas glycinebetaine had no inhibitory effect on either transport system. Size-fractionated rat renal-cortex mRNA (median size 2 kb) induced a 3-fold higher L-carnitine transport than did unfractionated mRNA. These studies demonstrate that Xenopus laevis oocytes exhibit Na(+)-dependent L-carnitine transport and provide the basis for expression-cloning of a rat renal Na(+)-dependent L-carnitine transport system. PMID:7626001

  14. Using variable-frequency asymmetries to probe the magnetic field dependence of radial transport in a Malmberg-Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2009-03-01

    A new experimental technique is used to study the dependence of asymmetry-induced radial particle flux Γ on axial magnetic field B in a modified Malmberg-Penning trap. This dependence is complicated by the fact that B enters the physics in at least two places: in the asymmetry-induced first order radial drift velocity vr = Eθ/B and in the zeroth order azimuthal drift velocity vθ = Er/B. To separate these, we employ the hypothesis that the latter always enters the physics in the combination ω-lωR, where ωR = vθ/r is the column rotation frequency and ω and l are the asymmetry frequency and azimuthal mode number, respectively. Points where ω-lωR = 0 are then selected from a Γ vs r vs ω data set, thus insuring that any function of this combination is constant. When the selected flux Γsel is plotted versus the density gradient, a roughly linear dependence is observed, showing that this selected flux is diffusive. This linear dependence is roughly independent of the bias of the center wire in our trap φcw. Since in our experiment ωR is proportional to φcw, this latter point shows that our technique has successfully removed any dependence on ωR and its derivatives, thus confirming our hypothesis. The slope of a least-squares fitted line through the Γsel vs density gradient data then gives the diffusion coefficient D0 under the condition ω-lωR = 0. Varying the magnetic field, we find D0 is proportional to B-1.33±0.05, a scaling that does not match any theory we know. These findings are then used to constrain the form of the empirical flux equation. It may be possible to extend this technique to give the functional dependence of the flux on ω-lωR.

  15. Globally visualizing the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Qiu-Mei; Sun, En-Ze; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-04-15

    Understanding the microtubule-dependent behaviors of viruses in live cells is very meaningful for revealing the mechanisms of virus infection and endocytosis. Herein, we used a quantum dots-based single-particle tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the microtubule-dependent transport behaviors of influenza virus in live cells. We found that the intersection configuration of microtubules can interfere with the transport behaviors of the virus in live cells, which lead to the changing and long-time pausing of the transport behavior of viruses. Our results revealed that most of the viruses moved along straight microtubules rapidly and unidirectionally from the cell periphery to the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) near the bottom of the cell, and the viruses were confined in the grid of microtubules near the top of the cell and at the MTOC near the bottom of the cell. These results provided deep insights into the influence of entire microtubule geometry on the virus infection.

  16. Observation of a large spin-dependent transport length in organic spin valves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianmin; Mizukami, Shigemi; Kubota, Takahide; Ma, Qinli; Oogane, Mikihiko; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Ando, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Terunobu

    2013-01-01

    The integration of organic semiconductors and magnetism has been a fascinating topic for fundamental scientific research and future applications in electronics, because organic semiconductors are expected to possess a large spin-dependent transport length based on weak spin-orbit coupling and weak hyperfine interaction. However, to date, this length has typically been limited to several nanometres at room temperature, and a large length has only been observed at low temperatures. Here we report on a novel organic spin valve device using C(60) as the spacer layer. A magnetoresistance ratio of over 5% was observed at room temperature, which is one of the highest magnetoresistance ratios ever reported. Most importantly, a large spin-dependent transport length of approximately 110 nm was experimentally observed for the C(60) layer at room temperature. These results provide insights for further understanding spin transport in organic semiconductors and may strongly advance the development of spin-based organic devices. PMID:23340432

  17. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  18. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.—Patel, C., Douard, V., Yu, S., Gao, N., Ferraris, R. P. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption. PMID:26071406

  19. An asymptotic-preserving Lagrangian algorithm for the time-dependent anisotropic heat transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, Luis; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Hauck, Cory D.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a Lagrangian numerical algorithm for a time-dependent, anisotropic temperature transport equation in magnetized plasmas in the large guide field regime. The approach is based on an analytical integral formal solution of the parallel (i.e., along the magnetic field) transport equation with sources, and it is able to accommodate both local and non-local parallel heat flux closures. The numerical implementation is based on an operator-split formulation, with two straightforward steps: a perpendicular transport step (including sources), and a Lagrangian (field-line integral) parallel transport step. Algorithmically, the first step is amenable to the use of modern iterative methods, while the second step has a fixed cost per degree of freedom (and is therefore scalable). Accuracy-wise, the approach is free from the numerical pollution introduced by the discrete parallel transport term when the perpendicular to parallel transport coefficient ratio X /X becomes arbitrarily small, and is shown to capture the correct limiting solution when ε = X⊥L2/X1L2 → 0 (with L∥∙ L⊥ , the parallel and perpendicular diffusion length scales, respectively). Therefore, the approach is asymptotic-preserving. We demonstrate the capabilities of the scheme with several numerical experiments with varying magnetic field complexity in two dimensions, including the case of transport across a magnetic island.

  20. Biological significance of the importin-β family-dependent nucleocytoplasmic transport pathways.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-07-01

    Importin-β family proteins (Imp-βs) are nucleocytoplasmic transport receptors (NTRs) that import and export proteins and RNAs through the nuclear pores. The family consists of 14-20 members depending on the biological species, and each member transports a specific group of cargoes. Thus, the Imp-βs mediate multiple, parallel transport pathways that can be regulated separately. In fact, the spatiotemporally differential expressions and the functional regulations of Imp-βs have been reported. Additionally, the biological significance of each pathway has been characterized by linking the function of a member of Imp-βs to a cellular consequence. Connecting these concepts, the regulation of the transport pathways conceivably induces alterations in the cellular physiological states. However, few studies have linked the regulation of an importin-β family NTR to an induced cellular response and the corresponding cargoes, despite the significance of this linkage in comprehending the biological relevance of the transport pathways. This review of recent reports on the regulation and biological functions of the Imp-βs highlights the significance of the transport pathways in physiological contexts and points out the possibility that the identification of yet unknown specific cargoes will reinforce the importance of transport regulation.

  1. Charge dependence of neoclassical and turbulent transport of light impurities on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. S.; Garzotti, L.; Casson, F. J.; Dickinson, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Summers, H. P.; Tanabe, H.; Valovič, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Carbon and nitrogen impurity transport coefficients are determined from gas puff experiments carried out during repeat L-mode discharges on the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and compared against a previous analysis of helium impurity transport on MAST. The impurity density profiles are measured on the low-field side of the plasma, therefore this paper focuses on light impurities where the impact of poloidal asymmetries on impurity transport is predicted to be negligible. A weak screening of carbon and nitrogen is found in the plasma core, whereas the helium density profile is peaked over the entire plasma radius. Both carbon and nitrogen experience a diffusivity of the order of 10 m2s-1 and a strong inward convective velocity of ˜40 m s-1 near the plasma edge, and a region of outward convective velocity at mid-radius. The measured impurity transport coefficients are consistent with neoclassical Banana-Plateau predictions within ρ ≤slant 0.4 . Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the carbon and helium particle flux at two flux surfaces, ρ =0.6 and ρ =0.7 , suggest that trapped electron modes are responsible for the anomalous impurity transport observed in the outer regions of the plasma. The model, combining neoclassical transport with quasi-linear turbulence, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the impurity transport coefficients and the impurity charge dependence.

  2. Azimuthally polarized cathodoluminescence from InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Brenny, B. J. M.; Osorio, C. I.; Polman, A.; Dam, D. van; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2015-11-16

    We determine the angle and polarization dependent emission from 1.75 µm and 2.50 µm long InP nanowires by using cathodoluminescence polarimetry. We excite the vertical wires using a 5 keV electron beam, and find that the 880 nm bandgap emission shows azimuthally polarized rings, with the number of rings depending on the wire height. The data agree well with a model in which spontaneous emission from the wire emitted into the far field interferes with emission reflected off the substrate. From the model, the depth range from which the emission is generated is found to be up to 400 nm below the top surface of the wires, well beyond the extent of the primary electron cloud. This enables a probe of the carrier diffusion length in the InP nanowires.

  3. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructured materials studied by the Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Esfarjani, Keivan; Strubbe, David A.; Broido, David; Kolpak, Alexie M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials exhibit low thermal conductivity because of the additional scattering due to phonon-boundary interactions. As these interactions are highly sensitive to the mean free path (MFP) of phonons, MFP distributions in nanostructures can be dramatically distorted relative to bulk. Here we calculate the MFP distribution in periodic nanoporous Si for different temperatures, using the recently developed MFP-dependent Boltzmann transport equation. After analyzing the relative contribution of each phonon branch to thermal transport in nanoporous Si, we find that at room temperature optical phonons contribute 17 % to heat transport, compared to 5 % in bulk Si. Interestingly, we observe a constant thermal conductivity over the range 200 K transport of acoustic phonons with long intrinsic MFP and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Our findings, which are in qualitative agreement with the temperature trend of thermal conductivities measured in nanoporous Si-based systems, shed light on the origin of the reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructured materials and demonstrate the necessity of multiscale heat transport engineering, in which the bulk material and geometry are optimized concurrently.

  4. Electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels with pH-dependent charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-05-01

    "Smart" polyelectrolyte-grafted or "soft" nanochannels with pH-responsiveness have shown great promise for applications like manipulation of ion transport, ion sensing and selection, current rectification, and many more. In this paper, we develop a theory to study the electroosmotic transport in a polyelectrolyte-grafted (or soft) nanochannel with pH-dependent charge density. In one of our recent studies, we have identified that explicit consideration of hydrogen ion concentration is mandatory for appropriately describing the electrostatics of such systems and the resulting monomer concentration must obey a non-unique, cubic distribution. Here, we use this electrostatic calculation to study the corresponding electroosmotic transport. We establish that the effect of pH in the electroosmotic transport in polyelectrolyte-grafted nanochannels introduces two separate issues: first is the consideration of the hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentrations in describing the electroosmotic body force, and second is the consideration of the appropriate drag force that bears the signature of this cubic monomeric distribution. Our results indicate that the strength of the electroosmotic velocity for the pH-dependent case is always smaller than that for the pH-independent case, with the extent of this difference being a function of the system parameters. Such nature of the electroosmotic transport will be extremely significant in suppressing the electroosmotic flow strength with implications in large number applications such as capillary electrophoresis induced separation, electric field mediated DNA elongation, electrophoretic DNA nanopore sequencing, and many more.

  5. Proton-dependent glutamine uptake by aphid bacteriocyte amino acid transporter ApGLNT1.

    PubMed

    Price, Daniel R G; Wilson, Alex C C; Luetje, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Aphids house large populations of the gammaproteobacterial symbiont Buchnera aphidicola in specialized bacteriocyte cells. The combined biosynthetic capability of the holobiont (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Buchnera) is sufficient for biosynthesis of all twenty protein coding amino acids, including amino acids that animals alone cannot synthesize; and that are present at low concentrations in A. pisum's plant phloem sap diet. Collaborative holobiont amino acid biosynthesis depends on glutamine import into bacteriocytes, which serves as a nitrogen-rich amino donor for biosynthesis of other amino acids. Recently, we characterized A. pisum glutamine transporter 1 (ApGLNT1), a member of the amino acid/auxin permease family, as the dominant bacteriocyte plasma membrane glutamine transporter. Here we show ApGLNT1 to be structurally and functionally related to mammalian proton-dependent amino acid transporters (PATs 1-4). Using functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, combined with two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology we demonstrate that ApGLNT1 is electrogenic and that glutamine induces large inward currents. ApGLNT1 glutamine induced currents are dependent on external glutamine concentration, proton (H+) gradient across the membrane, and membrane potential. Based on these transport properties, ApGLNT1-mediated glutamine uptake into A. pisum bacteriocytes can be regulated by changes in either proton gradients across the plasma membrane or membrane potential. PMID:26028424

  6. ATP-dependent bile-salt transport in canalicular rat liver plasma-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, B; O'Neill, B; Meier, P J

    1992-01-01

    The present study identifies and characterizes a novel ATP-dependent bile-salt transport system in isolated canalicular rat liver plasma-membrane (cLPM) vesicles. ATP (1-5 mM) stimulated taurocholate uptake into cLPM vesicles between 6- and 8-fold above equilibrium uptake values (overshoot) and above values for incubations in the absence of ATP. The ATP-dependent portion of taurocholate uptake was 2-fold higher in the presence of equilibrated KNO3 as compared with potassium gluconate, indicating that the stimulatory effect of ATP was not due to the generation of an intravesicular positive membrane potential. Saturation kinetics revealed a very high affinity (Km approximately 2.1 microM) of the system for taurocholate. The system could only minimally be stimulated by nucleotides other than ATP. Furthermore, it was preferentially inhibited by conjugated univalent bile salts. Further strong inhibitory effects were observed with valinomycin, oligomycin, 4,4'-di-isothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulphonate, sulphobromophthalein, leukotriene C4 and N-ethylmaleimide, whereas nigericin, vanadate, GSH, GSSG and daunomycin exerted only weak inhibitory effects or none at all. These results indicate the presence of a high-affinity primary ATP-dependent bile-salt transport system in cLPM vesicles. This transport system might be regulated in vivo by the number of carriers present at the perspective transport site(s), which, in addition to the canalicular membrane, might also include pericanalicular membrane vesicles. PMID:1599411

  7. Infrared Observations Of Saturn's Rings : Azimuthal Variations And Thermal Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyrat, C.; Spilker, L. J.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S. G.; Wallis, B. D.; Nugent, C.; Flasar, M.

    2007-12-01

    Saturn's rings represent a collection of icy centimeter to meter size particles with their local dynamic dictated by self gravity, mutual collisions, surface roughness and thickness of the rings themselves. The infrared observations obtained by the CIRS infrared spectrometer on board Cassini over the last 3.5 year contain informations on the local dynamic, as the thermal signature of planetary rings is influenced both by the ring structure and the particle properties. The ring temperature is very dependent on the solar phase angle (Spilker et al., this issue), and on the local hour angle around Saturn, depending on whether or not particles' visible hemispheres are heated by the Sun. The geometric filling factor, which can be estimated from CIRS spectra, is less dependent on the local hour angle, suggesting that the non isothermal behavior of particles' surfaces have low impact, but it is very dependent on the spacecraft elevation for the A and C rings. The ring small scale structure can be explored using CIRS data. Variations of the filling factor with the local hour angle relative to the spacecraft azimuth reveals self-gravity wakes. We derive morphological parameters of such wakes in both A and B rings assuming that wakes can be modeled either by regularly spaced bars with infinite or finite optical depth. Our results indicates that wakes in the A ring are almost flat, with a ratio height/width ≈ 0.44 ± 0.16 and with a pitch angle relative to the orbital motion direction of ≍ 27deg. This is consistent with UVIS (Colwell et al., 2006) and VIMS data (Hedman et al., 2007). Such models are more difficult to constrain in the B ring, but small variations of the filling factor indicate that the pitch angle decreases drastically in this ring. We also present a new thermal bar model to explain azimuthal variations of temperatures in the A ring. We compare results with previous ring thermal models of spherical particles. The Cassini/CIRS azimuthal scans data set is

  8. Monoubiquitin-dependent endocytosis of the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) transporter controls iron uptake in plants.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Marie; Zelazny, Enric; Robert, Stéphanie; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Curie, Cathy; Friml, Jìrí; Vert, Grégory

    2011-08-01

    Plants take up iron from the soil using the iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) high-affinity iron transporter at the root surface. Sophisticated regulatory mechanisms allow plants to tightly control the levels of IRT1, ensuring optimal absorption of essential but toxic iron. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana IRT1 leads to constitutive IRT1 protein accumulation, metal overload, and oxidative stress. IRT1 is unexpectedly found in trans-Golgi network/early endosomes of root hair cells, and its levels and localization are unaffected by iron nutrition. Using pharmacological approaches, we show that IRT1 cycles to the plasma membrane to perform iron and metal uptake at the cell surface and is sent to the vacuole for proper turnover. We also prove that IRT1 is monoubiquitinated on several cytosol-exposed residues in vivo and that mutation of two putative monoubiquitination target residues in IRT1 triggers stabilization at the plasma membrane and leads to extreme lethality. Together, these data suggest a model in which monoubiquitin-dependent internalization/sorting and turnover keep the plasma membrane pool of IRT1 low to ensure proper iron uptake and to prevent metal toxicity. More generally, our work demonstrates the existence of monoubiquitin-dependent trafficking to lytic vacuoles in plants and points to proteasome-independent turnover of plasma membrane proteins.

  9. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-15

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  10. MARK/PAR1 kinase is a regulator of microtubule-dependent transport in axons.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Thies, Edda; Trinczek, Bernhard; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckard

    2004-10-11

    Microtubule-dependent transport of vesicles and organelles appears saltatory because particles switch between periods of rest, random Brownian motion, and active transport. The transport can be regulated through motor proteins, cargo adaptors, or microtubule tracks. We report here a mechanism whereby microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) represent obstacles to motors which can be regulated by microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK)/Par-1, a family of kinases that is known for its involvement in establishing cell polarity and in phosphorylating tau protein during Alzheimer neurodegeneration. Expression of MARK causes the phosphorylation of MAPs at their KXGS motifs, thereby detaching MAPs from the microtubules and thus facilitating the transport of particles. This occurs without impairing the intrinsic activity of motors because the velocity during active movement remains unchanged. In primary retinal ganglion cells, transfection with tau leads to the inhibition of axonal transport of mitochondria, APP vesicles, and other cell components which leads to starvation of axons and vulnerability against stress. This transport inhibition can be rescued by phosphorylating tau with MARK.

  11. Measurement of plasma current dependent changes in impurity transport and comparison with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; White, A. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Ernst, D.; Podpaly, Y.; Candy, J.

    2012-05-01

    Measured impurity transport coefficients are found to demonstrate a strong dependence on plasma current in the core of Alcator C-Mod. These measurements are compared directly with linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation in an attempt to both qualitatively and quantitatively reproduce the measured impurity transport. Discharges constituting a scan of plasma current from 0.6 to 1.2 MA were performed during the 2010 run campaign. The impurity transport from these discharges was determined using a novel set of spectroscopic diagnostics available on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic suite allowed for the effective constraint of impurity transport coefficient profiles inside of r/a = 0.6. A decrease in the measured impurity diffusivity and inward convection is found with increased plasma current. Global, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations were performed using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] for all discharges in the experimental scan and are found to reproduce the experimental trends, while demonstrating good quantitative agreement with measurement. A more comprehensive quantitative comparison was performed on the 0.8 MA discharge of the current scan which demonstrates that simultaneous agreement between experiment and simulation in both the impurity particle transport and ion heat transport channels is attainable within experimental uncertainties.

  12. High-Throughput Screening Assay for Inhibitors of TonB-Dependent Iron Transport.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mathew; Jordan, Lorne D; Shipelskiy, Yan; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2016-03-01

    The TonB-dependent Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein FepA actively transports the siderophore ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) into the periplasm. We developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay that observes FeEnt uptake through FepA in living Escherichia coli, by monitoring fluorescence quenching that occurs upon binding of FeEnt, and then unquenching as the bacteria deplete it from solution by transport. We optimized the labeling and spectroscopic methods to screen for inhibitors of TonB-dependent iron uptake through the outer membrane. The assay works like a molecular switch that is on in the presence of TonB activity and off in its absence. It functions in 96-well microtiter plates, in a variety of conditions, with Z factors of 0.8-1.0. TonB-dependent iron transport is energy dependent, and the inhibitory effects of the metabolic inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, 2,4-dinitrophenol, azide, cyanide, and arsenate on FeEnt uptake were readily detected by the assay. Because iron acquisition is a determinant of bacterial pathogenesis, HTS with this method may identify inhibitors that block TonB function and constitute novel therapeutics against infectious disease caused by Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Azimuth orientation of the dragonfly (Sympetrum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hisada, M.

    1972-01-01

    Evidence is presented of directional orientation by an alighting dragonfly relative to the azimuth of the sun. The effects of wind direction on this orientation are analyzed. It was concluded that wind does not play a major role in orientation but may have some secondary function in helping greater numbers of dragonflies face windward more often than leeward. A search was made to find the principle sensory receptor for orientation. Two possibilities, the large compound eye and the frontal ocelli, were noted; however, no conclusive evidence could be found.

  14. The Insertion and Transport of Anandamide in Synthetic Lipid Membranes Are Both Cholesterol-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Chahinian, Henri; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Anandamide is a lipid neurotransmitter which belongs to a class of molecules termed the endocannabinoids involved in multiple physiological functions. Anandamide is readily taken up into cells, but there is considerable controversy as to the nature of this transport process (passive diffusion through the lipid bilayer vs. involvement of putative proteic transporters). This issue is of major importance since anandamide transport through the plasma membrane is crucial for its biological activity and intracellular degradation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the involvement of cholesterol in membrane uptake and transport of anandamide. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecular modeling simulations suggested that anandamide can adopt a shape that is remarkably complementary to cholesterol. Physicochemical studies showed that in the nanomolar concentration range, anandamide strongly interacted with cholesterol monolayers at the air-water interface. The specificity of this interaction was assessed by: i) the lack of activity of structurally related unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and arachidonic acid at 50 nM) on cholesterol monolayers, and ii) the weak insertion of anandamide into phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin monolayers. In agreement with these data, the presence of cholesterol in reconstituted planar lipid bilayers triggered the stable insertion of anandamide detected as an increase in bilayer capacitance. Kinetics transport studies showed that pure phosphatidylcholine bilayers were weakly permeable to anandamide. The incorporation of cholesterol in phosphatidylcholine bilayers dose-dependently stimulated the translocation of anandamide. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that cholesterol stimulates both the insertion of anandamide into synthetic lipid monolayers and bilayers, and its transport across bilayer membranes. In this respect, we suggest that besides putative anandamide protein-transporters, cholesterol could

  15. Symmetry-dependent transport properties and magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jun; Wu, Fengmin; Li, Jingbo

    2012-06-01

    First principles calculations are performed to study the transport properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). ZSiNRs show symmetry-dependent transport properties similar to those of zigzag graphene nanoribbons, although the σ mirror plane is absent. Even-N and odd-N ZSiNRs have very different current-voltage relationships, which can be attributed to the different parity of their π and π* bands under c2 symmetry operation with respect to the center axis. Moreover, magnetoresistance effect is observed in even-N ZSiNRs, and the order can reach 1 000 000%. On the basis of these interesting transport properties, ZSiNR-based logic devices, such as not, and, and or gates, are proposed.

  16. Simple models for the analysis of binding protein-dependent transport systems.

    PubMed Central

    Shilton, B. H.; Mowbray, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Mathematical modeling was used to evaluate experimental data for bacterial binding protein-dependent transport systems. Two simple models were considered in which ligand-free periplasmic binding protein interacts with the membrane-bound components of transport. In one, this interaction was viewed as a competition with the ligand-bound binding protein, whereas in the other, it was considered to be a consequence of the complexes formed during the transport process itself. Two sets of kinetic parameters were derived for each model that fit the available experimental results for the maltose system. By contrast, a model that omitted the interaction of ligand-free binding protein did not fit the experimental data. Some applications of the successful models for the interpretation of existing mutant data are illustrated, as well as the possibilities of using mutant data to test the original models and sets of kinetic parameters. Practical suggestions are given for further experimental design. PMID:7670377

  17. TIME-DEPENDENT PERPENDICULAR TRANSPORT OF FAST CHARGED PARTICLES IN A TURBULENT MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fraschetti, F.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2011-06-20

    We present an analytic derivation of the temporal dependence of the perpendicular transport coefficient of charged particles in magnetostatic turbulence, for times smaller than the time needed for charged particles to travel the turbulence correlation length. This time window is left unexplored in most transport models. In our analysis all magnetic scales are taken to be much larger than the particle gyroradius, so that perpendicular transport is assumed to be dominated by the guiding center motion. Particle drift from the local magnetic field lines (MFLs) and magnetic field line random walk are evaluated separately for slab and three-dimensional (3D) isotropic turbulence. Contributions of wavelength scales shorter and longer than the turbulence coherence length are compared. In contrast to the slab case, particles in 3D isotropic turbulence unexpectedly diffuse from local MFLs; this result questions the common assumption that particle magnetization is independent of turbulence geometry. Extensions of this model will allow for a study of solar wind anisotropies.

  18. Using an electronic compass to determine telemetry azimuths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, R.R.; Scalf, J.D.; Jamison, B.E.; Lutz, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers typically collect azimuths from known locations to estimate locations of radiomarked animals. Mobile, vehicle-mounted telemetry receiving systems frequently are used to gather azimuth data. Use of mobile systems typically involves estimating the vehicle's orientation to grid north (vehicle azimuth), recording an azimuth to the transmitter relative to the vehicle azimuth from a fixed rosette around the antenna mast (relative azimuth), and subsequently calculating an azimuth to the transmitter (animal azimuth). We incorporated electronic compasses into standard null-peak antenna systems by mounting the compass sensors atop the antenna masts and evaluated the precision of this configuration. This system increased efficiency by eliminating vehicle orientation and calculations to determine animal azimuths and produced estimates of precision (azimuth SD=2.6 deg., SE=0.16 deg.) similar to systems that required orienting the mobile system to grid north. Using an electronic compass increased efficiency without sacrificing precision and should produce more accurate estimates of locations when marked animals are moving or when vehicle orientation is problematic.

  19. Zinc- and bicarbonate-dependent ZIP8 transporter mediates selenite uptake

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Joseph R.; Geng, Xiangrong; Jiang, Lan; Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Chen, Fei; Nebert, Daniel W.; Liu, Zijuan

    2016-01-01

    Selenite (HSeO3−) is a monovalent anion of the essential trace element and micronutrient selenium (Se). In therapeutic concentrations, HSeO3− has been studied for treating certain cancers, serious inflammatory disorders, and septic shock. Little is known, however, about HSeO3− uptake into mammalian cells; until now, no mammalian HSeO3− uptake transporter has been identified. The ubiquitous mammalian ZIP8 divalent cation transporter (encoded by the SLC39A8 gene) is bicarbonate-dependent, moving endogenous substrates (Zn2+, Mn2+, Fe2+ or Co2+) and nonessential metals such as Cd2+ into the cell. Herein we studied HSeO3− uptake in: human and mouse cell cultures, shRNA-knockdown experiments, Xenopus oocytes, wild-type mice and two transgenic mouse lines having genetically altered ZIP8 expression, and mouse erythrocytes ex vivo. In mammalian cell culture, excess Zn2+ levels and/or ZIP8 over-expression can be associated with diminished viability in selenite-treated cells. Intraperitoneal HSeO3− causes the largest ZIP8-dependent increases in intracellular Se content in liver, followed by kidney, heart, lung and spleen. In every model system studied, HSeO3− uptake is tightly associated with ZIP8 protein levels and sufficient Zn2+ and HCO3− concentrations, suggesting that the ZIP8-mediated electroneutral complex transported contains three ions: Zn2+/(HCO3−)(HSeO3−). Transporters having three different ions in their transport complex are not without precedent. Although there might be other HSeO3− influx transporters as yet undiscovered, data herein suggest that mammalian ZIP8 plays a major role in HSeO3− uptake. PMID:27166256

  20. Using time-dependent density functional theory in real time for calculating electronic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffhauser, Philipp; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for calculating electronic transport within the propagation approach to time-dependent density functional theory. Our scheme is based on solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations on grids in real space and real time for a finite system. We use absorbing and antiabsorbing boundaries for simulating the coupling to a source and a drain. The boundaries are designed to minimize the effects of quantum-mechanical reflections and electrical polarization build-up, which are the major obstacles when calculating transport by applying an external bias to a finite system. We show that the scheme can readily be applied to real molecules by calculating the current through a conjugated molecule as a function of time. By comparing to literature results for the conjugated molecule and to analytic results for a one-dimensional model system we demonstrate the reliability of the concept.

  1. Magnon excitation and temperature dependent transport properties in magnetic tunnel junctions with Heusler compound electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewello, Volker; Ebke, Daniel; Schäfers, Markus; Kugler, Zoë; Reiss, Günter; Thomas, Andy

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions were prepared with the Heusler compounds Co2FeAl, Co2FeSi, and Co2MnSi as the soft magnetic electrode. The Co2MnSi electrodes had a multilayer design that used either the Co2FeAl or the Co2FeSi compound as a buffer material. Pinned Co-Fe was used as the hard reference electrode. The electronic transport characteristics were analyzed by tunneling spectroscopy. The dependence of sample properties on the buffer material was of interest, especially the gap in the minority density of states of the Heusler electrode. The temperature dependence of the transport properties was also investigated.

  2. Vibrationally dependent electron-electron interactions in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, A.; Härtle, R.; Bockstedte, M.; Thoss, M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of electronic-vibrational coupling in resonant electron transport through single-molecule junctions, taking into account that the corresponding coupling strengths may depend on the charge and excitation state of the molecular bridge. Within an effective-model Hamiltonian approach for a molecule with multiple electronic states, this requires to extend the commonly used model and include vibrationally dependent electron-electron interaction. We use Born-Markov master equation methods and consider selected models to exemplify the effect of the additional interaction on the transport characteristics of a single-molecule junction. In particular, we show that it has a significant influence on local cooling and heating mechanisms, it may result in negative differential resistance, and it may cause pronounced asymmetries in the conductance map of a single-molecule junction.

  3. Examination of temperature dependent subgroup formulations in direct whole core transport calculation for power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Y. S.; Lee, U. C.; Joo, H. G.

    2012-07-01

    The traditional subgroup method which has been applied for lattice transport calculations has an inherent limitation for non-uniform temperature distributions. As a measure to incorporate temperature dependence into the subgroup formulation, the subgroup level and number density adjustment method have been proposed. In this paper, the temperature dependent subgroup formulations employed for reflecting the non-uniform temperature effects on the resonance spatial self-shielding are examined for the whole core transport calculation with the thermal feedback. For 2D pin-cell problem with non-uniform temperature profiles, the inherent limitation of conventional subgroup method is confirmed. And the improvement in terms of reactivity is observed with the proposed adjustment scheme. For the real PWR core calculation with thermal feedback in the hot-full-power condition, the noticeable correction for the fuel temperature coefficient by about 10% more negative is obtained with the correction schemes. (authors)

  4. Parametric dependence of particle pinch coefficients for electron particle transport in linear gyrokinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fable, E.; Sauter, O.; Angioni, C.

    2008-11-01

    Peaked density profiles are observed in the core of Tokamak plasmas in regimes where the core particle sources and neoclassical transport are negligible. Gyrokinetic theory predicts that microinstabilities can produce a net inward particle convection balancing outward diffusion and thus explaining the experimental observations. In this work we present a general methodology that allows to calculate the particle pinch coefficients, i.e. the off-diagonal elements of the transport matrix. We adopt this procedure to perform a systematic study of the parametric dependence of these coefficients for electron particle transport in different plasma conditions. Once the coefficients are computed, one can reconstruct the predicted gradient and compare with the experimental observations in regimes with parameters similar to the ones employed in these calculations. The procedure can predict the density logarithmic gradient at zero particle flux in a self-consistent way, based on first principles. The results can be helpful in understanding the possible range of variation of the predicted gradients as a function of the main plasma parameters and in clarifying the relevant dependencies for electrons. Finally, as instructive example, we discuss how this procedure can effectively help to interpret measurements of peaked density profiles in TCV electron Internal Transport Barriers and the significant thermodiffusive inward convection that is observed.

  5. Unassisted membrane insertion as the initial step in DeltapH/Tat-dependent protein transport.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bo; Frielingsdorf, Stefan; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2006-02-01

    In the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts as well as in the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria, the DeltapH/Tat-dependent protein transport pathway is responsible for the translocation of folded proteins. Using the chimeric 16/23 protein as model substrate in thylakoid transport experiments, we dissected the transport process into several distinct steps that are characterized by specific integral translocation intermediates. Formation of the early translocation intermediate Ti-1, which still exposes the N and the C terminus to the stroma, is observed with thylakoids pretreated with (i) solutions of chaotropic salts or alkaline pH, (ii) protease, or (iii) antibodies raised against TatA, TatB, or TatC. Membrane insertion takes place even into liposomes, demonstrating that proteinaceous components are not required. This suggests that Tat-dependent transport may be initiated by the unassisted insertion of the substrate into the lipid bilayer, and that interaction with the Tat translocase takes place only in later stages of the process.

  6. Serum albumin promotes ATP-binding cassette transporter-dependent sterol uptake in yeast.

    PubMed

    Marek, Magdalena; Silvestro, Daniele; Fredslund, Maria D; Andersen, Tonni G; Pomorski, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Sterol uptake in fungi is a multistep process that involves interaction between external sterols and the cell wall, incorporation of sterol molecules into the plasma membrane, and subsequent integration into intracellular membranes for turnover. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been implicated in sterol uptake, but key features of their activity remain to be elucidated. Here, we apply fluorescent cholesterol (NBD-cholesterol) to monitor sterol uptake under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in two fungal species, Candida glabrata (Cg) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc). We found that in both fungal species, ABC transporter-dependent uptake of cholesterol under anaerobic conditions and in mutants lacking HEM1 gene is promoted in the presence of the serum protein albumin that is able to bind the sterol molecule. Furthermore, the C. glabrata ABC transporter CgAus1p expressed in S. cerevisiae requires the presence of serum or albumin for efficient cholesterol uptake. These results suggest that albumin can serve as sterol donor in ABC transporter-dependent sterol uptake, a process potentially important for growth of C. glabrata inside infected humans.

  7. Orbital-cooperative spin fluctuation and orbital-dependent transport in ruthenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2014-12-01

    Unusual transport properties deviating from the Fermi liquid are observed in ruthenates near a magnetic quantum-critical point (QCP). To understand the electronic properties of the ruthenates near and away from an antiferromagnetic (AF) QCP, I study the electronic structure and magnetic and transport properties for the t2 g-orbital Hubbard model on a square lattice in fluctuation-exchange approximation including Maki-Thompson (MT) current vertex correction (CVC). The results away from the AF QCP reproduce several experimental results of Sr2RuO4 qualitatively and provide new mechanisms about the enhancement of spin fluctuation at QIC -AF≈(0.66 π ,0.66 π ) , larger mass enhancement of the dx y orbital than that of the dx z /y z orbital, and nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient. Also, the results near the AF QCP explain the T -linear inplane resistivity in Sr2Ru0.075Ti0.025O4 and give an experimental test on the obtained temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient. I reveal spatial correlation including the self-energy of electrons beyond mean-field approximations is essential to determine the electronic properties of the ruthenates. I also show several ubiquitous transport properties near an AF QCP and characteristic transport properties of a multiorbital system by comparison with results of a single-orbital system near an AF QCP.

  8. [Age-dependent changes in mRNA transport (nucleus-cytoplasm)].

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Agutter, P S; Prochnow, D J; Fasold, H; Sève, A P; Tsiapalis, C M; Schröder, H C

    1993-01-01

    Transport of mRNA from nucleus to cytoplasm is an ATP-dependent process which occurs strictly vectorially. Because the mRNA is structurally bound during transport, mRNA transport is a "solid-state" process consisting of i) mRNA release from the nuclear matrix, ii) mRNA translocation through the nuclear pore, and iii) cytoskeletal binding. We identified and purified the following components involved in the translocation step: i) the nuclear envelope (NE) nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) which is stimulated by the 3'poly(A) tail of mRNA, ii) the poly(A)-recognizing mRNA carrier, iii) the NE protein kinase, and iv) the NE phosphatase. In addition, we found that an RNA helicase activity is present in NE, which also may be involved in RNA transport. Our results show that, besides poly(A), also double-stranded RNA structures may modulate RNA export. The amount of mRNA released from nuclei markedly decreases with age. Evidence is presented that this age-dependent change is caused by an impairment of polyadenylation of mRNA, hnRNA processing, release of mRNA from nuclear matrix, and translocations of mRNA from nuclear to cytoplasmic compartment (decrease in activities of NE NTPase, protein kinase, and phosphatase; decrease in poly(A)-binding affinity of mRNA carrier).

  9. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  10. Azimuthal field instability in a confined ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2015-02-01

    We report the development of interfacial ferrohydrodynamic instabilities when an initially circular bubble of a nonmagnetic inviscid fluid is surrounded by a viscous ferrofluid in the confined geometry of a Hele-Shaw cell. The fluid-fluid interface becomes unstable due to the action of magnetic forces induced by an azimuthal field produced by a straight current-carrying wire that is normal to the cell plates. In this framework, a pattern formation process takes place through the interplay between magnetic and surface tension forces. By employing a perturbative mode-coupling approach we investigate analytically both linear and intermediate nonlinear regimes of the interface evolution. As a result, useful analytical information can be extracted regarding the destabilizing role of the azimuthal field at the linear level, as well as its influence on the interfacial pattern morphology at the onset of nonlinear effects. Finally, a vortex sheet formalism is used to access fully nonlinear stationary solutions for the two-fluid interface shapes. PMID:25768610

  11. Azimuthal field instability in a confined ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2015-02-01

    We report the development of interfacial ferrohydrodynamic instabilities when an initially circular bubble of a nonmagnetic inviscid fluid is surrounded by a viscous ferrofluid in the confined geometry of a Hele-Shaw cell. The fluid-fluid interface becomes unstable due to the action of magnetic forces induced by an azimuthal field produced by a straight current-carrying wire that is normal to the cell plates. In this framework, a pattern formation process takes place through the interplay between magnetic and surface tension forces. By employing a perturbative mode-coupling approach we investigate analytically both linear and intermediate nonlinear regimes of the interface evolution. As a result, useful analytical information can be extracted regarding the destabilizing role of the azimuthal field at the linear level, as well as its influence on the interfacial pattern morphology at the onset of nonlinear effects. Finally, a vortex sheet formalism is used to access fully nonlinear stationary solutions for the two-fluid interface shapes.

  12. Aquaporin-4–dependent K+ and water transport modeled in brain extracellular space following neuroexcitation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Zhang, Hua; Binder, Devin K.

    2013-01-01

    Potassium (K+) ions released into brain extracellular space (ECS) during neuroexcitation are efficiently taken up by astrocytes. Deletion of astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in mice alters neuroexcitation by reducing ECS [K+] accumulation and slowing K+ reuptake. These effects could involve AQP4-dependent: (a) K+ permeability, (b) resting ECS volume, (c) ECS contraction during K+ reuptake, and (d) diffusion-limited water/K+ transport coupling. To investigate the role of these mechanisms, we compared experimental data to predictions of a model of K+ and water uptake into astrocytes after neuronal release of K+ into the ECS. The model computed the kinetics of ECS [K+] and volume, with input parameters including initial ECS volume, astrocyte K+ conductance and water permeability, and diffusion in astrocyte cytoplasm. Numerical methods were developed to compute transport and diffusion for a nonstationary astrocyte–ECS interface. The modeling showed that mechanisms b–d, together, can predict experimentally observed impairment in K+ reuptake from the ECS in AQP4 deficiency, as well as altered K+ accumulation in the ECS after neuroexcitation, provided that astrocyte water permeability is sufficiently reduced in AQP4 deficiency and that solute diffusion in astrocyte cytoplasm is sufficiently low. The modeling thus provides a potential explanation for AQP4-dependent K+/water coupling in the ECS without requiring AQP4-dependent astrocyte K+ permeability. Our model links the physical and ion/water transport properties of brain cells with the dynamics of neuroexcitation, and supports the conclusion that reduced AQP4-dependent water transport is responsible for defective neuroexcitation in AQP4 deficiency. PMID:23277478

  13. Beam energy dependence of azimuthal anisotropy at RHIC-PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, A.

    2012-05-15

    Recent PHENIX measurements of the elliptic ({upsilon}{sub 2}) and hexadecapole ({upsilon}{sub 4}) Fourier flow coefficients for charged hadrons as a function of transverse momentum (p{sub T}), collision centrality and particle species are presented and compared with results from the PHOBOS and STAR Collaborations respectively. The status of extensions to future PHENIX measurements at lower beam energies is also discussed.

  14. ATP-dependent calcium transport across basal plasma membranes of human placental trophoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.J.; Kelley, L.K.; Smith, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    As a first step in understanding the cellular basis of maternal-fetal calcium transfer, the authors examined the characteristics of calcium uptake by a highly purified preparation of the syncytiotrophoblast basal (fetal facing) plasma membrane. In the presence of nanomolar concentrations of free calcium, basal membranes demonstrated substantial ATP-dependent calcium uptake. This uptake required magnesium, was not significantly affected by Na/sup +/ or K/sup +/ (50 mM), or sodium azide (10 mM). Intravesicular calcium was rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore rapidly and completely released by the calcium ionophore A23187. Calcium transport was significantly stimulated by the calcium-dependent regulatory protein calmodulin. Placental membrane fractions enriched in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria also demonstrated ATP-dependent calcium uptake. In contrast to basal membrane, mitochondrial calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake was completely inhibited by azide. The rate of calcium uptake by the ER was only 20% of that of basal membranes. They conclude that the placental basal plasma membrane possesses a high-affinity calcium transport system similar to that found in plasma membranes of a variety of cell types. This transporter is situated to permit it to function in vivo in maternal-fetal calcium transfer.

  15. pH-dependent regulation of electron transport and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2013-10-01

    This review is focused on pH-dependent mechanisms of regulation of photosynthetic electron transport and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts. The light-induced acidification of the thylakoid lumen is known to decelerate the plastoquinol oxidation by the cytochrome b 6 f complex, thus impeding the electron flow between photosystem II and photosystem I. Acidification of the lumen also triggers the dissipation of excess energy in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II, thereby protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against a solar stress. After brief description of structural and functional organization of the chloroplast electron transport chain, our attention is focused on the nature of the rate-limiting step of electron transfer between photosystem II and photosystem I. In the context of pH-dependent mechanism of photosynthetic control in chloroplasts, the mechanisms of plastoquinol oxidation by the cytochrome b 6 f complex have been considered. The light-induced alkalization of stroma is another factor of pH-dependent regulation of electron transport in chloroplasts. Alkalization of stroma induces activation of the Bassham-Benson-Calvin cycle reactions, thereby promoting efflux of electrons from photosystem I to NADP(+). The mechanisms of the light-induced activation of ATP synthase are briefly considered.

  16. Spectral properites and scale dependent transport in simplified stratified systems subject to sporadic threshold adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.

    2005-12-01

    A stratified atmosphere can be essentially characterized by systems subject to stochastic forcing and threshold adjustment due to convective and shear instability, and the vertical transport can be approximated by eddy diffusion/viscosity. In the linear limit, the equations can be solved explicitly, and the spectra could be determined and are shown to follow power-law distributions, and the eddy transport coefficients are scale independent. The nonlinear equations are also shown to support scale invariance under rather general conditions, and the power-law indices of the spectra are derived from the analysis. These indices, as well as those in the linear limit, are confirmed by numerical simulations. The power-law indices of the ``universal'' spectra of temperature and horizontal wind versus vertical wavenumber and frequency from previous observations are shown to fall in the range determined by the linear and nonlinear limit. This theory, therefore, provides a possible explanation to the universal vertical wavenumber and frequency spectra and their variability. By relating the universal spectra with the sporadic threshold adjustment due to convective or shear instability, which is ubiquitous in stratified fluid systems, the difficulty of previous theories to associate the time and location independent spectral feature with the highly time and location dependent gravity waves is avoided. The analysis also suggests that the vertical eddy transport coefficients are scale dependent, and the implication of this scale dependence will be explored.

  17. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  18. Modeling ballistic effects in frequency-dependent transient thermal transport using diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maassen, Jesse; Lundstrom, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Understanding ballistic phonon transport effects in transient thermoreflectance experiments and explaining the observed deviations from classical theory remains a challenge. Diffusion equations are simple and computationally efficient but are widely believed to break down when the characteristic length scale is similar or less than the phonon mean-free-path. Building on our prior work, we demonstrate how well-known diffusion equations, namely, the hyperbolic heat equation and the Cattaneo equation, can be used to model ballistic phonon effects in frequency-dependent periodic steady-state thermal transport. Our analytical solutions are found to compare excellently to rigorous numerical results of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. The correct physical boundary conditions can be different from those traditionally used and are paramount for accurately capturing ballistic effects. To illustrate the technique, we consider a simple model problem using two different, commonly used heating conditions. We demonstrate how this framework can easily handle detailed material properties, by considering the case of bulk silicon using a full phonon dispersion and mean-free-path distribution. This physically transparent approach provides clear insights into the nonequilibrium physics of quasi-ballistic phonon transport and its impact on thermal transport properties.

  19. Mechanism of Orientation-Dependent Asymmetric Charge Transport in Tunneling Junctions Comprising Photosystem I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, photoactive proteins have gained a lot of attention due to their incorporation into bioinspired (photo)electrochemical and solar cells. This paper describes the measurement of the asymmetry of current transport of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the entire photosystem I (PSI) protein complex (not the isolated reaction center, RCI), on two different “director SAMs” supported by ultraflat Au substrates. The director SAMs induce the preferential orientation of PSI, which manifest as asymmetry in tunneling charge-transport. We measured the oriented SAMs of PSI using eutectic Ga–In (EGaIn), a large-area technique, and conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), a single-complex technique, and determined that the transport properties are comparable. By varying the temperatures at which the measurements were performed, we found that there is no measurable dependence of the current on temperature from ±0.1 to ±1.0 V bias, and thus, we suggest tunneling as the mechanism for transport; there are no thermally activated (e.g., hopping) processes. Therefore, it is likely that relaxation in the electron transport chain is not responsible for the asymmetry in the conductance of SAMs of PSI complexes in these junctions, which we ascribe instead to the presence of a large, net dipole moment present in PSI. PMID:26057523

  20. N-Glycosylation is required for Na{sup +}-dependent vitamin C transporter functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Veedamali S. Marchant, Jonathan S.; Reidling, Jack C.; Said, Hamid M.

    2008-09-12

    The human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters (hSVCT1 and hSVCT2) mediate cellular uptake of ascorbic acid. Both these transporters contain potential sites for N-glycosylation in their extracellular domains (Asn-138, Asn-144 [hSVCT1]; Asn-188, Asn-196 [hSVCT2]), however the role of N-glycosylation in transporter function is unexplored. On the basis of the result that tunicamycin decreased {sup 14}C-ascorbic acid uptake in HepG2 cells, we systematically ablated all consensus N-glycosylation sites in hSVCT1 and hSVCT2 to resolve any effects on ascorbic acid uptake, transporter expression and targeting. We show that removal of individual N-glycosylation sites significantly impairs protein expression and consequently ascorbic acid uptake for hSVCT1 mutants (N138Q is retained intracellularly) and for hSVCT2 mutants (all of which reach the cell surface). N-Glycosylation is therefore essential for vitamin C transporter functionality.

  1. Salt transport and the time-dependent salt balance of a partially stratified estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Melissa M.; Geyer, W. Rockwell

    2003-05-01

    The transport of salt along the channel of an estuary determines the length of the saline intrusion and provides bounds on the transfer of other substances. Observations of salt transport have been hampered by a lack of long time series measurements and complexities of the sampling situation (e.g., local topography and simultaneous variations of tides, freshwater, and winds). Here we estimate salt transport at a relatively uniform section of the Hudson Estuary over a 70-day period during drought conditions. The salt balance of the estuary is also assessed by comparing salt transport at the section with surveys of total salt content in the estuary. Most salt enters the estuary in monthly pulses of estuarine salt transport (i.e., spatial variations of tidally-averaged velocity and salinity) during apogean neap tides when vertical stratification is greatest. Oscillatory salt transport (i.e., the covariance of tidally-varying velocity and salinity) is a more minor player in the salt balance and shows a surprising lack of spring-neap variation. Integrated salt transport at the section is consistent with estimates of total salt content of the estuary; however, the mismatch in magnitude of the variations indicates that the salinity intrusion is not in equilibrium within the spring-neap cycle. In contrast, the salt balance adjusts rapidly to an increase in freshwater flow at the end of the deployment. A scaling argument is derived to illustrate the adjustment of the salinity intrusion to the tides and freshwater flow. The results suggest that time dependence is an intrinsic part of the estuarine salt balance.

  2. Substrate-Dependent Ligand Inhibition of the Human Organic Cation Transporter OCT2

    PubMed Central

    Belzer, Mathew; Morales, Mark; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Mash, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) mediates the initial step in renal secretion of organic cations: uptake from the blood, across the basolateral membrane, and into the renal proximal tubule cells. Because of its potential as a target for unwanted drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considerable attention has been directed toward understanding the basis of OCT2 selectivity. These studies typically assess selectivity based on ligand inhibition profiles for OCT2-mediated transport of a probe substrate. However, little attention has been given to the potential influence of the substrate on the profile of ligand inhibition. Here we compared the IC50 values obtained for a set of structurally distinct inhibitors against OCT2-mediated transport of three structurally distinct substrates: 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP); metformin; and a novel fluorescent substrate, N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][l,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium iodide (NBD-MTMA). The median IC50 value for inhibition of MPP transport was 9-fold higher than that for inhibition of metformin transport. Similarly, the median IC50 value for inhibition of MPP transport was 5-fold higher than that for NBD-MTMA transport. However, this was not a systematic difference in inhibitory efficacy; the ratio of IC50 values, MPP versus NBD-MTMA, ranged from 88-fold (ipratropium) to 0.3-fold (metformin). These data show that 1) the choice of OCT2 substrate significantly influences both quantitative and qualitative inhibitory interactions with cationic drugs; and 2) ligand interactions with OCT2 are not restricted to competition for a common ligand binding site, consistent with a binding surface characterized by multiple, possibly overlapping interaction sites. Development of predictive models of DDIs with OCT2 must take into account the substrate dependence of ligand interaction with this protein. PMID:23709117

  3. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions And Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, Russell

    2014-06-30

    Matrix diffusion and adsorption within a rock matrix are widely regarded as important mechanisms for retarding the transport of radionuclides and other solutes in fractured rock (e.g., Neretnieks, 1980; Tang et al., 1981; Maloszewski and Zuber, 1985; Novakowski and Lapcevic, 1994; Jardine et al., 1999; Zhou and Xie, 2003; Reimus et al., 2003a,b). When remediation options are being evaluated for old sources of contamination, where a large fraction of contaminants reside within the rock matrix, slow diffusion out of the matrix greatly increases the difficulty and timeframe of remediation. Estimating the rates of solute exchange between fractures and the adjacent rock matrix is a critical factor in quantifying immobilization and/or remobilization of DOE-relevant contaminants within the subsurface. In principle, the most rigorous approach to modeling solute transport with fracture-matrix interaction would be based on local-scale coupled advection-diffusion/dispersion equations for the rock matrix and in discrete fractures that comprise the fracture network (Discrete Fracture Network and Matrix approach, hereinafter referred to as DFNM approach), fully resolving aperture variability in fractures and matrix property heterogeneity. However, such approaches are computationally demanding, and thus, many predictive models rely upon simplified models. These models typically idealize fracture rock masses as a single fracture or system of parallel fractures interacting with slabs of porous matrix or as a mobile-immobile or multi-rate mass transfer system. These idealizations provide tractable approaches for interpreting tracer tests and predicting contaminant mobility, but rely upon a fitted effective matrix diffusivity or mass-transfer coefficients. However, because these fitted parameters are based upon simplified conceptual models, their effectiveness at predicting long-term transport processes remains uncertain. Evidence of scale dependence of effective matrix diffusion

  4. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-06-13

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations.

  5. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations. PMID:27304959

  6. A Novel Azimuth Super-Resolution Method by Synthesizing Azimuth Bandwidth of Multiple Tracks of Airborne Stripmap SAR Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jingwen; Sun, Bing; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Azimuth resolution of airborne stripmap synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is restricted by the azimuth antenna size. Conventionally, a higher azimuth resolution should be achieved by employing alternate modes that steer the beam in azimuth to enlarge the synthetic antenna aperture. However, if a data set of a certain region, consisting of multiple tracks of airborne stripmap SAR data, is available, the azimuth resolution of specific small region of interest (ROI) can be conveniently improved by a novel azimuth super-resolution method as introduced by this paper. The proposed azimuth super-resolution method synthesize the azimuth bandwidth of the data selected from multiple discontinuous tracks and contributes to a magnifier-like function with which the ROI can be further zoomed in with a higher azimuth resolution than that of the original stripmap images. Detailed derivation of the azimuth super-resolution method, including the steps of two-dimensional dechirping, residual video phase (RVP) removal, data stitching and data correction, is provided. The restrictions of the proposed method are also discussed. Lastly, the presented approach is evaluated via both the single- and multi-target computer simulations. PMID:27304959

  7. Dynamic potential-dependent electron transport pathway shifts in anode biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Yoho, Rachel A; Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I

    2014-12-01

    Biofilms of the anode-respiring bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens (G. sulfurreducens) demonstrate dynamic potential-dependent changes between two electron transport pathways that are used selectively depending on the anode potential. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements suggest that these pathways (both n=1), with midpoint potentials of -0.155 (± 0.005) and -0.095 (± 0.003) V versus standard hydrogen electrode, are not additive within the biofilm, but are preferentially used depending on the anode potential. Potential step voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry (CV) confirmed rapid changes between the two pathways in minutes when the anode potential is changed. We confirm that the electrochemical response observed in a slow-scan-rate CV (∼1 mV s(-1) ) is often composed of at least the two pathways characterized. Thus, beyond understanding the electron transport pathways in G. sulfurreducens, this study also has implications on the interpretation of previously collected and future potential-dependent datasets.

  8. Functional Implications and Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation of the Peptide Transporter Ptr2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Ken; Moriya, Atsuto; Uemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The peptide transporter Ptr2 plays a central role in di- or tripeptide import in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although PTR2 transcription has been extensively analyzed in terms of upregulation by the Ubr1-Cup9 circuit, the structural and functional information for this transporter is limited. Here we identified 14 amino acid residues required for peptide import through Ptr2 based on the crystallographic information of Streptococcus thermophilus peptide transporter PepTst and based on the conservation of primary sequences among the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs). Expression of Ptr2 carrying one of the 14 mutations of which the corresponding residues of PepTst are involved in peptide recognition, salt bridge interaction, or peptide translocation failed to enable ptr2Δtrp1 cell growth in alanyl-tryptophan (Ala-Trp) medium. We observed that Ptr2 underwent rapid degradation after cycloheximide treatment (half-life, approximately 1 h), and this degradation depended on Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. The ubiquitination of Ptr2 most likely occurs at the N-terminal lysines 16, 27, and 34. Simultaneous substitution of arginine for the three lysines fully prevented Ptr2 degradation. Ptr2 mutants of the presumed peptide-binding site (E92Q, R93K, K205R, W362L, and E480D) exhibited severe defects in peptide import and were subjected to Rsp5-dependent degradation when cells were moved to Ala-Trp medium, whereas, similar to what occurs in the wild-type Ptr2, mutant proteins of the intracellular gate were upregulated. These results suggest that Ptr2 undergoes quality control and the defects in peptide binding and the concomitant conformational change render Ptr2 subject to efficient ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. PMID:25172766

  9. Angular dependent study on spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures with Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanian, S. M.; Shokri, A. A.; Mikaili Agah, K.; Elahi, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically the effects of Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (DSOC) on the spin-dependent current and shot noise through II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor/nonmagnetic semiconductor (DMS/NMS) barrier structures. The calculation of transmission probability is based on an effective mass quantum-mechanical approach in the presence of an external magnetic field applied along the growth direction of the junction and also applied voltage. We also study the dependence of spin-dependent properties on external magnetic field and relative angle between the magnetizations of two DMS layers in CdTe/CdMnTe heterostructures by including the DSOC effect. The results show that the DSOC has great different influence on transport properties of electrons with spin up and spin down in the considered system and this aspect may be utilized in designing new spintronics devices.

  10. Fingerprint of topological Andreev bound states in phase-dependent heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sothmann, Björn; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that phase-dependent heat currents through superconductor-topological insulator Josephson junctions provide a useful tool to probe the existence of topological Andreev bound states, even for multichannel surface states. We predict that in the tunneling regime topological Andreev bound states lead to a minimum of the thermal conductance for a phase difference ϕ =π , in clear contrast to a maximum of the thermal conductance at ϕ =π that occurs for trivial Andreev bound states in superconductor-normal-metal tunnel junctions. This opens up the possibility that phase-dependent heat transport can distinguish between topologically trivial and nontrivial 4 π modes. Furthermore, we propose a superconducting quantum interference device geometry where phase-dependent heat currents can be measured using available experimental technology.

  11. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties. PMID:27257640

  12. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties.

  13. VACUUM calculation in azimuthally symmetric geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    A robustly accurate and effective method is presented to solve Laplace`s equation in general azimuthally symmetric geometry for the magnetic scalar potential in the region surrounding a plasma discharge which may or may not contain external conducting shells. These shells can be topologically toroidal or spherical, and may have toroidal gaps in them. The solution is incorporated into the various MHD stability codes either through the volume integrated perturbed magnetic energy in the vacuum region or through the continuity requirements for the normal component of the perturbed magnetic field and the total perturbed pressure across the unperturbed plasma-vacuum boundary. The method is based upon using Green`s second identity and the method of collocation. As useful byproducts, the eddy currents and the simulation of Mirnov loop measurements are calculated.

  14. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale.

  15. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale. PMID:23944468

  16. Fully energy-dependent HZETRN (a galactic cosmic-ray transport code)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; John, Sarah; Tripathi, Ram K.; Norbury, John W.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    For extended manned space missions, the radiation shielding design requires efficient and accurate cosmic-ray transport codes that can handle the physics processes in detail. The Langley Research Center galactic cosmic-ray transport code (HZETRN) is currently under development for such design use. The cross sections for the production of secondary nucleons in the existing HZETRN code are energy dependent only for nucleon collisions. The approximation of energy-independent, heavy-ion fragmentation cross section is now removed by implementing a mathematically simplified energy-dependent stepping formalism for heavy ions. The cross section at each computational grid is obtained by linear interpolation from a few tabulated data to minimize computing time. Test runs were made for galactic cosmic-ray transport through a liquid hydrogen shield and a water shield at solar minimum. The results show no appreciable change in total fluxes or computing time compared with energy-independent calculations. Differences in high LET (linear energy transfer) spectra are noted, however, because of the large variation in cross sections at the low-energy region. The high LET components are significantly higher in the new code and have important implications on biological risk estimates for heavy-ion exposure.

  17. Energy dependence of jet transport parameter and parton saturationin quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2007-06-24

    We study the evolution and saturation of the gluondistribution function in the quark-gluon plasma as probed by apropagating parton and its effect on the computation of jet quenching ortransport parameter $\\hat q $. For thermal partons, the saturation scale$Q2_s$ is found to be proportional to the Debye screening mass $\\mu_D2$.For hard probes, evolution at small $x=Q2_s/6ET$ leads to jet energydependence of hat q. We study this dependence for both a conformal gaugetheory in weak and strong coupling limit and for (pure gluon) QCD. Theenergy dependence can be used to extract the shear viscosity $\\eta$ ofthe medium since $\\eta$ can be related to the transport parameter forthermal partons in a transport description. We also derive upper boundson the transport parameter for both energetic and thermal partons. Thelater leads to a lower bound on shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratiowhich is consistent with the conjectured lower bound $\\eta/s\\geq 1/4\\pi$.Implications on the study of jet quenching at RHIC and LHC and the bulkproperties of the dense matter are discussed.

  18. Time-dependent Radial Transport of Electron Distributions Due to ECCD in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; Prater, R.; Petty, C. C.

    2007-11-01

    The radial transport modeling capability in the CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck collisional-rf quasilinear code[1] has been greatly improved and the self-consistent time-dependent toroidal electric field added, making the code truly a ``Fokker-Planck-Transport'' code. The time-dependent, coupled 3D Fokker-Planck equation and the Ampere-Faraday Law equation are solved for the electron distribution, f( u,θu,ρ,t ), and the toroidal loop voltage, Vloop( ρ,t ). A fully 3D, time-implicit solution of the FP equation using sparse-matrix methods[2] is coupled to a new iterative toroidal electric field solve. The DIII-D ECH experiment is in an intermediate driven regime with τtransport τslowing[3] for the EC driven electrons. Results will be reported for time-evolution of radial profiles of current density, fast electrons, and toroidal loop voltage due to EC heating and current drive in DIII-D. [1] R.W. Harvey and M.G. McCoy, IAEA TCM on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, 1992; USDOC NTIS No. 93002962. [2] Y. Peysson et al., Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas, 15th Topical Conference, Moran, Wyoming (2003). [3] R.W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 205001 (2002).

  19. Surface Charge- and Space-Dependent Transport of Proteins in Crowded Environments of Nanotailored Posts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Retterer, Scott T; Siuti, Piro; Iyer, Sukanya; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The reaction and diffusion of molecules across barriers and through crowded environments is integral to biological system function and to separation technologies. Ordered, microfabricated post arrays are a promising route to creating synthetic barriers with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. They can be used to create crowded environments, to mimic aspects of cellular membranes, and to serve as engineered replacements of polymer-based separation media. Here, the translational diffusion of fluorescein isothiocyante and various forms of green fluorescent protein (GFP), including 'supercharged' variants, are examined in a silicon-based post array environment. The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is combined with analytical approximations and numerical simulations to assess the relative effects of reaction and diffusion on molecular transport, respectively. FRAP experiments were conducted for 64 different cases where the molecular species, the density of the posts, and the chemical surface charge of the posts were varied. In all cases, the dense packing of the posts hindered the diffusive transport of the fluorescent species. The supercharged GFPs strongly interacted with oppositely charged surfaces. With similar molecular and surface charges, transport is primarily limited by hindered diffusion. For conventional, enhanced GFP in a positively charged surface environment, transport was limited by the coupled action of hindered diffusion and surface interaction with the posts. Quantification of the size-, space-, time-, and charge-dependent translational diffusion in the post array environments can provide insight into natural processes and guide the design and development of selective membrane systems.

  20. Proton Gradients and Proton-Dependent Transport Processes in the Chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    Höhner, Ricarda; Aboukila, Ali; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Venema, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Proton gradients are fundamental to chloroplast function. Across thylakoid membranes, the light induced -proton gradient is essential for ATP synthesis. As a result of proton pumping into the thylakoid lumen, an alkaline stromal pH develops, which is required for full activation of pH-dependent Calvin Benson cycle enzymes. This implies that a pH gradient between the cytosol (pH 7) and the stroma (pH 8) is established upon illumination. To maintain this pH gradient chloroplasts actively extrude protons. More than 30 years ago it was already established that these proton fluxes are electrically counterbalanced by Mg2+, K+, or Cl- fluxes, but only recently the first transport systems that regulate the pH gradient were identified. Notably several (Na+,K+)/H+ antiporter systems where identified, that play a role in pH gradient regulation, ion homeostasis, osmoregulation, or coupling of secondary active transport. The established pH gradients are important to drive uptake of essential ions and solutes, but not many transporters involved have been identified to date. In this mini review we summarize the current status in the field and the open questions that need to be addressed in order to understand how pH gradients are maintained, how this is interconnected with other transport processes and what this means for chloroplast function. PMID:26973667

  1. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  2. A time dependent mixing model to close PDF equations for transport in heterogeneous aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, L.; Suciu, N.; Knabner, P.; Attinger, S.

    2016-10-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are a promising alternative to predicting the transport of solutes in groundwater under uncertainty. They make it possible to derive the evolution equations of the mean concentration and the concentration variance, used in moment methods. The mixing model, describing the transport of the PDF in concentration space, is essential for both methods. Finding a satisfactory mixing model is still an open question and due to the rather elaborate PDF methods, a difficult undertaking. Both the PDF equation and the concentration variance equation depend on the same mixing model. This connection is used to find and test an improved mixing model for the much easier to handle concentration variance. Subsequently, this mixing model is transferred to the PDF equation and tested. The newly proposed mixing model yields significantly improved results for both variance modelling and PDF modelling.

  3. Controlling spin-dependent localization and directed transport in a bipartite lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yunrong; Lu, Gengbiao; Kong, Chao; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-04-01

    We study coherent control of spin-dependent dynamical localization (DL) and directed transport (DT) of a spin-orbit-coupled single atom held in a driven optical bipartite lattice. Under the high-frequency limit and nearest-neighbor tight-binding approximation, we find a new decoupling mechanism between states with the same (different) spins, which leads to two sets of analytical solutions describing DL and DT with (without) spin flipping. The analytical results are numerically confirmed, and perfect agreements are found. Extending the research to a system of spin-orbit-coupled single atoms, the spin current and quantum information transport with controllable propagation speed and distance are investigated. The results can be experimentally tested in the current setups and may be useful in quantum information processing.

  4. Vectorization of the time-dependent Boltzmann transport equation: Application to deep penetration problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, Agustín C.; Poma, Ana L.; Alvarez, Guillermo D.; Sanz, Darío E.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce an alternative method to calculate the steady state solution of the angular photon flux after a numerical evolution of the time-dependent Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). After a proper discretization the transport equation was converted into an ordinary system of differential equations that can be iterated as a weighted Richardson algorithm. As a different approach, in this work the time variable regulates the iteration process and convergence criteria is based on physical parameters. Positivity and convergence was assessed from first principles and a modified Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition was devised to guarantee convergence. The Penelope Monte Carlo method was used to test the convergence and accuracy of our approach for different phase space discretizations. Benchmarking was performed by calculation of total fluence and photon spectra in different one-dimensional geometries irradiated with 60Co and 6 MV photon beams and radiological applications were devised.

  5. Eigen decomposition solution to the one-dimensional time-dependent photon transport equation.

    PubMed

    Handapangoda, Chintha C; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Premaratne, Malin

    2011-02-14

    The time-dependent one-dimensional photon transport (radiative transfer) equation is widely used to model light propagation through turbid media with a slab geometry, in a vast number of disciplines. Several numerical and semi-analytical techniques are available to accurately solve this equation. In this work we propose a novel efficient solution technique based on eigen decomposition of the vectorized version of the photon transport equation. Using clever transformations, the four variable integro-differential equation is reduced to a set of first order ordinary differential equations using a combination of a spectral method and the discrete ordinates method. An eigen decomposition approach is then utilized to obtain the closed-form solution of this reduced set of ordinary differential equations. PMID:21369115

  6. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  7. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  8. Developmental and target-dependent regulation of vesicular glutamate transporter expression by dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Jose Alfredo; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Dal Bo, Gregory; Bourdeau, Mathieu L; Danik, Marc; Williams, Sylvain; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2008-06-18

    Mesencephalic dopamine (DA) neurons have been suggested to use glutamate as a cotransmitter. Here, we suggest a mechanism for this form of cotransmission by showing that a subset of DA neurons both in vitro and in vivo expresses vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2). Expression of VGluT2 decreases with age. Moreover, when DA neurons are grown in isolation using a microculture system, there is a marked upregulation of VGluT2 expression. We provide evidence that expression of this transporter is normally repressed through a contact-dependent interaction with GABA and other DA neurons, thus providing a partial explanation for the highly restricted expression of VGluT2 in DA neurons in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the neurotransmitter phenotype of DA neurons is both developmentally and dynamically regulated. These findings may have implications for a better understanding of the fast synaptic action of DA neurons as well as basal ganglia circuitry. PMID:18562601

  9. Spin dependent transport in diluted magnetic semiconductor/superconductor tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, A. A.; Negarestani, S.

    2014-12-01

    A modification of Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) model is proposed to describe transport properties of diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS)/superconductor(SC)/DMS double tunneling junctions. Coherent spin-polarized transport is studied by taking into account the Andreev reflection on spatial variation of SC barrier parameters in the heterostructure. It is shown that the conductance spectrum exhibits an oscillatory behavior with quasi-particle energy, and the oscillation amplitude is reduced with increasing temperature. We also examine the dependence of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) on the barrier strength (κ) and spin polarization (P) of two DMS layers. Our results show that TMR decreases with increasing temperature and barrier strength, which may be useful in designing the nano spin-valve devices based on DMS and SC materials.

  10. Allyl Isothiocyanate Inhibits Actin-Dependent Intracellular Transport in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Øverby, Anders; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2015-01-01

    Volatile allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) derives from the biodegradation of the glucosinolate sinigrin and has been associated with growth inhibition in several plants, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of this feature remain scarcely investigated in plants. In this study, we present evidence of an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport in A. thaliana. A transgenic line of A. thaliana expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged actin filaments was used to show attenuation of actin filament movement by AITC. This appeared gradually in a time- and dose-dependent manner and resulted in actin filaments appearing close to static. Further, we employed four transgenic lines with YFP-fusion proteins labeling the Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vacuoles and peroxisomes to demonstrate an AITC-induced inhibition of actin-dependent intracellular transport of or, in these structures, consistent with the decline in actin filament movement. Furthermore, the morphologies of actin filaments, ER and vacuoles appeared aberrant following AITC-exposure. However, AITC-treated seedlings of all transgenic lines tested displayed morphologies and intracellular movements similar to that of the corresponding untreated and control-treated plants, following overnight incubation in an AITC-absent environment, indicating that AITC-induced decline in actin-related movements is a reversible process. These findings provide novel insights into the cellular events in plant cells following exposure to AITC, which may further expose clues to the physiological significance of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system. PMID:26690132

  11. Saturation Dependence of Transport in Porous Media Predicted by Percolation and Effective Medium Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, Behzad; Hunt, Allen G.; Skinner, Thomas E.; Ewing, Robert P.

    2015-02-01

    Accurate prediction of the saturation dependence of different modes of transport in porous media, such as those due to conductivity, air permeability, and diffusion, is of broad interest in engineering and natural resources management. Most current predictions use a "bundle of capillary tubes" concept, which, despite its widespread use, is a severely distorted idealization of natural porous media. In contrast, percolation theory provides a reliable and powerful means to model interconnectivity of disordered networks and porous materials. In this study, we invoke scaling concepts from percolation theory and effective medium theory to predict the saturation dependence of modes of transport — hydraulic and electrical conductivity, air permeability, and gas diffusion — in two disturbed soils. Universal scaling from percolation theory predicts the saturation dependence of air permeability and gas diffusion accurately, even when the percolation threshold for airflow is estimated from the porosity. We also find that the non-universal scaling obtained from the critical path analysis (CPA) of percolation theory can make excellent predictions of hydraulic and electrical conductivity under partially saturated conditions.

  12. Application of the multigrid amplitude function method for time-dependent transport equation using MOC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujita, K.; Endo, T.; Yamamoto, A.

    2013-07-01

    An efficient numerical method for time-dependent transport equation, the mutigrid amplitude function (MAF) method, is proposed. The method of characteristics (MOC) is being widely used for reactor analysis thanks to the advances of numerical algorithms and computer hardware. However, efficient kinetic calculation method for MOC is still desirable since it requires significant computation time. Various efficient numerical methods for solving the space-dependent kinetic equation, e.g., the improved quasi-static (IQS) and the frequency transform methods, have been developed so far mainly for diffusion calculation. These calculation methods are known as effective numerical methods and they offer a way for faster computation. However, they have not been applied to the kinetic calculation method using MOC as the authors' knowledge. Thus, the MAF method is applied to the kinetic calculation using MOC aiming to reduce computation time. The MAF method is a unified numerical framework of conventional kinetic calculation methods, e.g., the IQS, the frequency transform, and the theta methods. Although the MAF method is originally developed for the space-dependent kinetic calculation based on the diffusion theory, it is extended to transport theory in the present study. The accuracy and computational time are evaluated though the TWIGL benchmark problem. The calculation results show the effectiveness of the MAF method. (authors)

  13. Coordinate depression of bradykinin receptor recycling and microtubule-dependent transport by taxol.

    PubMed Central

    Hamm-Alvarez, S F; Alayof, B E; Himmel, H M; Kim, P Y; Crews, A L; Strauss, H C; Sheetz, M P

    1994-01-01

    Significant cardiovascular side effects have limited the use of taxol as an anticancer drug. A link between decreased plasma membrane dynamics and taxol has been implied because taxol can inhibit intracellular vesicle movements. Reduced membrane recycling caused by taxol could inhibit agonist-evoked Ca2+ signaling within endothelial cells, resulting in endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Bradykinin and ATP are two agonists that evoke Ca2+ transients in endothelial cells. Since the bradykinin receptor-agonist complex is internalized and recycled whereas the ATP agonist-receptor complex is not, we expected that a taxol inhibition of recycling would decrease bradykinin but not ATP receptor activity. We found that taxol depresses (i) the frequency (to 41% of control) and velocity (to 55% of control) of microtubule-dependent vesicle transport and (ii) bradykinin-evoked cytosolic Ca2+ transients (to 76% of control) in bovine aortic endothelial cells. In studying bradykinin receptor desensitization, which reflects receptor recycling, we demonstrate that taxol inhibits bradykinin-evoked Ca2+ transients by 50%. Taxol did not significantly alter ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients in either single-exposure or desensitization experiments. We suggest that taxol's reduction of bradykinin-evoked Ca2+ transients is due to altered microtubule-dependent membrane recycling. This report describes taxol's ability to alter plasma membrane composition through effects on vesicle transport and membrane trafficking pathways. This finding provides a possible mechanism by which taxol can substantially alter cardiovascular function. Images PMID:7914372

  14. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.; Hollmann, E. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  15. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E.

    2014-06-15

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  16. PIP Water Transport and Its pH Dependence Are Regulated by Tetramer Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Sigaut, Lorena; Scochera, Florencia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; González Flecha, F Luis; Alleva, Karina

    2016-03-29

    Many plasma membrane channels form oligomeric assemblies, and heterooligomerization has been described as a distinctive feature of some protein families. In the particular case of plant plasma membrane aquaporins (PIPs), PIP1 and PIP2 monomers interact to form heterotetramers. However, the biological properties of the different heterotetrameric configurations formed by PIP1 and PIP2 subunits have not been addressed yet. Upon coexpression of tandem PIP2-PIP1 dimers in Xenopus oocytes, we can address, for the first time to our knowledge, the functional properties of single heterotetrameric species having 2:2 stoichiometry. We have also coexpressed PIP2-PIP1 dimers with PIP1 and PIP2 monomers to experimentally investigate the localization and biological activity of each tetrameric assembly. Our results show that PIP2-PIP1 heterotetramers can assemble with 3:1, 1:3, or 2:2 stoichiometry, depending on PIP1 and PIP2 relative expression in the cell. All PIP2-PIP1 heterotetrameric species localize at the plasma membrane and present the same water transport capacity. Furthermore, the contribution of any heterotetrameric assembly to the total water transport through the plasma membrane doubles the contribution of PIP2 homotetramers. Our results also indicate that plasma membrane water transport can be modulated by the coexistence of different tetrameric species and by intracellular pH. Moreover, all the tetrameric species present similar cooperativity behavior for proton sensing. These findings throw light on the functional properties of PIP tetramers, showing that they have flexible stoichiometry dependent on the quantity of PIP1 and PIP2 molecules available. This represents, to our knowledge, a novel regulatory mechanism to adjust water transport across the plasma membrane.

  17. Glucose transport in Acholeplasma laidlawii B: dependence on the fluidity and physical state of membrane lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Read, B D; McElhaney, R N

    1975-01-01

    The uptake of D-glucose by Acholeplasma laidlawii B occurs via a mediated transport process, as shown by the following observations: (i) glucose permeates A. laidlawii B cells at a rate at least 100 times greater than would be expected if its entry occurred only by simple passive diffusion; (ii) the apparent activation energy for glucose uptake in A. laidlawii is significantly lower than that expected and observed for the passive permeation of this sugar; (iii) glucose uptake appears to be a saturable process; (iv) glucose uptake can be completely inhibited by low concentrations of phloretin and phlorizin; and (v) glucose uptake is markedly inhibited at temperatures above 45 C, whereas the passive entry of erythritol continues to increase logarithmically until at least 60 C. The metabolism of D-glucose by this organism is rapid and, at low glucose concentrations, the intracellular radioactivity derived from D-[14-C]glucose is at any given time a reflection of the net effect of glucose transport, glucose metabolism, and loss from the cell of radioactive metabolic products. Care must thus be taken when attempting to determine the rate of glucose transport by measuring the accumulation by the cells of the total radioactivity derived from D-[14-C]glucose. The rate of uptake of D-glucose by A. laidlawii B cells is markedly dependent on the fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of the plasma membrane and exhibits a direct dependence on the fluidity of the membrane lipids as measured by their reversible, thermotropic gel to liquie-crystalline phase transition temperatures. In contrast to the transport rates, the apparent activation energy for glucose uptake above the phase transition temperature is not dependent on membrane lipid composition. At the temperature range within the membrane lipid phase transition region, the apparent activation energy of glucose uptake is different from the activation energy observed at temperatures above the phase transition. This

  18. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Affect Electrolyte Transport in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Dependence on Cyclooxygenase and Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nüsing, Rolf M.; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, MDCK C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short circuit current (Isc) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Further, both a Cl−-free bath solution and the Ca2+ antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE2 receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE2 was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE2 caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared to 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE2 sythesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1 in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1. 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1, caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl-transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE2 but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  19. 14 CFR 171.313 - Azimuth performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (vertical offset), or towards the stop end of the runway (longitudinal distance). The convention for the... end; (2) Be adjusted so that the zero degree azimuth plane will be a vertical plane which contains the.... EC15SE91.015 (5) Antenna far field pattern in the vertical plane. The azimuth antenna free space...

  20. Spin-dependent transport properties in GaMnAs-based spin hot-carrier transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Ohya, Shinobu; Hai, Pham Nam; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2007-04-01

    The authors have investigated the spin-dependent transport properties of GaMnAs-based "three-terminal" semiconductor spin hot-carrier transistor (SSHCT) structures. The emitter-base bias voltage VEB dependence of the collector current IC, emitter current IE, and base current IB shows that the current transfer ratio α (=IC/IE) and the current gain β (=IC/IB) are 0.8-0.95 and 1-10, respectively, which means that GaMnAs-based SSHCTs have current amplification capability. In addition, the authors observed an oscillatory behavior of the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio with the increasing bias, which can be explained by the resonant tunneling effect in the GaMnAs quantum well.

  1. Spin-dependent electron transport in zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simchi, Hamidreza; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi Mazidabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-28

    The spin-dependent electron transport properties of zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules connected to zigzag graphene leads are studied in the zero bias regime using the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The conductance of the adenine molecule increased and became spin-dependent when a zinc or manganese atom was doped into the molecules. The effects of a transverse electric field on the spin-polarization of the transmitted electrons were investigated and the spin-polarization was controlled by changing the transverse electric field. Under the presence of a transverse electric field, both the zinc- and manganese-doped adenine molecules acted as spin-filters. The maximum spin-polarization of the manganese-doped adenine molecule was greater than the molecule doped with zinc.

  2. Field dependent transport properties in InAs nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Susac, Darija; Kavanagh, Karen L; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2008-10-01

    We present detailed studies of the field dependent transport properties of InAs nanowire field-effect transistors. Transconductance dependence on both vertical and lateral fields is discussed. Velocity-field plots are constructed from a large set of output and transfer curves that show negative differential conductance behavior and marked mobility degradation at high injection fields. Two dimensional electrothermal simulations at current densities similar to those measured in the InAs NWFET devices indicate that a significant temperature rise occurs in the channel due to enhanced phonon scattering that leads to the observed mobility degradation. Scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements on devices operated at high current densities reveal arsenic vaporization and crystal deformation in the subject nanowires.

  3. Geometric dependence of transport and universal behavior in three dimensional carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leizhi; Yin, Ming; Jaroszynski, Jan; Park, Ju-Hyun; Mbamalu, Godwin; Datta, Timir

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures with the spherical voids exhibit interesting temperature and magnetic field dependent transport properties. By increasing the void size, the structures are tuned from metallic to insulating; in addition, the magnetoresistance (MR) is enhanced. Our investigation in the magnetic fields (B) up to 18 T at temperatures (T) from 250 mK to 20 K shows that at high temperatures (T > 2 K), the MR crosses over from quadratic to a non-saturating linear dependence with increasing magnetic field. Furthermore, all MR data in this temperature regime collapse onto a single curve as a universal function of B/T, following Kohler's rule. Remarkably, the MR also exhibits orientation insensitivity, i.e., it displays a response independent of the direction on the magnetic field.

  4. Constraining Data Mining with Physical Models: Voltage- and Oxygen Pressure-Dependent Transport in Multiferroic Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Belianinov, Alexei; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Chu, Ying-Hao; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-27

    Development of new generation electronic devices requires understanding and controlling the electronic transport in ferroic, magnetic, and optical materials, which is hampered by two factors. First, the complications of working at the nanoscale, where interfaces, grain boundaries, defects, and so forth, dictate the macroscopic characteristics. Second, the convolution of the response signals stemming from the fact that several physical processes may be activated simultaneously. Here, we present a method of solving these challenges via a combination of atomic force microscopy and data mining analysis techniques. Rational selection of the latter allows application of physical constraints and enables direct interpretation of the statistically significant behaviors in the framework of the chosen physical model, thus distilling physical meaning out of raw data. We demonstrate our approach with an example of deconvolution of complex transport behavior in a bismuth ferrite–cobalt ferrite nanocomposite in ambient and ultrahigh vacuum environments. Measured signal is apportioned into four electronic transport patterns, showing different dependence on partial oxygen and water vapor pressure. These patterns are described in terms of Ohmic conductance and Schottky emission models in the light of surface electrochemistry. Finally and furthermore, deep data analysis allows extraction of local dopant concentrations and barrier heights empowering our understanding of the underlying dynamic mechanisms of resistive switching.

  5. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers.

  6. Charge-Dependent Transport Switching of Single Molecular Ions in a Weak Polyelectrolyte Multilayer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10–9 cm2/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  7. Constraining Data Mining with Physical Models: Voltage- and Oxygen Pressure-Dependent Transport in Multiferroic Nanostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Belianinov, Alexei; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Chu, Ying-Hao; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-08-27

    Development of new generation electronic devices requires understanding and controlling the electronic transport in ferroic, magnetic, and optical materials, which is hampered by two factors. First, the complications of working at the nanoscale, where interfaces, grain boundaries, defects, and so forth, dictate the macroscopic characteristics. Second, the convolution of the response signals stemming from the fact that several physical processes may be activated simultaneously. Here, we present a method of solving these challenges via a combination of atomic force microscopy and data mining analysis techniques. Rational selection of the latter allows application of physical constraints and enables direct interpretation ofmore » the statistically significant behaviors in the framework of the chosen physical model, thus distilling physical meaning out of raw data. We demonstrate our approach with an example of deconvolution of complex transport behavior in a bismuth ferrite–cobalt ferrite nanocomposite in ambient and ultrahigh vacuum environments. Measured signal is apportioned into four electronic transport patterns, showing different dependence on partial oxygen and water vapor pressure. These patterns are described in terms of Ohmic conductance and Schottky emission models in the light of surface electrochemistry. Finally and furthermore, deep data analysis allows extraction of local dopant concentrations and barrier heights empowering our understanding of the underlying dynamic mechanisms of resistive switching.« less

  8. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  9. Transport of Sulfide-Reduced Graphene Oxide in Saturated Quartz Sand: Cation-Dependent Retention Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tianjiao; Fortner, John D; Zhu, Dongqiang; Qi, Zhichong; Chen, Wei

    2015-10-01

    We describe how the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) via environmentally relevant pathways affects its transport behavior in porous media. A pair of sulfide-reduced GOs (RGOs), prepared by reducing 10 mg/L GO with 0.1 mM Na2S for 3 and 5 days, respectively, exhibited lower mobility than did parent GO in saturated quartz sand. Interestingly, decreased mobility cannot simply be attributed to the increased hydrophobicity and aggregation upon GO reduction because the retention mechanisms of RGOs were highly cation-dependent. In the presence of Na(+) (a representative monovalent cation), the main retention mechanism was deposition in the secondary energy minimum. However, in the presence of Ca(2+) (a model divalent cation), cation bridging between RGO and sand grains became the most predominant retention mechanism; this was because sulfide reduction markedly increased the amount of hydroxyl groups (a strong metal-complexing moiety) on GO. When Na(+) was the background cation, increasing pH (which increased the accumulation of large hydrated Na(+) ions on grain surface) and the presence of Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) significantly enhanced the transport of RGO, mainly due to steric hindrance. However, pH and SRHA had little effect when Ca(2+) was the background cation because neither affected the extent of cation bridging that controlled particle retention. These findings highlight the significance of abiotic transformations on the fate and transport of GO in aqueous systems.

  10. Constraining Data Mining with Physical Models: Voltage- and Oxygen Pressure-Dependent Transport in Multiferroic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Belianinov, Alexei; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Chu, Ying-Hao; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-10-14

    Development of new generation electronic devices necessitates understanding and controlling the electronic transport in ferroic, magnetic, and optical materials, which is hampered by two factors. First, the complications of working at the nanoscale, where interfaces, grain boundaries, defects, and so forth, dictate the macroscopic characteristics. Second, the convolution of the response signals stemming from the fact that several physical processes may be activated simultaneously. Here, we present a method of solving these challenges via a combination of atomic force microscopy and data mining analysis techniques. Rational selection of the latter allows application of physical constraints and enables direct interpretation of the statistically significant behaviors in the framework of the chosen physical model, thus distilling physical meaning out of raw data. We demonstrate our approach with an example of deconvolution of complex transport behavior in a bismuth ferrite-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite in ambient and ultrahigh vacuum environments. Measured signal is apportioned into four electronic transport patterns, showing different dependence on partial oxygen and water vapor pressure. These patterns are described in terms of Ohmic conductance and Schottky emission models in the light of surface electrochemistry. Furthermore, deep data analysis allows extraction of local dopant concentrations and barrier heights empowering our understanding of the underlying dynamic mechanisms of resistive switching. PMID:26312554

  11. Structure, biosynthesis, and function of bacterial capsular polysaccharides synthesized by ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Willis, Lisa M; Whitfield, Chris

    2013-08-30

    Bacterial capsules are formed primarily from long-chain polysaccharides with repeat-unit structures. A given bacterial species can produce a range of capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) with different structures and these help distinguish isolates by serotyping, as is the case with Escherichia coli K antigens. Capsules are important virulence factors for many pathogens and this review focuses on CPSs synthesized via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent processes in Gram-negative bacteria. Bacteria utilizing this pathway are often associated with urinary tract infections, septicemia, and meningitis, and E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis provide well-studied examples. CPSs from ABC transporter-dependent pathways are synthesized at the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane through the concerted action of glycosyltransferases before being exported across the inner membrane and translocated to the cell surface. A hallmark of these CPSs is a conserved reducing terminal glycolipid composed of phosphatidylglycerol and a poly-3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) linker. Recent discovery of the structure of this conserved lipid terminus provides new insights into the early steps in CPS biosynthesis.

  12. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains.

    PubMed

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wang, Kun

    2016-07-28

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μB for BnNn-1, 2 μB for BnNn, and 3 μB for BnNn+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short BnNn+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long BnNn+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (BnNn-1 and BnNn). The proposed short BnNn+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied. PMID:27475355

  13. Sex-dependent activity of the spinal excitatory amino acid transporter: Role of estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Felice, Valeria D; Golubeva, Anna V; Cryan, John F; O'Mahony, Siobhain M

    2016-10-01

    Females are more likely to experience visceral pain than males, yet mechanisms underlying this sex bias are not fully elucidated. Moreover, pain sensitivity can change throughout the menstrual cycle. Alterations in the glutamatergic system have been implicated in several pain-disorders; however, whether these are sex-dependent is unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate sex differences in the spinal cord glutamate uptake and how it varies across the estrous cycle. The activity of the glutamate transporters, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) was assessed using an ex vivo aspartate radioactive uptake assay in the lumbosacral spinal cord in Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. The gene expression of EAATs, glutamate receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B and the estrogen receptors ERα & ERβ in the spinal cord were also analyzed. EAAT activity was lower in females, particularly during the estrus phase, and this was the only cycle stage that was responsive to the pharmacological effects of the EAATs activator riluzole. Interestingly, EAAT1 mRNA expression was lower in high-estrogen and high-ERα states compared to diestrus in females. We conclude that the Spinal EAAT activity in females is different to that in males, and varies across the estrous cycle. Furthermore, the expression levels of estrogen receptors also showed a cycle-dependent pattern that may affect EAATs function and expression. PMID:27471194

  14. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves.

    PubMed

    Wong, P K Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, Dave A

    2016-07-19

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET.

  15. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves

    PubMed Central

    Wong, P. K. Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G.; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N.; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, Dave A.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET. PMID:27432047

  16. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains.

    PubMed

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wang, Kun

    2016-07-28

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μB for BnNn-1, 2 μB for BnNn, and 3 μB for BnNn+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short BnNn+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long BnNn+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (BnNn-1 and BnNn). The proposed short BnNn+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied.

  17. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P. K. Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G.; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N.; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, Dave A.

    2016-07-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET.

  18. Large Conductance Switching in a Single-Molecule Device through Room Temperature Spin-Dependent Transport.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Cerdá, Jorge I; Acís-Castillo, Zulema; Li, Haipeng; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Hihath, Josh; Ruiz, Eliseo; Díez-Pérez, Ismael

    2016-01-13

    Controlling the spin of electrons in nanoscale electronic devices is one of the most promising topics aiming at developing devices with rapid and high density information storage capabilities. The interface magnetism or spinterface resulting from the interaction between a magnetic molecule and a metal surface, or vice versa, has become a key ingredient in creating nanoscale molecular devices with novel functionalities. Here, we present a single-molecule wire that displays large (>10000%) conductance switching by controlling the spin-dependent transport under ambient conditions (room temperature in a liquid cell). The molecular wire is built by trapping individual spin crossover Fe(II) complexes between one Au electrode and one ferromagnetic Ni electrode in an organic liquid medium. Large changes in the single-molecule conductance (>100-fold) are measured when the electrons flow from the Au electrode to either an α-up or a β-down spin-polarized Ni electrode. Our calculations show that the current flowing through such an interface appears to be strongly spin-polarized, thus resulting in the observed switching of the single-molecule wire conductance. The observation of such a high spin-dependent conductance switching in a single-molecule wire opens up a new door for the design and control of spin-polarized transport in nanoscale molecular devices at room temperature. PMID:26675052

  19. Spin-Dependent Transport in Fe/GaAs(100)/Fe Vertical Spin-Valves.

    PubMed

    Wong, P K Johnny; Zhang, Wen; Wu, Jing; Will, Iain G; Xu, Yongbing; Xia, Ke; Holmes, Stuart N; Farrer, Ian; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, Dave A

    2016-01-01

    The integration of magnetic materials with semiconductors will lead to the development of the next spintronics devices such as spin field effect transistor (SFET), which is capable of both data storage and processing. While the fabrication and transport studies of lateral SFET have attracted greatly attentions, there are only few studies of vertical devices, which may offer the opportunity for the future three-dimensional integration. Here, we provide evidence of two-terminal electrical spin injection and detection in Fe/GaAs/Fe vertical spin-valves (SVs) with the GaAs layer of 50 nanometers thick and top and bottom Fe electrodes deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. The spin-valve effect, which corresponds to the individual switching of the top and bottom Fe layers, is bias dependent and observed up to 20 K. We propose that the strongly bias- and temperature-dependent MR is associated with spin transport at the interfacial Fe/GaAs Schottky contacts and in the GaAs membranes, where balance between the barrier profiles as well as the dwell time to spin lifetime ratio are crucial factors for determining the device operations. The demonstration of the fabrication and spin injection in the vertical SV with a semiconductor interlayer is expected to open a new avenue in exploring the SFET. PMID:27432047

  20. Spin-dependent transport for armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons between ferromagnetic leads.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benhu; Chen, Xiongwen; Zhou, Benliang; Ding, Kai-He; Zhou, Guanghui

    2011-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the spin-dependent transport for the system of an armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) between two ferromagnetic (FM) leads with arbitrary polarization directions at low temperatures, where a magnetic insulator is deposited on the AGNR to induce an exchange splitting between spin-up and -down carriers. By using the standard nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique, it is demonstrated that the spin-resolved transport property for the system depends sensitively on both the width of AGNR and the polarization strength of FM leads. The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) around zero bias voltage possesses a pronounced plateau structure for a system with semiconducting 7-AGNR or metallic 8-AGNR in the absence of exchange splitting, but this plateau structure for the 8-AGNR system is remarkably broader than that for the 7-AGNR one. Interestingly, an increase of the exchange splitting Δ suppresses the amplitude of the structure for the 7-AGNR system. However, the TMR is much enhanced for the 8-AGNR system under a bias amplitude comparable to the splitting strength. Further, the current-induced spin-transfer torque (STT) for the 7-AGNR system is systematically larger than that for the 8-AGNR one. The findings here suggest the design of GNR-based spintronic devices by using a metallic AGNR, but it is more favorable to fabricate a current-controlled magnetic memory element by using a semiconducting AGNR.

  1. The magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of boron nitride atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yipeng; Zhang, Mengjun; Wu, Dapeng; Fu, Zhaoming; Wang, Tianxing; Jiao, Zhaoyong; Wang, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Very recently, boron nitride atomic chains were successively prepared and observed in experiments [O. Cretu et al., ACS Nano 8, 11950 (2015)]. Herein, using a first-principles technique, we study the magnetism and spin-dependent electronic transport properties of three types of BN atomic chains whose magnetic moment is 1 μB for BnNn-1, 2 μB for BnNn, and 3 μB for BnNn+1 type atomic chains, respectively. The spin-dependent electronic transport results demonstrate that the short BnNn+1 chain presents an obvious spin-filtering effect with high spin polarization ratio (>90%) under low bias voltages. Yet, this spin-filtering effect does not occur for long BnNn+1 chains under high bias voltages and other types of BN atomic chains (BnNn-1 and BnNn). The proposed short BnNn+1 chain is predicted to be an effective low-bias spin filters. Moreover, the length-conductance relationships of these BN atomic chains were also studied.

  2. Redox-Dependent Franck-Condon Blockade and Avalanche Transport in a Graphene-Fullerene Single-Molecule Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chit Siong; Sadeghi, Hatef; Rogers, Gregory; Sangtarash, Sara; Dallas, Panagiotis; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Warner, Jamie; Lambert, Colin J; Briggs, G Andrew D; Mol, Jan A

    2016-01-13

    We report transport measurements on a graphene-fullerene single-molecule transistor. The device architecture where a functionalized C60 binds to graphene nanoelectrodes results in strong electron-vibron coupling and weak vibron relaxation. Using a combined approach of transport spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and DFT calculations, we demonstrate center-of-mass oscillations, redox-dependent Franck-Condon blockade, and a transport regime characterized by avalanche tunnelling in a single-molecule transistor.

  3. Crystal Phase- and Orientation-Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mengqi; Tang, Zhiqiang; Li, Xing; Ning, Zhiyuan; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-13

    We report a systematic study on the correlation of the electrical transport properties with the crystal phase and orientation of single-crystal InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A new method is developed to allow the same InAs NW to be used for both the electrical measurements and transmission electron microscopy characterization. We find both the crystal phase, wurtzite (WZ) or zinc-blende (ZB), and the orientation of the InAs NWs remarkably affect the electronic properties of the field-effect transistors based on these NWs, such as the threshold voltage (VT), ON-OFF ratio, subthreshold swing (SS) and effective barrier height at the off-state (ΦOFF). The SS increases while VT, ON-OFF ratio, and ΦOFF decrease one by one in the sequence of WZ ⟨0001⟩, ZB ⟨131⟩, ZB ⟨332⟩, ZB ⟨121⟩, and ZB ⟨011⟩. The WZ InAs NWs have obvious smaller field-effect mobility, conductivities, and electron concentration at VBG = 0 V than the ZB InAs NWs, while these parameters are not sensitive to the orientation of the ZB InAs NWs. We also find the diameter ranging from 12 to 33 nm shows much less effect than the crystal phase and orientation on the electrical transport properties of the InAs NWs. The good ohmic contact between InAs NWs and metal remains regardless of the variation of the crystal phase and orientation through temperature-dependent measurements. Our work deepens the understanding of the structure-dependent electrical transport properties of InAs NWs and provides a potential way to tailor the device properties by controlling the crystal phase and orientation of the NWs.

  4. Induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 transporters during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is dependent on Nrf2

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksunes, Lauren M. Slitt, Angela L. Maher, Jonathan M. Augustine, Lisa M. Goedken, Michael J. Chan, Jefferson Y. Cherrington, Nathan J. Klaassen, Curtis D. Manautou, Jose E.

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates detoxification and antioxidant gene transcription following electrophile exposure and oxidative stress. Mice deficient in Nrf2 (Nrf2-null) are highly susceptible to acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity and exhibit lower basal and inducible expression of cytoprotective genes, including NADPH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutamate cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit, or Gclc). Administration of toxic APAP doses to C57BL/6J mice generates electrophilic stress and subsequently increases levels of hepatic Nqo1, Gclc and the efflux multidrug resistance-associated protein transporters 1-4 (Mrp1-4). It was hypothesized that induction of hepatic Mrp1-4 expression following APAP is Nrf2 dependent. Plasma and livers from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2-null mice were collected 4, 24 and 48 h after APAP. As expected, hepatotoxicity was greater in Nrf2-null compared to WT mice. Gene and protein expression of Mrp1-4 and the Nrf2 targets, Nqo1 and Gclc, was measured. Induction of Nqo1 and Gclc mRNA and protein after APAP was dependent on Nrf2 expression. Similarly, APAP treatment increased hepatic Mrp3 and Mrp4 mRNA and protein in WT, but not Nrf2-null mice. Mrp1 was induced in both genotypes after APAP, suggesting that elevated expression of this transporter was independent of Nrf2. Mrp2 was not induced in either genotype at the mRNA or protein levels. These results show that Nrf2 mediates induction of Mrp3 and Mrp4 after APAP but does not affect Mrp1 or Mrp2. Thus coordinated regulation of detoxification enzymes and transporters by Nrf2 during APAP hepatotoxicity is a mechanism by which hepatocytes may limit intracellular accumulation of potentially toxic chemicals.

  5. Crystal Phase- and Orientation-Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mengqi; Tang, Zhiqiang; Li, Xing; Ning, Zhiyuan; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianhua; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-13

    We report a systematic study on the correlation of the electrical transport properties with the crystal phase and orientation of single-crystal InAs nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. A new method is developed to allow the same InAs NW to be used for both the electrical measurements and transmission electron microscopy characterization. We find both the crystal phase, wurtzite (WZ) or zinc-blende (ZB), and the orientation of the InAs NWs remarkably affect the electronic properties of the field-effect transistors based on these NWs, such as the threshold voltage (VT), ON-OFF ratio, subthreshold swing (SS) and effective barrier height at the off-state (ΦOFF). The SS increases while VT, ON-OFF ratio, and ΦOFF decrease one by one in the sequence of WZ ⟨0001⟩, ZB ⟨131⟩, ZB ⟨332⟩, ZB ⟨121⟩, and ZB ⟨011⟩. The WZ InAs NWs have obvious smaller field-effect mobility, conductivities, and electron concentration at VBG = 0 V than the ZB InAs NWs, while these parameters are not sensitive to the orientation of the ZB InAs NWs. We also find the diameter ranging from 12 to 33 nm shows much less effect than the crystal phase and orientation on the electrical transport properties of the InAs NWs. The good ohmic contact between InAs NWs and metal remains regardless of the variation of the crystal phase and orientation through temperature-dependent measurements. Our work deepens the understanding of the structure-dependent electrical transport properties of InAs NWs and provides a potential way to tailor the device properties by controlling the crystal phase and orientation of the NWs. PMID:27002386

  6. Minimum audible movement angle as a function of the azimuth and elevation of the source.

    PubMed

    Strybel, T Z; Manligas, C L; Perrott, D R

    1992-06-01

    In the future auditory directional cues may enhance situational awareness in cockpits with head-coupled displays. This benefit would depend, however, on the pilot's ability to detect the direction of moving sounds at different locations in space. The present investigation examined this ability. Auditory motion acuity was measured by the minimum audible movement angle (MAMA): the minimum angle of travel required for detection of the direction of sound movement. Five experienced listeners were instructed to indicate the direction of travel of a sound source (broadband noise at 50 dBA) that moved at a velocity of 20 deg/s. Nine azimuth positions were tested at 0 deg elevation. Five elevations were then tested at 0 deg azimuth. Finally two azimuth positions were tested at an elevation of 80 deg. The position of the source did not significantly affect the MAMA for azimuth locations between +40 and -40 deg and elevations below 80 deg. Within this area the MAMA ranged between 1 and 2 deg. Outside this area the MAMA increased to 3 to 10 deg.

  7. Low frequency azimuthal stability of the ionization region of the Hall thruster discharge. II. Global analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, D.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-10-15

    The linear stability of the Hall thruster discharge is analysed against axial-azimuthal perturbations in the low frequency range using a time-dependent 2D code of the discharge. This azimuthal stability analysis is spatially global, as opposed to the more common local stability analyses, already afforded previously (D. Escobar and E. Ahedo, Phys. Plasmas 21(4), 043505 (2014)). The study covers both axial and axial-azimuthal oscillations, known as breathing mode and spoke, respectively. The influence on the spoke instability of different operation parameters such as discharge voltage, mass flow, and thruster size is assessed by means of different parametric variations and compared against experimental results. Additionally, simplified models are used to unveil and characterize the mechanisms driving the spoke. The results indicate that the spoke is linked to azimuthal oscillations of the ionization process and to the Bohm condition in the transition to the anode sheath. Finally, results obtained from local and global stability analyses are compared in order to explain the discrepancies between both methods.

  8. Length dependence of electron transport through molecular wires--a first principles perspective.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Khoong Hong; Chen, Yifeng; Li, Suchun; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-01-01

    -resonant tunneling in the systems under investigation. Calculations show that the tunneling decay constant beta is a robust quantity that does not depend on details of the contact geometry, provided that the same contact geometry is used for all molecular lengths considered. However, because conductance is sensitive to contact geometry, values of beta obtained by considering conductance values where the contact geometry is changing with the molecular junction length can be quite different. Experimentally measured values of beta in general compare well with beta obtained using DFT + Sigma and GW transport calculations, while discrepancies can be attributed to changes in the experimental contact geometries with molecular length. This review also summarizes experimental and theoretical efforts towards finding perfect molecular wires with high conductance and small beta values.

  9. Sodium dependency of active chloride transport across isolated fish skin (Gillichthys mirabilis).

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, W S

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of thiocyanate, ouabain, ion-substituted Ringer solution and electrochemical gradients on Na+ and Cl- transport were examined using the isolated skin of the marine teleost, Gillichthys mirabilis. 2. Bilateral replacement of Na+ with choline in the bathing solutions reduces net Cl- flux by 93%, indicating that active Cl- transport by the skin is Na-dependent. 3. Thiocyanate inhibits short-circuit current with an ED50 of 6.4 x 10(-4)M, and, at 10(-2)M, decreases Cl-efflux, influx, net flux and short-circuit current by 68, 33, 74 and 81%, respectively. 4. Ouabain (10(-5)M) reduces Cl- efflux and net flux by 56 and 86%, respectively, indicating that the Cl- transport requires Na,K-ATPase. 5. Subsequent addition of thiocyanate to ouabain-treated skin reduces Cl- efflux, net flux and short-circuit current, suggesting that the two agents operate at different sites involved in Cl- transport. 6. Unilateral substitution of gluconate for Cl- on the serosal side does not affect Cl- influx, indicating that Cl- passive transport is via Fickean diffusion, not Cl-Cl exchange diffusion. 7. The addition of NaCl to the mucosal side, which mimics the in vivo sea-water condition, increases Cl- influx and transepithelial potential and decreases tissue resistance. The net flux (secretion) of Cl- with hypertonic saline on the mucosal side (0.51 +/- 0.06 muequiv/cm2 . hr) demonstrates that the skin could secrete Cl- in vivo. 8. Na+ fluxes across the skin are passive, as the observed flux ration (efflux/influx) is similar to that predicted by the Ussing-Teorell equation under both closed- and open-circuit conditions. 9. The permeability ratio (PNa:PCl) in approximately 5.4:1.0, indicating that the skin is more permeable to Na+, and that at least part of the serosa-positive transepithelial potential may be a Na+ diffusion potential. 10. The results suggest that Cl- secretion by Gillichthys skin is secondary active transport involving Na,K-ATPase and serosal Na+. PMID:7320911

  10. A nitrogen-dependent switch in the high affinity ammonium transport in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Straub, Daniel; Ludewig, Uwe; Neuhäuser, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are crucial for the high affinity primary uptake and translocation of ammonium in plants. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the genomic set of AMT-type ammonium transporters comprises eight members. Only four genes were abundantly expressed in young seedlings, both in roots and shoots. While the expression of all AMTs in the shoot was not affected by the nitrogen availability, the dominating MtAMT1;1 gene was repressed by nitrogen in roots, despite that cellular nitrogen concentrations were far above deficiency levels. A contrasting de-repression by nitrogen was observed for MtAMT1;4 and MtAMT2;1, which were both expressed at intermediate level. Weak expression was found for MtAMT1;2 and MtAMT2;3, while the other AMTs were not detected in young seedlings. When expressed from their endogenous promoters, translational fusion proteins of MtAMT1;1 and MtAMT2;1 with green fluorescent protein were co-localized in the plasma membrane of rhizodermal cells, but also detected in cortical root layers. Both transporter proteins similarly functionally complemented a yeast strain that is deficient in high affinity ammonium transport, both at acidic and neutral pH. The uptake into yeast mediated by these transporters saturated with Km AMT1;1 = 89 µM and Km AMT2;1 = 123 µM, respectively. When expressed in oocytes, MtAMT1;1 mediated much larger (15)N-ammonium uptake than MtAMT2;1, but NH4 (+) currents were only recorded for MtAMT1;1. These currents saturated with a voltage-dependent Km = 90 µM at -80 mV. The cellular localization and regulation of the AMTs suggests that MtAMT1;1 encodes the major high affinity ammonium transporter gene in low nitrogen grown young M. truncatula roots and despite the similar localization and substrate affinity, MtAMT2;1 appears functionally distinct and more important at higher nitrogen supply. PMID:25164101

  11. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-27

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma.

  12. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-28

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma

  13. Continuous energy, multi-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculations for problem dependent resonance treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng

    In the past twenty 20 years considerable progress has been made in developing new methods for solving the multi-dimensional transport problem. However the effort devoted to the resonance self-shielding calculation has lagged, and much less progress has been made in enhancing resonance-shielding techniques for generating problem-dependent multi-group cross sections (XS) for the multi-dimensional transport calculations. In several applications, the error introduced by self-shielding methods exceeds that due to uncertainties in the basic nuclear data, and often they can be the limiting factor on the accuracy of the final results. This work is to improve the accuracy of the resonance self-shielding calculation by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. A new method has been developed, it can calculate the continuous-energy neutron fluxes for the whole two-dimensional domain, which can be utilized as weighting function to process the self-shielded multi-group cross sections for reactor analysis and criticality calculations, and during this process, the two-dimensional heterogeneous effect in the resonance self-shielding calculation can be fully included. A new code, GEMINEWTRN (Group and Energy-Pointwise Methodology Implemented in NEWT for Resonance Neutronics) has been developed in the developing version of SCALE [1], it combines the energy pointwise (PW) capability of the CENTRM [2] with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport capability of lattice physics code NEWT [14]. Considering the large number of energy points in the resonance region (typically more than 30,000), the computational burden and memory requirement for GEMINEWTRN is tremendously large, some efforts have been performed to improve the computational efficiency, parallel computation has been implemented into GEMINEWTRN, which can save the computation and memory requirement a lot; some energy points reducing

  14. Binding-protein-dependent sugar transport by Agrobacterium radiobacter and A. tumefaciens grown in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Cornish, A; Greenwood, J A; Jones, C W

    1989-11-01

    Binding-protein-dependent sugar transport has been investigated in Agrobacterium radiobacter and A. tumefaciens. A. radiobacter contained two high-affinity glucose-binding proteins (GBP1 and GBP2) that additionally bound D-galactose (KD 0.26 microM) and D-xylose (KD 0.04 microM) respectively and were involved in the transport of these sugars. Partial sequencing of GBP1 and GBP2 showed that GBP2 exhibited significant homology with both the arabinose-binding protein (ABP) and the galactose-binding protein (GalBP) from Escherichia coli, whereas GBP1 exhibited significant homology only with ABP. Antiserum raised against GBP1 cross-reacted with GBP1 but not with GBP2, and vice versa. Anti-GBP1 and anti-GBP2 also cross-reacted with proteins corresponding to GBP1 and GBP2 respectively in A. tumefaciens, but little or no cross-reaction was observed with selected members of the Enterobacteriaceae, Rhizobiaceae and Pseudomonadaceae families grown under glucose limitation. GBP1 was less strongly repressed than GBP2 following batch growth of A. radiobacter on various carbon sources. The growth of A. radiobacter for more than approximately 10 generations in continuous culture under galactose or xylose limitation (D 0.045 h-1) led to the emergence of new strains which exhibited increased rates of glucose/galactose or glucose/xylose uptake, and which respectively hyperproduced GBP1 (strain AR18a) or GBP2 (strain AR9a). Similarly, growth of A. tumefaciens for more than approximately 15 generations under glucose or galactose limitation produced new strains which exhibited increased rates of glucose/xylose or glucose/galactose uptake and which respectively hyperproduced proteins analogous to GBP2 (strain AT9) or GBP1 (strain AT18a). It is concluded that growth of Agrobacterium species under carbon-limited conditions leads to the predictable emergence of new strains which specifically hyperproduce the transport system for the limiting nutrient. The GBP1-dependent system of A

  15. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  16. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  17. Reduced striatal dopamine transporter density associated with working memory deficits in opioid-dependent male subjects: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Ho, Pei-Shen; Yen, Che-Hung; Yeh, Yi-Wei; Kuo, Shin-Chang; Huang, Chang-Chih; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Mei-Chen; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effects of repeated opioid use on striatal dopamine transporters has yielded inconsistent results, possibly confounded by a history of methamphetamine or methadone exposure in opioid-dependent individuals. Previous studies have shown that striatal dopamine transporter density is positively correlated with the cognitive performance of healthy volunteers. This study aimed to investigate changes in striatal dopamine transporter density and their functional significance in opioid-dependent individuals. Single-photon emission computed tomography with [(99m) Tc]TRODAT-1 as a ligand was used to measure striatal dopamine transporter levels in 20 opioid-dependent individuals and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Opioid-dependent individuals had no history of methamphetamine or methadone use. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was performed to assess neurocognitive function. We found that compared with healthy controls, opioid-dependent individuals showed a significant reduction in striatal dopamine transporter density. They also showed poorer performance on the WCST in terms of the trials administered, total errors, perseverative responses, perseverative errors, and non-perseverative errors. Striatal dopamine transporter levels negatively correlated with non-perseverative errors not only in opioid-dependent individuals but also in healthy controls. These findings suggest that in human, repeated opioid exposure reduces striatal dopamine transporter density, which can be associated with non-perseverative errors. Non-perseverative errors may be one of the more sensitive parameters in WCST to identify working memory deficits associated with striatal dopamine transporter reduction. Moreover, we suggest that whether opioid-associated neurotoxicity is reversible depends on the brain region. PMID:25439653

  18. Field dependent thermoelectric properties of organic semiconductors—A tool to determine the nature of charge transport in materials exhibiting thermally activated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendels, Dan; Tessler, Nir

    2015-03-01

    By implementing Monte Carlo simulations and employing the concept of effective temperature, we explore the effects of an applied field bias on the charge carrier statistics and Peltier coefficient in hopping systems subject to the parameter range applicable to disordered organic semiconductors. Distinct differences are found between the observed field dependences as obtained from systems in which energetic disorder is spatially correlated and those in which it is not. Considerable differences are also found between the charge carrier statistics and the Peltier coefficient's field dependence in systems in which charge is transported by bare charge carriers and systems in which it is propagated by polarons. Peltier coefficient field dependence investigations are, hence, proposed as a new tool for studying charge transport and thermoelectricity in disordered organic semiconductors and systems which exhibit thermally activated transport in general.

  19. The endocannabinoid transport inhibitor AM404 differentially modulates recognition memory in rats depending on environmental aversiveness

    PubMed Central

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Ratano, Patrizia; Manduca, Antonia; Scattoni, Maria L.; Palmery, Maura; Trezza, Viviana; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid compounds may influence both emotional and cognitive processes depending on the level of environmental aversiveness at the time of drug administration. However, the mechanisms responsible for these responses remain to be elucidated. The present experiments investigated the effects induced by the endocannabinoid transport inhibitor AM404 (0.5–5 mg/kg, i.p.) on both emotional and cognitive performances of rats tested in a Spatial Open Field task and subjected to different experimental settings, named High Arousal (HA) and Low Arousal (LA) conditions. The two different experimental conditions influenced emotional reactivity independently of drug administration. Indeed, vehicle-treated rats exposed to the LA condition spent more time in the center of the arena than vehicle-treated rats exposed to the HA context. Conversely, the different arousal conditions did not affect the cognitive performances of vehicle-treated animals such as the capability to discriminate a spatial displacement of the objects or an object substitution. AM404 administration did not alter locomotor activity or emotional behavior of animals exposed to both environmental conditions. Interestingly, AM404 administration influenced the cognitive parameters depending on the level of emotional arousal: it impaired the capability of rats exposed to the HA condition to recognize a novel object while it did not induce any impairing effect in rats exposed to the LA condition. These findings suggest that drugs enhancing endocannabinoid signaling induce different effects on recognition memory performance depending on the level of emotional arousal induced by the environmental conditions. PMID:22454620

  20. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  1. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  2. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  3. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  4. Stoichiometry dependent electron transport and gas sensing properties of indium oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gali, Pradeep; Sapkota, Gopal; Syllaios, A J; Littler, Chris; Philipose, U

    2013-06-01

    The effect of stoichiometry of single crystalline In2O3 nanowires on electrical transport and gas sensing was investigated. The nanowires were synthesized by vapor phase transport and had diameters ranging from 80 to 100 nm and lengths between 10 and 20 μm, with a growth direction of [001]. Transport measurements revealed n-type conduction, attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the crystal lattice. As-grown In2O3 nanowires were shown to have a carrier concentration of ≈5 × 10(17) cm(-3), while nanowires that were annealed in wet O2 showed a reduced carrier concentration of less than 10(16) cm(-3). Temperature dependent conductivity measurements on the as-grown nanowires and analysis of the thermally activated Arrhenius conduction for the temperature range of 77-350 K yielded an activation energy of 0.12 eV. This is explained on the basis of carrier exchange that occurs between the surface states and the bulk of the nanowire, resulting in a depleted surface layer of thickness of the order of the Debye length (LD), estimated to be about 3-4 nm for the as-grown nanowires and about 10 times higher for the more stoichiometric nanowires. Significant changes in the electrical conductance of individual In2O3 nanowires were also observed within several seconds of exposure to NH3 and O2 gas molecules at room temperature, thus demonstrating the potential use of In2O3 nanowires as efficient miniaturized chemical sensors. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the nanowire channel conductance, and a simple energy band diagram is used to explain the change in conductivity when gas molecules adsorbed on the nanowire surface influence its electrical properties. Less stoichiometric nanowires were found to be more sensitive to oxidizing gases while more stoichiometric nanowires showed significantly enhanced response to reducing gases.

  5. Spin-dependent thermoelectronic transport of a single molecule magnet Mn(dmit){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Zhongbo; Wei, Xinyuan; Yang, Zhongqin; An, Yipeng

    2014-05-28

    We investigate spin-dependent thermoelectronic transport properties of a single molecule magnet Mn(dmit){sub 2} sandwiched between two Au electrodes using first-principles density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function method. By applying a temperature difference between the two Au electrodes, spin-up and spin-down currents flowing in opposite directions can be induced due to asymmetric distribution of the spin-up and spin-down transmission spectra around the Fermi level. A pure spin current and 100% spin polarization are achieved by tuning back-gate voltage to the system. The spin caloritronics of the molecule with a perpendicular conformation is also explored, where the spin-down current is blocked strongly. These results suggest that Mn(dmit){sub 2} is a promising material for spin caloritronic applications.

  6. The spin-dependent transport of Co-encapsulated Si nanotubes contacted with Cu electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yan-Dong; Yan, Xiao-Hong; Xiao, Yang

    2014-02-10

    Unlike carbon nanotubes, silicon ones are hard to form. However, they could be stabilized by metal-encapsulation. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the spin-dependent electronic transport of Co-encapsulated Si nanotubes, which are contacted with Cu electrodes. For the finite tubes, as the tube-length increases, the transmission changes from spin-unpolarized to spin-polarized. Further analysis shows that, not only the screening of electrodes on Co's magnetism but also the spin-asymmetric Co-Co interactions are the physical mechanisms. As Cu and Si are the fundamental elements in semiconductor industry, our results may throw light on the development of silicon-based spintronic devices.

  7. Water ingress in Y-type zeolite: anomalous moisture-dependent transport diffusivity.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, Eduardo N; da Silva, D Vitoreti; de Souza, R E; Engelsberg, M

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging measurements of liquid water ingress in a large number of nonactivated Y-type (Na) zeolite samples prepared under different conditions are reported on. Using an experimental arrangement that permits the application of Boltzmann's transformation of the 1D (one-dimensional) diffusion equation, the spatiotemporal scaling variables required for a collapse of the measured profiles into universal curves revealed subdiffusive behavior in all cases. It is shown that the one-dimensional fractal time diffusion equation constitutes a powerful tool to analyze the data and provides a connection between the moisture dependence of the effective transport diffusivities and the shapes of the universal curves. Thus, even for anomalous diffusion, the relationship between the universal curves and structural characteristics of the system; such as porosity, tortuosity of the pore space and, in some cases, the interplay between mesopores and nanopores can be addressed. PMID:17155023

  8. Guanidinylated neomycin mediates heparan sulfate-dependent transport of active enzymes to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Stéphane; Wilson, Beth; Sly, William S; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2010-07-01

    Guanidinylated neomycin (GNeo) can transport bioactive, high molecular weight cargo into the interior of cells in a process that depends on cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In this report, we show that GNeo-modified quantum dots bind to cell surface heparan sulfate, undergo endocytosis and eventually reach the lysosomal compartment. An N-hydroxysuccinimide activated ester of GNeo (GNeo-NHS) was prepared and conjugated to two lysosomal enzymes, beta-D-glucuronidase (GUS) and alpha-L-iduronidase. Conjugation did not interfere with enzyme activity and enabled binding of the enzymes to heparin-Sepharose and heparan sulfate on primary human fibroblasts. Cells lacking the corresponding lysosomal enzyme took up sufficient amounts of the conjugated enzymes to restore normal turnover of glycosaminoglycans. The high capacity of proteoglycan-mediated uptake suggests that this method of delivery might be used for enzyme replacement or introduction of foreign enzymes into cells.

  9. Temperature dependent dielectric properties and ion transportation in solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengwa, R. J.; Dhatarwal, Priyanka; Choudhary, Shobhna

    2016-05-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film consisted of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blend matrix with lithium tetrafluroborate (LiBF4) as dopant ionic salt and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as plasticizer has been prepared by solution casting method followed by melt pressing. Dielectric properties and ionic conductivity of the SPE film at different temperatures have been determined by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. It has been observed that the dc ionic conductivity of the SPE film increases with increase of temperature and also the decrease of relaxation time. The temperature dependent relaxation time and ionic conductivity values of the electrolyte are governed by the Arrhenius relation. Correlation observed between dc conductivity and relaxation time confirms that ion transportation occurs with polymer chain segmental dynamics through hopping mechanism. The room temperature ionic conductivity is found to be 4 × 10-6 S cm-1 which suggests the suitability of the SPE film for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  10. Spin-Dependent Electron Transport Through a Three-Terminal Mesoscopic Spin-Orbit Coupled Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhonghui; Xiao, Xianbo; Chen, Yuguang

    2013-03-01

    We studied theoretically the spin-dependent electron transport properties of a three-terminal nanostructure proposed by Xiao and Chen [J. Appl. Phys.1, 108 (2010)]. The spin-resolved recursive Green's function method is used to calculate the three-terminal spin-polarization. We focus on the influence both of the structural parameters and Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) strength in the investigated system. It is shown that the spin-polarization is still a reasonable value for being observable in experiment with small Rashba SOC strength and longer length of the wide region in the investigated system. The underlying physics is revealed to originate from the effect of SOC-induced effective magnetic field at the structure-induced Fano resonance. This length of the middle wide region in three-terminal nanostructure can be more easily fabricated experimentally.

  11. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE PAGES

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  12. Beyond the Lorentzian Model in Quantum Transport: Energy-Dependent Resonance Broadening in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenfei; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    In quantum transport calculations, transmission functions of molecular junctions, as well as spectral functions of metal-organic interfaces, often feature peaks originating from molecular resonances. These resonance peaks are often assumed to be Lorentzian, with an energy-independent broadening function Γ. However, in the general case, the wide-band-limit breaks down, and the Lorentzian approximation is no longer valid. Here, we develop a new energy-dependent broadening function Γ (E) , based on diagonalization of non-Hermitian matrices within a non-equilbrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. As defined, Γ (E) can describe resonances of non-Lorentzian nature and can be decomposed into components associated with the left and right leads, respectively; and it is particularly useful in understanding transport properties in terms of molecular orbitals in asymmetric junctions. We compute this quantity via an ab initio NEGF approach based on density functional theory and illustrate its utility with several junctions of experimental relevance, including recent work on rectification in Au-graphite junctions. This work is supported by the DOE, and computational resources are provided by NERSC.

  13. MATE Transporter-Dependent Export of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Gorzolka, Karin; Matern, Andreas; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Böttcher, Christoph; Rosahl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to successfully prevent colonization by Phytophthora infestans, the causal agent of late blight disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum), depends on multilayered defense responses. To address the role of surface-localized secondary metabolites for entry control, droplets of a P. infestans zoospore suspension, incubated on Arabidopsis leaves, were subjected to untargeted metabolite profiling. The hydroxycinnamic acid amide coumaroylagmatine was among the metabolites secreted into the inoculum. In vitro assays revealed an inhibitory activity of coumaroylagmatine on P. infestans spore germination. Mutant analyses suggested a requirement of the p-coumaroyl-CoA:agmatine N4-p-coumaroyl transferase ACT for the biosynthesis and of the MATE transporter DTX18 for the extracellular accumulation of coumaroylagmatine. The host plant potato is not able to efficiently secrete coumaroylagmatine. This inability is overcome in transgenic potato plants expressing the two Arabidopsis genes ACT and DTX18. These plants secrete agmatine and putrescine conjugates to high levels, indicating that DTX18 is a hydroxycinnamic acid amide transporter with a distinct specificity. The export of hydroxycinnamic acid amides correlates with a decreased ability of P. infestans spores to germinate, suggesting a contribution of secreted antimicrobial compounds to pathogen defense at the leaf surface. PMID:26744218

  14. Na/sup +/-dependent transport of /sup 14/C-L-lysine across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Crandall, E.D.

    1986-03-01

    Transepithelial transport of the basic amino acid L-lysine has been studied utilizing the isolated intact bullfrog lung mounted in the Ussing chamber. Lungs were excised from doubly pithed bullfrogs and sandwiched between two hemichambers. /sup 14/C-(U)-L-lysine was added to the upstream reservoir of amphibian Ringer solution, while the tissue was short-circuited. Two lungs from the same animal were used simultaneously to determine the two opposite unidirectional fluxes. Downstream and upstream radioactivities were assayed and used to estimate the apparent permeability (P) of the labeled lysine. Results indicate that the apparent P of /sup 14/C-L-lysine measured in the alveolar (M) to the pleural (S) direction is 19.06 (+- 2.84) x 10/sup -7/ cm/s and P in the S to M direction is 3.29 (+- 0.02) x 10/sup -7/ cm/s. When the 100 mM NaCl in the bath was replaced by 110 mM choline chloride, the flux of /sup 14/C-L-lysine from the alveolar to the pleural side decreased to the same value as that in the opposite direction. The flux from the pleural to the alveolar direction in the absence of Na/sup +/ did not change. These results suggest that the alveolar epithelium exhibits Na/sup +/-dependent amino acid (L-lysine) transport in the M->S, but not in the S->M, direction.

  15. Temperature-dependent charge injection and transport in pentacene thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Hyunji; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, Jaehoon; Choi, Jong Sun

    2015-11-01

    The electrical characteristics of p-channel pentacene thin-film transistors (TFTs) were analyzed at different operating temperatures ranging from 253 to 353 K. An improvement in the drain current and field-effect mobility of the pentacene TFTs is observed with increasing temperature. From the Arrhenius plots of field-effect mobility extracted at various temperatures, a lower activation energy of 99.34 meV was obtained when the device is operating in the saturation region. Such observation is ascribed to the thermally activated hole transport through the pentacene grain boundaries. On the other hand, it was found that the Au/pentacene contact significantly affects the TFTs electrical characteristics in the linear region, which resulted in a higher activation energy. The activation energy based on the linear field-effect mobility, which increased from 344.61 to 444.70 meV with decreasing temperature, implies the charge-injection-limited electrical behavior of pentacene TFTs at low temperatures. The thermally induced electrical characteristic variations in pentacene TFTs can thus be studied through the temperature dependence of the charge injection and transport processes.

  16. Temperature Dependent Electrical Transport Properties of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Thakore, B. Y.; Khambholja, S. G.; Bhatt, N. K.; Jani, A. R.; Suthar, P. H.; Gajjar, P. N.

    2011-12-12

    The temperature dependent electrical transport properties viz. electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ni{sub 10}Cr{sub 90} and Co{sub 20}Cr{sub 80} alloys are computed at various temperatures. The electrical resistivity has been calculated according to Faber-Ziman model combined with Ashcroft-Langreth partial structure factors. In the present work, to include the ion-electron interaction, we have used a well tested local model potential. For exchange-correlation effects, five different forms of local field correction functions due to Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru and Utsumi (IU), Farid et al (F) and Sarkar et al (S) are used. The present results due to S function are in good agreement with the experimental data as compared to results obtained using other four functions. The S functions satisfy compressibility sum rule in long wave length limit more accurately as compared to T, IU and F functions, which may be responsible for better agreement of results, obtained using S function. Also, present result confirms the validity of present approach in determining the transport properties of alloys like Ni-Cr and Co-Cr.

  17. Activity-dependent transport of the transcriptional coactivator CRTC1 from synapse to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, Toh Hean; Uzgil, Besim; Lin, Peter; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Martin, Kelsey C

    2012-07-01

    Long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, such as those underlying long-term memory, require transcription. Activity-dependent transport of synaptically localized transcriptional regulators provides a direct means of coupling synaptic stimulation with changes in transcription. The CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC1), which is required for long-term hippocampal plasticity, binds CREB to potently promote transcription. We show that CRTC1 localizes to synapses in silenced hippocampal neurons but translocates to the nucleus in response to localized synaptic stimulation. Regulated nuclear translocation occurs only in excitatory neurons and requires calcium influx and calcineurin activation. CRTC1 is controlled in a dual fashion with activity regulating CRTC1 nuclear translocation and cAMP modulating its persistence in the nucleus. Neuronal activity triggers a complex change in CRTC1 phosphorylation, suggesting that CRTC1 may link specific types of stimuli to specific changes in gene expression. Together, our results indicate that synapse-to-nuclear transport of CRTC1 dynamically informs the nucleus about synaptic activity.

  18. Functional assembly of thylakoid deltapH-dependent/Tat protein transport pathway components in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Vivian; Dabney-Smith, Carole; Cline, Kenneth

    2003-12-01

    Assembly of the components of the thylakoid deltapH-dependent/Tat protein transport machinery was analyzed in vitro. Upon incubation with intact chloroplasts, precursors to all three components, Hcf106, cpTatC and Tha4, were imported into the organelle and assembled into characteristic endogenous complexes. In particular, all of the imported cpTatC and approximately two-thirds of the imported Hcf106 functionally assembled into 700 kDa complexes capable of binding Tat pathway precursor proteins. The amounts assembled into thylakoids by this procedure were moderate. However, physiological quantities of mature forms of Tha4 and Hcf106 were integrated into isolated thylakoids and a significant percentage of the Hcf106 so integrated was assembled into the 700 kDa complex. Interestingly, a mutant form of Hcf106 in which an invariant transmembrane glutamate was changed to glutamine integrated into the membrane but did not assemble into the receptor complex. Analysis of energy and known pathway component requirements indicated that Hcf106 and Tha4 integrate by an unassisted or 'spontaneous' mechanism. The functionality of in vitro integrated Tha4 was verified by its ability to restore transport to thylakoid membranes from the maize tha4 mutant, which lacks the Tha4 protein. Development of this functional in vitro assembly assay will facilitate structure-function studies of the thylakoid Tat pathway translocation machinery.

  19. Towards a structural understanding of drug and peptide transport within the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter (POT) family.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Simon

    2011-10-01

    One of the principal aims of modern drug design is the targeted delivery of drugs within the body, such as to the central nervous system, combined with their exclusion from the liver and kidneys, which break down foreign molecules and subsequently eliminate them. Many of the commonly prescribed drugs are transported into cells and across the plasma membrane via endogenous membrane transporters, whose principal roles are the uptake of essential nutrients for metabolism. In many cases, such drug transport is serendipitous as they are simply mistaken as 'natural' compounds. Many of these transporters could, however, be targeted more efficiently, improving drug absorption, distribution and retention. The molecular details of these drug-transporter interactions, however, are at best poorly understood, in large part through the absence of any high-resolution structural information. To address this issue, we recently determined the structure of a prokaryotic peptide transporter, PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis, which shares a high degree of sequence similarity and functional characteristics with the human PepT1 and PepT2 proteins. PepT1 and PepT2 contribute significantly to the oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of a number of important drug families, including antibiotics, antivirals and anticancer agents. The crystal structure of PepTSo provides the first high-resolution model of a drug importer and provides the starting point for understanding drug and peptide transport within the human body.

  20. Association between low-activity serotonin transporter genotype and heroin dependence: behavioral and personality correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Garofano, L; Santoro, G; Bosari, S; Pellegrini, C; Zaimovic, A; Moi, G; Bussandri, M; Moi, A; Brambilla, F; Donnini, C

    2004-04-01

    In previous studies, serotonin (5-HT) system disturbance was found involved in a variety of behavioral disorders, psychopathologies, and substance use disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was recently identified and the presence of the short (S) allele found to be associated with a lower level of expression of the gene, lower levels of 5-HT uptake, type 2 alcoholism, violence and suicidal behavior. In the present study, 101 heroin addicts (males, West European, Caucasians) and 101 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. Aggressiveness levels were measured in both heroin addicts and controls utilizing Buss-Durkee-Hostility-Inventory (BDHI). Data about suicide attempt and violent criminal behavior in subject history have been collected. The short-short (SS) genotype frequency was significantly higher among heroin dependent individuals compared with control subjects (P = 0.025). The odds ratio for the SS genotype versus the long-long (LL) genotype frequency was 0.69, 95% Cl (0.49-0.97), when heroin addicts were compared with healthy controls. The SS genotype frequency was significantly higher among violent heroin dependent individuals compared with addicted individuals without aggressive behavior (P = 0.02). BDHI mean total scores and suspiciousness and negativism subscales scores were significantly higher in SS individuals, in comparison with LL subjects, among heroin addicts. No association was found between SS genotype and suicide history. Our data suggest that a decreased expression of the gene encoding the 5-HTT transporter, due to "S" promoter polymorphism, may be associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders, particularly in the subjects with more consistent aggressiveness and impulsiveness.

  1. Experimental studies of Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Warhaft, Z.

    1994-07-01

    Predicting turbulent mixing and transport remains a critical problem in industrial flows (combustion chambers, mixers, ventillation systems etc.) and in the environment (smoke plumes etc.). The mixing and transport processes are often a strong function of Reynolds number (Re) and yet there is a paucity of information on their Re dependence. Here we propose experiments of passive scalar mixing in isotropic grid turbulence whereby the Taylor Reynolds number (R{lambda}) will be varied from 30 to over 400 (60 < R{sub l} < 10,000). We will achieve the high R{lambda} by means of an active grid, which consists of grid bars with small wings that rotate and flap in a random way. We propose to study basic statistics (pdf, spectra etc). of a homogeneous passive scalar (linear mean profile), as well as of an inhomogeneous scalar (passive line source) as a function of Re. There are many problems concerning the nature of the fine scale structure of a scalar (e.g., the existence of derivative skewness, the relation of the scalar spectrum to the velocity spectrum, and the rate of spreading (dispersion) of a contaminant plume), placing the similarity theory developed over the past 40 years in doubt, yet there is no information concerning its Reynolds number dependence in isotropic turbulence. The passive scalar will be temperature, although some experiments will be done using helium (which has a Schmidt number of 0.23). Particular emphasis will be placed on higher order statistics of both the signal and its derivative. Our experiments will be related to theory and modelling and to recent advances in Direct Numerical Simulations. We will also do further work on mixing in a jet (also as a function of Re) and will relate this work to the (shearless) grid turbulence. The duration of the proposed research is three years.

  2. Experimental studies of Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warhaft, Z.

    Predicting turbulent mixing and transport remains a critical problem in industrial flows (combustion chambers, mixers, ventilation systems, etc.) and in the environment (smoke plumes, etc.). The mixing and transport processes are often a strong function of Reynolds number (Re) and yet there is a paucity of information on their Re dependence. We propose experiments of passive scalar mixing in isotropic grid turbulence whereby the Taylor Reynolds number (R(sub lambda)) will be varied from 30 to over 400 (60 less than R(sub l) less than 10,000). We will achieve the high R(sub lambda) by means of an active grid, which consists of grid bars with small wings that rotate and flap in a random way. We propose to study basic statistics (pdf, spectra, etc). of a homogeneous passive scalar (linear mean profile), as well as of an inhomogeneous scalar (passive line source) as a function of Re. There are many problems concerning the nature of the fine scale structure of a scalar (e.g., the existence of derivative skewness, the relation of the scalar spectrum to the velocity spectrum, and the rate of spreading of a contaminant plume), placing the similarity theory developed over the past 40 years in doubt, yet there is no information concerning its Reynolds number dependence in isotropic turbulence. The passive scalar will be temperature, although some experiments will be done using helium (which has a Schmidt number of 0.23). Particular emphasis will be placed on higher order statistics of both the signal and its derivative. Our experiments will be related to theory and modeling and to recent advances in direct numerical simulations. We will also do further work on mixing in a jet (also as a function of Re) and will relate this work to the (shearless) grid turbulence.

  3. Understanding pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions using a transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasim, Md.; Esha, Roli; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2016-04-01

    A systematic study of the pseudorapidity dependence of elliptic flow parameter using transport models (e.g., a multiphase transport model, AMPT, and ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics, UrQMD) has been presented. We have observed that while at mid-pseudorapidity the elliptic flow measured using the event-plane method differs significantly from that measured by actual reaction plane method, both the event-plane and reaction-plane methods give the same elliptic flow for far forward and backward pseudorapidity. This indicates that the magnitude of measured v2 around midrapidity strongly depends on the analysis method. Therefore, one should use the same procedure (as used in data analysis) in model calculations while comparing model results and experimental data. We find the shape of v2(η ) measured by the PHOBOS experiment is not reproduced by using actual v2 (i.e., measured with respect to the reaction plane) from AMPT and UrQMD models. The shape and magnitude of measured v2(η ) can be explained by the AMPT model with string-melting mode only if one uses the same procedure as used in data analysis. Magnitude of elliptic flow can be reproduced for all pseudorapidity range by taking the parton-parton interaction cross section to be 3 mb at √{sN N}=62.4 and 200 GeV. This implies that the partonic interactions are necessary to reproduce data at √{sN N}=62.4 and 200 GeV and the strength of partonic interactions at far forward and backward rapidity is as strong as at midrapidity. Both UrQMD and AMPT with default mode fail to explain the data.

  4. Hepatic taurine transport: a Na/sup +/-dependent carrier on the basolateral plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bucuvalas, J.C.; Goodrich, A.L.; Suchy, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    Highly purified rat basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles were used examine the mechanism and the driving forces for hepatic uptake of the ..beta..-amino acid, taurine. An inwardly directed 100 mM NaCl gradient stimulated the initial rate of taurine uptake and energized a transient twofold accumulation of taurine above equilibrium (overshoot). In contrast, uptake was slower and no overshoot was detected in the presence of a KCl gradient. A negative intravesicular electrical potential generated by the presence of permeant anions or an outwardly directed K/sup +/ gradient with valinomycin increased Na/sup +/-stimulated taurine uptake. External Cl/sup -/ stimulated Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake independent of effects on the transmembrane electrical potential difference. Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake showed a sigmoidal dependence on extravesicular Na/sup +/ concentration, suggesting multiple Na/sup +/ ions are involved in the translocation of each taurine molecule. Na/sup +/-dependent taurine uptake demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a maximum velocity of 0.537 nmol x mg protein/sup -1/ x min/sup -1/ and an apparent K/sub m/ of 174 ..mu..M. (/sup 3/H)taurine uptake was inhibited by the presence of excess unlabeled taurine, ..beta..-alanine, or hypotaurine but not by L-glutamine or L-alanine. In summary, using basolateral liver plasma membrane vesicles, the authors have shown that hepatic uptake of taurine occurs by a carrier-mediated, secondary active transport process specific for ..beta..-amino acids. Uptake is electrogenic, stimulated by external Cl/sup -/, and requires multiple Na/sup +/ ions for the translocation of each taurine molecule.

  5. Discrimination between spin-dependent charge transport and spin-dependent recombination in π-conjugated polymers by correlated current and electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavand, Marzieh; Baird, Douglas; van Schooten, Kipp; Malissa, Hans; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Spin-dependent processes play a crucial role in organic electronic devices. Spin coherence can give rise to spin mixing due to a number of processes such as hyperfine coupling, and leads to a range of magnetic field effects. However, it is not straightforward to differentiate between pure single-carrier spin-dependent transport processes which control the current and therefore the electroluminescence, and spin-dependent electron-hole recombination which determines the electroluminescence yield and in turn modulates the current. We therefore investigate the correlation between the dynamics of spin-dependent electric current and spin-dependent electroluminescence in two derivatives of the conjugated polymer poly(phenylene-vinylene) using simultaneously measured pulsed electrically detected (pEDMR) and optically detected (pODMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This experimental approach requires careful analysis of the transient response functions under optical and electrical detection. At room temperature and under bipolar charge-carrier injection conditions, a correlation of the pEDMR and the pODMR signals is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the recombination currents involve spin-dependent electronic transitions. This observation is inconsistent with the hypothesis that these signals are caused by spin-dependent charge-carrier transport. These results therefore provide no evidence that supports earlier claims that spin-dependent transport plays a role for room-temperature magnetoresistance effects. At low temperatures, however, the correlation between pEDMR and pODMR is weakened, demonstrating that more than one spin-dependent process influences the optoelectronic materials' properties. This conclusion is consistent with prior studies of half-field resonances that were attributed to spin-dependent triplet exciton recombination, which becomes significant at low temperatures when the triplet lifetime increases.

  6. Equations of the surface harmonics method for solving time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Time-dependent equations of the surface harmonics method (SHM) are obtained for planar one-dimensional geometry. The equations are verified by calculations of test problems from Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416, and the capabilities and efficiency of applying the SHM for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation in the diffusion approximation are demonstrated. The results of the work show that the implementation of the SHG for full-scale computations will make possible substantial progress in the efficient solution of time-dependent problems of neutron transport in nuclear reactors.

  7. Functional characterisation of human SGLT-5 as a novel kidney-specific sodium-dependent sugar transporter.

    PubMed

    Grempler, Rolf; Augustin, Robert; Froehner, Stefanie; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Simon, Eric; Mark, Michael; Eickelmann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLT) actively catalyse carbohydrate transport across cellular membranes. Six of the 12 known SGLT family members have the capacity to bind and/or transport monosaccharides (SGLT-1 to 6); of these, all but SGLT-5 have been characterised. Here we demonstrate that human SGLT-5 is exclusively expressed in the kidney. Four splice variants were detected and the most abundant SGLT-5-mRNA was functionally characterised. SGLT-5 mediates sodium-dependent [(14)C]-α-methyl-D-glucose (AMG) transport that can be inhibited by mannose, fructose, glucose, and galactose. Uptake studies using demonstrated high capacity transport for mannose and fructose and, to a lesser extent, glucose, AMG, and galactose. SGLT-5 mediated mannose, fructose and AMG transport was weakly (μM potency) inhibited by SGLT-2 inhibitors. In summary, we have characterised SGLT-5 as a kidney mannose transporter. Further studies are warranted to explore the physiological role of SGLT-5.

  8. Forward-backward correlations between multiplicities in windows separated in azimuth and rapidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechernin, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    The forward-backward (FB) charged particle multiplicity correlations between windows separated in rapidity and azimuth are analyzed using a model that treats strings as independent identical emitters. Both the short-range (SR) contribution, originating from the correlation between multiplicities produced from a single source, and the long-range (LR) contribution, originating from the fluctuation in the number of sources, are taken into account. The dependencies of the FB correlation coefficient, b, on the windows' rapidity and azimuthal acceptance and the gaps between these windows are studied and compared with the preliminary data of ALICE. The analysis of these dependencies effectively separates the contributions of two above mechanisms. It is also demonstrated that traditional definitions of FB correlation coefficient b have a strong nonlinear dependence on the acceptance of windows. Suitable alternative observables for the future FB correlation studies are proposed. The connection between b and the two-particle correlation function, C2, is traced, as well as its connection to the untriggered di-hadron correlation analysis. Using a model independent analysis, it is shown that measurement of the FB multiplicity correlations between two small windows separated in rapidity and azimuth fully determines the two-particle correlation function C2, even if the particle distribution in rapidity is not uniform.

  9. Azimuthal diffusion of the large-scale circulation of turbulent Rayleight-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaozhou; van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Ahlers, Guenter

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation θ0 (t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) of turbulent Rayleight-Bénard convection. The sample was a cylinder with height and diameter equal to 1.12 m. We used compressed SF6 gas at pressures up to 19 bars as the fluid. The measurements covered the Rayleigh-number range 1012 <= Ra <=1014 at a Prandtl number Pr ~= 0 . 80 . We found that the preferred orientation of the LSC upflow was aligned to the West, consistent with Earth's Coriolis force. The LSC azimuthal dynamics was diffusive, driven by the small-scale turbulent fluctuations. For Ra <=1013 the Reynolds number Reθ˙ based on the azimuthal diffusivity had a Ra dependence similar to that seen for 109 <= Ra <=1011 and Pr = 4 . 38 . The Pr dependence Reθ˙ ~Prα with α ~= - 1 . 2 was the same as that found for the Reynolds number based on the root-mean-square fluctuation velocity in the interior bulk flow. For Ra = Ra1* ~= 2 ×1013 Reθ˙ showed the ultimate-state transition and for Ra >= Ra2* ~= 8 ×1013 it had a Ra dependence with an exponent of 0 . 40 +/- 0 . 02 . Supported by the Max Planck Society, the Volkswagenstiftung, the DFD Sonderforschungsbereich SFB963, and NSF Grant DMR11-58514.

  10. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  11. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  12. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  13. Ionic dependence of active Na-K transport: "clamping" of cellular Na+ with monensin.

    PubMed

    Haber, R S; Pressley, T A; Loeb, J N; Ismail-Beigi, F

    1987-07-01

    The Na+ ionophore monensin was used to study the Na+- and K+-dependence of ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb+ uptake in ARL 15 cells, a rat liver cell line. Graded concentrations of monensin rapidly induced incremental elevations of cellular Na+ that were stable for up to 2 h. In experiments in which cellular Na+ was thus "clamped" at various levels, the activation curve for ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb+ uptake as a function of intracellular Na+ was found to be steepest near basal Na+ levels (Hill coefficient approximately equal to 2.4), indicating that these cells can respond to relatively large changes in passive Na+ entry by increasing the race of Na-K pump function with only minimal increases in cellular Na+. Exposure of cells to monensin also permitted examination of the extracellular-K+ dependence of ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb+ uptake in the presence of saturating intracellular Na+ and yielded a Hill coefficient of approximately 1.5. The rate of ATP hydrolysis calculated from measurements of the maximal rate of ouabain-inhibitable 86Rb+ uptake in intact cells was similar to the enzymatic Vmax of the Na+-K+-ATPase in cell lysates, suggesting that the Na+-K+-ATPase activity in these broken-cell preparations closely reflects the functional transport capacity of the Na-K pump.

  14. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5–7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ∼16 cm2 V−1 s−1 around misorientation angle≈20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ≈0.5 eV at low angles and ≈0.15 eV at high angles (≥20°). PMID:26813605

  15. Effect of temperature-dependent electrical conductivity on transport processes in magnetosolidmechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, G. T.; Arnas, O. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of temperature-dependent electrical conductivity on transport processes for a solid block is analyzed on the basis of a one-dimensional steady-state model under specified thermal boundary conditions. Assumptions are that the solid has an infinitely segmented electrode configuration, the magnetic field (By) may be resolved into a constant applied field and an induced field, the gradient of the electrochemical potential is equal to the electrostatic potential, a constant potential difference is applied externally across each pair of opposite electrodes, and all material properties except electrical conductivity are constant. Conductivity is expressed in normalized form in terms of a baseline conductivity and a constant for the material. The application of the assumptions of the model to the general phenomenological relations yields the governing equations. Solution of these equations gives the distribution of temperature, electric current density, and magnetic field strength along the length of the solid. It is shown that significant differences exist between the case for constant electrical conductivity and the case where electrical conductivity is temperature dependent.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in porous media. A significant question in modeling transport in porous media is definition of the porous media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a porous media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous porous media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in porous media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth impacts the porous media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the porous media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered porous media: Volume averaged

  17. Azimuthal HBT and Transverse Momentum Fluctuations from CERES.

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiec,D.; Rehak, P.; et al.

    2007-07-09

    CERES is a dilepton experiment at the CERN SPS, known for its observation of enhanced production of low mass efe- pairs in collisions between heavy nuclei [1]. The upgrade of CERES in 1997-1998 by a radial Time Projection Chamber (TPC) [2] allowed to improve the momentum resolution and the particle identification capability while retaining the cylindrical symmetry. The upgraded experiment is shown in Fig. 1. The upgrade also extended the sensitivity of CERES to hadrons and made possible results like those described below. The measurement of central Pb+Au collisions at the maximum SPS energy of 158 GeV per nucleon in the fall of 2000 was the first run of the fully upgraded CERES and at the same time the last run of this experiment. About 30 million Pb+Au collision events at 158 GeV per nucleon were collected, most of them with centrality within the top 7% of the geometrical cross section {sigma}{sub G} = 6.94 b. Small samples of the 20% and the minimum bias collisions, as well as a short run at 80 AGeV, were recorded in addition. The dilepton mass spectra from this experiment were published in [3]. In this talk I present two particular results of hadron analysis, the azimuthal dependence of two-pion correlations and a differential p{sub t} fluctuation study.

  18. Ultra-small-angle neutron scattering with azimuthal asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Gu, X.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from thin sections of rock samples such as shales demand as great a scattering vector range as possible because the pores cover a wide range of sizes. The limitation of the scattering vector range for pinhole SANS requires slit-smeared ultra-SANS (USANS) measurements that need to be converted to pinhole geometry. The desmearing algorithm is only successful for azimuthally symmetric data. Scattering from samples cut parallel to the plane of bedding is symmetric, exhibiting circular contours on a two-dimensional detector. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding show elliptically dependent contours with the long axis corresponding to the normal to the bedding plane. A method is given for converting such asymmetric data collected on a double-crystal diffractometer for concatenation with the usual pinhole-geometry SANS data. The aspect ratio from the SANS data is used to modify the slit-smeared USANS data to produce quasi-symmetric contours. Rotation of the sample about the incident beam may result in symmetric data but cannot extract the same information as obtained from pinhole geometry. PMID:27275140

  19. Azimuthal anisotropy: Transition from hydrodynamic flow to jet suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, R.; PHENIX Collaboration, et al.

    2010-11-09

    Measured second and fourth azimuthal anisotropy coefficients v{sub 2,4}(N{sub part},p{sub T}) are scaled with the initial eccentricity {var_epsilon}{sub 2,4}(N{sub part}) of the collision zone and studied as a function of the number of participants N{sub part} and the transverse momenta p{sub T}. Scaling violations are observed for p{sub T} {le} 3 GeV/c, consistent with a p{sub T}{sup 2} dependence of viscous corrections and a linear increase of the relaxation time with p{sub T}. These empirical viscous corrections to flow and the thermal distribution function at freeze-out constrain estimates of the specific viscosity and the freeze-out temperature for two different models for the initial collision geometry. The apparent viscous corrections exhibit a sharp maximum for p{sub T} {ge} 3 GeV/c, suggesting a breakdown of the hydrodynamic ansatz and the onset of a change from flow-driven to suppression-driven anisotropy.

  20. Adaptive mapping functions to the azimuthal anisotropy of the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegout, P.; Biancale, R.; Soudarin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The anisotropy of propagation of radio waves used by global navigation satellite systems is investigated using high-resolution observational data assimilations produced by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecast. The geometry and the refractivity of the neutral atmosphere are built introducing accurate geodetic heights and continuous formulations of the refractivity and its gradient. Hence the realistic ellipsoidal shape of the refractivity field above the topography is properly represented. Atmospheric delays are obtained by ray-tracing through the refractivity field, integrating the eikonal differential system. Ray-traced delays reveal the anisotropy of the atmosphere. With the aim to preserve the classical mapping function strategy, mapping functions can evolve to adapt to high-frequency atmospheric fluctuations and to account for the anisotropy of propagation by fitting at each site and time the zenith delays and the mapping functions coefficients. Adaptive mapping functions (AMF) are designed with coefficients of the continued fraction form which depend on azimuth. The basic idea is to expand the azimuthal dependency of the coefficients in Fourier series introducing a multi-scale azimuthal decomposition which slightly changes the elevation functions with the azimuth. AMF are used to approximate thousands of atmospheric ray-traced delays using a few tens of coefficients. Generic recursive definitions of the AMF and their partial derivatives lead to observe that the truncation of the continued fraction form at the third term and the truncation of the azimuthal Fourier series at the fourth term are sufficient in usual meteorological conditions. Delays' and elevations' mapping functions allow to store and to retrieve the ray-tracing results to solve the parallax problem at the observation level. AMF are suitable to fit the time-variable isotropic and anisotropic parts of the ray-traced delays at each site at each time step and to provide GPS range

  1. History-dependent ion transport through conical nanopipettes and the implications in energy conversion dynamics at nanoscale interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yan; Wang, Dengchao; Kvetny, Maksim M.; Brown, Warren; Liu, Juan; Wang, Gangli

    2014-08-20

    The dynamics of ion transport at nanostructured substrate–solution interfaces play vital roles in high-density energy conversion, stochastic chemical sensing and biosensing, membrane separation, nanofluidics and fundamental nanoelectrochemistry. Advancements in these applications require a fundamental understanding of ion transport at nanoscale interfaces. The understanding of the dynamic or transient transport, and the key physical process involved, is limited, which contrasts sharply with widely studied steady-state ion transport features at atomic and nanometer scale interfaces. Here we report striking time-dependent ion transport characteristics at nanoscale interfaces in current–potential (I–V) measurements and theoretical analyses. First, a unique non-zero I–V cross-point and pinched I–Vmore » curves are established as signatures to characterize the dynamics of ion transport through individual conical nanopipettes. Moreoever, ion transport against a concentration gradient is regulated by applied and surface electrical fields. The concept of ion pumping or separation is demonstrated via the selective ion transport against concentration gradients through individual nanopipettes. Third, this dynamic ion transport process under a predefined salinity gradient is discussed in the context of nanoscale energy conversion in supercapacitor type charging–discharging, as well as chemical and electrical energy conversion. Our analysis of the emerging current–potential features establishes the urgently needed physical foundation for energy conversion employing ordered nanostructures. The elucidated mechanism and established methodology can be generalized into broadly-defined nanoporous materials and devices for improved energy, separation and sensing applications.« less

  2. History-dependent ion transport through conical nanopipettes and the implications in energy conversion dynamics at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wang, Dengchao; Kvetny, Maksim M.; Brown, Warren; Liu, Juan; Wang, Gangli

    2014-08-20

    The dynamics of ion transport at nanostructured substrate–solution interfaces play vital roles in high-density energy conversion, stochastic chemical sensing and biosensing, membrane separation, nanofluidics and fundamental nanoelectrochemistry. Advancements in these applications require a fundamental understanding of ion transport at nanoscale interfaces. The understanding of the dynamic or transient transport, and the key physical process involved, is limited, which contrasts sharply with widely studied steady-state ion transport features at atomic and nanometer scale interfaces. Here we report striking time-dependent ion transport characteristics at nanoscale interfaces in current–potential (I–V) measurements and theoretical analyses. First, a unique non-zero I–V cross-point and pinched I–V curves are established as signatures to characterize the dynamics of ion transport through individual conical nanopipettes. Moreoever, ion transport against a concentration gradient is regulated by applied and surface electrical fields. The concept of ion pumping or separation is demonstrated via the selective ion transport against concentration gradients through individual nanopipettes. Third, this dynamic ion transport process under a predefined salinity gradient is discussed in the context of nanoscale energy conversion in supercapacitor type charging–discharging, as well as chemical and electrical energy conversion. Our analysis of the emerging current–potential features establishes the urgently needed physical foundation for energy conversion employing ordered nanostructures. The elucidated mechanism and established methodology can be generalized into broadly-defined nanoporous materials and devices for improved energy, separation and sensing applications.

  3. Color Entanglement for Azimuthal Asymmetries in the Drell-Yan Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffing, M. G. A.; Mulders, P. J.

    2014-03-01

    In the resummation of collinear gluons emitted together with active partons from the hadrons in the Drell-Yan process, effects of color entanglement become important when the transverse directions are taken into account. It is then no longer possible to write the cross section as the convolution of two soft correlators and a hard part. We show that the color entanglement introduces additional color factors that must be taken into account in the extraction of transverse momentum-dependent parton distribution functions from azimuthal asymmetries. Examples where such effects matter are the extractions of the double Sivers and double Boer-Mulders asymmetries. Furthermore, we will argue why this color entanglement is a basic ingredient already in the tree-level description of azimuthal asymmetries.

  4. pH dependent but not P-gp dependent bidirectional transport study of S-propranolol: the importance of passive diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Benet, Leslie Z.; Okochi, Hideaki; Chen, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent controversial publications, citing studies purporting to show that P-gp mediates the transport of propranolol, proposed that passive biological membrane transport is negligible. Based on the BDDCS, the extensively metabolized-highly permeable-highly soluble BDDCS class 1 drug, propranolol, shows a high passive permeability at concentrations unrestricted by solubility that can overwhelm any potential transporter effects. Here we reinvestigate the effects of passive diffusion and carrier-mediated transport on S-propranolol. Methods Bidirectional permeability and inhibition of efflux transport studies were carried out in MDCK, MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell lines at different concentrations. Transcellular permeability studies were conducted at different apical pHs in the rat jejunum Ussing chamber model and PAMPA system. Results S-propranolol exhibited efflux ratios lower than 1 in MDCK, MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. No significant differences of Papp, B->A in the presence and absence of the efflux inhibitor GG918 were observed. However, an efflux ratio of 3.63 was found at apical pH 6.5 with significant decrease in Papp, A->B and increase in Papp, B->A compared to apical pH 7.4 in Caco-2 cell lines. The pH dependent permeability was confirmed in the Ussing chamber model. S-propranolol flux was unchanged during inhibition by verapamil and rifampin. Furthermore, pH dependent permeability was also observed in the PAMPA system. Conclusions S-propranolol does not exhibit active transport as proposed previously. The "false" positive efflux ratio can be explained by the pH partition theory. As expected, passive diffusion, but not active transport, plays the primary role in the permeability of the BDDCS class 1 drug propranolol. PMID:25690341

  5. Green tea polyphenols inhibit the sodium-dependent glucose transporter of intestinal epithelial cells by a competitive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Suzuki, M; Satsu, H; Arai, S; Hara, Y; Suzuki, K; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-11-01

    Intestinal glucose uptake is mainly performed by the sodium-dependent glucose transporter, SGLT1. The transport activity of SGLT1 was markedly inhibited by green tea polyphenols, this inhibitory activity being most pronounced in polyphenols having galloyl residues such as epicatechin gallate (ECg) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). Experiments using brush-border membrane vesicles obtained from the rabbit small intestine demonstrated that ECg inhibited SGLT1 in a competitive manner, although ECg itself was not transported via SGLT1. The present results suggest that tea polyphenols such as ECg interact with SGLT1 as antagonist-like molecules, possibly playing a role in controlling the dietary glucose uptake in the intestinal tract.

  6. Measurement of Azimuthal Asymmetries in Inclusive Production of Hadron Pairs in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, R.; Hasuko, K.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Ogawa, A.; Abe, K.; Hoshi, Y.; Adachi, I.; Dragic, J.; Gershon, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Limosani, A.; Nakamura, I.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.

    2006-06-16

    The Collins effect connects transverse quark spin with a measurable azimuthal dependence in the yield of hadronic fragments around the quark's momentum vector. Using two different reconstruction methods, we find evidence of statistically significant azimuthal asymmetries for charged pion pairs in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 10.52 GeV, which can be attributed to a transverse polarization of the primordial quarks. The measurement was performed using a sample of 79x10{sup 6} hadronic events collected with the Belle detector.

  7. Azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons, pions, and kaons produced in deep-inelastic scattering off unpolarized protons and deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetisyan, E.; Belostotski, S.; Blok, H. P.; Borissov, A.; Bowles, J.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capiluppi, M.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; De Leo, R.; De Nardo, L.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Golembiovskaya, M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Kaiser, R.; Karyan, G.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; López Ruiz, A.; Lorenzon, W.; Ma, B.-Q.; Mahon, D.; Makins, N. C. R.; Manaenkov, S. I.; Manfré, L.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Marukyan, H.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Movsisyan, A.; Murray, M.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrosyan, A.; Raithel, M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanftl, F.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seitz, B.; Shibata, T.-A.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Terkulov, A.; Truty, R. M.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Yu, W.; Zagrebelnyy, V.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2013-01-01

    The azimuthal cos⁡ϕ and cos⁡2ϕ modulations of the distribution of hadrons produced in unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons and positrons off hydrogen and deuterium targets have been measured in the HERMES experiment. For the first time these modulations were determined in a four-dimensional kinematic space for positively and negatively charged pions and kaons separately, as well as for unidentified hadrons. These azimuthal dependences are sensitive to the transverse motion and polarization of the quarks within the nucleon via, e.g., the Cahn, Boer-Mulders and Collins effects.

  8. Charge and heat transport in soft nanosystems in the presence of time-dependent perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perroni, Carmine Antonio; Ramaglia, Vincenzo Marigliano; Cataudella, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Soft nanosystems are electronic nanodevices, such as suspended carbon nanotubes or molecular junctions, whose transport properties are modulated by soft internal degrees of freedom, for example slow vibrational modes. Effects of the electron–vibration coupling on the charge and heat transport of soft nanoscopic systems are theoretically investigated in the presence of time-dependent perturbations, such as a forcing antenna or pumping terms between the leads and the nanosystem. A well-established approach valid for non-equilibrium adiabatic regimes is generalized to the case where external time-dependent perturbations are present. Then, a number of relevant applications of the method are reviewed for systems composed by a quantum dot (or molecule) described by a single electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode. Results: Before introducing time-dependent perturbations, the range of validity of the adiabatic approach is discussed showing that a very good agreement with the results of an exact quantum calculation is obtained in the limit of low level occupation. Then, we show that the interplay between the low frequency vibrational modes and the electronic degrees of freedom affects the thermoelectric properties within the linear response regime finding out that the phonon thermal conductance provides an important contribution to the figure of merit at room temperature. Our work has been stimulated by recent experimental results on carbon nanotube electromechanical devices working in the semiclassical regime (resonator frequencies in the megahertz range compared to an electronic hopping frequency of the order of tens of gigahertz) with extremely high quality factors. The nonlinear vibrational regime induced by the external antenna in such systems has been discussed within the non-perturbative adiabatic approach reproducing quantitatively the characteristic asymmetric shape of the current–frequency curves. Within the same set-up, we have

  9. Ballistic spin-dependent transport of Rashba rings with multi-leads

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Guangyao; Liang Shidong

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Transmission coefficients of each outgoing lead in multi-lead mesoscopic Rashba rings. > Spin polarizations of each outgoing lead in multi-lead mesoscopic Rashba rings. > Resonant and antiresonant conditions of spin polarization in multi-lead Rashba rings. > Symmetries of conductance and spin polarization of symmetric multi-lead Rashba rings. - Abstract: Using the Landauer-Buettiker formula with the transfer matrix technique, we develop a formalism of the ballistic spin-dependent electron transport in the multi-lead Rashba rings. We give analytic formulas of the total conductance G{sub j}, spin-{sigma} conductance g{sub j}{sup {sigma}} and spin polarization P{sub j} of each outgoing lead j, and their resonant and antiresonant conditions. Analytic studying with numerical investigating Rashba rings with several symmetric and asymmetric leads, we find that G{sub j}, g{sub j}{sup {sigma}} and P{sub j} oscillate with the incoming electron energy and the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) strength, and their antiresonances depend on the incoming electron energy, the SOI strength and the outgoing-lead angle with the incoming lead. For the symmetric-lead rings, G{sub j}, g{sub j}{sup {sigma}} and P{sub j} have some symmetries, G{sub j}=G{sub N-j},g{sub j}{sup {sigma}}=g{sub N-j}{sup -{sigma}}, and P{sub j} = -P{sub N-j} for symmetric leads, j and N - j, where the angles between the symmetric outgoing leads j and N - j and the incoming lead are {gamma}{sub N-j} = 2{pi} - {gamma}{sub j}. The spin polarization of the outgoing lead with {gamma}{sub j} = {pi} is exactly zero for even-N-symmetric-lead rings. These symmetries originate from the lead symmetry and time reversal invariance. For asymmetry-lead rings these symmetries vanish.

  10. Radial and azimuthal dynamics of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, Matthew

    The moon Io orbits Jupiter emitting neutral particles from its volcanic surface. This emission is ionized and forms the Io plasma torus around Jupiter. The variation of conditions at Io and Jupiter lead to variations in the content of the plasma in the torus. Volcanoes on Io's surface erupt and change the rate of neutral input. Hot electrons (30--100 eV), whose abundances vary in azimuth, create highly ionized species. Radial variation in subcorotation velocities, velocities less than that of the motion of the dipole magnetic field, creates shears while maintaining coherent radial structure in the torus. Poorly understood changes in plasma density circulate through the torus creating the anomalous System IV behavior that has a period slightly longer than the rotation of Jupiter's magnetic field. This thesis summarizes the research that has produced a two-dimensional physical chemistry model, tested several existing theories about subcorotation velocities, System IV variation, and hot electrons, and adopted new methods of Io plasma torus analysis. In an attempt to understand important dynamics, the thesis modeled differing scenarios such as an initialized two-peak structure, a subcorotation profile dictated by mass loading and ionospheric conductivity, and a critical combination of two populations of hot electrons that accurately mimics the observed System IV phenomenon. This model was also used to solve the inverse problem of determining the best fit for the model parameters, neutral source input rate and radial transport rate, using observations of density, temperature, and composition. In addition the thesis shows the need for multi-dimensional modeling and the results from its groundbreaking two-dimensional model.

  11. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate.

    PubMed

    Baswan, Sudhir M; Li, S Kevin; LaCount, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases, such as onychomycosis, using iontophoresis. To address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of -1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were 3-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upward of 5 Å (molecular weight, ca. ≥ 340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate. PMID:26886342

  12. Spatial and temporal features of density-dependent contaminant transport: Experimental investigation and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoia, Andrea; Latrille, Christelle; Beccantini, Alberto; Cartadale, Alain

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the spatial and temporal features of variable-density contaminant plumes migration in porous materials. Our analysis is supported by novel experimental results concerning concentration profiles inside a vertical column setup that has been conceived at CEA to this aim. The experimental method relies on X-ray spectrometry, which allows determining solute profiles as a function of time at several positions along the column. The salient outcomes of the measurements are elucidated, with focus on miscible fluids in homogeneous saturated media. The role of the injected solution molarity is evidenced. As molarity increases, the solutes plume transport progressively deviates from the usual Fickian behavior, and pollutants distribution becomes skewed in the direction dictated by gravity. By resorting to a finite elements approach, we numerically solve the nonlinear equations that rule the pollutants migration: a good agreement is found between the simulated profiles and the experimental data. At high molarity, a strong dependence on initial conditions is found. Finally, we qualitatively explore the (unstable) interfacial dynamics between the dense contaminant plume and the lighter resident fluid that saturates the column, and detail its evolution for finite-duration contaminant injections.

  13. Spatial and temporal features of density-dependent contaminant transport: experimental investigation and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zoia, Andrea; Latrille, Christelle; Beccantini, Alberto; Cartadale, Alain

    2009-10-13

    We investigate the spatial and temporal features of variable-density contaminant plumes migration in porous materials. Our analysis is supported by novel experimental results concerning concentration profiles inside a vertical column setup that has been conceived at CEA to this aim. The experimental method relies on X-ray spectrometry, which allows determining solute profiles as a function of time at several positions along the column. The salient outcomes of the measurements are elucidated, with focus on miscible fluids in homogeneous saturated media. The role of the injected solution molarity is evidenced. As molarity increases, the solutes plume transport progressively deviates from the usual Fickian behavior, and pollutants distribution becomes skewed in the direction dictated by gravity. By resorting to a finite elements approach, we numerically solve the nonlinear equations that rule the pollutants migration: a good agreement is found between the simulated profiles and the experimental data. At high molarity, a strong dependence on initial conditions is found. Finally, we qualitatively explore the (unstable) interfacial dynamics between the dense contaminant plume and the lighter resident fluid that saturates the column, and detail its evolution for finite-duration contaminant injections.

  14. Composition-dependent structural and transport properties of amorphous transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Buchholz, D. Bruce; Chang, Robert P. H.; Medvedeva, Julia E.

    2015-05-01

    Structural properties of amorphous In-based oxides, In -X -O with X =Zn , Ga, Sn, or Ge, are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics liquid-quench simulations. The results reveal that indium retains its average coordination of 5.0 upon 20% X fractional substitution for In, whereas X cations satisfy their natural coordination with oxygen atoms. This finding suggests that the carrier generation is primarily governed by In atoms, in accord with the observed carrier concentration in amorphous In-O and In -X -O . At the same time, the presence of X affects the number of six-coordinated In atoms as well as the oxygen sharing between the InO6 polyhedra. Based on the obtained interconnectivity and spatial distribution of the InO6 and XO x polyhedra in amorphous In -X -O , composition-dependent structural models of the amorphous oxides are derived. The results help explain our Hall mobility measurements in In -X -O thin films grown by pulsed-laser deposition and highlight the importance of long-range structural correlations in the formation of amorphous oxides and their transport properties.

  15. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Nucleotide-Dependent Activation of the KtrAB K+ Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Szollosi, Andras; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S.; Teixeira-Duarte, Celso M.; Rocha, Rita; Morais-Cabral, João H.

    2016-01-01

    KtrAB belongs to the Trk/Ktr/HKT superfamily of monovalent cation (K+ and Na+) transport proteins that closely resemble K+ channels. These proteins underlie a plethora of cellular functions that are crucial for environmental adaptation in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria. The activation mechanism of the Trk/Ktr/HKT proteins remains unknown. It has been shown that ATP stimulates the activity of KtrAB while ADP does not. Here, we present X-ray structural information on the KtrAB complex with bound ADP. A comparison with the KtrAB-ATP structure reveals conformational changes in the ring and in the membrane protein. In combination with a biochemical and functional analysis, we uncover how ligand-dependent changes in the KtrA ring are propagated to the KtrB membrane protein and conclude that, despite their structural similarity, the activation mechanism of KtrAB is markedly different from the activation mechanism of K+ channels. PMID:26771197

  16. Open Quantum Transport and Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin; Zhao, Yanxiang; Chen, Hanning

    Sub-nanometer electronic devices are notoriously difficult to simulate, with the most widely adopted transport schemes predicting currents that diverge from experiment by several orders of magnitude. This deviation arises from numerous factors, including the inability of these methods to accommodate dynamic processes such as charge reorganization. A promising alternative entails the direct propagation of an electronic structure calculation, as exemplified by real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). Unfortunately this framework is inherently that of a closed system, and modifications must be made to handle incoming and outgoing particle fluxes. To this end, we establish a formal correspondence between the quantum master equation for an open, many-particle system and its description in terms of RT-TDDFT and non-Hermitian boundary potentials. By dynamically constraining the particle density within the boundary regions corresponding to the device leads, a simulation may be selectively converged to the non-equilibrium steady state associated with a given electrostatic bias. Our numerical tests demonstrate that this algorithm is both highly stable and readily integrated into existing electronic structure frameworks

  17. MGS MAG/ER Data Analysis Using a Time and Magnetic Field Dependent Electron Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Mitchell, David L.; Nagy, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of that project was to examine certain details about the dayside electron environment at Mars as seen by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) magnetometer/electron reflectometer (MAG/ER) instrument. Specifically, we stated that we would use the Khazanov and Liemohn (K&L) kinetic electron transport model to analyze features in the observations. This code includes a non-uniform magnetic field and time-dependence in the result (different from most other models of this type). It was originally developed for electron motion along field lines in the Earth's magnetosphere (between conjugate ionospheres), and is thus quite appropriate for application to the Mars magnetic field scenario. Numerous code developments were implemented and the Mars version of the K&L model is fully operational. Initial results from this code have focused on the examination of MGS MAG/ER observations in the crustal field region when it is on the dayside. After several presentations at scientific meetings, this study culminated in a JGR publication last year.

  18. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanism of Nucleotide-Dependent Activation of the KtrAB K+ Transporter.

    PubMed

    Szollosi, Andras; Vieira-Pires, Ricardo S; Teixeira-Duarte, Celso M; Rocha, Rita; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2016-01-01

    KtrAB belongs to the Trk/Ktr/HKT superfamily of monovalent cation (K+ and Na+) transport proteins that closely resemble K+ channels. These proteins underlie a plethora of cellular functions that are crucial for environmental adaptation in plants, fungi, archaea, and bacteria. The activation mechanism of the Trk/Ktr/HKT proteins remains unknown. It has been shown that ATP stimulates the activity of KtrAB while ADP does not. Here, we present X-ray structural information on the KtrAB complex with bound ADP. A comparison with the KtrAB-ATP structure reveals conformational changes in the ring and in the membrane protein. In combination with a biochemical and functional analysis, we uncover how ligand-dependent changes in the KtrA ring are propagated to the KtrB membrane protein and conclude that, despite their structural similarity, the activation mechanism of KtrAB is markedly different from the activation mechanism of K+ channels.

  19. Size and Charge Dependence of Ion Transport in Human Nail Plate.

    PubMed

    Baswan, Sudhir M; Li, S Kevin; LaCount, Terri D; Kasting, Gerald B

    2016-03-01

    The electrical properties of human nail plate are poorly characterized yet are a key determinate of the potential to treat nail diseases, such as onychomycosis, using iontophoresis. To address this deficiency, molar conductivities of 17 electrolytes comprising 12 ionic species were determined in hydrated human nail plate in vitro. Cation transport numbers across the nail for 11 of these electrolytes were determined by the electromotive force method. Effective ionic mobilities and diffusivities at infinite dilution for all ionic species were determined by regression analysis. The ratios of diffusivities in nail to those in solution were found to correlate inversely with the hydrodynamic radii of the ions according to a power law relationship having an exponent of -1.75 ± 0.27, a substantially steeper size dependence than observed for similar experiments in skin. Effective diffusivities of cations in nail were 3-fold higher than those of comparably sized anions. These results reflect the strong size and charge selectivity of the nail plate for ionic conduction and diffusion. The analysis implies that efficient transungual iontophoretic delivery of ionized drugs having radii upward of 5 Å (molecular weight, ca. ≥ 340 Da) will require chemical or mechanical alteration of the nail plate.

  20. Fast strontium transport induced by hydrodynamic dispersion and pH-dependent sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Hesse, Marc A.; Bryant, Steven L.

    2012-09-01

    As a fluid carries solutes through a porous material, species that sorb onto the surface of the material travel more slowly than the fluid. Stronger adsorption results in slower solute migration, or increased solute retardation. The adsorption of strontium (Sr2+) onto iron-oxides is strongly pH-dependent and becomes significant at high pH. Radioactive Sr2+ isotopes are, therefore, commonly stored in alkaline solutions to maximize their retardation. Field observations and numerical simulations of the leakage of such solutions into low-pH soils, however, show that even Sr2+ stored in alkaline solutions can migrate without retardation. Migration occurs because hydrodynamic dispersion allows mixing of Sr2+ with the low-pH fluid forming an acidic Sr2+-rich plume which can travel without retardation. Here we report the first experimental observations confirming this dispersion-induced fast Sr2+ transport. We report column-flood experiments where a high-pH solution containing Sr2+ was injected into a low-pH porous medium of iron-oxide-coated beads. We observe both a strongly retarded Sr2+ front and an isolated fast pulse of Sr2+ traveling at the average fluid velocity. This dispersion-induced fast pulse of strontium must be taken into account when considering the safety of radionuclide storage in alkaline solutions.

  1. Co nanoelectrodes for the study of spin dependent transport through nano-objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisolia, J.; Martin, C.; Ressier, L.; Gauffier, J.-L.; Respaud, M.; Peyrade, J.-P.; Vieu, C.

    2004-07-01

    In order to study the spin dependent transport mechanisms through a small collection of nano-objects, we propose an original fabrication process of ferromagnetic nanoelectrodes (NEs). It consists in etching, through a negative PMMA mask patterned by high-dose HREBL exposure, the continuous ferromagnetic layer deposited in optimal conditions by sputtering under ultra high vacuum into couples of planar nanoelectrodes (NEs) separated by a nanometric gap. The main advantage of this approach is to guarantee a priori a better crystalline and magnetic quality of the NEs. In this paper, we describe in detail the impact of various parameters such as the electron beam dose, the coded layout NE gap, the layer development, the inversed PMMA removal as well as the ion beam etching parameters …. Observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveal that a 270 nC cm -1 is required to reverse the PMMA tone and provide a strong etching mask. NE gap from 5 nm to several tens of nm were obtained in a reproducible way. Moreover, thanks to the micropads created by a first HREBL stage, the samples were electrically bonded to a gold base plate allowing low current electrical measurements. These measurements on Co NEs showed that 5-20 nm range separated gaps have resistance in the range of hundreds GΩ to TΩ. These measurements correlated with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) observations demonstrate that this process provides well adapted systems for the investigation of nano-object electrical properties.

  2. Three Agt1 transporters from brewer's yeasts exhibit different temperature dependencies for maltose transport over the range of brewery temperatures (0–20 °C).

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Viljanen, Kaarina; Mattinen, Laura; Rautio, Jari; Londesborough, John

    2014-06-01

    Zero-trans rates of maltose transport by brewer's yeasts exert strong control over fermentation rates and are strongly temperature-dependent over the temperature range (20–0 °C) of brewery fermentations. Three α-glucoside transporters, ScAgt1(A60) (a Saccharomyces cerevisiae version of Agt1 from an ale strain), ScAgt1-A548V (a variant of ScAgt1(A60) with a single amino acid change in a transmembrane domain), and SbAgt1 (a Saccharomyces (eu)bayanus version from a lager strain), were compared. When expressed in the same laboratory yeast, grown at 24 °C and assayed at 0, 10, and 20 °C, SbAgt1 had the lowest absolute maltose uptake activity at 20 °C but smallest temperature dependence, ScAgt1-A548V had the highest activity but greatest temperature dependence, and ScAgt1(A60) had intermediate properties. ScAgt1(A60) exhibited higher absolute rates and smaller temperature dependencies when expressed in laboratory rather than brewer's strains. Absolute rates closely reflected the amounts of GFP-tagged ScAgt1(A60) transporter in each host's plasma membrane. Growth at 15 °C instead of 24 °C decreased the absolute activities of strains expressing ScAgt1(A60) by two- to threefold. Evidently, the kinetic characteristics of at least ScAgt1(A60) depended on the nature of the host plasma membrane. However, no consistent correlation was observed between transport activities and fatty acid or ergosterol compositions. PMID:25035870

  3. Transparent boundary conditions for time-dependent electron transport in the R-matrix method with applications to nanostructured interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemnes, G. A.; Palici, Alexandra; Manolescu, A.

    2016-11-01

    Transparent boundary conditions for the time-dependent Schrödinger equation are implemented using the R-matrix method. The employed scattering formalism is suitable for describing open quantum systems and provides the framework for the time-dependent coherent transport. Transmission and reflection of wave functions at the edges of a finite quantum system are essential for an accurate and efficient description of the time-dependent processes on large time scales. We detail the computational method and point out the numerical advantages stemming from the open system approach based on the R-matrix formalism. The approach is used here to describe time-dependent transport across nanostructured interfaces relevant for photovoltaic applications.

  4. Syntabulin-kinesin-1 family member 5B-mediated axonal transport contributes to activity-dependent presynaptic assembly.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Pan, Ping-Yue; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2007-07-01

    The mechanism by which microtubule-based axonal transport regulates activity-dependent presynaptic plasticity in developing neurons remains mostly unknown. Our previous studies established that syntabulin is an adaptor capable of conjoining the kinesin family member 5B (KIF5B) motor and syntaxin-1. We now report that the complex of syntaxin-1-syntabulin-KIF5B mediates axonal transport of the active zone (AZ) components essential for presynaptic assembly. Syntabulin associates with AZ precursor carriers and colocalizes and comigrates with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Bassoon-labeled AZ transport cargos within developing axons. Knock-down of syntabulin or disruption of the syntaxin-1-syntabulin-KIF5B complex impairs the anterograde transport of GFP-Bassoon out of the soma and reduces the axonal densities of synaptic vesicle (SV) clusters and FM4-64 [N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl)pyridinium, dibromide] loading. Furthermore, syntabulin loss of function results in a reduction in both the amplitude of postsynaptic currents and the frequency of asynchronous quantal events, and abolishes the activity-induced recruitment of new GFP-Bassoon into the axons and subsequent coclustering with SVs. Consequently, syntabulin loss of function blocks the formation of new presynaptic boutons during activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in developing neurons. These studies establish that a kinesin motor-adaptor complex is critical for the anterograde axonal transport of AZ components, thus contributing to activity-dependent presynaptic assembly during neuronal development.

  5. Polarized localization and borate-dependent degradation of the Arabidopsis borate transporter BOR1 in tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis the borate transporter BOR1, which is located in the plasma membrane, is degraded in the presence of excess boron by an endocytosis-mediated mechanism. A similar mechanism was suggested in rice as excess boron decreased rice borate transporter levels, although in this case whether the decrease was dependent on an increase in degradation or a decrease in protein synthesis was not elucidated. To address whether the borate-dependent degradation mechanism is conserved among plant cells, we analyzed the fate of GFP-tagged BOR1 (BOR1-GFP) in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells. Cells expressing BOR1-GFP displayed GFP fluorescence at the plasma membrane, especially at the membrane between two attached cells. The plasma membrane signal was abolished when cells were incubated in medium with a high concentration of borate (3 to 5 mM). This decrease in BOR1-GFP signal was mediated by a specific degradation of the protein after internalization by endocytosis from the plasma membrane. Pharmacological analysis indicated that the decrease in BOR1-GFP largely depends on the increase in degradation rate and that the degradation was mediated by a tyrosine-motif and the actin cytoskeleton. Tyr mutants of BOR1-GFP, which has been shown to inhibit borate-dependent degradation in Arabidopsis root cells, did not show borate-dependent endocytosis in tobacco BY-2 cells. These findings indicate that the borate-dependent degradation machinery of the borate transporter is conserved among plant species. PMID:24715955

  6. A Barley Efflux Transporter Operates in a Na+-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by a Multidisciplinary Platform.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Yagnesh; Rongala, Jay; Luang, Sukanya; Singh, Abhishek; Shadiac, Nadim; Hayes, Julie; Sutton, Tim; Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Stephen D; McPhee, Gordon; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Kirby, Nigel M; Lee, Jung-Goo; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Hrmova, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and survival depend upon the activity of membrane transporters that control the movement and distribution of solutes into, around, and out of plants. Although many plant transporters are known, their intrinsic properties make them difficult to study. In barley (Hordeum vulgare), the root anion-permeable transporter Bot1 plays a key role in tolerance to high soil boron, facilitating the efflux of borate from cells. However, its three-dimensional structure is unavailable and the molecular basis of its permeation function is unknown. Using an integrative platform of computational, biophysical, and biochemical tools as well as molecular biology, electrophysiology, and bioinformatics, we provide insight into the origin of transport function of Bot1. An atomistic model, supported by atomic force microscopy measurements, reveals that the protein folds into 13 transmembrane-spanning and five cytoplasmic α-helices. We predict a trimeric assembly of Bot1 and the presence of a Na(+) ion binding site, located in the proximity of a pore that conducts anions. Patch-clamp electrophysiology of Bot1 detects Na(+)-dependent polyvalent anion transport in a Nernstian manner with channel-like characteristics. Using alanine scanning, molecular dynamics simulations, and transport measurements, we show that conductance by Bot1 is abolished by removal of the Na(+) ion binding site. Our data enhance the understanding of the permeation functions of Bot1. PMID:26672067

  7. A Barley Efflux Transporter Operates in a Na+-Dependent Manner, as Revealed by a Multidisciplinary Platform[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Yagnesh; Rongala, Jay; Luang, Sukanya; Shadiac, Nadim; Sutton, Tim; Tyerman, Stephen D.; McPhee, Gordon; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and survival depend upon the activity of membrane transporters that control the movement and distribution of solutes into, around, and out of plants. Although many plant transporters are known, their intrinsic properties make them difficult to study. In barley (Hordeum vulgare), the root anion-permeable transporter Bot1 plays a key role in tolerance to high soil boron, facilitating the efflux of borate from cells. However, its three-dimensional structure is unavailable and the molecular basis of its permeation function is unknown. Using an integrative platform of computational, biophysical, and biochemical tools as well as molecular biology, electrophysiology, and bioinformatics, we provide insight into the origin of transport function of Bot1. An atomistic model, supported by atomic force microscopy measurements, reveals that the protein folds into 13 transmembrane-spanning and five cytoplasmic α-helices. We predict a trimeric assembly of Bot1 and the presence of a Na+ ion binding site, located in the proximity of a pore that conducts anions. Patch-clamp electrophysiology of Bot1 detects Na+-dependent polyvalent anion transport in a Nernstian manner with channel-like characteristics. Using alanine scanning, molecular dynamics simulations, and transport measurements, we show that conductance by Bot1 is abolished by removal of the Na+ ion binding site. Our data enhance the understanding of the permeation functions of Bot1. PMID:26672067

  8. Unusual Temperature and Field Dependence of Transport Properties Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yimin; Li, Jianneng; Jin, Rongying

    2010-10-01

    The in-plane transport properties of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 single crystals with x = 0.02 ˜ 0.28 was measured as a function of temperature (2 ˜ 300 K) and magnetic field (up to 14 Tesla). A Cobalt doping composition-temperature (x-T) phase diagram was plotted and shows a non-Fermi liquid (NFL) transport behavior around the optimal doing level. The Hall effect and magneto-resistance results also show an anomaly and a change of field dependence around the optimal doing. The underlying physics of such unusual temperature and field dependence of transport properties ab plane will be discussed.

  9. The role of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 2 in the absorption of cyanidin-3-o-β-glucoside in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Feng, Dan; Song, Gang; Li, Hua-Wen; Tang, Huan-Wen; Ling, Wen-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Anthocyanins have multiple biological activities of benefit to human health. While a few studies have been conducted to evaluate the bioavailability of anthocyanins, the mechanisms of their absorption mechanism remain ill-defined. In the present study, we investigated the absorption mechanism of cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (Cy-3-G) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cy-3-G transport was assessed by measuring the absorptive and efflux direction. Inhibition studies were conducted using the pharmacological agents, phloridzin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), or phloretin, an inhibitor of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). The results showed that phloridzin and phloretin significantly inhibited the absorption of Cy-3-G. In addition, Caco-2 cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for SGLT1 or GLUT2 showed significantly decreased Cy-3-G absorption. These siRNA transfected cells also showed a significantly decreased rate of transport of Cy-3-G compared with the control group. These findings suggest that Cy-3-G absorption is dependent on the activities of SGLT1 and GLUT2 in the small intestine and that SGLT1 and GLUT2 could be a limiting step for the bioavailability of Cy-3-G. PMID:25314643

  10. Azimuthal Directivity of Fan Tones Containing Multiple Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Nallasamy, M.

    1997-01-01

    The directivity of fan tone noise is generally measured and plotted in the sideline or flyover plane and it is assumed that this curve is the same for all azimuthal angles. When two or more circumferential (m-order) modes of the same tone are present in the fan duct, an interference pattern develops in the azimuthal direction both in the duct and in the farfield. In this investigation two m-order modes of similar power were generated in a large low speed fan. Farfield measurements and a finite element propagation code both show substantial variations in the azimuthal direction. Induct mode measurement were made and used as input to the code. Although these tests may represent a worst case scenario, the validity of the current practice of assuming axisymmetry should be questioned.

  11. Incongruent reduction of dopamine transporter availability in different subgroups of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Yen, Che-Hung; Shih, Mei-Chen; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Lu, Ru-Band; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcohol dependence (AD) and major depression (MD), and males have more risk factors for the development of AD. However, imaging studies on brain DAT availability in males with AD comorbid with MD (AD/MD) are limited, and the association of DAT availability with cognitive function and depressive scores in patients with AD/MD has not been analyzed. Hence, this study examined the relationship between brain DAT availability, cognitive function, and depressive symptoms in different subgroups of males with AD.Single-photon emission computed tomography imaging with Tc-TRODAT-1 as a ligand was used to measure striatal DAT availability in 49 patients with AD (28 pure AD and 21 AD/MD) and 24 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were used to assess neurocognitive function and depressive scores, respectively. Patients with AD showed a significant reduction of DAT availability in 3 brain regions (P < 0.001), and this reduction was more pronounced in the patients with pure AD compared to healthy controls. The patients with AD showed significantly poorer performance on the WCST, but only in the control group was DAT availability significantly negatively correlated with total errors and perseverative errors (P < 0.001).These preliminary findings suggest that DAT availability is associated with neurocognitive function, and incongruent reduction of DAT may play a pathophysiological role in different subgroups of AD. In addition, decreased DAT availability may be associated with the severity of depressive symptoms in patients with AD/MD. PMID:27537550

  12. Role of the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in the maintenance of intestinal mucosal integrity.

    PubMed

    Sabui, Subrata; Bohl, Jennifer Ann; Kapadia, Rubina; Cogburn, Kyle; Ghosal, Abhisek; Lambrecht, Nils W; Said, Hamid M

    2016-09-01

    Utilizing a conditional (intestinal-specific) knockout (cKO) mouse model, we have recently shown that the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) (SLC5A6) is the only biotin uptake system that operates in the gut and that its deletion leads to biotin deficiency. Unexpectedly, we also observed that all SMVT-cKO mice develop chronic active inflammation, especially in the cecum. Our aim here was to examine the role of SMVT in the maintenance of intestinal mucosal integrity [permeability and expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins]. Our results showed that knocking out the mouse intestinal SMVT is associated with a significant increase in gut permeability and with changes in the level of expression of TJ proteins. To determine whether these changes are related to the state of biotin deficiency that develops in SMVT-cKO mice, we induced (by dietary means) biotin deficiency in wild-type mice and examined its effect on the above-mentioned parameters. The results showed that dietary-induced biotin deficiency leads to a similar development of chronic active inflammation in the cecum with an increase in the level of expression of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as an increase in intestinal permeability and changes in the level of expression of TJ proteins. We also examined the effect of chronic biotin deficiency on permeability and expression of TJ proteins in confluent intestinal epithelial Caco-2 monolayers but observed no changes in these parameters. These results show that the intestinal SMVT plays an important role in the maintenance of normal mucosal integrity, most likely via its role in providing biotin to different cells of the gut mucosa. PMID:27492331

  13. Gabapentin increases extracellular glutamatergic level in the locus coeruleus via astroglial glutamate transporter-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Suto, Takashi; Severino, Amie L; Eisenach, James C; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro

    2014-06-01

    Gabapentin has shown to be effective in animals and humans with acute postoperative and chronic pain. Yet the mechanisms by which gabapentin reduces pain have not been fully addressed. The current study performed in vivo microdialysis in the locus coeruleus (LC) in normal and spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats to examine the effect of gabapentin on extracellular glutamate concentration and its mechanisms of action with focus on presynaptic GABA-B receptors, astroglial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), and interactions with α2δ subunits of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and endogenous noradrenaline. Basal extracellular concentration and tissue content of glutamate in the LC were greater in SNL rats than normal ones. Intravenously administered and LC-perfused gabapentin increased extracellular glutamate concentration in the LC. The net amount of glutamate increased by gabapentin is larger in SNL rats compared with normal ones, although the percentage increases from the baseline did not differ. The gabapentin-related α2δ ligand pregabalin increased extracellular glutamate concentration in the LC, whereas another α2δ ligand, 3-exo-aminobicyclo [2.2.1] heptane-2-exo-carboxylic acid (ABHCA), did not. Selective blockade by the dihydrokainic acid or knock-down of GLT-1 by the small interfering RNA abolished the gabapentin-induced glutamate increase in the LC, whereas blockade of GABA-B receptors by the CGP-35348 and depletion of noradrenalin by the dopamine-β-hydroxylase antibody conjugated to saporin did not. These results suggest that gabapentin induces glutamate release from astrocytes in the LC via GLT-1-dependent mechanisms to stimulate descending inhibition. The present study also demonstrates that this target of gabapentin in astrocytes does not require interaction with α2δ subunits in neurons.

  14. Theory of valley-dependent transport in graphene-based lateral quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Wu; Chou, Mei-Yin; Chen, Yiing-Rei; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of electronic states in two-dimensional materials can be achieved by using in-plane variations of the band gap or the average potential in lateral quantum structures. In the atomic configurations with hexagonal symmetry, this approach makes it possible to tailor the valleytronic properties for potential device applications. In this work, we present a multiband theory to calculate the valley-dependent electron transport in graphene-based lateral quantum structures. As an example, we consider the structures with a single interface that exhibits an energy gap or potential discontinuity. The theoretical formalism proceeds within the tight-binding description, by first deriving the local bulk complex band structures in the regions of a constant gap or potential and, next, joining the local wave functions across the interface via a cell-averaged current operator to ensure the current continuity. The theory is applied to the study of electron reflection off and transmission through an interface. Both reflection and transmission are found to exhibit valley-contrast behavior that can be used to generate valley-polarized electron sources. The results vary with the type of interfaces, as well as between monolayer and bilayer graphene-based structures. In the monolayer case, the valley contrast originates from the band warping and only becomes sizable for incident carriers of high energy, whereas in AB-stacked bilayer graphene, the vertical interlayer coupling emerges as an additional important cause for valley contrast, and the favorable carrier energy is also found to be drastically lower. Our numerical results clearly demonstrate the propitious valleytronic properties of bilayer graphene structures.

  15. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  16. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  17. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors.

  18. Ionic mechanisms of Ca(2+)-dependent electrolyte transport across equine sweat gland epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, W H; Chan, H C; Chew, S B; Wong, P Y

    1996-01-01

    1. The ionic mechanism involved in Ca(2+)-stimulated electrolyte transport in cultured equine sweat gland epithelial cells was studied using the short-circuit current (ISC) technique. 2. Microscopy revealed that the cultured cells grown on Millipore filters formed polarized monolayers with tight junctions. Monolayers exhibited a mean transepithelial resistance of 333.9 +/- 40.4 omega cm2. 3. Ca(2+)-mobilizing agents, A23187 (1 microM) or thapsigargin (0.01-1 microM), stimulated ISC while forskolin exerted little effect on the ISC. 4. Replacement of external Cl- by gluconate significantly reduced the ISC by 63% when stimulated by 0.1 microM thapsigargin. Residual ISC could be abolished (> 99%) by elimination of HCO3- from the bathing solution. 5. Basolateral addition of bumetanide (0.1 mM), ouabain (0.01 mM) and acetazolamide (45 microM) and apical addition of methyl isobutyl amiloride (MIA, 1-100 microM) all had inhibitory effects on the thapsigargin-stimulated ISC to various extents. 6. Substantial current inhibition could be obtained using 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) in a concentration-dependent manner. 7. The K+ channel blocker barium (5 mM) was effective on both sides of the epithelium with a much larger effect on the basolateral side. 8. The inhibitory effects of acetazolamide, amiloride, MIA, DIDS and DPC on the thapsigargin-stimulated ISC were also observed when a Cl(-)-free solution was used. 9. The results provide evidence for Ca(2+)-stimulated HCO3- as well as Cl- secretion by equine sweat gland epithelium. Images Figure 1 PMID:8799908

  19. Kinetic and time-dependent features of sustained inhibitory effect of myricetin on folate transport by proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takahiro; Ohta, Kinya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Furumiya, Mai; Hayashi, Yayoi; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2015-10-01

    Myricetin is a flavonoid that has recently been suggested to induce sustained inhibition of proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1), which operates for intestinal folate uptake. The present study was conducted to characterize the inhibitory effect in more detail, using human PCFT stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells, to gain information to cope with problems potentially arising from that. The kinetics of saturable folate transport was first assessed in the absence of myricetin in the cells pretreated with the flavonoid for 60 min. The pretreatment induced PCFT inhibition in a manner dependent on the concentration of myricetin, where the maximum transport rate was reduced by 35.5% and 83.1%, respectively, at its concentrations of 20 μM and 50 μM. The inhibitory effect was, however, less extensive at lower folate concentrations, because the Michaelis constant was also reduced similarly in a manner dependent on myricetin concentration. The inhibition was induced depending on the time of pretreatment and, after removal of myricetin (50 μM) upon the manifestation of an extensive inhibition at 60 min, reversed almost completely in 90 min. This rather short time required for recovery may suggest that the sustained inhibition of PCFT is of a reversible type.

  20. Length-dependent thermal transport in one-dimensional self-assembly of planar π-conjugated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hao; Xiong, Yucheng; Zu, Fengshuo; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Qiang; Jie, Jiansheng; Yang, Juekuan; Xu, Dongyan

    2016-06-01

    This work reports a thermal transport study in quasi-one-dimensional organic nanostructures self-assembled from conjugated planar molecules via π-π interactions. Thermal resistances of single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanoribbons are measured via a suspended thermal bridge method. We experimentally observed the deviation from the linear length dependence for the thermal resistance of single crystalline β-phase CuPc nanoribbons, indicating possible subdiffusion thermal transport. Interestingly, a gradual transition to the linear length dependence is observed with the increase of the lateral dimensions of CuPc nanoribbons. The measured thermal resistance of single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons shows an increasing trend with temperature. However, the trend of temperature dependence of thermal resistance is reversed after electron irradiation, i.e., decreasing with temperature, indicating that the single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons become `amorphous'. Similar behavior is also observed for PTCDI nanoribbons after electron irradiation, proving that the electron beam can induce amorphization of single crystalline self-assembled nanostructures of planar π-conjugated molecules. The measured thermal resistance of the `amorphous' CuPc nanoribbon demonstrates a roughly linear dependence on the nanoribbon length, suggesting that normal diffusion dominates thermal transport.This work reports a thermal transport study in quasi-one-dimensional organic nanostructures self-assembled from conjugated planar molecules via π-π interactions. Thermal resistances of single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanoribbons are measured via a suspended thermal bridge method. We experimentally observed the deviation from the linear length dependence for the thermal resistance of single crystalline β-phase CuPc nanoribbons, indicating possible subdiffusion thermal transport

  1. Surface harmonics method for two-dimensional time-dependent neutron transport problems of square-lattice nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent equations of the Surface Harmonics Method (SHM) have been derived from the time-dependent neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons for solving the two-dimensional time-dependent problems. These equations have been realized in the SUHAM-TD code. The TWIGL benchmark problem has been used for verification of the SUHAM-TD code. The results of the study showed that computational costs required to achieve necessary accuracy of the solution can be an order of magnitude less than with the use of the conventional finite difference method (FDM). (authors)

  2. Backscatter by azimuthally oriented ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Konoshonkin, Alexander; Wang, Zhenzhu; Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-09-01

    The backscattering Mueller matrix has been calculated for the first time for the hexagonal ice columns and plates with both zenith and azimuth preferential orientations. The possibility of a vertically pointing polarization lidar measuring the full Mueller matrix for retrieving the orientation distributions of the crystals is considered. It is shown that the element m44 or, equivalently, the circular depolarization ratio distinguishes between the low and high zenith tilts of the crystals. Then, at their low or high zenith tilts, either the element m22 or m34, respectively, should be measured to retrieve the azimuth tilts.

  3. Backscatter by azimuthally oriented ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Konoshonkin, Alexander; Wang, Zhenzhu; Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-09-01

    The backscattering Mueller matrix has been calculated for the first time for the hexagonal ice columns and plates with both zenith and azimuth preferential orientations. The possibility of a vertically pointing polarization lidar measuring the full Mueller matrix for retrieving the orientation distributions of the crystals is considered. It is shown that the element m44 or, equivalently, the circular depolarization ratio distinguishes between the low and high zenith tilts of the crystals. Then, at their low or high zenith tilts, either the element m22 or m34, respectively, should be measured to retrieve the azimuth tilts. PMID:27607728

  4. Seed filling in domesticated maize and rice depends on SWEET-mediated hexose transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate import into seeds directly determines seed size and must have been increased through domestication. However, evidence for domestication of sugar translocation and the identity of seed filling transporters remained elusive. Maize ZmSWEET4c, as opposed to its sucrose-transporting homologs...

  5. Cooling a nanomechanical resonator using spin-dependent transport and noise interference in Andreev reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Pascal; Belzig, Wolfgang; Rastelli, Gianluca

    Nanoelectromechanical systems promise to manipulate mechanical motion in the quantum regime using electron transport. For such a goal, a necessary condition is the ability of cooling the resonator into or near to its quantum ground state. A still open challenge in this field is the achievement of active cooling using purely electron transport in, for instance, suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. We consider the quantum transport in a carbon nanotube quantum dot suspended between two electric nanocontacts. Due to the interaction between electrons and flexural mechanical modes, the electron transport results in inelastic vibration-assisted tunneling processes. These give rise to a mechanical damping and to a steady nonequilibrium phonon occupation of the resonator. We discuss these effects for two different coherent transport regimes: (i) spin-polarized current between two ferromagnets and (ii) subgap Andreev current between a superconductor and normal metal.

  6. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Lucy C.J.; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M.; Weaver, Richard J.

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  7. Kinetic modeling of pH-dependent antimony (V) sorption and transport in iron oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongbing; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics controlling the retention and transport of antimony (Sb) is prerequisite for evaluating the risk of groundwater contamination by the toxic element. In this study, kinetic batch and saturated miscible displacement experiments were performed to investigate effects of protonation-deprotonation reactions on sorption-desorption and transport of Sb(V) in iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Results clearly demonstrated that Sb(V) sorption was highly nonlinear and time dependent, where both sorption capacity and kinetic rates decreased with increasing solution pH. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained at different solution pH exhibited that mobility of Sb(V) were higher under neutral to alkaline condition than under acidic condition. Because of the nonlinear and non-equilibrium nature of Sb(V) retention and transport, multi-reaction models (MRM) with equilibrium and kinetic sorption expressions were utilized successfully to simulate the experiment data. Equilibrium distribution coefficient (Ke) and reversible kinetic retention parameters (k1 and k2) of both kinetic sorption and transport experiment showed marked decrease as pH increased from 4.0 to 7.5. Surface complexation is suggested as the dominant mechanism for the observed pH-dependent phenomena, which need to be incorporated into the kinetic models to accurately simulate the reactive transport of Sb(V) in vadose zone and aquifers.

  8. Contact metal-dependent electrical transport in carbon nanotubes and fabrication of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perello, David

    In this thesis, we fabricate and characterize carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based field effect transistor devices. The CNT-based work centers around the physics of metal contacts to CNT, particularly relating the work function of contact metals to carrier transport across the junction. The graphene work is motivated by the desire to utilize the high carrier mobility of graphene in field effect transistors. CNT have excellent electrical properties including high carrier mobility, large field effect switching capabilities, and a long mean free path. Absent, however is an experimentally-backed model explaining contact-metal work function, device layout, and environment effects. To fill this void, we introduce a surface-inversion channel (SIC) model based on low temperature and electrical measurements of a distinct single-walled semiconducting CNT contacted by Hf, Cr, Ti and Pd electrodes. Anomalous barrier heights and metal-contact dependent band-to-band tunneling phenomena are utilized to show that dependent upon contact work function and gate field, transport occurs either directly between the metal and CNT channel or indirectly via injection of carriers from the metal-covered CNT region to the CNT channel. The model is consistent with previously contradictory experimental results, and the methodology is simple enough to apply in other contact-dominant systems. In agreement with the initial contact theory above, we further develop a model explain Isd-Vsd tendencies in CNT FETs. Using experimental and analytical analysis, we demonstrate a relationship between the contact metal work function and electrical transport properties saturation current (Isat) and differential conductance ssd=6Isd 6Vsd in ambient exposed CNT. A single chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown 6 millimeter long semiconducting single-walled CNT is electrically contacted with a statistically significant number of Hf, Cr, Ti, Pd, and Ti, Au electrodes, respectively. The observed exponentially

  9. Charge transport perpendicular to the high mobility plane in organic crystals: Bandlike temperature dependence maintained despite hundredfold anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blülle, B.; Troisi, A.; Häusermann, R.; Batlogg, B.

    2016-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility in van der Waals bonded organic crystals is strongly dependent on the transfer integral between neighboring molecules, and therefore the anisotropy of charge transport is determined by the molecular arrangement within the crystal lattice. Here we report on temperature dependent transport measurements along all three principal crystal directions of the same rubrene single crystals of high purity. Hole mobilities are obtained from the carrier transit time measured with high-frequency admittance spectroscopy perpendicular to the molecular layers (μc) and from the transfer characteristics of two field-effect transistor (FET) structures oriented perpendicularly to each other in the layers (μa and μb). While the measurements of the field-effect channels confirm the previously reported high mobility and anisotropy within the a b plane, we find the mobility perpendicular to the molecular layers in the same crystals to be lower by about two orders of magnitude (μc˜0.2 cm2/Vs at 300 K ). Although the bandwidth is vanishingly small along the c direction and the transport cannot be coherent, we find μc to increase upon cooling. We show that the delocalization within the high mobility a b plane prevents the formation of small polarons and leads to the observed "bandlike" temperature dependence also in the direction perpendicular to the molecular layers, despite the incoherent transport mechanism.

  10. Long-range azimuthal correlations in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions from the incoherent scattering of partons

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Guo -Liang; Bzdak, Adam

    2014-11-04

    In this study, we show that the incoherent elastic scattering of partons, as present in a multi-phase transport model (AMPT), with a modest parton–parton cross-section of σ = 1.5 – 3 mb, naturally explains the long-range two-particle azimuthal correlation as observed in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. A two-dimensional, time-dependent model of suspended sediment transport and bed reworking for continental shelves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, C.K.; Wiberg, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional, time-dependent solution to the transport equation is formulated to account for advection and diffusion of sediment suspended in the bottom boundary layer of continental shelves. This model utilizes a semi-implicit, upwind-differencing scheme to solve the advection-diffusion equation across a two-dimensional transect that is configured so that one dimension is the vertical, and the other is a horizontal dimension usually aligned perpendicular to shelf bathymetry. The model calculates suspended sediment concentration and flux; and requires as input wave properties, current velocities, sediment size distributions, and hydrodynamic sediment properties. From the calculated two-dimensional suspended sediment fluxes, we quantify the redistribution of shelf sediment, bed erosion, and deposition for several sediment sizes during resuspension events. The two-dimensional, time-dependent approach directly accounts for cross-shelf gradients in bed shear stress and sediment properties, as well as transport that occurs before steady-state suspended sediment concentrations have been attained. By including the vertical dimension in the calculations, we avoid depth-averaging suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes, and directly account for differences in transport rates and directions for fine and coarse sediment in the bottom boundary layer. A flux condition is used as the bottom boundary condition for the transport equation in order to capture time-dependence of the suspended sediment field. Model calculations demonstrate the significance of both time-dependent and spatial terms on transport and depositional patterns on continental shelves. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A new prenylated flavone from Artocarpus champeden inhibits the K(+)-dependent amino acid transport in Bombyx mori midgut.

    PubMed

    Parenti, P; Pizzigoni, A; Hanozet, G; Hakim, E H; Makmur, L; Achmad, S A; Giordana, B

    1998-03-17

    The effect of some flavonoids on the K(+)-dependent and K(+)-independent leucine uptake into brush border membrane vesicles from Bombyx mori larval midgut was investigated. Among the compounds tested, cyclochampedol, recently purified from Artocarpus champeden, was able to inhibit in micromolar range the leucine transport. The inhibition occurred both in the absence and in the presence of potassium and was not affected by leucine concentration. The apparent Ki was 0.25 mM. Cyclochampedol represents the first non-competitive inhibitor of an amino acid transport system in Lepidoptera. The relevance of this result is discussed.

  13. K(+)- and HCO3(-)-dependent acid-base transport in squid giant axons II. Base influx

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We used microelectrodes to determine whether the K/HCO3 cotransporter tentatively identified in the accompanying paper (Hogan, E. M., M. A. Cohen, and W. F. Boron. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:821- 844) can mediate an increase in the intracellular pH (pHi) of squid giant axons. An 80-min period of internal dialysis increased pHi to 7.7, 8.0, or 8.3; the dialysis fluid was free of K+, Na+, and Cl-. Our standard artificial seawater (ASW), which also lacked Na+, K+, and Cl-, had a pH of 8.0. Halting dialysis unmasked a slow pHi decrease. Subsequently introducing an ASW containing 437 mM K+ and 0.5% CO2/12 mM HCO3- had two effects: (a) it caused membrane potential (Vm) to become very positive, and (b) it caused a rapid pHi decrease, because of CO2 influx, followed by a slower plateau-phase pHi increase, presumably because of inward cotransport of K+ and HCO3- ("base influx"). Only extracellular Rb+ substituted for K+ in producing the plateau-phase pHi increase in the presence of CO2/HCO3-. Mean fluxes with Na+, Li+, and Cs+ were not significantly different from zero, even though Vm shifts were comparable for all monovalent cations tested. Thus, unless K+ or Rb+ (but not Na+, Li+, or Cs+) somehow activates a conductive pathway for H+, HCO3-, or both, it is unlikely that passive transport of H+, HCO3-, or both makes the major contribution to the pHi increase in the presence of K+ (or Rb+) and CO2/HCO3-. Because exposing axons to an ASW containing 437 mM K+, but no CO2/HCO3-, produced at most a slow pHi increase, K-H exchange could not make a major contribution to base influx. Introducing an ASW containing CO2/HCO3-, but no K+ also failed to elicit base influx. Because we observed base influx when the ASW and DF were free of Na+ and Cl-, and because the disulfonic stilbene derivatives SITS and DIDS failed to block base influx, Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchange also cannot account for the results. Rather, we suggest that the most straightforward explanation for

  14. K(+)- and HCO3(-)-dependent acid-base transport in squid giant axons II. Base influx.

    PubMed

    Hogan, E M; Cohen, M A; Boron, W F

    1995-11-01

    We used microelectrodes to determine whether the K/HCO3 cotransporter tentatively identified in the accompanying paper (Hogan, E. M., M. A. Cohen, and W. F. Boron. 1995. Journal of General Physiology. 106:821-844) can mediate an increase in the intracellular pH (pHi) of squid giant axons. An 80-min period of internal dialysis increased pHi to 7.7, 8.0, or 8.3; the dialysis fluid was free of K+, Na+, and Cl-. Our standard artificial seawater (ASW), which also lacked Na+, K+, and Cl-, had a pH of 8.0. Halting dialysis unmasked a slow pHi decrease. Subsequently introducing an ASW containing 437 mM K+ and 0.5% CO2/12 mM HCO3- had two effects: (a) it caused membrane potential (Vm) to become very positive, and (b) it caused a rapid pHi decrease, because of CO2 influx, followed by a slower plateau-phase pHi increase, presumably because of inward cotransport of K+ and HCO3- ("base influx"). Only extracellular Rb+ substituted for K+ in producing the plateau-phase pHi increase in the presence of CO2/HCO3-. Mean fluxes with Na+, Li+, and Cs+ were not significantly different from zero, even though Vm shifts were comparable for all monovalent cations tested. Thus, unless K+ or Rb+ (but not Na+, Li+, or Cs+) somehow activates a conductive pathway for H+, HCO3-, or both, it is unlikely that passive transport of H+, HCO3-, or both makes the major contribution to the pHi increase in the presence of K+ (or Rb+) and CO2/HCO3-. Because exposing axons to an ASW containing 437 mM K+, but no CO2/HCO3-, produced at most a slow pHi increase, K-H exchange could not make a major contribution to base influx. Introducing an ASW containing CO2/HCO3-, but no K+ also failed to elicit base influx. Because we observed base influx when the ASW and DF were free of Na+ and Cl-, and because the disulfonic stilbene derivatives SITS and DIDS failed to block base influx, Na(+)-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchange also cannot account for the results. Rather, we suggest that the most straightforward explanation for

  15. Length-dependent thermal transport in one-dimensional self-assembly of planar π-conjugated molecules.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Xiong, Yucheng; Zu, Fengshuo; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Qiang; Jie, Jiansheng; Yang, Juekuan; Xu, Dongyan

    2016-06-01

    This work reports a thermal transport study in quasi-one-dimensional organic nanostructures self-assembled from conjugated planar molecules via π-π interactions. Thermal resistances of single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanoribbons are measured via a suspended thermal bridge method. We experimentally observed the deviation from the linear length dependence for the thermal resistance of single crystalline β-phase CuPc nanoribbons, indicating possible subdiffusion thermal transport. Interestingly, a gradual transition to the linear length dependence is observed with the increase of the lateral dimensions of CuPc nanoribbons. The measured thermal resistance of single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons shows an increasing trend with temperature. However, the trend of temperature dependence of thermal resistance is reversed after electron irradiation, i.e., decreasing with temperature, indicating that the single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons become 'amorphous'. Similar behavior is also observed for PTCDI nanoribbons after electron irradiation, proving that the electron beam can induce amorphization of single crystalline self-assembled nanostructures of planar π-conjugated molecules. The measured thermal resistance of the 'amorphous' CuPc nanoribbon demonstrates a roughly linear dependence on the nanoribbon length, suggesting that normal diffusion dominates thermal transport.

  16. Length-dependent thermal transport in one-dimensional self-assembly of planar π-conjugated molecules.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Xiong, Yucheng; Zu, Fengshuo; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Qiang; Jie, Jiansheng; Yang, Juekuan; Xu, Dongyan

    2016-06-01

    This work reports a thermal transport study in quasi-one-dimensional organic nanostructures self-assembled from conjugated planar molecules via π-π interactions. Thermal resistances of single crystalline copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) nanoribbons are measured via a suspended thermal bridge method. We experimentally observed the deviation from the linear length dependence for the thermal resistance of single crystalline β-phase CuPc nanoribbons, indicating possible subdiffusion thermal transport. Interestingly, a gradual transition to the linear length dependence is observed with the increase of the lateral dimensions of CuPc nanoribbons. The measured thermal resistance of single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons shows an increasing trend with temperature. However, the trend of temperature dependence of thermal resistance is reversed after electron irradiation, i.e., decreasing with temperature, indicating that the single crystalline CuPc nanoribbons become 'amorphous'. Similar behavior is also observed for PTCDI nanoribbons after electron irradiation, proving that the electron beam can induce amorphization of single crystalline self-assembled nanostructures of planar π-conjugated molecules. The measured thermal resistance of the 'amorphous' CuPc nanoribbon demonstrates a roughly linear dependence on the nanoribbon length, suggesting that normal diffusion dominates thermal transport. PMID:27240641

  17. Thickness-dependent transport channels in topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films grown by magnetron sputtering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen Jie; Gao, Kuang Hong; Li, Zhi Qing

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-temperature transport properties of Bi2Se3 thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. A positive magnetoresistance resulting from the weak antilocalization (WAL) effect is observed at low temperatures. The observed WAL effect is two dimensional in nature. Applying the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory, we have obtained the dephasing length. It is found that the temperature dependence of the dephasing length cannot be described only by the Nyquist electron-electron dephasing, in conflict with prevailing experimental results. From the WAL effect, we extract the number of the transport channels, which is found to increase with increasing the thickness of the films, reflecting the thickness-dependent coupling between the top and bottom surface states in topological insulator. On the other hand, the electron-electron interaction (EEI) effect is observed in temperature-dependent conductivity. From the EEI effect, we also extract the number of the transport channel, which shows similar thickness dependence with that obtained from the analysis of the WAL effect. The EEI effect, therefore, can be used to analyze the coupling effect between the top and bottom surface states in topological insulator like the WAL effect. PMID:27142578

  18. Interactions of noncanonical motifs with hnRNP A2 promote activity-dependent RNA transport in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Muslimov, Ilham A.; Tuzhilin, Aliya; Tang, Thean Hock; Wong, Robert K.S.; Bianchi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    A key determinant of neuronal functionality and plasticity is the targeted delivery of select ribonucleic acids (RNAs) to synaptodendritic sites of protein synthesis. In this paper, we ask how dendritic RNA transport can be regulated in a manner that is informed by the cell’s activity status. We describe a molecular mechanism in which inducible interactions of noncanonical RNA motif structures with targeting factor heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2 form the basis for activity-dependent dendritic RNA targeting. High-affinity interactions between hnRNP A2 and conditional GA-type RNA targeting motifs are critically dependent on elevated Ca2+ levels in a narrow concentration range. Dendritic transport of messenger RNAs that carry such GA motifs is inducible by influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent calcium channels upon β-adrenergic receptor activation. The combined data establish a functional correspondence between Ca2+-dependent RNA–protein interactions and activity-inducible RNA transport in dendrites. They also indicate a role of genomic retroposition in the phylogenetic development of RNA targeting competence. PMID:24841565

  19. Thickness-dependent transport channels in topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films grown by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen Jie; Gao, Kuang Hong; Li, Zhi Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the low-temperature transport properties of Bi2Se3 thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. A positive magnetoresistance resulting from the weak antilocalization (WAL) effect is observed at low temperatures. The observed WAL effect is two dimensional in nature. Applying the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory, we have obtained the dephasing length. It is found that the temperature dependence of the dephasing length cannot be described only by the Nyquist electron-electron dephasing, in conflict with prevailing experimental results. From the WAL effect, we extract the number of the transport channels, which is found to increase with increasing the thickness of the films, reflecting the thickness-dependent coupling between the top and bottom surface states in topological insulator. On the other hand, the electron-electron interaction (EEI) effect is observed in temperature-dependent conductivity. From the EEI effect, we also extract the number of the transport channel, which shows similar thickness dependence with that obtained from the analysis of the WAL effect. The EEI effect, therefore, can be used to analyze the coupling effect between the top and bottom surface states in topological insulator like the WAL effect.

  20. Thickness-dependent transport channels in topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films grown by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen Jie; Gao, Kuang Hong; Li, Zhi Qing

    2016-05-04

    We study the low-temperature transport properties of Bi2Se3 thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. A positive magnetoresistance resulting from the weak antilocalization (WAL) effect is observed at low temperatures. The observed WAL effect is two dimensional in nature. Applying the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka theory, we have obtained the dephasing length. It is found that the temperature dependence of the dephasing length cannot be described only by the Nyquist electron-electron dephasing, in conflict with prevailing experimental results. From the WAL effect, we extract the number of the transport channels, which is found to increase with increasing the thickness of the films, reflecting the thickness-dependent coupling between the top and bottom surface states in topological insulator. On the other hand, the electron-electron interaction (EEI) effect is observed in temperature-dependent conductivity. From the EEI effect, we also extract the number of the transport channel, which shows similar thickness dependence with that obtained from the analysis of the WAL effect. The EEI effect, therefore, can be used to analyze the coupling effect between the top and bottom surface states in topological insulator like the WAL effect.

  1. Dependence of transport rate on area of lithography and pretreatment of tip in dip-pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Heng; Lu, Hui-Hsin; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2012-10-16

    This study examines the lithographic capacity of tips in dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The dependence of the transport rate (R) decay on the area of lithography (A(lith)), the dependence of A(lith) on the lithographic time (t), and the effect of piranha cleaning on the lithographic capacity are considered herein. The dependencies in the line-drawing lithography process are studied using 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) ink. On the basis of the linear decay dependence discovered in the R-A(lith) dependence, piranha treatment can increase the lithographic capacity by up to 35.5-fold, an improvement that may originate from a change in the tip's surface chemistry. Moreover, a theoretical model is derived to describe the A(lith)-t dependence accurately and to predict the tips' lifetime. Furthermore, an experiment involving DPN-based nanostructure fabrication demonstrates the importance of monitoring the tips' transport rate and lifetime. In addition to shedding light on the physical and chemical principles behind DPN, this study provides a comprehensive model for a quantitative analysis of the tips' behavior. PMID:23020585

  2. Dependence of transport rate on area of lithography and pretreatment of tip in dip-pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Heng; Lu, Hui-Hsin; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2012-10-16

    This study examines the lithographic capacity of tips in dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The dependence of the transport rate (R) decay on the area of lithography (A(lith)), the dependence of A(lith) on the lithographic time (t), and the effect of piranha cleaning on the lithographic capacity are considered herein. The dependencies in the line-drawing lithography process are studied using 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) ink. On the basis of the linear decay dependence discovered in the R-A(lith) dependence, piranha treatment can increase the lithographic capacity by up to 35.5-fold, an improvement that may originate from a change in the tip's surface chemistry. Moreover, a theoretical model is derived to describe the A(lith)-t dependence accurately and to predict the tips' lifetime. Furthermore, an experiment involving DPN-based nanostructure fabrication demonstrates the importance of monitoring the tips' transport rate and lifetime. In addition to shedding light on the physical and chemical principles behind DPN, this study provides a comprehensive model for a quantitative analysis of the tips' behavior.

  3. Systematic Azimuth Quadrupole and Minijet Trends from Two-Particle Correlations in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettler, David

    Heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) produce a tremendous amount of data but new techniques are necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the physics behind these collisions. We present measurements from the STAR detector of both pt-integral and pt-differential azimuth two-particle correlations on azimuth (phi) and pseudorapidity (eta) for unidentified hadrons in Au-Au collisions at a center of mass energy = 62 and 200 GeV. The azimuth correlations can be fit to extract a quadrupole component--related to conventional v2 measures--and a same-side peak. The azimuth quadrupole component is distinguished from eta-localized same-side correlations by taking advantage of the full 2D eta and phi dependence. Both pt-integral and pt-differential results are presented as functions of Au-Au centrality. We observe simple universal energy and centrality trends for the pt-integral quadrupole component. pt-differential results can be transformed to reveal quadrupole pt spectra that are nearly independent of centrality. A parametrization of the pt-differential quadrupole shows a simple pt dependence that can be factorized from the centrality and collision energy dependence above 0.75 GeV/c. Angular correlations contain jet-like structure with most-probable hadron momentum 1 GeV/c. For better comparison to RHIC data we analyze the energy scale dependence of fragmentation functions from e+-e - collisions on rapidity y. We find that replotting fragmentation functions on a normalized rapidity variable results in a compact form precisely represented by the beta distribution, its two parameters varying slowly and simply with parton energy scale Q. The resulting parameterization enables extrapolation of fragmentation functions to low Q in order to describe fragment distributions at low transverse momentum ptin heavy ion collisions at RHIC. We convert minimum-bias jet-like angular correlations to single-particle hadron yields and compare them with parton

  4. Breaking symmetry in propagation of radially and azimuthally polarized high power laser pulses in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Naveen; Zhidkov, Alexei; Nakanii, Nobuhiko; Masuda, Shinichi; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of relativistically intense azimuthally or radially polarized laser pulses (RPP) is demonstrated, via 3D particle-in-cell simulations, to be unstable in uniform underdense plasma. Strong breaking of the pulse symmetry occurs for RPP with power exceeding the critical one for self-focusing in transversely uniform plasma with an increment, Γ, close to the well-known Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability depending on the acceleration, α, and the modulated density gradient length, L, as Γ≈(α/L) 1 /2 . In deeper plasma channels, the instability vanishes. Electron self-injection in the pulse wake and resulting acceleration is explored.

  5. Binding-protein-dependent alanine transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides is regulated by the internal pH.

    PubMed

    Abee, T; van der Wal, F J; Hellingwerf, K J; Konings, W N

    1989-09-01

    The properties of an L-alanine uptake system in Rhodobacter sphaeroides were studied and compared with those of H+/lactose symport in R. sphaeroides 4P1, a strain in which the lactose carrier of Escherichia coli has been cloned and functionally expressed (F. E. Nano, Ph.D. thesis, University of Illinois, Urbana, 1984). Previous studies indicated that both transport systems were active only when electron transfer took place in the respiratory or cyclic electron transfer chain, while uptake of L-alanine also required the presence of K+ (M. G. L. Elferink, Ph.D. thesis, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands, 1986). The results presented in this paper offer an explanation for these findings. Transport of the nonmetabolizable L-alanine analog 2-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) is mediated by a shock-sensitive transport system. The apparently unidirectional uptake of AIB results in accumulation levels which exceed 7 x 10(3). The finding of L-alanine-binding activity in the concentrated crude shock fluid indicates that L-alanine is taken up by a binding-protein-dependent transport system. Transport of the nonmetabolizable lactose analog methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (TMG) by the lactose carrier under anaerobic conditions in the dark was observed in cells and membrane vesicles. This indicates that the H+/lactose symport system is active without electron transfer. Uptake of AIB, but not that of TMG, is inhibited by vanadate with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 50 microM, which suggests a role of a phosphorylated intermediate in AIB transport. Uptake of TMG and AIB is regulated by the internal pH. The initial rates of uptake increased with the internal pH, and and pKa values of 7.2 for TMG and 7.8 for AIB. At an internal pH of 7, no AIB uptake occurred, and the rate of TMG uptake was only 30% of the rate at an internal pH of 8. In a previous study, we found that K+ plays an essential role in regulating the internal pH (T. Abee, K. J. Hellingwerf, and W

  6. Regulation of energy partitioning and alternative electron transport pathways during cold acclimation of lodgepole pine is oxygen dependent.

    PubMed

    Savitch, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G; Krol, Marianna; Sprott, David P; Oquist, Gunnar; Huner, Norman P A

    2010-09-01

    Second year needles of Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta L.) were exposed for 6 weeks to either simulated control summer ['summer'; 25 °C/250 photon flux denisty (PFD)], autumn ('autumn'; 15°C/250 PFD) or winter conditions ('winter'; 5 °C/250 PFD). We report that the proportion of linear electron transport utilized in carbon assimilation (ETR(CO2)) was 40% lower in both 'autumn' and 'winter' pine when compared with the 'summer' pine. In contrast, the proportion of excess photosynthetic linear electron transport (ETR(excess)) not used for carbon assimilation within the total ETR(Jf) increased by 30% in both 'autumn' and 'winter' pine. In 'autumn' pine acclimated to 15°C, the increased amounts of 'excess' electrons were directed equally to 21  kPa O2-dependent and 2  kPa O2-dependent alternative electron transport pathways and the fractions of excitation light energy utilized by PSII photochemistry (Φ(PSII)), thermally dissipated through Φ(NPQ) and dissipated by additional quenching mechanism(s) (Φ(f,D)) were similar to those in 'summer' pine. In contrast, in 'winter' needles acclimated to 5 °C, 60% of photosynthetically generated 'excess' electrons were utilized through the 2  kPa O2-dependent electron sink and only 15% by the photorespiratory (21  kPa O2) electron pathway. Needles exposed to 'winter' conditions led to a 3-fold lower Φ(PSII), only a marginal increase in Φ(NPQ) and a 2-fold higher Φ(f,D), which was O2 dependent compared with the 'summer' and 'autumn' pine. Our results demonstrate that the employment of a variety of alternative pathways for utilization of photosynthetically generated electrons by Lodgepole pine depends on the acclimation temperature. Furthermore, dissipation of excess light energy through constitutive non-photochemical quenching mechanisms is O2 dependent. PMID:20630988

  7. Regulation of energy partitioning and alternative electron transport pathways during cold acclimation of lodgepole pine is oxygen dependent.

    PubMed

    Savitch, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G; Krol, Marianna; Sprott, David P; Oquist, Gunnar; Huner, Norman P A

    2010-09-01

    Second year needles of Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta L.) were exposed for 6 weeks to either simulated control summer ['summer'; 25 °C/250 photon flux denisty (PFD)], autumn ('autumn'; 15°C/250 PFD) or winter conditions ('winter'; 5 °C/250 PFD). We report that the proportion of linear electron transport utilized in carbon assimilation (ETR(CO2)) was 40% lower in both 'autumn' and 'winter' pine when compared with the 'summer' pine. In contrast, the proportion of excess photosynthetic linear electron transport (ETR(excess)) not used for carbon assimilation within the total ETR(Jf) increased by 30% in both 'autumn' and 'winter' pine. In 'autumn' pine acclimated to 15°C, the increased amounts of 'excess' electrons were directed equally to 21  kPa O2-dependent and 2  kPa O2-dependent alternative electron transport pathways and the fractions of excitation light energy utilized by PSII photochemistry (Φ(PSII)), thermally dissipated through Φ(NPQ) and dissipated by additional quenching mechanism(s) (Φ(f,D)) were similar to those in 'summer' pine. In contrast, in 'winter' needles acclimated to 5 °C, 60% of photosynthetically generated 'excess' electrons were utilized through the 2  kPa O2-dependent electron sink and only 15% by the photorespiratory (21  kPa O2) electron pathway. Needles exposed to 'winter' conditions led to a 3-fold lower Φ(PSII), only a marginal increase in Φ(NPQ) and a 2-fold higher Φ(f,D), which was O2 dependent compared with the 'summer' and 'autumn' pine. Our results demonstrate that the employment of a variety of alternative pathways for utilization of photosynthetically generated electrons by Lodgepole pine depends on the acclimation temperature. Furthermore, dissipation of excess light energy through constitutive non-photochemical quenching mechanisms is O2 dependent.

  8. Membrane targeting and intracellular trafficking of the human sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Marchant, Jonathan S; Boulware, Michael J; Ma, Thomas Y; Said, Hamid M

    2009-04-01

    The human sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (hSMVT) mediates sodium-dependent uptake of biotin in renal and intestinal epithelia. To date, however, there is nothing known about the structure-function relationship or targeting sequences in the hSMVT polypeptide that control its polarized expression within epithelia. Here, we focused on the role of the COOH-terminal tail of hSMVT in the targeting and functionality of this transporter. A full-length hSMVT-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was functional and expressed at the apical membrane in renal and intestinal cell lines. Microtubule disrupting agents disrupted the mobility of trafficking vesicles and impaired cell surface delivery of hSMVT, which was also prevented in cells treated with dynamitin (p50), brefeldin, or monensin. Progressive truncation of the COOH-terminal tail impaired the functionality and targeting of the transporter. First, biotin transport decreased by approximately 20-30% on deletion of up to 15 COOH-terminal amino acids of hSMVT, a decrease mimicked solely by deletion of the terminal PDZ motif (TSL). Second, deletions into the COOH-terminal tail (between residues 584-612, containing a region of predicted high surface accessibility) resulted in a further drop in hSMVT transport (to approximately 40% of wild-type). Third, apical targeting was lost on deletion of a helical-prone region between amino acids 570-584. We conclude that the COOH tail of hSMVT contains several determinants important for polarized targeting and biotin transport.

  9. Trimethylamine oxide respiration in Proteus sp. strain NTHC153: electron transfer-dependent phosphorylation and L-serine transport.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, E; Styrvold, O B; Strøm, A R

    1982-01-01

    Cells of Proteus sp. strains NTHC153 grown anaerobically with glucose and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) were converted to spheroplasts by the penicillin method. The spheroplasts were lysed by osmotic shock, and the membrane vesicles were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Vesicles energized electron transfer from formate to TMAO displayed active anaerobic transport of serine. An anaerobic cell-free extract of Proteus sp. disrupted in a French pressure cell reduced TMAO with formate and NADH with the concomitant formation of organic phosphate. The net P/2e- ratios determined were 0.1 and 0.3, respectively. The NADH- and TMAO-dependent phosphorylation was sensitive to uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation (protonophores), and the formate- and TMAO-dependent serine transport was sensitive to ionophores and protonophores. We conclude that TMAO reduction in Proteus sp. fulfills the essential features of anaerobic respiration. PMID:6798018

  10. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-15

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-T{sub c} superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the I{sub a}-B{sub a} plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  11. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  12. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.; Ma, D. H.

    2015-07-28

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  13. Anomalous diameter dependence of thermal transport in ultra-narrow Si nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Karamitaheri, Hossein; Neophytou, Neophytos; Kosina, Hans

    2014-01-14

    We present atomistic valence force field calculations of thermal transport in Si nanowires of diameters from 12 nm down to 1 nm. We show that as the diameter is reduced, the phonon density-of-states and transmission function acquire a finite value at low frequency, in contrast to approaching zero as in the bulk material. It turns out that this effect results in what Ziman described as the “problem of long longitudinal waves” [J. M. Ziman, Electrons and Phonons: The Theory of Transport Phenomena in Solids (Clarendon, Oxford, 1962)], which states that the thermal conductivity of a material increases as its length is increased due to the vanishing scattering for long-wavelength phonons. We show that this thermal transport improvement also appears in nanowires as their diameter is decreased below D = 5 nm (not only as the length increases), originating from the increase in the density of the long wavevector modes. The observation is present under ballistic transport conditions, and further enhanced with the introduction of phonon-phonon scattering. Because of this, in such ultra-narrow nanowires, as the diameter is reduced, phonon transport is dominated more and more by lower energy phonons with longer mean-free paths. We show that ∼80% of the heat is carried by phonons with energies less than 5 meV, most with mean-free paths of several hundreds of nanometers.

  14. Nuclear transport of paxillin depends on focal adhesion dynamics and FAT domains

    PubMed Central

    Sathe, Aneesh R.; Shivashankar, G. V.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear transport of paxillin appears to be crucial for paxillin function but the mechanism of transport remains unclear. Here, we show that the nuclear transport of paxillin is regulated by focal adhesion turnover and the presence of FAT domains. Focal adhesion turnover was controlled using triangular or circular fibronectin islands. Circular islands caused higher focal adhesion turnover and increased the nuclear transport of paxillin relative to triangular islands. Mutating several residues of paxillin had no effect on its nuclear transport, suggesting that the process is controlled by multiple domains. Knocking out FAK (also known as PTK2) and vinculin caused an increase in nuclear paxillin. This could be reversed by rescue with wild-type FAK but not by FAK with a mutated FAT domain, which inhibits paxillin binding. Expressing just the FAT domain of FAK not only brought down nuclear levels of paxillin but also caused a large immobile fraction of paxillin to be present at focal adhesions, as demonstrated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies. Taken together, focal adhesion turnover and FAT domains regulate the nuclear localization of paxillin, suggesting a possible role for transcriptional control, through paxillin, by focal adhesions. PMID:27068537

  15. Regulation of nitrate transport in citrus rootstocks depending on nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Miguel; Camañes, Gemma; Flors, Víctor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Previously, we reported that in Citrus plants, nitrate influx through the plasmalemma of roots cells follows a biphasic pattern, suggesting the existence of at least two different uptake systems, a high and low affinity transport system (HATS and LATS, respectively). Here, we describe a novel inducible high affinity transport system (iHATS). This new nitrate transport system has a high capacity to uptake nitrate in two different Citrus rootstocks (Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange). The iHATS was saturable, showing higher affinity than constitutive high affinity transport system (cHATS) to the substrate NO(3) (-). The V(max) for this saturable component iHATS was higher than cHATS, reaching similar values in both rootstocks.Additionally, we studied the regulation of root NO(3) (-) uptake mediated by both HATS (iHATS and cHATS) and LATS. In both rootstocks, cHATS is constitutive and independent of N-status. Concerning the regulation of iHATS, this system is upregulated by NO(3) (-) and down-regulated by the N status and by NO(3) (-) itself when plants are exposed to it for a longer period of time. LATS in Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange rootstocks is repressed by the N-status.The use of various metabolic uncouplers or inhibitors indicated that NO(3) (-) net uptake mediated by iHATS and LATS was an active transport system in both rootstocks.

  16. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  17. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Hruz, Paul W

    2016-08-12

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  18. Regulation of Nitrate Transport in Citrus Rootstocks Depending on Nitrogen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Miguel; Camañes, Gemma; Flors, Víctor; Primo-Millo, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported that in Citrus plants, nitrate influx through the plasmalemma of roots cells follows a biphasic pattern, suggesting the existence of at least two different uptake systems, a high and low affinity transport system (HATS and LATS, respectively). Here, we describe a novel inducible high affinity transport system (iHATS). This new nitrate transport system has a high capacity to uptake nitrate in two different Citrus rootstocks (Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange). The iHATS was saturable, showing higher affinity than constitutive high affinity transport system (cHATS) to the substrate NO3−. The Vmax for this saturable component iHATS was higher than cHATS, reaching similar values in both rootstocks. Additionally, we studied the regulation of root NO3− uptake mediated by both HATS (iHATS and cHATS) and LATS. In both rootstocks, cHATS is constitutive and independent of N-status. Concerning the regulation of iHATS, this system is upregulated by NO3− and down-regulated by the N status and by NO3− itself when plants are exposed to it for a longer period of time. LATS in Cleopatra mandarin and Troyer citrange rootstocks is repressed by the N-status. The use of various metabolic uncouplers or inhibitors indicated that NO3− net uptake mediated by iHATS and LATS was an active transport system in both rootstocks. PMID:19516998

  19. Protonation-dependent conformational dynamics of the multidrug transporter EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Dastvan, Reza; Mishra, Smriti; Meiler, Jens; Mchaourab, Hassane S.

    2016-01-01

    The small multidrug transporter from Escherichia coli, EmrE, couples the energetically uphill extrusion of hydrophobic cations out of the cell to the transport of two protons down their electrochemical gradient. Although principal mechanistic elements of proton/substrate antiport have been described, the structural record is limited to the conformation of the substrate-bound state, which has been shown to undergo isoenergetic alternating access. A central but missing link in the structure/mechanism relationship is a description of the proton-bound state, which is an obligatory intermediate in the transport cycle. Here we report a systematic spin labeling and double electron electron resonance (DEER) study that uncovers the conformational changes of EmrE subsequent to protonation of critical acidic residues in the context of a global description of ligand-induced structural rearrangements. We find that protonation of E14 leads to extensive rotation and tilt of transmembrane helices 1–3 in conjunction with repacking of loops, conformational changes that alter the coordination of the bound substrate and modulate its access to the binding site from the lipid bilayer. The transport model that emerges from our data posits a proton-bound, but occluded, resting state. Substrate binding from the inner leaflet of the bilayer releases the protons and triggers alternating access between inward- and outward-facing conformations of the substrate-loaded transporter, thus enabling antiport without dissipation of the proton gradient. PMID:26787875

  20. Ion and water transport by the flounder urinary bladder: salinity dependence.

    PubMed

    Demarest, J R

    1984-04-01

    Urinary bladders from seawater-acclimated (SW) flounder had a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of congruent to 2,000 omega X cm2 and absorbed Na and Cl at equal rates of about 3 mueq X cm-2 X h-1 in an electrically silent manner; the short-circuit current (Isc) was 0.03 +/- 0.01 mueq X cm-2 X h-1. The transport of Na and Cl was only partially coupled. Removal of Na (or Cl) from the bathing solutions reduced net Cl (or Na) absorption by only 60%, yet there was neither a change in transepithelial potential nor the appearance of a short-circuit current that could be associated with the net Cl (or Na) transport that remained. Bladders from freshwater-acclimated (FW) flounder had a fivefold lower Rt and exhibited the same partially coupled and equal Na and Cl transport, but the ion transport rates were twice as large as those of SW bladders and the bladders exhibited a significant Isc of 0.51 +/- 0.08 mueq X cm-2 X h-1. The rate of fluid transport was much lower in FW than in SW bladders, reflecting a sixfold decrease in hydraulic conductivity (Lp). In both SW and FW bladders a large portion of the serosal-to-mucosal ion movement appears to be through nonconductive pathways.

  1. Seismic azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere from broadband surface wave analysis of OBS array records at 60 Ma seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeo, A.; Kawakatsu, H.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Sugioka, H.; Ito, A.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed seismic ambient noise and teleseismic waveforms of nine broadband ocean bottom seismometers deployed at a 60 Ma seafloor in the southeastward of Tahiti island, the South Pacific, by the Tomographic Investigation by seafloor ARray Experiment for the Society hotspot project. We first obtained one-dimensional shear wave velocity model beneath the array from average phase velocities of Rayleigh waves at a broadband period range of 5-200 s. The obtained model shows a large velocity reduction at depths between 40 and 80 km, where the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary might exist. We then estimated shear wave azimuthal anisotropy at depths of 20-100 km by measuring azimuthal dependence of phase velocities of Rayleigh waves. The obtained model shows peak-to-peak intensity of the azimuthal anisotropy of 2%-4% with the fastest azimuth of NW-SE direction both in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. This result suggests that the ancient flow frozen in the lithosphere is not perpendicular to the strike of the ancient mid-ocean ridge but is roughly parallel to the ancient plate motion at depths of 20-60 km. The fastest azimuths in the current asthenosphere are subparallel to current plate motion at depths of 60-100 km. Additional shear wave splitting analysis revealed possible perturbations of flow in the mantle by the hot spot activities and implied the presence of azimuthal anisotropy in the asthenosphere down to a depth of 190-210 km.

  2. Search for gyrokinetic dependencies in helium transport at Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kenneth; Rowan, William; Hatch, David; Bespamyatnov, Igor; Horton, Wendell

    2013-10-01

    Helium-3 and helium-4 impurity transport measurements and density profile measurements have been obtained on Alcator C-Mod in a variety of discharge conditions, using the core Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic. The helium concentrations range from trace (< 2 %) to large minority (~ 20 %). L-mode, H-mode, and I-mode results are included, with Ohmic heated, ICRF heated, and LH heated plasmas. Helium profiles are observed to vary with plasma current, and also change in time during ICRF shots. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are performed for some shots using the GENE code. Sensitivity scans are done for magnetic shear, impurity density, and other plasma parameters and transport scalings are compared with experimental results. Simulated transport flux is compared with experimentally derived D and v parameters. Supported by USDoE awards DE-FG03-96ER-54373 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. Automobile dependence in cities: An international comparison of urban transport and land use patterns with implications for sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Kenworthy, J.R.; Laube, F.B.

    1996-07-01

    Cities around the world are subject to increasing levels of environmental impact from dependence on the automobile. In the highly auto-dependent cities of the US and Australia, this is manifested in problems such as urban sprawl and its destruction of prime farming land and natural landscapes, photochemical smog that can be primarily attributed to auto emissions. On top of the more local impacts of the automobile, the global dimension should not be forgotten. Perhaps the two most pressing issues in this regard are the oil problem and the greenhouse problem. A comparison of global cities over the period 1980 to 1990 reveals large differences in automobile dependence with implications for the future sustainability of cities in different countries. This study explores some of the underlying land use, transport, and economic reasons for these different transport patterns. It briefly reviews what the sustainability agenda means for transport and land use patterns in cities and suggests a suite of targets or goals for sustainability by which cities might measure their current directions and plans.

  4. The immediate wound-induced oxidative burst of Saccharina latissima depends on light via photosynthetic electron transport.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ruth E; Amsler, Margaret O; Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R; Amsler, Charles D

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by an oxidative burst are an important component of the wound response in algae, vascular plants, and animals. In all taxa, ROS production is usually attributed solely to a defense-related enzyme like NADPH-oxidase (Nox). However, here we show that the initial, wound-induced oxidative burst of the kelp Saccharina latissima depends on light and photosynthetic electron transport. We measured oxygen evolution and ROS production at different light levels and in the presence of a photosynthetic inhibitor, and we used spin trapping and electron paramagnetic resonance as an orthogonal method. Using an in vivo chemical probe, we provide data suggesting that wound-induced ROS production in two distantly related and geographically isolated species of Antarctic macroalgae may be light dependent as well. We propose that electron transport chains are an important and as yet unaddressed component of the wound response, not just for photosynthetic organisms, but for animals via mitochondria as well. This component may have been obscured by the historic use of diphenylene iodonium, which inhibits not only Noxes but also photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport as well. Finally, we anticipate physiological and/or ecological consequences of the light dependence of macroalgal wound-induced ROS since pathogens and grazers do not disappear in the dark. PMID:26986660

  5. Characteristics of a ugp-encoded and phoB-dependent glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase which is physically dependent on the ugp transport system of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, P; Boos, W

    1988-01-01

    The ugp-encoded transport system of Escherichia coli accumulates sn-glycerol-3-phosphate with high affinity; it is binding protein mediated and part of the pho regulon. Here, we report that glycerophosphoryl diesters (deacylated phospholipids) are also high-affinity substrates for the ugp-encoded system. The diesters are not taken up in an unaltered form but are hydrolyzed during transport to sn-glycerol-3-phosphate plus the corresponding alcohols. The enzyme responsible for this reaction is not essential for the translocation of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate or for the glycerophosphoryl diesters but can only hydrolyze diesters that are in the process of being transported. Diesters in the periplasm or in the cytoplasm were not recognized, and no enzymatic activity could be detected in cellular extracts. The enzyme is encoded by the last gene in the ugp operon, termed ugpQ. The product of the ugpQ gene, expressed in minicells, has an apparent molecular weight of 17,500. We present evidence that only one major phoB-dependent promoter controls all ugp genes. Images PMID:2842304

  6. Na+-dependent and Na+-independent betaine transport across the apical membrane of rat renal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Cano, Mercedes; Calonge, María L; Ilundáin, Anunciación A

    2015-10-01

    The low renal excretion of betaine indicates that the kidney efficiently reabsorbs the betaine filtered by the glomeruli but the mechanisms involved in such a process have been scarcely investigated. We have detected concentrative and non-concentrative betaine transport activity in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from rat renal cortex and medulla. The concentrative system is the Sodium/Imino-acid Transporter 1 (SIT1) because it is Na+- and Cl--dependent, electrogenic and is inhibited by an anti-SIT1 antibody. Its apparent affinity constant for betaine, Kt, is 1.1±0.5 mM and its maximal transport velocity, Vmax, 0.5±0.1 nmol betaine/mg protein/s. Inhibitors of the Na+/Cl-/betaine uptake are L-proline (75%) and cold betaine, L-carnitine and choline (40-60%). Neither creatine, TEA, taurine, β-alanine, GABA nor glycine significantly inhibited Na+/Cl-/betaine uptake. The non-concentrative betaine transport system is Na+- and H+-independent, electroneutral, with a Kt for betaine of 47±7 μM and a Vmax of 7.8±1 pmol betaine/mg protein/s. Its transport activity is nearly abolished by betaine, followed by L-carnitine (70-80%) and proline (40-50%), but a difference from the Na+/Cl-/betaine transport is that it is inhibited by TEA (approx. 50%) and unaffected by choline. The underlying carrier functions as an antiporter linking betaine entry into the BBMV with the efflux of either L-carnitine or betaine, an exchange unaffected by the anti-SIT1 antibody. As far as we know this is the first work reporting that betaine crosses the apical membrane of rat renal epithelium by SIT1 and by a Na+- and H+-independent transport system.

  7. P2Y1 receptor inhibits GABA transport through a calcium signalling-dependent mechanism in rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Pedro F; Vaz, Sandra H; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of purinergic (P2) receptors, involved in astrocytic communication through fast increases in [Ca(2+) ]i . Of these, the metabotropic ATP receptors (P2Y) regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels through the PLC-PKC pathway. GABA transporters are a substrate for a number of Ca(2+) -related kinases, raising the possibility that calcium signalling in astrocytes impact the control of extracellular levels of the major inhibitory transmitter in the brain. To access this possibility we tested the influence of P2Y receptors upon GABA transport into astrocytes. Mature primary cortical astroglial-enriched cultures expressed functional P2Y receptors, as evaluated through Ca(2+) imaging, being P2Y1 the predominant P2Y receptor subtype. ATP (100 μM, for 1 min) caused an inhibition of GABA transport through either GAT-1 or GAT-3 transporters, decreasing the Vmax kinetic constant. ATP-induced inhibition of GATs activity was still evident in the presence of adenosine deaminase, precluding an adenosine-mediated effect. This, was mimicked by a specific agonist for the P2Y1,12,13 receptor (2-MeSADP). The effect of 2-MeSADP on GABA transport was blocked by the P2 (PPADS) and P2Y1 selective (MRS2179) receptor antagonists, as well as by the PLC inhibitor (U73122). 2-MeSADP failed to inhibit GABA transport in astrocytes where intracellular calcium had been chelated (BAPTA-AM) or where calcium stores were depleted (α-cyclopiazonic acid, CPA). In conclusion, P2Y1 receptors in astrocytes inhibit GABA transport through a mechanism dependent of P2Y1 -mediated calcium signalling, suggesting that astrocytic calcium signalling, which occurs as a consequence of neuronal firing, may operate a negative feedback loop to enhance extracellular levels of GABA. PMID:24733747

  8. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  9. Coupled Factors Influencing Concentration Dependent Colloid Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The coupled influence of input suspension concentration (Ci), ionic strength (IS) and hydrodynamics on the transport and retention of 1.1 'm carboxyl modified latex colloids in saturated quartz sand (150 'm) was investigated. Results from batch experiments and interaction energy calculations indica...

  10. Time-Dependent Neutral Particle Transport Benchmarks in Two and Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Ganapol

    2007-10-12

    The main objective of NEER grant was to generate highly accurate 2D and 3D time-dependent neutral particle intensity maps from 3D pulsed wire sources through integration of the analytical representation of a time-dependent point source.

  11. Danofloxacin-mesylate is a substrate for ATP-dependent efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schrickx, J A; Fink-Gremmels, J

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Next to its broad antimicrobial spectrum, the therapeutic advantages of the fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug Danofloxacin-Mesylate (DM) are attributed to its rapid distribution to the major target tissues such as lungs, intestines and the mammary gland in animals. Previous analyses revealed that effective drug concentrations are achieved also in luminal compartments of these organs, suggesting that active transport proteins facilitate excretion into the luminal space. Members of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily, including P-gp, BCRP and MRP2 are known to be expressed in many tissue barriers and in cell-membranes facing luminal compartments. Hence we hypothesized that DM is a substrate for one of these efflux-transporters. Experimental approach: Confluent monolayers of Caco-2 cells, grown on microporous membranes in two-chamber devices were used. DM concentrations were measured by fluorimetric assay after HPLC of the culture media. Key results: DM transport across Caco-2 cells was asymmetric, with a rate of secretion exceeding that of absorption. The P-gp inhibitors PSC833 and GF120918 and the MRP-inhibitor MK571 partially decreased the secretion of DM and increased its absorption rate. The BCRP inhibitor, Ko143, decreased secretion only at a concentration of 1 μM. When DM was applied together with ciprofloxacin, secretion as well as absorption of DM decreased. Conclusions and Implications: DM is a substrate for the efflux transporters P-gp and MRP2, whereas the specific role of BCRP in DM transport needs further evaluation. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for the understanding of the pharmacokinetics of DM in healthy and diseased individuals. PMID:17211460

  12. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-01-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl− and HCO3− secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (Isc) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) calculated under open-circuit conditions. Isc was equivalent to the HCO3− net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas Ieq was the sum of the Cl− and HCO3− net fluxes. Ieq and HCO3− fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl2, suggesting that some secreted HCO3− is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H+ secretion. Ieq and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na+ and HCO3−. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of Ieq and HCO3− secretion, suggesting that HCO3− transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl− was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50–70% of Cl− and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl− loading by a sodium–potassium–chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO3− gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO3− secretion was increased by bilateral Cl− removal and therefore did not require apical Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO3− is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl−, and the resulting HCO3−-dependent Cl− transport provides an osmotic driving force for

  13. Bicarbonate-dependent chloride transport drives fluid secretion by the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jiajie; Liao, Jie; Huang, Junwei; Robert, Renaud; Palmer, Melissa L; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; O'Grady, Scott M; Hanrahan, John W

    2012-11-01

    Anion and fluid secretion are both defective in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, the transport mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) secretion was measured using genetically matched CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-deficient and CFTR-expressing cell lines derived from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3. Forskolin stimulated the short-circuit current (I(sc)) across voltage-clamped monolayers, and also increased the equivalent short-circuit current (I(eq)) calculated under open-circuit conditions. I(sc) was equivalent to the HCO(3)(-) net flux measured using the pH-stat technique, whereas I(eq) was the sum of the Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) net fluxes. I(eq) and HCO(3)(-) fluxes were increased by bafilomycin and ZnCl(2), suggesting that some secreted HCO(3)(-) is neutralized by parallel electrogenic H(+) secretion. I(eq) and fluid secretion were dependent on the presence of both Na(+) and HCO(3)(-). The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide abolished forskolin stimulation of I(eq) and HCO(3)(-) secretion, suggesting that HCO(3)(-) transport under these conditions requires catalysed synthesis of carbonic acid. Cl(-) was the predominant anion in secretions under all conditions studied and thus drives most of the fluid transport. Nevertheless, 50-70% of Cl(-) and fluid transport was bumetanide-insensitive, suggesting basolateral Cl(-) loading by a sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1)-independent mechanism. Imposing a transepithelial HCO(3)(-) gradient across basolaterally permeabilized Calu-3 cells sustained a forskolin-stimulated current, which was sensitive to CFTR inhibitors and drastically reduced in CFTR-deficient cells. Net HCO(3)(-) secretion was increased by bilateral Cl(-) removal and therefore did not require apical Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange. The results suggest a model in which most HCO(3)(-) is recycled basolaterally by exchange with Cl(-), and the resulting HCO(3)(-)-dependent Cl(-) transport

  14. An ATP-dependent L-carnitine transporter in Listeria monocytogenes Scott A is involved in osmoprotection.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A; Rombouts, F M; Beumer, R R; Abee, T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive, psychotrophic, food-borne pathogen which is able to grow in osmotically stressful environments. Carnitine (beta-hydroxy-L-tau-N-trimethyl aminobutyrate) can contribute significantly to growth of L. monocytogenes at high osmolarity (R. R. Beumer, M. C. te Giffel, L. J. Cox, F. M. Rombouts, and T. Abee, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 60:1359-1363, 1994). Transport of L-[N-methyl-14C]carnitine in L. monocytogenes was shown to be energy dependent. Analysis of cell extracts revealed that L-carnitine was not further metabolized, which supplies evidence for its role as an osmoprotectant in L. monocytogenes. Uptake of L-carnitine proceeds in the absence of a proton motive force and is strongly inhibited in the presence of the phosphate analogs vanadate and arsenate. The L-carnitine permease is therefore most likely driven by ATP. Kinetic analysis of L-carnitine transport in glucose-energized cells revealed the presence of a high-affinity uptake system with a Km of 10 microM and a maximum rate of transport (Vmax) of 48 nmol min-1 mg of protein-1. L-[14C]carnitine transport in L. monocytogenes is significantly inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabelled L-carnitine, acetylcarnitine, and tau-butyrobetaine, whereas L-proline and betaine display, even at a 100-fold excess, only a weak inhibitory effect. In conclusion, an ATP-dependent L-carnitine transport system in L. monocytogenes is described, and its possible roles in cold adaptation and intracellular growth in mammalian cells are discussed. PMID:7768820

  15. Quantum transport of injected electrons in an asymmetric FM/I 1/SC/I 2/FM junction: Directional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soodchomshom, Bumned; Tang, I.-Ming; Hoonsawat, Rassmidara

    2008-07-01

    We have studied the directional dependence of the spin dependent coherent quantum transport in an asymmetric nano layer FM/I1/SC/I2/FM junction. We have used the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to describe the quasiparticles in the different layers in the junction. The two ferromagnetic layers are taken to be the same material, while the SC is taken to be a s-wave superconductor, I1 and I2 are taken to be thin insulating layers made with different materials. Both the effects of parallel (P) and anti parallel (AP) alignments of the magnetizations in the different FM layers are studied. We find that the probabilities for the Andreev and normal reflections and for the transmission of the particles into the ferromagnetic layers are dependent on the spins. We also find that the transports of the particles injected from the left side into the FM/I1/SC/I2/FM and into the FM/I2/SC/I1/FM junctions are different. When the I1 and I2 are removed (resulting in the formation of a trilayer FM/SC/FM junction) and the thickness of the SC layer is made small, the probability for the Andreev reflection is seen to depend on the spins of the particles in contradiction to the results obtained by Bozovic and Radovic [M. Bozovic, Z. Radovic, Phys. Rev. B 66 (2002) 134524].

  16. A Novel Member of the Trehalose Transporter Family Functions as an H+-Dependent Trehalose Transporter in the Reabsorption of Trehalose in Malpighian Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Kikuta, Shingo; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Noda, Hiroaki; Kikawada, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    In insects, Malpighian tubules are functionally analogous to mammalian kidneys in that they not only are essential to excrete waste molecules into the lumen but also are responsible for the reabsorption of indispensable molecules, such as sugars, from the lumen to the principal cells. Among sugars, the disaccharide trehalose is highly important to insects because it is the main hemolymph sugar to serve as a source of energy and carbon. The trehalose transporter TRET1 participates in the transfer of newly synthesized trehalose from the fat body across the cellular membrane into the hemolymph. Although transport proteins must play a pivotal role in the reabsorption of trehalose in Malpighian tubules, the molecular context underlying this process remains obscure. Previously, we identified a Tret1 homolog (Nlst8) that is expressed principally in the Malpighian tubules of the brown planthopper (BPH). Here, we used the Xenopus oocyte expression system to show that NlST8 exerts trehalose transport activity that is elevated under low pH conditions. These functional assays indicate that Nlst8 encodes a proton-dependent trehalose transporter (H-TRET1). To examine the involvement of Nlst8 in trehalose reabsorption, we analyzed the sugar composition of honeydew by using BPH with RNAi gene silencing. Trehalose was detected in the honeydew as waste excreted from Nlst8-dsRNA-injected BPH under hyperglycemic conditions. However, trehalose was not expelled from GFP-dsRNA-injected BPH even under hyperglycemic conditions. We conclude that NlST8 could participate in trehalose reabsorption driven by a H+ gradient from the lumen to the principal cells of the Malpighian tubules. PMID:22934042

  17. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  18. Azimuthal Decorrelation of Jets Widely Separated in Rapidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Gu, W. X.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tao; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Margulies, S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; Wen, F.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1996-07-01

    This study reports the first measurement of the azimuthal decorrelation between jets with pseudorapidity separation up to five units. The data were accumulated using the D0 detector during the 1992-1993 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron at s = 1.8 TeV. These results are compared to next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions and to two leading-log approximations (LLA) where the leading-log terms are resummed to all orders in αS. The final state jets as predicted by NLO QCD show less azimuthal decorrelation than the data. The parton showering LLA Monte Carlo HERWIG describes the data well; an analytical LLA prediction based on Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov resummation shows more decorrelation than the data.

  19. Maximizing Solar Energy Capture Through Multi-Azimuth PV Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    By orienting photovoltaic (PV) arrays in multiple directions, significantly greater energy capture can be realized in high latitude locations. Conventional wisdom dictates orienting PV panels south (in the northern hemisphere), but multi-azimuth arrays can confer several advantages during the summer months: - Nearly even power production over a large part of the day (20+ hours) - Reduced issues with power quality in grid interactive systems - Support higher loads in independent, off-grid systems - Reduced energy storage (battery) requirements in off-grid systems This poster will present two multi-azimuth systems, one a grid-interactive system deployed at Summit Station, Greenland; the second an independent, off-grid system supporting a science project near Toolik Field Station, Alaska.

  20. Replacement of the Green Bank Telescope azimuth track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert; Symmes, Arthur; Egan, Dennis

    2008-07-01

    The azimuth track of the Green Bank Telescope did not perform as designed. Relative movement of components was noted during construction; in addition, fretting of the base plate and wear plate faying surfaces, fatigue cracking of the wear plates, fatigue failure of wear plate fasteners, and deterioration of the cementitous grout layer occurred at a rapid pace during the first few years of operation. After extensive failure analysis, a new system of components was designed and fabricated, and installation of the components was performed during 2007 (Symmes, Anderson, and Egan, "Improving the service life of the 100m Green Bank Telescope azimuth track", SPIE 7012-121). The highlights and lessons learned during the fabrication and installation phases are described herein. This information will benefit any organization performing a similar replacement, and may be helpful in new installations as well.

  1. Magnetotelluric inversion for azimuthally anisotropic resistivities employing artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montahaei, Mansoure; Oskooi, Behrooz

    2014-02-01

    An extension of an artificial neural network (ANN) approach to solve the magnetotelluric (MT) inverse problem for azimuthally anisotropic resistivities is presented and applied for a real dataset. Three different model classes, containing general 1-D and 2-D azimuthally anisotropic features, have been considered. For each model class, characteristics of three-layer feed forward ANNs trained through an error back propagation algorithm have been adjusted to approximate the inverse modeling function. It appears that, at least for synthetic models, reasonable results would be obtained by applying the amplitudes of the complex impedance tensor elements as inputs. Furthermore, the Levenberg-Marquart algorithm possesses optimal performance as a learning paradigm for this problem. The evaluation of applicability of the trained ANNs for unknown data sets excluded from the learning procedure reveals that the trained ANNs possess acceptable interpolation and extrapolation abilities to estimate model parameters accurately. This method was also successfully used for a field dataset wherein anisotropy had been previously recognized.

  2. Differential regulation of Na+ transporters along nephron during ANG II-dependent hypertension: distal stimulation counteracted by proximal inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mien T X; Lee, Donna H; Delpire, Eric; McDonough, Alicia A

    2013-08-15

    During angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent hypertension, ANG II stimulates, while hypertension inhibits, Na(+) transporter activity to balance Na(+) output to input. This study tests the hypothesis that ANG II infusion activates Na(+) transporters in the distal nephron while inhibiting transporters along the proximal nephron. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with ANG II (400 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) or vehicle for 2 wk. Kidneys were dissected (cortex vs. medulla) or fixed for immunohistochemistry (IHC). ANG II increased mean arterial pressure by 40 mmHg, urine Na(+) by 1.67-fold, and urine volume by 3-fold, evidence for hypertension and pressure natriuresis. Na(+) transporters' abundance and activation [assessed by phosphorylation (-P) or proteolytic cleavage] were measured by immunoblot. During ANG II infusion Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) abundance decreased in both cortex and medulla; Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 2 (NKCC2) decreased in medullary thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) and increased, along with NKCC2-P, in cortical TALH; Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) and NCC-P increased in the distal convoluted tubule; and epithelial Na(+) channel subunits and their cleaved forms were increased in both cortex and medulla. Like NKCC2, STE20/SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and SPAK-P were decreased in medulla and increased in cortex. By IHC, during ANG II NHE3 remained localized to proximal tubule microvilli at lower abundance, and the differential regulation of NKCC2 and NKCC2-P in cortex versus medulla was evident. In summary, ANG II infusion increases Na(+) transporter abundance and activation from cortical TALH to medullary collecting duct while the hypertension drives a natriuresis response evident as decreased Na(+) transporter abundance and activation from proximal tubule through medullary TALH. PMID:23720346

  3. AtCCX3 Is an Arabidopsis Endomembrane H+-Dependent K+ Transporter1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jay; Tian, Hui; Park, Sunghun; Sreevidya, Coimbatore S.; Ward, John M.; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cation calcium exchangers (CCXs) were recently identified as a subfamily of cation transporters; however, no plant CCXs have been functionally characterized. Here, we show that Arabidopsis AtCCX3 (At3g14070) and AtCCX4 (At1g54115) can suppress yeast mutants defective in Na+, K+, and Mn2+ transport. We also report high-capacity uptake of 86Rb+ in tonoplast-enriched vesicles from yeast expressing AtCCX3. Cation competition studies showed inhibition of 86Rb+ uptake in AtCCX3 cells by excess Na+, K+, and Mn2+. Functional epitope-tagged AtCCX3 fusion proteins were localized to endomembranes in plants and yeast. In Arabidopsis, AtCCX3 is primarily expressed in flowers, while AtCCX4 is expressed throughout the plant. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that expression of AtCCX3 increased in plants treated with NaCl, KCl, and MnCl2. Insertional mutant lines of AtCCX3 and AtCCX4 displayed no apparent growth defects; however, overexpression of AtCCX3 caused increased Na+ accumulation and increased 86Rb+ transport. Uptake of 86Rb+ increased in tonoplast-enriched membranes isolated from Arabidopsis lines expressing CCX3 driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Overexpression of AtCCX3 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) produced lesions in the leaves, stunted growth, and resulted in the accumulation of higher levels of numerous cations. In summary, these findings suggest that AtCCX3 is an endomembrane-localized H+-dependent K+ transporter with apparent Na+ and Mn2+ transport properties distinct from those of previously characterized plant transporters. PMID:18775974

  4. Dependence of simulations of long range transport on meteorology, model and dust size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahowald, N. M.; Albani, S.; Smith, M.; Losno, R.; Marticorena, B.; Ridley, D. A.; Heald, C. L.; Qu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral aerosols interact with radiation directly, as well as modifying climate, and provide important micronutrients to ocean and land ecosystems. Mineral aerosols are transported long distances from the source regions to remote regions, but the rates at which this occurs can be difficult to deduce from either observations or models. Here we consider interactions between the details of the simulation of dust size and long-range transport. In addition, we compare simulations of dust using multiple reanalysis datasets, as well as different model basis to understand how robust the mean, seasonality and interannual variability are in models. Models can provide insight into how long observations are required in order to characterize the atmospheric concentration and deposition to remote regions.

  5. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-03-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  6. Secretory vesicle transport velocity in living cells depends on the myosin-V lever arm length.

    PubMed

    Schott, Daniel H; Collins, Ruth N; Bretscher, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that exert force against actin filaments. One widely conserved myosin class, the myosin-Vs, recruits organelles to polarized sites in animal and fungal cells. However, it has been unclear whether myosin-Vs actively transport organelles, and whether the recently challenged lever arm model developed for muscle myosin applies to myosin-Vs. Here we demonstrate in living, intact yeast that secretory vesicles move rapidly toward their site of exocytosis. The maximal speed varies linearly over a wide range of lever arm lengths genetically engineered into the myosin-V heavy chain encoded by the MYO2 gene. Thus, secretory vesicle polarization is achieved through active transport by a myosin-V, and the motor mechanism is consistent with the lever arm model.

  7. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  8. Model predictions of latitude-dependent ozone depletion due to supersonic transport operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Whitten, R. C.; Watson, V. R.; Woodward, H. T.; Riegel, C. A.; Capone, L. A.; Becker, T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented from a two-dimensional model of the stratosphere that simulates the seasonal movement of ozone by both wind and eddy transport, and contains all the chemistry known to be important. The calculated reductions in ozone due to NO2 injection from a fleet of supersonic transports are compared with the zonally averaged results of a three-dimensional model for a similar episode of injection. The agreement is good in the northern hemisphere, but is not as good in the southern hemisphere. Both sets of calculations show a strong corridor effect in that the predicted ozone depletions are largest to the north of the flight corridor for aircraft operating in the northern hemisphere.

  9. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  10. Global enhancement of nuclear localization-dependent nuclear transport in transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Kuusisto, Henna V; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Alvisi, Gualtiero; Roth, Daniela M; Jans, David A

    2012-03-01

    Fundamental to eukaryotic cell function, nucleocytoplasmic transport can be regulated at many levels, including through modulation of the importin/exportin (Imp/Exp) nuclear transport machinery itself. Although Imps/Exps are overexpressed in