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Sample records for azo dye acid

  1. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  3. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  5. 40 CFR 721.980 - Sodium salt of azo acid dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sodium salt of azo acid dye. 721.980... Substances § 721.980 Sodium salt of azo acid dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a sodium salt of azo acid dye (PMN...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10633 Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (PMN P-12-276) is subject to reporting under...

  7. Aerobic biodegradation of azo dye Acid Black-24 by Bacillus halodurans.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus halodurans MTCC 865 was employed for decolorization of textile azo dye, Acid Black-24 (AB-24). Thousand mgl⁻¹ of AB-24 was decolorized with 90% efficiency by the strain within 6 hrs at pH 9 and 37 °C with 5% NaCl under static conditions in screening medium. Decolorization was evaluated by measuring the periodic decrease in absorbance at 557 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of Acid Black-24 was determined by FTIR and HPLC. The FTIR spectrum of the AB-24 dye suggests the presence of azo bond (-N = N-) peak at 1618.28 cm⁻¹. Absence of the azo bond in the degraded sample spectrum indicates biodegradation of the dye. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed degradation of the azo dye, Acid Black-24 by Bacillus halodurans.

  8. Mineralization of sulfonated azo dyes and sulfanilic acid by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Streptomyces chromofuscus.

    PubMed

    Paszczynski, A; Pasti-Grigsby, M B; Goszczynski, S; Crawford, R L; Crawford, D L

    1992-11-01

    Five 14C-radiolabeled azo dyes and sulfanilic acid were synthesized and used to examine the relationship between dye substitution patterns and biodegradability (mineralization to CO2) by a white-rot fungus and an actinomycete. 4-Amino-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(3-sulfo-4-aminophenylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid were used as representative compounds having sulfo groups or both sulfo and azo groups. Such compounds are not known to be present in the biosphere as natural products. The introduction of lignin-like fragments into the molecules of 4-amino-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(3-sulfo-4-aminophenylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid by coupling reactions with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) resulted in the formation of the dyes 4-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(2-sulfo-3'-methoxy-4'-hydroxy-azobenzene-4-azo)-[U-14C]benzenesulf oni c acid, respectively. The synthesis of acid azo dyes 4-(2-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid and 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo)-[U-14C]benzenesulfonic acid also allowed the abilities of these microorganisms to mineralize these commercially important compounds to be evaluated. Phanerochaete chrysosporium mineralized all of the sulfonated azo dyes, and the substitution pattern did not significantly influence the susceptibility of the dyes to degradation. In contrast, Streptomyces chromofuscus was unable to mineralize aromatics with sulfo groups and both sulfo and azo groups. However, it mediated the mineralization of modified dyes containing lignin-like substitution patterns. This work showed that lignocellulolytic fungi and bacteria can be used for the biodegradation of anionic azo dyes, which thus far have been considered among the xenobiotic compounds most resistant to biodegradation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Sulfanilic acid: behavioral change related to azo food dyes in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Goldenring, J R; Batter, D K; Shaywitz, B A

    1982-01-01

    The effects of sulfanilic acid, a major azo food dye metabolite, were studied in normal developing rat pups and pups treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (60HDA). Chronic daily intraperitoneal injection of sulfanilic acid during the first postnatal month elicited hyperactivity and impaired shock escape performance in vehicle pups. No differences were noted in 60HDA treated rat pups receiving sulfanilic acid. These findings, which are similar to the results of our study of chronic administration of a food dye mix, suggest that sulfanilic acid may be one of the causative agents in food dye-induced behavioral changes in developing rats. While our work suggests a significant effect of azo food dyes on the developing rat central nervous system, species differences in parameters such as absorption, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier properties do not permit any extrapolation of these observations to proposed effects in children.

  10. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition.

  11. The stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their impact on microbial phospholipid fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Shaharoona, Baby; Crowley, David E; Khalid, Azeem; Hussain, Sabir; Arshad, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the stability of structurally different azo dyes in soil and their impact on the microbial community composition by analyzing phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Sterile and non-sterile soils were amended with three azo dyes, including: Direct Red 81, Reactive Black 5 and Acid Yellow 19 at 160mgkg(-1) soil. The results showed that the azo dyes were quite stable and that large amounts of these dyes ranging from 17.3% to 87.5% were recoverable from the sterile and non-sterile soils after 14 days. The maximum amount of dye was recovered in the case of Direct Red 81. PLFA analysis showed that the azo dyes had a significant effect on microbial community structure. PLFA concentrations representing Gram-negative bacteria in dye-amended soil were substantially less as compared to the PLFA concentration of Gram-positive bacteria. Acid Yellow 19 dye had almost similar effects on the PLFA concentrations representing bacteria and fungi. In contrast, Reactive Black 5 had a greater negative effect on fungal PLFA than that on bacterial PLFA, while the opposite was observed in the case of Direct Red 81. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the stability of textile azo dyes in soil and their effects on soil microbial community composition. PMID:26074308

  12. Effect of a sulfonated azo dye and sulfanilic acid on nitrogen transformation processes in soil.

    PubMed

    Topaç, F Olcay; Dindar, Efsun; Uçaroğlu, Selnur; Başkaya, Hüseyin S

    2009-10-30

    Introduction of organic dyes into soil via wastewater and sludge applications has been of increasing concern especially in developing or under-developed countries where appropriate management strategies are scarce. Assessing the response of terrestrial ecosystems to organic dyes and estimating the inhibition concentrations will probably contribute to soil remediation studies in regions affected by the same problem. Hence, an incubation study was conducted in order to investigate the impact of a sulfonated azo dye, Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and sulfanilic acid (SA), a typical representative of aromatic sulfonated amines, on soil nitrogen transformation processes. The results apparently showed that nitrogen related processes in soil can be used as bioindicators of anthropogenic stress caused by organic dyes. It was found that urease activity, arginine ammonification rate, nitrification potential and ammonium oxidising bacteria numbers decreased by 10-20% and 7-28% in the presence of RB5 (> 20 mg/kg dry soil) and SA (> 8 mg/kg dry soil), respectively. Accordingly, it was concluded that organic dye pollution may restrict the nitrogen-use-efficiency of plants, thus further reducing the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. Furthermore, the response of soil microbiota to SA suggested that inhibition effects of the organic dye may continue after the possible reduction of the parent dye to associated aromatic amines.

  13. Citric Acid Fuctionalized Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dye.

    PubMed

    Mahto, Triveni Kumar; Roy, Anurag; Sahoo, Banalata; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this study different magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFe2O4, where M = Fe, Mn, Zn) were synthesized through an aqueous coprecipitation method and then functionalized with citric acid for the degradation of azo dye present in industrial waste water. Here we evaluated the role of citric acid for photocatalytic application. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the catalytic activity in degradation of methyl orange (MO) was evaluated. The rate of MO degradation in different magnetic systems was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of active parameters (pH, initial MO concentration and effect of sunlight) on degradation performance was investigated. For the first time, citric acid chemistry is successfully exploited to develop a photocatalyst that can successfully degrade the dyes. This citric acid functionalized magnetic ferrite nanoparticles are very much effective for photocalytic degradation of dye and also these can be recollected with the help of permanent magnet for successive uses.

  14. Holographic gratings recorded in poly(lactic acid)/azo-dye films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiasso, Javier; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    Diffraction gratings were recorded in biodegradable polymer films of poly(lactic acid) doped with the photoisomerisable azo-dye (Disperse Orange 3). It is shown that the diffraction efficiency of the recorded grating can be improved by 220% via an all-optical treatment. This all-optical treatment consists of a pre-irradiation of the sample with the writing laser beam at high power during a short period of time, preventing damage of the material, followed by a much longer inscription at relatively low power. Furthermore, it is shown that the addition of a small amount of 0.05 wt% of multi-walled carbon nanotubes to the photoresponsive polymer increases the maximum diffraction efficiency as well as the remanent efficiency by 20%. Finally, this last photoresponsive nano-composite is also sensitive to the pre-irradiation treatment.

  15. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  16. Enzyme-mediated bacterial biodegradation of an azo dye (C.I. Acid blue 113): reuse of treated dye wastewater in post-tanning operations.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, T; Kanagaraj, J; Panda, R C

    2014-11-01

    "Dyeing" is a common practice used to color the hides during the post-tanning operations in leather processing generating plenty of wastewater. The waste stream containing dye as pollutant is severely harmful to living beings. An azo dye (C.I. Acid Blue 113) has been biodegraded effectively by bacterial culture mediated with azoreductase enzyme to reduce the pollution load in the present investigation. The maximum rate of dye degradation was found to be 96 ± 4 and 92 ± 4 % for the initial concentrations of 100 and 200 mg/l, respectively. The enzyme activity was measured using NADH as a substrate. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis was confirmed that the transformation of azo linkage could be transformed into N2 or NH3 or incorporated into complete biomass. Breaking down of dye molecules to various metabolites (such as aniline, naphthalene-1,4-diamine, 3-aminobenzenesulfonic acid, naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 8-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid, 5,8-diaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was confirmed by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC-MS) and mass (electrospray ionization (ESI)) spectra analysis. The treated wastewater could be reused for dyeing operation in the leather processing, and the properties of produced leather were evaluated by conventional methods that revealed to have improved dye penetration into the grain layer of experimental leather sample and resulted in high levelness of dyeing, which helps to obtain the desired smoothness and soft leather properties.

  17. Degradation of azo dye acid red B on manganese dioxide in the absence and presence of ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jiantuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2003-06-27

    Degradation of azo dye acid red B (ARB) on MnO(2) in the absence and presence of ultrasonic irradiation (sonication) has been investigated. The effect of initial pH, anions (Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-)), and saturated gas (argon/oxygen) has been studied. The experimental results show that decolorization of the dye on MnO(2) is highly pH dependent, with increasing decolorization efficiencies at decreasing pH values. The SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) ions are observed to suppress the adsorption of ARB on MnO(2) dramatically, suggesting competitive nature with the dye. Sonication accelerates decolorization and mineralization of the dye. And oxygen used as saturated gas is more favorable for mineralization of the dye than argon. The average particle diameter of MnO(2) decreases from 47.5 to 3.19 microm after sonication. PMID:12835022

  18. Carcinogenicity of azo dyes: Acid Black 52 and Yellow 3 in hamsters and rats. Volume 2. Technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Plankenhorn, L.J.

    1983-09-30

    This document is an appendix to a study concerning the carcinogenicity of the azo dyes acid-black-52 and yellow-3 in male and female hamsters and rats and contains individual histopathology studies of both dyes. Histopathological features were reported in tabular form for the skin, mammary gland, muscle, salivary gland, mandibular lymph node, sciatic nerve, thymus, larynx, thyroid, parathyroid, trachea, bronchus, esophagus, adrenal, stomach, duodenum, jejunem, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum, mesenteric lymph node, lung, liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidney, heart, urinary bladder, seminal vesicle, prostate, testis, cerebrum, cerebellum, pituitary, sternabrae, femur, bone marrow, and nasal cavity.

  19. [Leather azo dyes: mutagenic and carcinogenic risks].

    PubMed

    Clonfero, E; Venier, P; Granella, M; Levis, A G

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity data on azo dyes used in the leather industry. Two water soluble benzidine-based dyes were classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). No other dyes have been evaluated by the IARC. Of the 48 azo dyes assayed in the Salmonella/microsome test, 20 gave positive results. Attention is drawn to the important role of the in vivo metabolism of azo compounds, which includes a preliminary reduction of the azo bonds and subsequent release of the aromatic amines of the dye. A useful assay (Prival test) for evaluating the mutagenic properties of azo dyes involves a reductive step that permits the release of any genotoxic agents present in the compounds. A list of leather azo dyes is furnished that are considered as potentially harmful due to the presence of a carcinogenic aromatic amine (benzidine, p-aminobenzene and derivatives) in their formulae.

  20. Kinetics of anaerobic biodecolourisation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, S; Yemashova, N; Fedorovich, V

    2006-01-01

    Kinetics of anaerobic biodecolourisation (methanogenic environment) of four azo dyes (Acid Orange 6, Acid Orange 7, Methyl Orange and Methyl Red) was investigated with regard to their electrochemical properties as well as under variation of dye and sludge concentrations, pH and temperature. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a correlation between the potential of irreversible reduction peak of the dye and its first-order decolorisation constant. For each dye tested, this decolourisation constant was adversely proportional to dye concentration (0.086-1.7 mM) and had a saturation (hyperbolic) dependency on sludge concentration (0.04-1.1 g VSS/l), a bell-shape dependency on pH (4.0-9.0) and Arrhenius dependency on temperature (24-40 degrees C). Transfer from methanogenic to sulphate reducing environment led to an increase of decolorisation constant for all the dyes investigated due to the abundant presence of sulphide as a reducing agent in the reaction medium. Similar transfer to a denitrifying environment resulted in an almost complete decease of decolourisation because nitrate easily outcompetes azo dyes as an electron acceptor.

  1. Allergic contact dermatitis from azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Su, J C; Horton, J J

    1998-02-01

    Contact allergy to textile dyes usually occurs with disperse dyes of the azo or anthraquinone groups. A case is reported of a woman with clinical features of contact allergy to coloured nylon stockings who had multiple sensitivities to dyes of different azo groups.

  2. Bacterial Decolorization of Textile Azo Dye Acid Orange by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajat Pratap; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Lakhan

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain RMLRT03 with ability to decolorize textile dye Acid Orange dye was isolated from textile effluent contaminated soil of Tanda, Ambedkar Nagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). The decolorization studies were performed in Bushnell and Haas medium (BHM) amended with Acid Orange dye. The bacterial strain was identified as Staphylococcus hominis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence. The bacterial strain exhibited good decolorization ability with glucose and yeast extract supplementation as cosubstrate in static conditions. The optimal condition for the decolorization of Acid Orange dye by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03 strain were at pH 7.0 and 35°C in 60 h of incubation. The bacterial strain could tolerate high concentrations of Acid Orange dye up to 600 mg l-1. The high decolorizing activity under natural environmental conditions indicates that the bacterial strain has practical application in the treatment of dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25253925

  3. Bacterial Decolorization of Textile Azo Dye Acid Orange by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajat Pratap; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Lakhan

    2014-05-01

    A bacterial strain RMLRT03 with ability to decolorize textile dye Acid Orange dye was isolated from textile effluent contaminated soil of Tanda, Ambedkar Nagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). The decolorization studies were performed in Bushnell and Haas medium (BHM) amended with Acid Orange dye. The bacterial strain was identified as Staphylococcus hominis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence. The bacterial strain exhibited good decolorization ability with glucose and yeast extract supplementation as cosubstrate in static conditions. The optimal condition for the decolorization of Acid Orange dye by Staphylococcus hominis RMLRT03 strain were at pH 7.0 and 35°C in 60 h of incubation. The bacterial strain could tolerate high concentrations of Acid Orange dye up to 600 mg l(-1). The high decolorizing activity under natural environmental conditions indicates that the bacterial strain has practical application in the treatment of dye containing wastewaters.

  4. Decolorization of azo dyes in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yang; Rabaey, Korneel; Rozendal, René A; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg

    2009-07-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitously used in the textile industry. These dyes need to be removed from the effluent prior to discharge to sewage due to their intense color and toxicity. In this study we investigated the use of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) to abioticlly cathodic decolorization of a model azo dye, Acid Orange 7 (AO7), where the process was driven by microbial oxidation of acetate atthe anode. Effective decolorization of AO7 at rates up to 264 +/- 0.03 mol m(-3) NCC d(-1) (net cathodic compartment, NCC) was achieved at the cathode, with concomitant energy recovery. The AO7 decolorization rate was significantly enhanced when the BES was supplied with power, reaching 13.18 +/- 0.05 mol m(-3) NCC d(-1) at an energy consumption 0.012 +/- 0.001 kWh mol(-1) AO7 (at a controlled cathode potential of -400 mV vs SHE). Compared with conventional anaerobic biological methods, the required dosage of organic cosubstrate was significantly reduced in the BES. A possible cathodic reaction mechanism for the decolorization of AO7 is suggested based on the decolorization products identified: the azo bond of AO7 was cleaved at the cathode, resulting in the formation of the colorless sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphthol.

  5. [Predicting biodegradability from the electrochemical characteristic of azo dyes].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-bo; Zhou, Ji-ti; Wang, Dong; Tian, Cun-ping; Ge, Jun; Wang, Ping; Yu, Hui

    2006-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to study some electrochemical factors affecting the bacterial reduction (cleavage) of four azo dyes. And a common mixed culture was used as test organism and the reduction of azo dyes Acid Yellow 4, 11, 17 and Acid Yellow Bis was studied. It was found that the azo dyes were reduced at different rates,which could be correlated with the reduction potential of the azo compounds in cyclic voltammetric experiments. Acid Yellow Bis (Er = -616.75 mV) was reduced at the highest rate of 0.01209 mol x (L x h)(-1), Acid Yellow 11 (Er = -593.25 mV) at 0.01040 mol x (L x h)(-1) and Acid Yellow 4 (Er = - 513 mV) at 0.007575 mol x (L x h)(-1). It is showed that the reduction potential is a preliminary tool to predict the decolorization capacity of oxidative and reductive biocatalysts.

  6. Biodegradation of azo dyes acid red 183, direct blue 15 and direct red 75 by the isolate Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Pareek, Nidhi; Prasad, R; Singh, R P

    2014-07-01

    Soils contaminated with dyes were collected and screened for obtaining potential fungal strains for the degradation of azo dyes. A strain that demonstrated broad spectrum ability for catabolizing different azo dyes viz. Acid Red 183 (AR 183), Direct Blue 15 (DB 15) and Direct Red 75 (DR 75) at 100 mg L(-1) concentration was subsequently identified as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 based on 18S and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain has shown remarkably higher levels of degradation (95-100%) for almost all the dyes within 120 h at 30°C at pH 7.0. Notable levels of manganese peroxidase (659.4 ± 20 UL(-1)) during dye decolorization indicated the involvement of this enzyme in the decolorization process. The dyes following decolorization were catabolized as evident by spectroscopic analyses.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of sildenafil citrate in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation using some chromotropic acid azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Y. M.; El-Hawary, W. F.; Youssef, A. F. A.; Senosy, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Two simple and highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the quantitative determination of the drug sildenafil citrate (SC), Viagra, in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations, through ion-associate formation reactions (method A) with mono-chromotropic acid azo dyes, chromotrope 2B (I) and chromotrope 2R (II) and ion-pair reactions (method B) with bi-chromotropic acid azo dyes, 3-phenylazo-6-o-carboxyphenylazo-chromotropic acid (III), bis-3,6-(o-hydroxyphenylazo)-chromotropic acid (IV), bis-3,6-(p-N,N-dimethylphenylazo)-chromotropic acid (V) and 3-phenylazo-6-o-hydroxyphenylazo-chromotorpic acid (VI). The reaction products, extractable in methylene chloride, were quantitatively measured at 540, 520, 540, 570, 600 and 575 nm using reagents, I-VI, respectively. The reaction conditions were studied and optimized. Beer's plots were linear in the concentration ranges 3.3-87.0, 3.3-96.0, 5.0-115.0, 2.5-125.0, 8.3-166.7 and 0.8-15.0 μg mL -1 with corresponding molar absorptivities 1.02 × 10 4, 8.34 × 10 3, 6.86 × 10 3, 5.42 × 10 3, 3.35 × 10 3 and 2.32 × 10 4 L mol -1 cm -1 using reagents I-VI, respectively. The limits of detection and Sandell's sensitivities were calculated. The methods were successfully applied to the analysis of commercial tablets (Vigoran) and the recovery study reveals that there is no interference from the common excipients that are present in tablets. Statistical comparison of the results was performed with regard to accuracy and precision using Student's t- and F-tests at 95% confidence level. There is no significant difference between the reported and proposed methods with regard to accuracy and precision.

  8. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Azo Dyes Using Recyclable Silver Nanoparticles Immobilized on Tannic Acid-Grafted Eggshell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojing; Liang, Miao; Liu, Mingyue; Su, Rongxin; Wang, Mengfan; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a facile one-step synthesis of a novel nanocomposite catalytic film was developed based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized in tannic acid-modified eggshell membrane (Tan-ESM). Tannic acid, as a typical plant polyphenol from oak wood, was first grafted onto ESM fibers to serve as both the reductant and the stabilizer during the synthesis of AgNPs. The morphology, constitution, and thermal stability of the resulting AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites were fully characterized to explain the excellent catalytic efficiency of AgNPs@Tan-ESM composites. These composite catalysts were applied to the degradation of azo dyes which exhibited the high catalytic activity toward Congo red and methyl orange according to the kinetic curves. More importantly, they can be easily recovered and reused for many times because of their good stability.

  9. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150 μg mL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites.

  10. Toxicity of the azo dyes Acid Red 97 and Bismarck Brown Y to Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis).

    PubMed

    Soriano, Jeriel J; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Norman, Grant; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valérie S

    2014-03-01

    Azo compounds are used in a variety of industrial applications, such as textile colorant. Azo dyes have been found to contaminate aquatic environments and it has been shown that these compounds could potentially be toxic or induce endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. However, there are few data available on the toxicity of these dyes, specifically Acid Red 97 (AR97) and Bismarck Brown Y (BBY). The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity and the endocrine-disrupting properties of AR97 and BBY in frogs. As fugacity modeling predicted that both compounds would sorb to sediment, sediment exposures were performed using a geometric range of concentrations (0, 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm). Both AR97 and BBY dyes were not lethal to Silurana tropicalis embryos; however, BBY significantly induced malformations. Gene expression analysis of oxidative stress and mutagen-related genes was performed in BBY-treated larvae. There were significant two-fold increases of the tumor-suppressing protein p53 and heat shock protein 70 mRNA at 1,000 ppm suggesting that BBY induces cellular stress in early S. tropicalis development. Transcripts of the heat shock protein 90 did not change. Furthermore, reproductive-related genes were assessed and a 2.1-fold change was observed in the mRNA of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein while steroid 5 alpha-reductase type 2 and androgen receptor transcript levels did not vary among treatments. In conclusion, high concentrations of BBY lead to increased developmental defects in frog embryogenesis and early larval development.

  11. Decolorization of azo dyes by Geobacter metallireducens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Chen, Congcong; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Geobacter metallireducens was found to be capable of decolorizing several azo dyes with different structures to various extents. Pyruvate, ethanol, acetate, propionate, and benzoate could support 66.3 ± 2.6-93.7 ± 2.1 % decolorization of 0.1 mM acid red 27 (AR27) in 40 h. The dependence of the specific decolorization rate on AR27 concentration (25 to 800 μM) followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K m = 186.9 ± 1.4 μΜ, V max = 0.65 ± 0.02 μmol mg protein(-1) h(-1)). Enhanced AR27 decolorization was observed with the increase of cell concentrations ranging from 7.5 to 45 mgL(-1). AR27 decolorization by G. metallireducens was retarded by the presence of goethite, which competed electrons with AR27 and was reduced to Fe(II). The addition of low concentrations of humic acid (1-100 mgL(-1)) or 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (0.5-50 μM) could improve the decolorization performance of G. metallireducens. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis suggested reductive pathway to be responsible for decolorization. This was the first study on azo dye decolorization by Geobacter strain and might improve our understanding of natural attenuation and bioremediation of environments polluted by azo dyes.

  12. The significance of azo-reduction in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Chung, K T

    1983-04-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in textile, printing, cosmetic, drug and food-processing industries. They are also used extensively in laboratories as either biological stains or pH indicators. The extent of such use is related to the degree of industrialization. Since intestinal cancer is more common in highly industrialized countries, a possible connection may exist between the increase in the number of cancer cases and the use of azo dyes. Azo dyes can be reduced to aromatic amines by the intestinal microflora. The mutagenicity of a number of azo dyes is reviewed in this paper. They include Trypan Blue, Ponceau 3R, Pinceau 2R, Methyl Red, Methyl Yellow, Methyl Orange, Lithol Red, Orange I, Orange II, 4-Phenylazo-Naphthylamine, Sudan I, Sudan IV, Acid Alizarin Violet N, Fast Garnet GBC, Allura Red, Ponceau SX, Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine, Citrus Red No. 2, Orange B, Yellow AB, Carmoisine, Mercury Orange, Ponceau S, Versatint Blue, Phenylazophenol, Evan's Blue and their degraded aromatic amines. The significance of azo reduction in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis of azo dyes is discussed.

  13. Inhibition of acidic corrosion of carbon steel by some mono and bis azo dyes based on 1,5 dihydroxynaphihalene.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Metwally; Moustafa, Moustafa E

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition of the corrosion of carbon steel in hydrochloric acid solution by some mono- and bis-azo dyes based on 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene was studied in relation to the concentration of inhibitors using weight loss and potentiostatic polarization techniques. The percentage inhibition efficiency calculated from two methods is in a good agreement with each other. The inhibition mechanism of the additives was ascribed to the formation of complex compound adsorbed on the metal surface. The adsorption process follows Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The formation of the complex compound was studied by conductometric and potentiometric titrations. The stability constants of the Fe-complexes were determined using the latter technique and related to the inhibition efficiency.

  14. High performance degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7 and sulfanilic acid in a laboratory scale reactor after seeding with cultured bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Michael F; Kinkle, Brian K; Bishop, Paul L

    2003-06-01

    Bacterial strains 1CX and SAD4i--previously isolated from the mixed liquor of a municipal sewage treatment plant--are capable of degrading the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and sulfanilic acid, respectively. A rotating drum bioreactor (RDBR), operating under continuous flow and nutrient conditions designed to simulate the effluent from a dye manufacturing plant, was seeded with strains 1CX and SAD4i, forming a biofilm capable of degrading AO7 and sulfanilic acid. In addition, an RDBR containing a pre-existing biofilm capable of degrading AO7, but not sulfanilic acid, was seeded with strain SAD4i alone. Strain SAD4i was incorporated into the existing biofilm and degraded the sulfanilic acid resulting from the degradation of AO7 by indigenous members of the biofilm. The ability to seed a bioreactor with bacterial strains capable of degrading azo dyes, and resulting by-products, in a mixed microbial community suggests that this process could have commercial applications.

  15. Variability in antioxidant/detoxification enzymes of Labeo rohita exposed to an azo dye, acid black (AB).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satinder; Kaur, Arvinder

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate effect of a highly toxic azo dye, acid black (AB) (CI: 20470, 96 h LC50=10 mg/L) on the biochemical responses of Labeo rohita. Antioxidant/detoxification enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), acid phosphatase (AcP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) were determined in liver, kidney, gill, muscle and brain of L. rohita after 96 h exposure to 6 mg/L (LC10), 8 mg/L (LC30) and 10 mg/L (LC50) of dye with an aim to find out the target tissue and biomarker enzyme for AB. The fish were then kept for a recovery period of 90 days, and activity of the selected enzymes was determined at the end of this period. Present dye altered the activities of all these enzymes in the selected tissues of the experimental fish in a dose-dependent manner. SOD was the maximally affected enzyme, and liver was the most affected tissue. The results indicate that AB is very toxic to L. rohita as there was a significant effect of even 6 mg/L dose of the dye and the toxicity prolonged for a long time because the fish was not able to recover from the stress even 90 days after the exposure. The study suggests that SOD can be used as a biomarker enzyme and liver is the target tissue for AB.

  16. Multiple azo disperse dye sensitization mainly due to group sensitizations to azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Kawai, K; Kawai, K

    1996-01-01

    A female patient, with a previous episode of contact dermatitis caused by a blue dress, developed similar dermatitis due to a navy-blue dress. Patch tests revealed multiple allergic positive reactions to paraphenylenediamine (PPD), the navy-blue dress, its extracts, 6 azo disperse dyes in a textile series, as well as 3 dye components, including Disperse (DP) Red 153, which were present in the dress; these were composed of 9 azo disperse dyes, all dyes being of a different chemical structure. On the basis of chemical similarities between these 16 azo dyes including PPD, these are classified into the following 4 groups: thiazol-azoyl-PPD group (including DP Blue 106, DP Blue 124 and 5 used dyes), aminoazobenzene group (DP Red 1, DP Red 17, DP Brown 1 and 2 used dyes), PPD group (PPD and DP Orange 3) and benzothiazol-azoyl-PPD group (2 dyes in DP Red 153). With few exceptions, cross-sensitizations between dyes in the same group have been reported by other authors, or are suggested by us, in the former 3 groups. Multiple azo disperse dye sensitization is therefore considered to be attributable mainly to group sensitizations to azo dyes.

  17. Decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2008-07-01

    Wastewaters from textile processing and dye-stuff manufacture industries contain substantial amounts of salts in addition to azo dye residues. To examine salinity effects on dye-degrading bacteria, a study was carried out with four azo dyes in the presence of varying concentrations of NaCl (0-100 g l(-1)) with a previously isolated bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens strain AS96. Under static, low oxygen conditions, the bacterium decolorized 100 mg dye l(-1) at salt concentrations up to 60 g NaCl l(-1). There was an inverse relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction and salt concentration over the range between 5 and 60 g NaCl l(-1) and at dye concentrations between 100 and 500 mg l(-1). The addition of either glucose (C source) or NH(4)NO(3) (N source) to the medium strongly inhibited the decolorization process, while yeast extract (4 g l(-1)) and Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O (1 g l(-1)) both enhanced decolorization rates. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated the presence of 1-amino-2-naphthol, sulfanilic acid and nitroaniline as the major metabolic products of the azo dyes, which could be further degraded by a shift to aerobic conditions. These findings show that Shewanella could be effective for the treatment of dye-containing industrial effluents containing high concentrations of salt.

  18. Enhancement of azo dye Acid Orange 7 removal in newly developed horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Tee, Heng-Chong; Lim, Poh-Eng; Seng, Chye-Eng; Mohd Nawi, Mohd Asri; Adnan, Rohana

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal subsurface-flow (HSF) constructed wetland incorporating baffles was developed to facilitate upflow and downflow conditions so that the treatment of pollutants could be achieved under multiple aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions sequentially in the same wetland bed. The performances of the baffled and conventional HSF constructed wetlands, planted and unplanted, in the removal of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) were compared at the hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 5, 3 and 2 days when treating domestic wastewater spiked with AO7 concentration of 300 mg/L. The planted baffled unit was found to achieve 100%, 83% and 69% AO7 removal against 73%, 46% and 30% for the conventional unit at HRT of 5, 3 and 2 days, respectively. Longer flow path provided by baffled wetland units allowed more contact of the wastewater with the rhizomes, microbes and micro-aerobic zones resulting in relatively higher oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and enhanced performance as kinetic studies revealed faster AO7 biodegradation rate under aerobic condition. In addition, complete mineralization of AO7 was achieved in planted baffled wetland unit due to the availability of a combination of aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions.

  19. The microbial degradation of azo dyes: minireview.

    PubMed

    Chengalroyen, M D; Dabbs, E R

    2013-03-01

    The removal of dyes in wastewater treatment plants still involves physical or chemical processes. Yet numerous studies currently exist on degradation based on the use of microbes-which is a well-studied field. However progress in the use of biological methods to deal with this environmentally noxious waste is currently lacking. This review focuses on the largest dye class, that is azo dyes and their biodegradation. We summarize the bacteria identified thus far which have been implicated in dye decolorization and discuss the enzymes involved and mechanisms by which these colorants are broken down.

  20. Anaerobic/aerobic treatment of selected azo dyes in wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Seshadri, S.; Bishop, P.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Agha, A.M. . Faculty of Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Azo dyes represent the largest class of dyes in use today. Current environmental concern with these dyes revolves around the potential carcinogenic health risk presented by these dyes or their intermediate biodegradation products when exposed to microflora in the human digestive tract. These dyes may build up in the environment, since many wastewater treatment plants allow these dyes to pass through the system virtually untreated. The initial step in the degradation of these dyes is the cleavage of the Azo bond. This cleavage is often impossible under aerobic conditions, but has been readily demonstrated under anaerobic conditions. The focus of the study was to determine the feasibility of using an anaerobic fluidized-bed reactor to accomplish this cleavage. The effects of typical process variables such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent dye concentration levels, and degree of bed fluidization on removal efficiencies were also studied. The four dyes selected for this study were Acid-Orange 7, Acid-Orange 8, Acid-Orange 10, and Acid-Red 14. The effectiveness of using a bench-scale-activated sludge reactor as a sequenced second stage was also examined. Results indicate that nearly complete cleavage of the Azo bond is easily accomplished for each of the four dyes under hydraulic retention times of either 12 or 24 h. Initial results indicate, though, that aromatic amine by-products remain. The sequenced second stage was able to remove the remaining Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) load to acceptable levels. Work is presently underway to determine the face of the anaerobic by-products in the aerobic second stage.

  1. Post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 using aerobic moving bed biofilm process: enhanced removal of aromatic amines.

    PubMed

    Koupaie, E Hosseini; Moghaddam, M R Alavi; Hashemi, S H

    2011-11-15

    The application of aerobic moving bed biofilm process as post-treatment of anaerobically degraded azo dye Acid Red 18 was investigated in this study. The main objective of this work was to enhance removal of anaerobically formed the dye aromatic metabolites. Three separate sequential treatment systems were operated with different initial dye concentrations of 100, 500 and 1000 mg/L. Each treatment system consisted of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (An-SBR) followed by an aerobic moving bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (MB-SBBR). Up to 98% of the dye decolorization and more than 80% of the COD removal occurred anaerobically. The obtained results suggested no significant difference in COD removal as well as the dye decolorization efficiency using three An-SBRs receiving different initial dye concentrations. Monitoring the dye metabolites through HPLC suggested that more than 80% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate was completely removed in the aerobic biofilm reactors. Based on COD analysis results, at least 65-72% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment systems. According to the measured biofilm mass and also based on respiration-inhibition test results, increasing the initial dye concentration inhibited the growth and final mass of the attached-growth biofilm in MB-SBBRs.

  2. Microbial conversion of selected azo dyes and their breakdown products.

    PubMed

    Yemashova, N; Kalyuzhnyi, S

    2006-01-01

    Four selected azo dyes (acid orange 6, acid orange 7, methyl orange and methyl red) were completely decolourised in the presence of anaerobic granular sludge, while only methyl red was degraded in aerobic conditions using a conventional activated sludge. Additional experiments with culture broth devoid of cells showed that anaerobic decolourisation of azo dyes was performed by extracellular reducing agents produced by anaerobic bacteria. This was further confirmed by abiotic experiments with sulphide and NADH. The presence of redox mediators such as riboflavin led to dramatic acceleration of the anaerobic biodecolourisation process. The azo dye reduction products were found to be sulphanilic acid and 4-aminoresorcinol for acid orange 6; sulphanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphthol for acid orange 7; N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine and sulphanilic acid for methyl orange; and N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine and anthranilic acid for methyl red. Anaerobic toxicity assays showed that the azo dyes were more toxic than their breakdown products (aromatic amines), except 1-amino-2-naphthol. In the presence of activated sludge, only anthranilic acid was completely mineralised while sulphanilic acid was persistent. 4-aminoresorcinol, 1-amino-2-naphthol and N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine underwent autooxidation in aerobic conditions yielding coloured polymeric products. On the contrary, in the presence of granular methanogenic sludge, 4-aminoresorcinol, 1-amino-2-naphthol and anthranilic acid were quantitatively methanised, sulphanilic acid was partially (70%) mineralised while N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine was only demethylated producing 1,4-phenylenediamine as an end product.

  3. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-11-05

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively.

  4. Application of acidic treated pumice as an adsorbent for the removal of azo dye from aqueous solutions: kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Samarghandi, Mohammad Reza; Zarrabi, Mansur; Sepehr, Mohammad Noori; Amrane, Abdeltif; Safari, Gholam Hossein; Bashiri, Saied

    2012-01-01

    Colored effluents are one of the important environment pollution sources since they contain unused dye compounds which are toxic and less-biodegradable. In this work removal of Acid Red 14 and Acid Red 18 azo dyes was investigated by acidic treated pumice stone as an efficient adsorbent at various experimental conditions. Removal of dye increased with increase in contact time and initial dye concentration, while decreased for increment in solution temperature and pH. Results of the equilibrium study showed that the removal of AR14 and AR18 followed Freundlich (r2>0.99) and Langmuir (r2>0.99) isotherm models. Maximum sorption capacities were 3.1 and 29.7 mg/g for AR 14 and AR18, namely significantly higher than those reported in the literature, even for activated carbon. Fitting of experimental data onto kinetic models showed the relevance of the pseudo-second order (r2>0.99) and intra-particle diffusion (r2>0.98) models for AR14 and AR18, respectively. For both dyes, the values of external mass transfer coefficient decreased for increasing initial dye concentrations, showing increasing external mass transfer resistance at solid/liquid layer. Desorption experiments confirmed the relevance of pumice stone for dye removal, since the pH regeneration method showed 86% and 89% regeneration for AR14 and AR18, respectively. PMID:23369579

  5. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4594 - Substituted azo metal complex dye.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted azo metal complex dye. 721... Substances § 721.4594 Substituted azo metal complex dye. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a substituted azo metal...

  10. Comprehensive review and compilation of treatment for azo dyes using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Hamidin, Nasrul

    2013-03-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent an emerging technology that focuses on power generation and effluent treatment. This review compiles articles related to MFCs using azo dye as the substrate. The significance of the general components in MFCs and systems of MFCs treating azo dye is depicted in this review. In addition, degradation of azo dyes such as Congo red, methyl orange, active brilliant red X-3B, amaranth, reactive blue 221, and acid orange 7 in MFCs are summarized. Further exploration and operational modification are suggested to address the challenges of complete removal of azo dye with maximum power generation in an MFC. In addition, a sequential treatment system with MFCs is suggested for complete mineralization of azo dye.

  11. Mechanism of azo dye degradation in Advanced Oxidation Processes: Degradation of Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop and its parent compounds in aqueous solution by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálfi, Tamás; Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2011-03-01

    Mechanistic studies were made on hydroxyl radical and hydrated electron reaction with Sulfanilic Acid Azochromotrop (SPADNS) as model azo dye in dilute aqueous solution. SPADNS contains 4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid part and 4-sulfophenylazo group. To establish the details of the reaction mechanism the reactions of two simpler molecules without 4-sulfophenylazo part were also studied: one of them contained one (in position 4, II), the other two (in positions 4 and 5, III) -OH groups. Hydroxyl radicals react with these molecules with radical addition to the naphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid part. The adduct hydroxycyclohexadienyl type radical decays in radical-radical reactions, or undergoes a (pH dependent) water elimination to yield naphthoxy radical. The radical decay takes place on the ms timescale. Degradation efficiencies are 0.6-0.8. Hydrated electron in the case of the two simpler molecules reacts with the rings, while in the case of dye with the azo bond. Electron scavenging is followed by protonation, this reaction in the case of II and III yields cyclohexadienyl, while with the dye hydrazo radical. The efficiency of degradation with II and III is 0.2-0.6, while for SPADNS it is close to 1.

  12. Degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms and helminths

    SciTech Connect

    Kingthom Chung; Stevens, S.E. Jr. . Dept. of Biology)

    1993-11-01

    The degradation of azo dyes by environmental microorganisms, fungi, and helminths is reviewed. Azo dyes are used in a wide variety of products and can be found in the effluent of most sewage treatment facilities. Substantial quantities of these dyes have been deposited in the environment, particularly in streams and rivers. Azo dyes were shown to affect microbial activities and microbial population sizes in the sediments and in the water columns of aquatic habitats. Only a few aerobic bacteria have been found to reduce azo dyes under aerobic conditions, and little is known about the process. A substantial number of anaerobic bacteria capable of azo dye reduction have been reported. The enzyme responsible for azo dye reduction has been partially purified, and characterization of the enzyme is proceeding. The nematode Ascaris lumbricoides and the cestode Moniezia expanza have been reported to reduce azo dyes anaerobically. Recently the fungus Phanerochaete chrysoporium was reported to mineralize azo dyes via a peroxidation-mediated pathway. A possible degradation pathway for the mineralization of azo dye is proposed and future research needs are discussed.

  13. [Enhanced biodecolourization of azo dyes by the catalysis of anthraquinone dyes intermediators].

    PubMed

    Su, Yan-Yan; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Lü, Hong; Li, Li-Hua

    2008-07-01

    Enhanced biodecolourization of azo dyes by suspended and immobilized quinone-reducing community using kinds of anthraquinone dyes intermediators as redox mediators was investigated. The suspended bacterium community could enhance the biodecolourization of many kinds of azo dyes using bromoamine acid (BAA) as a redox mediator, the optimum conditions for Acid Red 3R were as follows: pH 6-9, glucose, BAA and initial dye concentrations 400-600 mg/L, 19-34.2 mg/L and < or = 900 mg/L, respectively. Under these conditions, the maximal decolourization rate was about 95%, which is reached within 7 h for suspended cells and 14 h for immobilized cells. However, the latter needed 38-57 mg/L BAA as a redox mediator. In addition, after 7 cycles without BAA addition, the decolourization rate of Acid Red 3R by immobilized cells retained over 85%.

  14. Evaluation of genotoxicity and pro-oxidant effect of the azo dyes: acids yellow 17, violet 7 and orange 52, and of their degradation products by Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    PubMed

    Ben Mansour, Hedi; Corroler, David; Barillier, Daniel; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir, Leila; Mosrati, Ridha

    2007-09-01

    Acids yellow 17, violet 7 and orange 52, very important commercial azo dyes used in the textile, food, paper and cosmetic industries, were degraded by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 at concentrations up to 100mg/l. The culture media was completely decolorized under static incubation for 60 h, this faster than under continuous shaking incubation. SOS chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37, with and without metabolic activation (S-9 preparations), was used to assess genotoxicity potential of these dyes before and after biodegradation. None of these dyes or their metabolites was found to be genotoxic in the absence of "Araclor-Induced rat liver microsome" preparations (S-9). However, in presence of the preparation S-9, the genotoxicity of the biodegradation products was highlighted. Metabolites resulting from static cultures were more genotoxic than those obtained in shaken conditions. In addition to genotoxic effects, metabolites have shown a significant ability to induce the formation of superoxide free radical anion (O(2)(*-)). The toxicities generated by the pure azo dyes and the pure azo-reduction products (sulfanilic acid, N,N'-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and 4'-aminoacetanilid) were compared. These results suggest that P. putida mt-2 degrades the studied azo dyes in two steps: an azo-reduction followed by an oxygen-dependent metabolization. Some of the derived metabolites would be responsible of genotoxicity and metabolic toxicity.

  15. Enhancement of oxyanion and diatrizoate reduction kinetics using selected azo dyes on Pd-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Danmeng; Chaplin, Brian P; Shapley, John R; Menendez, Nathaniel P; McCalman, Dorrell C; Schneider, William F; Werth, Charles J

    2010-03-01

    Azo dyes are widespread pollutants and potential cocontaminants for nitrate; we evaluated their effect on catalytic reduction of a suite of oxyanions, diatrizoate, and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). The azo dye methyl orange significantly enhanced (less than or equal to a factor of 5.24) the catalytic reduction kinetics of nitrate, nitrite, bromate, perchlorate, chlorate, and diatrizoate with several different Pd-based catalysts; NDMA reduction was not enhanced. Nitrate was selected as a probe contaminant, and a variety of azo dyes (methyl orange, methyl red, fast yellow AB, metanil yellow, acid orange 7, congo red, eriochrome black T, acid red 27, acid yellow 11, and acid yellow 17) were evaluated for their ability to enhance reduction. Hydrogenation energies of azo dyes were calculated using density functional theory and a volcano relationship between hydrogenation energies and reduction rate enhancement was observed. A kinetic model based on Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) theory matched the volcano relationship and suggests sorbed azo dyes enhance reduction kinetics through hydrogen atom shuttling between reduced azo dyes (i.e., hydrazo dyes) and oxyanions or diatrizoate. This is the first research that has identified this synergetic effect, and it has implications for designing more efficient catalysts and reducing Pd costs in water treatment systems.

  16. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  17. Azo dye decolorization assisted by chemical and biogenic sulfide.

    PubMed

    Prato-Garcia, Dorian; Cervantes, Francisco J; Buitrón, Germán

    2013-04-15

    The effectiveness of chemical and biogenic sulfide in decolorizing three sulfonated azo dyes and the robustness of a sulfate-reducing process for simultaneous decolorization and sulfate removal were evaluated. The results demonstrated that decolorization of azo dyes assisted by chemical sulfide and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) was effective. In the absence of AQDS, biogenic sulfide was more efficient than chemical sulfide for decolorizing the azo dyes. The performance of sulfate-reducing bacteria in attached-growth sequencing batch reactors suggested the absence of competition between the studied azo dyes and the sulfate-reducing process for the reducing equivalents. Additionally, the presence of chemical reduction by-products had an almost negligible effect on the sulfate removal rate, which was nearly constant (94%) after azo dye injection.

  18. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai, Qinhong; Wong, Chong-Kim; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po-Keung

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 degrees C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4+/-0.6 and 40.7+/-1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e(-) donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  19. Performance of mango seed adsorbents in the adsorption of anthraquinone and azo acid dyes in single and binary aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Jiménez, Martín M; Elizalde-González, María P; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia

    2009-12-01

    In this study the husk of mango seed and two carbonaceous adsorbents prepared from it were used to study the adsorption behavior of eight acid dyes. The adsorbed amount in mmol m(-2) decayed asymptotically as the molecular volume and area increased. The interaction between the studied dyes and the mesoporous carbon was governed by the ionic species in solution and the acidic/basic groups on the surface. Less than 50% of the external surface of the microporous carbon became covered with the dyes molecules, though monolayer formation demonstrating specific interactions only with active sites on the surface and the adsorption magnitudes correlated with the shape parameter of the molecule within a particular dye group. The adsorption behavior in mixtures was determined by the molecular volume of the constituents; the greater the molecular volume difference, the greater the effect on the adsorbed amount. We also demonstrated that the raw husk of the mango seed can be used to remove up to 50% from model 50 mg l(-1) solutions of the studied acid dyes.

  20. Treatment of azo dye-containing synthetic textile dye effluent using sulfidogenic anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Sebnem; Cirik, Kevser; Akman, Dilek; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Cinar, Ozer

    2013-10-01

    This study aims at investigating azo dye reduction performance of a sulfidogenic anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) for around 400 days. ABR was operated at 30 °C in a temperature-controlled room and hydraulic retention time (HRT) was kept constant at 2 days. The robustness of ABR was assessed under varying azo dye loadings and COD/sulfate ratios. Additionally, oxygen was supplied (1-2 L air/m(3)reactor min) to the last compartment to investigate the removal of azo dye breakdown products. ABR performed well in terms of COD, sulfate and azo dye removals throughout the reactor operation. Maximum azo dye, COD and sulfate removals were 98%, 98% and 93%, respectively, at COD/sulfate ratio of 0.8. Aeration created different redox conditions in last compartment, which enhanced the removal of COD and breakdown products. The adverse effects of aeration on azo dye reduction were eliminated thanks to the compartmentalized structure of the ABR.

  1. Key factors regarding decolorization of synthetic anthraquinone and azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Boonyakamol, A; Imai, T; Chairattanamanokorn, P; Higuchi, T; Sekine, M

    2009-07-01

    The factors affecting decolorization of anthraquinone dye represented by Reactive Blue 4 (RB4) and azo dye represented by Methyl Orange (MO) were studied in batch experiments under mesophilic (35 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic conditions. The results indicated differences in decolorization properties of the dyes with different chromophore structures. In abiotic conditions, MO could be decolorized by a physicochemical reaction when it was sterilized at 121 degrees C together with sludge cells or glucose. RB4 only showed absorption onto the cell mass. The presence of a redox mediator accelerated the decolorizing reaction when supplied together with glucose in the presence of sterilized sludge cells. In biotic conditions, the results indicated that the biological activity of microorganisms was an important factor in decolorization. The main factor involved in decolorization was the conversion of cosubstrate as electron donor, which reacted with dye as an electron acceptor in electron transfer. Redox mediators, anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid, and anthraquinone could accelerate decolorization even if a small amount (0.2 mM) was applied. On the other hand, a high concentration of redox mediator (1.0 mM) had an inhibitory effect on decolorization especially under thermophilic conditions. In addition, the decolorization of dye was accelerated by increasing treatment temperature, as shown in biotic treatments. Based on these results, increasing the treatment temperature could be used to improve the decolorizing process of textile dye wastewater treatment, especially for recalcitrant dyes such as anthraquinone.

  2. Recent advances in azo dye degrading enzyme research.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huizhong

    2006-04-01

    Azo dyes, which are characterized by one or more azo bonds, are a predominant class of colorants used in tattooing, cosmetics, foods, and consumer products. These dyes are mainly metabolized by bacteria to colorless aromatic amines, some of which are carcinogenic, by azoreductases that catalyze a NAD(P)H-dependent reduction. The resulting amines are further degraded aerobically by bacteria. Some bacteria have the ability to degrade azo dyes both aerobically and anaerobically. Plant-degrading white rot fungi can break down azo dyes by utilizing a number of oxidases and peroxidases as well. In yeast, a ferric reductase system participates in the extracellular reduction of azo dyes. Recently, two types of azoreductases have been discovered in bacteria. The first class of azoreductases is monomeric flavin-free enzymes containing a putative NAD(P)H binding motif at their N-termini; the second class is polymeric flavin dependent enzymes which are studied more extensively. Azoreductases from bacteria represent novel families of enzymes with little similarity to other reductases. Dissociation and reconstitution of the flavin dependent azoreductases demonstrate that the non-covalent bound flavin prosthetic group is required for the enzymatic functions. In this review, structures and carcinogenicity of azo colorants, protein structure, enzymatic function, and substrate specificity, as well as application of the azo dyes and azoreductases will be discussed.

  3. [Decolorization of azo dyes using quinone reductase and quinoid compounds].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Liu, Guang-Fei; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Jin, Ruo-Fei; Chen, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2009-06-15

    Using quinoid redox mediator and bacterial cellular quinone reductase, we investigated the decolorization ability of gene-engineered strain Escherichia coli YB and the effects of methylhydroquinone (MHQ) pretreatement on decolorization performance of E. coli JM109 and anaerobic sludge. The results indicate that lawsone is an effective accelerator for azo dye decolorization by E. coli YB overexpressing cellular quinone reductase AZR. In the presence of 0.2 mmol x L(-1) lawsone, 75% Amaranth (1 mmol x L(-1)) can be decolorized in 2 h. E. coli YB can also decolorize high concentration of azo dye in the presence of lawsone. Around 50% Amaranth (5 mmol x L(-1)) is decolorized in 8 h. Compared to lawsone, menadione is a less effective mediator. E. coli YB takes 12 h to reach 70% decolorization in the presence of 2.5 mmol x L(-1) menadione. Repeated decolorization studies showed that E. coli YB had stable decolorizing ability in the presence of lawsone. Four rounds of repeated decolorization can be completed in 12 h. Lawsone can also accelerate the decolorization of azo dyes with complex structures such as Acid Scarlet GR and Reactive Brilliant Red K-2BP. With the optimal LQ concentrations, 70% Acid Scarlet GR and Reactive Brilliant Red K-2BP are decolorized in 9 h and 30 h,respectively. Decolorization performances of E. coli JM109 and anaerobic sludge pretreated with MHQ are improved. After MHQ pretreatment,in the presence of lawsone, 80% Amaranth (1 mmol x L(-1)) can be decolorized in 5 h by E. coli JM109, while more than 75% Amaranth can be removed in 11 h by sludge.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of biodegradation of azo dyes via their interactions with AzrC azoreductase.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, Hamed; Kay, Maryam; Dehghanian, Fariba; Tavakol, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are one of the most important class of dyes, which have been widely used in industries. Because of the environmental pollution of azo dyes, many studies have been performed to study their biodegradation using bacterial systems. In present work, the AzrC of mesophilic gram-positive Bacillus sp. B29 has been considered to study its interaction with five common azo dyes (orange G, acid red 88, Sudan I, orange I, and methyl red). The molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to study the interaction between AzrC and azo dyes. The trajectory was confirmed using root mean square deviation and the root mean square fluctuation analyses. Then, the hydrogen bond and alanine scanning analyses were performed to reveal active site residues. Phe105 (A), Phe125 (B), Phe172 (B), and Pro132 (B) have been found as the most important hydrophobic residues whereas Asn104 (A), Tyr127 (B), and Asn187 (A) have key role in making hydrogen bond. The results of molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area calculations proved that the hydrophobic azo dyes like Acid red 88 binds more tightly to the AzrC protein. The calculated data suggested MR A 121 (B) I as a potential candidate for improving the AzrC-MR interactions.

  5. Assessment upon azo dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation by Proteus hauseri.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Meng-Meng; Chang, Chang-Tang; Ding, Yongtao; Lin, Kae-Long; Chiou, Chyow-San; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Xu, Huizhong

    2010-06-01

    This study explored dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation of indigenous Proteus hauseri ZMd44 for dye-bearing wastewater treatment. Chemical structures of azo dyes apparently affected the performance of dye biodecolorization. Additions of diazo dye C.I. reactive blue 160 (RBu160) stimulated simultaneous dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation of ZMd44 in single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, high-level additions of RBu160 repressed capabilities of power production in MFC due to competition of electrons used for reductive decolorization. Decolorized intermediates of RBu160-phenyl methadiamine and 5-sulfoanthranilic acid as electron shuttles might mediate electron transport for current generation in MFC.

  6. Decolorization and partial degradation of selected azo dyes by methanogenic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yemashova, Natalia; Telegina, Anna; Kotova, Irina; Netrusov, Alexander; Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey

    2004-10-01

    The toxicity potential and decolorization of three acid azo dyes (Acid Orange 6, Acid Orange 7, and Acid Orange 52) by methanogenic granular sludge from an anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed reactor was assayed. Complete bioreduction was found for all three azo dyes. Sulfanilic acid and 4-aminoresorcinol were detected from the decolorization of Acid Orange 6, sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphtol were detected from the reduction of Acid Orange 7, and sulfanilic acid and N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DMP) were found to be intermediates of Acid Orange 52 degradation. Sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-naphtol were persistent in the anaerobic conditions, whereas 4-aminoresorcinol was completely mineralized by anaerobic sludge and DMP was transformed into 1,4-phenylenediamine. Enrichment cultures obtained via consecutive passages on basal medium with only azo dye as a carbon and an energy source seemed to be morphologically heterogeneous. Baculiform and coccus cells were found when viewed under a light microscope. Cocci were joined in chains. Because anaerobic sludge contains sulfate-reducing bacteria and therefore may generate sulfide, azo dyes were tested for chemical decolorization by sulfide to compare rates of chemical and biologic reduction.

  7. Degradation of azo dyes by oxidative processes--laccase and ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Michael M; Gübitz, Georg M; Rehorek, Astrid

    2008-07-01

    Azo dyes are of synthetic origin and their environmental fate is not well understood. They are resistant to direct aerobic bacterial degradation and form potentially carcinogenic aromatic amines by reduction of the azo group. This study shows that applying the oxidative processes of enzymatic treatment with laccase and ultrasound treatment, both alone and in combination, leads to dye degradation. Laccase treatment degraded both Acid Orange and Direct Blue dyes within 1-5 h but failed in the case of Reactive dyes, whereas ultrasound degraded all the dyes investigated (3-15 h). When applied as multi-stage combinations the treatments showed synergistic effects for dye degradation compared with individual treatments. Bulk light absorption (UV-Vis) and ion pairing HPLC were used for process monitoring. Additionally, mass spectrometry was used to elucidate the structures of intermediates arising from ultrasound treatment.

  8. Growth and physiology of Clostridium perfringens wild-type and ΔazoC knockout: an azo dye exposure study.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2016-02-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic micro-organism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce the azoreductase enzyme AzoC, an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes to aromatic amines, which are carcinogenic in nature. A significant amount of work has been completed that focuses on the activity of this enzyme; however, few studies have been completed that focus on the physiology of azo dye reduction. Dye reduction studies coupled with C. perfringens growth studies in the presence of ten different azo dyes and in media of varying complexities were completed to compare the growth rates and dye-reducing activity of C. perfringens WT cells, a C. perfringens ΔazoC knockout, and Bifidobacterium infantis, a non-azoreductase-producing control bacterium. The presence of azo dyes significantly increased the generation time of C. perfringens in rich medium, an effect that was not seen in minimal medium. In addition, azo dye reduction studies with the ΔazoC knockout suggested the presence of additional functional azoreductases in this medically important bacterium. Overall, this study addresses a major gap in the literature by providing the first look, to our knowledge, at the complex physiology of C. perfringens upon azo dye exposure and the effect that both azo dyes and the azoreductase enzyme have on growth. PMID:26566621

  9. Exploring effects of chemical structure on azo dye decolorization characteristics by Pseudomonas luteola.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2008-06-15

    This follow-up study tended to provide a systematic comparison for how the variation of functional groups and molecular structures present in model azo dyes affects color removal capability of Pseudomonas luteola. As sulfo group at methyl orange (p-MO) or carboxyl group at 4-(4'-dimethylaminophenylazobenzoic acid) sodium salt (denoted p-MR) were both para to azo bond, the ranking of decolorization rate was p-MO>p-MR due to the stronger electron-withdrawing effect of the sulfo group. For isomers, when the functional groups (sulfo group at 2-(4'-dimethylamino-phenylazo) benzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (o-MO) or carboxyl group at methyl red (o-MR)) were ortho to azo bond, the decolorization rate significantly decreased (e.g., p-MO>o-MO or p-MR>o-MR) likely due to steric hindrance near azo linkage(s). Similarly, for phenolic azo dyes the series of decolorization rate was 3-(4'-dimethylaminophenylazo) phenol (m-OH)>2-(4'-dimethylaminophenylazo) phenol (o-OH). Apparently, azo dyes with different properties of substituent on aromatic ring could affect the efficiency of biodecolorization of P. luteola. Moreover, the relative position (e.g., ortho, meta, para) of the substituent to azo bond could also influence the capability of biodecolorization of P. luteola. Regarding the electronic effect, azo dyes with stronger electron-withdrawing group (e.g., sulfo group) at specific positions (e.g., at para) could be more easily biodecolored than those with a carboxyl group.

  10. Kinetics of azoreductase and assessment of toxicity of metabolic products from azo dyes by Pseudomonas luteola.

    PubMed

    Hu, T L

    2001-01-01

    This is a continuous study on a decolorization strain, Pseudomonas luteola, which involves treating seven azo dyes with different structures. This study focuses mainly on determining both the mechanism of decolorization by P. luteola and the activity of azoreductase from P. luteola as well as identifying and assessing the toxicity of metabolic products of azo dyes. The growth of P. luteola reached the stationary phase after shaking incubation for 24 hours. Then, while being kept static, the color of seven tested azo dyes (100 mg/l) could be removed. The proportion of color removal was between 59-99%, which figure is related to the structure of the dye. Monoazo dyes (RP2B, V2RP and Red 22) showed the fastest rate of decolorization, i.e. from 0.23-0.44 mg dye-mg cell-1 hr-1. P. luteola could remove the color of V2RP and a leather dye at a concentration of 200 mg/l, and as to the rest of the azo dyes, it could remove at a concentration of up to 100 mg/l. Decolorization of RP2B and Red 22 required activation energy of 7.00 J/mol and 6.63 J/mole, respectively, indicating that it was easier for azoreductase to decolorize structurally simple dyes. The kinetics of azoreductase towards seven azo dyes suggested a competitive inhibition model be applied. Microtox was used to analyze the toxicity of the metabolic products of azo dyes. EC50 showed differences in toxicity before and after the azo dyes had been metabolized. Analysis revealed significant differences between the results obtained by EC50 with Blue 15 and those obtained with the leather dye, indicating that the toxicities of the metabolic products were increased. The differences obtained by EC50 with Red 22, RP2P and V2RP were small, and Black 22 showed no such difference. Sulfanic acid and orthanilic acid may be the intermediate products of Violet 9 and RP2B, respectively. However, according to FT-IR analysis, aromatic amines were present in the metabolic product.

  11. Reduction and partial degradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth by Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Guo, Jun; Xu, Zhicheng; Mo, Cuiyun; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2007-06-01

    Reduction and biodegradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth using a newly isolated Shewanella decolorationis strain S12 were investigated. Under anaerobic conditions, amaranth was reduced by strain S12, and a stoichiometric amount of two reduction products RP-1 and RP-2 were generated. UV/visible spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that RP-1 and RP-2 were 1-aminenaphthylene -4-sulfonic acid and 1-aminenaphthylene-2-hydroxy-3, 6-disulfonic acid. The result strongly supports a mechanism of azo dye reduction by the process via the reductive cleavage of the azo bond to form corresponding aromatic amines. The result of HPLC analyses revealed that these aromatic amines were not able to be mineralized by strain S12 under anaerobic conditions. But after re-aeration of the decolorized culture, RP-2 was mineralized completely by this microorganism, but the consumption of RP-1 was not observed. Ames test showed that amaranth had mutagenic but no cytotoxic potential. The mutagenic potential was relieved after the anaerobic treatment with strain S12 as the mutagenic effect of the two reduction products from amaranth was not detected by Ames test. Thus, the ability of strain S12 to reduce and partially mineralize the naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye efficiently was demonstrated, which can potentially be used to biodegrade and detoxify wastewater containing azo dyes using an alternating anaerobic/aerobic treatment procedure.

  12. Detection of azo dyes and aromatic amines in women undergarment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2016-07-28

    Women are exposed to several chemical additives including azo dyes that exist in textile materials, which are a potential health hazard for consumers. Our objective was to analyze suspected carcinogenic azo dyes and their degradation aromatic amines in women underwear panties using a fast and simple method for quantification. Here, we evaluated 120 different samples of women underwear for their potential release of aromatic amines to the skin. Seventy-four samples yielded low level mixtures of aromatic amines; however eighteen samples were found to produce greater than 200 mg/kg (ppm) of aromatic amines. Azo dyes in these 18 samples were extracted from the fabrics and analyzed by reverse phase thin layer chromatography in tandem with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven azo dyes were identified based on their mass spectral data and the chemical structure of the aromatic amine produced from these samples. We demonstrate that planar chromatography and mass spectrometry can be really helpful in confirming the identity of the azo dyes, offering highly relevant molecular information of the responsible compounds in the fabrics. With the growing concern about the consumer goods, analysis of aromatic amines in garments has become a highly important issue. PMID:27149414

  13. Detoxification of azo dyes by bacterial oxidoreductase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Crowley, David E

    2016-08-01

    Azo dyes and their intermediate degradation products are common contaminants of soil and groundwater in developing countries where textile and leather dye products are produced. The toxicity of azo dyes is primarily associated with their molecular structure, substitution groups and reactivity. To avoid contamination of natural resources and to minimize risk to human health, this wastewater requires treatment in an environmentally safe manner. This manuscript critically reviews biological treatment systems and the role of bacterial reductive and oxidative enzymes/processes in the bioremediation of dye-polluted wastewaters. Many studies have shown that a variety of culturable bacteria have efficient enzymatic systems that can carry out complete mineralization of dye chemicals and their metabolites (aromatic compounds) over a wide range of environmental conditions. Complete mineralization of azo dyes generally involves a two-step process requiring initial anaerobic treatment for decolorization, followed by an oxidative process that results in degradation of the toxic intermediates that are formed during the first step. Molecular studies have revealed that the first reductive process can be carried out by two classes of enzymes involving flavin-dependent and flavin-free azoreductases under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions. The second step that is carried out by oxidative enzymes that primarily involves broad specificity peroxidases, laccases and tyrosinases. This review focuses, in particular, on the characterization of these enzymes with respect to their enzyme kinetics and the environmental conditions that are necessary for bioreactor systems to treat azo dyes contained in wastewater.

  14. Biosorption of Azo dyes by spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Neeta A.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, spent Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was used for the removal of six azo dyes from aqueous solutions. The dye removal capacity of the biomass was evaluated by conducting batch tests as a function of contact time, biomass dosage, pH and initial dye concentrations. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the experimental data with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999, suggesting that chemisorptions might be the rate limiting step. The equilibrium sorption data showed good fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. Among the six dyes tested, the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for fast red A and metanil yellow was found to be 108.8 and 128.5 mg/g, respectively. These encouraging results suggest that dead Rhizopus arrhizus biomass could be a potential biomaterial for the removal of azo dyes from aqueous dye solution.

  15. Degradation efficiencies of azo dye Acid Orange 7 by the interaction of heat, UV and anions with common oxidants: persulfate, peroxymonosulfate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiying; Wang, Ping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Liang; Zhang, Wenyi; Shao, Xueting; Niu, Rui

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, the degradation of azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by three common peroxides (persulfate (PS), peroxymonosulfate (PMS) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))) under various activation conditions, i.e., heat (25-80 degrees C), UV light (254 nm), or anions (SO(4)(2-), NO(3)(-), CO(3)(2-), HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-), and Cl(-)), was investigated. The order of AO7 degradation efficiencies by heat activation is PS>PMS>H(2)O(2). PS oxidation activated by heat (>50 degrees C) is an effective degradation technology, while PMS and H(2)O(2) are hardly activated. When assisted by UV, peroxides could all be activated and degrade AO7 quickly. The order is PS>H(2)O(2)>PMS. We activated peroxides, for the first time, by using some anions and compared the subsequently degradation efficiencies of AO7. It was found that PMS could be activated by some anions, but PS and H(2)O(2) cannot. The activation efficiencies of PMS by SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) are negligible, whereas remarkable by HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-), Cl(-) and CO(3)(2-). For HCO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-) and Cl(-), the activation efficiencies become higher with the increase of anion concentration. For CO(3)(2-), however, the activation efficiency is higher at lower concentration.

  16. Accelerated decolorization of structurally different azo dyes by newly isolated bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2008-02-01

    Wastewater effluents from the textile and other dye-stuff industries contain significant amounts of synthetic dyes that require treatment to prevent groundwater contamination. In research aimed at biotechnology for treatment of azo dyes, this study examined 288 strains of azo-dye degrading bacteria to identify efficient strains and determine incubation times required for decolorization. Initial enrichment cultures were carried out using a mixture of four structurally different dyes (Acid Red 88, Reactive Black 5, Direct Red 81, and Disperse Orange 3) as the sole source of C and N to isolate the bacteria from soil, activated sludge, and natural asphalt. Six strains were selected for further study based on their prolific growth and ability to rapidly decolorize the dyes individually or in mixtures. Treatment times required by the most efficient strain, AS96 (Shewanella putrefaciens) were as short as 4 h for complete decolorization of 100 mg l(-1) of AR-88 and DR-81 dyes under static conditions, and 6 and 8 h, respectively, for complete decolorization of RB-5 and DO-3. To our knowledge, these bacterial strains are the most efficient azo-dye degrading bacteria that have been described and may have practical application for biological treatment of dye-polluted wastewater streams.

  17. Structure-activity relationship study on the bioreduction of azo dyes by Clostridium paraputrificum.

    PubMed

    Moir, D; Masson, S; Chu, I

    2001-03-01

    Seven commercially available, structurally related azo dyes have been bioreduced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium paraputrificum. The rates of reduction of these dyes were found to vary between 24 and 74 nmoles reduced/mg protein/h. Acid red 1 and desmethyl acid red 106 were found to be the most readily reduced, while chromotrope 2R and cibacron brilliant red 3B-A were reduced at the slowest rates. The differences in reduction rates can be rationalized on the basis of structural differences and are consistent with the possible intermediacy of low molecular-weight electron carriers as the mediators of reduction. The incorporation of electron-withdrawing groups into the dyes, even if remotely placed, was found to increase the rate of reduction of dyes under controlled conditions, supporting the inversely proportional relationship between the electron density of the azo bond and the ease of bioreduction.

  18. FATE OF WATER SOLUBLE AZO DYES IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the partitioning of water soluble azo dyes in the activated sludge process (ASP). Azo dyes are of concern because some of the dyes, dye precursors , and/or their degradation products such as aromatic amines (which are also dye precurso...

  19. Toxicity assessment and microbial degradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2006-08-01

    Toxic effluents containing azo dyes are discharged from various industries and they adversely affect water resources, soil fertility, aquatic organisms and ecosystem integrity. They pose toxicity (lethal effect, genotoxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity) to aquatic organisms (fish, algae, bacteria, etc.) as well as animals. They are not readily degradable under natural conditions and are typically not removed from waste water by conventional waste water treatment systems. Benzidine based dyes have long been recognized as a human urinary bladder carcinogen and tumorigenic in a variety of laboratory animals. Several microorganisms have been found to decolourize, transform and even to completely mineralize azo dyes. A mixed culture of two Pseudomonas strains efficiently degraded mixture of 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) and phenol/cresols. Azoreductases of different microorganisms are useful for the development of biodegradation systems as they catalyze reductive cleavage of azo groups (-N=N-) under mild conditions. In this review, toxic impacts of dyeing factory effluents on plants, fishes, and environment, and plausible bioremediation strategies for removal of azo dyes have been discussed.

  20. Comparative azo reductase activity of red azo dyes through caecal and hepatic microsomal fraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Das, M; Khanna, S K

    1997-09-01

    In order to study the rate of formation of toxic aromatic amines, anaerobic reduction of four red azo dyes viz. amaranth, carmoisine, fast Red E and ponceau 4R was investigated by incubating caecal content and hepatic microsomal fraction of rats with 37.5 microM concentration of dyes in sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4 using NADPH generating system, glucose oxidase system and nitrogen as the gaseous phase. Caecal suspension exhibited higher azo reductase activity than that of hepatic microsomal fraction using any of the 4 azo dyes. Caecal microbes showed maximal azo reductase activity when ponceau 4R was used as a substrate followed by fast Red E and carmoisine, while with amaranth the activity was minimum. Similarly ponceau 4 R exhibited maximum hepatic microsomal azo reductase activity followed by fast Red E and carmoisine whereas, amaranth had minimum activity. Caecal flora possessed almost 17 fold higher degradative capability of ponceau 4 R and fast Red E colourants than the hepatic microsomal fraction. The higher reductive ability through caecal flora for ponceau 4R and fast Red E signifies the formation of more aromatic amines which may be re-absorbed through the intestine to be either eliminated through urine as conjugates or retained in the target tissues to elicit toxic effects.

  1. Using protein nanofibrils to remove azo dyes from aqueous solution by the coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Morshedi, Dina; Mohammadi, Zeinab; Akbar Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi; Aliakbari, Farhang

    2013-12-01

    The ever-increasing applications of hazardous azo dyes as industrialized coloring agents have led to serious remediation challenges. In this study, proteinaceous nanofibrils were examined as coagulants for decolorization of azo dyes in aqueous solutions. The results provided some insight regarding the mechanism of dye removal. The strength of nanofibrils to remove dyes from solution was evaluated by remediation of acid red 88, Bismarck brown R, direct violet 51, reactive black 5, and Congo red. However, the efficiency of nanofibrils to coagulate with different dyes was variable (60-98%) and dependent on the structures of dyes and the physicochemical conditions of the solutions. Increasing the temperature or ionic strength declined the coagulation time and induced the rate of dye removal. Changing pH had contradictory effects on the dye removal efficiency which was more affected by the chemical structure of the dye rather than the change in stability of the coagulant. The efficiency of nanofibrils to remove dyes was more than that of charcoal, which is considered as one of the most common substances used for azo dye remediation which may be due to its well dispersion in the aqueous solutions, and slower rates of the coagulation than that of the adsorption process. Furthermore, cytotoxicity was not detected after treating cell cultures with the decolorized solutions. Accordingly, by integrating biological and biophysicochemical processes, proteinaceous nanofibrils can be promising candidates for treatment of colored wastewaters. Ease of production, proper and quick dispersion in water, without the production of dangerous dye by-products and derivatives, are some of the main advantages of nanofibrils. PMID:23999142

  2. Detoxification of azo dyes in the context of environmental processes.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Deepak; Mishra, Vandana; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Azo dyes account for >70% of the global industrial demand (∼9 million tons). Owing to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential, the annual disposal of ∼4,500,000 tons of dyes and/or degraded products is an environmental and socio-economic concern. In comparison to physico-chemical methods, microbe-mediated dye degradation is considered to be low-input, cost-effective and environmentally-safe. However, under different environmental conditions, interactions of chemically diverse dyes with metabolically diverse microbes produce metabolites of varying toxicity. In addition, majority of studies on microbial dye-degradation focus on decolorization with least attention towards detoxification. Therefore, the environmental significance of microbial dye detoxification research of past >3 decades is critically evaluated with reference to dye structure and the possible influence of microbial interactions in different environments. In the absence of ecosystem-based studies, the results of laboratory-based studies on dye degradation, metabolite production and their genotoxic impact on model organisms are used to predict the possible fate and consequences of azo dyes/metabolites in the environment. In such studies, the predominance of fewer numbers of toxicological assays that too at lower levels of biological organization (molecular/cellular/organismic) suggests its limited ecological significance. Based on critical evaluation of these studies the recommendations on inclusion of multilevel approach (assessment at multiple levels of biological organization), multispecies microcosm approach and native species approach in conjunction with identification of dye metabolites have been made for future studies. Such studies will bridge the gap between the fundamental knowledge on dye-microbe-environment interactions and its application to combat dye-induced environmental toxicity. Thus an environmental perspective on dye toxicity in the background of dye structure and effects of

  3. Detoxification of azo dyes in the context of environmental processes.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Deepak; Mishra, Vandana; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Azo dyes account for >70% of the global industrial demand (∼9 million tons). Owing to their genotoxic/carcinogenic potential, the annual disposal of ∼4,500,000 tons of dyes and/or degraded products is an environmental and socio-economic concern. In comparison to physico-chemical methods, microbe-mediated dye degradation is considered to be low-input, cost-effective and environmentally-safe. However, under different environmental conditions, interactions of chemically diverse dyes with metabolically diverse microbes produce metabolites of varying toxicity. In addition, majority of studies on microbial dye-degradation focus on decolorization with least attention towards detoxification. Therefore, the environmental significance of microbial dye detoxification research of past >3 decades is critically evaluated with reference to dye structure and the possible influence of microbial interactions in different environments. In the absence of ecosystem-based studies, the results of laboratory-based studies on dye degradation, metabolite production and their genotoxic impact on model organisms are used to predict the possible fate and consequences of azo dyes/metabolites in the environment. In such studies, the predominance of fewer numbers of toxicological assays that too at lower levels of biological organization (molecular/cellular/organismic) suggests its limited ecological significance. Based on critical evaluation of these studies the recommendations on inclusion of multilevel approach (assessment at multiple levels of biological organization), multispecies microcosm approach and native species approach in conjunction with identification of dye metabolites have been made for future studies. Such studies will bridge the gap between the fundamental knowledge on dye-microbe-environment interactions and its application to combat dye-induced environmental toxicity. Thus an environmental perspective on dye toxicity in the background of dye structure and effects of

  4. Activated carbon as an electron acceptor and redox mediator during the anaerobic biotransformation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Frank P; Bisschops, Iemke A E; Lettinga, Gatze; Field, Jim A

    2003-01-15

    Activated carbon (AC) has a long history of applications in environmental technology as an adsorbent of pollutants for the purification of drinking waters and wastewaters. Here we describe novel role of AC as redox mediator in accelerating the reductive transformation of pollutants as well as a terminal electron acceptor in the biological oxidation of an organic substrate. This study explores the use of AC as an immobilized redox mediator for the reduction of a recalcitrant azo dye (hydrolyzed Reactive Red 2) in laboratory-scale anaerobic bioreactors, using volatile fatty acids as electron donor. The incorporation of AC in the sludge bed greatly improved dye removal and formation of aniline, a dye reduction product. These results indicate that AC acts as a redox mediator. In supporting batch experiments, bacteria were shown to oxidize acetate at the expense of reducing AC. Furthermore, AC greatly accelerated the chemical reduction of an azo dye by sulfide. The results taken as a whole clearly suggest that AC accepts electrons from the microbial oxidation of organic acids and transfers the electrons to azo dyes, accelerating their reduction. A possible role of quinone surface groups in the catalysis is discussed. PMID:12564915

  5. Influence of Methyl Substituents on Azo-Dye Photoalignment in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulich, V. S.; Murawski, An. A.; Muravsky, Al. A.; Agabekov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    Photoalignment of azo dyes derived from salicylic acid in thin films (80-200 nm) was studied upon irradiation with polarized light (λmax = 457 nm). It is shown that different trends of molecular reorientation, i.e., in the layer plane or orthogonal to it, are observed depending on the position of the methyl substituent in the dye structure. A new distribution parameter Z that allows the portion of molecules reoriented in the layer plane during exposure to be determined is introduced. The novel azo dye potassium 3,7-bis[1-(4-hydroxy-3-carboxylate)phenylazo]-5,5'-dioxodibenzothiophene was synthesized. Its molecules are photoaligned in the layer plane upon irradiation with polarized light.

  6. Biodegradation of textile azo dye by Shewanella decolorationis S12 under microaerophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping

    2007-09-01

    The complete biodegradation of azo dye, Fast Acid Red GR, was observed under microaerophilic conditions by Shewanella decolorationis S12. Although the highest decolorizing rate was measured under anaerobic condition and the highest biomass was obtained under aerobic condition, a further biodegradation of decolorizing products can only be achieved under microaerophilic conditions. Under microaerophilic conditions, S. decolorationis S12 could use a range of carbon sources for azo dye decolorization, including lactate, formate, glucose and sucrose, with lactate being the optimal carbon source. Sulfonated aromatic amines were not detected during the biotransformation of Fast Acid Red GR, while H(2)S formed. The decolorizing products, aniline, 1,4-diaminobenzene and 1-amino-2-naphthol, were followed by complete biodegradation through catechol and 4-aminobenzoic acid based on the analysis results of GC-MS and HPLC.

  7. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Lactobacillus paracase CL1107 isolated from deep sea sediment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangdao; Wang, Wei; Liu, Guoguang

    2015-07-01

    Lactobacillus paracase CL1107 capable of removing toxic chromium (Cr(VI)) and Acid Black (ATT) azo dye simultaneously was isolated from deep sea sediment of the North Atlantic. CL1107 exhibited appreciable dye-Cr(VI) bioremoval ability in the pH range from 5 to 7, temperature 25-35 °C and NaCl 0-6% under aerobic conditions. The maximum removal values of Cr(VI) (95.8%) and dye (92.3%) were obtained in the media including only Cr(VI) or dye at initial concentration of 100 mg/L. In the experiments for the simultaneous treatment of both pollutants, the reduction of Cr(VI) and dye was 58.5% and 51.9%, respectively. The azo dye and Cr(VI) reductive activities in strain CL1107 were located in the cell free extract and cell debris, respectively. The mechanisms of azo dye and Cr(VI) reduction were found to be enzyme-mediated. In the treatment of saline tannery wastewater, decolourization of about 76% and 63% Cr(VI) reduction of were achieved. Furthermore, Azo dyes, Cr(VI) and wastewater showed reduced toxicity toward Artemia salina after treatment. These results demonstrate the potential of CL1107 in bioremediation of dye or/and Cr(VI) contamination in salt environments.

  8. Comparative metabolism and mutagenicity of azo and hydrazone dyes in the Ames test.

    PubMed

    De France, B F; Carter, M H; Josephy, P D

    1986-02-01

    Enteric bacterial and hepatic azoreductase enzymes are capable of reducing azo dyes to yield the constituent aromatic amines. Azo dyes based on benzidine and benzidine congeners have received particular attention because of their widespread use and the known carcinogenicity of benzidine to humans. Azo dyes based on beta-diketone coupling components exist preferentially as the tautomeric hydrazones. A series of hydrazone dyes based on benzidine and benzidine congeners was prepared and characterized by NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy. These dyes were tested for mutagenicity using a modified Ames assay and, unlike the true azo dyes, showed no significant mutagenic activity. The hydrazone dyes were resistant to enzymatic reduction by FMN-supplemented hamster-liver post-mitochondrial supernatant (S-9); under identical conditions, azo dyes such as trypan blue were rapidly reduced.

  9. 40 CFR 721.10107 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, [amino-hydroxy-[(substituted)azo-sulfo-naphthaleneyl]azo]-hydroxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10107 Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy... chemical substance identified generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy- , metal salt (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10107 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, [amino-hydroxy-[(substituted)azo-sulfo-naphthaleneyl]azo]-hydroxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10107 Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy... chemical substance identified generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy- , metal salt (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10107 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, [amino-hydroxy-[(substituted)azo-sulfo-naphthaleneyl]azo]-hydroxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10107 Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy... chemical substance identified generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy- , metal salt (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10107 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, [amino-hydroxy-[(substituted)azo-sulfo-naphthaleneyl]azo]-hydroxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10107 Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy... chemical substance identified generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy- , metal salt (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10107 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, [amino-hydroxy-[(substituted)azo-sulfo-naphthaleneyl]azo]-hydroxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10107 Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy... chemical substance identified generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, azo]-hydroxy- , metal salt (PMN...

  14. Liquid-Crystal Photoalignment by Super Thin Azo Dye Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xihua; Kozenkov, Vladimir M.; Yeung, Fion Sze-Yan; Xu, Peizhi; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2006-01-01

    A novel liquid crystal (LC) photoalignment method, based on a super thin azo dye molecular layer is proposed. The basic idea of this method is to form a very neat textile knitwear and uniform alignment by azo dye layer without spin coating and rubbing processes. The thickness of the alignment layer is smaller than 3 nm, which is much thinner than traditional PI alignment film. In addition to the advantages of a conventional photoalignment method, the use of super thin layer simplifies the alignment procedure, making possible a high electrooptical performance, good photo-tolerance and thermal stability, better adhesion on indium tin oxide (ITO) surface and compatibility with roll-to-roll process.

  15. Decolorization of water soluble azo dyes by bacterial cultures, isolated from dye house effluent.

    PubMed

    Modi, H A; Rajput, Garima; Ambasana, Chetan

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work is to isolate and characterize bacterial isolates form dye house effluent, and to check their ability of decolorizing sulfonated azo dyes, and also to study influence of various environmental parameters on same process. Among seven Gram positive bacterial isolates obtained form dye house effluent, M1 (Bacillus cereus) and M6 were proved to be more potent for decolorizing sulfonated azo dyes under aerobic conditions. Maltose as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source enhanced decolorization efficiency of M1 (B. cereus). HPTLC studies proved that more than 97% of the dye (Reactive Red 195) was degraded by bacteria after 72 h of incubation. These results along with spectrophotometric data prove the efficiency of bacteria suggesting their possible use in treating dye containing effluents.

  16. Complete degradation of the azo dye Acid Orange-7 and bioelectricity generation in an integrated microbial fuel cell, aerobic two-stage bioreactor system in continuous flow mode at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Eustace; Keshavarz, Taj; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the commercially used model azo dye Acid Orange-7 (AO-7) was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates using an integrated microbial fuel cell (MFC) and aerobic bioreactor system. The integrated bioreactor system was operated at ambient temperature and continuous-flow mode. AO-7 loading rate was varied during experiments from 70gm(-3)day(-1) to 210gm(-3)day(-1). Colour and soluble COD removal rates reached>90% under all AO-7 loading rates. The MFC treatment stage prompted AO-7 to undergo reductive degradation into its constituent aromatic amines. HPLC-MS analysis of metabolite extracts from the aerobic stage of the bioreactor system indicated further oxidative degradation of the resulting aromatic amines into simpler compounds. Bioluminescence based Vibrio fischeri ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that aerobic stage effluent exhibited toxicity reductions of approximately fivefold and ten-fold respectively compared to the dye wastewater influent and MFC-stage effluent.

  17. Novel Strategy for Tracking the Microbial Degradation of Azo Dyes with Different Polarities in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Xu, Meiying; Chen, Xingjuan; Yang, Yonggang; Wang, Haiji; Sun, Guoping

    2015-10-01

    Direct visualization evidence is important for understanding the microbial degradation mechanisms. To track the microbial degradation pathways of azo dyes with different polar characterizations, sensors based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from 1,8-naphthalimide to azo dyes were synthesized, in which the quenched fluorescence will recover when the azo bond was cleaved. In living cells, the sensor-tracking experiment showed that the low polarity and hydrophobic azo dye can be taken up into the cells and reduced inside the cells, whereas the high polarity and hydrophilic azo dye can be reduced only outside the cells because of the selective permeability of the cell membranes. These results indicated that there were two different bacterial degradation pathways available for different polarity azo dyes. To our knowledge, no fluorescent sensor has yet been designed for illuminating the microbial degradation mechanisms of organic pollutants with different characteristics.

  18. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used.

  19. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used. PMID:25967675

  20. Oxidative degradation of azo dyes using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Zhang, Yanwei; Yu, Li; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the catalyzed degradation ability of tourmaline on the dyes methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB), and congo red (CR) at different pH values. Interestingly, tourmaline strongly adsorbed anionic dyes, but it did not adsorb cationic dyes. When H₂O₂ was introduced into the tourmaline-dye systems, the degradation percentage for CR catalysis by tourmaline was lower than the percentage of adsorption, whereas the opposite was true for MB and RhB systems. Notably, the catalyzed degradation decreased from 100% to 45% for MB, 100% to 15% for RhB and 100% to 25% for CR as the pH increased from 3.0 to 10.0, respectively, which was much greater than the degradation obtained for previously reported materials at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 10.0. Tourmaline catalytically degraded the dyes over a broad range of pH values, which was attributed to tourmaline automatically adjusting the pH of the dye solutions to approximately 5.5 from an initial range of 4.2-10.0. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping technique observed peroxyl (ROO·) and alkoxy (RO·) or alkyl (R·) radicals originated from the attack of ·OH radicals and O₂(·-) radicals, indicating that these radicals were involved in the catalyzed degradation of MB. Importantly, four intermediate products of MB at m/z 383, 316, 203 and 181 were observed by LC/MS. PMID:23876254

  1. Oxidative degradation of azo dyes using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Zhang, Yanwei; Yu, Li; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the catalyzed degradation ability of tourmaline on the dyes methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB), and congo red (CR) at different pH values. Interestingly, tourmaline strongly adsorbed anionic dyes, but it did not adsorb cationic dyes. When H₂O₂ was introduced into the tourmaline-dye systems, the degradation percentage for CR catalysis by tourmaline was lower than the percentage of adsorption, whereas the opposite was true for MB and RhB systems. Notably, the catalyzed degradation decreased from 100% to 45% for MB, 100% to 15% for RhB and 100% to 25% for CR as the pH increased from 3.0 to 10.0, respectively, which was much greater than the degradation obtained for previously reported materials at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 10.0. Tourmaline catalytically degraded the dyes over a broad range of pH values, which was attributed to tourmaline automatically adjusting the pH of the dye solutions to approximately 5.5 from an initial range of 4.2-10.0. An electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping technique observed peroxyl (ROO·) and alkoxy (RO·) or alkyl (R·) radicals originated from the attack of ·OH radicals and O₂(·-) radicals, indicating that these radicals were involved in the catalyzed degradation of MB. Importantly, four intermediate products of MB at m/z 383, 316, 203 and 181 were observed by LC/MS.

  2. An improved method for removal of azo dye orange II from textile effluent using albumin as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Tadashi; Jara, Alícia M T; Batista, Anabelle C L; Franco, Luciana O; Barbosa Lima, Marcos A; Benachour, Mohand; Alves da Silva, Carlos A; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2012-11-30

    Azo dyes are generally resistant to biodegradation due to their complex structures. Acid orange II is one of the most widely used dyes in the textile industry. The influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in different concentrations, pH, and time of contact on Orange II was investigated using kinetics and adsorption-isotherm experiments. The results showed that the maximum colour removed from dye/albumin was 99.50% and that a stable dye-protein complex had been formed at pH 3.5 and in a proportion of 1:3 (v/v), respectively. The synthetic effluent did not show toxicity to the microcrustacean Artemia salina, and showed a CL₅₀ equal to 97 µg/mL to azo dye orange II. Additionally, the methodology was effective in removing the maximum of orange II using BSA by adsorption at pH 3.5 which mainly attracted ions to the azo dye during the adsorption process. This suggests that this form of treatment is economical and easy to use which potentially could lead to bovine serum albumin being used as a sorbent for azo dyes.

  3. Integration of nanofiltration and biological degradation of textile wastewater containing azo dye.

    PubMed

    Paździor, Katarzyna; Klepacz-Smółka, Anna; Ledakowicz, Stanisław; Sójka-Ledakowicz, Jadwiga; Mrozińska, Zdzisława; Zyłła, Renata

    2009-04-01

    The anaerobic biological azo dyes reduction process was successfully applied to decolourization of the concentrates from the nanofiltration treatment of real textile effluents. The anaerobic phase was followed by aerobic oxidation aimed at the destruction of the aromatic amine released from azo dye. In the first experiment sequential batch reactor (SBR) combining both the anaerobic and aerobic phase in one unit was used. In the second one the anaerobic stage was separated from the aerobic one. The anaerobic phase fulfilled its aim (decolourization) in both systems (over 90%). In opposite, the aromatic amine was completely degraded in the aerobic reactor (two-sludge system), whereas the orthanilic acid was not degraded (during the aerobic phase) in SBR reactor. The COD reduction was also higher in the two-sludge system than in SBR.

  4. Ultrafast degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by cobalt-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, X. D.; Zhu, Z. W.; Liu, G.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. F.

    2015-12-01

    Reactivity and mass loss are considered mutually exclusive in conventional zero-valent metal (ZVM) technology to treat environmental contaminants. Here, we report the outstanding performance of Co-based metallic glass (MG) in degrading an aqueous solution of azo dye, thus eliminating this trade-off. Ball-milled Co-based MG powders completely degrade Acid Orange II at an ultrafast rate. The surface-area-normalized rate constant of Co-based MG powders was one order of magnitude higher than that of Co-based crystalline counterparts and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the widely studied Fe0 powders. The coordinatively unsaturated local structure in Co-based MG responds to the catalysis for degradation, resulting in very low mass loss. Wide applicability and good reusability were also present. Co-based MG is the most efficient material for azo dye degradation reported thus far, and will promote the practical application of MGs as functional materials.

  5. Abatement of Azo Dye from Wastewater Using Bimetal-Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Ghorban; Farjadfard, Sima

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new adsorbent, bimetallic chitosan particle (BCP) that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye from wastewater. The effects of pH, BCP quantity, and contact time are initially verified on the basis of the percentage of orange II removed from the wastewater. Experimental data reveal that the Cu/Mg bimetal and chitosan have a synergistic effect on the adsorption process of the adsorbate, where the dye adsorption by Cu/Mg bimetal, chitosan alone, and bimetal-chitosan is 10, 49, and 99.5%, respectively. The time required for the complete decolorization of orange II by 1 mg/L of BCP is 10 min. The Langmuir model is the best fit for the experimental data, which attains a maximum adsorption capacity of 384.6 mg/g. The consideration of the kinetic behavior indicates that the adsorption of orange II onto the BCP fits best with the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models. Further, the simulated azo dye wastewater can be effectively treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent, 1 mg/L, within a short reaction time of 20 min. Overall, the use of BCP can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. PMID:24348163

  6. Azo Dye Biodecolorization Enhanced by Echinodontium taxodii Cultured with Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jing; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose facilitates the fungal oxidization of recalcitrant organic pollutants through the extracellular ligninolytic enzymes induced by lignin in wood or other plant tissues. However, available information on this phenomenon is insufficient. Free radical chain reactions during lignin metabolism are important in xenobiotic removal. Thus, the effect of lignin on azo dye decolorization in vivo by Echinodontium taxodii was evaluated. In the presence of lignin, optimum decolorization percentages for Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R, Direct Red 5B, Direct Black 38, and Direct Black 22 were 91.75% (control, 65.96%), 76.89% (control, 43.78%), 43.44% (control, 17.02%), and 44.75% (control, 12.16%), respectively, in the submerged cultures. Laccase was the most important enzyme during biodecolorization. Aside from the stimulating of laccase activity, lignin might be degraded by E. taxodii, and then these degraded low-molecular-weight metabolites could act as redox mediators promoting decolorization of azo dyes. The relationship between laccase and lignin degradation was investigated through decolorization tests in vitro with purified enzyme and dozens of aromatics, which can be derivatives of lignin and can function as laccase mediators or inducers. Dyes were decolorized at triple or even higher rates in certain laccase–aromatic systems at chemical concentrations as low as 10 µM. PMID:25285777

  7. A novel recombinant AzrC protein proposed by molecular docking and in silico analyses to improve azo dye's binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Dehghanian, Fariba; Kay, Maryam; Kahrizi, Danial

    2015-09-15

    Azo dyes are broadly used in different industries through their chemical stability and ease of synthesis. These dyes are usually identified as critical environmental pollutants and many attentions were performed to degradation of azo dyes using biological systems. In this study, the interactions of an azoreductase from mesophilic gram-positive Bacillus sp. B29, AzrC, with four common azo dyes (orange I, orange II, orange G and acid red 88) were investigated. Fifteen points, double, triple and quadruple mutant forms of AzrC were made using Molegro Virtual Docker 6.0 in order to improve the binding affinity of azo dyes to AzrC. The impact of 15 different mutations on azo dye affinity potency of AzrC was computationally analyzed using AzrC-azo dye molecular docking, and each interaction was scored based on AutoDock 4.2 free binding energy. Our results have indicated that Asn 104 (A), Asn 187 (B), and Tyr 151 (A) make stable hydrogen bond between AzrC and azo dyes. The hydrophobic amino acids like Phe105 (A), Phe 125 (B), and Phe 172 (B) in wild type form make hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the presence of more hydrophobic residues F60 (B), I119 (B), I121 (B) and F132 (B) in mutant forms made more powerful hydrophobic pocket in the active site. In conclusion, recombinant AzrC with quadruple mutations was suggested in order to increase the biodegradation capacity of AzrC through improving its affinity to four studied azo dyes. This study would be promising for future experimental analyses in order to produce recombinant form of AzrC.

  8. A novel recombinant AzrC protein proposed by molecular docking and in silico analyses to improve azo dye's binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Dehghanian, Fariba; Kay, Maryam; Kahrizi, Danial

    2015-09-15

    Azo dyes are broadly used in different industries through their chemical stability and ease of synthesis. These dyes are usually identified as critical environmental pollutants and many attentions were performed to degradation of azo dyes using biological systems. In this study, the interactions of an azoreductase from mesophilic gram-positive Bacillus sp. B29, AzrC, with four common azo dyes (orange I, orange II, orange G and acid red 88) were investigated. Fifteen points, double, triple and quadruple mutant forms of AzrC were made using Molegro Virtual Docker 6.0 in order to improve the binding affinity of azo dyes to AzrC. The impact of 15 different mutations on azo dye affinity potency of AzrC was computationally analyzed using AzrC-azo dye molecular docking, and each interaction was scored based on AutoDock 4.2 free binding energy. Our results have indicated that Asn 104 (A), Asn 187 (B), and Tyr 151 (A) make stable hydrogen bond between AzrC and azo dyes. The hydrophobic amino acids like Phe105 (A), Phe 125 (B), and Phe 172 (B) in wild type form make hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the presence of more hydrophobic residues F60 (B), I119 (B), I121 (B) and F132 (B) in mutant forms made more powerful hydrophobic pocket in the active site. In conclusion, recombinant AzrC with quadruple mutations was suggested in order to increase the biodegradation capacity of AzrC through improving its affinity to four studied azo dyes. This study would be promising for future experimental analyses in order to produce recombinant form of AzrC. PMID:26026905

  9. Spectral Studies of UV and Solar Photocatalytic Degradation of AZO Dye and Textile Dye Effluents Using Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mariselvam, R.; Ranjitsingh, A. J. A.; Mosae Selvakumar, P.; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the chemical dye AZO and dye effluents in different time duration has been investigated using biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Dye industry effluents and AZO dye undergo degradation to form harmless intermediate and colourless products following irradiation by UV and solar light in the presence of green synthesized silver nanoparticles. The degree of degradation was tested under the experimental conditions such as PH, temperature, and absorbance of the dye in UV and solar light was measured. The degradation was higher in the UV light source than in the solar light source. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles in the UV light source were found to expedite the dye degradation process. PMID:27382364

  10. The accelerating effect and mechanism of a newly functional bio-carrier modified by redox mediators for the azo dyes decolorization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Kang, Li; Lian, Jing; Yang, Jingliang; Yan, Bin; Li, Zaixing; Liu, Chun; Yue, Lin

    2010-11-01

    In this study, a functional bio-carrier modified by redox meditors was developed as a redox mediator for application in azo dye decolorization processes. Its accelerating effect and mechanism for azo dyes decolorization were also examined. The decolorization rates of 10 azo dyes were enhanced about 1.5-3 fold by the functional bio-carrier modified with disperse turquoise blue S-GL, and the ORP value during the acid red GR decolorization process was changed to a more negative value of 20-25 mV. Non-dissolved redox mediator on the functional bio-carrier played a similar role as NADH during the azo dyes decolorization process. At the same time, the functional bio-carrier exhibited good reusability and the combinational technology of the redox mediator and bio-carrier was a great improvement of the redox mediator application and represents a new bio-treatment concept.

  11. Synthesis, biological activity and dyeing performance of some novel azo disperse dyes incorporating pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines for dyeing of polyester fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Ahmed Z.; Aboul-Fetouh, Mahmoud S.; Nassar, Hesham S.

    2012-02-01

    Several novel pyrazolopyrimidine azo compounds were achieved from diazotization of 4-aminoacetanilide and coupling with malononitrile and then refluxed with hydrazine hydrate to furnish 3,5-diamino-4-(4-acetamidophenylazo)-1H-pyrazole. The later compound was diazotized and coupled with substituted α-cyanocinnamate, α-cyanocinnamonitrile, 2-cyano-3-ethoxyacrylic acid ethyl ester, chalcones and ethylacetoacetate to produce novel dyestuffs. Structures of the dyes were fully characterized by using FT-IR, 1H NMR, mass spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The dyes were applied to polyester fiber, affording satisfactory results and showed biological activity towards various microorganisms.

  12. Structural basis of the mutagenicity of 1-amino-2-naphthol-based azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, H S; Klopman, G

    1990-03-01

    A structure-activity study of 1-amino-2-naphthol derived azo dyes using CASE, the Computer Automated Structure Evaluation system, revealed that for optimal mutagenicity, reduction of the azo bond was required, thus suggesting that activity could be related to the liberated aromatic amines. Although it has long been known that sulfonation of azo dyes resulted in decreased carcinogenicity and mutagenicity, the present study elucidates the sites of sulfonation which will decrease mutagenicity maximally. Comparison of CASE predictions with available mutagenicity data indicates a concordance. Unexpectedly, CASE indicates that one of the aromatic amines obtained upon azo reduction of FD and C Red no. 40 is predicted to be mutagenic.

  13. Photoluminescence analysis of self induced planer alignment in azo dye dispersed nematic liquid crystal complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rishi Sood, Srishti Raina, K. K.

    2014-04-24

    We have developed azo dye doped nematic liquid crystal complex for advanced photonic liquid crystal display technology aspects. Disperse orange azo dye self introduced planer alignment in the nematic liquid crystal without any surface anchoring treatment. Planer alignment was characterized by optical polarizing microscopy. The electro-optical switching response of dye disperse planer aligned nematic cell was investigated as a function of applied voltage with the help of photoluminescence spectrophotometer for the tuning of photoluminescence contrast.

  14. Metabolism of the benzidine-based azo dye Direct Black 38 by human intestinal microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, B.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.; Federle, T.W.

    1985-07-01

    Benzidine-based azo dyes are proven mutagens and have been linked to bladder cancer. Previous studies have indicated that their initial reduction is the result of the azo reductase activity of the intestinal microbiota. Metabolism of the benzidine-based dye Direct Black 38 was examined by using a semicontinuous culture system that simulates the lumen of the human large intestine. The system was inoculated with freshly voided feces, and an active flora was maintained as evidenced by volatile fatty acid and gas production. Within 7 days after exposure to the dye, the following metabolites were isolated and identified by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry: benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl, monoacetylbenzidine, and acetylaminobiphenyl. Benzidine reached its peak level after 24 h, accounting for 39.1% of the added dye. Its level began to decline, and by day 7 the predominant metabolite was acetylaminobiphenyl, which accounted for 51.1% of the parent compound. Formation of the deaminated and N-acetylated analogs of benzidine, which have enhanced mutagenicity and lipophilicity, previously has not been attributed to the intestinal microbiota.

  15. Probing horseradish peroxidase catalyzed degradation of azo dye from tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Preethi, Sadhanandam; Anumary, Ayyappan; Ashokkumar, Meiyazhagan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2013-01-01

    Biocatalysis based effluent treatment has outclassed the presently favored physico-chemical treatments due to nil sludge production and monetary savings. Azo dyes are commonly employed in the leather industry and pose a great threat to the environment. Here, we show the degradation of C. I. Acid blue 113 using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) assisted with H2O2 as a co-substrate. It was observed that 0.08 U HRP can degrade 3 mL of 30 mg/L dye up to 80% within 45 min with the assistance of 14 μL of H2O2 at pH 6.6 and 30°C. The feasibility of using the immobilized HRP for dye degradation was also examined and the results show up to 76% dye degradation under similar conditions to that of free HRP with the exception of longer contact time of 240 min. Recycling studies reveal that the immobilized HRP can be recycled up to 3 times for dye degradation. Kinetics drawn for the free HRP catalyzed reaction marked a lower K m and higher V max values, which denotes a proper and faster affinity of the enzyme towards the dye, when compared to the immobilized HRP. The applicability of HRP for treating the actual tannery dye-house wastewater was also demonstrated. PMID:23961406

  16. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of azo dye (Congo red) using modified Y zeolite as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Kondru, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Chand, Shri

    2009-07-15

    The present study explores the degradation of azo dye (Congo red) by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using Fe exchanged commercial Y zeolite as a catalyst. The effects of various operating parameters like temperature, initial pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalyst loading on the removal of dye, color and COD from an aqueous solution were studied at atmospheric pressure. The percent removals of dye, color and COD at optimum pH(0) 7, 90 degrees C using 0.6 ml H(2)O(2)/350 ml solution and 1g/l catalyst was 97% (in 4h), 100% (in 45 min) and 58% (in 4h), respectively. The % dye removal has been found to be less in comparison to % color removal at all conditions, e.g. dye removal in 45 min and at above conditions was 82%, whereas the color removal was 100%. The results indicate that the Fe exchanged Y zeolite is a promising catalyst for dye removal. Fe exchanged catalyst is characterized using XRD, SEM/EDAX, surface area analyzer and FTIR. Though the dye, color and COD removals were maximum at pH(0) 2 but as the leaching of Fe from the catalyst was more in acidic pH range, pH(0) 7 was taken as operating pH due to almost comparable removals as of pH(0) 2 and no leaching of Fe ions. PMID:19135790

  17. Evaluation of integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor for decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye acid red 18: comparison of using two types of packing media.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    Two integrated anaerobic/aerobic fixed-bed sequencing batch biofilm reactor (FB-SBBR) were operated to evaluate decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Volcanic pumice stones and a type of plastic media made of polyethylene were used as packing media in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Decolorization of AR18 in both reactors followed first-order kinetic with respect to dye concentration. More than 63.7% and 71.3% of anaerobically formed 1-naphthylamine-4-sulfonate (1N-4S), as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase in FB-SBBR1 and FB-SBBR2, respectively. Based on statistical analysis, performance of FB-SBBR2 in terms of COD removal as well as biodegradation of 1N-4S was significantly higher than that of FB-SBBR1. Spherical and rod shaped bacteria were the dominant species of bacteria in the biofilm grown on the pumice stones surfaces, while, the biofilm grown on surfaces of the polyethylene media had a fluffy structure.

  18. In-situ formation and immobilization of biogenic nanopalladium into anaerobic granular sludge enhances azo dyes degradation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiangchun; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Hengduo

    2015-07-01

    Azo dyes are toxic and recalcitrant wastewater pollutants. An innovative technology based on biogenic nanopalladium (Bio-Pd) supported anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was developed for azo dyes reduction. In-situ formation of Bio-Pd in the AGS was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The Pd associated AGS (Pd-AGS) showed enhanced decolorization rates to the three azo dyes of Congo Red, Evans Blue and Orange II, with the degradation kinetic constants increased by 2.3-10 fold compared to the control AGS in the presence of electron donor formate. Impacts of different electron donors on Orange II decolorization were further investigated. Results showed that formic acid, formate, acetate, glucose, ethanol and lactate could serve as electron and hydrogen donors to stimulate Orange II decolorization by the Pd-AGS, and their activities followed the order: formic acid > formate > ethanol > glucose > lactate > acetate. Most of the Bio-Pd was bound with microbes in the AGS with a small fraction in the extracellular polymer substances (EPS). Transmission Electronic Microscopy analysis revealed that the Bio-Pd formed in the periplasmic space, cytoplasm and on the cell walls of bacteria. This study provides a new concept for azo dye reduction, which couples sludge microbial degradation ability with Bio-Pd catalytic ability via in-situ formation and immobilization of Bio-Pd into AGS, and offers an alternative for the current azo dye treatment technology.

  19. In-situ formation and immobilization of biogenic nanopalladium into anaerobic granular sludge enhances azo dyes degradation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiangchun; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Hengduo

    2015-07-01

    Azo dyes are toxic and recalcitrant wastewater pollutants. An innovative technology based on biogenic nanopalladium (Bio-Pd) supported anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was developed for azo dyes reduction. In-situ formation of Bio-Pd in the AGS was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The Pd associated AGS (Pd-AGS) showed enhanced decolorization rates to the three azo dyes of Congo Red, Evans Blue and Orange II, with the degradation kinetic constants increased by 2.3-10 fold compared to the control AGS in the presence of electron donor formate. Impacts of different electron donors on Orange II decolorization were further investigated. Results showed that formic acid, formate, acetate, glucose, ethanol and lactate could serve as electron and hydrogen donors to stimulate Orange II decolorization by the Pd-AGS, and their activities followed the order: formic acid > formate > ethanol > glucose > lactate > acetate. Most of the Bio-Pd was bound with microbes in the AGS with a small fraction in the extracellular polymer substances (EPS). Transmission Electronic Microscopy analysis revealed that the Bio-Pd formed in the periplasmic space, cytoplasm and on the cell walls of bacteria. This study provides a new concept for azo dye reduction, which couples sludge microbial degradation ability with Bio-Pd catalytic ability via in-situ formation and immobilization of Bio-Pd into AGS, and offers an alternative for the current azo dye treatment technology. PMID:25912251

  20. THE MUTAGENICITY OF METALLIZED AND UNMETALLIZED AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES IN THE SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mutagenicity of metallized and unmetallized azo and formazan dyes in the Salmonella mutagenicity
    Laura. C. Edwards', Harold S. Freeman'*, and Larry D. Claxton2

    Abstract
    In previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron complexed azo and formazan d...

  1. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Lalnunhlimi, Sylvine; Krishnaswamy, Veenagayathri

    2016-01-01

    Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100–300 mg/L). The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200 mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment. PMID:26887225

  2. Decolorization of azo dyes (Direct Blue 151 and Direct Red 31) by moderately alkaliphilic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Lalnunhlimi, Sylvine; Krishnaswamy, Veenagayathri

    2016-01-01

    Removal of synthetic dyes is one of the main challenges before releasing the wastes discharged by textile industries. Biodegradation of azo dyes by alkaliphilic bacterial consortium is one of the environmental-friendly methods used for the removal of dyes from textile effluents. Hence, this study presents isolation of a bacterial consortium from soil samples of saline environment and its use for the decolorization of azo dyes, Direct Blue 151 (DB 151) and Direct Red 31 (DR 31). The decolorization of azo dyes was studied at various concentrations (100-300mg/L). The bacterial consortium, when subjected to an application of 200mg/L of the dyes, decolorized DB 151 and DR 31 by 97.57% and 95.25% respectively, within 5 days. The growth of the bacterial consortium was optimized with pH, temperature, and carbon and nitrogen sources; and decolorization of azo dyes was analyzed. In this study, the decolorization efficiency of mixed dyes was improved with yeast extract and sucrose, which were used as nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively. Such an alkaliphilic bacterial consortium can be used in the removal of azo dyes from contaminated saline environment.

  3. Statistical optimization of synthetic azo dye (orange II) degradation by azoreductase from Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, V; Kanimozhi, A M; Palvannan, T

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1 produced an intracellular azoreductase as the more prominent enzyme that reduces the azo bridge during the azo dye decolorization process. In order to optimize the expression of azoreductase, statistically based experiments were applied. Eleven significant factors were screened on decolorization activity using Plackett-Burman design. Dye, NADH, glucose, and peptone were identified as having highest positive influence on the decolorization activity. Central composite design of response surface methodology was employed for the concerted effect of these four factors on decolorization activity. This method showed that the optimum medium containing dye (200 mg L(-1)), NADH (1.14 mM), glucose (2.07 g L(-1)), and peptone (6.44 g L(-1)) for the decolorization of Orange II up to 87% in 48 hr. The applied methodology was validated through the adequacy and accuracy of the overall experiments, and the results proved that the applied methods were most effective. Further, the enzyme was purified ninefold with 16% yield by anion-exchange chromatography and a specific activity of 26 U mg(-1). The purified enzyme with a molecular mass of 29,000 Da gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel, and the degradation products sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-napthol of Orange II by azoreductase were analyzed by using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer and hish-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). PMID:23768111

  4. Statistical optimization of synthetic azo dye (orange II) degradation by azoreductase from Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, V; Kanimozhi, A M; Palvannan, T

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans PAMD_1 produced an intracellular azoreductase as the more prominent enzyme that reduces the azo bridge during the azo dye decolorization process. In order to optimize the expression of azoreductase, statistically based experiments were applied. Eleven significant factors were screened on decolorization activity using Plackett-Burman design. Dye, NADH, glucose, and peptone were identified as having highest positive influence on the decolorization activity. Central composite design of response surface methodology was employed for the concerted effect of these four factors on decolorization activity. This method showed that the optimum medium containing dye (200 mg L(-1)), NADH (1.14 mM), glucose (2.07 g L(-1)), and peptone (6.44 g L(-1)) for the decolorization of Orange II up to 87% in 48 hr. The applied methodology was validated through the adequacy and accuracy of the overall experiments, and the results proved that the applied methods were most effective. Further, the enzyme was purified ninefold with 16% yield by anion-exchange chromatography and a specific activity of 26 U mg(-1). The purified enzyme with a molecular mass of 29,000 Da gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel, and the degradation products sulfanilic acid and 1-amino-2-napthol of Orange II by azoreductase were analyzed by using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer and hish-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  5. Integration of photocatalysis and biological treatment for azo dye removal--application to AR183.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Derradji; Fourcade, Florence; Brosillon, Stephan; Nacef, Saci; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2011-04-01

    The feasibility of coupling photocatalysis with biological treatment to treat effluents containing azo dyes was examined in this work. With this aim, the degradation of Acid Red 183 was investigated. The very low biodegradability of AR183 was confirmed beforehand by measuring the biological oxygen demand (BOD5). Photocatalysis experiments were carried out in a closed-loop step photoreactor. The reactor walls were covered by TiO2 catalyst coated on non-woven paper, and the effluent flowed over the photocatalyst as a thin falling film. The removal of the dye was 82.7% after 4 h, and a quasi-complete decolorization (98.5%) was obtained for 10 h of irradiation (initial concentration 100 mg L(-1)). The decrease in concentration followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a constant k of 0.47 h(-1). Mineralization and oxidation yields were 80% and 75%, respectively, after 10 h of pretreatment. Therefore, even if target compound oxidation occurs (COD removal), indicating a modification to the chemical structure, the concomitant high mineralization was not in favour of subsequent microbial growth. The BOD5 measurement confirmed the non-biodegradability of the irradiated solution, which remained toxic since the EC50 decreased from 35 to 3 mg L(-1). The proposed integrated process appeared, therefore, to be not relevant for the treatment of AR183. However, this result should be confirmed for other azo dyes.

  6. Differential catalytic action of Brevibacillus laterosporus on two dissimilar azo dyes Remazol red and Rubine GFL.

    PubMed

    Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2013-02-01

    This comparative study disclosed the diverse catalytic activities of Brevibacillus laterosporus on two different azo dyes. It decolorized 100% of Remazol red and 95% of Rubine GFL within 30 and 48 h respectively, under static condition at 50 mg l⁻¹ dye concentration. Significant increase was observed in azo reductase, NADH-DCIP reductase, veratryl alcohol oxidase and tyrosinase in cells obtained after decolorization of Remazol red; whereas these values were much different with complete inhibition of azo reductase during decolorization of Rubine GFL. The plausible pathway of dye degradation obtained from Gas chromatography-Mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) data confirmed the different metabolic fate of these structurally unidentical dyes. FTIR and HPTLC analysis of extracted metabolites confirmed the biodegradation, while phytotoxicity study assured the detoxification of both the dyes studied. The results obtained in this study suggests, i) sulpho and hydroxyl group present at ortho position to azo group stimulated reduction of azo bond by azo reductase in Remazol red, ii) the same reduction was totally hampered due to presence of ethyl-amino propanenitrile group at para position to azo group in Rubine GFL.

  7. Laboratory studies of electrochemical treatment of industrial azo dye effluent.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, Sanjay S; Jethva, Ashok D; Mehta, Bhavesh B; Dave, Sunil P; Adimurthy, Subbarayappa; Ramachandraiah, Gadde

    2005-04-15

    Removal of color and reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in an industrial azo dye effluent containing chiefly reactive dyes were investigated under single-pass conditions at a dimensionally stable anode (DSA) in a thin electrochemical flow reactor at different current densities, flow rates, and dilutions. With 50% diluted effluent, decolorization was achieved up to 85-99% at 10-40 mA/ cm2 at 5 mL/min flow rate and 50-88% at 30-40 mA/ cm2 at high (10-15 mL/min) flow rates. The COD reduction was maximum (81%) at 39.9 mA/cm2 or above when solution-electrode contact time (Ct) was as high as 21.7 s/cm2 and decreased as Ct declined at a given current density. Cyclic voltammetric studies suggesting an indirect oxidation of dye molecules over the anode surface were carried out at a glassy carbon electrode. The effect of pH on decolorization and COD reduction was determined. An electrochemical mechanism mediated by OCl- operating in the decolorization and COD reduction processes was suggested. The effluent was further treated with NaOCI. The oxidized products from the treated effluents were isolated and confirmed to be free from chlorine-substituted products by IR spectroscopy. From the apparent pseudo-first-order rate data, the second-order rate coefficients were evaluated to be 2.9 M(-1) s(-1) at 5 mL/ min, 76.2 M(-1) s(-1) at 10 mL/min, and 156.1 M(-1) s(-1) at 15 mL/ min for color removal, and 1.19 M(-1) s(-1) at 5 mL/min, 1.79 M(-1) s(-1) at 10 mL/min, and 3.57 M(-1) s(-1) at 15 mL/min for COD reduction. Field studies were also carried out with a pilot-scale cell at the source of effluent generation of different plants corresponding to the industry. Decolorization was achieved to about 94-99% with azo dye effluents at 0.7-1.0 L/min flow costing around Indian Rupees 0.02-0.04 per liter, and to about 54-75% in other related effluents at 0.3-1.0 L/min flow under single-pass conditions. PMID:15884385

  8. Screening of azo dyes for mutagenicity with Ames/Salmonella assay.

    PubMed

    Kaur, A; Sandhu, R S; Grover, I S

    1993-01-01

    Azo dyes, the largest portion of manufactured dyestuffs, are primarily used as colouring substances in food, textiles, and the plastic industry. It has been estimated that 128 tonnes per annum of dyes are released into the environment worldwide [Anliker, 1977]. Certain azo compounds are known to be mutagenic in bacterial tests [Yahagi et al., 1975; Venitt and Bushell, 1976; Brown et al., 1978]. Watersoluble dyes are biotransformed by intestinal micro-organisms in the gastro intestinal tract, and the toxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of these dyes in the gut or liver may be attributed to their metabolites. Since it is desirable to have a genotoxic evaluation of a chemical being released into the environment in order to check their indiscriminate use, a project has been initiated to determine the mutagenicity of the azo dyes being used commercially. The present report deals with the results of 13 dyes tested in Salmonella typhimurium with and without metabolic activation.

  9. Evaluating the effectiveness of marine actinobacterial extract and its mediated titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the degradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Priyaragini, S; Veena, S; Swetha, D; Karthik, L; Kumar, G; Bhaskara Rao, K V

    2014-04-01

    Aim of the present study was to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) from marine actinobacteria and to develop an eco-friendly azo-dye degradation method. A total of five actinobacterial isolates were isolated from Chennai marine sediments, Tamilnadu, India and analyzed for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs using titanium hydroxide. Among these, the isolate PSV 3 showed positive results for the synthesis of TiO2 NPs, which was confirmed by UV analysis. Further characterization of the synthesized TiO2 NPs was done using XRD, AFM and FT-IR analysis. Actinobacterial crude extract and synthesized TiO2 NPs was found efficient in degrading azo dye such as Acid Red 79 (AR-79) and Acid Red 80 (AR-80). Degradation percentage was found to be 81% for AR-79, 83% for AR-80 using actinobacterial crude extract and 84% for AR-79, 85% for AR-80 using TiO2 NPs. Immobilized actinobacterial cells showed 88% for AR-79 and 81% for AR-80, dye degrading capacity. Degraded components were characterized by FT-IR and GC-MS analysis. The phytotoxicity test with 500 μg/mL of untreated dye showed remarkable phenotypic as well as cellular damage to Tagetes erecta plant. Comparatively no such damage was observed on plants by degraded dye components. In biotoxicity assay, treated dyes showed less toxic effect as compared to the untreated dyes.

  10. Rapid degradation of azo dye methyl orange using hollow cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sha, Yingying; Mathew, Iswarya; Cui, Qingzhou; Clay, Molly; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie; Gu, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and efficient method for methyl orange degradation using hollow cobalt (Co) nanoparticles is reported. Hollow Co nanoparticles were fabricated by a galvanic replacement reaction using aluminum (Al) nanoparticles as the template material. The methyl orange degradation characteristics were investigated by measuring the time dependent UV-Vis absorption of the dye solution, which showed a very fast degradation rate under acidic conditions. At an initial methyl orange concentration of 100 mg/L (pH = 2.5) and Co nanoparticle dosage of 0.5 g/L, the azo dye degradation efficiency reached up to 99% within 4 min, and the degradation constant rate was up to 2.444 min(-1), which is the highest value among other studies. A comparison of the decolorization rates at similar conditions with several other azo dyes, including Congo red, Amaranth, and Orange G, showed that the dye with a simpler structure and lower molecular mass decolorized considerably faster than the ones having a more complicated structure (higher molecular mass). The methyl orange degradation was also conducted using hollow nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and commercially available solid spherical Co and Ni nanoparticles. The results showed that Co-based nanoparticles outperformed Ni-based nanoparticles, with the hollow Co nanoparticles exhibiting the fastest degradation rate. Using the hollow Co nanoparticles is a very promising approach for the remediation of methyl orange dye containing wastewater due to the fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency. In addition, these hollow Co nanoparticles are easily recycled because of their magnetic property. PMID:26498101

  11. Rapid degradation of azo dye methyl orange using hollow cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sha, Yingying; Mathew, Iswarya; Cui, Qingzhou; Clay, Molly; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie; Gu, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and efficient method for methyl orange degradation using hollow cobalt (Co) nanoparticles is reported. Hollow Co nanoparticles were fabricated by a galvanic replacement reaction using aluminum (Al) nanoparticles as the template material. The methyl orange degradation characteristics were investigated by measuring the time dependent UV-Vis absorption of the dye solution, which showed a very fast degradation rate under acidic conditions. At an initial methyl orange concentration of 100 mg/L (pH = 2.5) and Co nanoparticle dosage of 0.5 g/L, the azo dye degradation efficiency reached up to 99% within 4 min, and the degradation constant rate was up to 2.444 min(-1), which is the highest value among other studies. A comparison of the decolorization rates at similar conditions with several other azo dyes, including Congo red, Amaranth, and Orange G, showed that the dye with a simpler structure and lower molecular mass decolorized considerably faster than the ones having a more complicated structure (higher molecular mass). The methyl orange degradation was also conducted using hollow nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and commercially available solid spherical Co and Ni nanoparticles. The results showed that Co-based nanoparticles outperformed Ni-based nanoparticles, with the hollow Co nanoparticles exhibiting the fastest degradation rate. Using the hollow Co nanoparticles is a very promising approach for the remediation of methyl orange dye containing wastewater due to the fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency. In addition, these hollow Co nanoparticles are easily recycled because of their magnetic property.

  12. Investigation of the azo-hydrazone tautomeric equilibrium in an azo dye involving the naphthalene moiety by UV-vis spectroscopy and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Arslan; Eren, Bilge; Eren, Erdal

    2013-10-01

    Photophysical properties of the azo-hydrazone tautomerism of Eriochrome Blue Black B (1-(1-hydroxy-2-naphthylazo)-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid) in DMF, MeCN and water were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The optimized molecular structure parameters, relative energies, mole fractions, electronic absorption spectra and HOMO-LUMO energies for possible stable tautomeric forms of EBB were theoretically calculated by using hybrid density functional theory, (B3LYP) methods with 6-31G(d) basis set level and polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation effect. The effects of varying pH-, dye concentration-, solvent-, temperature-, and time-dependences on the UV-vis spectra of Eriochrome Blue Black B were also investigated experimentally. The calculations showed that the dye exhibited acid-base, azo-hydrazone and aggregate equilibria in DMF solution, while the most probably preferred form in MeCN solution was azo form. Thermodynamic parameters of dimerization reaction in DMF solution proved that entropy was the driving force of this reaction.

  13. Differential expression of peroxidase and ABC transporter as the key regulatory components for degradation of azo dyes by Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Prasad, Manoj; Singh, R P

    2014-12-01

    Fungal species are potential dye decomposers since these secrete spectra of extracellular enzymes involved in catabolism. However, cellular mechanisms underlying azo dye catalysis and detoxification are incompletely understood and obscure. A potential strain designated as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 demonstrated broad-spectrum catabolic ability of different azo dyes. A forward suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of P. oxalicum SAR-3 constructed in presence and absence of azo dye Acid Red 183 resulted in identification of 183 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) which were functionally classified into 12 functional categories. A number of novel genes that affect specifically organic azo dye degradation were discovered. Although the ABC transporters and peroxidases emerged as prominent hot spot for azo dye detoxification, we also identified a number of proteins that are more proximally related to stress-responsive gene expression. Majority of the ESTs (29.5%) were grouped as hypothetical/unknown indicating the presence of putatively novel genes. Analysis of few ESTs through quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed their possible role in AR183 degradation. The ESTs identified in the SSH library provide a novel insight on the transcripts that are expressed in P. oxalicum strain SAR-3 in response to AR183.

  14. Photo-stimulated phase and anchoring transitions of chiral azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sudarshan; Kang, Shin-Woong

    2013-12-16

    We report concurring phase and anchoring transitions of chiral azo-dye doped nematic liquid crystals. The transitions are induced by photo-stimulation and stable against light and thermal treatments. Photochromic trans- to cis-isomerization of azo-dye induces an augmented dipole moment and strong dipole-dipole interaction of the cis-isomers, resulting in the formation of nano-sized dye-aggregates. Consequent phase separation of the aggregates of a chiral azo-dye induces phase transition from a chiral to nonchiral nematic phase. In addition, the deposition of dye-aggregates at the surfaces brings about anchoring transition of LC molecules. The stability and irreversibility of the transition, together with no need of pretreatments for LC alignment, provide fascinating opportunity for liquid crystal device applications.

  15. Conducting polypyrrole films as a potential tool for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in textile wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Mominul; Smith, Warren T; Wong, Danny K Y

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate conducting polypyrrole films as a potential green technology for electrochemical treatment of azo dyes in wastewaters using Acid Red 1 as a model analyte. These films were synthesised by anodically polymerising pyrrole in the presence of Acid Red 1 as a supporting electrolyte. In this way, the anionic Acid Red 1 is electrostatically attracted to the cationic polypyrrole backbone formed to maintain electroneutrality, and is thus entrapped in the film. These Acid Red 1-entrapped polypyrrole films were characterised by electrochemical, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. Based on a two-level factorial design, the solution pH, Acid Red 1 concentration and polymerisation duration were identified as significant parameters affecting the entrapment efficiency. The entrapment process will potentially aid in decolourising Acid Red 1-containing wastewaters. Similarly, in a cathodic process, electrons are supplied to neutralise the polypyrrole backbone, liberating Acid Red 1 into a solution. In this work, following an entrapment duration of 480 min in 2000 mg L(-1) Acid Red 1, we estimated 21% of the dye was liberated after a reduction period of 240 min. This allows the recovery of Acid Red 1 for recycling purposes. A distinctive advantage of this electrochemical Acid Red 1 treatment, compared to many other techniques, is that no known toxic by-products are generated in the treatment. Therefore, conducting polypyrrole films can potentially be applied as an environmentally friendly treatment method for textile effluents.

  16. Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dyes using Doped Titania Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugasundaram, Prasad

    Photo-catalytic degradation using semiconductor particle as dispersion in aqueous medium has been gaining increased attention over the past several years. Their versatility in application makes them unique along with their easy processing techniques and low cost. Titania semiconductor is one of the most important members of this family. It has been widely used for various applications ranging from environmental to bio-medical. Titanium dioxide has gained importance as an effective photo-catalyst because of its advantages over other semiconductor oxides which include high photo-stability, inexpensive, reusable property, chemical and biological inertness, high reactivity, non-toxicity, corrosion resistance, operation at ambient temperatures and its ability to treat trace level pollutants. Its use as a photocatalyst is primarily because of its band gap of 3.0-3.3 eV which can be effectively activated under ultraviolet radiation (wavelength lambda < 400 nm), which leads to electron jump from valence to conduction band. This project aims at developing electrospun titania fibers doped with copper in order to study and demonstrate photocatalytic activity in the visible light spectrum, resulting in quick formation of holes which are ready to react with water to form -OH radicals. A comparative study of pure titania and copper doped titania for degradation of azo dyes were carried out. SEM, EDAX, XRD were carried out to thoroughly understand the structure of the fibers. The photocatalytic activity measurements for different dyes were noted using Uv-Vis method. The fibers when fully developed will be disposable photocatalytic materials for degrading dyes, Organic pollutants and for bio-medical applications when exposed to visible light.

  17. 'Naturalization' of textile disperse dyes through glycoconjugation: the case of a bis(2-hydroxyethyl) group containing azo dye.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Roberto; Catelani, Giorgio; Cecconi, Riccardo; D'Andrea, Felicia; Frino, Elena; Isaad, Jalal; Rolla, Massimo

    2008-08-11

    A family of five strictly related glycoconjugated azo dyes (GADs), characterized by the presence of the same chromophore and a variable number (1-4) of deprotected hexose units, has been prepared by employing succinate bridges for connecting the azo dye and the sugar portions. The modulation of the hydrophilic portion determines the appreciable changes in the water solubility of GADs. In all the cases, however, hydrophobic fibres (polyester) were homogeneously dyed with GADs at temperatures lower than that used for original azo dyes, at atmospheric pressure, and avoiding the use of surfactants. Furthermore, GADs show an interesting multipurpose character leading to dyeing well also the natural fibres as, for instance, wool. The presence of a variable number of hexose units in the different GADs determines some changes in the colour intensity of dyed fabrics, but in all the cases an appreciable rubbing and water fastness were maintained.

  18. Ultrafast degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by cobalt-based metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Qin, X. D.; Zhu, Z. W.; Liu, G.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactivity and mass loss are considered mutually exclusive in conventional zero-valent metal (ZVM) technology to treat environmental contaminants. Here, we report the outstanding performance of Co-based metallic glass (MG) in degrading an aqueous solution of azo dye, thus eliminating this trade-off. Ball-milled Co-based MG powders completely degrade Acid Orange II at an ultrafast rate. The surface-area-normalized rate constant of Co-based MG powders was one order of magnitude higher than that of Co-based crystalline counterparts and three orders of magnitude higher than that of the widely studied Fe0 powders. The coordinatively unsaturated local structure in Co-based MG responds to the catalysis for degradation, resulting in very low mass loss. Wide applicability and good reusability were also present. Co-based MG is the most efficient material for azo dye degradation reported thus far, and will promote the practical application of MGs as functional materials. PMID:26656918

  19. A built-in zero valent iron anaerobic reactor to enhance treatment of azo dye wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaobin; Jing, Yanwen; Quan, Xie; Liu, Yiwen; Onu, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Waste scrap iron was packed into an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to form a zero valent iron (ZVI) - UASB reactor system for treatment of azo dye wastewater. The ZVI acted as a reductant to decrease ORP in the reactor by more than 40 mv and functioned as an acid buffer to increase the pH in the reactor from 5.44 to 6.29, both of which improved the performance of the anaerobic reactor. As a result, the removal of color and COD in this reactor was 91.7% and 53%, respectively, which was significantly higher than that of a reference UASB reactor without ZVI. The UV-visible spectrum demonstrated that absorption bands of the azo dye from the ZVI-UASB reactor were substantially reduced. The ZVI promoted methanogenesis, which was confirmed by an increase in CH(4) content in the biogas from 47.9% to 64.8%. The ZVI bed was protected well from rusting, which allowed it to function stably. The effluent could be further purified only by pH adjustment because the Fe(2+) released from ZVI served as a flocculent.

  20. Activated carbon fiber for heterogeneous activation of persulfate: implication for the decolorization of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiabin; Hong, Wei; Huang, Tianyin; Zhang, Liming; Li, Wenwei; Wang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) was used as a green catalyst to activate persulfate (PS) for oxidative decolorization of azo dye. ACF demonstrated a higher activity than activated carbon (AC) to activate PS to decolorize Orange G (OG). The decolorization efficiency of OG increased as ACF loading, PS dosage, and temperature increased. OG decolorization followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, and the activation energy was 40.902 kJ/mol. pH had no apparent effect on OG decolorization. Radical quenching experiments with various radical scavengers (e.g., alcohols, phenol) showed that radical-induced decolorization of OG took place on the surface of ACF, and both SO4 (·-) and HO· were responsible for OG decolorization. The impact of inorganic salts was also evaluated because they are important compositions of dye wastewater. Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) exhibited a promoting effect on OG decolorization, and the accelerating rate increased with elevating dosage of ions. Addition of Cl(-) and SO4 (2-) could increase the adsorption of OG on ACF surface, thus favorable for OG decolorization caused by the surface-bound SO4 (·-) and HO·. Conversely, HCO3 (-) and humic acid (HA) slightly inhibited OG decolorization. The azo band and naphthalene ring on OG were remarkably destructed to other intermediates and finally mineralized to CO2 and H2O. PMID:27294702

  1. Azo dye treatment with simultaneous electricity production in an anaerobic-aerobic sequential reactor and microbial fuel cell coupled system.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongjian; Zhang, Xingwang; Lin, Jun; Han, Song; Lei, Lecheng

    2010-06-01

    A microbial fuel cell and anaerobic-aerobic sequential reactor coupled system was used for azo dye degradation with simultaneous electricity production. Electricity was produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and azo dye. A microorganism cultured graphite-granular cathode effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance of the cathode and yielded higher power density. Operation parameters including glucose concentration and hydraulic retention time were optimized. The results indicated that recovering electricity during a sequential aerobic-anaerobic azo dye treatment process enhanced chemical oxygen demand removal and did not decrease azo dye removal. Moreover, UV-vis spectra and GC-MS illustrated that the azo bond was cleaved biologically in the anaerobic chamber and abiotically in the aerobic chamber. The toxic intermediates, aromatic amines, were removed by aerobic treatment. Our work demonstrated that the microbial fuel cell and sequential anode-cathode reactor coupled system could be applied to achieve electricity production with simultaneous azo dye degradation. PMID:20188540

  2. Formation of a carcinogenic aromatic amine from an azo dye by human skin bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Platzek, T; Lang, C; Grohmann, G; Gi, U S; Baltes, W

    1999-09-01

    Azo dyes represent the major class of dyestuffs. They are metabolised to the corresponding amines by liver enzymes and the intestinal microflora following incorporation by both experimental animals and humans. For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo dyes by the skin microflora should be considered since, in contrast to many dyes, aromatic amines are easily absorbed by the skin. A method for measuring the ability of human skin flora to reduce azo dyes was established. In a standard experiment, 3x10(11) cells of a culture of Staphylococcus aureus were incubated in synthetic sweat (pH 6.8, final volume 20 mL) at 28 degrees C for 24 h with Direct Blue 14 (C.I. 23850, DB 14). The reaction products were extracted and analysed using HPLC. The reduction product o-tolidine (3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, OT) could indeed be detected showing that the strain used was able to metabolise DB 14 to the corresponding aromatic amine. In addition to OT, two further metabolites of DB 14 were detected. Using mass spectrometry they were identified as 3,3'-dimethyl-4-amino-4'-hydroxybiphenyl and 3, 3'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl. The ability to cleave azo dyes seems to be widely distributed among human skin bacteria, as, under these in vitro conditions, bacteria isolated from healthy human skin and human skin bacteria from strain collections also exhibited azo reductase activity. Further studies are in progress in order to include additional azo dyes and coloured textiles. At the moment, the meaning of the results with regard to consumer health cannot be finally assessed.

  3. The non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes by flavin and nicotinamide cofactors under varying conditions.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2013-10-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitous in products and often become environmental pollutants due to their anthropogenic nature. Azoreductases are enzymes which are present within many bacteria and are capable of breaking down the azo dyes via reduction of the azo bond. Often, though, carcinogenic aromatic amines are formed as metabolites and are of concern to humans. Azoreductases function via an oxidation-reduction reaction and require cofactors (a nicotinamide cofactor and sometimes a flavin cofactor) to perform their function. Non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes in the absence of an azoreductase enzyme has been suggested in previous studies, but has never been studied in detail in terms of varying cofactor combinations, different oxygen states or pHs, nor has the enzymatic reduction been compared to azoreduction in terms of dye reduction or metabolites produced, which was the aim of this study. Reduction of azo dyes by different cofactor combinations was found to occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and under physiologically-relevant pHs to produce the same metabolites as an azoreductase. Our results show that, in some cases, the non-enzymatic reduction by the cofactors was found to be equal to that seen with the azoreductase, suggesting that all dye reduction in these cases is due to the cofactors themselves. This study details the importance of the use of a cofactor-only control when studying azoreductase enzymes.

  4. Comparative mutagenicity studies of azo dyes and their reduction products in Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, G.; Xu, J.; Nath, J.

    1986-01-01

    The arabinose-resistant and Ames assay systems of Salmonella typhimurium were used to evaluate the mutagenic potential of azo dyes and their aromatic amine reduction products. Azo dyes, namely direct black 38, direct blue 15, and direct red 2, were mutagenic in the arabinose-resistant and Ames assays with both hamster and rat liver S9 activation. Both assays gave relatively higher mutagenic responses with hamster S9. Reduction products of these dyes, namely benzidine, o-dianisidine, and o-tolidine, were mutagenic in the Ames assay. Benzidine was weakly mutagenic and o-dianisidine and o-tolidine were nonmutagenic in the arabinose-resistant assay. These results indicate that both arabinose-resistant tester SV50 and Ames tester TA98 were sensitive in detecting mutagenicity of azo dyes. The use of the standard plate protocol with Ames tester TA98 is more efficient than the modified azo dye protocol in detecting mutagenicity of aromatic amine reduction products. Additional modifications in either the standard plate or modified azo dye protocols may improve detection of mutagenicity of these compounds in the arabinose-resistant assay system.

  5. Spectral Studies of UV and Solar Photocatalytic Degradation of AZO Dye and Textile Dye Effluents Using Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mariselvam, R; Ranjitsingh, A J A; Mosae Selvakumar, P; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the chemical dye AZO and dye effluents in different time duration has been investigated using biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Dye industry effluents and AZO dye undergo degradation to form harmless intermediate and colourless products following irradiation by UV and solar light in the presence of green synthesized silver nanoparticles. The degree of degradation was tested under the experimental conditions such as P(H), temperature, and absorbance of the dye in UV and solar light was measured. The degradation was higher in the UV light source than in the solar light source. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles in the UV light source were found to expedite the dye degradation process. PMID:27382364

  6. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  7. Kinetic characteristics of bacterial azo-dye decolorization by Pseudomonas luteola.

    PubMed

    Chang, J S; Chou, C; Lin, Y C; Lin, P J; Ho, J Y; Hu, T L

    2001-08-01

    A Pseudomonas luteola strain expressing azoreductase activity was utilized to remove the color of an azo dye (reactive red 22) from contaminated solutions. The effects of substrate concentrations, medium compositions, and operation parameters (e.g., pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, etc.) on decolorization of the azo dye by a P. luteola strain were systematically investigated to reveal the key factors that dominate the performance of azo-dye decolorization. The metabolites resulting from bacterial decolorization were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometery (MS). The results show that the dissolved oxygen and glucose concentration retarded decolorization of reactive red 22 by P. luteola. The optimal azo-dye decolorization occurred at 37 degrees C, while more rapid decolorization took place over pH 7-9. Yeast extract and tryptone strongly enhanced the decolorization. The Michaelis-Menten model can satisfactorily describe the dependence of specific decolorization rate on the concentration of substrate (reactive red 22 or yeast extract). Decolorization of the azo dye by intact cells of P. luteola was essentially independent of the growth phase, whereas the azoreductase activity of the cell-free extract decreased in the order of late-stationary phase > early-stationary phase > mid-log phase. This suggests that mass transfer of the azo dye across the cell membrane may be the rate-limiting step. The HPLC and MS analyses suggest that both partial reduction and complete cleavage of the azo bond could contribute to decolorization of reactive red 22 by P. luteola.

  8. Decolorization of the AO24 azo dye and reduction of toxicity and genotoxicity in trickling biofilters.

    PubMed

    Garzóón-Zúñga, Marco A; Sandoval-Villasana, Ana M; Moeller-Chávez, Gabriela E

    2011-02-01

    Acid Orange 24 (AO24) dye was degraded in a trickling biofilter packed with peat and wood chips and inoculated with biomass from a petrochemical industry wastewater system. Different operating strategies were tested; in the first stage, two biofilters were operated independently--one non-aerated biofilter (passive) and the other with aeration-subsequently, the systems were operated serially, and effluent from the non-aerated biofilter was fed to the biofilter with aeration. This treatment train was used to test three different filtration velocities--0.141, 0.282, and 0.423 m/d. The results show that, when operating the systems with a dye charge of 0.035 kg AO24 m2/d and treating the effluent in a single step, good removal efficiencies of AO24 (95 and 89%), COD (63 and 53%), and acute toxicity (63 and 78%) were obtained in both biofilters (with and without air), although mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic intermediary compounds were not removed, because genotoxicity exhibits values higher than 2.0 units for the mutation rate. When using the non-aerated biofilter/aerated biofilter treatment train, it is possible to treat a dye charge 3 times greater (0.106 kg AO24 m2/d) and efficiently remove 98% AO24, 76% COD, 100% acute toxicity, and 100% genotoxicity, which indicates that, with this biological system, an advanced degree of biotransformation and mineralization of the azo dye AO24 is achieved.

  9. Crystal structures, solvatochromisms and DFT computations of three disperse azo dyes having the same azobenzene skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui-Fen; Tao, Tao; Feng, Ya-Nan; Wang, Yin-Ge; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Three disperse azo dyes having the same 4-nitrobenzene/azo/4-aminobenzene skeleton but different color have been structurally and spectrally characterized and compared in this paper. X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis of compound 3 reveals that it has a planar molecular conformation between the azo and the nitrobenzene units. However, severely twisted aminoazobenzene structures in compounds 1 and 2 are observed because of the steric hindrance effect of ortho chloro and bromo groups. Electronic spectra of 1-3 are closely related to their molecular structures, which demonstrate that the presence of different substituted groups and the spatial crowding effect in the aminoazobenzene backbone leads to the significant alterations of bathochromic and hypochromatic shifts. In addition, theoretic computational studies as well as solvatochromisms for three azo dyes have been included.

  10. Use of titanium dioxide photocatalysis on the remediation of model textile wastewaters containing azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Saggioro, Enrico Mendes; Oliveira, Anabela Sousa; Pavesi, Thelma; Maia, Cátia Gil; Ferreira, Luis Filipe Vieira; Moreira, Josino Costa

    2011-12-14

    The photocatalytic degradation of two commercial textile azo dyes, namely C.I Reactive Black 5 and C.I Reactive Red 239, has been studied. TiO(2) P25 Degussa was used as catalyst and photodegradation was carried out in aqueous solution under artificial irradiation with a 125 W mercury vapor lamp. The effects of the amount of TiO(2) used, UV-light irradiation time, pH of the solution under treatment, initial concentration of the azo dye and addition of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were investigated. The effect of the simultaneous photodegradation of the two azo dyes was also investigated and we observed that the degradation rates achieved in mono and bi-component systems were identical. The repeatability of photocatalytic activity of the photocatalyst was also tested. After five cycles of TiO(2) reuse the rate of colour lost was still 77% of the initial rate. The degradation was followed monitoring the change of azo dye concentration by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Results show that the use of an efficient photocatalyst and the adequate selection of optimal operational parameters may easily lead to a complete decolorization of the aqueous solutions of both azo dyes.

  11. [The decolorization and biodegrading metabolism of azo dyes by Pseudomonas S-42].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z P; Yang, H F

    1989-12-01

    Pseudomonas S-42 was capable of decolorizing azo dyes such as Diamira Brilliant Orange RR(DBO-RR), Direct Brown M (DBM), Eriochrome Brown R(EBR) and so on. The cell suspension, cell-free extract and purified enzyme of Pseud. S-42 could decolorize azo dyes under similar conditions: the optimum pH and temperature laid 7.0 and 37 degrees C respectively. The efficiencies of decolorizing of DBO-RR, DBM, EBR by intact cells stood more than 90%. When the cell concentration was 15 mg(wet)/ml and the reaction time was 5 hours, the decolorizing activity for above three azo dyes by intact cells were 1.75, 2.4, 0.95 micrograms dye/mg cell, respectively. Cell-free extract and purified enzyme could well express the decolorizing activity only under the anaerobic condition and added NADH. Purified enzyme belongs to azoreductase, its molecular weight is about 34,000-2000 daltons, and its Vmax and Km for DBO-RR are 13 mumol.mg protein-1.min-1 and 54 mumol/L. The results of the detection of the biodegrading products of DBO-RR by spectrophotometric and NaNO2 reactional methods showed that the biodegradation of azo dyes was initiated by the reduction cleavage of azo bonds. It was hypothesized that biodegrading metabolism pathway of DBO-RR by Pseudomonas S-42.

  12. Electrolysis within anaerobic bioreactors stimulates breakdown of toxic products from azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Gavazza, Sávia; Guzman, Juan J L; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-04-01

    Azo dyes are the most widely used coloring agents in the textile industry, but are difficult to treat. When textile effluents are discharged into waterways, azo dyes and their degradation products are known to be environmentally toxic. An electrochemical system consisting of a graphite-plate anode and a stainless-steel mesh cathode was placed into a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor to evaluate the removal of an azo dye (Direct Black 22) from synthetic textile wastewater. At applied potentials of 2.5 and 3.0 V when water electrolysis occurs, no improvement in azo dye removal efficiency was observed compared to the control reactor (an integrated system with electrodes but without an applied potential). However, applying such electric potentials produces oxygen via electrolysis and promoted the aerobic degradation of aromatic amines, which are toxic, intermediate products of anaerobic azo dye degradation. The removal of these amines indicates a decrease in overall toxicity of the effluent from a single-stage anaerobic bioreactor, which warrants further optimization in anaerobic digestion.

  13. Oxidation of Levafix CA reactive azo-dyes in industrial wastewater of textile dyeing by electro-generated Fenton's reagent.

    PubMed

    El-Desoky, Hanaa S; Ghoneim, Mohamed M; El-Sheikh, Ragaa; Zidan, Naglaa M

    2010-03-15

    The indirect electrochemical removal of pollutants from effluents has become an attractive method in recent years. Removal (decolorization and mineralization) of Levafix Blue CA and Levafix Red CA reactive azo-dyes from aqueous media by electro-generated Fenton's reagent (Fe(2+)/H(2)O(2)) using a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode and a platinum gauze anode was optimized. Progress of oxidation (decolorization and mineralization) of the investigated azo-dyes with time of electro-Fenton's reaction was monitored by UV-visible absorbance measurements, Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and HPLC analysis. The results indicated that the electro-Fenton's oxidation system is efficient for treatment of such types of reactive dyes. Oxidation of each of the investigated azo-dyes by electro-generated Fenton's reagent up to complete decolorization and approximately 90-95% mineralization was achieved. Moreover, the optimized electro-Fenton's oxidation was successfully applied for complete decolorization and approximately 85-90% mineralization of both azo-dyes in real industrial wastewater samples collected from textile dyeing house at El-Mahalla El-Kobra, Egypt.

  14. Decolorization of textile azo dyes by newly isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asad, S; Amoozegar, M A; Pourbabaee, A A; Sarbolouki, M N; Dastgheib, S M M

    2007-08-01

    Studies were carried out on the decolorization of textile azo dyes by newly isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacteria. Among the 27 strains of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria isolated from effluents of textile industries, three showed remarkable ability in decolorizing the widely utilized azo dyes. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence comparisons indicate that these strains belonged to the genus Halomonas. The three strains were able to decolorize azo dyes in a wide range of NaCl concentration (up to 20%w/v), temperature (25-40 degrees C), and pH (5-11) after 4 days of incubation in static culture. They could decolorize the mixture of dyes as well as pure dyes. These strains also readily grew in and decolorized the high concentrations of dye (5000 ppm) and could tolerate up to 10,000 ppm of the dye. UV-Vis analyses before and after decolorization and the colorless bacterial biomass after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation, rather than inactive surface adsorption. Analytical studies based on HPLC showed that the principal decolorization was reduction of the azo bond, followed by cleavage of the reduced bond.

  15. Treatment of simulated Reactive Yellow 22 (azo) dye effluents using Spirogyra species.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Rao, N Chandrasekhar; Srinivas, S; Prasad, K Krishna; Karthikeyan, J

    2002-01-01

    The potential of commonly available green algae belonging to Spirogyra species was investigated as viable biomaterials for biological treatment of simulated synthetic azo dye (Reactive Yellow 22) effluents. The results obtained from the batch experiments revealed the ability of the algal species in removing the dye colour and was dependent both on the dye concentration and algal biomass. Maximum dye colour removal was observed on the third day for all the system conditions. Monitoring of ORP values helped to understand the overlying biochemical mechanism of algal-dye system. Based upon the results, the dye-algal treatment mechanism was attributed to biosorption (sorption of dye molecules over the surface of algal cells), bioconversion (diffusion of dye molecules into the algal cells and subsequent conversion) and biocoagulation (coagulation of dye molecules present in the aqueous phase onto the biopolymers released as metabolic intermediates during metabolic conversion of dye and subsequent settlement).

  16. Decolourization of azo dyes and a dye industry effluent by a white rot fungus Thelephora sp.

    PubMed

    Selvam, K; Swaminathan, K; Chae, Keon-Sang

    2003-06-01

    A white rot fungus Thelephora sp. was used for decolourization of azo dyes such as orange G (50 microM), congo red (50 microM), and amido black 10B (25 microM). Decolourization using the fungus was 33.3%, 97.1% and 98.8% for orange G, congo red and amido black 10B, respectively. An enzymatic dye decolourization study showed that a maximum of 19% orange G was removed by laccase at 15 U/ml whereas lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese dependent peroxidase (MnP) at the same concentration decolourized 13.5% and 10.8%, orange G, respectively. A maximum decolourization of 12.0% and 15.0% for congo red and amido black 10B, respectively, was recorded by laccase. A dye industry effluent was treated by the fungus in batch and continuous modes. A maximum decolourization of 61% was achieved on the third day in the batch mode and a maximum decolourization of 50% was obtained by the seventh day in the continuous mode. These results suggest that the batch mode of treatment using Thelephora sp. may be more effective than the continuous mode for colour removal from dye industry effluents.

  17. Methods for the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industry--A review.

    PubMed

    Yamjala, Karthik; Nainar, Meyyanathan Subramania; Ramisetti, Nageswara Rao

    2016-02-01

    A wide variety of azo dyes are generally added for coloring food products not only to make them visually aesthetic but also to reinstate the original appearance lost during the production process. However, many countries in the world have banned the use of most of the azo dyes in food and their usage is highly regulated by domestic and export food supplies. The regulatory authorities and food analysts adopt highly sensitive and selective analytical methods for monitoring as well as assuring the quality and safety of food products. The present manuscript presents a comprehensive review of various analytical techniques used in the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industries of different parts of the world. A brief description on the use of different extraction methods such as liquid-liquid, solid phase and membrane extraction has also been presented. PMID:26304415

  18. [Azo dyes, their environmental effects, and defining a strategy for their biodegradation and detoxification].

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ivana; Hrenović, Jasna; Dragičević, Tibela Landeka; Delaš, Frane; Soljan, Vice; Gudelj, Hrvoje

    2011-03-01

    Intense industrial development has been accompanied by the production of wastewaters of very complex content, which pose a serious hazard to the environment, put at risk sustainable development, and call for new treatment technologies that would more effectively address the issue. One particular challenge in terms of science and technology is how to biodegrade xenobiotics such as azo dyes, which practically do not degrade under natural environmental conditions. These compounds tend to bioaccumulate in the environment, and have allergenic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic properties for humans. Removal of azo dyes from effluents is mostly based on physical-chemical methods. These methods are often very costly and limited, as they accumulate concentrated sludge, which also poses a significant secondary disposal problem, or produce toxic end-products. Biotechnological approach may offer alternative, lowcost biological treatment systems that can completely biodegrade and detoxify even the hard-to-biodegrade azo dyes.

  19. Development of an activated carbon-packed microbial bioelectrochemical system for azo dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Cardenas-Robles, Arely; Martinez, Eduardo; Rendon-Alcantar, Idelfonso; Frontana, Carlos; Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Linda

    2013-01-01

    A microbial bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) was employed for the degradation of azo dyes without the use of an external electron donor, using activated carbon (GAC) as a redox mediator. Contribution of pH values, open circuit potential (OCP), dye concentration and applied current were individually studied. A batch system and an upflow fixed bed bioreactor were built for analyzing the effect of the applied current on biodegradation of the azo dye Reactive Red 272. The presence of GAC (20% w/v) regulated both pH and OCP values in solution and led to a removal efficiency of 98%. Cyclic voltammetry results indicate a dependence of the electron transfer mechanism with the concentration of the azo compound. With these results, a continuous flow reactor operating with J=0.045 mA cm(-2), led to removal rates of 95% (± 3.5%) in a half-residence time of 1 hour. PMID:23128299

  20. Methods for the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industry--A review.

    PubMed

    Yamjala, Karthik; Nainar, Meyyanathan Subramania; Ramisetti, Nageswara Rao

    2016-02-01

    A wide variety of azo dyes are generally added for coloring food products not only to make them visually aesthetic but also to reinstate the original appearance lost during the production process. However, many countries in the world have banned the use of most of the azo dyes in food and their usage is highly regulated by domestic and export food supplies. The regulatory authorities and food analysts adopt highly sensitive and selective analytical methods for monitoring as well as assuring the quality and safety of food products. The present manuscript presents a comprehensive review of various analytical techniques used in the analysis of azo dyes employed in food industries of different parts of the world. A brief description on the use of different extraction methods such as liquid-liquid, solid phase and membrane extraction has also been presented.

  1. Decolorization of azo dyes by marine Shewanella strains under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Meng, Xianming; Fu, Shiang Q; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Azo dye decolorization was studied with Shewanella strains under saline conditions. Growing cells of Shewanella algae and Shewanella marisflavi isolated from marine environments demonstrated better azo dye decolorization capacities than the other three strains from non-saline sources. Cell suspensions of S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize single or mixed azo dyes with different structures. Decolorization kinetics were described with Michaelis-Menton equation, which indicated better decolorization performance of S. algae over S. marisflavi. Lactate and formate were identified as efficient electron donors for amaranth decolorization by the two strains. S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize amaranth at up to 100 g L(-1) NaCl or Na2SO4. However, extremely low concentration of NaNO3 exerted strong inhibition on decolorization. Both strains could remove the color and COD of textile effluent during sequential anaerobic-aerobic incubation. Lower concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g L(-1)) stimulated the activities of azoreductase, laccase, and NADH-DCIP reductase. The decolorization intermediates were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Decolorization metabolites of amaranth were less toxic than original dye. These findings improved our knowledge of azo-dye-decolorizing Shewanella species and provided efficient candidates for the treatment of dye-polluted saline wastewaters.

  2. Determination of the dissociation constants of sulfonated azo dyes by capillary zone electrophoresis and spectrophotometry methods.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Urquiza, M; Beltrán, J L

    2001-05-11

    The dissociation constants of 10 sulfonated azo dyes, six of the most common food colours used as additives (Food Yellow 4, Food Yellow 3, Food Red 9, Food Red 7, Food Red 17 and Food Blue 5), and four commonly used as textile dyes (Acid Orange 7, Acid Orange 12, Acid Red 26 and Acid Red 88), have been determined by two different systems, one by using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with diode array detection and the other by using UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, which has been used as reference method to obtain the pKa values. The pKa values obtained by CE were determined in two ways, first on the basis of the electrophoretic mobilities (calculated from the migration times), and after we propose a new methodology, in which the dissociation constants are determined from the spectra corresponding to the maxima of electrophoretic peaks. The pKa values obtained by using these CE methods have been compared with those obtained by using the spectrophotometric method. The results show that the pKa values obtained by the CE proposed method are in general closer to the reference values than those obtained from the electrophoretic mobilities. Moreover, the proposed method retains the advantages of CE, as the possibility of working with small amounts of sample, despite its purity.

  3. Influence of mass transfer and chemical reaction on ozonation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Choi, I S; Wiesmann, U

    2004-01-01

    Azo dyes can be only mineralised by chemical oxidation. In this paper the oxidation of Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) and Reactive Orange 96 (RO 96) with concentrations between 35 and 5,700 mgL(-1) (RB 5) and between 20 and 2,050 mgL(-1) (RO 96) was investigated in a lab-scale bubble column. The reactor was modelled for two cases, a completely mixed and a plug flow gas phase. The oxidation rate was influenced by mass transfer for all dye concentrations used. For low dye concentrations mass transfer alone was decisive for the reaction rate showing no enhancement due to chemical reaction, E approximately equal to 1. However, in the region of high dye concentrations, the slope of the ozone concentration profile inside the liquid boundary layer increases more and more with increasing dye concentration as a result of a chemical oxidation. Therefore, the enhancement factor depends on the type and concentration of the azo dyes. For RB 5, a diazo dye, an enhancement factor of E = 5.5 was observed for cd = 2,000 mgL(-1), RO 96, a mono azo dye, with a remarkably higher chemical oxidation rate shows an E = 16 for cd = 2,050 mgL(-1).

  4. Spontaneous photoinduced patterning of azo-dye polymer films: the facts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christophe; Fiorini-Debuisschert, Céline; Rocha, Licinio; Raimond, Paul; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2007-08-01

    We describe the spontaneous photoinduced patterning of azo-dye polymer films. We have observed that the illumination of an azo-dye polymer film by a uniform single laser beam with normal incidence leads to a self-structurization process that results in the formation of well-ordered submicrometer-sized structures whose organization depends on the light polarization direction. A modulation depth as high as 100 nm can be achieved. The influence of several experimental parameters on the structure formation is studied. Results are discussed and confronted to different models and phenomena already investigated in the literature. A physical origin to this peculiar photopatterning process is proposed.

  5. Aerobic decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a newly isolated yeast Candida tropicalis TL-F1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liang; Ning, Shuxiang; Zhang, Xuwang; Shi, Shengnan

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by growing cells of a new yeast strain TL-F1 which was isolated from the sea mud. Strain TL-F1 was identified as Candida tropicalis on the basis of 28S rDNA analysis. Various azo dyes (20mg/L) were efficiently decolorized through aerobic degradation. Meantime, the effects of different parameters on both decolorization of Acid Brilliant Scarlet GR and growth of strain TL-F1 were investigated. Furthermore, possible degradation pathway of the dye GR was proposed through analysis of metabolic products using UV-Vis spectroscopy and HPLC-MS methods. As far as it is known, it is the first systematic research on a C. tropicalis strain which is capable of efficiently decolorizing various azo dyes under aerobic condition. This work provides a potentially useful microbial strain TL-F1 for treatment of azo dye contaminated wastewater.

  6. Accelerated decolorization of reactive azo dyes under saline conditions by bacteria isolated from Arabian seawater sediment.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Kausar, Farzana; Arshad, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq; Ahmed, Iftikhar

    2012-12-01

    Presence of huge amount of salts in the wastewater of textile dyeing industry is one of the major limiting factors in the development of an effective biotreatment system for the removal of azo dyes from textile effluents. Bacterial spp. capable of thriving under high salt conditions could be employed for the treatment of saline dyecontaminated textile wastewaters. The present study was aimed at isolating the most efficient bacterial strains capable of decolorizing azo dyes under high saline conditions. Fiftyeight bacterial strains were isolated from seawater, seawater sediment, and saline soil, using mineral salt medium enriched with 100 mg l−1 Reactive Black-5 azo dye and 50 g NaCl l−1 salt concentration. Bacterial strains KS23 (Psychrobacter alimentarius) and KS26 (Staphylococcus equorum) isolated from seawater sediment were able to decolorize three reactive dyes including Reactive Black 5, Reactive Golden Ovifix, and Reactive Blue BRS very efficiently in liquid medium over a wide range of salt concentration (0-100 g NaCl l)⁻¹. Time required for complete decolorization of 100 mg dye l ⁻¹ varied with the type of dye and salt concentration. In general, there was an inverse linear relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction (V) and salt concentration. This study suggested that bacteria isolated from saline conditions such as seawater sediment could be used in designing a bioreactor for the treatment of textile effluent containing high concentration of salts.

  7. Choline-based ionic liquids-enhanced biodegradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Sudharshan; Surianarayanan, Mahadevan; Ranganathan, Vijayaraghavan; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-05-01

    Industrial wastewaters such as tannery and textile processing effluents are often characterized by a high content of dissolved organic dyes, resulting in large values of chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD and BOD) in the aquatic systems into which they are discharged. Such wastewater streams are of rapidly growing concern as a major environmental issue in developing countries. Hence there is a need to mitigate this challenge by effective approaches to degrade dye-contaminated wastewater. In this study, several choline-based salts originally developed for use as biocompatible hydrated ionic liquids (i.e., choline sacchrinate (CS), choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDP), choline lactate (CL), and choline tartarate (CT)) have been successfully employed as the cosubstrate with S. lentus in the biodegradation of an azo dye in aqueous solution. We also demonstrate that the azo dye has been degraded to less toxic components coupled with low biomass formation.

  8. [Microbial degradation mechanism of disperse azo dye Red 30 by Streptomyces sp. FX645].

    PubMed

    Xie, Lian-Wu; Fang, Ji-Qian; Guo, Ya-Ping

    2013-02-01

    One strain, identified as Streptomyces sp. FX645 which was isolated from the sludge collected in a printing and dyeing mill, had high potency of degradation and decolourisation of azo dye Red 30 (AR30). The microbial degradation mechanism on AR30 by strain FX645 was proposed through analyzing the UV-vis spectra and LC-MS spectra of the degradation products and investigating the variations in the concentrations of the degradation products in the culture. It is suggested that the azo bond of AR30 was iniially cracked by azo reductase to produce 2,6-dichloro- 4-nitrobenzenamine and 2-[(4-aminophenyl)-(2-cyanoethyl) amino] ethylacetate, which then generated several aromatic amine compounds under the actions of nitror4duction, aminoacylation and cyano hydrolysis, respectively.

  9. Sonoenzymatic decolourization of an azo dye employing immobilized horse radish peroxidase (HRP): a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Malani, Ritesh S; Khanna, Swati; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2013-07-15

    For degradation of biorefractory pollutants, enzymatic treatments and sonochemical treatments have shown high potential. A combined technique of sono-enzymatic treatment is of special interest as it has shown enhancement effect than the individual techniques. This work has attempted to give a mechanistic insight into the interaction of sonochemical and enzymatic treatments using immobilized horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme on the decolourization of acid red dye (an azo dye). In order to segregate the effect of ultrasound and cavitation, experiments were conducted at elevated static pressure. The kinetic parameters of HRP, viz. Vmax and Km were marginally affected by immobilization. There was a minor change in pH optima and temperature optima for immobilized HRP (6.5, 25°C) from free HRP (7.0, 20-25°C). Though the specific activity of free enzyme (0.272U/mg) was found to be higher than the immobilized enzyme (0.104U/mg), immobilized enzyme exhibited higher stability (up to 3 cycles) and degradation potential than free enzyme in all experiments. The results revealed that the coupling of sonication and enzymatic treatment at high pressure in presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) yielded the highest decolourization of acid red (61.2%). However, the total decolourization achieved with combined technique was lesser than the sum of individual techniques, indicating negative synergy between the sonochemical and enzymatic techniques. PMID:23708258

  10. Evaluation of impact of exposure of Sudan azo dyes and their metabolites on human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongmiao; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2012-08-01

    Sudan azo dyes are banned for food usage in most countries, but they are illegally used to maintain or enhance the color of food products due to low cost, bright staining, and wide availability of the dyes. In this report, we examined the toxic effects of these azo dyes and their potential reduction metabolites on 11 prevalent human intestinal bacterial strains. Among the tested bacteria, cell growth of 2, 3, 5, 5, and 1 strains was inhibited by Sudan I, II, III, IV, and Para Red, respectively. At the tested concentration of 100 μM, Sudan I and II inhibited growth of Clostridium perfringens and Lactobacillus rhamnosus with decrease of growth rates from 14 to 47%. Sudan II also affected growth of Enterococcus faecalis. Growth of Bifidobacterium catenulatum, C. perfringens, E. faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Peptostreptococcus magnus was affected by Sudan III and IV with decrease in growth rates from 11 to 67%. C. perfringens was the only strain in which growth was affected by Para Red with 47 and 26% growth decreases at 6 and 10 h, respectively. 1-Amino-2-naphthol, a common metabolite of the dyes, was capable of inhibiting growth of most of the tested bacteria with inhibition rates from 8 to 46%. However, the other metabolites of the dyes had no effect on growth of the bacterial strains. The dyes and their metabolites had less effect on cell viability than on cell growth of the tested bacterial strains. Clostridium indolis and Clostridium ramosum were the only two strains with about a 10 % decrease in cell viability in the presence of Sudan azo dyes. The present results suggested that Sudan azo dyes and their metabolites potentially affect the human intestinal bacterial ecology by selectively inhibiting some bacterial species, which may have an adverse effect on human health.

  11. Molecular characterization of a novel thermal stable reductase capable of decoloration of both azo and triphenylmethane dyes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fen; Ding, Haitao; Shao, Lida; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative triphenylmethane reductase (TMR)-like protein derived from Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius C56-Y593 (named as GtAZR) was synthesized, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and extensively characterized for the first time. The recombinant GtAZR displayed its maximum activity at pH 5.5 and 40 °C. GtAZR was stable at temperatures below 65 °C. It also exhibited a broad pH stability and retained more than 90% of its initial activities in pH range of 4.5-10.5 after incubating in various buffers for 1 h. Moreover, GtAZR showed significant stability against metal ions and organic solvents. GtAZR displayed broad substrate spectrum toward both azo and triphenylmethane dyes. As a sequence and structural TMR-like protein, GtAZR was characterized as an azoreductase biochemically due to its high specificity for azo dye rather than triphenylmethane dye. Molecular docking and mutagenesis analysis revealed that amino acids Asp-79 and Thr-80 are responsible for its azoreductase activity, which eliminated the steric hindrance caused by His-77 and Tyr-78 at the correspond sites in other structural homologous triphenylmethane reductase. The robust stability and substrate promiscuity of GtAZR made it a promising candidate for practical removal of mixed dye wastewater.

  12. DEVELOPING AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES BASED ON ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: SALMONELLA MUTAGENICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    In previous papers, the synthesis and chemical properties of iron-complexed azo and formazan dyes were reported. In this regard, it was shown that in certain cases iron could be substituted for the traditionally used metals, chromium and cobalt, without having an adve...

  13. Development of a novel high-entropy alloy with eminent efficiency of degrading azo dye solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Z. Y.; Liu, X. J.; Jia, B.; Wang, H.; Wu, Y.; Lu, Z. P.

    2016-09-01

    In addition to its scientific importance, the degradation of azo dyes is of practical significance from the perspective of environmental protection. Although encouraging progress has been made on developing degradation approaches and materials, it is still challenging to fully resolve this long-standing problem. Herein, we report that high entropy alloys, which have been emerging as a new class of metallic materials in the last decade, have excellent performance in degradation of azo dyes. In particular, the newly developed AlCoCrTiZn high-entropy alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying exhibits a prominent efficiency in degradation of the azo dye (Direct Blue 6: DB6), as high as that of the best metallic glass reported so far. The newly developed AlCoCrTiZn HEA powder has low activation energy barrier, i.e., 30 kJ/mol, for the degrading reaction and thus make the occurrence of reaction easier as compared with other materials such as the glassy Fe-based powders. The excellent capability of our high-entropy alloys in degrading azo dye is attributed to their unique atomic structure with severe lattice distortion, chemical composition effect, residual stress and high specific surface area. Our findings have important implications in developing novel high-entropy alloys for functional applications as catalyst materials.

  14. Development of a novel high-entropy alloy with eminent efficiency of degrading azo dye solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Z. Y.; Liu, X. J.; Jia, B.; Wang, H.; Wu, Y.; Lu, Z. P.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its scientific importance, the degradation of azo dyes is of practical significance from the perspective of environmental protection. Although encouraging progress has been made on developing degradation approaches and materials, it is still challenging to fully resolve this long-standing problem. Herein, we report that high entropy alloys, which have been emerging as a new class of metallic materials in the last decade, have excellent performance in degradation of azo dyes. In particular, the newly developed AlCoCrTiZn high-entropy alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying exhibits a prominent efficiency in degradation of the azo dye (Direct Blue 6: DB6), as high as that of the best metallic glass reported so far. The newly developed AlCoCrTiZn HEA powder has low activation energy barrier, i.e., 30 kJ/mol, for the degrading reaction and thus make the occurrence of reaction easier as compared with other materials such as the glassy Fe-based powders. The excellent capability of our high-entropy alloys in degrading azo dye is attributed to their unique atomic structure with severe lattice distortion, chemical composition effect, residual stress and high specific surface area. Our findings have important implications in developing novel high-entropy alloys for functional applications as catalyst materials. PMID:27677462

  15. Optical properties of Azo Dye (1-Phenylazo-2-Naphthol) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, M. S.; El-Mallah, H. M.; Mansour, A. N.

    2009-11-01

    Thin Films of Azo Dye (1-Phenylazo-2-Naphthol) have been prepared by thermal evaporation technique onto quartz substrates held at about 300 K during the deposition process with different thicknesses range 625-880 nm. X-ray diffraction and the differential thermal analysis showed that the Azo Dye sample is crystalline nature and thermal stable in temperature range from room temperature to 100 circC. The optical constants (the refractive index n, the absorption index k and the absorption coefficient α) were calculated for Azo Dye (1-Phenylazo-2-Naphthol) thin films by using spectrophotometer measurements of the transmittance and reflectance at normal incidence in the spectral range 400-2200 nm. The obtained values of both n and k were found to be independent of the film thicknesses. The refractive index has anomalous behavior in the wavelength range 400-1000 nm besides a high energy transition at 2.385 eV. The optical parameters (the dispersion energy Ed, the oscillation energy Eo, the room temperature optical dielectric constant \\varepsilonl, the lattice dielectric constant \\varepsilonL, the high frequency dielectric constant \\varepsilon∞ and the ratio of carrier concentration to the effective mass N/mast) were calculated. The allowed optical transition responsible for optical absorption was found to be direct transition with optical energy gap of 1.5 eV for Azo Dye sample. The band tail obeys Urbach's empirical relation. in here

  16. Parallel Combinatorial Synthesis of Azo Dyes: A Combinatorial Experiment Suitable for Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gung, Benjamin W.; Taylor, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment in the parallel synthesis of azo dyes that demonstrates the concepts of structure-activity relationships and chemical diversity with vivid colors is described. It is seen that this experiment is suitable for the second-semester organic chemistry laboratory and also for the one-semester organic laboratory.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a Klebsiella oxytoca strain for simultaneous azo-dye anaerobic reduction and bio-hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing; Wu, Chao

    2012-07-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacteria strain GS-4-08, isolated from an anaerobic sequence batch reactor for synthetic dye wastewater treatment, was investigated for azo-dye decolorization. This bacterium was identified as a member of Klebsiella oxytoca based on Gram staining, morphology characterization and 16S rRNA gene analysis. It exhibited a good capacity of simultaneous decolorization and hydrogen production in the presence of electron donor. The hydrogen production was less affected even at a high Methyl Orange (MO) concentration of 0.5 mM, indicating a superior tolerability of this strain to MO. This efficient bio-hydrogen production from electron donor can not only avoid bacterial inhibition due to accumulation of volatile fatty acids during MO decolorization, but also can recover considerable energy from dye wastewater.

  18. Study of bio-degradation and bio-decolourization of azo dye by Enterobacter sp. SXCR.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Shiv Shankar; Aikat, Kaustav

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the decolourization potential of textile dyes by a relatively newly identified bacteria species, Enterobacter sp. SXCR which was isolated from the petroleum polluted soil samples. The bacterial strain was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The effects of operational conditions like initial dye concentration, pH, and temperature were optimized to develop an economically feasible decolourization process. The isolate was able to decolourize sulphonated azo dye (Congo red) over a wide range (0.1-1 gl(-1)), pH 5-9, and temperature 22-40 degrees C in static condition. Anaerobic condition with minimal salt medium supplemented with 2 gl(-1) glucose, pH 7 and 34 degrees C were considered to be the optimum decolourizing condition. The bacterial isolate SXCR showed a strong ability to decolourize dye (0.2 gl(-1)) within 93 h. The biodegradation was monitored by UV-vis, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Furthermore, the involvement of azoreductase in the decolourization process was identified in this strain. Cells of Enterobacter cloacae were immobilized by entrapment in calcium-alginate beads. Immobilized bacterial cells were able to reduced azo bonds enzymatically and used as a biocatalyst for decolourization of azo dye Congo red. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was used to describe the correlation between the decolourization rate and the dye concentration.

  19. Comparative study on reaction selectivity of azo dye decolorization by Pseudomonas luteola.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2007-03-22

    This study is to inspect how the variation of molecular structures and functional groups present in our model azo dyes (i.e., Congo red, Eriochrome black T (EBT), methyl orange, and methyl red) affects biodecolorization capability of Pseudomonas luteola. The most viable decolorization was found at pH 7-9 and the optimal cellular age for the most effective decolorization was 7 days after static incubation in dye-free cultures. In decolorization, the maximal absorption wavelength in UV-vis spectra for the different dye-containing cultures shifted from visible light range towards the ultraviolet visible range. Methyl red was not decolorized in contrast to methyl orange, Congo red, and Eriochrome black T. The sulfonic group para to azo bond (-N=N-) in methyl orange was a strong electron-withdrawing group through resonance to cause an enhancement of color removal to be easily biodecolorized. As a charged carboxyl group on methyl red is at ortho position (i.e., in the proximity) to azo bond, this led to a complete inhibition to decolorization. However, decolorization of Congo red and EBT in the absence of charged group (e.g., hydroxy or amino group) near azo bond was not completely repressed like methyl red. Thus, the presence of electron-withdrawing groups as the substituents on azo dyes enhanced decolorization capability for biodegradability. In addition, Monod kinetic model provided better predictions to all dye decolorization at initial short periods of time due to negligible intermediate formed at initial short time duration, but significant intermediate accumulation took place at longer period of time. In contrast, the decolorization performances of methyl orange at 400ppm and EBT at 230ppm were significantly less than those predicted from the Monod kinetic model likely due to accumulated intermediates exceeding the threshold levels for feedback inhibition.

  20. Phragmites australis peroxidases role in the degradation of an azo dye.

    PubMed

    Carias, C C; Novais, J M; Martins-Dias, S

    2007-01-01

    Phragmites australis are commonly used in constructed wetlands either for domestic sewage or industrial effluents treatment. The aerobic mineralization mechanisms of Acid Orange 7, AO7, in a Vertical Flow Constructed Wetland (VFCW) planted with P. australis suggest that AO7 degradation pathway may involve enzymes like peroxidases (POD), known to degrade some recalcitrant pollutants. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of POD extracted from the VFCW P. australis leaves in the decolourization of AO7, which belongs to the very restricted group of bio-degradable azo dyes and is widely used in the textile industry. Leaves' crude extract (CE) was purified by protein fractioning with ammonium sulphate (20-80%). AO7 (0.14 mM) decolourization rate of each CE fraction was determined using hydrogen peroxide (0.2 mM) as a co-substrate. A maximum specific activity of 6.8 x 10(-3) micromol QNNM min(-1) mg protein(-1) was obtained for the 40-60% fraction. The results obtained suggest that P. australis may be a good candidate for the treatment of AO7 contaminated effluents in a VFCW, as very high removal efficiencies were achieved at pilot scale and in vitro studies leading to the decolourization of the dye, suggesting a positive and active role of P. australis in the removal mechanisms within the VFCW. Moreover, some questions were put forward regarding the participation of other important plant enzymes in the degradation process.

  1. Fe3O4@Nico-Ag magnetically recyclable nanocatalyst for azo dyes reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtan, U.; Amir, Md.; Baykal, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the successful synthesis of Fe3O4@Nico-Ag nanocomposite as magnetically recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) via reflux process at 80 °C for 5 h followed by reduction of Ag+. FeCl3·6H2O, FeCl2·4H2O, AgNO3 as starting reactants and nicotinic acid as linker. The structure, morphology, thermal behaviour and magnetic properties of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX), thermal gravimetry (TG) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), respectively. The catalytic activity of product for various azo dyes such as methylene blue (MB), methyl orange (MO), Rhodamine B (RhB) and eosin Y (EY) and their double mixtures were studied. It was found that Fe3O4@Nico-Ag MRCs is an efficient catalyst and can also rapidly separated from the reaction medium using magnet without considerable loss in its catalytic activity and used several times. Fe3O4@Nico-Ag MRCs has potential for the treatment of industrial dye pollutants.

  2. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters.

  3. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part I: Synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe

    2012-02-01

    Four new 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes were synthesized via condensation of 3,5-diamino-1,2,4-triazole with azo-coupled o-vanillin precursors. The prepared dyes were characterized by IR, UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analyses. Thermal properties of the prepared dyes were examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Results indicated that the framework of the dyes was stable up to 225 °C. Also, the influence of various factors including time and mixed DMSO/EtOH solution on UV-vis spectra of the dyes were investigated.

  4. Optimization and kinetics evaluation of biodegradation of synthetic azo reactive dye by fungal consortium.

    PubMed

    Chitradevi, V; Sivakumar, V

    2011-10-01

    Wastewater containing direct dyes discharged from various industries, in particular, textile industry, often cause many environmental problems. Among the various effluent treatment methods, biological methods found to be cost effective and do not end up in secondary pollutants. In this study, an attempt has been made to study the decolorization of cibacron yellow S-3R, an azo reactive dye by using fungal cultures such as Coriolus versicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pleurotus ostreatus, and Myrothecium verrucaria. The fungi were able to decolorize individually the azo reactive dye cibacron yellow S-3R to an extent of nearly in the range 75 - 85%, whereas the mixed fungal consortium was able to decolorize to an extent of nearly 95%.The study is extended with the kinetics of decolorization of Cibacron yellow S-3R using mixed fungal consortium containing equal proportions of the cultures. The experimental results show that decolorization kinetics follow second order rate equation.

  5. Synthesis and anion recognition studies of novel bis (4-hydroxycoumarin) methane azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitsiri, Amorn; Tongkhan, Sukanya; Radchatawedchakoon, Widchaya; Sakee, Uthai

    2016-03-01

    Four new bis (4-hydroxycoumarin) methane azo dyes were synthesized by the condensation of 4-hydroxycoumarin with four different azo salicylaldehydes and their structures were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HRMS. Anion binding ability in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solutions with tetrabutylammonium (TBA) salts (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, AcO- and H2PO4-) was investigated by the naked eye, as well as UV-visible spectroscopy. The sensor shows selective recognition towards fluoride and acetate. The binding affinity of the sensors with fluoride and acetate was calculated using UV-visible spectroscopic technique.

  6. Effects of redox mediators on azo dye decolorization by Shewanella algae under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianming; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Fu, Q Shiang

    2014-01-01

    Azo dye decolorization by Shewanella algae (SAL) in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl and different quinones or humic acids was investigated to reveal the effects of redox mediator under saline conditions. Growth of SAL and the other two marine Shewanella strains coupled to anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) reduction was observed in a wide range of NaCl concentrations (0-7%). AQDS showed the best enhancing effects, whereas some other quinones demonstrated poorer stimulating or even inhibiting effects on acid red 27 (AR27) decolorization. Different humic acids could also enhance the decolorization. The correlation between specific AQDS-mediated reduction rate and initial AR27 concentration could be described with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km=0.2 mM and Vmax=9.3 μmol mg cell(-1) h(-1)). AQDS reduction by SAL was determined to be the rate-limiting step of mediated reduction. Mediated decolorization products of AR27 were determined to be less phytotoxic aromatic amines.

  7. Effect of inducers on the decolorization and biodegradation of textile azo dye Navy blue 2GL by Bacillus sp. VUS.

    PubMed

    Dawkar, Vishal V; Jadhav, Umesh U; Ghodake, Gajanan S; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus sp. VUS decolorized azo dye Navy blue 2GL in 48 h at static anoxic condition in yeast extract medium, whereas it took only 18 h for the decolorization in presence of CaCl(2). Different inducers played role in the decolorization of Navy blue 2GL. CaCl(2) found to be the most effective inducer among all inducers tested. The activity of enzymes like lignin peroxidase, laccase and reductases viz. NADH-DCIP, azo and riboflavin induced during decolorization represents their role in the biodegradation. Extracellular LiP and intracellular laccase activity induced with CaCl(2). Yeast extract was best medium for faster decolorization than other media. UV-vis spectrophotometer analysis and visual examinations showed decolorization of dye. High performance liquid chromatography, Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy showed degradation of dye. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy revealed formation of 4-Amino-3-(2-bromo-4, 6-dinitro-phenylazo)-phenol and acetic acid 2-(-acetoxy-ethylamino)-ethyl ester as final products. Bacillus sp. VUS also decolorized synthetic effluent. Phytotoxicity study showed detoxification of Navy blue 2GL.

  8. Fastest non-ionic azo dyes and transfer of their thermal isomerisation kinetics into liquid-crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Castro, M Cidália R; Coelho, Paulo; Raposo, M Manuela M; Velasco, Dolores

    2016-04-14

    Push-pull bithienylpyrrole-based azo dyes exhibit thermal isomerisation rates as fast as 1.4 μs in acetonitrile at 298 K becoming, thus, the fastest neutral azo dyes reported so far. These remarkably low relaxation times can be transferred into liquid-crystalline matrices enabling light-triggered oscillations in the optical density of the final material up to 11 kHz under ambient conditions.

  9. Fastest non-ionic azo dyes and transfer of their thermal isomerisation kinetics into liquid-crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Castro, M Cidália R; Coelho, Paulo; Raposo, M Manuela M; Velasco, Dolores

    2016-04-14

    Push-pull bithienylpyrrole-based azo dyes exhibit thermal isomerisation rates as fast as 1.4 μs in acetonitrile at 298 K becoming, thus, the fastest neutral azo dyes reported so far. These remarkably low relaxation times can be transferred into liquid-crystalline matrices enabling light-triggered oscillations in the optical density of the final material up to 11 kHz under ambient conditions. PMID:26990527

  10. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L-1 concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn’t show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic

  11. Biodegradation and detoxification of textile azo dyes by bacterial consortium under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Kadam, Avinash; Paul, Diby; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Release of textile azo dyes to the environment is an issue of health concern while the use of microorganisms has proved to be the best option for remediation. Thus, in the present study, a bacterial consortium consisting of Providencia rettgeri strain HSL1 and Pseudomonas sp. SUK1 has been investigated for degradation and detoxification of structurally different azo dyes. The consortium showed 98-99 % decolorization of all the selected azo dyes viz. Reactive Black 5 (RB 5), Reactive Orange 16 (RO 16), Disperse Red 78 (DR 78) and Direct Red 81 (DR 81) within 12 to 30 h at 100 mg L(-1) concentration at 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic, sequential aerobic/microaerophilic and microaerophilic/aerobic processes. However, decolorization under microaerophilic conditions viz. RB 5 (0.26 mM), RO 16 (0.18 mM), DR 78 (0.20 mM) and DR 81 (0.23 mM) and sequential aerobic/microaerophilic processes viz. RB 5 (0.08 mM), RO 16 (0.06 mM), DR 78 (0.07 mM) and DR 81 (0.09 mM) resulted into the formation of aromatic amines. In distinction, sequential microaerophilic/ aerobic process doesn't show the formation of amines. Additionally, 62-72 % reduction in total organic carbon content was observed in all the dyes decolorized broths under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggesting the efficacy of method in mineralization of dyes. Notable induction within the levels of azoreductase and NADH-DCIP reductase (97 and 229 % for RB 5, 55 and 160 % for RO 16, 63 and 196 % for DR 78, 108 and 258 % for DR 81) observed under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes suggested their critical involvements in the initial breakdown of azo bonds, whereas, a slight increase in the levels of laccase and veratryl alcohol oxidase confirmed subsequent oxidation of formed amines. Also, the acute toxicity assay with Daphnia magna revealed the nontoxic nature of the dye-degraded metabolites under sequential microaerophilic/aerobic processes. As biodegradation under sequential microaerophilic

  12. The azo dye Disperse Red 13 and its oxidation and reduction products showed mutagenic potential.

    PubMed

    Chequer, Farah Maria Drumond; Lizier, Thiago Mescoloto; de Felício, Rafael; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Debonsi, Hosana Maria; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2015-10-01

    Common water pollutants, azo dyes and their degradation products have frequently shown toxicity, including carcinogenic and mutagenic effects, and can induce serious damage in aquatic organisms and humans. In the present study, the mutagenic potential of the azo dye Disperse Red 13 (DR13) was first evaluated using the Micronucleus Assay in human lymphocytes. Subsequently, in order to mimic hepatic biotransformation, controlled potential electrolysis was carried out with a DR13 solution using a Potentiostat/Galvanostat. In addition, a DR13 solution was oxidized using S9 (homogenate of rat liver cells). DR13 oxidation and the reduction products were identified using HPLC-DAD and GC/MS, and their mutagenic potential investigated by way of a Salmonella/microsome assay using TA98 and YG1041 strains, with no S9. The original azo dye DR13 induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes, and the respective oxidation and reduction products also showed mutagenic activity, as detected by the Salmonella/microsome assay. Furthermore sulfate 2-[(4-aminophenyl)ethylamino]-ethanol monohydrate, 2-chloro-4-nitro-benzamine, 4-nitro-benzamine and 2-(ethylphenylamine)-ethanol were identified as products of the DR13 reduction/oxidation reactions. Thus it was concluded that the contamination of water effluents with DR13 is a health risk not only due to the dye itself, but also due to the possibility of drinking contaminated water, considering the harmful compounds that can be produced after hepatic biotransformation. PMID:26247324

  13. The azo dye Disperse Red 13 and its oxidation and reduction products showed mutagenic potential.

    PubMed

    Chequer, Farah Maria Drumond; Lizier, Thiago Mescoloto; de Felício, Rafael; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Debonsi, Hosana Maria; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2015-10-01

    Common water pollutants, azo dyes and their degradation products have frequently shown toxicity, including carcinogenic and mutagenic effects, and can induce serious damage in aquatic organisms and humans. In the present study, the mutagenic potential of the azo dye Disperse Red 13 (DR13) was first evaluated using the Micronucleus Assay in human lymphocytes. Subsequently, in order to mimic hepatic biotransformation, controlled potential electrolysis was carried out with a DR13 solution using a Potentiostat/Galvanostat. In addition, a DR13 solution was oxidized using S9 (homogenate of rat liver cells). DR13 oxidation and the reduction products were identified using HPLC-DAD and GC/MS, and their mutagenic potential investigated by way of a Salmonella/microsome assay using TA98 and YG1041 strains, with no S9. The original azo dye DR13 induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes, and the respective oxidation and reduction products also showed mutagenic activity, as detected by the Salmonella/microsome assay. Furthermore sulfate 2-[(4-aminophenyl)ethylamino]-ethanol monohydrate, 2-chloro-4-nitro-benzamine, 4-nitro-benzamine and 2-(ethylphenylamine)-ethanol were identified as products of the DR13 reduction/oxidation reactions. Thus it was concluded that the contamination of water effluents with DR13 is a health risk not only due to the dye itself, but also due to the possibility of drinking contaminated water, considering the harmful compounds that can be produced after hepatic biotransformation.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10108 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy-[[[(hydroxyl-disulfo-naphthaleneyl)azo]-alkyl(C=1-5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). 721.10108 Section 721... Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). (a... generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10108 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy-[[[(hydroxyl-disulfo-naphthaleneyl)azo]-alkyl(C=1-5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). 721.10108 Section 721... Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). (a... generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10108 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy-[[[(hydroxyl-disulfo-naphthaleneyl)azo]-alkyl(C=1-5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). 721.10108 Section 721... Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). (a... generically as naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted...

  17. [Decoloration and bioaugmentation on azo dye by immobilized genetically engineered strain].

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruo-Fei; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Wang, Jing; Cao, Tong-Chuan

    2007-11-01

    Decoloration and bioaugmentation on azo dye are investigated by using immobilized genetically engineered strain Escherichia coli JM109 (pGEX-AZR) on marcroporous foam carriers. The kinetics of the acid red GR decolorization by the immobilized E. coli JM109 (pGEX-AZR) accords with Andrews model proved by our experiments, and the kinetic parameters, mu(max,c), K(c) and K(ic), are found to be 49.2 mg x (g x h)(-1), 710.43 mg x L(-1) and 681.62 mg x L(-1) respectively. For continuous operating in the anaerobic SBRs with 10% inoculation of Escherichia coli JM109 (pGEX-AZR) on marcroporous foam carriers for 32 d, both the tolerance to red GR concentration shock and the colorific removal in the bioaugmented anaerobic SBRs are higher than the control system, and the acid red GR decoloration rate reached 90%. Changes in microbial community have been detected by the RISA, in which the introduced immobilized GEM and preponderant mixed culture were subsisted steadily in sludge systems.

  18. Dyeing of Polyester with Disperse Dyes: Part 2. Synthesis and Dyeing Characteristics of Some Azo Disperse Dyes for Polyester Fabrics.

    PubMed

    Al-Etaibi, Alya M; Alnassar, Huda S; El-Apasery, Morsy Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize carrier for accelerating the rate of dyeing not only to enhance dyeing of polyester fabrics dyed with disperse dyes 3a,b, but also to save energy. Both the color strength expressed as dye uptake and the fastness properties of the dyed fabrics were evaluated. PMID:27367659

  19. The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on biodegradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Yaşar, Semra; Cirik, Kevser; Cinar, Ozer

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on the biodegradative capability of the mixed microbial culture for the azo dye Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R (RBV-5R) was investigated in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a synthetic textile wastewater. The SBR had a 12-h cycle time with anaerobic-aerobic periods of 3/9, 6/6 and 9/3 h. General SBR performance was assessed by measurement of catabolic enzymes (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, azo reductase), chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and amount of aromatic amines. In this study, under steady-state conditions, the anaerobic period of the cyclic SBR was found to allow the reductive decolorization of azo dye. Longer anaerobic periods resulted in higher color removal efficiencies, approximately 71% for the 3-h, 87% for 6-h and 92% for the 9-h duration. Total COD removal efficiencies were over 84% under each of the cyclic conditions and increased as the length of the anaerobic period was increased; however, the highest color removal rate was attained for the cycle with the shortest anaerobic period of 3 h. During the decolorization of RBV-5R, two sulfonated aromatic amines (benzene based and naphthalene based) were formed. Additionally, anaerobic azo reductase enzyme was found to be positively affected with the increasing duration of the anaerobic period; however; it was vice versa for the aerobic catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23DO) enzyme.

  20. Evaluation of azo food dyes for mutagenicity and inhibition of mutagenicity by methods using Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Prival, M J; Davis, V M; Peiperl, M D; Bell, S J

    1988-10-01

    The mutagenicity of 4 azo dyes (FD&C Yellow No. 5, FD&C Yellow No. 6, FD&C Red No. 40 and amaranth) that are widely used to color food has been evaluated. 4 different methods were used: (1) the standard Ames plate-incorporation assay performed directly on the dyes in the absence of S9 and in the presence of rat- or hamster-liver S9; (2) application of the standard plate assay to ether extracts of aqueous solutions of the dyes; (3) a variant of the standard assay, using hamster liver S9, preincubation, flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and other modifications designed to facilitate azo reduction; and (4) reduction of the dyes with sodium dithionite, followed by ether extraction and the standard plate assay. Assays that include chemical reduction (methods 3 and 4) were included because azo compounds ingested orally are reduced in the intestine with the release of free aromatic amines. No mutagenic activity was seen for any of the azo dyes tested by using the standard Ames plate assay (method 1). Ether extracts of some samples of FD&C Yellow No. 6, FD&C Red No. 40 and amaranth were active (method 2), but only at high doses, generally 250 mg-equivalents or more per plate. These results indicate the presence of low levels of ether-extractable mutagenic impurities. The FMN preincubation assay (method 3) gave negative results for all dye samples tested. Most batches of FD&C Red No. 40 tested had mutagenic activity that was detectable when the ether extract of less than 1 mg of dithionite-reduced dye was plated in the presence of S9 (method 4). This finding implies that an impurity in these samples of FD&C Red No. 40 can be reduced to yield an ether-extractable mutagen. Dithionite-reduced samples of FD&C Yellow No. 6 and amaranth showed ether-extractable mutagenic activity only at much higher doses than those at which activity was seen with most dithionite-reduced samples of FD&C Red No. 40 (method 4). FD&C Yellow No. 5 showed no mutagenic activity with this method. Mutagenic

  1. Adsorption studies of cationic, anionic and azo-dyes via monodispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Saharan, Priya; Kumar, Arun; Mehta, S K; Mor, Suman; Umar, Ahmad

    2013-05-01

    The present paper reports the applicability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as an adsorbent for the removal of three dyes viz. Acridine orange (cationic dye), Comassie Brilliant Blue R-250 (anionic dye) and Congo red (azo dye) from their aqueous solution. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via simple chemical precipitation method using CTAB, as surfactant. The as-prepared nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphological, structural and optical properties by using transmission electron microscopy X-ray diffraction and UV-visible spectroscopic measurements. The dye removal efficiency of Fe3O4 NPs have been determined by investigating several factors such as effect of pH, amount of adsorbent dose and effect of contact time on different dye concentrations. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms have also been studied to explain the interaction of dyes. The experimental data indicate that the adsorption rate follows pseudo- second-order kinetics for the removal of all the three dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles and the adsorbed dyes were desorbed. The identities of recovered nanoparticles as well as the three dyes have been found, as same and were reused. PMID:23858837

  2. Polarization-dependent circular Dammann grating made of azo-dye-doped liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Sun, Xiao Wei; Dai, Hai Tao; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-05-20

    A polarization-dependent circular Dammann grating (CDG) was generated from an azo-dye-doped liquid crystal (LC) cell. A simple multiexposure photo-alignment process was used to fabricate a binary phase LC CDG zone plane, which was composed of an odd zone with a twisted nematic LC structure and an even zone with a homogenous LC structure. A two-order CDG with equal-intensity rings was produced through a Fourier transform. The maximum zeroth and first diffraction orders of obtained CDG can be separately achieved by rotating the analyzer's polarization direction. The CDG using an azo-dye-doped LC cell can be used to generate diffractions by lasers in a broad wavelength range, hence expanding possible device applications. PMID:21614127

  3. Biological degradation of anthroquinone and azo dyes by a novel laccase from Lentinus sp.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-An; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Su, Yu-Chang; Jiang, Zhi-Bing; Chen, Chin-Wen; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-05-01

    This study identifies a new fungal strain, Lentinus sp., that can produce extracellular forms of laccases with an activity of approximately 58 300 U/L. A purified laccase (designated lcc3) was identified by LC-ESI MS/MS as an N-linkage glycosylated protein. The isolated lcc3 cDNA is composed of 1563 bp encoding for a polypeptide of 521 amino acid residues with 4 putative Cu binding regions. Kinetic analyses revealed that the specific activity, k(cat), K(m), and k(cat)/K(m) of lcc3 at pH 2.5 and 70 °C with 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) used as a substrate was 2047 U mg(-1), 2017 s(-1), 8.4 μM, and 240 s(-1) μM(-1), respectively. Lcc3 is stable at pH 6.0-10.0 and has a midpoint temperature (T(m)) of 77.1 °C. We observed 97% decolorization efficiency on Acid Blue 80, 88% on RBBR, and 61% on Acid Red 37 by lcc3. Structural modeling analysis showed that five, four, and three hydrogen bonds can be formed between Acid Blue 80 and Arg(178), Arg(182), or Asn(358); between RBBR and His(132), Ser(134), or Asp(482); and between Acid Red 37 and Arg(178), respectively. Notably, Lentinus lcc3 efficiently reversed the toxicity of anthraquinone and azo dyes on rice seed germination and decolorized industrial textile effluent, suggesting the enzyme may be valuable for bioremediation.

  4. Removal of azo dye by a highly graphitized and heteroatom doped carbon derived from fish waste: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengang; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Tingting; Peng, Nana; Gai, Chao

    2016-11-01

    A highly graphitized and heteroatom doped porous carbon was prepared from fish waste in the present study. The morphology and chemical composition of the resultant porous carbon were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, BET, XRD and Raman measurement. The prepared porous carbon was employed as an adsorbent for acid orange 7, a typical azo dye, removal from aqueous solution. The results showed that the porous carbon had ultrahigh surface area of 2146 m(2)/g, a high degree of graphitization structure and naturally doped with nitrogen and phosphorous. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid orange 7 reached 285.71 mg/g due to unique property of the prepared porous carbon. In addition, acid orange 7 adsorption onto the porous carbon well followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model and acid orange 7 diffusion in micropores was the potential rate controlling step. PMID:27526082

  5. Removal of azo dye by a highly graphitized and heteroatom doped carbon derived from fish waste: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengang; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Tingting; Peng, Nana; Gai, Chao

    2016-11-01

    A highly graphitized and heteroatom doped porous carbon was prepared from fish waste in the present study. The morphology and chemical composition of the resultant porous carbon were characterized by SEM-EDS, TEM, BET, XRD and Raman measurement. The prepared porous carbon was employed as an adsorbent for acid orange 7, a typical azo dye, removal from aqueous solution. The results showed that the porous carbon had ultrahigh surface area of 2146 m(2)/g, a high degree of graphitization structure and naturally doped with nitrogen and phosphorous. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid orange 7 reached 285.71 mg/g due to unique property of the prepared porous carbon. In addition, acid orange 7 adsorption onto the porous carbon well followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model and acid orange 7 diffusion in micropores was the potential rate controlling step.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10399 - Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10399 Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (generic). (a) Chemical... as benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (PMN P-10-501) is subject to reporting under this...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10399 - Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10399 Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (generic). (a) Chemical... as benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (PMN P-10-501) is subject to reporting under this...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10399 - Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10399 Benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (generic). (a) Chemical... as benzoic acid azo-substituted pyridine (PMN P-10-501) is subject to reporting under this...

  9. Performance of microbial fuel cell coupled constructed wetland system for decolorization of azo dye and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhou; Song, Hai-Liang; Cang, Ning; Li, Xian-Ning

    2013-09-01

    A microbial fuel cell coupled constructed wetland (planted with Ipomoea aquatica) system (planted CW-MFC) was used for azo dye decolorization. Electricity was simultaneously produced during the co-metabolism process of glucose and azo dye. A non-planted and an open-circuit system were established as reference to study the roles of plants and electrodes in azo dye decolorization and electricity production processes, respectively. The results indicated that plants grown in cathode enhanced the cathode potential and slightly promoted dye decolorization efficiency. The electrodes promoted the dye decolorization efficiency in the anode. The planted CW-MFC system achieved the highest decolorization rate of about 91.24% and a voltage output of about 610 mV. The connection of external circuit promoted the growth of electrogenic bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens and Beta Proteobacteria, and inhibited the growth of Archaea in anode.

  10. Preparation of Dis-Azo Dyes Derived from p-Aminophenol and Their Fastness Properties for Synthetic Polymer-Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otutu, J. O.; Okoro, D.; Ossai, E. K.

    The preparation and properties of a series of dis-azo dyes derived from p-aminophenol is described. The influence on colour, dyeing fastness properties of the dyes on synthetic polymer-fibres is reported. Most of the dyes synthesized afford better light fastness and better wet (wash, perspiration) fastness on PET than on nylon 6 fabric. The structure of each compound was confirmed by using infrared, UV-VIS and elemental analysis.

  11. Kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye films: Two-state and diffusion models

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, Alexei D.; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2009-07-15

    We theoretically study the kinetics of photoinduced ordering in azo-dye photoaligning layers and present the results of modeling performed using two different phenomenological approaches. A phenomenological two-state model is deduced from the master equation for the one-particle distribution functions of an ensemble of two-level molecular systems by specifying the angular redistribution probabilities and by expressing the order parameter correlation functions in terms of the order parameter tensor. Using an alternative approach that describes light-induced reorientation of azo-dye molecules in terms of a rotational Brownian motion, we formulate the two-dimensional diffusion model as the free energy Fokker-Planck equation simplified for the limiting regime of purely in-plane reorientation. The models are employed to interpret the irradiation time dependence of the absorption order parameters defined in terms of the principal extinction (absorption) coefficients. Using the exact solution to the light transmission problem for a biaxially anisotropic absorbing layer, these coefficients are extracted from the absorbance-vs-incidence angle curves measured at different irradiation doses for the probe light linearly polarized parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence. It is found that, in the azo-dye films, the transient photoinduced structures are biaxially anisotropic whereas the photosteady and the initial states are uniaxial.

  12. Density functional theory study of new azo dyes with different π-spacers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bagheri Novir, Samaneh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2015-05-15

    Some of new azo-based metal-free dyes with different π-conjugation spacers, such as carbazole, fluorene, pyrrole, thiophene, furan and thiazole, have been investigated with density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations. Theoretical calculations allow us to quantify factors such as light harvesting efficiency (LHE), electron injection driving force (ΔG(inject)) and the weight of the LUMO orbital on the carboxylic group (QLUMO) related to the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc), and to evaluate both charge recombination between the semiconductor conduction band electrons and the oxidized dyes and/or electrolyte, and also the shift of the conduction band of the semiconductor as a result of the adsorption of the dyes onto the semiconductor surface, associated with the open-circuit photovoltage (Voc). According to the results, we could predict that how the π-conjugation spacers influence the Jsc as well as the Voc of DSSCs. Among these dyes, the carbazole and fluorene-based dyes (dyes 1 and 2) show the highest LHE, ΔG(inject), QLUMO, and the slowest recombination rate. Consequently, the obtained results show that the carbazole and fluorene-based dyes could have the better Jsc and Voc compared to the other dyes.

  13. pI-Control in Comparative Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) using amphoteric azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Hanneken, Marina; Šlais, Karel; König, Simone

    2015-06-01

    Amphoteric azo dyes were used for internal control of pI values in Comparative two-dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis (CoFGE) [1]. The 2D-gel images of separated Escherichia coli proteins as well as those of colored amphoteric dyes separated by isoelectric focussing are presented. The latter were used to correct for variation in the first electrophoretic dimension and further improve protein coordinate assignment in 2D-gel electrophoresis. Data tables are supplied to demonstrate pI-value calibration and the effect on the assignment of protein spot coordinates. PMID:26217748

  14. Decolorization and biodegradability of photocatalytic treated azo dyes and wool textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, Y

    1999-11-01

    The photodegradation and biodegradability have been investigated for four non-biodegradable commercial azo dyes, Reactive YellowKD-3G, Reactive Red 15, Reactive Red 24, Cationic Blue X-GRL, an indicator. Methyl Orange, and one industrial wool textile wastewater, using TiO2 suspensions irradiated with a medium pressure mercury lamp. The color removal of dyes solution and dyeing wastewater reached to above 90% within 20-30 min. of photocatalytic treatment. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) was found to increase, while chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) decreased, so that the ratio of BOD5/COD of the wastewater increased from original zero up to 0.75. The result implies that photocatalytic oxidation enhanced the biodegradability of the dye-containing wastewater and therefore relationship between decolorization and biodegradability exists. When the color disappeared completely, the wastewater biodegraded normally and could be discharged for further treatment. The experimental results demonstrate that it is possible to combine photocatalysis with conventional biological treatment for the remedy of wastewater containing generally non-biodegradable azo dyes.

  15. Simultaneous determination of three azo dyes in food product by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiandong; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Mingfeng; Li, Junqing; Li, Qihong; Quan, Qinbo; Chen, Jinquan

    2016-07-01

    Color is an important property for food evaluation. Synthetic azo dyes are usually used in food product to obtain better appearance because of their stability and low cost. However, such dyes should be strictly controlled because of their potential threat to human health. A simple, rapid and sensitive method has been developed to determine orange II, allura red, and para red simultaneously by ion mobility spectrometry. The three dyes could be separated at the same time and the migration time of orange II, allura red, and para red are 12.070±0.010, 8.180±0.015, and 11.037±0.016ms, respectively. The effects of different parameters, such as pH, solvent, percentage of water, were investigated to establish the optimal condition. The detection limits were 0.1, 0.05, and 0.2μg/mL for orange II, allura red, and para red, respectively. The recoveries of the three azo dyes from jellies were all higher than 81%. The developed method is fast and accurate for the detection of the three synthetic dyes. PMID:27235999

  16. Decolorization of azo dyes and simulated dye bath wastewater using acclimatized microbial consortium--biostimulation and halo tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dafale, Nishant; Rao, N Nageswara; Meshram, Sudhir U; Wate, Satish R

    2008-05-01

    Anaerobic acclimatization of activated sludge from a textile effluent treatment plant to high concentration of RB5 could effectively decolorize RB5 dye solution. The strains viz. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus circulans and other unidentified laboratory isolates (NAD1 and NAD6) were predominantly present in the microbial consortium. The conditions for efficient decolorization, biostimulation to increase effectiveness of microbial consortium, its tolerance to high salt concentration and non-specific ability towards decolorization of eight azo dyes, are reported. The optimum inoculums concentration for maximum decolorization were found to be 1-5 ml of 1800+/-50 mg l(-1) MLSS and 37 degrees C, respectively. The decolorization efficiency was 70-90% during 48 h. The biomass showed efficient decolorization even in the presence of 10% NaCl, as tested with RB5. In the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) more than 99% decolorization occurred in 8h. The decolorization of RB5 was traced to extracellular enzymes. The effectiveness of acclimatized biomass under optimized conditions towards decolorization of two types of synthetic dye bath wastewaters that were prepared using chosen azo dyes is reported.

  17. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by an aerobic bacterial consortium using a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Abraham, T Emilia; Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, Jegan J; Poulose, T P; Thomas, P P

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of an azo dye mixture by an aerobic bacterial consortium was studied in a rotating biological reactor. Laterite pebbles of particle size 850 microm to 1.44 mm were fixed on gramophone records using an epoxy resin on which the developed consortium was immobilized. Rate of degradation, BOD, biomass determination, enzymes involved, and fish bioassay were studied. The RBC has a high efficiency for dye degradation even at high dye concentrations (100 microg/mL) and high flow rate (36 L/h) at alkaline pH and salinity conditions normally encountered in the textile effluents. Bioassays (LD-50) using Thilapia fish in treated effluent showed that the percentage mortality was zero over a period of 96 h, whereas the mortality was 100% in untreated dye water within 26 h. Fish bioassay confirms that the effluent from RBC can be discharged safely to the environment. PMID:12892505

  18. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by an aerobic bacterial consortium using a rotating biological contactor.

    PubMed

    Abraham, T Emilia; Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, Jegan J; Poulose, T P; Thomas, P P

    2003-01-01

    The degradation of an azo dye mixture by an aerobic bacterial consortium was studied in a rotating biological reactor. Laterite pebbles of particle size 850 microm to 1.44 mm were fixed on gramophone records using an epoxy resin on which the developed consortium was immobilized. Rate of degradation, BOD, biomass determination, enzymes involved, and fish bioassay were studied. The RBC has a high efficiency for dye degradation even at high dye concentrations (100 microg/mL) and high flow rate (36 L/h) at alkaline pH and salinity conditions normally encountered in the textile effluents. Bioassays (LD-50) using Thilapia fish in treated effluent showed that the percentage mortality was zero over a period of 96 h, whereas the mortality was 100% in untreated dye water within 26 h. Fish bioassay confirms that the effluent from RBC can be discharged safely to the environment.

  19. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal. PMID:23810998

  20. Degradation of a model azo dye in submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC).

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Luna, H J; Sanson, A L; Silva, S Q; Aquino, S F

    2013-10-15

    This work investigated the anaerobic degradation of the model azo dye Remazol Yellow Gold RNL in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) and two submerged anaerobic membrane (SAMBR) bioreactors, one of which (SAMBR-1) was operated with powdered activated carbon (PAC) in its interior. The reactors were operated at 35 °C with a hydraulic retention time of 24 h in three operational phases, aimed to assess the effect of external sources of carbon (glucose) or redox mediator (yeast extract) on the removal or color and organic matter. The results showed that removal efficiencies of COD (73-94%) and color (90-94%) were higher for SAMBR-1 when compared to SAMBR-2 (operated without PAC) and UASB reactors. In addition, the presence of PAC in SAMBR-1 increased reactor stability, thereby leading to a lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). The microfiltration membrane was responsible for an additional removal of ~50% of soluble residual COD in the form of VFA, thus improving permeate quality. On its turn, PAC exhibited the ability to adsorb byproducts (aromatic amines) of azo dye degradation as well as to act as source of immobilized redox mediator (quinone groups on its surface), thereby enhancing color removal.

  1. Biomineralization of azo dye bearing wastewater in periodic discontinuous batch reactor: Effect of microaerophilic conditions on treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Naresh Kumar, A; Nagendranatha Reddy, C; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-01-01

    The present study illustrates the influence of microaerophilic condition on periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR) operation in treating azo dye containing wastewater. The process performance was evaluated with the function of various dye load operations (50-750 mg/l) by keeping the organic load (1.6 kg COD/m(3)-day) constant. Initially, lower dye operation (50mg dye/l) resulted in higher dye [45 mg dye/l (90%)] and COD [SDR: 1.29 kg COD/m(3)-day (92%)] removal efficiencies. Higher dye load operation (750 mg dye/l) also showed non-inhibitory performance with respect to dye [600 mg dye/l (80%)] and COD [1.25 kg COD/m(3)-day (80%)] removal efficiencies. Increment in dye load showed increment in azo reductase and dehydrogenase activities (39.6 U; 4.96 μg/ml; 750 mg/l). UV-Vis spectroscopy (200-800 nm), FTIR and (1)H NMR studies revealed the disappearance of azo bond (-NN-). First derivative cyclic voltammogram supported the involvement of various membrane bound redox shuttlers, viz., cytochrome-C, cytochrome-bc1 and flavoproteins (FAD (H)).

  2. Biodegradation of azo and heterocyclic dyes by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, C; Bumpus, J A; Aust, S D

    1990-01-01

    Biodegradation of Orange II, Tropaeolin O, Congo Red, and Azure B in cultures of the white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was demonstrated by decolarization of the culture medium, the extent of which was determined by monitoring the decrease in absorbance at or near the wavelength maximum for each dye. Metabolite formation was also monitored. Decolorization of these dyes was most extensive in ligninolytic cultures, but substantial decolorization also occurred in nonligninolytic cultures. Incubation with crude lignin peroxidase resulted in decolorization of Azure B, Orange II, and Tropaeolin O but not Congo Red, indicating that lignin peroxidase is not required in the initial step of Congo Red degradation. PMID:2339873

  3. Discovery and structural elucidation of the illegal azo dye Basic Red 46 in sumac spice.

    PubMed

    Ruf, J; Walter, P; Kandler, H; Kaufmann, A

    2012-01-01

    An unknown red dye was discovered in a sumac spice sample during routine analysis for Sudan dyes. LC-DAD and LC-MS/MS did not reveal the identity of the red substance. Nevertheless, using LC-high-resolution MS and isotope ratio comparisons the structure was identified as Basic Red 46. The identity of the dye was further confirmed by comparison with a commercial hair-staining product and two textile dye formulations containing Basic Red 46. Analogous to the Sudan dyes, Basic Red 46 is an azo dye. However, some of the sample clean-up methodology utilised for the analysis of Sudan dyes in food prevents its successful detection. In contrast to the Sudan dyes, Basic Red 46 is a cation. Its cationic properties make it bind strongly to gel permeation columns and silica solid-phase extraction cartridges and prevent elution with standard eluents. This is the first report of Basic Red 46 in food. The structure elucidation of this compound as well as the disadvantages of analytical methods focusing on a narrow group of targeted analytes are discussed. PMID:22455543

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and electrochemical studies on thiazolyl azo based disperse dyes bearing coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkütük, Müjgan; İpek, Ezgi; Aydıner, Burcu; Mamaş, Serhat; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2016-03-01

    In this study, seven novel thiazolyl azo disperse dyes (6a-g) were synthesized and fully characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectral techniques. The electronic absorption spectra of the dyes in solvents of different polarities cover a λmax range of 404-512 nm. The absorption properties of the dyes changed drastically upon acidification. This was due to the protonation of the nitrogen in the thiazole ring, which in turn increased the donor-acceptor interplay of the π system in the dyes, and therefore increased the absorption properties of the prepared dyes. Thermal analysis showed that these dyes are thermal stable up to 269 °C. Additionally, the electrochemical behavior of the dyes (6a-g) were investigated using cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric techniques, in the presence of 0.10 M tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate, in dimethylsulfoxide, at a glassy carbon electrode. The number of transferred electrons, and the diffusion coefficient were determined by electrochemical methods. The results showed that, for all the dyes, one oxidation peak and two reduction peaks were observed.

  5. Decolorization of Textile Dyes and Degradation of Mono-Azo Dye Amaranth by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIM 2890.

    PubMed

    Ghodake, Gajanan; Jadhav, Umesh; Tamboli, Dhawal; Kagalkar, Anuradha; Govindwar, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIM 2890 (A. caloaceticus) was found to decolorize 20 different textile dyes of various classes. Decolorization of an azo dye amaranth was observed effectively (91%) at static anoxic condition, whereas agitated culture grew well but showed less decolorization (68%) within 48 h of incubation. Induction of intracellular and extracellular lignin peroxidase, intracellular laccase, dichlorophenol indophenol (DCIP) reductase and riboflavin reductase represented their involvement in the biodegradation of amaranth. The products obtained after degradation of Amaranth were characterized as naphthalene sulfamide, hydroxyl naphthalene diazonium and naphthalene diazonium. The germination and growth of Sorghum vulgare and Phaseolus mungo seeds, and the growth of E. coli and Bacillus substilis were not inhibited by the metabolic products of the dye.

  6. Experimental data for synthesis of bi-metalized chitosan particle for attenuating of an azo dye from wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Hajivandi, Abdollah; Farjadfard, Sima; Ramavandi, Bahman; Akbarzadeh, Samad

    2016-01-01

    In this data article, we introduce data acquired from new adsorbent, bi-metalized chitosan particle that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye, an azo dye, from textile wastewater. The adsorbent was meso- and macro-porous material with BET surface area of 12.69 m2/g and pHzpc 6.6. The simulated textile-wastewater can be significantly treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent. Overall, the use of bi-metalized chitosan particle can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. Accordingly, these data will be useful for decolorizing of azo dyes from textile wastewater. PMID:26955651

  7. Experimental data for synthesis of bi-metalized chitosan particle for attenuating of an azo dye from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hajivandi, Abdollah; Farjadfard, Sima; Ramavandi, Bahman; Akbarzadeh, Samad

    2016-06-01

    In this data article, we introduce data acquired from new adsorbent, bi-metalized chitosan particle that is successfully synthesized and applied to remove the orange II dye, an azo dye, from textile wastewater. The adsorbent was meso- and macro-porous material with BET surface area of 12.69 m(2)/g and pHzpc 6.6. The simulated textile-wastewater can be significantly treated using a relatively low quantity of the adsorbent. Overall, the use of bi-metalized chitosan particle can be considered a promising method for eliminating the azo dye from wastewater effectively. Accordingly, these data will be useful for decolorizing of azo dyes from textile wastewater. PMID:26955651

  8. Decolorization of azo dyes under batch anaerobic and sequential anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Işik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Batch anaerobic and sequential anaerobic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)/aerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were used to determine the color and COD removals under anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Two azo dyes namely "Reactive Black 5 (RB 5)," "Congo Red (CR)," and glucose as a carbon source were used for synthetic wastewater. The course of the decolorization process approximates to first order and zero order kinetics with respect to dye concentration for RB 5 and Congo Red azo dyes, respectively, in batch conditions. The decolorization kinetic constant (K0) values increased from 3.6 to 11.8 mg(L h)(-1) as increases in dye concentrations from 200 to 3200 mg L(-1) for CR. Increases in dye concentrations from 0 to 3200 mg L(-1) reduce the decolorization rate constant (k1) values from 0.0141 to 0.0019 h(-1) in batch studies performed with RB 5. Decolorization was achieved effectively under test conditions but ultimate decolorization of azo dyes was not observed at all dye concentrations in batch assay conditions. Dye concentrations of 100 mg L(-1) and 3000 mg L(-1) of glucose-COD containing basal medium were used for continuous studies. The effect of organic loadings and HRT, on the color removal efficiencies and methane gas productions were monitored. 94.1-45.4% COD and 79-73% color removal efficiencies were obtained at an organic system during decolorization of Reactive Black 5. 92.3-77.0% COD and 95.3-92.2% decolorization efficiencies were achieved at a organic loading rate of 1.03-6.65 kg (m3 day)(-1) and a HRT of 3.54-0.49 for Congo Red treatment. The results of this study showed that, although decolorization continued, COD removal efficiencies and methane gas production were depressed at high organic loadings under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, VFA accumulation, alkalinity consumption, and methane gas percentage were monitored at organic loading as high as 2.49-4.74 kg (m3 day)(-1) and 24.60-30.62 kg (m3 day)(-1), respectively, through the

  9. Revealing characteristics of mixed consortia for azo dye decolorization: Lotka-Volterra model and game theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Yann

    2007-10-22

    This study provides a novel explanation to put forward, in Lotka-Volterra competition model and game theory, interspecific competition in bioaugmentation using constructed mixed consortia for azo dye decolorization. As mixed cultures are regularly used in industrial dye-laden wastewater treatment, understanding species competition of mixed consortia is apparently of great importance to azo dye decolorization. In aerobic growth conditions, Escherichia coli DH5alpha owned a growth advantage to out-compete Pseudomonas luteola due to preferential growth rate of DH5alpha. However, in static decolorization conditions DH5alpha surrendered some proportion of its advantage (i.e., a decrease in its competitive power for metabolite stimulation) to enhance color removal of P. luteola for total coexistence. In aerobic growth, DH5alpha had its growth advantage to exclude P. luteola for dominance (i.e, conflict strategy) according to competitive exclusion principle. In static decolorization conditions, as the removal of a common dye threat was crucial to both species for survival, both species selected cooperation strategy through metabolite stimulation of DH5alpha to enhance effective decolorization of P. luteola for long-term sustainable management. This analysis of game theory clearly unlocked unsolved mysteries in previous studies.

  10. Assessment of by-products of chlorination and photoelectrocatalytic chlorination of an azo dye.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rafael Leite; Anderson, Marc A; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de Aragão; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2012-02-29

    The present work describes a more efficient methodology for the chlorination of water containing disperse dyes, where the chlorinated byproducts identified by mass spectra are compared. For this investigation, we tested the degradation of CI Disperse Blue 291 dye, 2-[(2-Bromo-4,6-dinitrophenyl)azo]-5-(diethylamino)-4-methoxyacetanilide) a commercial azo dye with mutagenic properties. The present work evaluates the photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of removing the CI Disperse Blue 291 dye from a wastewater of the textile industry. We employed NaCl as a supporting electrolyte. It should be noted that photoelectrocatalytic techniques are non-conventional method of generating chlorine radicals. The by-products formed in this process were analyzed using spectrophotometry, liquid chromatography, dissolved organic carbon, mass spectral analysis and mutagenicity assays. The process efficiency was compared with the conventional chlorination process adopted during sewage and effluents treatment processes. This conventional chlorination process is less efficient in removing color, total organic carbon than the photoelectrochemistry technique. Furthermore, we shall demonstrate that the mutagenicity of the generated by-products obtained using photoelectrocatalysis is completely different from that obtained by the conventional oxidation of chloride ions in the drinking water treatment process.

  11. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes.

  12. Electrode as sole electrons donor for enhancing decolorization of azo dye by an isolated Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-zhao; Wang, Ai-jie; Zhou, Ai-juan; Liu, Wen-zong; Huang, Li-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Tao, Hu-chun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2 was isolated from a biocathode which accelerating azo dye decolorization. When the electrode was polarized at -0.8 V (vs. SCE), WYZ-2 could exist on electrode, because the current of working electrode stabilized at -0.35 mA from -0.13 mA after inoculation. Moreover, cyclic voltammetry scanned an unidentified redox-active molecule which involved in the electron charge transfer potentially. On azo dye decolorization experiments by WYZ-2 modified electrode, electrochemical tests also indicated that the catalytic ability of WYZ-2 modified electrode was improved because charge transfer resistance decreased to 255 Ω from 720 Ω, azo dye reduction potential was shifted to -0.78 V from -0.89 V, and the maximum decolorization efficiency of azo dye was increased to 93.4% from 53.2%, comparing with unmodified electrode. Although numerous studies on azo dye decolorization employed biological agents, electrochemical activity bacteria accelerate the decolorization process using electrode as sole electron source has seldom been reported.

  13. Electrode as sole electrons donor for enhancing decolorization of azo dye by an isolated Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-zhao; Wang, Ai-jie; Zhou, Ai-juan; Liu, Wen-zong; Huang, Li-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Tao, Hu-chun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2 was isolated from a biocathode which accelerating azo dye decolorization. When the electrode was polarized at -0.8 V (vs. SCE), WYZ-2 could exist on electrode, because the current of working electrode stabilized at -0.35 mA from -0.13 mA after inoculation. Moreover, cyclic voltammetry scanned an unidentified redox-active molecule which involved in the electron charge transfer potentially. On azo dye decolorization experiments by WYZ-2 modified electrode, electrochemical tests also indicated that the catalytic ability of WYZ-2 modified electrode was improved because charge transfer resistance decreased to 255 Ω from 720 Ω, azo dye reduction potential was shifted to -0.78 V from -0.89 V, and the maximum decolorization efficiency of azo dye was increased to 93.4% from 53.2%, comparing with unmodified electrode. Although numerous studies on azo dye decolorization employed biological agents, electrochemical activity bacteria accelerate the decolorization process using electrode as sole electron source has seldom been reported. PMID:24314602

  14. Bioremediation of textile azo dyes by aerobic bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Abraham, T Emilia

    2004-08-01

    An aerobic bacterial consortium consisting of two isolated strains (BF1, BF2) and a strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC1194) was developed for the aerobic degradation of a mixture of textile azodyes and individual azodyes at alkaline pH (9-10.5) and salinity (0.9-3.68 g/l) at ambient temperature (28 +/- 2 degrees C). The degradation efficiency of the strains in different media (mineral media and in the Simulated textile effluent (STE)) and at different dye concentrations were studied. The presence of a H2O2 independent oxidase-laccase (26.5 IU/ml) was found in the culture filtrate of the organism BF2. The analysis of the degraded products by TLC and HPLC, after the microbial treatment of the dyes showed the absence of amines and the presence of low molecular weight oxidative degradation products. The enzymes present in the crude supernatant was found to be reusable for the dye degradation.

  15. Synthesis, structural elucidation, solvatochromism and spectroscopic properties of some azo dyes derived from 6-chloro-4-hydroxyquinoline-2(1H)-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufchahi, E. O. Moradi; Gilani, A. Ghanadzadeh; Taghvaei, V.; Karimi, R.; Ramezanzade, N.

    2016-03-01

    Malondianilide (I) derived from p-chloroaniline was cyclized to 6-chloro-4-hydroxyquinoline-2(1H)-one (II) in moderately good yield using polyphosphoric acid as catalyst. This compound was then coupled with some diazotized aromatic amines to give the corresponding azo disperse dyes 1-12. A systematic study of the effect of solvent, acid, base and pH upon the electronic absorption spectra of the dyes 1-12 was carried out. In DMSO, DMF, CH3CN, CHCl3, EtOH and acidic media (CH3COOH, acidified EtOH) these dyes that theoretically may be involved in azo-hydrazone tautomerism have been detected only as hydrazone tautomers T1 and T2. The acidic dissociation constants of the dyes were measured in 80 vol% ethanol-water solution at room temperature and ionic strength of 0.1. The results were correlated by the Hammett-type equation using the substituent constants σx.

  16. Anaerobic degradation of azo dye Drimaren blue HFRL in UASB reactor in the presence of yeast extract a source of carbon and redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Baêta, B E L; Aquino, S F; Silva, S Q; Rabelo, C A

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents results on anaerobic degradation of the azo dye blue HFRL in a bench scale Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. The results show that the addition of yeast extract (500 mg/L) increased color removal (P < 0.05) from 62 to 93% despite the low chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (~35%) which happened due to volatile fatty acids (VFA) accumulation. There were no differences in color removal (~91%) when yeast extract (500 mg/L) was used in the presence or absence of glucose, suggesting that yeast extract acted as source of redox mediator (riboflavin) and carbon. The specific rate of dye removal increased along the operational phases and depended on the presence of yeast extract, suggesting progressive biomass acclimatization. Analysis of bacterial diversity by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) method showed there was biomass selection along the bioreactor operation and no evidence of azo dye degrading bacteria predominance. This strengthens the hypothesis that color removal happens extracellularly by the reduction of azo bond by reduced redox mediators, such as riboflavin, which is present in high amount in the yeast extract.

  17. Biodegradation of azo dyes in a sequential anaerobic-aerobic system.

    PubMed

    Rajaguru, P; Kalaiselvi, K; Palanivel, M; Subburam, V

    2000-08-01

    A sequential anaerobic aerobic treatment process based on mixed culture of bacteria isolated from textile dye effluent-contaminated soil was used to degrade sulfonated azo dyes Orange G (OG), Amido black 10B (AB), Direct red 4BS (DR) and Congo red (CR). Under anaerobic conditions in a fixed-bed column using glucose as co-substrate, the azo dyes were reduced and amines were released by the bacterial biomass. The amines were completely mineralized in a subsequent aerobic treatment using the same isolates. The maximum degradation rate observed in the treatment system for OG was 60.9 mg/l per day (16.99 mg/g glucose utilized), for AB 571.3 mg/l per day (14.46 mg/g glucose utilized), for DR 112.5 mg/l per day (32.02 mg/g glucose utilized) and for CR 134.9 mg/l per day (38.9 mg/g glucose utilized).

  18. Adsorption of azo dyes from aqueous solution by the hybrid MOFs/GO.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Shi, Zhennan; Zhu, Hongyang; Hong, Wei; Xie, Fengwei; Sun, Keke

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid of chromium(III) terephthalate metal organic framework (MIL-101) and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and its performance in the removal of azo dyes (Amaranth, Sunset Yellow, and Carmine) from water was evaluated. The adsorption for azo dyes on MIL-101/GO was compared with that of MIL-101, and it was found that the addition of GO enhanced the stability of MIL-101 in water and increased the adsorption capacity. The maximum adsorption capacities of MIL-101/GO were 111.01 mg g(-1) for Amaranth, 81.28 mg g(-1) for Sunset Yellow, and 77.61 mg g(-1) for Carmine. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics were investigated, showing that the adsorption fits the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The recyclability of MIL-101/GO was shown by the regeneration by acetone. The high adsorption capability and excellent reusability make MIL-101/GO a competent adsorbent for the removal dyes from aqueous solution.

  19. Fusarium oxysporum degradation and detoxification of a new textile-glycoconjugate azo dye (GAD).

    PubMed

    Porri, Aimone; Baroncelli, Riccardo; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Guazzelli, Lorenzo; Forti, Maurizio; Catelani, Giorgio; Valentini, Giorgio; Bazzichi, Agostino; Franceschi, Massimiliano; Vannacci, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Degradation and detoxification of textile dyes are of interest due to the huge environmental impact of such chemicals. An isolate of Fusarium oxysporum was used to degrade and to detoxify a new chemical class of textile dyes called Glycoconjugate Azo Dye (GAD). After 6 d of growth in a liquid batch culture, the fungus degraded the dye and the culture medium at the end of incubation period showed a ˜100% detoxification compared to the initial dye solution. Increasing the initial fungal inoculum, the dye was totally decolourized after 24 h of incubation. The degradation ability was found to be common among various isolates of F. oxysporum suggesting this as a specific trait of this species. Degrading rate was enhanced in concomitancy to the glucose depletion and the beginning of the stationary phase of growth, suggesting that the shift from the primary to the secondary metabolism may be the trigger of the degradation pathway. The Daphnia magna acute toxicity test demonstrated a strong detoxification of GAD-4 by F. oxysporum, resulting in non-toxic metabolite production. Fusarium oxysporum could, therefore, be taken into consideration to develop new remediation strategies of textile effluents.

  20. Kinetic study of electro-Fenton oxidation of azo dyes on boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares; Baranova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    The present work compares electrochemical degradation of red and blue azo textile dyes in single- and two-compartment electrochemical cells in the presence of Fenton reagent (Fe2+) and using a boron-doped diamond anode. Degradation of both dyes was related to the concentration of dye, applied current density and the concentration of FeSO4 catalyst. Complete colour removal and approximately 91% of organic matter oxidation was achieved in a two-compartment electrochemical cell at an applied current density of 20 mA x cm(-2), pH of 3 and Fe(2+) ion concentration of 0.02 mM. Higher current density and reaction time were required to achieve the same removals in a one-compartment electrochemical cell. Dye degradation kinetics as well as chemical oxygen demand removal rate were successfully modelled to pseudo first-order kinetics. The apparent first-order rate constants (k(o)) for degradation of red dye with an initial concentration of 20, 40 and 60 ppm were found to be 2.67 +/- 0.16, 2.19 +/- 0.09 and 1.5 +/- 0.03 min(-1), and for blue dye at the same initial concentrations were 1.99 +/- 0.2, 0.95 +/- 0.02 and 0.71 +/- 0.030 min(-1), respectively. PMID:24191481

  1. Kinetic study of electro-Fenton oxidation of azo dyes on boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares; Baranova, Elena A

    2013-01-01

    The present work compares electrochemical degradation of red and blue azo textile dyes in single- and two-compartment electrochemical cells in the presence of Fenton reagent (Fe2+) and using a boron-doped diamond anode. Degradation of both dyes was related to the concentration of dye, applied current density and the concentration of FeSO4 catalyst. Complete colour removal and approximately 91% of organic matter oxidation was achieved in a two-compartment electrochemical cell at an applied current density of 20 mA x cm(-2), pH of 3 and Fe(2+) ion concentration of 0.02 mM. Higher current density and reaction time were required to achieve the same removals in a one-compartment electrochemical cell. Dye degradation kinetics as well as chemical oxygen demand removal rate were successfully modelled to pseudo first-order kinetics. The apparent first-order rate constants (k(o)) for degradation of red dye with an initial concentration of 20, 40 and 60 ppm were found to be 2.67 +/- 0.16, 2.19 +/- 0.09 and 1.5 +/- 0.03 min(-1), and for blue dye at the same initial concentrations were 1.99 +/- 0.2, 0.95 +/- 0.02 and 0.71 +/- 0.030 min(-1), respectively.

  2. Process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems: effect of several key factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hou-Yun; He, Chuan-Shu; Li, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Shen, Jin-You; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the influence of several key factors on the process and kinetics of azo dye decolourization in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), including cathode potential, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of catholyte and biofilm formed on the cathode. The results show that azo dye methyl orange (MO) decolourization in the BES could be well described with the pseudo first-order kinetics. The MO decolourization efficiency increased from 0 to 94.90 ± 0.01% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant increased from 0 to 0.503 ± 0.001 h−1 with the decrease in cathodic electrode potential from −0.2 to −0.8 V vs Ag/AgCl. On the contrary, DO concentration of the catholyte had a negative impact on MO decolourization in the BES. When DO concentration increased from zero to 5.80 mg L−1, the MO decolourization efficiency decreased from 87.19 ± 4.73% to 27.77 ± 0.06% and correspondingly the reaction rate constant reduced from 0.207 ± 0.042 to 0.033 ± 0.007 h−1. Additionally, the results suggest that the biofilm formed on the cathode could led to an adverse rather than a positive effect on azo dye decolourization in the BES in terms of efficiency and kinetics. PMID:27270398

  3. Wall teichoic acid protects Staphylococcus aureus from inhibition by Congo red and other dyes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Campbell, Jennifer; Kim, Younghoon; Swoboda, Jonathan G.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Walker, Suzanne; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Polyanionic polymers, including lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid, are important determinants of the charged character of the staphylococcal cell wall. This study was designed to investigate the extent to which teichoic acid contributes to protection from anionic azo dyes and to identify barriers to drug penetration for development of new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methods We studied antimicrobial activity of azo dyes against S. aureus strains with or without inhibition of teichoic acid in vitro and in vivo. Results We observed that inhibition of wall teichoic acid expression resulted in an ∼1000-fold increase in susceptibility to azo dyes such as Congo red, reducing its MIC from >1024 to <4 mg/L. Sensitization occurred when the first step in the wall teichoic acid pathway, catalysed by TarO, was inhibited either by mutation or by chemical inhibition. In contrast, genetic blockade of lipoteichoic acid biosynthesis did not confer Congo red susceptibility. Based on this finding, combination therapy was tested using the highly synergistic combination of Congo red plus tunicamycin at sub-MIC concentrations (to inhibit wall teichoic acid biosynthesis). The combination rescued Caenorhabditis elegans from a lethal challenge of S. aureus. Conclusions Our studies show that wall teichoic acid confers protection to S. aureus from anionic azo dyes and related compounds, and its inhibition raises the prospect of development of new combination therapies based on this inhibition. PMID:22615298

  4. Efficient treatment of azo dye containing wastewater in a hybrid acidogenic bioreactor stimulated by biocatalyzed electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Cheng; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Shu-Sen; Cui, Dan; Han, Jing-Long; Hu, Ya-Ping; Su, Shi-Gang; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel scaled-up hybrid acidogenic bioreactor (HAB) was designed and adopted to evaluate the performance of azo dye (acid red G, ARG) containing wastewater treatment. Principally, HAB is an acidogenic bioreactor coupled with a biocatalyzed electrolysis module. The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and ARG loading rate on the performance of HAB were investigated. In addition, the influent was switched from synthetic wastewater to domestic wastewater to examine the key parameters for the application of HAB. The results showed that the introduction of the biocatalyzed electrolysis module could enhance anoxic decolorization and COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal. The combined process of HAB-CASS presented superior performance compared to a control system without biocatalyzed electrolysis (AB-CASS). When the influent was switched to domestic wastewater, with an environment having more balanced nutrients and diverse organic matters, the ARG, COD and nitrogen removal efficiencies of HAB-CASS were further improved, reaching 73.3%±2.5%, 86.2%±3.8% and 93.5%±1.6% at HRT of 6 hr, respectively, which were much higher than those of AB-CASS (61.1%±4.7%, 75.4%±5.0% and 82.1%±2.1%, respectively). Moreover, larger TCV/TV (total cathode volume/total volume) for HAB led to higher current and ARG removal. The ARG removal efficiency and current at TCV/TV of 0.15 were 39.2%±3.7% and 28.30±1.48 mA, respectively. They were significantly increased to 62.1%±2.0% and 34.55±0.83 mA at TCV/TV of 0.25. These results show that HAB system could be used to effectively treat real wastewater. PMID:26899658

  5. A biosorption isotherm model for the removal of reactive azo dyes by inactivated mycelia of Cunninghamella elegans UCP542.

    PubMed

    Ambrósio, Sandra T; Vilar, José C; Silva, Carlos A Alves da; Okada, Kaoru; Nascimento, Aline E; Longo, Ricardo L; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2012-01-04

    The biosorption of three reactive azo dyes (red, black and orange II) found in textile effluents by inactive mycelium of Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated. It was found that after 120 hours of contact the adsorption led to 70%, 85%, 93% and 88% removal of reactive orange II, reactive black, reactive red and a mixture of them, respectively. The mycelium surface was found to be selective towards the azo dyes in the following order: reactive red > reactive black > orange II. Dye removal from a mixture solution resulted in 48.4 mg/g retention by mycelium and indicated a competition amongst the dyes for the cellular surface. A Freundlich adsorption isotherm model exhibited a better fit, thus suggesting the presence of heterogeneous binding sites. Electrondense deposits observed on the mycelium ultrastructure suggest that the dyes are mainly retained under the cellular surface of the inactive biomass of C. elegans.

  6. Differential Expression of Antioxidant Enzymes During Degradation of Azo Dye Reactive black 8 in Hairy roots of Physalis minima L.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Modi, Nikita; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, Neetin

    2015-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the protection of plant metabolism in presence of azo dye was characterized by studying activities of the role of antioxidant enzymes in the hairy roots (HRs) of Physalis minima L. during degradation of an azo dye, Reactive Black 8 (RB8). When the HRs were exposed to RB8 (30 mg L(-1)), a  nine fold increase in SOD activity was observed after 24 h, while 22 and 50 fold increase in activity was observed for POX and APX respectively after 72 h, whereas there was no significant change in activity of CAT. The activation of different antioxidant enzymes at different time intervals under dye stress suggests the synchronized functioning of antioxidant machinery to protect the HRs from oxidative damage. FTIR analysis confirmed the degradation of dye and the non-toxic nature of metabolites formed after dye degradation was confirmed by phytotoxicity study.

  7. Comparison of three combined sequencing batch reactor followed by enhanced Fenton process for an azo dye degradation: Bio-decolorization kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Azizi, A; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Maknoon, R; Kowsari, E

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this research was to compare three combined sequencing batch reactor (SBR) - Fenton processes as post-treatment for the treatment of azo dye Acid Red 18 (AR18). Three combined treatment systems (CTS1, CTS2 and CTS3) were operated to investigate the biomass concentration, COD removal, AR18 dye decolorization and kinetics study. The MLSS concentration of CTS2 reached 7200 mg/L due to the use of external feeding in the SBR reactor of CTS2. The COD concentration remained 273 mg/L and 95 mg/L (initial COD=3270 mg/L) at the end of alternating anaerobic-aerobic SBR with external feeding (An-A MSBR) and CTS2, respectively, resulting in almost 65% of Fenton process efficiency. The dye concentration of 500 mg/L was finally reduced to less than 10mg/L in all systems indicating almost complete AR18 decolorization, which was also confirmed by UV-vis analysis. The dye was removed following two successive parts as parts 1 and 2 with pseudo zero-order and pseudo first-order kinetics, respectively, in all CTSs. Higher intermediate metabolites degradation was obtained using HPLC analysis in CTS2. Accordingly, a combined treatment system can be proposed as an appropriate and environmentally-friendly system for the treatment of the azo dye AR18 in wastewater.

  8. FRET efficiency in surface complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with azo-dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annas, Kirill I.; Gromova, Yuliya A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced dissociation of surface complexes of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with azo-dye 1-(2- pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was investigated. It was shown that the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes in the complexes photodissociation rate, which depends on resonance condition between electronic levels of donor (quantum dots) and acceptor (azo-dye) and donor photoluminescent quantum yield. It has allowed to estimate energy transfer efficiency in the complexes and disclosed a new nonradiative channel that has minor contribution in the deactivation of excited states of quantum dots in the complexes.

  9. Decolourization of azo dyes by a newly isolated Klebsiella sp. strain Y3, and effects of various factors on biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Daizong; Li, Guofang; Zhao, Min; Han, Song

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized a new strain of Klebsiella sp. Y3, which was capable of decolourizing azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The effects of physico-chemical parameters on the Methyl Red degradation by the strain were determined. The results indicated that strain Y3 exhibited a good decolourization ability in the range of pH from 4 to 9, temperature from 30 °C to 42 °C and salinity from 1% to 4%. A broad spectrum of azo dyes with different structures could be decolourized by the strain. The isolate decolourized Methyl Red, Congo Red, Orange I and Methyl Orange by almost 100% (100 mg/L) in 48 h. The culture exhibited an ability to decolourize repeated additions of dye, showing that the strain could be used for multiple cycles of biodegradation. Azo dyes at high concentrations could be tolerated and degraded by Y3. An almost complete mineralization of Methyl Red and Congo Red at the concentration of 800 mg/L was observed within 48 h. The high degradation potential of this bacterium supports its use in the treatment of industrial wastewater containing azo dyes. PMID:26019533

  10. Heterogeneous fenton degradation of azo dyes catalyzed by modified polyacrylonitrile fiber fe complexes: QSPR (quantitative structure peorperty relationship) study.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Dong, Yongchun; Ding, Zhizhong

    2013-07-01

    The amidoximated polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber Fe complexes were prepared and used as the heterogeneous Fenton catalysts for the degradation of 28 anionic water soluble azo dyes in water under visible irradiation. The multiple linear regression (MLR) method was employed to develop the quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model equations for the decoloration and mineralization of azo dyes. Moreover, the predictive ability of the QSPR model equations was assessed using Leave-one-out (LOO) and cross-validation (CV) methods. Additionally, the effect of Fe content of catalyst and the sodium chloride in water on QSPR model equations were also investigated. The results indicated that the heterogeneous photo-Fenton degradation of the azo dyes with different structures was conducted in the presence of the amidoximated PAN fiber Fe complex. The QSPR model equations for the dye decoloration and mineralization were successfully developed using MLR technique. MW/S (molecular weight divided by the number of sulphonate groups) and NN=N (the number of azo linkage) are considered as the most important determining factor for the dye degradation and mineralization, and there is a significant negative correlation between MW/S or NN=N and degradation percentage or total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Moreover, LOO and CV analysis suggested that the obtained QSPR model equations have the better prediction ability. The variation in Fe content of catalyst and the addition of sodium chloride did not alter the nature of the QSPR model equations. PMID:24218861

  11. Removal of anionic azo dyes from aqueous solution by functional ionic liquid cross-linked polymer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hejun; Kan, Taotao; Zhao, Siyuan; Qian, Yixia; Cheng, Xiyuan; Wu, Wenli; Wang, Xiaodong; Zheng, Liqiang

    2013-10-15

    A novel functional ionic liquid based cross-linked polymer (PDVB-IL) was synthesized from 1-aminoethyl-3-vinylimidazolium chloride and divinylbenzene for use as an adsorbent. The physicochemical properties of PDVB-IL were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorptive capacity was investigated using anionic azo dyes of orange II, sunset yellow FCF, and amaranth as adsorbates. The maximum adsorption capacity could reach 925.09, 734.62, and 547.17 mg/g for orange II, sunset yellow FCF and amaranth at 25°C, respectively, which are much better than most of the other adsorbents reported earlier. The effect of pH value was investigated in the range of 1-8. The result shows that a low pH value is found to favor the adsorption of those anionic azo dyes. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms are well fitted by a pseudo second-order model and Langmuir model, respectively. The adsorption process is found to be dominated by physisorption. The introduction of functional ionic liquid moieties into cross-linked poly(divinylbenzene) polymer constitutes a new and efficient kind of adsorbent.

  12. Direct laser interference patterning of polystyrene films doped with azo dyes, using 355 nm laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, M. F.; Suarez, S.; Soldera, F.; Mücklich, F.; Barbero, C. A.; Bellingeri, R.; Alustiza, F.; Acevedo, D.

    2014-05-01

    The generation of line-like periodic patterns by direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) of polystyrene films (PS) at a wavelength of 355 nm has been investigated. No structuration is achieved in plain PS due to the weak absorption of the polymer at 355 nm. On the other hand, patterning is achieved on films doped (PSd) with an azo dye (2-anisidine → 2-anisidine) which is incorporated in the polymer solution used for film preparation. Periodic micro-structures are generated. DLIP on PSd results in the swelling of the surface at low fluences, while at high laser intensities it causes the ablation of the regions at the interference maxima positions. The results contrast with the usual process of DLIP on PS (at shorter wavelengths, like 266 nm) where only ablation is detected. The results suggest that decomposition of the azo dye is the driving force of the patterning which therefore differ from the patterning obtained when plain PS is irradiated with laser light able to be absorbed by the aromatic ring in PS (e.g. 266 nm). The biocompatibility of these materials and adhesion of cells was tested, the data from in vitro assays shows that fibroblast cells are attached and proliferate extensively on the PSd films.

  13. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract

    PubMed Central

    Silva, S.Q.; Silva, D.C.; Lanna, M.C.S.; Baeta, B.E.L.; Aquino, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal. PMID:25763018

  14. Effect of an azo dye on the performance of an aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactor treating a simulated textile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Franca, Rita D G; Vieira, Anabela; Mata, Ana M T; Carvalho, Gilda S; Pinheiro, Helena M; Lourenço, Nídia D

    2015-11-15

    This study analyzed the effect of an azo dye (Acid Red 14) on the performance of an aerobic granular sludge (AGS) sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system operated with 6-h anaerobic-aerobic cycles for the treatment of a synthetic textile wastewater. In this sense, two SBRs inoculated with AGS from a domestic wastewater treatment plant were run in parallel, being one supplied with the dye and the other used as a dye-free control. The AGS successfully adapted to the new hydrodynamic conditions forming smaller, denser granules in both reactors, with optimal sludge volume index values of 19 and 17 mL g(-1) after 5-min and 30-min settling, respectively. As a result, high biomass concentration levels and sludge age values were registered, up to 13 gTSS L(-1) and 40 days, respectively, when deliberate biomass wastage was limited to the sampling needs. Stable dye removal yields above 90% were attained during the anaerobic reaction phase, confirmed by the formation of one of the aromatic amines arising from azo bond reduction. The control of the sludge retention time (SRT) to 15 days triggered a 30% reduction in the biodecolorization yield. However, the increase of the SRT values back to levels above 25 days reverted this effect and also promoted the complete bioconversion of the identified aromatic amine during the aerobic reaction phase. The dye and its breakdown products did not negatively affect the treatment performance, as organic load removal yields higher than 80% were attained in both reactors, up to 77% occurring in the anaerobic phase. These high anaerobic organic removal levels were correlated to an increase of Defluviicoccus-related glycogen accumulating organisms in the biomass. Also, the capacity of the system to deal with shocks of high dye concentration and organic load was successfully demonstrated. Granule breakup after long-term operation only occurred in the dye-free control SBR, suggesting that the azo dye plays an important role in improving granule

  15. Decolourization of azo, heterocyclic and reactive dyes using spent mycelium substrate of Hypsizygus ulmarius.

    PubMed

    Ranjini, R; Padmavathi, T

    2015-09-01

    Cultivation of Hypsizygus ulmarius to generate spent mycelium substrate (SMS) for dye decolourization gave better yield, biological efficiency, fruitwidth and moisture content (145 gm, 33%, 4 cm, 91%) on paddy straw as compared to coconut husk (59 gm, 21%, 3 cm, 90%). Solid-phase decolourization of Congo red (Azo dye) and Methylene blue (Heterocyclic dye) showed that maximum decolourization (3.31), measured as Decolourization Index, occurred at dye concentration of 25 mg l(-1), while in Solochrome black (Reactive dye), it was at 100 mg l(-1) (1.7). Time taken for maximum decolourization was 10 days in Congo red and Solochrome black; 20 days in Methylene blue. Decolourization Index was maximum in Methylene blue (3.1), followed by Congo red (1.9) and Solochrome black (1.2). Liquid-phase decolourization of Methylene blue and Solochrome black showed that maximum decolourization (62.5%) measured as percent decolourization occurred at 25 mg l(-1), while it was at 50 mg l(-1) (36%) for Congo red. Time taken for maximum decolourization for all three dyes was 10 days. During this period, the percent decolourization was maximum in Methylene blue (91.3%), followed by Solochrome black (82.2%) and Congo red (79.7%). Decolourization potential in solid-phase was observed till 100 mg l(-1) and day 25 for all the three dyes, however, in liquid-phase it was observed till 50 mg I(-1) and day 20 for Congo red, 75 mg l(-1) and day 10 for Solochrome black, 100 mg I(-1) and day 20 for Methylene blue. Maximum laccase was produced on day 25 during decolourization of 25 mg I(-1) Congo red, while maximum Manganese peroxidase was noted on day 20 at 50 mg l(-1) Congo red.

  16. Metabolic activation of aromatic amines and azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, H

    1981-01-01

    Aromatic amines, amides and nitro compounds are a class of chemicals that produce tumors in a wide variety of tissues in experimental animals, including liver, urinary bladder, forestomach, small intestine, Zymbal's gland, subcutaneous tissue or skin. In man, exposure to some aromatic amines is associated with tumours of the urinary bladder and carcinoma of the renal pelvis. Their biological activity as carcinogens or genotoxic agents is, in all the cases that have been studied in detail, dependent on metabolic activation in vivo, occurring by multiple pathways. Differences in these metabolic pathways may largely account for the differences in tissues and species susceptibilities to cancer induction. Carcinogenicity of aromatic amines or amides is dependent on their oxidation to N-hydroxy derivatives, whilst the carcinogenicity of aromatic nitro compounds is linked to their reduction to hydroxylamines. Further conversion of the N-hydroxylamine or N-hydroxyamide to reactive intermediates can occur in several ways, which include (i) esterification of the N-hydroxy group, (ii) non-enzymic protonation of the nitrogen of the hydroxylamine and (iii) oxidation to a free radical of arylhydroxamic acids. Following generation of such reactive electrophilic intermediates in tissues or cells, macromolecular binding has been observed to nucleic acids and proteins. In many cases, arylamidated and arylaminated products are formed with nucleic acid bases; in the case of the well-studied 2-acetylaminofluorene, nucleophilic atoms of guanine are the predominant site of reaction. Relatively little is known of the structure and biological consequences of DNA adducts formed from other aromatic amines, amides or nitro compounds; more research in these directions is warranted.

  17. Synthesis of MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles for azo dye degradation by catalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Manivel, Arumugam; Lee, Gang-Juan; Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Jing-Heng; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Horng, Tzzy-Leng; Wu, Jerry J.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of one-dimensional MoO{sub 3} nanostructures using hydrothermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. • Sonochemical synthesized MoO{sub 3} presents the best efficiency for the dye removal by catalytic ozonation. • Efficient environmental remediation process. - Abstract: One-dimensional molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were prepared in three different approaches, including thermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. The physicochemical properties of the obtained MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated by diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Among the methods as investigated, sonochemical synthesis gave well-dispersed fine MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles compared with the other approaches. All the synthesized MoO{sub 3} nanostructures were examined for the catalytic ozonation to degrade azo dye in aqueous environment. Different performances were obtained for the catalyst prepared in different methods and the catalytic efficiencies were found to be the order of sonochemical, microwave, and then thermal methods. The sonochemical MoO{sub 3} catalyst allowed the total dye removal within 20 min and its good performance was justified according to their higher surface area with higher number of active sites that provide effective dye interaction for better degradation.

  18. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction.

  19. Bladder cancer in crack testers applying azo dye-based sprays to metal bodies.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Kopps, Silke; Prager, Hans-Martin; Mende, Stephan v; Thiel, Ralf; Jungmann, Olaf; Zumbe, Jürgen; Bolt, Hermann M; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Selinski, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer may be produced by azo dyes due to the presence of carcinogenic aromatic amines. Nine cases of suspected occupational bladder cancer that were exposed to different crack test sprays in metal-related jobs were examined. A detailed occupational history was taken and, if possible, the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) status was determined. The first exposure to crack test sprays ranged from 1957 to 1986. Age at first exposure was between 14 and 33 yr. Age at first diagnosis of bladder cancer varied from 35 to 64 yr. Latency periods were between 17 and 45 yr. The maximal reported exposure period was 29 yr. Four of six genotyped cases were slow NAT2 acetylators. The handling of the crack test spray included spraying the red dye-containing matter on the metal body and washing off the spray with a rag. Thus, workers were exposed by dermal contact as well as by inhalation. The crack test spray, which makes the cracks visible after washing off the red testing spray compounds and applying an additional white spray, contained dyes such as solvent red 19 (Sudan red 7B, N-ethyl-1[[4-(phenylazo)phenyl]azo]-2-naphthylamine) or a mixture of p-phenylazoaniline-N-ethyl-2-naphthylamine and p-phenylazoaniline-N-ethyl-1-naphthylamine. The aromatic amine 2-naphthylamine is classified as human carcinogen by IARC and the national authorities and has been banned in many countries since the mid 1950s. Bladder cancer patients with metal-related jobs need to be explicitly asked about the use of crack test sprays.

  20. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Danish; Abdulateif, Huda; Ismail, Iqbal M.; Sabir, Suhail; Khan, Mohammad Zain

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC) which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB) dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE) and power density (PD) attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD) values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5–8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6–18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity) recovery. PMID:26496083

  1. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Danish; Abdulateif, Huda; Ismail, Iqbal M; Sabir, Suhail; Khan, Mohammad Zain

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC) which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB) dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE) and power density (PD) attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD) values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5-8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6-18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity) recovery.

  2. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Danish; Abdulateif, Huda; Ismail, Iqbal M; Sabir, Suhail; Khan, Mohammad Zain

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC) which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB) dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE) and power density (PD) attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD) values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5-8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6-18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity) recovery. PMID:26496083

  3. Biodecolorization of a food azo dye by the deep sea Dermacoccus abyssi MT1.1(T) strain from the Mariana Trench.

    PubMed

    Lang, Weeranuch; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Martins, Lígia O; Ngiwsara, Lukana; Sakairi, Nobuo; Pathom-aree, Wasu; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Kimura, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the characterization of the ability of Dermacoccus spp. isolated from the deepest point of the world's oceans for azo dye decolorization. A detailed investigation of Dermacoccus abyssi MT1.1(T) with respect to the azoreductase activity and enzymatic mechanism as well as the potential role of the bacterial strain for biocleaning of industrial dye baths is reported. Resting cells with oxygen-insensitive azoreductase resulted in the rapid decolorization of the polysulfonated dye Brilliant Black BN (BBN) which is a common food colorant. The highest specific decolorization rate (vs) was found at 50 °C with a moderately thermal tolerance for over 1 h. Kinetic analysis showed the high rates and strong affinity of the enzymatic system for the dye with a Vmax = 137 mg/g cell/h and a Km = 19 mg/L. The degradation of BBN produces an initial orange intermediate, 8-amino-5-((4-sulfonatophenyl)diazenyl)naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid, identified by mass spectrometry which is later converted to 4-aminobenzene sulfonic acid. Nearly 80% of the maximum vs is possible achieved in resting cell treatment with the salinity increased up to 5.0% NaCl in reaction media. Therefore, this bacterial system has potential for dye decolorization bioprocesses occurring at high temperature and salt concentrations e.g. for cleaning dye-containing saline wastewaters.

  4. Enhancement of the optical response in a biodegradable polymer/azo-dye film by the addition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Ribba, Laura; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2014-04-01

    A new biodegradable photoresponsive material was developed using poly(lactic acid) (PLA) as the matrix material and Disperse Orange 3 (DO3) as photoisomerizable azo-dye. It was observed that the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) leads to a new phenomenon consisting of an enhancement of the optical anisotropy in a wide range of temperatures. In particular, the optical anisotropy increases 100% at room temperature. Moreover, the material containing MWCNTs shows a faster optical response that is evidenced as an increase in the growth rate of optical anisotropy. Spectroscopic data is provided to study the interaction among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA. The enhancement of optical anisotropy obtained with the addition of MWCNTs was related to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of each material. Maximum optical anisotropy was obtained 15 °C below the Tg for both materials. Results are interpreted in terms of the interactions among DO3, MWCNTs and PLA and the packing density of the dye into the polymer chains. In memory of Professor Iñaki Mondragon.

  5. Mutagenicity of selected sulfonated azo dyes in the Salmonella/microsome assay: use of aerobic and anaerobic activation procedures.

    PubMed

    Brown, J P; Dietrich, P S

    1983-03-01

    A selection of 16 sulfonated azo dyes of both the monoazo type and diazo dyes based on benzidine, o-tolidine and o-dianisidine were assayed for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 employing both aerobic and anaerobic preincubation procedures. 3 food dyes, FD & C Red No. 40 and Yellows No. 5 and No. 6 were non-mutagenic in all tests. 5 dyes were mutagenic with aerobic treatment (trypan blue, Pontacyl Sky Blue 4BX, Congo Red, Eriochrome Blue Black B, dimethylaminoazobenzene) and 6 were mutagenic aerobically with riboflavin and cofactors (Deltapurpurin, trypan blue, Pontacyl Sky Blue 4BX, Congo Red, methyl orange, Ponceau 3R). Anaerobic preincubation involving enzymatic reduction of the dyes led to a different pattern of mutagenicity, with trypan blue giving much enhanced mutagenicity; Eriochrome Blue Black B, Pontacyl Sky Blue 4BX, Deltapurpurin and Congo Red exhibiting similar activity to aerobic preincubation; and methyl orange and Ponceau 3R yielding no mutagenicity. The results are interpreted with respect to an hypothesis involving partial reduction of the azo bond under differing degrees of aerobiosis via azo-anion radicals and hydrazo intermediates.

  6. High-throughput determination of Sudan Azo-dyes within powdered chili pepper by paper spray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Domenico; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Policicchio, Barbara; Sindona, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    A high-throughput mass spectrometric method is presented for the simultaneous detection of Sudan I, II, III, IV and Para-Red azo-dyes in foodstuff. The method is based on the use of paper spray mass spectrometry (MS) and deuterium-labeled internal standards on a triple-quadrupole instrument. A detailed assay of each azo-dye was performed by the isotope dilution method, through the precursor ion scan approach, using deuterium-labeled internal standards. The gas-phase breakdown pattern of each labeled and unlabeled analogue displays the naphthoic moiety as a common fragment. Sudan dyes can be determined above the threshold of 1 ppm. Paper spray allows for a wide range of analytes and samples to be investigated by MS in the open air and without sample preparation and bypassing chromatography. PMID:23674278

  7. Azo-dyes photocatalytic degradation in aqueous suspension of TiO2 under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Augugliaro, Vincenzo; Baiocchi, Claudio; Prevot, Alessandra Bianco; García-López, Elisa; Loddo, Vittorio; Malato, Sixto; Marcí, Giuseppe; Palmisano, Leonardo; Pazzi, Marco; Pramauro, Edmondo

    2002-12-01

    The photodegradation of two common and very stable azo-dyes, i.e. methyl-orange (C14H14N3SO3Na) and orange II (C16H11N2SO4Na), is reported. The photocatalytic oxidation was carried out in aqueous suspensions of polycrystalline TiO2 irradiated by sunlight. Compound parabolic collectors, installed at the "Plataforma Solar de Almería" (PSA, Spain) were used as the photoreactors and two identical reacting systems allowed to perform photoreactivity runs for the two dyes at the same time and under the same irradiation conditions. The disappearance of colour and substrates together with the abatement of total organic carbon content was monitored. The main sulfonate-containing intermediates were found to be in lower number in respect to those obtained under artificial irradiation. In particular there were no more evidence of the presence of hydroxylated transients. The dependence of dye photooxidation rate on: (i) substrate concentration; (ii) catalyst amount; and (iii) initial pH was investigated. The influence of the presence of strong oxidant species (H2O2, S2O8(2-)) and some ions (Cl-, SO4(2-)) on the process was also studied.

  8. Random UV mutagenesis approach for enhanced biodegradation of sulfonated azo dye, Green HE4B.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Swati M; Inamdar, Shrirang A; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the study was to execute mutant bacteria for efficient biodegradation of sulfonated azo dye, Green HE4B (GHE4B). UV irradiation was used to introduce random mutations in Pseudomonas sp. LBC1. Genetic alterations induced by UV irradiation in selected mutant bacteria were confirmed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA technique. The mutant bacteria named as Pseudomonas sp. 1 F reduced the time required for complete degradation of recalcitrant dye GHE4B by 25 % when compared with the wild one. The biodegradation was monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometric analysis. Activities of enzymes like laccase, lignin peroxidase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, and NADH dichlorophenol indophenol reductase were found to be boosted in mutant bacteria as a consequence of UV-induced mutation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis of differentially expressed proteins of mutant bacteria suggested active role of antioxidant enzymes in the degradation of the dye. The degradation product was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-performance thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results revealed few variations in the degradation end products of wild-type and mutant bacteria. Phytotoxicity study underlined the safer biodegradation of GHE4B by mutant Pseudomonas sp. 1 F.

  9. Biodegradation mechanisms and kinetics of azo dye 4BS by a microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Yuezhong

    2004-10-01

    A microbial consortium consisting of a white-rot fungus 8-4* and a Pseudomonas 1-10 was isolated from wastewater treatment facilities of a local dyeing house by enrichment, using azo dye Direct Fast Scarlet 4BS as the sole source of carbon and energy, which had a high capacity for rapid decolorization of 4BS. To elucidate the decolorization mechanisms, decolorization of 4BS was compared between individual strains and the microbial consortium under different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement on dye decolorization rates under either static or shaking culture, which might be attributed to the synergetic reaction of single strains. From the curve of COD values and the UV-visible spectra of 4BS solutions before and after decolorization cultivation with the microbial consortium, it was found that 4BS could be mineralized completely, and the results had been used for presuming the degrading pathway of 4BS. This study also examined the kinetics of 4BS decolorization by immobilized microbial consortium. The results demonstrated that the optimal decolorization activity was observed in pH range between four and 9, temperature range between 20 and 40 degrees C and the maximal specific decolorization rate occurred at 1,000 mg l(-1) of 4BS. The proliferation and distribution of microbial consortium were also microscopically observed, which further confirmed the decolorization mechanisms of 4BS.

  10. Electro-oxidation of two reactive azo dyes on boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares; Baranova, Elena A

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation (decolorization/degradation) of blue and red commercial reactive azo dyes was carried out on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. The effect of various quantities of FeSO(4) was investigated in the electro-Fenton reaction on BDD. Progress of dyes degradation during the electrolysis and electro-Fenton reaction was monitored by UV-visible absorption and by estimation of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Direct electrolysis showed a limiting capacity for red and blue dye removal even at high current densities, e.g. maximum red color and COD removal were 70 and 20%, respectively at 30 mA cm(-2) after 300 min. Higher red and blue color removal efficiencies were achieved by electro-Fenton oxidation. Current density of 30 mA cm(-2) in the presence of 0.05 mmol/L of FeSO(4) resulted in the red color and COD removal of 98 and 96%, respectively. The optimum FeSO(4) concentration for the electro-Fenton reaction was determined to be 0.05 mmol/L. Instantaneous current efficiency (ICE) in the presence of FeSO(4) was almost three times higher than for experiments carried out without FeSO(4). PMID:22744674

  11. Electro-oxidation of two reactive azo dyes on boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Almomani, Fares; Baranova, Elena A

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical oxidation (decolorization/degradation) of blue and red commercial reactive azo dyes was carried out on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. The effect of various quantities of FeSO(4) was investigated in the electro-Fenton reaction on BDD. Progress of dyes degradation during the electrolysis and electro-Fenton reaction was monitored by UV-visible absorption and by estimation of the chemical oxygen demand (COD). Direct electrolysis showed a limiting capacity for red and blue dye removal even at high current densities, e.g. maximum red color and COD removal were 70 and 20%, respectively at 30 mA cm(-2) after 300 min. Higher red and blue color removal efficiencies were achieved by electro-Fenton oxidation. Current density of 30 mA cm(-2) in the presence of 0.05 mmol/L of FeSO(4) resulted in the red color and COD removal of 98 and 96%, respectively. The optimum FeSO(4) concentration for the electro-Fenton reaction was determined to be 0.05 mmol/L. Instantaneous current efficiency (ICE) in the presence of FeSO(4) was almost three times higher than for experiments carried out without FeSO(4).

  12. Testing of some azo dyes and their reduction products for mutagenicity using Salmonella typhimurium TA 1538.

    PubMed

    Garner, R C; Nutman, C A

    1977-07-01

    A series of ten azo dyes as well as various single ring aromatic amines substituted on the benzene ring were tested for bacterial mutagenicity with Salmonella typhimurium TA 1538 using a soft-agar overlay method. Two dyes, sudan 2 and chrysoidin induced mutation but only in the presence of a rat liver preparation. Chrysoidin was the more active. Testing of its reduction products, aniline and 1,2,4-triaminobenzene showed a liver metabolite of the latter compound could be responsible for the mutagenic effect, having a comparable mutagenicity with 1,2-diamino-4-nitro-benzene, one of the mutagenic constituents of hair dyes. Structure-activity studies on a series of ring-substituted anilines indicated that mutagenic activity required at least two positions to be substituted with either amino or nitro groups, or one of each. The bacteria as well as the liver enzyme preparation may partake in the activation of these chemicals. The correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity for this group of compounds is discussed.

  13. Potentials of high-temperature anaerobic treatment and redox mediators for the reductive decolorization of azo dyes from textile wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, A B; Cervantes, F J; van Lier, J B

    2006-01-01

    The discharge of dye-colored wastewaters in surface water represents a serious environmental problem because it may decrease the water transparency, therefore having an effect on photosynthesis, and a public health concern because dyes and their reducing products are carcinogenic. In recent years, big achievements have been made in the use of anaerobic granular sludge not only on colored wastewaters but also on the detoxification of other xenobiotics compounds. This paper compiles some important findings related to the potentials of high-temperature anaerobic treatment and redox mediators on the reductive decolorization of azo dyes from textile wastewaters.

  14. Optical phase conjugation in azo-dye doped chiral liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinski, Pawel; Miniewicz, Andrzej

    2012-10-15

    We report on optical phase conjugation phenomenon observed in chiral nematic liquid crystal showing band gap type Bragg reflection. The phase conjugate to the signal beam is observable only in the small temperature interval when the Bragg condition is fulfilled and only for circularly polarized light. The optical phase conjugation signals were observed at low cw laser light intensities (<100 mW/cm{sup 2}, {lambda} = 532 nm). Estimated value of third order optical susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)} = 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} m{sup 2}/V{sup 2} is attributed to enhancement due to photoisomerisation of azo-dye (disperse red 1) inducing molecular reorientation process of liquid crystal molecules.

  15. Evaluation of in vitro efficacy for decolorization and degradation of commercial azo dye RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 isolated from dye contaminated industrial landfill.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Hilor; Soni, Dhaval; Chauhan, Kishor

    2014-06-01

    Reactive Black-B (RB-B) - one of the multi-sulphonated reactive azo dye - is being used extensively in textile as well as paper industries. Reactive azo dyes comprise of a significant group of synthetic compounds categorized as xenobiotics and its abatement from the environment still remains a challenge. In the present study, a newly isolated indigenous bacterial strain Morganella sp. HK-1 was exploited for its ability to decolorize and degrade RB-B dye. The isolate completely degraded RB-B (20 g L(-1)) within 24h under static conditions. Furthermore, the visible and FTIR spectral analysis established the bio-degradation of RB-B. The degraded metabolites of RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 were identified by GC-MS analysis as disodium 3,4,6-triamino-5-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonate, 4-aminophenylsulfonylethyl hydrogen sulfate, naphthalene-1-ol, aniline and benzene. Based on this information, a putative pathway of degradation of RB-B by Morganella sp. HK-1 has been proposed. This study is the first report on elucidation of mechanism of bacterial degradation of RB-B dye. Furthermore, phytotoxicity, genotoxicity and aquatic acute toxicity studies of the parent dye and the bio-degraded dye products revealed drastic reduction in the toxicity of metabolites as compared to the parent dye. This implies that the biotreatment of the dye is of non-toxic nature. This study thus indicates the effectiveness of Morganella sp. HK-1 for the treatment of textile effluents containing sulphonated azo dyes.

  16. Preparation and Absorption Spectral Property of a Multifunctional Water-Soluble Azo Compound with D-π-A Structure, 4-(4- Hydroxy-1-Naphthylazo)Benzoic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Lv, H.; Xie, C. G.; Chang, W. G.; Yan, Z. Q.

    2015-07-01

    A multifunctional water-soluble azo dye with the D-π-A conjugated structure, 4-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthylazo) benzoic acid ( HNBA), was designed and synthesized using 1-naphanol as the electron donator, benzoic acid as the electron acceptor, and -N=N- as the bridging group. After its structure was characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, and element analysis, the UV-Vis absorption spectral performance of the target dye was studied in detail. The results showed that the dye, combining hydroxyl group, azo group, and carboxyl group, possessed excellent absorption spectral properties (ɛ = 1.2·104 l·mol-1·cm-1) changing with pH and solvents. In particular, in polar and protonic water, it had excellent optical response to some metal ions, i.e., Fe3+ and Pb2+, which might make it a latent colorimetric sensor for detecting heavy metal ions.

  17. Azo dye removal in a membrane-free up-flow biocatalyzed electrolysis reactor coupled with an aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan; Guo, Yu-Qi; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Liang, Bin; Kong, Fan-Ying; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2012-11-15

    Azo dyes that consist of a large quantity of dye wastewater are toxic and persistent to biodegradation, while they should be removed before being discharged to water body. In this study, Alizarin Yellow R (AYR) as a model azo dye was decolorized in a combined bio-system of membrane-free, continuous up-flow bio-catalyzed electrolysis reactor (UBER) and subsequent aerobic bio-contact oxidation reactor (ABOR). With the supply of external power source 0.5 V in the UBER, AYR decolorization efficiency increased up to 94.8±1.5%. Products formation efficiencies of p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) were above 90% and 60%, respectively. Electron recovery efficiency based on AYR removal in cathode zone was nearly 100% at HRTs longer than 6 h. Relatively high concentration of AYR accumulated at higher AYR loading rates (>780 gm(-3) d(-1)) likely inhibited acetate oxidation of anode-respiring bacteria on the anode, which decreased current density in the UBER; optimal AYR loading rate for the UBER was 680 gm(-3) d(-1) (HRT 2.5 h). The subsequent ABOR further improved effluent quality. Overall the Chroma decreased from 320 times to 80 times in the combined bio-system to meet the textile wastewater discharge standard II in China. PMID:23009797

  18. Aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes in a packed bed reactor having bacteria-coated laterite pebbles.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Abraham, T Emilia

    2003-01-01

    A microbial consortium capable of aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes consisting of two isolated strains (RRL,TVM) and one known strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC 1194) was immobilized on laterite stones. The amount of bacterial biomass attached to the laterite stones was 8.64 g per 100 g of the stone on a dry weight basis. The packed bed reactor was filled with these stones and had a total capacity of 850 mL and a void volume of 210 mL. The feed consisted of an equal mixture of seven azo dyes both in water as well as in a simulated textile effluent, at a pH of 9.0 and a salinity of 900 mg/L. The dye concentrations of influent were 25, 50, and 100 microg/mL. The residence time was varied between 0.78 and 6.23 h. It was found that at the lowest residence time 23.55, 45.73, and 79.95 microg of dye was degraded per hour at an initial dye concentration of 25, 50, and 100 microg, respectively. The pH was reduced from 9.0 to 7.0. Simulated textile effluent containing 50 microg/mL dye was degraded by 61.7%. Analysis of degradation products by TLC and HPLC showed that the dye mixture was degraded to nontoxic smaller molecules. The bacteria-coated pebbles were stable, there was no washout even after 2 months, and the reactor was found to be suitable for the aerobic degradation of azo dyes. PMID:12675610

  19. Aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes in a packed bed reactor having bacteria-coated laterite pebbles.

    PubMed

    Senan, Resmi C; Shaffiqu, T S; Roy, J Jegan; Abraham, T Emilia

    2003-01-01

    A microbial consortium capable of aerobic degradation of a mixture of azo dyes consisting of two isolated strains (RRL,TVM) and one known strain of Pseudomonas putida (MTCC 1194) was immobilized on laterite stones. The amount of bacterial biomass attached to the laterite stones was 8.64 g per 100 g of the stone on a dry weight basis. The packed bed reactor was filled with these stones and had a total capacity of 850 mL and a void volume of 210 mL. The feed consisted of an equal mixture of seven azo dyes both in water as well as in a simulated textile effluent, at a pH of 9.0 and a salinity of 900 mg/L. The dye concentrations of influent were 25, 50, and 100 microg/mL. The residence time was varied between 0.78 and 6.23 h. It was found that at the lowest residence time 23.55, 45.73, and 79.95 microg of dye was degraded per hour at an initial dye concentration of 25, 50, and 100 microg, respectively. The pH was reduced from 9.0 to 7.0. Simulated textile effluent containing 50 microg/mL dye was degraded by 61.7%. Analysis of degradation products by TLC and HPLC showed that the dye mixture was degraded to nontoxic smaller molecules. The bacteria-coated pebbles were stable, there was no washout even after 2 months, and the reactor was found to be suitable for the aerobic degradation of azo dyes.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Paracoccus sp. GSM2 Capable of Degrading Textile Azo Dye Reactive Violet 5

    PubMed Central

    Bheemaraddi, Mallikarjun C.; Shivannavar, Channappa T.; Gaddad, Subhashchandra M.

    2014-01-01

    A potential bacterial strain GSM2, capable of degrading an azo dye Reactive Violet 5 as a sole source of carbon, was isolated from textile mill effluent from Solapur, India. The 16S rDNA sequence and phenotypic characteristics indicated an isolated organism as Paracoccus sp. GSM2. This strain exhibited complete decolorization of Reactive Violet 5 (100 mg/L) within 16 h, while maximally it could decolorize 800 mg/L of dye within 38 h with 73% decolorization under static condition. For color removal, the most suitable pH and temperature were pH 6.0–9.0 and 25–40°C, respectively. The isolate was able to decolorize more than 70% of five structurally different azo dyes within 38 h. The isolate is salt tolerant as it can bring out more than 90% decolorization up to a salt concentration of 2% (w/v). UV-Visible absorption spectra before and after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation and was further confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Overall results indicate the effectiveness of the strain GSM2 explored for the treatment of textile industry effluents containing various azo dyes. To our knowledge, this could be the first report on biodegradation of Reactive Violet 5 by Paracoccus sp. GSM2. PMID:24883397

  1. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive sulfonated azo dyes by a newly isolated Brevibacterium sp. strain VN-15.

    PubMed

    Franciscon, Elisangela; Grossman, Matthew James; Paschoal, Jonas Augusto Rizzato; Reyes, Felix Guillermo Reyes; Durrant, Lucia Regina

    2012-12-01

    Azo dyes constitute the largest and most versatile class of synthetic dyes used in the textile, pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industries and represent major components in wastewater from these industrial dying processes. Biological decolorization of azo dyes occurs efficiently under low oxygen to anaerobic conditions. However, this process results in the formation of toxic and carcinogenic amines that are resistant to further detoxification under low oxygen conditions. Moreover, the ability to detoxify these amines under aerobic conditions is not a wide spread metabolic activity. In this study we describe the use of Brevibacterium sp. strain VN-15, isolated from an activated sludge process of a textile company, for the sequential decolorization and detoxification of the azo dyes Reactive Yellow 107 (RY107), Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Reactive Red 198 (RR198) and Direct Blue 71 (DB71). Tyrosinase activity was observed during the biotreatment process suggesting the role of this enzyme in the decolorization and degradation process, but no-activity was observed for laccase and peroxidase. Toxicity, measured using Daphnia magna, was completely eliminated.

  2. Isolation and characterization of Paracoccus sp. GSM2 capable of degrading textile azo dye Reactive Violet 5.

    PubMed

    Bheemaraddi, Mallikarjun C; Patil, Santosh; Shivannavar, Channappa T; Gaddad, Subhashchandra M

    2014-01-01

    A potential bacterial strain GSM2, capable of degrading an azo dye Reactive Violet 5 as a sole source of carbon, was isolated from textile mill effluent from Solapur, India. The 16S rDNA sequence and phenotypic characteristics indicated an isolated organism as Paracoccus sp. GSM2. This strain exhibited complete decolorization of Reactive Violet 5 (100 mg/L) within 16 h, while maximally it could decolorize 800 mg/L of dye within 38 h with 73% decolorization under static condition. For color removal, the most suitable pH and temperature were pH 6.0-9.0 and 25-40 °C, respectively. The isolate was able to decolorize more than 70% of five structurally different azo dyes within 38 h. The isolate is salt tolerant as it can bring out more than 90% decolorization up to a salt concentration of 2% (w/v). UV-Visible absorption spectra before and after decolorization suggested that decolorization was due to biodegradation and was further confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Overall results indicate the effectiveness of the strain GSM2 explored for the treatment of textile industry effluents containing various azo dyes. To our knowledge, this could be the first report on biodegradation of Reactive Violet 5 by Paracoccus sp. GSM2.

  3. Enhanced azo dye removal in a continuously operated up-flow anaerobic filter packed with henna plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Wu, Mengke; Chen, Jianjun; Liu, Xiuyan; Chen, Tingting; Wen, Yue; Tang, Junhong; Xie, Zhengmiao

    2015-12-15

    Effects of henna plant biomass (stem) packed in an up-flow anaerobic bio-filter (UAF) on an azo dye (AO7) removal were investigated. AO7 removal, sulfanilic acid (SA) formation, and pseudo first-order kinetic constants for these reactions (kAO7 and kSA) were higher in the henna-added UAF (R2) than in the control UAF without henna (R1). The maximum kAO7 in R1 and R2 were 0.0345 and 0.2024 cm(-1), respectively, on day 18; the corresponding molar ratios of SA formation to AO7 removal were 0.582 and 0.990. Adsorption and endogenous bio-reduction were the main AO7 removal pathways in R1, while in R2 bio-reduction was the dominant. Organics in henna could be released and fermented to volatile fatty acids, acting as effective electron donors for AO7 reduction, which was accelerated by soluble and/or fixed lawsone. Afterwards, the removal process weakened over time, indicating the demand of electron donation and lawsone-releasing during the long-term operation of UAF.

  4. Microbial diversity in a continuous system based on rice husks for biodegradation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Reactive Black 5.

    PubMed

    Forss, Jörgen; Pinhassi, Jarone; Lindh, Markus; Welander, Ulrika

    2013-02-01

    In the present study the degradation of two common azo dyes used in dye houses today, Reactive Black 5 and Reactive Red 2 was evaluated in biofilters. In two experiments, bioreactors performed over 80% decolorization at a hydraulic retention time of only 28.4h with little production of metabolites. Molecular analyses showed a diverse and dynamic bacterial community composition in the bioreactors, including members of the Bacteroidetes, Acinetobacter (Gammaproteobacteria) and Clostridium (Firmicutes) that possess the capacity to reduce azo dyes. Collectively, the results indicate that the development of mixed bacterial communities from natural biomaterials contributes to an efficient and robust degradation performance in bioreactors even at high concentration of dyes.

  5. Red Emitting Coumarin-Azo Dyes : Synthesis, Characterization, Linear and Non-linear Optical Properties-Experimental and Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Tathe, Abhinav B; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2016-07-01

    The coumarin molecules with 7-(N,N-diethylamino) substitution and aryl azo (Ar-N=N-) at 3-position were synthesized, by reacting diazonium salt of substituted amines and 7-(N, N-diethylamino)-4-hydroxy coumarin under basic conditions. They were found to be fluorescent despite the presence of azo group. The azo group rotation was blocked by complexing with -BF2, so as to get a red shift in absorption. The azo molecules show charge transfer, whereas BF2-complexes do not. The dipole moment ratios between the ground and excited states calculated suggest highly polar excited state and an intra-molecular charge transfer at the excited state in the case of azo dyes. The NLO properties were calculated by solvatochromic method and computationally. Second order hyperpolarizability was found to be 46 to 1083 times more than urea. DFT and TDTDF calculations were performed to understand the electronic properties of the molecules at the ground as well as excited states.

  6. Red Emitting Coumarin-Azo Dyes : Synthesis, Characterization, Linear and Non-linear Optical Properties-Experimental and Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Tathe, Abhinav B; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2016-07-01

    The coumarin molecules with 7-(N,N-diethylamino) substitution and aryl azo (Ar-N=N-) at 3-position were synthesized, by reacting diazonium salt of substituted amines and 7-(N, N-diethylamino)-4-hydroxy coumarin under basic conditions. They were found to be fluorescent despite the presence of azo group. The azo group rotation was blocked by complexing with -BF2, so as to get a red shift in absorption. The azo molecules show charge transfer, whereas BF2-complexes do not. The dipole moment ratios between the ground and excited states calculated suggest highly polar excited state and an intra-molecular charge transfer at the excited state in the case of azo dyes. The NLO properties were calculated by solvatochromic method and computationally. Second order hyperpolarizability was found to be 46 to 1083 times more than urea. DFT and TDTDF calculations were performed to understand the electronic properties of the molecules at the ground as well as excited states. PMID:27155862

  7. Application of response surface analysis for biodegradation of azo reactive textile dye using Aspergillus foetidus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Singh, Lakhvinder

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the application of experimental design methodology for the optimization of decolourization of azo reactive textile dye Remazol Red RR and reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) using fungal isolate Aspergillus foetidus. Response surface methodology (RSM), involving central composite design matrix in three most important input variables; temperature, pH and initial dye concentration was employed. A total of 20 experiments were conducted in the study towards the construction of a quadratic model. This demonstrated the benefits of approach in achieving excellent predictions, while minimizing the number of experiments required. Very high regression coefficient between the variables and the responses indicated excellent evaluation of experimental data. Under optimized conditions fungal isolate was capable to decolourize Remazol Red RR up to 86.21% and COD reduction up to 55.43% was achieved during the experimental setup. Enzymatic activity indicated excellent outcome under the optimal process conditions. The experimental values agreed with the predicted ones, indicating suitability of the model and success of RSM approach in optimizing the process.

  8. Kinetics of adsorption of sulphonated azo dyes on strong basic anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    The macroporous polystyrene anion exchangers Amberlite IRA-900 and Amberlite IRA-910 were used in order to remove sulphonated azo dyes (Allura Red and Sunset Yellow) from aqueous solutions of 100-500 mg/L concentrations. The experimental data obtained at 100, 200, 300 and 500 mg/L initial concentrations at 20 degrees C were applied to the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and Weber-Morris kinetic models. The calculated sorption capacities (qe,cal) and the rate constant of the first-order adsorption (k1) were determined. The pseudo-second-order kinetic constants (k2) and capacities were calculated from the plots of t/qt vs t, 1/qt vs 1/t, 1/t vs 1/qt, qt/t vs qt and 1/qe-qt vs t for type 1, type 2, type 3, type 4 and type 5 of the pseudo-second-order expression, respectively. The influence of phase contact time, initial dye concentration, solution pH and temperature on Allura Red and Sunset Yellow removal was also discussed.

  9. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsubaşi, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation.

  10. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsubaşi, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation. PMID:23240212

  11. Sorption and desorption studies of a reactive azo dye on effective disposal of redundant material.

    PubMed

    Çelekli, Abuzer; Bozkurt, Hüseyin

    2013-07-01

    The effective disposal of redundant elephant dung (ED) is important for environmental protection and utilization of resource. The aim of this study was to remove a toxic-azo dye, Reactive Red (RR) 120, using this relatively cheap material as a new adsorbent. The FTIR-ATR spectra of ED powders before and after the sorption of RR 120 and zero point charge (pHzpc) of ED were determined. The sorption capacity of ED for removing of RR 120 were carried out as functions of particle size, adsorbent dose, pH, temperature, ionic strength, initial dye concentration, and contact time. Sorption isotherm, kinetic, activation energy, thermodynamic, and desorption parameters of RR 120 on ED were studied. The sorption process was found to be dependent on particle size, adsorbent dose, pH, temperature, ionic strength, initial dye concentration, and contact time. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy indicated that amine and amide groups have significant role on the sorption of RR 120 on ED. The pHzpc of ED was found to be 7.3. Sorption kinetic of RR 120 on ED was well described by sigmoidal Logistic model. The Langmuir isotherm was well fitted to the equilibrium data. The maximum sorption capacity was 95.71 mg g(-1). The sorption of RR 120 on ED was mainly physical and exothermic according to results of D-R isotherm, Arrhenius equation, thermodynamic, and desorption studies. The thermodynamic parameters showed that this process was feasible and spontaneous. This study showed that ED as a low-cost adsorbent had a great potential for the removal of RR 120 as an alternative eco-friendly process.

  12. Accelerated decolorization of azo dye Congo red in a combined bioanode-biocathode bioelectrochemical system with modified electrodes deployment.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Haoyi; Liang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, BES with bioanode and biocathode was applied to decolorize an azo dye Congo red (CR). Results showed that the Congo red decolorization efficiency (CR-DE) within 23 h in a combined bioanode-biocathode single chamber BES was 98.3±1.3%, significantly higher than that of mixed solution in a dual chamber BES (67.2±3.5%) (P<0.005). Various electrodes deployments (horizontal, vertical and surrounding) in the combined bioanode-biocathode BES were further compared based on the decolorization performance and electrochemical characterization. Results indicated that CR-DE within 11h improved from 87.4±1.3% to 97.5±2.3%, meanwhile the internal resistance decreased from 236.6 to 42.2Ω as modifying the horizontal deployment to be a surrounding deployment. It proved that the combination of bioanode and biocathode with suitable electrodes deployment could accelerate the decolorization of azo dye Congo red, which would be great potential for the application of bioelectrochemical technology in azo dye wastewater treatment.

  13. Fish erythrocytes as biomarkers for the toxicity of sublethal doses of an azo dye, Basic Violet-1 (CI: 42535).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Kaur, Arvinder

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate poikilocytosis in Labeo rohita (an important food fish) as an early indicator of stress due to an azo dye, Basic Violet-1 (CI: 42535). This dye was observed to be very toxic to test fish (96 h LC50 as0.45 mg/L dye). Fish were given short-term (96 h) and subchronic (150 days) exposures to the dye, and poikilocytosis was recorded under light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Light microscopy helped in identification of micronuclei along with irregularities, notches, blebs, lobes, crenation, clumps, chains, spherocytes, vacuolation, and necrosis in erythrocytes. However, SEM indicated shrinkage, oozing of cytoplasm, and several new abnormal shapes including marginal foldings, discocytes, keratocytes, dacrocytes, degmacytes, acanthocytes, echinocytes, protuberances, stomatocytes, drepanocytes, holes in the membrane, stippling/spicules, crescent-shaped cells, triangular cells, and pentagonal cells. Earlier studies speculated changes in the membrane to be responsible for clumping and chaining of erythrocytes, whereas the present SEM study clearly indicates that oozing out of cytoplasm is also responsible for the formation of chains and clumps. This study also shows that erythrocytes exhibit pathological symptoms before the appearance of other external symptoms such as abnormal behavior or mortality of fish. There was a dose- and duration-dependent increase; therefore, poikilocytosis, especially echinocytes, spherocytes, and clumps, can act as a biomarker for the stress caused by azo dyes.

  14. Genotoxic and carcinogenic products arising from reductive transformations of the azo dye, Disperse Yellow 7.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Shirin, Salma; Aman, Ahmed M; de Solla, Shane R; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Langlois, Valerie S

    2016-03-01

    Selected aromatic azo and benzidine based dyes are priority compounds under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP) for environmental risk assessments. Organic compounds undergo chemical and biological transformations when they interact with environmental matrices and biotic species; identifying the transformation products is thus a critical component of the risk assessment process. Here, we used zero valent iron (ZVI) to initiate the reduction of the diazo compound dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY 7). Using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS), four transformation products were conclusively identified, while a fifth product was tentatively ascertained. The conclusively established transformation products included p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA, a known genotoxin), 4-aminoazobenzene (4-AAB, a category 2 carcinogen) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP, a category 1 human carcinogen). 4-ABP is thought to form via a benzidine rearrangement; this is the first report of DY 7 undergoing a benzidine rearrangement. Given the importance of reduction processes in the metabolism of organic contaminants by aquatic species, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze sediment samples that had been generated previously upon exposure of Western clawed frogs (Silurana tropicalis) to DY 7 (at exposure levels where cellular stress was observed in S. tropicalis). We found p-PDA, 4-AAB, and 4-ABP were present in all exposures, but not in any of the sediment controls, demonstrating that upon release of DY 7 to the aquatic environment, sediment dwelling organisms will metabolize DY 7 to generate known (and suspected) human carcinogens, including through a previously unreported in vivo benzidine rearrangement to produce 4-ABP.

  15. Genotoxic and carcinogenic products arising from reductive transformations of the azo dye, Disperse Yellow 7.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Shirin, Salma; Aman, Ahmed M; de Solla, Shane R; Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Langlois, Valerie S

    2016-03-01

    Selected aromatic azo and benzidine based dyes are priority compounds under the Government of Canada's Chemical Management Plan (CMP) for environmental risk assessments. Organic compounds undergo chemical and biological transformations when they interact with environmental matrices and biotic species; identifying the transformation products is thus a critical component of the risk assessment process. Here, we used zero valent iron (ZVI) to initiate the reduction of the diazo compound dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY 7). Using state-of-the-art accurate mass Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-QToF-MS), four transformation products were conclusively identified, while a fifth product was tentatively ascertained. The conclusively established transformation products included p-phenylenediamine (p-PDA, a known genotoxin), 4-aminoazobenzene (4-AAB, a category 2 carcinogen) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP, a category 1 human carcinogen). 4-ABP is thought to form via a benzidine rearrangement; this is the first report of DY 7 undergoing a benzidine rearrangement. Given the importance of reduction processes in the metabolism of organic contaminants by aquatic species, we used LC-MS/MS to analyze sediment samples that had been generated previously upon exposure of Western clawed frogs (Silurana tropicalis) to DY 7 (at exposure levels where cellular stress was observed in S. tropicalis). We found p-PDA, 4-AAB, and 4-ABP were present in all exposures, but not in any of the sediment controls, demonstrating that upon release of DY 7 to the aquatic environment, sediment dwelling organisms will metabolize DY 7 to generate known (and suspected) human carcinogens, including through a previously unreported in vivo benzidine rearrangement to produce 4-ABP. PMID:26735719

  16. Magnetically Recyclable Fe3O4@His@Cu Nanocatalyst for Degradation of Azo Dyes.

    PubMed

    Kurtan, U; Amir, Md; Baykal, A; Sözeri, H; Toprak, M S

    2016-03-01

    Fe3O4@His@Cu magnetic recyclable nanocatalyst (MRCs) was synthesized by reflux method using L-histidine as linker. The composition, structure and magnetic property of the product were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). Powder XRD, FT-IR and EDAX results confirmed that the as-synthesized products has Fe3O4 with spinel structure and Cu nanoparticles with moderate crystallinity without any other impurities. The surface of the Fe3O4@His nanocomposite was covered by tiny Cu nanoparticles. We examine the catalytic activity of Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs for the degradation of two azo dyes, methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) as well as their mixture. The reusability of the nanocatalyst was good and sustained even after 3 cycles. Therefore this innovated Fe3O4@His@Cu MRCs has a potential to be used for purification of waste water. PMID:27455668

  17. A highly fluorescent simultaneous azo dye technique for demonstration of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, C A; Lepire, M L; Torres, I

    1990-03-01

    We describe a fluorescent histochemical technique for detection of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (APase) in cells. The technique utilizes standard azo dye chemistry with naphthol AS-MX phosphate as substrate and fast red TR as the diazonium salt. The reaction product is a highly fluorescent red precipitate. Pre-implantation mouse embryos were used to establish optimal fixation and staining protocols and the specificity and sensitivity of the method. Fixation was in 4% paraformaldehyde for 1 hr, as glutaraldehyde induced autofluorescence of the cells. Maximal discriminable staining was detected after 15-20 min in the stain solution. The stain solution itself proved to be non-fluorescent, thus allowing visual observation of the progress of the staining reaction by fluorescence microscopy in its presence. To test the specificity of this fluorescent APase stain, a variety of cell types of known APase reactivity were stained by this protocol. Mouse lymphocytes and STO fibroblasts were negative, whereas F9 teratocarcinoma cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and rat fetal primordial germ cells were all found to be highly positive for APase activity, in agreement with published results on APase localization in these cells.

  18. Ruthenium Doped ZnO Semiconductor: Synthesis, Characterization and Photodegradation of Azo Dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranganayagam, K. R.; Senthilkumaar, S.; Ganapathi Subramaniam, N.; Kang, T. Wang

    2013-04-01

    Ruthenium doped zinc oxide was synthesized by a simple sol-gel method via ultrasonication. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques and tested for the feasibility as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. The photocatalytic activity of Ru doped ZnO was tested using an azo dye, congo red (CR) in an aqueous solution, as a model compound. For comparison, the photocatalytic activity of pure ZnO was also performed. The parameters studied include the effect of initial CR concentration, photocatalyst weight and charge transfer phenomenon. The observed reaction mechanism was rationalized based on the elementary chemical reaction occurring in the irradiated heterogeneous reaction mixture. Total mineralization of CR was observed for both pure and Ru doped ZnO system. However, the photocatalytic activity of Ru doped ZnO was found to be higher than that of a pure ZnO.

  19. Can nitro groups really anchor onto TiO2? Case study of dye-to-TiO2 adsorption using azo dyes with NO2 substituents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2016-07-28

    The nitro group has recently been suggested as a new type of anchor for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and has shown promising optoelectronic properties. Considering the excellent electron withdrawing ability of the nitro group and wider materials selection brought about by this substituent, it is helpful to evaluate the interfacial structures and photophysics of more organic dyes where NO2 poses as the dye-to-TiO2 anchor. A computational study on a family of azo dyes bearing a nitro group is presented, where the effect of certain side groups on their optical properties is examined. Both isolated dye molecules and dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied via density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory, with complementary experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy and photovoltaic device testing. Results demonstrate that these nitro-containing dyes prefer a monodentate anchoring mode on a TiO2 cluster. These nitro dyes reveal weak, but non-negligible, adsorption onto TiO2; yet, very low photovoltaic performance once incorporated into a DSSC device. This poor delivery of nitro groups as DSSC anchors is ostensibly inconsistent with previous findings; but is rationalized via the "auxiliary anchor" concept. PMID:27356762

  20. Deciphering effects of functional groups and electron density on azo dyes degradation by graphene loaded TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2015-12-01

    This study tended to decipher the mechanism of photo degradation of azo dyes, which bond was favorable to be broken for application of wastewater decolorization. That is, from chemical structure perspective, the critical substituents to affect electron donor/acceptor for dye degradation would be identified in this research. The model reactive blacks (RB5), reactive blue 171 (RB171) and reactive red 198 (RR198) were degraded by graphene loaded TiO2, indicating how the electron withdrawing and releasing groups affect azo dye degradability. The byproducts and intermediate products were analyzed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Furthermore, the radicals involved in the reaction were found by electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR) to confirm the main oxidized species of hydroxyl radicals rather than the light generated positive holes. The finding revealed that the breakages of the bonds were due to the electron density changes around the bonds. This principle can be applicable not only for RB5 degradation, but also for reactive blue 171 (RB171), reactive red 198 (RR198) and some other textile dyes.

  1. A review of the genotoxicity of food, drug and cosmetic colours and other azo, triphenylmethane and xanthene dyes.

    PubMed

    Combes, R D; Haveland-Smith, R B

    1982-03-01

    The genetic toxicology of the major dyestuffs used in foods, drugs and cosmetics has been reviewed. Published data for azo, triphenylmethane and xanthene dyes from short-term assays for muta-carcinogenicity have been summarized and discussed according to usage, current and previous worldwide legislative status. Certain other synthetic food dyes, commercial mixtures, natural and polymeric colourants as well as a section on aminoazobenzene and its derivatives have been included. Genotoxicity has been discussed with reference to structural chemistry, levels of exposure, absorption and metabolism and to epidemiological information. The extent of agreement between data from different tests and correlations with animal cancer assays have been considered. Synthetic dyes from the 3 major structural classes exhibit genotoxicity, whilst only 2 natural colours have proved active. Activity may be due to the presence of certain functional groups, notably nitro- and amino-substituents which are metabolized to ultimate electrophiles that may be stabilized by electronic interaction with aryl rings. Metabolic processes such as azo-reduction may be activating or detoxifying. the low but significant correlation between animal carcinogenicity and short-term test data may be increased with further screening, especially involving chromosome assays. It is suggested that a human cancer hazard may exist where significant quantities of finished benzidine dye samples are handled. Such risks from exposures to other colours and the possibility of human germ-line mutation induction by dyestuffs cannot be meaningfully assessed.

  2. Improved azo dye decolorization in an advanced integrated system of bioelectrochemical module with surrounding electrode deployment and anaerobic sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A new integrated system, embedding a modular bioelectrochemical system (BES) with surrounding electrode deployment into an anaerobic sludge reactor (ASR), was developed to improve azo dye decolorization. Results demonstrated that the AO7 decolorization and COD removal can be improved without co-substrate in such system. The kinetic rate of decolorization (0.54h(-1)) in integrated system was 1.4-fold and 54.0-fold higher than that in biocathode BES (0.39h(-1)) and ASR (0.01h(-1)), respectively. COD can be removed after cleavage of azo bond, different from biocathode BES. The combined advantages of this integrated system were achieved by the cooperation of biocathode in modular BES and sludge in ASR. Biocathode was a predominant factor in AO7 decolorization, and anaerobic sludge contributed negligibly to AO7 reduction decolorization but mostly in the COD removal. These results demonstrated the great potential of integrating a BES module with anaerobic treatment process for azo dye treatment.

  3. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide. PMID:22795071

  4. The role of Aster amellus Linn. in the degradation of a sulfonated azo dye Remazol Red: a phytoremediation strategy.

    PubMed

    Khandare, Rahul V; Kabra, Akhil N; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-02-01

    Phytoremediation is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of pollutants. This study did explore the potential of Aster amellus Linn. to decolorize a sulfonated azo dye Remazol Red (RR), a mixture of dyes and a textile effluent. Induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, tyrosinase, veratryl alcohol oxidase and riboflavin reductase was observed during RR decolorization, suggesting their involvement in the metabolism of RR. UV-Visible absorption spectrum, HPLC and FTIR analysis confirmed the degradation of RR. Four metabolites after the degradation of the dye were identified as 2-[(3-diazenylphenyl) sulfonyl] ethanesulfonate, 4-amino-5-hydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonate, naphthalene-2-sulfonate and 3-(1,3,5-triazin-2-ylamino)benzenesulfonate by using GC/MS. Textile effluent and mixture of dyes showed 47% and 62% decrease respectively in American Dye Manufacturers Institute value. BOD of textile effluent and mixture of dyes were reduced by 75% and 48% respectively, COD of industrial effluent and mixture of dyes was reduced by 60% and 75% and TOC was reduced by 54% and 69% respectively after the treatment by A. amellus for 60 h; this indicated that the plant can be used for cleaning textile effluents. Toxicity study revealed the phytotransformation of RR into non-toxic products.

  5. Simultaneous two and three photon resonant enhancement of third-order NLO susceptibility in an azo-dye functionalized polymer film.

    PubMed

    Jerca, Florica Adriana; Jerca, Valentin Victor; Kajzar, Francois; Manea, Ana Maria; Rau, Ileana; Vuluga, Dumitru Mircea

    2013-05-21

    We report the observation of simultaneous two and three photon resonances, enhancing the third-order NLO susceptibility in a thin film of an azo-dye polymer. The possibility of 2-3 orders of magnitude increase in χ((3)) susceptibility is sustained by quantum mechanical calculations. This improves the applications of azo-polymers in all optical signal processing as well as in nonlinear optical imaging.

  6. Semiconductor-mediated photocatalysed degradation of two selected azo dye derivatives, amaranth and bismarck brown in aqueous suspension.

    PubMed

    Tariq, M Abu; Faisal, M; Muneer, M

    2005-12-01

    Semiconductor-mediated photocatalysed degradation of two selected azo dye derivatives such as amaranth (1) and bismarck brown (2) has been investigated in aqueous suspension by monitoring the change in substrate concentration employing UV spectroscopic analysis technique as a function of irradiation time. The degradation was studied under different conditions such as types of TiO(2), pH, substrate concentration, catalyst concentration, and in the presence of electron acceptors such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), potassium bromate (KBrO(3)) and ammonium persulphate (NH(4))(2)S(2)O(8) besides air. The degradation rates were found to be strongly influenced by all the above parameters. The photocatalyst Degussa P25 showed comparatively highest photocatalytic activity. The dye derivative, bismarck brown (2) was found to degrade faster than amaranth dye (1).

  7. Ultrastructural and Metabolic Determinants of Resistance to Azo-dye and Susceptibility to Nitrosamine Carcinogenesis of the Guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, G. M.; Sohal, R. S.; Argus, M. F.; Arcos, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    During diethylnitrosamine (DEN) administration, a distinctive difference was observed between rats and guinea-pigs in the sequence of ultrastructural changes in the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In DEN-induced hepatic tumour cells in the guinea-pig there was extensive proliferation of the rough ER, while the smooth ER was quite sparse; in the premalignant liver the opposite was noted. This is in contrast to the rat, in which administration of either DEN or 3′-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3′-Me-DAB) brings about, in both premalignant and malignant hepatic tissue, proliferation of the smooth ER and sparsity of the rough ER. Yet, as in the rat, the number of ribosomes on the outer surface of the guinea-pig liver rough ER is greatly reduced and this is paralleled by a 49% decrease of the RNA/protein ratio as early as 4 weeks of nitrosamine administration. The decrease of RNA/protein ratio and ultrastructurally observed loss of ribosomes from the ER, following nitrosamine administration, correlate with a decrease of photometric response of microsomal suspensions to the sulphydryl probe, p-chloromercuribenzoate. While azo-dye-reductase activity is higher in untreated rats than in untreated guinea-pigs, feeding 3′-Me-DAB for 6 weeks brings about a 76% decrease in the rat, but no significant decrease in the guinea-pig, which is refractory to azo-dye carcinogenesis. Thus, the ability of the liver to inactivate the dye is greatly decreased in the rat, but not in the guinea-pig, as administration progresses toward the threshold dose for tumorigenesis. On the other hand, constitutive levels of nitrosamine dealkylase are identical in the 2 species and remain essentially unchanged following administration of DEN for 10 weeks. Inasmuch as nitrosamine dealkylation represents activating metabolism, this provides a rationale for the comparable susceptibility of the rat and guinea-pig to DEN carcinogenesis. Of the 2 enzymes in the 2 species, it is only azo-dye

  8. Biodegradation of Azo Dye Disperse Orange S-RL by a Newly Isolated Strain Acinetobacter sp. SRL8.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wenjie; Ma, Jiangtao; Cai, Jinyan; Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Xiaolin; Yang, Guanghua; Zhao, Xiyue

    2015-06-01

    The strain SRL8, which could decolorize the azo dye disperse orange S-RL (S-RL), was first isolated from sludge and identified as Acinetobacter sp. through physiobiochemical identification and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The effects of temperature, pH, dye concentration, O2, and glucose concentration on S-RL decolorization by the strain SRL8 were studied. The optimal conditions were 30 °C, pH 7.0, 4g·L(-1) of inoculation (wet cells), and microaerophilic incubation. The decolorization percentage for S-RL by the strain SRL8 could reach 90.2% under optimal conditions. The strain SRL8 was highly tolerant to the azo dye SRL up to 300 mg·L(-1) and it had a broad decolorizing spectrum. According to the Monod equation, kinetic parameters of decolorization by SRL8 were calculated. The vmax and Km were 5.57×10(-3) h(-1) and 14.53 mg·L(-1), respectively.

  9. Properties of the metallochromic dyes Arsenazo III, Antipyrylazo III and Azo1 in frog skeletal muscle fibres at rest.

    PubMed

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S; Hui, C S; Quinta-Ferreira, M E

    1986-08-01

    Intact single twitch fibres from frog muscle were isolated and mounted in a normal Ringer solution (16 degrees C) on an optical bench apparatus for measuring fibre absorbance as a function of the wave-length and polarization of the incident light. Fibre absorbance was measured in resting fibres both in the absence and in the presence of one of three metallochromic dyes: Arsenazo III, Antipyrylazo III and Azo1. In the absence of dye, the fibre intrinsic absorbance, Ai(lambda), measured as a function of wave-length, lambda, was well described by the equation: Ai(lambda) = Ai(lambda long) (lambda long/lambda)X, where lambda long is a reference wave-length selected to lie beyond the absorbance band of the dyes and X is the exponential index. For wave-lengths between 480 and 810 nm, the average value of X was 1.1 for 0 deg polarized light (electric vector parallel to the fibre axis) and 1.3 for 90 deg polarized light (electric vector perpendicular to the fibre axis). The intrinsic absorbance at 0 deg, Ai,0(lambda), was somewhat larger than the intrinsic absorbance at 90 deg, Ai,90(lambda); for example, on average (n = 6), Ai,0 (810 nm) was 0.22, whereas Ai,90 (810 nm) was 0.016. Following dye injection, dye-related absorbance was estimated from the measured total fibre absorbance by subtracting the component attributable to the intrinsic absorbance; additionally, for comparison with in vitro calibrations as a function of wave-length, myoplasmic dye absorbance was corrected for the steady change in dye-concentration with time that was attributable to dye diffusion. In fibres injected with either Arsenazo III or Antipyrylazo III, the dye-related absorbance measured with 0 deg light, A0(lambda), was found to be significantly greater than that measured with 90 deg light, A90(lambda), indicating the presence of a resting 'dichroic' signal, A0(lambda)-A90(lambda), attributable to bound and oriented dye molecules. On average, the lower limit estimated for the percentage of

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of an azo-dye on TiO2/activated carbon composite material.

    PubMed

    Andriantsiferana, C; Mohamed, E F; Delmas, H

    2014-01-01

    A sequential adsorption/photocatalytic regeneration process to remove tartrazine, an azo-dye in aqueous solution, has been investigated. The aim ofthis work was to compare the effectiveness of an adsorbent/photocatalyst composite-TiO2 deposited onto activated carbon (AC) - and a simple mixture of powders of TiO2 and AC in same proportion. The composite was an innovative material as the photocatalyst, TiO2, was deposited on the porous surface ofa microporous-AC using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition in fluidized bed. The sequential process was composed of two-batch step cycles: every cycle alternated a step of adsorption and a step of photocatalytic oxidation under ultra-violet (365 nm), at 25 degreeC and atmospheric pressure. Both steps, adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation, have been investigated during four cycles. For both materials, the cumulated amounts adsorbed during four cycles corresponded to nearly twice the maximum adsorption capacities qmax proving the photocatalytic oxidation to regenerate the adsorbent. Concerning photocatalytic oxidation, the degree of mineralization was higher with the TiO2/AC composite: for each cycle, the value of the total organic carbon removal was 25% higher than that obtained with the mixture powder. These better photocatalytic performances involved better regeneration than higher adsorbed amounts for cycles 2, 3 and 4. Better performances with this promising material - TiO2 deposited onto AC - compared with TiO2 powder could be explained by the vicinity of photocatalytic and AC adsorption sites.

  11. Solvatochromism, spectral properties and antimicrobial activities of new azo-azomethine dyes with N2S2O2 donor set of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Pass, Maryam; Rezaeian, Khatereh; Talei, Gholamreza

    2014-08-01

    Six new azo-azomethine dyes, H2Ln (n = 1-6), with N2S2O2 donor set of atoms have been prepared via condensation reaction of 1,10-diaza-4,7-dithiadecane, I, with substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The dyes were characterized by IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The solvatochromic behavior of the dyes was also probed by studying their UV-Vis spectra in four pure organic solvents of different polarities and a meaningful correlation was observed. Furthermore, all prepared dyes were assayed for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by disc diffusion method. The results indicated that all prepared dyes show good inhibition against Staphylococcus epidermidis and Bacillus cereus and did not show any antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli as compared to standard drugs.

  12. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part II: synthesis, characterization, electrochemical properties and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe; Bayat, Atena; Babaei, Ali; Sohrabi, Masoud

    2012-11-01

    A new series of monoiminated 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes have been synthesized via condensation reaction of 4-amino-3-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole with various substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The dyes have been characterized by using FT-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The electrochemical behavior of the dyes has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry in DMSO at five different scan rates. Solvatochromic behavior of the dyes has been also investigated in four organic solvents with different polarities. Furthermore, the (1)H chemical shielding of the dyes were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method at the level of density functional theory (DFT). PMID:22902931

  13. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes. Part II: Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical properties and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Erfantalab, Malihe; Bayat, Atena; Babaei, Ali; Sohrabi, Masoud

    2012-11-01

    A new series of monoiminated 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dyes have been synthesized via condensation reaction of 4-amino-3-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole with various substituted azo-coupled salicylaldehyde. The dyes have been characterized by using FT-IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. The electrochemical behavior of the dyes has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry in DMSO at five different scan rates. Solvatochromic behavior of the dyes has been also investigated in four organic solvents with different polarities. Furthermore, the 1H chemical shielding of the dyes were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method at the level of density functional theory (DFT).

  14. Effect of trace metals and electron shuttle on simultaneous reduction of reactive black-5 azo dye and hexavalent chromium in liquid medium by Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Shahid; Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Riaz

    2015-11-01

    This study demonstrates the role of electron shuttles and trace metals in the biotransformation of azo dye reactive black-5 and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) that are released simultaneously in tannery effluent. Previously isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida KI was used for the simultaneous reduction of the dye (100 mg L(-1)) and CrVI (2 mg L(-1)) in a mineral salts medium (MSM). Among various trace metals, only Cu(II) had a stimulating effect on the bacterial-mediated reduction process. Application of electron shuttles such as hydroquinone and uric acid at a low concentration (1mM) had a positive effect on the reduction process and caused simultaneous reduction of 100% dye and 97% CrVI in 12-18 h. Mannitol, EDTA and sodium benzoate at all concentrations (ranging from 1 to 9 mM) showed an inhibitory effect on the reduction of reactive black-5 and CrVI. An inverse linear relationship between the velocity of reaction (V) and the concentration [S] of electron shuttles was observed. The results imply that both types and concentration of an electron shuttle and trace metals can affect the simultaneous reduction of reactive black-5 and CrVI.

  15. An integrated (electro- and bio-oxidation) approach for remediation of industrial wastewater containing azo-dyes: Understanding the degradation mechanism and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Aravind, Priyadharshini; Selvaraj, Hosimin; Ferro, Sergio; Sundaram, Maruthamuthu

    2016-11-15

    A hybrid approach for the remediation of recalcitrant dye wastewater is proposed. The chlorine-mediated electrochemical oxidation of real textile effluents and synthetic samples (using Ti/IrO2-RuO2-TiO2 anodes), lead to discoloration by 92% and 89%, respectively, in 100min, without significant mineralization. The remediation was obtained through biodegradation, after removing the residual bio-toxic active chlorine species via sunlight exposition. Results show that the electrochemical discoloration enhances the effluent biodegradability with about 90% COD removal employing acclimatized naphthalene-degrading bacterial consortia, within 144h. Based on results obtained through FT-IR and GC-MS, it is likely that azo group stripping and oxidative cleavage of dyes occur due to the nucleophilic attack of active chlorine species during electro-oxidation. This leads to generation of aromatic intermediates which are further desulfonated, deaminated or oxidized only at their functional groups. These aromatic intermediates were mineralized into simpler organic acids and aldehydes by bacterial consortia. Phyto-toxicity trials on Vigna radiata confirmed the toxic nature of the untreated dye solutions. An increase in root and shoot development was observed with the electrochemically treated solutions, the same was higher in case of bio-treated solutions. Overall, obtained results confirm the capability of the proposed hybrid oxidation scheme for the remediation of textile wastewater. PMID:27427887

  16. Induction of anoxic microenvironment in multi-phase metabolic shift strategy during periodic discontinuous batch mode operation enhances treatment of azo dye wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nagendranatha Reddy, C; Naresh Kumar, A; Annie Modestra, J; Venkata Mohan, S

    2014-08-01

    Variation in anoxic microenvironment (multi-phase (MP) metabolic shift strategy) during cycle operation of periodic discontinuous batch/sequencing batch (PDBR/SBR) mode operation showed enhanced degradation of recalcitrant azo dye (C.I. Acid Black 10B) at higher dye load (1250mg/l). The process performance was evaluated by varying anoxic phasing period during cycle operation. Before multiphase (BMP) operation with 2.1% of anoxic period showed color/COD removal efficiency of 41.9%/46.3%. Increment in anoxic period responded favorable in enhancing treatment efficiency [AMPI (16.2%), 49.4%/52.4%; AMPII (26.6%), 54.7%/57.2%; AMPIII (34.9%), 58.4%/61.5%]. Relatively higher bio-electrochemical activity, persistent reductive behavior (redox catalytic currents, 0.26/-0.72μA), prevalence of redox shuttlers (Fe-S proteins, cytochromes, quinones) facilitating enhanced electron transfer by minimization of associated losses and higher enzyme activities were observed with induction of anoxic phase. Anoxic condition shifts system microenvironment between oxidation and reduction assisting reduction of dye to its intermediates followed by their mineralization.

  17. Decolorization and detoxification of sulfonated azo dye C.I. Remazol Red and textile effluent by isolated Lysinibacillus sp. RGS.

    PubMed

    Saratale, Rijuta G; Gandhi, Soniya S; Purankar, Madhavi V; Kurade, Mayur B; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Oh, Sang Eun; Saratale, Ganesh D

    2013-06-01

    A novel bacterium was isolated from the soil of Ichalkaranji textile industrial area. Through 16S rRNA sequence matching and morphological observation it was identified as Lysinibacillus sp. RGS. This strain has ability to decolorize various industrial dyes among which, it showed complete decolorization and degradation of toxic sulfonated azo dye C.I. Remazol Red (at 30°C, pH 7.0, under static condition) with higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction (92%) within 6 h of incubation. Various parameters like agitation, pH, temperature and initial dye concentrations were optimized to develop faster decolorization process. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of Lysinibacillus sp. RGS. Induction in oxidoreductive enzymes presumably indicates involvement of these enzymes in the decolorization/degradation process. Analytical studies of the extracted metabolites confirmed the significant degradation of Remazol Red into various metabolites. The phytotoxicity assay (with respect to plants Phaseolus mungo and Sorghum vulgare) revealed that the degradation of Remazol Red produced nontoxic metabolites. Finally Lysinibacillus sp. RGS was applied to decolorize mixture of dyes and actual industrial effluent showing 87% and 72% decolorization (in terms of decrease in ADMI value) with 69% and 62% COD reduction within 48 h and 96 h, respectively. The foregoing result increases the applicability of the strain for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  18. Decolorization and detoxification of Synozol red HF-6BN azo dye, by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation the fungi, Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were employed for decolorization of Synozol red HF-6BN. Decolorization study showed that Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were able to decolorize 88% and 96% Synozol red 6BN, respectively, in 24 days. It was also studied that 86% and 90% Synozol red containing of dye effluent was decolorized by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. after 28 days of incubation at room temperature. A fungal-based protein with relative molecular mass of 70 kDa was partially purified and examined for enzymatic characteristics. The enzyme exhibited highest activity at temperature ranging from 40-50°C and at pH=6.0. The enzyme activity was enhanced in the presence of metal cations. High performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed that these fungal strains are capable to degrade Synozol red dye into metabolites. No zones of inhibition on agar plates and growth of Vigna radiata in the presence of dye extracted sample, indicated that the fungal degraded dye metabolites are nontoxic to beneficial micro-flora and plant growth. Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. have promising potential in color removal from textile wastewater-containing azo dyes. PMID:23369298

  19. Biodecolorization of azo dye Remazol orange by Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH and toxicity (oxidative stress) reduction in Allium cepa root cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Shekhar B; Surwase, Shripad N; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Gurav, Ranjit G; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2012-11-01

    In this report a textile azo dye Remazol orange was degraded and detoxified by bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH in plain distilled water. This bacterial decolorization performance was found to be pH and temperature dependent with maximum decolorization observed at pH 8 and temperature 30 °C. Bacterium tolerated higher dye concentrations up to 400 mg l(-1). Effect of initial cell mass showed that higher cell mass concentration can accelerate decolorization process with maximum of 92 % decolorization observed at 2.5 g l(-1) cell mass within 6.5 h. Effect of various metal ions showed Mn has inducing effect whereas Zn strongly inhibited the decolorization process at 5 mM concentration. Analysis of biodegradation products carried out with UV-vis spectroscopy, HPTLC and FTIR confirmed the decolorization and degradation of Remazol orange. Possible route for the degradation of dye was proposed based on GC-MS analysis. During toxicological scrutiny in Allium cepa root cells, induction in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and inhibition of catalase (CAT) along with raised levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in dye treated samples were detected which conclusively indicated the generation of oxidative stress. Less toxic nature of the dye degraded products was observed after bacterial treatment.

  20. Decolorization and detoxification of Synozol red HF-6BN azo dye, by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Sidra; Rehman, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation the fungi, Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were employed for decolorization of Synozol red HF-6BN. Decolorization study showed that Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. were able to decolorize 88% and 96% Synozol red 6BN, respectively, in 24 days. It was also studied that 86% and 90% Synozol red containing of dye effluent was decolorized by Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. after 28 days of incubation at room temperature. A fungal-based protein with relative molecular mass of 70 kDa was partially purified and examined for enzymatic characteristics. The enzyme exhibited highest activity at temperature ranging from 40-50°C and at pH=6.0. The enzyme activity was enhanced in the presence of metal cations. High performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed that these fungal strains are capable to degrade Synozol red dye into metabolites. No zones of inhibition on agar plates and growth of Vigna radiata in the presence of dye extracted sample, indicated that the fungal degraded dye metabolites are nontoxic to beneficial micro-flora and plant growth. Aspergillus niger and Nigrospora sp. have promising potential in color removal from textile wastewater-containing azo dyes.

  1. Biodecolorization of azo dye Remazol orange by Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH and toxicity (oxidative stress) reduction in Allium cepa root cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Shekhar B; Surwase, Shripad N; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Gurav, Ranjit G; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2012-11-01

    In this report a textile azo dye Remazol orange was degraded and detoxified by bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa BCH in plain distilled water. This bacterial decolorization performance was found to be pH and temperature dependent with maximum decolorization observed at pH 8 and temperature 30 °C. Bacterium tolerated higher dye concentrations up to 400 mg l(-1). Effect of initial cell mass showed that higher cell mass concentration can accelerate decolorization process with maximum of 92 % decolorization observed at 2.5 g l(-1) cell mass within 6.5 h. Effect of various metal ions showed Mn has inducing effect whereas Zn strongly inhibited the decolorization process at 5 mM concentration. Analysis of biodegradation products carried out with UV-vis spectroscopy, HPTLC and FTIR confirmed the decolorization and degradation of Remazol orange. Possible route for the degradation of dye was proposed based on GC-MS analysis. During toxicological scrutiny in Allium cepa root cells, induction in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and inhibition of catalase (CAT) along with raised levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in dye treated samples were detected which conclusively indicated the generation of oxidative stress. Less toxic nature of the dye degraded products was observed after bacterial treatment. PMID:22948606

  2. Enzymatic reduction of azo and indigoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Pricelius, S; Held, C; Murkovic, M; Bozic, M; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2007-11-01

    A customer- and environment-friendly method for the decolorization azo dyes was developed. Azoreductases could be used both to bleach hair dyed with azo dyes and to reduce dyes in vat dyeing of textiles. A new reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent azoreductase of Bacillus cereus, which showed high potential for reduction of these dyes, was purified using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography and had a molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pH 6 to 7, while the maximum temperature was reached at 40 degrees C. Oxygen was shown to be an alternative electron acceptor to azo compounds and must therefore be excluded during enzymatic dye reduction. Biotransformation of the azo dyes Flame Orange and Ruby Red was studied in more detail using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry (MS). Reduction of the azo bonds leads to cleavage of the dyes resulting in the cleavage product 2-amino-1,3 dimethylimidazolium and N approximately 1 approximately ,N approximately 1 approximately -dimethyl-1,4-benzenediamine for Ruby Red, while only the first was detected for Flame Orange because of MS instability of the expected 1,4-benzenediamine. The azoreductase was also found to reduce vat dyes like Indigo Carmine (C.I. Acid Blue 74). Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidizing agent was used to reoxidize the dye into the initial form. The reduction and oxidation mechanism of Indigo Carmine was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy.

  3. Enzymatic reduction of azo and indigoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Pricelius, S; Held, C; Murkovic, M; Bozic, M; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2007-11-01

    A customer- and environment-friendly method for the decolorization azo dyes was developed. Azoreductases could be used both to bleach hair dyed with azo dyes and to reduce dyes in vat dyeing of textiles. A new reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent azoreductase of Bacillus cereus, which showed high potential for reduction of these dyes, was purified using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography and had a molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pH 6 to 7, while the maximum temperature was reached at 40 degrees C. Oxygen was shown to be an alternative electron acceptor to azo compounds and must therefore be excluded during enzymatic dye reduction. Biotransformation of the azo dyes Flame Orange and Ruby Red was studied in more detail using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry (MS). Reduction of the azo bonds leads to cleavage of the dyes resulting in the cleavage product 2-amino-1,3 dimethylimidazolium and N approximately 1 approximately ,N approximately 1 approximately -dimethyl-1,4-benzenediamine for Ruby Red, while only the first was detected for Flame Orange because of MS instability of the expected 1,4-benzenediamine. The azoreductase was also found to reduce vat dyes like Indigo Carmine (C.I. Acid Blue 74). Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidizing agent was used to reoxidize the dye into the initial form. The reduction and oxidation mechanism of Indigo Carmine was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy. PMID:17891390

  4. Complex formation, thermal behavior and stability competition between Cu(II) ion and Cu(0) nanoparticles with some new azo dyes. Antioxidant and in vitro cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Gaber, M; El-Sayed, Y S; El-Baradie, K Y; Fahmy, R M

    2013-04-15

    Four triazole and thiadiazole-based azo chromophores namely [(E)-4-((1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(1)), (E)-4-((5-(methylthio)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(2)), (E)-4-((1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(3)) and (E)-4-((5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(4))] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis as well as mass spectroscopy. Cu(II) complexes of the investigated azo dyes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, electronic and ESR spectra, magnetic susceptibility and thermogravimetric analyses. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the azodyes to copper nanoparticles was described as coordination mode of charged dye molecules on the colloidal Cu(0) surface through anchoring OH(-) group. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles azodye complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) azo complexes. The antitumor and antioxidant activities of the synthesized azo dyes and their Cu(II) azo complexes have been evaluated.

  5. CYP-450 isoenzymes catalyze the generation of hazardous aromatic amines after reaction with the azo dye Sudan III.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Thalita Boldrin; Lizier, Thiago M; Assis, Marilda das Dores; Zanoni, Maria Valnice B; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2013-07-01

    This work describes the mutagenic response of Sudan III, an adulterant food dye, using Salmonella typhimurium assay and the generation of hazardous aromatic amines after different oxidation methods of this azo dye. For that, we used metabolic activation by S9, catalytic oxidation by ironporphyrin and electrochemistry oxidation in order to simulate endogenous oxidation conditions. The oxidation reactions promoted discoloration from 65% to 95% of Sudan III at 1 × 10(-4)molL(-1) and generation of 7.6 × 10(-7)molL(-1) to 0.31 × 10(-4)molL(-1) of aniline, o-anisidine, 2-methoxi-5-methylaniline, 4-aminobiphenyl, 4,4'-oxydianiline; 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 2,6-dimethylaniline. The results were confirmed by LC-MS-MS experiments. We also correlate the mutagenic effects of Sudan III using S. typhimurium with the strain TA1535 in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation (S9) with the metabolization products of this compound. Our findings clearly indicate that aromatic amines are formed due to oxidative reactions that can be promoted by hepatic cells, after the ingestion of Sudan III. Considering that, the use of azo compounds as food dyestuffs should be carefully controlled. PMID:23562707

  6. Efficient azo dye decolorization in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with built-in bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Gao, Lei; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-10-01

    A continuous stirred tank reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system (CSTR-BES) was developed for azo dye Alizarin Yellow R (AYR) containing wastewater treatment. The decolorization efficiency (DE) of the CSTR-BES was 97.04±0.06% for 7h with sludge concentration of 3000mg/L and initial AYR concentration of 100mg/L, which was superior to that of the sole CSTR mode (open circuit: 54.87±4.34%) and the sole BES mode (without sludge addition: 91.37±0.44%). The effects of sludge concentration and sodium acetate (NaAc) concentration on azo dye decolorization were investigated. The highest DE of CSTR-BES for 4h was 87.66±2.93% with sludge concentration of 12,000mg/L, NaAc concentration of 2000mg/L and initial AYR concentration of 100mg/L. The results in this study indicated that CSTR-BES could be a practical strategy for upgrading conventional anaerobic facilities against refractory wastewater treatment.

  7. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater.

  8. Mineralization of reactive azo dyes present in simulated textile waste water using down flow microaerophilic fixed film bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Balapure, Kshama; Bhatt, Nikhil; Madamwar, Datta

    2015-01-01

    The present research emphasizes on degradation of azo dyes from simulated textile wastewater using down flow microaerophilic fixed film reactor. Degradation of simulated textile wastewater (COD 7200mg/L and dye concentration 300mg/L) was studied in a microaerophilic fixed film reactor using pumice stone as a support material under varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR). The intense metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterial consortium in the reactor led to 97.5% COD reduction and 99.5% decolorization of simulated wastewater operated under OLR of 7.2kgCODm(3)/d and 24h of HRT. FTIR, (1)H NMR and GC-MS studies revealed the formation of lower molecular weight aliphatic compounds under 24h of HRT, leading to complete mineralization of simulated wastewater. The detection of oxido-reductive enzyme activities suggested the enzymatic reduction of azo bonds prior to mineralization. Toxicity studies indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of simulated wastewater. PMID:25459797

  9. Creation of second-order nonlinear optical effects by photoisomerization of polar azo dyes in polymeric films: theoretical study of steady-state and transient properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekkat, Zouheir; Knoll, Wolfgang

    1995-10-01

    It was shown recently that the application of a dc field across a polymer film containing polar azo dye chromophores at a temperature far below that of its glass transition leads to an appreciable polar order when the azo dyes undergo cis \\left-right-double-arrow trans isomerization. We present a detailed theoretical study of this phenomenon based on the enhanced mobility of the azo chromophores during the isomerization process. The equations representing this phenomenological theory are solved by recurrence relations of Legendre polynomials, and both the steady state and the dynamics are investigated. Analytical expressions are derived for the photoinduced polar order and its related anisotropy for both cis and trans molecular distributions.

  10. Identification of non-regulated aromatic amines of toxicological concern which can be cleaved from azo dyes used in clothing textiles.

    PubMed

    Brüschweiler, Beat J; Küng, Simon; Bürgi, Daniel; Muralt, Lorenz; Nyfeler, Erich

    2014-07-01

    Azo dyes in textiles may release aromatic amines after enzymatic cleavage by skin bacteria or after dermal absorption and metabolism in the human body. From the 896 azo dyes with known chemical structure in the available textile dyes database, 426 azo dyes (48%) can generate one or more of the 22 regulated aromatic amines in the European Union in Annex XVII of REACH. Another 470 azo dyes (52%) can be cleaved into exclusively non-regulated aromatic amines. In this study, a search for publicly available toxicity data on non-regulated aromatic amines was performed. For a considerable percentage of non-regulated aromatic amines, the toxicity database was found to be insufficient or non-existent. 62 non-regulated aromatic amines with available toxicity data were prioritized by expert judgment with objective criteria according to their potential for carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and/or skin sensitization. To investigate the occurrence of azo dye cleavage products, 153 random samples of clothing textiles were taken from Swiss retail outlets and analyzed for 22 high priority non-regulated aromatic amines of toxicological concern. Eight of these 22 non-regulated aromatic amines of concern could be detected in 17% of the textile samples. In 9% of the samples, one or more of the aromatic amines of concern could be detected in concentrations >30 mg/kg, in 8% of the samples between 5 and 30 mg/kg. The highest measured concentration was 622 mg/kg textile. There is an obvious need to assess consumer health risks for these non-regulated aromatic amines and to fill this gap in the regulation of clothing textiles.

  11. DFT and ab initio study of structure of dyes derived from 2-hydroxy and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Teimouri, Abbas; Najafi Chermahini, Alireza; Shahraki, Maryam

    2008-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structural, infrared spectra and visible spectra of a series of azo dyes preparation of salicylic acid and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid derivatives as the coupling component. The preparation of these azo dyes with salicylic acid and 2,4-dihydroxy benzoic acid derivatives (salicylic acid, methyl salicylate, ethyl salicylate, butyl salicylate, methyl 2,4-dihydroxy benzoate, ethyl 2,4-dihydroxy benzoate, salicylaldehyde, salicylamide, 2,4-dihydroxy benzamide, salicylaldoxime) have been investigated theoretically by performing HF and DFT levels of theory using the standard 6-31G* basis set. The optimized geometries and calculated vibrational frequencies are evaluated via comparison with experimental values. The vibrational spectral data obtained from solid phase FT-IR spectra are assigned modes based on the results of the theoretical calculations. The observed spectra are found to be in good agreement with the calculations.

  12. Decolorization and degradation of Disperse Blue 79 and Acid Orange 10, by Bacillus fusiformis KMK5 isolated from the textile dye contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Yogesh M; Pawar, Shrikant P; Gawai, Kachru R; Lokhande, Pradeep D; Shouche, Yogesh S; Kodam, Kisan M

    2008-12-01

    The release of azo dyes into the environment is a concern due to coloration of natural waters and due to the toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of the dyes and their biotransformation products. The dye degrading bacterial strain KMK 5 was isolated from the textile dyes contaminated soil of Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra, India. It was identified as Bacillus fusiformis based on the biochemical and morphological characterization as well as 16S rDNA sequencing. KMK 5 could tolerate and degrade azo dyes, Disperse Blue 79 (DB79) and Acid Orange 10 (AO10) under anoxic conditions. Complete mineralization of DB79 and AO10 at the concentration of 1.5g/l was observed within 48h. This degradation potential increased the applicability of this microorganism for the dye removal.

  13. Decolorization and degradation of xenobiotic azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A and textile effluent by Galactomyces geotrichum.

    PubMed

    Govindwar, Sanjay P; Kurade, Mayur B; Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kabra, Akhil N; Kim, Pil Joo; Waghmode, Tatoba R

    2014-08-01

    Galactomyces geotrichum MTCC 1360 exhibited 86% decolorization of azo dye Reactive Yellow-84A (50mgL(-1)) within 30h at 30°C and pH 7.0 under static condition. Examination of azoreductase, laccase and tyrosinase enzyme activities confirmed their prominent role in Reactive Yellow-84A degradation. Considerable reduction of COD (73%) and TOC (62%) during degradation of the dye was indicative of conversion of complex dye into simple products, which were further analyzed by HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and HPTLC. The degradation products were identified as 4(5-hydroxy, 4-amino cyclopentane) sulfobenzene and 4(5-hydroxy cyclopentane) sulfobenzene by GC-MS. In addition, when G. geotrichum was applied to decolorize textile effluent, it showed 85% of true color removal (ADMI removal) within 72h, along with a significant reduction in TOC and COD. Phytotoxicity studies revealed the less toxic nature of degraded Reactive Yellow-84A as compared to original dye.

  14. Batch and fixed-bed adsorption of tartrazine azo-dye onto activated carbon prepared from apricot stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albroomi, H. I.; Elsayed, M. A.; Baraka, A.; Abdelmaged, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work describes the potential of utilizing prepared activated carbon from apricot stones as an efficient adsorbent material for tartrazine (TZ) azo-dye removal in a batch and dynamic adsorption system. The results revealed that activated carbons with well-developed surface area (774 m2/g) and pore volume (1.26 cm3/g) can be manufactured from apricot stones by H3PO4 activation. In batch experiments, effects of the parameters such as initial dye concentration and temperature on the removal of the dye were studied. Equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Adsorption capacity was found to be dependent on the initial concentration of dye solution, and maximum adsorption was found to be 76 mg/g at 100 mg/L of TZ. The adsorption capacity at equilibrium (q e) increased from 22.6 to 76 mg/g with an increase in the initial dye concentrations from 25 to 100 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in free energy (ΔG 0), enthalpy (ΔH 0) and entropy (ΔS 0) were determined and the positive value of (ΔH) 78.1 (K J mol-1) revealed that adsorption efficiency increased with an increase in the process temperature. In fixed-bed column experiments, the effect of selected operating parameters such as bed depth, flow rate and initial dye concentration on the adsorption capacity was evaluated. Increase in bed height of adsorption columns leads to an extension of breakthrough point as well as the exhaustion time of adsorbent. However, the maximum adsorption capacities decrease with increases of flow rate. The breakthrough data fitted well to bed depth service time and Thomas models with high coefficient of determination, R 2 ≥ 94.

  15. Potential of the aquatic fern Azolla filiculoides in biodegradation of an azo dye: modeling of experimental results by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Khataee, A R; Movafeghi, A; Vafaei, F; Lisar, S Y Salehi; Zarei, M

    2013-01-01

    The potential of an aquatic fern, Azolla filiculoides, in phytoremediation of a mono azo dye solution, C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92), was studied. The effects of operational parameters such as reaction time, initial dye concentration, fern fresh weight, pH, temperature and reusability of the fern on biodegradation efficiency were investigated. The intermediate compounds produced by biodegradation process were analyzed using GC-MS analysis. An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the biodegradation efficiency. The findings indicated that ANN provides reasonable predictive performance (R2 = 0.961). The effects of AB92 solutions (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) on growth, chlorophylls and carotenoids content, activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase and formation of malondialdehyde were analyzed. AB92 generally showed inhibitory effects on the growth. Moreover, photosynthetic pigments in the fronds significantly decreased in the treatments. An increase was detected for lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity, suggesting that AB92 caused reactive oxygen species production in Azolla fronds, which were scavenged by induced activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  16. Effectiveness of Rice Agricultural Waste, Microbes and Wetland Plants in the Removal of Reactive Black-5 Azo Dye in Microcosm Constructed Wetlands.

    PubMed

    Saba, Beenish; Jabeen, Madeeha; Khalid, Azeem; Aziz, Irfan; Christy, Ann D

    2015-01-01

    Azo dyes are commonly generated as effluent pollutants by dye using industries, causing contamination of surface and ground water. Various strategies are employed to treat such wastewater; however, a multi-faceted treatment strategy could be more effective for complete removal of azo dyes from industrial effluent than any single treatment. In the present study, rice husk material was used as a substratum in two constructed wetlands (CWs) and augmented with microorganisms in the presence of wetland plants to effectively treat dye-polluted water. To evaluate the efficiency of each process the study was divided into three levels, i.e., adsorption of dye onto the substratum, phytoremediation within the CW and then bioremediation along with the previous two processes in the augmented CW. The adsorption process was helpful in removing 50% dye in presence of rice husk while 80% in presence of rice husk biocahr. Augmentation of microorganisms in CW systems has improved dye removal efficiency to 90%. Similarly presence of microorganisms enhanced removal of total nitrogen (68% 0 and Total phosphorus (75%). A significant improvement in plant growth was also observed by measuring plant height, number of leaves and leave area. These findings suggest the use of agricultural waste as part of a CW substratum can provide enhanced removal of textile dyes.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of simple naked-eye colorimetric chemosensors for anions based on azo dye-thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchatawedchakoon, Widchaya; Sangsuwan, Withsakorn; Kruanetr, Senee; Sakee, Uthai

    2014-03-01

    A series of novel, highly selective azo dye-thiosemicarbazones based anion sensors (3e-f) have been synthesized from the condensation reaction between thiosemicarbazide and six different azo salicylaldehydes. The structure of the sensors was confirmed by spectroscopic methods. The selectivity and sensitivity in the recognition for acetate anion over other anions such as fluoride, chloride, iodide and dihydrogenphosphate anions were determined by naked-eyes and UV-vis spectra. The color of the solution containing sensor had an obvious change from light yellow to orange only after the addition of acetate anion in aqueous solution (water/dimethylsulfoxide, 7:3, v/v) while other anions did not cause obvious color change. The anion recognition property of the receptor via proton-transfer is monitored by UV-vis titration and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Under condition in aqueous solution of sensor 3e (water/dimethylsulfoxide, 7:3, v/v), linearity range for the quantification of acetate anion was 1-22 μM and limit of detection (LOD) of acetate anion was 0.71 μM.

  18. Low-temperature-fabricated ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 nanoparticle-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hong Hee; Park, Cheolmin; Choi, WonKook; Cho, Sungjae; Moon, ByungJoon; Son, Dong Ick

    2014-11-01

    The authors investigated the microstructural and the electrical properties of ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated using a low-temperature-processed (200 °C) dye-sensitized ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 nanoparticle thin film and a Pt catalyst deposited on ITO/glass by RF magnetron sputtering. A hydropolymer containing PEG (poly ethylene glycol) and PEO (poly ethylene oxide) is used to make uniformly-distributed ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 nanoparticle layer which forms a nano porous ZnO, AZO, and SnO2 network after heat treatment. The layer is then dye sensitized and sandwiched between two electrodes in an electrolyte to make a DSSC device. The highest measured parameters, the short-circuit current density ( J sc ), the open circuit potential ( V oc ), the fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency ( η), of the DSSC fabricated wander optimized conditions were observed to be 5.10 mA/cm2, 0.61 V, 0.46, and 1.43%, respectively.

  19. Enhanced decolorization and biodegradation of textile azo dye Scarlet R by using developed microbial consortium-GR.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Kalyani, D C; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2009-05-01

    A developed consortium-GR, consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 (PV) and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 (MG), completely decolorized an azo dye Scarlet R under static anoxic condition with an average decolorization rate of 16,666 microg h(-1); which is much faster than that of the pure cultures (PV, 3571 microg h(-1); MG, 2500 microg h(-1)). Consortium-GR gave best decolorization performance with nearly complete mineralization of Scarlet R (over 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 3h, much shorter relative to the individual strains. Induction in the riboflavin reductase and NADH-DCIP reductase was observed in the consortium, suggesting the involvement of these enzymes during the fast decolorization process. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis showed that 1,4-benzenediamine was formed during decolorization/degradation of Scarlet R by consortium-GR. Phytotoxicity studies revealed no toxicity of the biodegraded products of Scarlet R by consortium-GR. In addition, consortium-GR applied for mixture of industrial dyes showed 88% decolorization under static condition with significant reduction in TOC (62%) and COD (68%) within 72 h, suggesting potential application of this microbial consortium in bioremediation of dye-containing wastewater.

  20. Activation by caecal reduction of the azo dye D & C red no. 9 to a bacterial mutagen.

    PubMed

    Dillon, D; Combes, R; Zeiger, E

    1994-07-01

    D & C Red No. 9 is a monoazo dye used for manufacturing printing inks, rubber and plastics, and as an additive in cosmetics and drugs. In an NTP carcinogenicity study in rats and mice it induced splenic sarcomas and liver nodules in male rats; no chemical-related tumours were induced in mice. On the basis of its contradictory responses in a range of in vitro tests and its inactivity in several in vivo genotoxicity assays, it has been suggested that the dye may act as a non-genotoxic carcinogen. We tested the dye in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay using several different protocols. The dye was not mutagenic when tested using the standard (aerobic) preincubation protocol. Variable responses were seen when the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reduction protocol was used. A third protocol was provided by incubating the test compound overnight with a rat caecal preparation under anoxic conditions to reduce the azo bond. Ethyl acetate extracts of this incubation mixture, when tested in the standard preincubation protocol using induced rat liver S9, yielded dose-related mutagenic responses in TA100, and a weak response in TA98. The presuemed major reduction product, 1-amino-2-naphthol (1-A-2-N) was mutagenic to TA100, but not TA98, in standard protocols with S9. The results show that it is necessary to use a protocol in which D & C Red No. 9 is reduced in order to demonstrate the mutagenicity of this dye. The non-genotoxicity previously reported for D & C Red No. 9, may have been due to insufficient reductive cleavage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Adsorption of an azo dye in an aqueous solution using hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB).

    PubMed

    Olya, Mohammad Ebrahim; Pirkarami, Azam; Mirzaie, Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports an investigation into the effect of a number of operating factors on the removal of Acid Blue 92 (AB92) from an aqueous solution using hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as an adsorbent. The optimum values of adsorbent dose and pH were found to be 35mgL(-1) and 6, respectively. Temperature showed a significant effect, with maximum dye removal being observed at 45°C. Stirring the solution during the treatment process resulted in significant removal improvement. The Langmuir adsorption model was used to quantify the amount of AB92 adsorbed on the surface of HTPB. FT-IR spectrometry results for HTPB, AB92, and HTPB-AB92 verified the efficiency of the treatment. Further, the adsorbent was characterized using SEM and H NMR techniques. PMID:23484459

  2. ANALYSIS OF ANIONIC METALLIZED AZO AND FORMAZAN DYES BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry was applied to the separation of several anionic dyes containing copper(II), chromium(III), or cobalt(III) as part of the dye molecule. The dyes were separated using a 110 cmX50 mu m uncoated fused-silica capillary and a 5 mM ammonium a...

  3. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source.

  4. Synthesis of some transition metal complexes with new heterocyclic thiazolyl azo dye and their uses as sensitizers in photo reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Adilee, Khalid J.; Abass, Ahmed K.; Taher, Ali M.

    2016-03-01

    A new heterocyclic thiazolylazo dye ligand, 2- [bar2-(4, 5- dimethyl thiazolyl) azo ] -4-Ethoxy Phenol (DMeTAEP), (LH) was synthesized by the diazotization of 4.5-dimethyl thiazolylazonium chloride and coupling with 4- Ethoxy phenol in alkaline alcoholic solution under suitable optimized experimental conditions to yield a new azo dye ligand. The structure of ligand and its complexes was prepared from Co(III), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Ag (I) and Au(III) ions. They confirmed by XRD, SEM, (TG-DTG) thermal analysis, 1H-NMR,UV-visb, mass and FT-IR spectroscopic methods, elemental analysis, atomic absorption, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance. The mole ratio [M: L], it was also studied which was 1:1 for Ag (I) and Au (III) complexes and 1:2 The rest of the metal complexes. The isolated solid complexes are found to have the general formula [M (L)2 ] Cln.mH2O, where n = 1, m = 0 when M = Co (III) and n = 0, m = 1 when M = Ni (II), and Hg(II) while n = 0 and m = 0 when M = Cu (II), Zn (II), Cd (II) and ]ML (H2O)] of Ag(I) - complex but Au(III)-complex structural formula was [Au(L)Cl] Cl conductivity measurements for prepared complexes showed 1:1 electrolyte for Co(III(and Au(III) complexes and non - electrolyte the rest of complexes. The spectral and analytical data revealed that this ligand behaves as a tridentate chelating agent and coordination number of all metal ions were found to be six except for Ag (I) and Au (III) which was four. The activities of complexes were examined as sensitizers in the photocatalytic reaction of p-nitro aniline (PNA) which is used as a model of water pollutants.

  5. Influence of azo dye concentration on activated sludge bacterial community in the presence of functionalized polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Lu, Shuilong; Wang, Ying; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Quan, Zhexue

    2015-03-01

    Immobilized quinones exhibit good catalytic performance in the biodecolorization of azo dyes. However, in practical activated sludge systems, little is known about the effect of azo dye concentration on microbial communities in the presence of immobilized quinones. 454 Pyrosequencing was used to investigate structural changes and to determine the key microorganisms involved in Reactive Red X-3B decolorization in the presence of anthraquinone-2-sulfonate immobilized on polyurethane foam (AQS-PUF). Our results show that the AQS-PUF-supplemented system exhibited better stability and decolorization performance during a 30-day run than polyurethane-foam-only (PUF-supplemented) and control systems. Analysis of pyrosequencing data showed that the AQS-PUF-supplemented system had the highest bacterial diversity, followed by the control and PUF-supplemented systems during decolorization. Reactive Red X-3B and AQS-PUF significantly influenced bacterial communities at the class level: Erysipelotrichia and the most dominant Deltaproteobacteria showed significant positive correlations with Reactive Red X-3B, while unclassified Firmicutes were found to be significantly correlated with AQS-PUF. At the genus level, Desulfomicrobium, which represents 8-44 % of the total population, displayed a significant positive correlation with Reactive Red X-3B. Some bacteria, including Desulfovibrio, Shewanella, and Clostridium with relative abundances of less than 6 %, were positively correlated with AQS-PUF. These findings provide a novel insight into the changes that occur in the bacterial community during immobilized AQS-mediated decolorization. Less abundant quinone-reducing bacteria play important roles in accelerating the effect of AQS-PUF on biodecolorization.

  6. Photo degradation of methyl orange an azo dye by advanced Fenton process using zero valent metallic iron: influence of various reaction parameters and its degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gomathi Devi, L; Girish Kumar, S; Mohan Reddy, K; Munikrishnappa, C

    2009-05-30

    Advanced Fenton process (AFP) using zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) is studied as a potential technique to degrade the azo dye in the aqueous medium. The influence of various reaction parameters like effect of iron dosage, concentration of H(2)O(2)/ammonium per sulfate (APS), initial dye concentration, effect of pH and the influence of radical scavenger are studied and optimum conditions are reported. The degradation rate decreased at higher iron dosages and also at higher oxidant concentrations due to the surface precipitation which deactivates the iron surface. The rate constant for the processes Fe(0)/UV and Fe(0)/APS/UV is twice compared to their respective Fe(0)/dark and Fe(0)/APS/dark processes. The rate constant for Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/UV process is four times higher than Fe(0)/H(2)O(2)/dark process. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/UV process is attributed to the cleavage of stable iron complexes which produces Fe(2+) ions that participates in cyclic Fenton mechanism for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The increase in the efficiency of Fe(0)/APS/UV or H(2)O(2) compared to dark process is due to continuous generation of hydroxyl radicals and also due to the frequent photo reduction of Fe(3+) ions to Fe(2+) ions. Though H(2)O(2) is a better oxidant than APS in all respects, but it is more susceptible to deactivation by hydroxyl radical scavengers. The decrease in the rate constant in the presence of hydroxyl radical scavenger is more for H(2)O(2) than APS. Iron powder retains its recycling efficiency better in the presence of H(2)O(2) than APS. The decrease in the degradation rate in the presence of APS as an oxidant is due to the fact that generation of free radicals on iron surface is slower compared to H(2)O(2). Also, the excess acidity provided by APS retards the degradation rate as excess H(+) ions acts as hydroxyl radical scavenger. The degradation of Methyl Orange (MO) using Fe(0) is an acid driven process shows higher efficiency at pH 3. The

  7. Role of surfactant derived intermediates in the efficacy and mechanism for radiation chemical degradation of a hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol.

    PubMed

    Das, Laboni; Chatterjee, Suchandra; Naik, Devidas B; Adhikari, Soumyakanti

    2015-11-15

    A combined methodology involving gamma and pulse radiolysis, product analysis and toxicity studies has been adopted to comprehend the degradation process of a model hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol, emphasizing the role of the surfactant, which is an integral part of textile waste. Two new and important findings are underlined in this article. The first is the direct attestation of the hydrazyl radical-parent adduct, formed in the reaction of the dye with e(-)aq followed by protonation and subsequent addition to the unreacted dye molecule. This has been confirmed from concentration dependent studies. Secondly, we have clearly shown that in the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the dye in Triton X-100 media, the initially produced TX radicals cause reductive degradation of the dye. Identification and detailed analysis of HPLC and GCMS data reveals that similar products are formed in both the reactions of e(-)aq and OH radicals. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of 10(-4)moldm(-3) dye was found to be reduced significantly after irradiation. Thus, the present study not only depicts new pathways for the degradation of hydrophobic azo dye, but also demonstrates the role of a surfactant in the entire process.

  8. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m3·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment. PMID:27121278

  9. Effect of electrode position on azo dye removal in an up-flow hybrid anaerobic digestion reactor with built-in bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min-Hua; Cui, Dan; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2016-04-28

    In this study, two modes of hybrid anaerobic digestion (AD) bioreactor with built-in BESs (electrodes installed in liquid phase (R1) and sludge phase (R2)) were tested for identifying the effect of electrodes position on azo dye wastewater treatment. Alizarin yellow R (AYR) was used as a model dye. Decolorization efficiency of R1 was 90.41 ± 6.20% at influent loading rate of 800 g-AYR/ m(3)·d, which was 39% higher than that of R2. The contribution of bioelectrochemical reduction to AYR decolorization (16.23 ± 1.86% for R1 versus 22.24 ± 2.14% for R2) implied that although azo dye was mainly removed in sludge zone, BES further improved the effluent quality, especially for R1 where electrodes were installed in liquid phase. The microbial communities in the electrode biofilms (dominant by Enterobacter) and sludge (dominant by Enterococcus) were well distinguished in R1, but they were similar in R2. These results suggest that electrodes installed in liquid phase in the anaerobic hybrid system are more efficient than that in sludge phase for azo dye removal, which give great inspirations for the application of AD-BES hybrid process for various refractory wastewaters treatment.

  10. Assessment of the effect of azo dye RP2B on the growth of a nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium--Anabaena sp.

    PubMed

    Hu, T L; Wu, S C

    2001-03-01

    Certain nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are diazotrophic, which profoundly impacts the aquatic ecosystem chemically and biologically. Although certain types are banned due to their carcinogenicity, azo dyes are commonly used in the dyeing or textile industry. This work investigates the effect of azo dye on the growth of cyanobacteria. Anabaena sp. isolated from the Da Jia Brook is an odor producing, nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium. The growth rates of Anabaena sp. in the media with or without nitrogen source were 3.56 x 10(-2) mg/ml day and 2.44 x 10(-2) mg/ml day, respectively. Anabaena sp. could not use azo dye RP2B as the nitrogen source. Experimental results indicated that the growth of Anabaena sp. was inhibited in the medium containing RP2B. The degree of inhibition increased from 50% to 81% with an increasing concentration of RP2B (0-50 mg/l). The IC-50 (inhibitory concentration) of RP2B on the growth of Anabaena sp. was 5 mg/l (as based on dry weight) or 7 mg/l (as measured by chlorophyll a).

  11. Variation in optoelectronic properties of azo dye-sensitized TiO2 semiconductor interfaces with different adsorption anchors: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl and pyridyl groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M; Dai, Chencheng

    2014-05-28

    The optoelectronic properties of four azo dye-sensitized TiO2 interfaces are systematically studied as a function of a changing dye anchoring group: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl, and pyridyl. The variation in optoelectronic properties of the free dyes and those in dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied both experimentally and computationally, in the context of prospective dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and DSSC device performance testing reveal a strong dependence on the nature of the anchor of the optoelectronic properties of these dyes, both in solution and as dye/TiO2 nanocomposites. First-principles calculations on both an isolated dye/TiO2 cluster model (using localized basis sets) and each dye modeled onto the surface of a 2D periodic TiO2 nanostructure (using plane wave basis sets) are presented. Detailed examination of these experimental and computational results, in terms of light harvesting, electron conversion and photovoltaic device performance characteristics, indicates that carboxylate is the best anchoring group, and hydroxyl is the worst, whereas sulfonate and pyridyl groups exhibit competing potential. Different sensitization solvents are found to affect critically the extent of dye adsorption achieved in the dye-sensitization of the TiO2 semiconductor, especially where the anchor is a pyridyl group.

  12. 40 CFR 721.5281 - 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[(2,4-dimethyl-6-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3- -2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2â²,2â³-nitrilotris (9CI). 721.5281 Section 721.5281 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5281 - 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[(2,4-dimethyl-6-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3- -2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2â²,2â³-nitrilotris (9CI). 721.5281 Section 721.5281 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT...

  14. Synthesized TiO2/ZSM-5 composites used for the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye: Intermediates, reaction pathway, mechanism and bio-toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kefu; Hu, Xin-Yan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jiajie; Lin, Yu-Jung; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a one-step solid dispersion method was used to synthesize titanium dioxide (TiO2)/Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) composites with substantially reduced time and energy consumption. A degradation efficiency of more than 95% was achieved within 10 min using 50% PTZ (synthesized TiO2/ZSM-5 composites with TiO2 contents of 50 wt% loaded on ZSM-5) at pH 7 and 25 °C. The possible degradation pathway of azo-dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC). The bonds between the N atoms and naphthalene groups are likely attacked first and cleaved by hydroxyl radicals, ultimately resulting in the decolorization and mineralization of the azo dye. A comparative assessment of the characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was completed. In addition, the toxicity effects of the degradation intermediates of azo-dye RB5 on cellular respiratory activity were analyzed. The bio-toxicity results showed that the decay rate constants of CO2 production from the azo-dye RB5 samples at different degradation times increased initially and subsequently decreased, indicating that intermediates of higher toxicity could adhere to the catalyst surface and gradually destroyed by further photocatalytic oxidation. Additionally, EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system. The results showed that the hydroxyl radicals are the main oxidation species in the photocatalytic process.

  15. Decolorization and biodegradation of azo dye, reactive blue 59 by aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Yogesh M; Nemade, Harshal N; Markad, Vijay L; Adav, Sunil S; Patole, Milind S; Kodam, Kisan M

    2012-01-01

    The present study deals with development of aerobic granules from textile wastewater sludge and challenged with different concentration of reactive blue 59 (RB59) to test their dye degradation potential. The granules efficiently degraded reactive blue 59 and also sustained higher dye loading of up to 5.0 g l(-1). The significant induction of enzymes azoreductase and cytochrome P-450 indicated their prominent role in the dye degradation while genotoxicity studies demonstrated that the biotransformed product of the dye as non-toxic. The microbial community of the textile dyes degrading aerobic sludge granules analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), revealed significantly diverse dye degrading microbial community belonging to alpha-, beta-, and gamma-proteobacteria.

  16. Textile dye decolorization using cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Amit; Madamwar, Datta

    2005-03-01

    Cyanobacterial cultures isolated from sites polluted by industrial textile effluents were screened for their ability to decolorize cyclic azo dyes. Gloeocapsa pleurocapsoides and Phormidium ceylanicum decolorized Acid Red 97 and FF Sky Blue dyes by more than 80% after 26 days. Chroococcus minutus was the only culture which decolorized Amido Black 10B (55%). Chlorophyll a synthesis in all cultures was strongly inhibited by the dyes. Visible spectroscopy and TLC confirmed that color removal was due to degradation of the dyes.

  17. Aerobic biodegradation of Azo dye by Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616; an obligately alkaliphilic bacterium and toxicity evaluation of metabolites by different bioassay systems.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A S Arun; Rao, K V Bhaskara

    2013-08-01

    An obligate alkaliphilic bacterium Bacillus cohnii MTCC 3616 aerobically decolorized a textile azo dye Direct Red-22 (5,000 mg l⁻¹) with 95 % efficiency at 37 °C and pH 9 in 4 h under static conditions. The decolorization of Direct Red-22 (DR-22) was possible through a broad pH (7-11), temperature (10-45 °C), salinity (1-7 %), and dye concentration (5-10 g l⁻¹) range. Decolorization of dye was assessed by UV-vis spectrophotometer with reduction of peak intensity at 549 nm (λ(max)). Biodegradation of dye was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The FTIR spectrum revealed that B. cohnii specifically targeted azo bond (N=N) at 1,614.42 cm⁻¹ to break down Direct Red-22. Formation of metabolites with different retention times in HPLC analysis further confirmed the degradation of dye. The phytotoxicity test with 5,000 mg l⁻¹ of untreated dye showed 80 % germination inhibition in Vigna mungo, 70 % in Sorghum bicolor and 80 % in Vigna radiata. No germination inhibition was noticed in all three plants by DR-22 metabolites at 5,000 mg l⁻¹. Biotoxicity test with Artemia salina proved the lethality of the azo dye at LC₅₀ of 4 and 8 % for degraded metabolites by causing death of its nauplii compared to its less toxic-degraded metabolites. Bioaccumulation of dye was observed in the mid-gut of A. salina. The cytogenotoxicity assay on the meristematic root tip cells of Allium cepa further confirmed the cytotoxic nature of azo dye (DR-22) with decrease in mitotic index (0.5 % at 500 ppm) and increase in aberrant index (4.56 %) over 4-h exposure period. Genotoxic damages (lagging chromosome, metaphase cluster, chromosome bridges, and dye accumulation in cytoplasm) were noticed at different stages of cell cycle. The degraded metabolites had negligible cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.

  18. Sediment contaminated with the Azo Dye disperse yellow 7 alters cellular stress- and androgen-related transcription in Silurana tropicalis larvae.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Martyniuk, Christopher J; de Solla, Shane R; Balakrishnan, Vimal K; Langlois, Valérie S

    2014-01-01

    Azo dyes are the most commonly used type of dye, accounting for 60-70% of all organic dye production worldwide. They are used as direct dyes in the textile, leather, printing ink, and cosmetic industries. The aim of this study was to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of the disazo dye Disperse Yellow 7 (DY7) in frogs to address a knowledge gap regarding mechanisms of toxicity and the potential for endocrine disrupting properties. Larvae of Silurana tropicalis (Western clawed frog) were exposed to DY7-contaminated water (0 to 22 μg/L) and sediment (0 to 209 μg/g) during early larval development. The concentrations used included the range of similar azo dyes found in surface waters in Canada. A significant decrease in tadpole survivorship was observed at 209 μg/g while there was a significant increase in malformations at the two highest concentrations tested in sediment. In the 209 μg/g treatment, DY7 significantly induced hsp70 (2.5-fold) and hsp90 (2.4-fold) mRNA levels, suggesting that cells required oxidative protection. The same treatment also altered the expression of two androgen-related genes: decreased ar (2-fold) and increased srd5a2 (2.6-fold). Furthermore, transcriptomics generated new hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of toxic action of DY7. Gene network analysis revealed that high concentrations of DY7 in sediment induced cellular stress-related gene transcription and affected genes associated with necrotic cell death, chromosome condensation, and mRNA processing. This study is the first to report on sublethal end points for azo dyes in amphibians, a growing environmental pollutant of concern for aquatic species.

  19. Cu(II) complexes of monobasic bi- or tridentate (NO, NNO) azo dye ligands: Synthesis, characterization, and interaction with Cu-nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaber, Mohamed; El-Sayed, Yusif S.; El-Baradie, Kamal; Fahmy, Rowaida M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of copper(II) azo complexes having the formula [CuL1-4(nH2O)]·OAc·xH2O where (n = 1-2) and (x = 0-1) have been synthesized using azo dyes containing the triazol and thiadiazole moieties. The azodyes and their metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic, mass, ESR spectra, magnetic moment measurements, and thermal analyses. IR spectra showed that the ligands having triazole moiety were coordinated with the copper(II) ion in a tridentate manner with ONN donor sites of the naphthyl OH, N-atoms of azo group, and triazole moiety while azodyes having thiadiazole moiety were coordinated with the copper(II) ion in a bidentate manner with ON donor sites of the naphthyl OH and the N-atom of the group. The thermodynamic activation parameters such as ΔE*, ΔH*, ΔS*, and ΔG* were calculated from the TG curves. Prepared spherical copper nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy and transition electron microscope (TEM). The spectral data showed the formation of surface complex between azo-dye ligands and colloidal copper nanoparticles through (sbnd OH) anchoring group. The stability constant of the prepared copper nanoparticles complexes is higher compared with the corresponding bulk ones due to the larger surface area of copper nanoparticles.

  20. Application of an enzyme immunoassay for the quantitative determination of azo dye (Orange II) in food products.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huyin; Xing, Yue; Yin, Yongmei; Zhang, Taichang; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Song, Pei; Tian, Xi; Xu, Yinghui; Wang, Peng; Meng, Meng; Xi, Rimo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic azo dye, Orange II, and the development of an indirect ELISA to detect Orange II in foods. The sulfonic group of Orange II was modified and linked with carrier protein to synthesise an artificial antigen. Based on the checkerboard titration, the method showed excellent sensitivity (IC₅₀ = 0.61 ng g⁻¹) to Orange II in the linear range of 0.05-10 ng g⁻¹. The antibody had little cross-reactivity with Chromotrope FB, Gardenia Yellow, Ponceau 4R, Sunset Yellow and Sudan dyes. The ELISA had limits of detection (LOD) of 0.22, 0.97 and 0.74 ng g⁻¹ in chilli powder, chilli oil and braised pork, respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) of the assay were 0.91 ng g⁻¹ in chilli powder, 1.48 ng g⁻¹ in chilli oil and 1.10 ng g⁻¹ in braised pork. For food products fortified with 1-10 ng g⁻¹ Orange II, the inter- and intra-assay variations were all less than 24.0% and 18.0%, respectively. Therefore, the proposed test could be used as a rapid screening method for Orange II detection in food samples. PMID:22889210

  1. Enhanced degradation of azo dye by nanoporous-copper-decorated Mg-Cu-Y metallic glass powder through dealloying pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuekun; Li, Ran; Zong, Jingzhen; Zhang, Ying; Li, Haifei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-06-01

    A controllable uniform nanoporous copper (NPC) layer was synthesized on the surface of the ball-milled powder of Mg65Cu25Y10 metallic glass by dealloying. The morphology, the elemental surface composition and the phase structure of the powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry, respectively. The composite powder with a core-shell structure shows higher degradation efficiency of the azo dye of Direct Blue 6 than the untreated powder and the pure NPC. The improved performance can be attributed to the strong synergistic effect between the NPC layer and the metallic glass matrix, because the nanoporous structure provides large surface area for the adsorption of the dye molecules and three-dimensional diffusion channels of reaction masses, as well as the dissolution acceleration of the active atoms through local galvanic cell reaction. This tunable pretreatment is a promising surface activation method for novel chemical applications of metallic glasses.

  2. Remediation of Water Contaminated with an Azo Dye: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Utilizing an Inexpensive Photocatalytic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumpus, John A.; Tricker, Jennifer; Andrzejewski, Ken; Rhoads, Heather; Tatarko, Matthew

    1999-12-01

    The construction and use of an inexpensive photocatalytic reactor that utilizes titanium dioxide as the photocatalyst for wastewater treatment is described. In these experiments and in supplementary material, students are made aware that a variety of techniques have been developed to treat wastewaters, including those generated by the chemical industry. Water contaminated with the azo dye Congo Red was selected as an example of how one might treat contaminated water from a textile manufacturing facility. These experiments emphasize that, in addition to product development, chemists must also be concerned with waste treatment. A summary of the theory of titanium dioxide-mediated photocatalysis is provided. The phenomenon of photosensitization is also discussed. The usefulness of Congo Red is summarized and a brief history of this dye is given. In addition to being inexpensive, the photocatalytic reactor described is easy to construct and uses a readily available low-wattage fluorescent light. An important feature of this reactor is that the heat generated by the light source is readily dissipated by the water undergoing treatment. Thus no special cooling apparatus is required. One of the most important aspects of this work is that it provides a wide variety of continuing research suggestions that would be suitable and readily accomplished in undergraduate departments and high school laboratories; even those where budgetary priorities are a major concern. Use of this reactor would also enable students to design systems to treat "real-world" wastes, including some that are generated in instructional laboratories.

  3. The azo dyes Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Orange 1 increase the micronuclei frequencies in human lymphocytes and in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chequer, Farah Maria Drumond; Angeli, José Pedro Friedmann; Ferraz, Elisa Raquel Anastácio; Tsuboy, Marcela Stefanini; Marcarini, Juliana Cristina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2009-05-31

    The use of azo dyes by different industries can cause direct and/or indirect effects on human and environmental health due to the discharge of industrial effluents that contain these toxic compounds. Several studies have demonstrated the genotoxic effects of various azo dyes, but information on the DNA damage caused by Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Orange 1 is unavailable, although these dyes are used in dyeing processes in many countries. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mutagenic activity of Disperse Red 1 and Disperse Orange 1 using the micronucleus (MN) assay in human lymphocytes and in HepG2 cells. In the lymphocyte assay, it was found that the number of MN induced by the lowest concentration of each dye (0.2 microg/mL) was similar to that of the negative control. At the other concentrations, a dose response MN formation was observed up to 1.0 microg/mL. At higher dose levels, the number of MN decreased. For the HepG2 cells the results were similar. With both dyes a dose dependent increase in the frequency of MN was detected. However for the HepG2, the threshold for this increase was 2.0 microg/mL, while at higher doses a reduction in the MN number was observed. The proliferation index was also calculated in order to evaluate acute toxicity during the test. No differences were detected between the different concentrations tested and the negative control.

  4. Mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a textile azo dye processing plant effluent that impacts a drinking water source.

    PubMed

    Alves de Lima, Rodrigo Otávio; Bazo, Ana Paula; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Rech, Célia Maria; de Palma Oliveira, Danielle; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela

    2007-01-10

    Recently a textile azo dye processing plant effluent was identified as one of the sources of mutagenic activity detected in the Cristais River, a drinking water source in Brazil [G.A. Umbuzeiro, D.A. Roubicek, C.M. Rech, M.I.Z. Sato, L.D. Claxton, Investigating the sources of the mutagenic activity found in a river using the Salmonella assay and different water extraction procedures, Chemosphere 54 (2004) 1589-1597]. Besides presenting high mutagenic activity in the Salmonella/microsome assay, the mutagenic nitro-aminoazobenzenes dyes CI Disperse Blue 373, CI Disperse Violet 93, and CI Disperse Orange 37 [G.A. Umbuzeiro, H.S. Freeman, S.H. Warren, D.P. Oliveira, Y. Terao, T. Watanabe, L.D. Claxton, The contribution of azo dyes in the mutagenic activity of the Cristais river, Chemosphere 60 (2005) 55-64] as well as benzidine, a known carcinogenic compound [T.M. Mazzo, A.A. Saczk, G.A. Umbuzeiro, M.V.B. Zanoni, Analysis of aromatic amines in surface waters receiving wastewater from textile industry by liquid chromatographic with eletrochemical detection, Anal. Lett., in press] were found in this effluent. After approximately 6 km from the discharge of this effluent, a drinking water treatment plant treats and distributes the water to a population of approximate 60,000. As shown previously, the mutagens in the DWTP intake water are not completely removed by the treatment. The water used for human consumption presented mutagenic activity related to nitro-aromatics and aromatic amines compounds probably derived from the cited textile processing plant effluent discharge [G.A. Umbuzeiro, D.A. Roubicek, C.M. Rech, M.I.Z. Sato, L.D. Claxton, Investigating the sources of the mutagenic activity found in a river using the Salmonella assay and different water extraction procedures, Chemosphere 54 (2004) 1589-1597; G.A. Umbuzeiro, H.S. Freeman, S.H. Warren, D.P. Oliveira, Y. Terao, T. Watanabe, L.D. Claxton, The contribution of azo dyes in the mutagenic activity of the Cristais

  5. Spectroscopic studies on gallic acid and its azo derivatives and their iron(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Ali, Alaa E; Haggag, Sawsan S; Nasr, Nessma M

    2014-01-01

    Azo gallic derivatives and their iron(III) complexes were synthesized and characterized. The stereochemistry and the mode of bonding of the complexes were achieved based on elemental analysis, UV-Vis and IR. The thermal behaviors of the complexes were studied. The effect of pH on the electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and its azo derivatives are discussed. Different spectroscopic methods (molar ratio, straight line method, continuous variation, slope ratio and successive method) are applied for determination of stoichiometry and pK values for the complex formation of gallic acid with iron(III) in aqueous media. Iron(III) complexes of gallic acid is formed with different ratio: 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4 (M:L).

  6. In situ homeotropic alignment of nematic liquid crystals based on photoisomerization of azo-dye, physical adsorption of aggregates, and consequent topographical modification.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sudarshan; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hee; Kang, Shin-Woong

    2013-06-25

    In situ homeotropic alignment is achieved by photochromic trans- to cis-isomerization of an azo-dye doped in a nematic host. The augmented dipole moment of the cis-isomer formed under UV-irradiation expedites molecular assembly into crystalline aggregates. Subsequent deposition of the aggregates creates a roughened surface and induces an anchoring transition from the initial planar to a homeotropic alignment of the LCs. PMID:23666876

  7. Bioremoval of the azo dye Congo Red by the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Montes-Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of dye-containing wastewater by the textile industry can adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and human health. Bioremoval is an alternative to industrial processes for detoxifying water contaminated with dyes. In this work, active and inactive biomass of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was assayed for the ability to remove Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. Through biosorption and biodegradation processes, Chlorella vulgaris was able to remove 83 and 58 % of dye at concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was 200 mg g(-1). The Langmuir model best described the experimental equilibrium data. The acute toxicity test (48 h) with two species of cladocerans indicated that the toxicity of the dye in the effluent was significantly decreased compared to the initial concentrations in the influent. Daphnia magna was the species less sensitive to dye (EC50 = 17.0 mg L(-1)), followed by Ceriodaphnia dubia (EC50 = 3.32 mg L(-1)). These results show that Chlorella vulgaris significantly reduced the dye concentration and toxicity. Therefore, this method may be a viable option for the treatment of this type of effluent.

  8. Bioremoval of the azo dye Congo Red by the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Montes-Horcasitas, María del Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Discharge of dye-containing wastewater by the textile industry can adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and human health. Bioremoval is an alternative to industrial processes for detoxifying water contaminated with dyes. In this work, active and inactive biomass of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was assayed for the ability to remove Congo Red (CR) dye from aqueous solutions. Through biosorption and biodegradation processes, Chlorella vulgaris was able to remove 83 and 58 % of dye at concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L(-1), respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity at equilibrium was 200 mg g(-1). The Langmuir model best described the experimental equilibrium data. The acute toxicity test (48 h) with two species of cladocerans indicated that the toxicity of the dye in the effluent was significantly decreased compared to the initial concentrations in the influent. Daphnia magna was the species less sensitive to dye (EC50 = 17.0 mg L(-1)), followed by Ceriodaphnia dubia (EC50 = 3.32 mg L(-1)). These results show that Chlorella vulgaris significantly reduced the dye concentration and toxicity. Therefore, this method may be a viable option for the treatment of this type of effluent. PMID:25772869

  9. Comparative analysis of bioremediation potential of adapted and non-adapted fungi on azo dye containing textile effluent.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, R; Karthik Sundaram, S; Prabhavathi, P; Sridevi, B V; Gopi, V

    2011-06-01

    About 4 different predominant adapted fungal strains (screened from effluent sample) Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., Fusarium sp. and Mucor sp. and 4 predominant non-adapted strains (screened from soil, water and fungal fruiting bodies) Aspergillus sp., Penicillium sp., Fusarium sp. and Rhizopus sp., with potential dye decolorization ability on Reactive black 5, Amido black-10B, Red 5B, Reactive red 120 and Anthraquinone violet R were isolated. These organisms were used to develop a consortium which was used in analyzing the bioremediation efficiency on textile effluents containing a mixture of azo dyes. There was about 67% of reduction in color along with 34% of COD reduction by non-adapted fungal consortium while effective bioremediation efficiency was observed in adapted fungal consortium (Color 75% and COD 50%). The regression co-efficient for Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were found to be higher for adapted fungal consortium (R2 = 0.97 and R2 = 0.92) than the non-adapted consortium (R2 = 0.97 and R2 = 0.85) proving that both monolayer and multilayer adsorption of dyes were observed on treating the samples with the adapted fungal consortium. On analyzing the results observed through chi-square test, the calculated value (28.712) was higher than the tabulated value (9.49) at a 4 degree freedom hence the hypothesis was rejected. So, there was an association between adapted fungal consortium and non-adapted fungal consortium and hence the adapted fungal consortium could be considered potentially useful for the bioremediation of textile effluent.

  10. CYP-dependent induction of glutathione S-transferase in Daphnia similis exposed to a disperse azo dye.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tsai Hsin; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Franciscon, Elisangela

    2015-01-01

    Disperse Red 1 (DR1) is an azo dye that can reach the aquatic environment through the discharge of textile industrial wastewaters. It has been tested in Daphnia similis and shown to be highly toxic. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a class of enzymes involved in phase I of detoxification, while glutathione S-transferase (GST) are a class of phase II enzymes. No information about phase I or II dye metabolism in microcrustacea were found in the literature. In this study we identified CYP and GST enzymes involved in the metabolism of DR1 in juveniles of D. similis. Using spectrophotometric analysis we showed that 50 % of the dye was absorbed by the organisms, which could be confirmed by the reddish color of animals exposed to DR1, however adsorption cannot be ruled out. GST activity increased from 280 to 615 nmol(-1 )min(-1 )mg when D. similis were exposed for 48 h to 0.2 mg L(-1) DR1 and from 274 to 815 nmol(-1) min(-1 )mg when exposed to 5 mg L(-1). Data clearly demonstrate that exposure to DR1 can stimulate a strong induction of GST activity, whose participation in DR1 metabolism needs to be confirmed. The induction of GST activity seems to be dependent on CYP activity, since treatment with SKF535A, a CYP inhibitor, blocked the DR1-dependent GST induction. We speculate that GST is involved in DR1 metabolism in Daphnia and that CYP activity is necessary to induce GST-activity, which is an indirect evidence of its role in the biotransformation of DR1.

  11. Comparative study on characteristics of azo dye decolorization by indigenous decolorizers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng-Meng; Chen, Wen-Ming; Chen, Bor-Yann; Chang, Chang-Tang; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Ding, Yongtao; Lin, Kae-Long; Xu, Huizhong

    2010-04-01

    This study provides a first attempt to explore indigenous strains with excellent decolorization capability from the most biodiverse region in Taiwan for dye-bearing wastewater treatment. Bacterial isolates were obtained via serial selections under selection pressure of the fungicide nystatin and model textile dye(s). According to profiles of protein expression and PCR-augmented 16S rRNA gene analyses for strain identification, >99% of nucleotide sequences in isolated strains were identical to type strains Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cancerogenus, Proteus hauseri, Acinetobacter johnsonii. This first-attempt study not only explored most abundant decolorizers in Taiwan, but also compared their color removal performance for further applications.

  12. The effect of high-energy radiation on aqueous solution of Acid Red 1 textile dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földváry, Cs. M.; Wojnárovits, L.

    2007-08-01

    The effect of high-energy radiation on Acid Red 1 (AR1) azo-dye solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy and chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements. Doses in the order of 10 kGy cause complete decolouration of the 10 -3-10 -4 mol dm -3 solutions; however, for complete mineralization doses higher by 1-2 order of magnitude are needed. Hydrated electrons and H rad atom are more effective in fading reaction, while the rad OH radicals have higher efficiency in mineralization. The HO 2•/O 2•- radical-radical anion pair is rather inefficient in fading reaction.

  13. Synthesis of some transition metal complexes with new heterocyclic thiazolyl azo dye and their uses as sensitizers in photo reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Adilee, Khalid J.; Abass, Ahmed K.; Taher, Ali M.

    2016-03-01

    A new heterocyclic thiazolylazo dye ligand, 2- [bar2-(4, 5- dimethyl thiazolyl) azo ] -4-Ethoxy Phenol (DMeTAEP), (LH) was synthesized by the diazotization of 4.5-dimethyl thiazolylazonium chloride and coupling with 4- Ethoxy phenol in alkaline alcoholic solution under suitable optimized experimental conditions to yield a new azo dye ligand. The structure of ligand and its complexes was prepared from Co(III), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Ag (I) and Au(III) ions. They confirmed by XRD, SEM, (TG-DTG) thermal analysis, 1H-NMR,UV-visb, mass and FT-IR spectroscopic methods, elemental analysis, atomic absorption, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance. The mole ratio [M: L], it was also studied which was 1:1 for Ag (I) and Au (III) complexes and 1:2 The rest of the metal complexes. The isolated solid complexes are found to have the general formula [M (L)2 ] Cln.mH2O, where n = 1, m = 0 when M = Co (III) and n = 0, m = 1 when M = Ni (II), and Hg(II) while n = 0 and m = 0 when M = Cu (II), Zn (II), Cd (II) and ]ML (H2O)] of Ag(I) - complex but Au(III)-complex structural formula was [Au(L)Cl] Cl conductivity measurements for prepared complexes showed 1:1 electrolyte for Co(III(and Au(III) complexes and non - electrolyte the rest of complexes. The spectral and analytical data revealed that this ligand behaves as a tridentate chelating agent and coordination number of all metal ions were found to be six except for Ag (I) and Au (III) which was four. The activities of complexes were examined as sensitizers in the photocatalytic reaction of p-nitro aniline (PNA) which is used as a model of water pollutants.

  14. Electro-optical light modulation in novel azo-dye-substituted poled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuto, Yoshito; Amano, Michiyuki; Kaino, Toshikuni

    1991-12-01

    We present results on nonlinear optical properties of newly-synthesized diazo-dye-substituted methacrylate polymers. These dye-substituted polymers, which have been developed for EO devices, contain a dicyanovinyl-terminated, dimethyl-substituted diazo (3RDCVXY) dye exhibiting a larger hyperpolarizability (beta) than that of nitro-terminated diazo (3RN) or monoazo dye. In order to describe the relationship between a bulk susceptibility (chi) (2) and the (beta) value in the presence of electric poling field, a molecular statistical model is proposed. In the model the intermolecular potential due to the van der Waals forces in transitory aggregates is considered. As the 3RDCVXY dyes, which have the central benzene ring substituted by methyl groups, are prevented to come close to each other, the intermolecular interactions influence more weakly on the 3RDCVXY polymers than the 3RN polymers. As a result, the corona-poled 3RDCVXY polymer exhibits a large (chi) (2) value of 1 X 10-6 esu at 1.06 micrometers , whose thermal stability is excellent even at 80 degree(s)C. The poled 3RDCVXY polymer film exhibits a linear EO coefficient as high as 40 pm/V at 0.633 micrometers . An electro-optical light modulation in the channel 3RDCVXY polymer waveguides with half-wave voltage as low as 5 V is also presented.

  15. Comparative study of toxicity of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B following biosorption and biodegradation treatments with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, E J R; Corso, C R

    2014-10-01

    Azo dyes are an important class of environmental contaminants and are characterized by the presence of one or more azo bonds (-N=N-) in their molecular structure. Effluents containing these compounds resist many types of treatments due to their molecular complexity. Therefore, alternative treatments, such as biosorption and biodegradation, have been widely studied to solve the problems caused by these substances, such as their harmful effects on the environment and organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biosorption and biodegradation of the azo dye Procion Red MX-5B in solutions with the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus. Decolorization tests were performed, followed by acute toxicity tests using Lactuca sativa seeds and Artemia salina larvae. Thirty percent dye removal of the solutions was achieved after 3 h of biosorption. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed that removal of the dye molecules occurred without major molecular changes. The acute toxicity tests confirmed lack of molecular degradation following biosorption with A. niger, as toxicity to L. sativa seed reduced from 5% to 0%. For A. salina larvae, the solutions were nontoxic before and after treatment. In the biodegradation study with the fungus A. terreus, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed molecular degradation and the formation of secondary metabolites, such as primary and secondary amines. The biodegradation of the dye molecules was evaluated after 24, 240 and 336 h of treatment. The fungal biomass demonstrated considerable affinity for Procion Red MX-5B, achieving approximately 100% decolorization of the solutions by the end of treatment. However, the solutions resulting from this treatment exhibited a significant increase in toxicity, inhibiting the growth of L. sativa seeds by 43% and leading to a 100% mortality rate among the A. salina larvae. Based on the present findings, biodegradation was effective in the decolorization of the samples, but generated

  16. Comparative study of toxicity of azo dye Procion Red MX-5B following biosorption and biodegradation treatments with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, E J R; Corso, C R

    2014-10-01

    Azo dyes are an important class of environmental contaminants and are characterized by the presence of one or more azo bonds (-N=N-) in their molecular structure. Effluents containing these compounds resist many types of treatments due to their molecular complexity. Therefore, alternative treatments, such as biosorption and biodegradation, have been widely studied to solve the problems caused by these substances, such as their harmful effects on the environment and organisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate biosorption and biodegradation of the azo dye Procion Red MX-5B in solutions with the filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus. Decolorization tests were performed, followed by acute toxicity tests using Lactuca sativa seeds and Artemia salina larvae. Thirty percent dye removal of the solutions was achieved after 3 h of biosorption. UV-Vis spectroscopy revealed that removal of the dye molecules occurred without major molecular changes. The acute toxicity tests confirmed lack of molecular degradation following biosorption with A. niger, as toxicity to L. sativa seed reduced from 5% to 0%. For A. salina larvae, the solutions were nontoxic before and after treatment. In the biodegradation study with the fungus A. terreus, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed molecular degradation and the formation of secondary metabolites, such as primary and secondary amines. The biodegradation of the dye molecules was evaluated after 24, 240 and 336 h of treatment. The fungal biomass demonstrated considerable affinity for Procion Red MX-5B, achieving approximately 100% decolorization of the solutions by the end of treatment. However, the solutions resulting from this treatment exhibited a significant increase in toxicity, inhibiting the growth of L. sativa seeds by 43% and leading to a 100% mortality rate among the A. salina larvae. Based on the present findings, biodegradation was effective in the decolorization of the samples, but generated

  17. Graphene oxide supported copper oxide nanoneedles: An efficient hybrid material for removal of toxic azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Rajendiran; Iyer, Sahithya S.; Ezhilan, Jayabal; Kumar, S. Senthil; Venkatesan, Rengarajan

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a simple, one step synthesis of hybrid copper oxide nanoneedles on graphene oxide sheets (GO-CuONNs) through sonochemical method. The present method affords a facile mean for controlling effective concentration of the active CuO nanoneedles on the graphene oxide sheets, and also offers the necessary stability to the resulting GO-CuONNs structure for adsorption transformations.Furthermore, this hybrid GO-CuONNs is successfully employed in the removal of a series of hazardous ionic organic dyes namely coomassie brilliant blue, methylene blue, congo red and amidoblack 10B. Through careful investigation of the material, we found that the synergetic effect between CuONNs and GO play a significant role in the adsorption of all the dyes studied. The prepared hybrid material contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic environment which is expected to enhance the electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent and the dye molecules, consequently favouring the adsorption process.

  18. Graphene oxide supported copper oxide nanoneedles: An efficient hybrid material for removal of toxic azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Rajendiran; Iyer, Sahithya S; Ezhilan, Jayabal; Kumar, S Senthil; Venkatesan, Rengarajan

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a simple, one step synthesis of hybrid copper oxide nanoneedles on graphene oxide sheets (GO-CuONNs) through sonochemical method. The present method affords a facile mean for controlling effective concentration of the active CuO nanoneedles on the graphene oxide sheets, and also offers the necessary stability to the resulting GO-CuONNs structure for adsorption transformations.Furthermore, this hybrid GO-CuONNs is successfully employed in the removal of a series of hazardous ionic organic dyes namely coomassie brilliant blue, methylene blue, congo red and amidoblack 10B. Through careful investigation of the material, we found that the synergetic effect between CuONNs and GO play a significant role in the adsorption of all the dyes studied. The prepared hybrid material contains both hydrophobic and hydrophilic environment which is expected to enhance the electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent and the dye molecules, consequently favouring the adsorption process.

  19. Heterogeneous electro-Fenton oxidation of azo dye methyl orange catalyzed by magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Sun, Yabing; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Azo dye methyl orange (MO) degradation by heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) with a magnetic nano-Fe3O4 catalyst was investigated. In this study, Fe3O4 was synthesized by a coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The influences of the main operating parameters such as current density, pH, catalyst dosage and aeration rate were studied. The results revealed that higher current density, catalyst dosage and aeration rate facilitated the degradation of MO, whereas the degradation efficiency of MO was decreased with an increase in the initial pH. After 90 min EF process, the volume of 500 mL, the initial concentration of 50 mg L(-1) MO solution could be degraded by 86.6% with the addition of 1 g L(-1) Fe3O4 under the current density of 10 mA cm(-2) and pH 3, compared with 69.5% for the electrolytic process alone. Meanwhile, a total organic carbon removal of 32% was obtained, up to 35.5 mg L(-1) accumulated H2O2 and less than 3.5 mg L(-1) Fe leaching were detected. Moreover, based on the results of natural bond orbital (at B3LYP/6-311G (d, p)) and liquid chromatograph-triple quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis, nine intermediates were identified and the proposed degradation pathways were investigated. PMID:27642831

  20. Optical bistability in a silicon nitride microring resonator with azo dye-doped liquid crystal as cladding material.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Ta; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Yu, Jui-Hao; Li, Yuan-Cheng; Lee, Chun-Hong; Jau, Hung-Chang; Lee, Ming-Chang; Chen, Yung-Jui; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-05-01

    This investigation reports observations of optical bistability in a silicon nitride (SiN) micro-ring resonator with azo dye-doped liquid crystal cladding. The refractive index of the cladding can be changed by switching the liquid crystal between nematic (NLC) and photo-induced isotropic (PHI) states by. Both the NLC and the PHI states can be maintained for many hours, and can be rapidly switched from one state to the other by photo-induced isomerization using 532 nm and 408 nm addressing light, respectively. The proposed device exhibits optical bistable switching of the resonance wavelength without sustained use of a power source. It has a 1.9 nm maximum spectral shift with a Q-factor of over 10000. The hybrid SiN- LC micro-ring resonator possesses easy switching, long memory, and low power consumption. It therefore has the potential to be used in signal processing elements and switching elements in optically integrated circuits. PMID:23669955

  1. Unveiling characteristics of a bioelectrochemical system with polarity reversion for simultaneous azo dye treatment and bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Yaping; Liu, Guoguang; Ning, Xunan; Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jingyong

    2015-09-01

    A novel bioelectrochemical system (BES) operated with polarity reversion was explored for simultaneous anaerobic/aerobic treatment of azo dye and production of bioelectricity under extremely low buffer. The Congo red was first decolorized in anode, with completed color removal in 35 h. The resultant decolorization intermediates were then mineralized after the anode reversed to aerobic biocathode, evidenced by 55 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in 200 h. The mineralization efficiency was further increased to 70 % when the period of the half-cycle was prolonged to 375 h. Meanwhile, the BES produced a continuous stable positive/negative alternate voltage output under 5 mM phosphate buffer because of the self-neutralization of the accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions in electrolyte. The electrode performance was significantly improved, which was indicated by alleviated electrode polarization, due to in situ use of accumulated protons and hydroxyl ions and enhanced electron transfer in the presence of Congo red and its degradation intermediates, which resulted in 1.05-fold increases in maximum power density (67.5 vs. 32.9 mW/m(2)). An analysis of the microbial diversity in the biofilm revealed that the biofilm was dominated by facultative bacteria with functional roles in contaminant degradation and electricity generation. PMID:25957151

  2. Optimized matching modes of bioelectrochemical module and anaerobic sludge in the integrated system for azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2015-09-01

    In this work, three matching modes (relative positions, catholyte flow sequences, and flow regimes) of bioelectrochemical module and anaerobic sludge were evaluated and optimized for azo dye treatment in the integrated system with embedding modular bioelectrochemical system into anaerobic sludge reactor. Results showed that it was favorable to operate this integrated system under the condition of 1/4 cathode soaking into sludge with spiral distributor in down-flow direction. Current, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and pH clearly demonstrated the important role of 1/4 soaking in electron/proton transfer. The down-flow direction flowed through electrode zone and then sludge zone could benefit to the efficient use of cathode and improve AO7 treatment. Furthermore, the positive effect of spiral catholyte distributor might be due to its promoting role in mixing and creating a spiral flow channel around the cathode electrode-microbes-solution interface. These results exhibited great potential for matching modular bioelectrochemical system with anaerobic treatment process.

  3. Carcinogenicities of 3-methoxy-4-aminoazobenzene, N-hydroxy-3-methoxy-4-aminoazobenzene and related azo dyes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H K; Hashimoto, Y; Abe, I; Sato, H

    1982-02-01

    The carcinogenicities of 2-methoxy-4-aminoazobenzene and 3-methoxy-4-aminoazobenzene (2-MeO-AAB and 3-MeO-AAB) and their N-hydroxy derivatives (N-OH-2-MeO-AAB and N-OH-3-MeO-AAB) were tested in (C3H X C57BL/6) F1 mice. Topical sc injections, twice weekly for 8 weeks, of 4 or 8 mumol of N-OH-3-MeO-AAB dissolved in 0.1 ml of olive oil containing 10% dimethyl sulfoxide induced fibrosarcomas at the site of application. Similar treatment with 3-MeO-AAB or 2-MeO-AAB as well as N-OH-2-MeO-AAB failed to induce sarcomas. Oral administration of 0.09% 3-MeO-AAB in the diet for 13 months induced hepatic tumors in female mice but not in males. 2-MeO-AAB did not induce tumors in male or female mice. The relationship between carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, the ability to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis, and the metabolism of these azo dyes is discussed.

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of azo dyes using Au:TiO2, gamma-Fe2O3:TiO2 functional nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Jagadale, Tushar; Kulkarni, Manjusha; Pravarthana, D; Ramadan, Wegdan; Thakur, Pragati

    2012-02-01

    We report photocatalytic degradation studies on Navy Blue HE2R (NB) dye on significant details as a representative from the class of azo dyes using functional nanosystems specifically designed to allow a strong photocatalytic activity. A modified sol-gel route was employed to synthesize Au and gamma-Fe2O3 modified TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) at low temperature. The attachment strategy is better because it allows clear surface of TiO2 to remain open for photo-catalysis. X-ray diffraction, Raman and UV-VIS spectroscopy studies showed the presence of gold and iron oxide phases along-with the anatase TiO2 phase. TEM studies showed TiO2 nanocomposite particles of size approximately 10-12 nm. A detailed investigation on heterogeneous photocatalytic performance for Navy Blue HE2R dye was done using the as-synthesized catalysts Au:TiO2 and gamma-Fe2O3:TiO2 in aqueous suspension under 8 W low-pressure mercury vapour lamp irradiation. Also, the photocatalytic degradation of Amranth and Orange G azo dyes were studied. The surface modified TiO2 NPs showed significantly improved photocatalytic activity as compared to pure TiO2. Exposure of the dye to the UV light in the presence of pure and gold NPs attached TiO2 catalysts caused dye degradation of about approximately 20% and approximately 80%, respectively, in the first couple of hours. In the presence of gamma-Fe2O3 NPs attached TiO2, a remarkable approximately 95% degradation of the azo dye was observed only in the first 15 min of UV exposure. The process parameters for the optimum catalytic activity are established which lead to a complete decoloration and substantial dye degradation, supported by the values of the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) approximately 93% and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) approximately 65% of the treated dye solution after 5 hours on the employment of the UV/Au:TiO2/H2O2 photocatalytic process.

  5. Plant-mediated synthesis of silver-nanocomposite as novel effective azo dye adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathy, Mantosh Kumar; Banerjee, Priya; Das, Papita

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of textile effluent is a globally alarming issue nowadays. In order to address this problem, a cost-effective and environment-friendly technique for adsorption of toxic dyes has been introduced in this research. Firstly in this study, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) having antibacterial efficacy, had been carried out using leaf extracts of Azadirachta indica as reducing as well as capping agent. This research idea was further extended for the development and application of a novel method of preparation of silver-nanocomposite using synthesized microwave-assisted AgNPs with soil as a novel nanocomposite to adsorb hazardous dyes. However, this nanocomposite was found to possess higher efficiency and adsorption capacity in comparison to soil as adsorbent for the removal of crystal violet dye under same experimental conditions. Additionally, it was also observed that use of this Ag-nanocomposite as adsorbent helped in achieving about 97.2 % removal of crystal violet dye from the effluent solution.

  6. AZO DYES ARE MAJOR CONTRIBUTORS TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY DETECTED IN THE CRISTAIS RIVER WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine if compounds from a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a Drinking Water T...

  7. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AZO DYES TO THE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF THE CRISTAIS RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    To verify if compounds within the discharge of a dye processing plant were contributing to the mutagenicity repeatedly found in the Cristais River, Sao Paulo, Brazil, we chemically characterized the treated industrial effluent, raw and treated water, and the sludge produced by a ...

  8. Optimization and modelling of synthetic azo dye wastewater treatment using Graphene oxide nanoplatelets: Characterization toxicity evaluation and optimization using Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Priya; Sau, Shubhra; Das, Papita; Mukhopadhayay, Aniruddha

    2015-09-01

    Azo dyes pose a major threat to current civilization by appearing in almost all streams of wastewater. The present investigation was carried out to examine the potential of Graphene oxide (GO) nanoplatelets as an efficient, cost-effective and non-toxic azo dye adsorbent for efficient wastewater treatment. The treatment process was optimized using Artificial Neural Network for maximum percentage dye removal and evaluated in terms of varying operational parameters, process kinetics and thermodynamics. A brief toxicity assay was also designed using fresh water snail Bellamya benghalensis to analyze the quality of the treated solution. 97.78% removal of safranin dye was obtained using GO as adsorbent. Characterization of GO nanoplatelets (using SEM, TEM, AFM and FTIR) reported the changes in its structure as well as surface morphology before and after use and explained its prospective as a good and environmentally benign adsorbent in very low quantities. The data recorded when subjected to different isotherms best fitted the Temkin isotherm. Further analysis revealed the process to be endothermic and chemisorption in nature. The verdict of the toxicity assay rendered the treated permeate as biologically safe for discharge or reuse in industrial and domestic purposes. PMID:25966335

  9. Thermal, optical and photoinduced properties of a series of homo and co-polyimides with two kinds of covalently bonded azo-dyes and their supramolecular counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konieczkowska, Jolanta; Wojtowicz, Magdalena; Sobolewska, Anna; Noga, Joanna; Jarczyk-Jedryka, Anna; Kozanecka-Szmigiel, Anna; Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes the synthesis and characterization of new aromatic polyimides with one or two different moieties of the azo-dyes covalently attached to the polymer backbone and their supramolecular analogues. Azo-functionalized polyimides were prepared using post-polymerization method including the introduction of Disperse Red 13 and/or 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]pyridine to homo and co-polyimides containing hydroxyl groups via Mitsunobu reaction. The degree of functionalization of polymers with chromophores was estimated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Polyimides containing hydroxyl groups were applied as matrixes to create supramolecular systems based on hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen-bond interactions in azosystems were studied by FTIR spectroscopy. The polymers were characterized by 1H NMR, FTIR, X-ray, UV-Vis, DSC and TGA methods. The photoisomerization process was investigated in supramolecular systems. The light-induced anisotropy was studied in a holographic gratings recording experiment and by photoinduced birefringence measurements. The polymer films were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) after the diffraction grating recording to confirm formation of surface relief gratings (SRGs). To the best of our knowledge, that the first time photoinduced anisotropy has been studied by birefringence measurements in polyimides containing two different azo-dyes.

  10. Exploring the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM to degrade textile dye Direct Blue GLL, mixture of dyes and textile effluent and production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid using waste biomass generated after dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Joshi, Swati M; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. Among all tested microorganisms, isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM effectively decolorized (100%) the dye Direct Blue GLL (DBGLL) and simultaneously it produced (64%) polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DBGLL at 300 mg l(-1) concentration within 24 h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The organism also decolorized three combinations of mixture of dyes. The organism decolorized textile effluent too when it was combined with medium. The organism produced a maximum of 66% and 61% PHD while decolorizing mixture of dyes and textile effluent respectively. Molasses was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The activity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was found to be higher after 24 h of addition of DBGLL. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation, viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase, and azo reductase were found to be induced during decolorization process of DBGLL and mixture of dyes. There was significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DBGLL.

  11. Exploring the ability of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM to degrade textile dye Direct Blue GLL, mixture of dyes and textile effluent and production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid using waste biomass generated after dye degradation.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kurade, Mayur B; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Joshi, Swati M; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. Among all tested microorganisms, isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM effectively decolorized (100%) the dye Direct Blue GLL (DBGLL) and simultaneously it produced (64%) polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DBGLL at 300 mg l(-1) concentration within 24 h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The organism also decolorized three combinations of mixture of dyes. The organism decolorized textile effluent too when it was combined with medium. The organism produced a maximum of 66% and 61% PHD while decolorizing mixture of dyes and textile effluent respectively. Molasses was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The activity of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase was found to be higher after 24 h of addition of DBGLL. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation, viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase, and azo reductase were found to be induced during decolorization process of DBGLL and mixture of dyes. There was significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DBGLL. PMID:20591565

  12. Kinetic study approach of remazol black-B use for the development of two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor for decolorization/biodegradation of azo dyes by activated bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Dafale, Nishant; Wate, Satish; Meshram, Sudhir; Nandy, Tapas

    2008-11-30

    The laboratory-isolated strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Proteus mirabilis, Bacillus circulance, NAD 1 and NAD 6 were observed to be predominant in the bacterial consortium responsible for effective decolorization of the azo dyes. The kinetic characteristics of azo dye decolorization by bacterial consortium were determined quantitatively using reactive vinyl sulfonated diazo dye, remazol black-B (RB-B) as a model substrate. Effects of substrate (RB-B) concentration as well as different substrates (azo dyes), environmental parameters (temperature and pH), glucose and other electron donor/co-substrate on the rate of decolorization were investigated to reveal the key factor that determines the performance of dye decolorization. The activation energy (E(a)) and frequency factor (K(0)) based on the Arrhenius equation was calculated as 11.67 kcal mol(-1) and 1.57 x 10(7)mg lg MLSS(-1)h(-1), respectively. The Double-reciprocal or Lineweaver-Burk plot was used to evaluate V(max), 15.97 h(-1) and K(m), 85.66 mg l(-1). The two-stage anoxic-oxic reactor system has proved to be successful in achieving significant decolorization and degradation of azo dyes by specific developed bacterial consortium with a removal of 84% color and 80% COD for real textile effluents vis-à-vis >or=90% color and COD removal for synthetic dye solution.

  13. Occurrence and risk assessment of an azo dye - The case of Disperse Red 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Francine Inforçato; Von der Ohe, Peter Carsten; Albuquerque, Anjaína Fernandes de; Vendemiatti, Josiane Aparecida de Souza; Azevedo, Carina Cristina Jesus; Honório, Jaqueline Gonçalves; Silva, Bianca Ferreira da; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin; Henry, Theodore B; Nogueira, Antonio J; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de Aragão

    2016-08-01

    Water quality criteria to protect aquatic life are not available for most disperse dyes which are often used as commercial mixtures in textile coloration. In this study, the acute and chronic toxicity of the commercial dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) to eight aquatic organisms from four trophic levels was evaluated. A safety threshold, i.e. Predicted No-Effect Concentration (PNEC), was derived based on the toxicity information of the commercial product and the purified dye. This approach was possible because the toxicity of DR1 was accounting for most of the toxicity of the commercial mixture. A long-term PNEC of 60 ng L(-1) was proposed, based on the most sensitive chronic endpoint for Daphnia similis. A short-term PNEC of 1800 ng L(-1) was proposed based on the most sensitive acute endpoint also for Daphnia similis. Both key studies have been evaluated with the new "Criteria for Reporting and Evaluating ecotoxicity Data" (CRED) methodology, applying more objective criteria to assess the quality of toxicity tests, resulting in two reliable and relevant endpoints with only minor restrictions. HPLC-MS/MS was used to quantify the occurrence of DR1 in river waters of three sites, influenced by textile industry discharges, resulting in a concentration range of 50-500 ng L(-1). The risk quotients for DR1 obtained in this work suggest that this dye can pose a potential risk to freshwater biota. To reduce uncertainty of the derived PNEC, a fish partial or full lifecycle study should be performed. PMID:27174821

  14. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  15. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-01-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L−1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L−1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h−l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  16. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-16

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents.

  17. Adsorption of azo dyes using peanut hull and orange peel: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Graziele Elisandra; Duarte, Marta Maria Menezes Bezerra; Campos, Natália Ferreira; da Rocha, Otidene Rossiter Sá; da Silva, Valdinete Lins

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes the use of agro-industrial wastes, specifically peanut hull (HP) and orange peel (OP), as adsorbents for dyes, such as Remazol Golden Yellow RNL-150% (RYG), Gray Reactive BF-2R (RG) and Reactive Turquoise Q-G125 (RT). Characterization by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller indicates that the adsorbents are mesoporous, with pHzpc values of 5.0 for HP and 4.0 for OP. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy identified carbonyl and sulphonic groups. The initial pH of the best-adsorbing solution of the three colours was 2.0. Increasing the concentration of the adsorbent promoted an increase in the percentage of removal until saturation of the adsorbent. In a factorial design, the largest value of q was obtained with 0.25 g of the adsorbent, with a particle size of < 0.4 mm and a stirring speed of 300 rpm. Such conditions were used in kinetic studies and studies of adsorption equilibrium. The evolution kinetics were rapid in the first few minutes, and after 180 min the system reached equilibrium. The kinetic model that best fit the experimental data to a 95% confidence level for the F test was the pseudo-second-order model for RYG/HP, RG/OP and RT/OP. There was no significant difference between the kinetic models as evaluated by the F test for RYG/OP, RG/HP and RT/HP. The experimental results indicated favourable dye adsorption characteristics for the adsorbents studied. The results of the F test showed that for RYG and RG, there was no significant difference between the two evaluated models. This study suggests that HP and OP are viable alternatives for the treatment of effluents containing RYG, RG and RT dyes. PMID:24701942

  18. Adsorption of azo dyes using peanut hull and orange peel: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Graziele Elisandra; Duarte, Marta Maria Menezes Bezerra; Campos, Natália Ferreira; da Rocha, Otidene Rossiter Sá; da Silva, Valdinete Lins

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes the use of agro-industrial wastes, specifically peanut hull (HP) and orange peel (OP), as adsorbents for dyes, such as Remazol Golden Yellow RNL-150% (RYG), Gray Reactive BF-2R (RG) and Reactive Turquoise Q-G125 (RT). Characterization by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller indicates that the adsorbents are mesoporous, with pHzpc values of 5.0 for HP and 4.0 for OP. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy identified carbonyl and sulphonic groups. The initial pH of the best-adsorbing solution of the three colours was 2.0. Increasing the concentration of the adsorbent promoted an increase in the percentage of removal until saturation of the adsorbent. In a factorial design, the largest value of q was obtained with 0.25 g of the adsorbent, with a particle size of < 0.4 mm and a stirring speed of 300 rpm. Such conditions were used in kinetic studies and studies of adsorption equilibrium. The evolution kinetics were rapid in the first few minutes, and after 180 min the system reached equilibrium. The kinetic model that best fit the experimental data to a 95% confidence level for the F test was the pseudo-second-order model for RYG/HP, RG/OP and RT/OP. There was no significant difference between the kinetic models as evaluated by the F test for RYG/OP, RG/HP and RT/HP. The experimental results indicated favourable dye adsorption characteristics for the adsorbents studied. The results of the F test showed that for RYG and RG, there was no significant difference between the two evaluated models. This study suggests that HP and OP are viable alternatives for the treatment of effluents containing RYG, RG and RT dyes.

  19. Effects of alkalinity and co-substrate on the performance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor through decolorization of Congo Red azo dye.

    PubMed

    Işik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2005-03-01

    The effect of substrate (glucose) concentrations and alkalinitiy (NaHCO3) on the decolorization of a synthetic wastewater containing Congo Red (CR) azo dye was performed in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB). Color removal efficiencies approaching 100% were obtained at glucose-COD concentrations varying between 0 and 3000 mg/l. The methane production rate and total aromatic amine (TAA) removal efficiencies were found to be 120 ml per day and 43%, respectively, while the color was completely removed during glucose-COD free operation of the UASB reactor. The complete decolorization of CR dye under co-substrate free operation could be attributed to TAA metabolism which may provide the electrons required for the cleavage of azo bond in CR dye exist in the UASB reactor. No significant differences in pH levels (6.6-7.4), methane production rates (2000-2700 ml/day) and COD removal efficiencies (82-90%) were obtained for NAHCO3 concentrations ranging between 550 and 3000 mg/l. However, decolorization efficiency remained at 100% with decreasing NaHCO3 concentrations as low as 250 mg/l in the feed. An alkalinity/COD ratio of 0.163 in the feed was suggested for simultaneous optimum COD and color removal. PMID:15501672

  20. Cr(VI) and azo dye removal using a hollow-fibre membrane system functionalized with a biogenic Pd-magnetite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Coker, V S; Garrity, A; Wennekes, W B; Roesink, H D W; Cutting, R S; Lloyd, J R

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the application of a hybrid system combining hollow-fibre membrane technology with the reductive abilities of magnetic nanoparticles for the remediation of toxic Cr(VI) and the azo dye, Remazol Black B. Nano-scale biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4), formed by microbial reduction of the mineral ferrihydrite, has a high reductive capacity due to the presence of Fe(II) in the mineral structure. The magnetic nanoparticles (approximately 20 nm) can be arrayed with Pd0 nanoparticles (approximately 5 nm) making a catalytically active nanomaterial. Membrane units, with and without nanoparticles, were challenged with either Cr(VI) or azo dye and some were supplemented with sodium formate, as an electron donor for contaminant reduction promoted by the Pd. The combination of Pd-magnetite with formate resulted in the most effective remediation strategy for both contaminants and the lifetime of the membrane unit was also increased, with 55% (19 days) and 70% (23 days) removal of the azo dye and Cr(VI), respectively. Low flow rates of 0.1 ml/min resulted in improved efficiencies due to increased contact time with the membrane/nanoparticle unit, with 70-75% removal of each contaminant. Chemical analyses of the nanoparticles post-exposure to Cr(VI) in the membrane modules indicated Pd to be more oxidized when Cr removal was maximized, and that the Cr was partially reduced to Cr(III) at the surface of the magnetite. These results have demonstrated that hollow-fibre membrane units can be enhanced for the removal of soluble, redox sensitive contaminants by incorporation of a layer of palladized biogenic nanoparticulate magnetite.

  1. Enzymes oxidizing the azo dye 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and their contribution to its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Stiborova, Marie; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Frei, Eva; Hodek, Petr; Martinek, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    Sudan I [1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthol, C.I. Solvent Yellow 14] is an industrial dye, which was found as a contaminant in numerous foods in several European countries. Because Sudan I has been assigned by the IARC as a Category 3 carcinogen, the European Union decreed that it cannot be utilized as food colorant in any European country. Sudan I induces the malignancies in liver and urinary bladder of rats and mice. This carcinogen has also been found to be a potent mutagen, contact allergen and sensitizer, and exhibits clastogenic properties. The oxidation of Sudan I increases its toxic effects and leads to covalent adducts in DNA. Identification of enzymatic systems that contribute to Sudan I oxidative metabolism to reactive intermediates generating such covalent DNA adducts on the one hand, and to the detoxification of this carcinogen on the other, is necessary to evaluate susceptibility to this toxicant. This review summarizes the identification of such enzymes and the molecular mechanisms of oxidation reactions elucidated to date. Human and animal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and peroxidases are capable of oxidizing Sudan I. Of the CYP enzymes, CYP1A1 is most important both in Sudan I detoxification and its bio-activation. Ring-hydroxylated metabolites and a dimer of this carcinogen were found as detoxification products of Sudan I generated with CYPs and peroxidases, respectively. Oxidative bio-activation of this azo dye catalyzed by CYPs and peroxidases leads to generation of proximate genotoxic metabolites (the CYP-catalyzed formation of the benzenediazonium cation and the peroxidase-mediated generation of one-electron oxidation products), which covalently modify DNA both in vitro and in vivo. The predominant DNA adduct generated with the benzenediazonium cation was characterized to be 8-(phenylazo)guanine. The Sudan I radical species mediated by peroxidases reacts with the -NH2 group in (deoxy)guanosine, generating the 4-[(deoxy)guanosin-N(2)-yl]Sudan I product. Sudan I

  2. Sprayed nanostructured TiO2 films for efficient photocatalytic degradation of textile azo dye.

    PubMed

    Stambolova, Irina; Shipochka, Capital Em Cyrillicaria; Blaskov, Vladimir; Loukanov, Alexandrе; Vassilev, Sasho

    2012-12-01

    Spray pyrolysis procedure for preparation of nanostructured TiO(2) films with higher photocatalytic effectiveness and longer exploitation life is presented in this study. Thin films of active nanocrystalline TiO(2) were obtained from titanium isopropoxide, stabilized with acetyl acetone and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The activity of sprayed nanostructured TiO(2) is tested for photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye with concentrations up to 80 ppm. Interesting result of the work is the reduction of toxicity after photocatalytic treatment of RB5 with TiO(2), which was confirmed by the lower percentage of mortality of Artemia salina. It was proved that the film thickness, conditions of post deposition treatment and the type of the substrate affected significantly the photocatalytic reaction. Taking into account that the parameters are interdependent, it is necessary to optimize the preparation conditions in order to synthesize photocatalytic active films.

  3. Highly efficient visible light mediated azo dye degradation through barium titanate decorated reduced graphene oxide sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Kushwaha, H. S.; Vaish, Rahul

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates BaTiO3 decorated reduced graphene oxide sheets as a potential visible light active catalyst for dye degradation (Rhodamine B). The composites were prepared through conventional hydrothermal synthesis technique using hydrazine as a reducing agent. A number of techniques have been employed to affirm the morphology, composition and photocatalytic properties of the composites; these include UV-visible spectrophotoscopy that assisted in quantifying the concentration difference of Rhodamine B. The phase homogeneity of the composites was examined through x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was employed to confirm the orientation of the BaTiO3 particles over the reduced graphene oxide sheets. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra assisted in determining the surface structure and excited state of the catalyst. Fourier transformed-infrared (FTIR) spectra investigated the vibrations and adsorption peak of the composites, thereby ascertaining the formation of reduced graphene oxide. In addition, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) demonstrated an enhanced absorption in the visible region. The experimental investigations revealed that graphene oxide acted as charge collector and simultaneously facilitated surface adsorption and photo-sensitization. It could be deduced that BaTiO3-reduced graphene oxide composites are of significant interest the field of water purification through solar photocatalysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Enhanced degradation of azo dye in wastewater by pulsed discharge plasma coupled with MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the photocatalytic performance of TiO2 in pulsed discharge plasma systems, easily recycled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-TiO2 supported on γ-Al2O3 (MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3) composite photocatalyst were prepared. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the prepared catalysts were investigated using XRD, SEM, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by degradation of azo dye acid orange II (AO7) in wastewater under pulsed discharge plasma. The results indicate that the MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite catalyst possesses enhanced photocatalytic activity facilitating the decomposition of AO7 compared with TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite in pulsed discharge plasma systems. Under pulsed discharge plasma, almost 100% AO7 is degraded by the MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite after 60 min at optimal conditions. The degradation efficiency of AO7 is also affected by the dosage of the composite catalyst and pulsed discharge peak voltage. As the amount of MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite and pulsed discharge peak voltage increases, the degradation efficiency of AO7 increases. The photocatalyst was implemented for 6 cycles and the degradation efficiency of AO7 remains higher than 85% under pulsed discharge plasma. Results indicate that the catalyst displays easy separation and minimal deactivation after several uses. Possible decomposition mechanisms were also investigated. MWCNTs are capable of improving the photocatalytic activity of TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite in pulsed discharge plasma systems primarily due to the photo-induced-electron absorption effect and the electron trap effect of MWCNTs. The results of this study establish the feasibility and potential implementation of MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composites in pulsed discharge plasma systems for the degradation of dye wastewater. PMID:26946167

  5. Enhanced degradation of azo dye in wastewater by pulsed discharge plasma coupled with MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the photocatalytic performance of TiO2 in pulsed discharge plasma systems, easily recycled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-TiO2 supported on γ-Al2O3 (MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3) composite photocatalyst were prepared. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the prepared catalysts were investigated using XRD, SEM, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated by degradation of azo dye acid orange II (AO7) in wastewater under pulsed discharge plasma. The results indicate that the MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite catalyst possesses enhanced photocatalytic activity facilitating the decomposition of AO7 compared with TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite in pulsed discharge plasma systems. Under pulsed discharge plasma, almost 100% AO7 is degraded by the MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite after 60 min at optimal conditions. The degradation efficiency of AO7 is also affected by the dosage of the composite catalyst and pulsed discharge peak voltage. As the amount of MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite and pulsed discharge peak voltage increases, the degradation efficiency of AO7 increases. The photocatalyst was implemented for 6 cycles and the degradation efficiency of AO7 remains higher than 85% under pulsed discharge plasma. Results indicate that the catalyst displays easy separation and minimal deactivation after several uses. Possible decomposition mechanisms were also investigated. MWCNTs are capable of improving the photocatalytic activity of TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composite in pulsed discharge plasma systems primarily due to the photo-induced-electron absorption effect and the electron trap effect of MWCNTs. The results of this study establish the feasibility and potential implementation of MWCNTs-TiO2/γ-Al2O3 composites in pulsed discharge plasma systems for the degradation of dye wastewater.

  6. Adsorption of aromatic compounds from the biodegradation of azo dyes on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, P. C. C.; Órfão, J. J. M.; Figueiredo, J. L.; Pereira, M. F. R.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption of three selected aromatic compounds (aniline, sulfanilic acid and benzenesulfonic acid) on activated carbons with different surface chemical properties was investigated at different solution pH. A fairly basic commercial activated carbon was modified by means of chemical treatment with HNO 3, yielding an acid activated carbon. The textural properties of this sample were not significantly changed after the oxidation treatment. Equilibrium isotherms of the selected compounds on the mentioned samples were obtained and the results were discussed in relation to their surface chemistry. The influence of electrostatic and dispersive interactions involved in the uptake of the compounds studied was evaluated. The Freundlich model was used to fit the experimental data. Higher uptakes are attained when the compounds are present in their molecular form. In general, adsorption was disfavoured by the introduction of oxygen-containing groups on the surface of the activated carbon.

  7. Evaluation of the treatment performance of lab-scaled vertical flow constructed wetlands in removal of organic compounds, color and nutrients in azo dye-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dogdu, Gamze; Yalcuk, Arda

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the treatment performance of vertical flow intermittent feeding constructed wetland (VFCW) in removal of organic pollution, nutrients and color in azo-dye containing wastewater. The systems consisted of PVC reactors, some filling materials such as gravel, sand and zeolite and wetland plants including Typha angustifolia and Canna indica. The average treatment efficiency of the systems for COD, color, sulphate, NH4-N, and PO4-P were in the range of 57-63%, 94-99%, 44-48%, 39-44%, and 84-88%, respectively among the VFCW reactors. It is concluded that VFCW reactor system can effectively be used in the treatment of dye-rich wastewater, especially for the removal of color and in the reduction of COD. Biofilm formation and cleavage of azo bonds could be observed by SEM and FTIR results, respectively. Almost similar NH4-N and PO4-P removal were obtained in all reactors by using same amount of zeolite media.

  8. Microextraction by packed sorbent and salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction for the determination of aromatic amines formed from azo dyes in textiles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Miguel del Nogal; Santos, Patricia Martín; Sappó, Cristina Pérez; Pavón, José Luis Pérez; Cordero, Bernardo Moreno

    2014-02-01

    EU legislation prohibits the use of certain azo dyes which, on reduction, form any of 22 aromatic amines listed in Regulation (EC) 1907/2006 at concentrations above the threshold limit of 30 mg Kg(-1). Two different extraction techniques for the determination of aromatic amines formed from azo dyes in textiles in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are described. The first one is based on microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) and the other approach involves salting-out-assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE). The influence of several parameters on the efficiency of the extraction using MEPS (sorbent material, sample volume, elution solvent, elution volume and washing steps, among others) and SALLE (extraction volume and amount of salt) were investigated. In addition, chromatographic separation was optimized and quadrupole mass spectrometry was evaluated using the synchronous SIM/scan data acquisition mode. The repeatability (n=8, S/N=3) of the methods, calculated as the relative standard deviation (RSD) was below 15 and 11% for all compounds when MEPS and SALLE were used, respectively. Standard additions procedure was used to quantify the aromatic amines in the textil samples. The detection limits in the samples for both methods were lower than the maximum value allowed by legislation. The results obtained in the analysis of textiles revealed the presence of o-anisidine, p-chloroaniline, 4-chloro-o-toluidine, 2-naphthylamine and 3,3'-dimethoxybenzidine in some of them.

  9. The UV and Laser Aging for PMMA/BDK/Azo-dye Polymer Blend Cured by UV Light Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A. A.; Omari, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    A polymeric-based solution blend composed of Azo-dye methyl red (MR) doped with polymethelmethacrelate (PMMA) solution, in addition, to the BenzylDimethylKetal (BDK) photoinitiator was made with optimum molar ratios and deposited on glass substrate by spin coating technique. The samples were then exposed to UV light beams in order to assist the layers polymerization by the proper exposure process. The photo chemical reaction occurred during the UV light polymerization process induces photo refractive changes which were presented as a function of wavelength or photon energy. Two main strong absorption peaks were observed in the films at around 330 nm (3.75 eV) and 500 nm (2.48 eV) for different curing time periods. This phenomenon enhances the films usage for optical data storage media at these two wavelengths. Since the deposited films were then useful as based layers for Read/Write optical data storage media, they were then tested by UV or laser Read/Write beams independently. The optical properties of the films were investigated while exposed to each beam. Finally, their optical properties were investigated as a function of aging time in order to relate the temporary and/or permanent light-exposure effect on the films compared to their optical properties before the light exposure. The films show a low absorbance at 630 nm (1.97 eV) and high absorbance at 480 nm (2.58 eV). This fact makes it possible to record holographic gratings in the polymeric film upon light exposure. In all cases the optical properties were evaluated by using the very sensitive, non destructive surface testing spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. The films were characterized in the spectral range of 300 to 1000 nm using Lorentz oscillator model with one oscillator centred at 4.15 eV. This study has been supported by the SEM and EDAX results to investigate the effect of the UV and visible beams on their optical properties. The results of this research determined the proper conditions for

  10. Solvatochromic behavior of the electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and some of its azo derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Hagagg, Sawsan S.; Ali, Alaa E.; Nasr, Nessma M.

    The electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and its azo derivatives have been studied in various solvents of different polarities. Multiple regression techniques were applied to calculate the regression and correlation coefficients based on an equation that relates the wavenumbers of the absorption band maxima (υmax-) to the solvent parameters; refractive index (n), dielectric constant (D), empirical Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters, π*(dipolarity/polarizability), α (solvent hydrogen-bond donor acidity) and β (solvent hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity). The fitting coefficient obtained from this analysis allows estimating the contribution of each type of interactions relative to total spectral shifts in solution. The dependence of υmax- on the solvent parameters indicates that the obtained bands are affected by specific and non-specific solute-solvent interactions.

  11. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of gallic acid and some of its azo complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Hagagg, Sawsan S.; Ali, Alaa E.; Nasr, Nessma M.

    2012-04-01

    A series of gallic acid and azo gallic acid complexes were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility. The complexes were of different geometries: Octahedral, Tetrahedral and Square Planar. ESR was studied for copper complexes. All of the prepared complexes were of isotropic nature. The thermal analyses of the complexes were studied by DTA and DSC techniques. The thermodynamic parameters and the thermal transitions, such as glass transitions, crystallization and melting temperatures for some ligands and their complexes were evaluated and discussed. The entropy change values, ΔS#, showed that the transition states are more ordered than the reacting complexes. The biological activities of some ligands and their complexes are tested against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The results showed that some complexes have a well considerable activity against different organisms.

  12. Solvatochromic behavior of the electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and some of its azo derivatives.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Mamdouh S; Hagagg, Sawsan S; Ali, Alaa E; Nasr, Nessma M

    2012-08-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of gallic acid and its azo derivatives have been studied in various solvents of different polarities. Multiple regression techniques were applied to calculate the regression and correlation coefficients based on an equation that relates the wavenumbers of the absorption band maxima (υ(max)(-)) to the solvent parameters; refractive index (n), dielectric constant (D), empirical Kamlet-Taft solvent parameters, π*(dipolarity/polarizability), α (solvent hydrogen-bond donor acidity) and β (solvent hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity). The fitting coefficient obtained from this analysis allows estimating the contribution of each type of interactions relative to total spectral shifts in solution. The dependence of υ(max)(-) on the solvent parameters indicates that the obtained bands are affected by specific and non-specific solute-solvent interactions.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Textile Azo Dye-Decolorizing and -Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PFK10, Isolated from the Common Effluent Treatment Plant of the Ankleshwar Industrial Area of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Faldu, P. R.; Kothari, V. V.; Kothari, C. R.; Rawal, C. M.; Domadia, K. K.; Patel, P. A.; Bhimani, H. D.; Raval, V. H.; Parmar, N. R.; Nathani, N. M.; Koringa, P. G.; Joshi, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PFK10, isolated from the common effluent treatment plant (CETP) of the Ankleshwar industrial area of Gujarat, India. The 6.04-Mb draft genome sequence of strain PFK10 provides information about the genes encoding enzymes that enable the strain to decolorize and degrade textile azo dye. PMID:24503984

  14. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial studies of 2-{(E)-[(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)imino]methyl}-4-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]phenol as a novel azo-azomethine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köse, Muhammet; Kurtoglu, Nurcan; Gümüşsu, Özkan; Tutak, Mustafa; McKee, Vickie; Karakaş, Duran; Kurtoglu, Mukerrem

    2013-12-01

    A novel dye, 2-{(E)-[(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)imino]methyl}-4-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]phenol dye was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-phenyldiazenyl]benzaldehyde with 2-amino-4-methylphenol in methanol. The title dye was characterized by its melting point, elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectroscopic studies. Molecular structure of the title dye was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. X-ray data showed that the dye crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c with cell parameters a = 18.541(2) Å, b = 4.7091(5) Å, c = 20.586(2) Å, V = 1761.5(3) Å3 and Z = 4. The title dye adopts azo-enamine tautomer in the solid state. The molecules crystallises as dimers assembled by two molecules of methanol via intermolecular hydrogen bonding resulting in R64(18) hydrogen bonding motif. Additionally, there is an intramolecular keto-amine hydrogen bond (NH⋯O) with a distance of 2.6172(17) Å. Optimized structures of the three possible tautomers of the compound were obtained using B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G and 3-21G basis sets in the gas phase. Thermal properties of the prepared dye were examined by thermogravimetric analysis and results indicated that the framework of the dye is stable up to 172 °C. Furthermore, the pathogenic activities of the synthesized dye were tested in vitro against the sensitive organisms, Bacillus cereous (ATCC 33019) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) as gram positive bacteria, Escherichia coli (ATCC 11229), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 13883) as gram negative bacteria and the results are discussed. The results indicated that the prepared dye had antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus and Bacillus cereuss), but it exhibited no activity against gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and K. pneumoniae).

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid linked to 2-phenylbenzoxazole-2-yl-5-acetic acid in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jilani, Jamal A; Shomaf, Maha; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the syntheses of 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid, (an analogue of a known nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug [NSAID]) and 5-[4-(benzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid)phenylazo]-2-hydroxybenzoic acid (a novel mutual azo prodrug of 5-aminosalicylic acid [5-ASA]) are reported. The structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed using infrared (IR), hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and mass spectrometry (MS) spectroscopy. Incubation of the azo compound with rat cecal contents demonstrated the susceptibility of the prepared azo prodrug to bacterial azoreductase enzyme. The azo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were evaluated for inflammatory bowel diseases, in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNB)-induced colitis in rats. The synthesized diazo compound and the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid were found to be as effective as 5-aminosalicylic acid for ulcerative colitis. The results of this work suggest that the 4-aminophenylbenzoxazol-2-yl-5-acetic acid may represent a new lead for treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:23983456

  16. Preparation and Photovoltaic Properties of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Using ZnO Nanorods Stacking Films on AZO Substrate as Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Xina; Liu, Rong; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional stacking of ZnO nanorods on conducting aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) glass were studied as efficient photoanodes of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By changing hydrothermal growth time and cycle times, the thickness of ZnO nanorods stacking films varied from 30 µm to 64 µm, and its influence on the energetic conversion efficiency of the DSSCs based on the stacking films photoanodes was investigated. The loading density of N719 on the surface of ZnO nanorods was studied to increase the efficiency of the cells. Annealing experiments showed that the AZO substrates remained good conductors until heated above 350 °C. A photoelectric conversion efficiency as high as ~2.0% together with ISC of ~9.5 mA/cm2, VOC of ~0.5 V and FF of ~41.4% was achieved for the DSSC using 50 µm-thick film stacking by ZnO nanorods as photoanode and N719 as sensitizer under illumination of AM1.5G solar light (power density of 100 mW/cm2). A charge separation and transfer mechanism was proposed for the ZnO nanorods stacking electrode-based DSSCs.

  17. Preparation and Photovoltaic Properties of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Using ZnO Nanorods Stacking Films on AZO Substrate as Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Wang, Xina; Liu, Rong; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional stacking of ZnO nanorods on conducting aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) glass were studied as efficient photoanodes of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). By changing hydrothermal growth time and cycle times, the thickness of ZnO nanorods stacking films varied from 30 µm to 64 µm, and its influence on the energetic conversion efficiency of the DSSCs based on the stacking films photoanodes was investigated. The loading density of N719 on the surface of ZnO nanorods was studied to increase the efficiency of the cells. Annealing experiments showed that the AZO substrates remained good conductors until heated above 350 °C. A photoelectric conversion efficiency as high as ~2.0% together with ISC of ~9.5 mA/cm2, VOC of ~0.5 V and FF of ~41.4% was achieved for the DSSC using 50 µm-thick film stacking by ZnO nanorods as photoanode and N719 as sensitizer under illumination of AM1.5G solar light (power density of 100 mW/cm2). A charge separation and transfer mechanism was proposed for the ZnO nanorods stacking electrode-based DSSCs. PMID:27451677

  18. Degradation of Amaranth azo dye in water by heterogeneous photo-Fenton process using FeWO4 catalyst prepared by microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Severo, Eric; Anchieta, Chayene Gonçalves; Foletto, Vitória Segabinazzi; Kuhn, Raquel Cristine; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Foletto, Edson Luiz

    2016-01-01

    FeWO4 particles were synthesized by a simple, rapid and facile microwave technique and their catalytic properties in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction were evaluated. This material was employed in the degradation of Amaranth azo dye. Individual and interactive effects of operational parameters such as pH, dye concentration and H2O2 dosage on the decolorization efficiency of Amaranth dye were evaluated by 2(3) central composite design. According to characterization techniques, a porous material and a well-crystallized phase of FeWO4 oxide were obtained. Regarding the photo-Fenton reaction assays, up to 97% color and 58% organic carbon removal were achieved in the best experimental conditions. In addition, the photo-Fenton process maintained treatment efficiency over five catalyst reuse cycles to indicate the durability of the FeWO4 catalyst. In summary, the results reveal that the synthesized FeWO4 material is a promising catalyst for wastewater treatment by heterogeneous photo-Fenton process. PMID:26744938

  19. Degradation of Amaranth azo dye in water by heterogeneous photo-Fenton process using FeWO4 catalyst prepared by microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Severo, Eric; Anchieta, Chayene Gonçalves; Foletto, Vitória Segabinazzi; Kuhn, Raquel Cristine; Collazzo, Gabriela Carvalho; Mazutti, Marcio Antonio; Foletto, Edson Luiz

    2016-01-01

    FeWO4 particles were synthesized by a simple, rapid and facile microwave technique and their catalytic properties in heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction were evaluated. This material was employed in the degradation of Amaranth azo dye. Individual and interactive effects of operational parameters such as pH, dye concentration and H2O2 dosage on the decolorization efficiency of Amaranth dye were evaluated by 2(3) central composite design. According to characterization techniques, a porous material and a well-crystallized phase of FeWO4 oxide were obtained. Regarding the photo-Fenton reaction assays, up to 97% color and 58% organic carbon removal were achieved in the best experimental conditions. In addition, the photo-Fenton process maintained treatment efficiency over five catalyst reuse cycles to indicate the durability of the FeWO4 catalyst. In summary, the results reveal that the synthesized FeWO4 material is a promising catalyst for wastewater treatment by heterogeneous photo-Fenton process.

  20. New 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine dye. Part III: Synthesis, characterization, thermal property, spectrophotometric and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Erfantalab, Malihe; Khanmohammadi, Hamid

    2014-05-01

    A new 1,2,4-triazole-based azo-azomethine compound, H2L, has been prepared by condensation reaction of 1-(3-formyl-4-hydroxyphenylazo)-4-ethylbenzene with prepared triazole-based diamine. The structure of H2L was characterized by using FT-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods as well as elemental analysis. Hard model chemometrics method has been used to determine the formation constants of zinc(II), copper(II), nickel(II) and cobalt(II) complexes of H2L in DMSO by UV-Vis spectrophotometric method. Solvatochromic behavior of the dye has been also investigated in some organic solvents with different polarities. Thermal properties of the prepared dye was examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Results indicated that the framework of the dye was stable up to 245 °C. Furthermore,(1)H chemical shifts and UV-Vis of H2L were studied by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO), continuous set of gauge transformations (CSGT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods respectively at the level of density functional theory using B3LYP/6-311+G(d) basis sets in DMSO. The computational data are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:24577255

  1. Study of the release of a microencapsulated acid dye in polyamide dyeing using mixed cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Isabel S C; Castanheira, Elisabete M S; Rocha Gomes, Jaime I N; Real Oliveira, M Elisabete C D

    2011-06-01

    The main objective of this work was to increase the retarding effect of the acid dye Telon(®) Blue RR (C.I. Acid Blue 62; DyStar, Frankfurt, Germany) release on polyamide fibres dyeing by encapsulation of the dye in liposomes as an alternative to synthetic auxiliaries, in order to reduce effluent pollution. The retarding effect achieved with the use of mixed cationic liposomes of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB)/soybean lecithin (containing a 10% molar fraction of DODAB) was better in comparison with either pure soybean lecithin liposomes or synthetic auxiliaries. The retarding effect of liposomes on the dye release was analysed through changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the acid dye at different conditions. The effect of temperature (in the range of 25 °C - 70 °C) on the spectroscopic behaviour of the dye in the absence and in presence of polyamide was also studied, in order to simulate the dyeing conditions. Exhaustion curves obtained in dyeing experiments showed that, below 45 °C, the retarding effect of the mixed liposomes (lecithin/DODAB (9:1)) was similar to that of the auxiliaries, but better than the one of pure lecithin liposomes. At higher temperatures (above 45 °C), the system lecithin/DODAB presents a better performance, achieving a higher final exhaustion level when compared with the commercial leveling agent without losing the smoothing effect of lecithin.

  2. Shifting the Azo-hydrazone tautomeric equilibrium of methyl yellow in acidic medium by the formation of inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ivania R.; Ando, Rômulo A.

    2012-01-01

    The protonation of methyl yellow (MY) leads to a tautomeric equilibrium involving the azo and hydrazone species, where the latter is predominant. Electronic and Raman spectroscopic data show that when MY in acidic medium is included in cyclodextrins, there is an inversion in the relative ratio of tautomers, in which the azo species become the major species. This indicates that the azo bond is included in cyclodextrin precluding its protonation. The understanding of the protonation, tautomeric and inclusion equilibria of these systems plays an important role in the designing of cyclodextrin based molecular machines controlled by light.

  3. Enhanced accumulation and visible light-assisted degradation of azo dyes in poly(allylamine hydrochloride)-modified mesoporous silica spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Xia Liu Bing; Hou Qian; Xu Hui; Chen Jianfeng

    2009-02-04

    A new route for the economic and efficient treatment of azo dye pollutants is reported, in which surface-modified organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous silica (MS) spheres were chosen as microreactors for the accumulation and subsequent photodegradation of pollutants in defined regions. The surface-modified silica materials were prepared by anchoring the polycationic species such as poly(allylamine hydrochloride) on MS spheres via a simple wet impregnation method. The as-synthesized spheres with well-defined porous structures exhibited 15 times of accumulating capacity for orange II and Congo red compared to that of the pure MS spheres. Diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the accumulated orange II and CR in defined MS spheres were rapidly degraded in the presence of Fenton reagent under visible radiation. Kinetics analysis in recycling degradation showed that the as-synthesized materials might be utilized as environment-friendly preconcentrators/microreactors for the remediation of dye wastewater.

  4. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as a catalyst to enhance the reductive decolourisation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Congo Red under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Mota, S; Nascimento, R F; Dos Santos, A B

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the catalytic effect of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to enhance the reductive decolourisation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Congo Red in batch and continuous-flow experiments. While testing the anaerobic sludge 1 in assays free of AQDS, the highest values for the first-order kinetic constant (k1) were found with co-substrates formate and glucose. In the assays that contained 50 microM of AQDS, the k1 values increased with all co-substrates tested, increasing by 3.5-fold when ethanol was the electron donor. The upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors R1 (AQDS-free) and R2 (AQDS-supplemented) reached excellent decolourisation efficiencies (higher than 90%) even for the high Congo Red concentration tested (1.2 mM). However, electron donor depletion in the influent drastically decreased the colour removal capacity in both bioreactors. Reactor R2 presented higher stability and decolourisation efficiency compared to R1, indicating that the addition of a redox mediator can be valuable for treating dye-coloured wastewaters. PMID:19717298

  5. Production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid by using waste biomass of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM generated after degradation of textile dye Direct Red 5B.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jadhav, Mital U; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. The isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM was found to decolorize dye Direct Red 5B (DR5B) and simultaneously it produced polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DR5B at 500mgl(-1) concentration within 24h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The medium contains carbon source as a molasses which was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates obtained revealed the compound as a polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid. The activity of PHA synthase was found more at 24h after dye addition. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation include veratrol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase and azo reductase was found to be induced during decolorization process. The FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DR5B. The GC-MS analysis of product obtained led to the identification of two metabolites after biotransformation of dye as p-amino benzenesulfonic acid and naphthalene-1-ol.

  6. Production of polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid by using waste biomass of Sphingobacterium sp. ATM generated after degradation of textile dye Direct Red 5B.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Kagalkar, Anuradha N; Jadhav, Mital U; Jadhav, Jyoti P; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2010-04-01

    The degradation of textile effluent using microorganisms has been studied extensively, but disposal of generated biomass after dye degradation is a serious problem. The isolated Sphingobacterium sp. ATM was found to decolorize dye Direct Red 5B (DR5B) and simultaneously it produced polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid (PHD). The organism decolorized DR5B at 500mgl(-1) concentration within 24h of dye addition and gave optimum production of PHD. The medium contains carbon source as a molasses which was found to be more significant within all carbon sources used. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates obtained revealed the compound as a polyhydroxyhexadecanoic acid. The activity of PHA synthase was found more at 24h after dye addition. The enzymes responsible for dye degradation include veratrol oxidase, laccase, DCIP (2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol) reductase, riboflavin reductase and azo reductase was found to be induced during decolorization process. The FTIR analysis of samples before and after decolorization of dye confirmed the biotransformation of DR5B. The GC-MS analysis of product obtained led to the identification of two metabolites after biotransformation of dye as p-amino benzenesulfonic acid and naphthalene-1-ol. PMID:20031399

  7. Soybean peroxidase-mediated degradation of an azo dye– a detailed mechanistic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peroxidases are emerging as an important class of enzymes that can be used for the efficient degradation of organic pollutants. However, detailed studies identifying the various intermediates produced and the mechanisms involved in the enzyme-mediated pollutant degradation are not widely published. Results In the present study, the enzymatic degradation of an azo dye (Crystal Ponceau 6R, CP6R) was studied using commercially available soybean peroxidase (SBP) enzyme. Several operational parameters affecting the enzymatic degradation of dye were evaluated and optimized, such as initial dye concentration, H2O2 dosage, mediator amount and pH of the solution. Under optimized conditions, 40 ppm dye solution could be completely degraded in under one minute by SBP in the presence of H2O2 and a redox mediator. Dye degradation was also confirmed using HPLC and TOC analyses, which showed that most of the dye was being mineralized to CO2 in the process. Conclusions Detailed analysis of metabolites, based on LC/MS results, showed that the enzyme-based degradation of the CP6R dye proceeded in two different reaction pathways- via symmetric azo bond cleavage as well as asymmetric azo bond breakage in the dye molecule. In addition, various critical transformative and oxidative steps such as deamination, desulfonation, keto-oxidation are explained on an electronic level. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses confirmed that the end products in both pathways were small chain aliphatic carboxylic acids. PMID:24308857

  8. Photo-electrochemical studies of chemically deposited nanocrystalline meso-porous n-type TiO2 thin films for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using simple synthesized azo dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezema, C. G.; Nwanya, A. C.; Ezema, B. E.; Patil, B. H.; Bulakhe, R. N.; Ukoha, P. O.; Lokhande, C. D.; Maaza, Malik; Ezema, Fabian I.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method onto fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrate at room temperature (300 K). Titanium trichloride and sodium hydroxide were used as cationic and anionic sources, respectively. The as-deposited and annealed films were characterized for structural, morphological, optical, electrical and wettability properties. The photoelectrochemical study of TiO2 sensitized with a laboratory synthesized organic dye (azo) was evaluated in the polyiodide electrolyte at 40 mW cm-2 light illumination intensity. The photovoltaic characteristics show a fill factor of 0.24 and solar conversion efficiency value of 0.032 % for a TiO2 thickness of 0.96 µm as compared to efficiency of 0.014 % for rose Bengal of the same thickness.

  9. Treatment of reactive azo dye from textile wastewater by burhead (Echinodorus cordifolius L.) in constructed wetland: Effect of molecular size.

    PubMed

    Noonpui, Sirikan; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2011-01-01

    The potential of burhead (Echinodorus cordifolius L.) for the treatment of textile wastewater has been investigated. Reactive red 2; RR2 [MW=615], reactive red 120; RR120 [MW=1469] and reactive red 141; RR141 [MW=1775] were studied in order to determine the effect of molecular size on the efficiency of dye removal by plants in batch systems of constructed wetlands under soil and soil-free conditions. Dye concentrations, total dissolve solids (TDS), conductivity and pH in the effluents, and the relative growth rates (RGR) of plants were measured. The highest efficiency of dye removal during 7 days under soil-free conditions was RR2 (33.09 μmol(RR2)kg(-1)(FW)), followed by RR120 (13.35 μmol(RR120)kg(-1)(FW)) and RR141 (10.57 μmol(RR141)kg(-1)(FW)), respectively. This suggests that the structure and size of dye molecule strongly affects the efficiency of dye removal by plant. The results from a synthetic wetland experiment found that dye removal was 96 % at 4 days and 6 days under soil and soil-free conditions, respectively. Furthermore, plants were able to decrease TDS (42 %), conductivity (50 %) and pH (from 9.5 to 7.4) within 2 days in the synthetic reactive red(141) dye wastewater (SRRW141) under soil-free conditions, thus demonstrating the potential of burhead for textile wastewater treatment.

  10. Investigation of the patterning efficiency in a new azo-dye copolymer under UV irradiation toward photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Licinio; Fiorini, Céline; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Raimond, Paul; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2008-04-01

    Azo-polymers have been the subject of a growing interest since the first demonstration of reversible birefringence and dichroism effects induced optically at room temperature in such materials. It is well established that the mechanisms involved are related to a molecular reorientation following photo induced trans-cis-trans isomerization of the chromophores. The interest for such materials has been strengthened with the more recent demonstration that the photo-isomerization mechanisms can be employed to induce controlled topographic modifications. A simple example is the induction of a sinusoidal modulation of the film surface by the irradiation with an interference pattern between two laser beams. Such a simple step technique appears thus as a simple tool towards realisation of photonic devices. However, if the realisation of gratings with periods in the visible wavelength scale is widely investigated, a strong decrease of the patterning efficiency is observed in the case of periods below 400nm, limiting then the potential of the technique. In order to circumvent this problem we have developed a new azo-polymer presenting an absorption band shifted to the Ultra Violet (UV) region of the spectrum. The possibility to induce gratings with periods down to 200nm with UV irradiation is evidenced. Optical geometries of excitation have been implemented to optimise the modulation efficiencies. As a potential application of the material investigated, the realisation of a polymer micro laser based on a distributed feedback scheme is demonstrated.

  11. Binding properties of HABA-type azo derivatives to avidin and avidin-related protein 4.

    PubMed

    Repo, Susanna; Paldanius, Tiina A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Halling, Katrin K; Huuskonen, Juhani; Pentikäinen, Olli T; Rissanen, Kari; Slotte, J Peter; Airenne, Tomi T; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Johnson, Mark S

    2006-10-01

    The chicken genome encodes several biotin-binding proteins, including avidin and avidin-related protein 4 (AVR4). In addition to D-biotin, avidin binds an azo dye compound, 4-hydroxyazobenzene-2-carboxylic acid (HABA), but the HABA-binding properties of AVR4 are not yet known. Differential scanning calorimetry, UV/visible spectroscopy, and molecular modeling were used to analyze the binding of 15 azo molecules to avidin and AVR4. Significant differences are seen in azo compound preferences for the two proteins, emphasizing the importance of the loop between strands beta3 and beta4 for azo ligand recognition; information on these loops is provided by the high-resolution (1.5 A) X-ray structure for avidin reported here. These results may be valuable in designing improved tools for avidin-based life science and nanobiotechnology applications.

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of SC-NTR: a subsidiary dye of allura red AC dye (FD&C red no. 40).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Goda, Y; Noguchi, H; Yamada, T; Yoshihira, K; Takeda, M

    1994-01-01

    A major subsidiary dye in US certified Allura Red AC dye (FD&C Red No. 40) has been isolated by preparative high performance liquid chromatography. The paper chromatographic properties of the isolated dye indicate that it is the dye designated as SC-NTR in a previous paper (Marmion 1971). Spectroscopic analysis of the isolated dye is consistent with the disodium salt of 6-hydroxy-5-(2-methoxy-5-methyl-3-sulphophenylazo)-2-naphthalen esulphonic acid, which is an azo-coupling product between the meta-isomer of cresidine-p-sulphonic acid (CSA) and Schaeffer's salt (SS).

  13. Differential fate of metabolism of a sulfonated azo dye Remazol Orange 3R by plants Aster amellus Linn., Glandularia pulchella (Sweet) Tronc. and their consortium.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Akhil N; Khandare, Rahul V; Waghmode, Tatoba R; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2011-06-15

    Plant consortium-AG of Aster amellus Linn. and Glandularia pulchella (Sweet) Tronc. showed complete decolorization of a dye Remazol Orange 3R in 36 h, while individually A. amellus and G. pulchella took 72 and 96 h respectively. Individually A. amellus showed induction in the activities of enzymes veratryl alcohol oxidase and DCIP reductase after degradation of the dye while G. pulchella showed induction of laccase and tyrosinase, indicating their involvement in the dye metabolism. Consortium-AG showed induction in the activities of lignin peroxidase, veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, tyrosinase and DCIP reductase. Two different sets of induced enzymes from A. amellus and G. pulchella work together in consortium-AG resulting in faster degradation of the dye. The degradation of the dye into different metabolites was confirmed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy analysis identified four metabolites of dye degradation by A. amellus as acetamide, benzene, naphthalene and 3-diazenylnaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid, four metabolites by G. pulchella as acetamide, 3-diazenyl-4-hydroxynaphthalene-2-sulfonic acid, naphthalen-1-ol and (ethylsulfonyl)benzene, while two metabolites by consortium-AG as 2-(phenylsulfonyl)ethanol and N-(naphthalen-2-yl)acetamide. The non-toxic nature of the metabolites of Remazol Orange 3R degradation was revealed by phytotoxicity studies.

  14. Effect of acidity on the polarization sensitivity of azo-indicator based recording media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaverdova, V. G.; Petrova, S. S.; Purtseladze, A. L.; Tarasashvili, V. I.; Obolashvili, N. Z.

    2013-01-01

    This is an experimental study of the photoanisotropic gyrotropic properties of recording media based on azoindicators — homologs (five dyes) of methyl orange-- introduced into the polymer matrix. Samples were prepared by a technology we have developed employing solvents with different acidities (pH 1.68-12.48). The samples were exposed to actinic radiation (λ = 488 nm) from an argon laser, and the photoinduced anisotropy measured in real time. The circular dichroism and circular birefringence in the layers under study are calculated for a neutral medium and at different pH levels.

  15. Torsionally Responsive C[subscript 3]-Symmetric Azo Dyes: Azo−Hydrazone Tautomerism, Conformational Switching, and Application for Chemical Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho Yong; Song, Xinli; Park, Hyunsoo; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Lee, Dongwhan

    2010-12-07

    An efficient triple azo coupling reaction between anilines and phloroglucinol furnished a series of C{sub 3}-symmetric molecules 7-9 supporting multiple conjugation pathways that converge at the molecular core. A combination of {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and density functional theory computational studies provided a coherent picture of the [n,{pi}]-conjugated molecular core, which is best described as the tris(hydrazone) [rather than tris(azo)] tautomer stabilized by resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding. For a homologous series of compounds, an increase in the torsional angles between the planar molecular core and the peripheral aryl groups results in a systematic blue shift in the low-energy electronic transitions (7, 523 nm; 8, 505 nm; 9, 445 nm in CHCl{sub 3}) that qualitatively correlates with the shrinkage of effective conjugation through structural distortion. Similar spectral shifts could also be induced by amine substrates that interact with the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network to trigger bond-twisting motions. Specifically, a brief exposure of a thin film of 7 to vapor samples of butyl-, hexyl-, diethyl-, and diisopropylamine resulted in a rapid and reversible color change from pink to dark-orange. Under similar conditions, however, triethylamine did not elicit any detectable color change, despite the fact that it has a significantly higher vapor pressure than n-hexylamine. These findings implicate that the hydrogen-bonding donor ability is a key requirement for the binding-induced conformational switching, which allows for direct naked-eye detection of volatile amines under ambient conditions.

  16. Intracellular azo decolorization is coupled with aerobic respiration by a Klebsiella oxytoca strain.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Xie, Tian; Hu, Jin-Mei; Wang, Shi; Li, Wen-Wei

    2015-03-01

    Reduction of azo dye methyl red coupled with aerobic respiration by growing cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 was investigated. In liquid media containing dye and 0.6 % glucose in a mineral salts base, 100 mg l(-1) of the dye are completely removed in 3 h under shaking conditions. The dye cannot be aerobically decolorized by strain GS-4-08 without extra carbon sources, indicating a co-metabolism process. Higher initial dye concentration prolonged the lag phase of the cell growth, but final cell concentrations of each batches reached a same level with range from 6.3 to 7.6 mg l(-1) after the dye adaption period. This strain showed stronger dye tolerance and decolorization ability than many reported strains. Furthermore, a new intracellular oxygen-insensitive azoreductase was isolated from this strain, and the specific activity of enzyme was 0.846 and 0.633 U mg(-1) protein in the presence of NADH and NADPH, respectively. N,N dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and anthranilic acid were stoichiometrically released from MR dye, indicating the breakage of azo bonds accounts for the intracellular decolorization. Combining the characteristics of azoreductase, the stoichiometry of EMP, and TCA cycle, the electron transfer chain theory of aerobic respiration, and the possible mechanism of aerobic respiration coupled with azo reduction by K. oxytoca GS-4-08 are proposed. This study is expected to provide a sound theoretical basis for the development of the K. oxytoca strain in aerobic process for azo dye containing wastewaters. PMID:25343980

  17. Different molecular complexity of linear-isomaltomegalosaccharides and β-cyclodextrin on enhancing solubility of azo dye ethyl red: towards dye biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Weeranuch; Kumagai, Yuya; Sadahiro, Juri; Maneesan, Janjira; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Sakairi, Nobuo; Kimura, Atsuo

    2014-10-01

    Intermolecular interaction of linear-type α-(1 → 6)-glucosyl megalosaccharide rich (L-IMS) and water-insoluble anionic ethyl red was firstly characterized in a comparison with inclusion complexation by cyclodextrins (CDs) to overcome the problem of poor solubility and bioavailability. Phase solubility studies indicated an enhancement of 3- and 9-fold over the solubility in water upon the presence of L-IMS and β-CD, respectively. (1)H NMR and circular dichrosim spectra revealed the dye forms consisted of 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex within the β-CD cavity, whereas they exhibited non-specific hydrophobic interaction, identified by solvent polarity changes, with L-IMS. The inclusion complex delivered by β-CD showed an uncompetitive inhibitory-type effect to azoreductase, particularly with high water content that did not promote dye liberation. Addition of the solid dye dispersed into coupled-enzyme reaction system supplied by L-IMS as the dye solubilizer provided usual degradation rate. The dye intermission in series exhibited successful removal with at least 5 cycles was economically feasible. PMID:25087215

  18. Different molecular complexity of linear-isomaltomegalosaccharides and β-cyclodextrin on enhancing solubility of azo dye ethyl red: towards dye biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Weeranuch; Kumagai, Yuya; Sadahiro, Juri; Maneesan, Janjira; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Sakairi, Nobuo; Kimura, Atsuo

    2014-10-01

    Intermolecular interaction of linear-type α-(1 → 6)-glucosyl megalosaccharide rich (L-IMS) and water-insoluble anionic ethyl red was firstly characterized in a comparison with inclusion complexation by cyclodextrins (CDs) to overcome the problem of poor solubility and bioavailability. Phase solubility studies indicated an enhancement of 3- and 9-fold over the solubility in water upon the presence of L-IMS and β-CD, respectively. (1)H NMR and circular dichrosim spectra revealed the dye forms consisted of 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex within the β-CD cavity, whereas they exhibited non-specific hydrophobic interaction, identified by solvent polarity changes, with L-IMS. The inclusion complex delivered by β-CD showed an uncompetitive inhibitory-type effect to azoreductase, particularly with high water content that did not promote dye liberation. Addition of the solid dye dispersed into coupled-enzyme reaction system supplied by L-IMS as the dye solubilizer provided usual degradation rate. The dye intermission in series exhibited successful removal with at least 5 cycles was economically feasible.

  19. Multi-scale biomarker evaluation of the toxicity of a commercial azo dye (Disperse Red 1) in an animal model, the freshwater cnidarian Hydra attenuata.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Laetitia; Pech, Nicolas; de Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Moreau, Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Acute (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) and chronic (7 days) tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of the commercial azo dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) using various biomarkers in the freshwater invertebrate Hydra attenuata. Morphological changes have been selected to calculate ecotoxicological thresholds for sublethal and lethal DR1 concentrations. A multinomial logistic model showed that the probability of each morphological stage occurrence was function of concentration, time and interaction between both. Results of oxidative balance parameter measurements (72 h and 7 days) suggest that polyps set up defense mechanisms to limit lipid peroxidation caused by DR1. DR1 exposure at hormetic concentrations induces increase of asexual reproductive rates. This result suggests (1) an impact on the fitness-related phenotypical traits and (2) trade-offs between reproduction and maintenance to allow the population to survive harsher conditions. Changes in serotonin immuno-labeling in polyps showing alterations in feeding behavior suggest that chronic DR1 exposure impaired neuronal processes related to ingesting behavior in H. attenuata. This ecotoxicity study sheds light on the possible serotonin function in Hydra model and reports for the first time that serotonin could play a significant role in feeding behavior. This study used a multi-scale biomarker approach investigating biochemical, morphological, reproductive and behavioral endpoints in Hydra attenuata. This organism is proposed for a pertinent animal model to assess ecotoxicological impact of pollutant mixtures in freshwater environment. PMID:27019466

  20. Optimization of working cathode position in sleeve-type bioelectrochemical system with inner chamber/outer chamber for azo dye treatment.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the optimization of working cathode position in sleeve-type bioelectrochemical system (BES) was evaluated with inner/outer chamber for azo dye decolorization. Results showed that the working position in outer chamber performed better with decolorization efficiencies of 97.8 ± 2.1% (7h) and 94.0 ± 2.3% (16 h) than that in inner chamber as the volume ratio Vcathode:Vanode=1:1 and 3:1, respectively. The current and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis indicated that the proton/electron transfer and anolyte diffusion could be improved using outer chamber as working position. The decolorization with increased volume ratio could be further improved through the strategy of increasing substrate concentration, which would provide enough electrons and decrease diffusion resistance, further improving the whole performance with increased outer cathode volume. It has the great potential in sleeve-type configuration application and would create more challenges for process optimization and maintenance.

  1. Biodegradation of C.I. Acid Red 1 by indigenous bacteria Stenotrophomonas sp. BHUSSp X2 isolated from dye contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Lata; Tiwary, Dhanesh; Mishra, Pradeep Kumar

    2016-03-01

    A significant proportion of xenobiotic recalcitrant azo dyes are being released in environment during carpet dyeing. The bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas sp. BHUSSp X2 was isolated from dye contaminated soil of carpet industry, Bhadohi, India. The isolated bacterial strain was identified morphologically, biochemically, and on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The isolate decolorized 97 % of C.I. Acid Red 1 (Acid RED G) at the concentration of 200 mg/l within 6 h under optimum static conditions (temperature -35 °C, pH 8, and initial cell concentration 7 × 10(7) cell/ml). Drastic reduction in dye degradation rate was observed beyond initial dye concentration from 500 mg/l (90 %), and it reaches to 25 % at 1000 mg/l under same set of conditions. The analysis related to decolorization and degradation was done using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, HPLC, and FTIR, whereas the GC-MS technique was utilized for the identification of degradation products. Phytotoxicity analysis revealed that degradation products are less toxic as compared to the original dye.

  2. The development and amino acid binding ability of nano-materials based on azo derivatives: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xuefang; Du, Jinge; Yang, Wancai; Liu, Yun; Fu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Xiaofang; Yan, Ruifang; Yao, Ningcong; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jinlian; Xu, Xiufang

    2014-05-01

    Two nano-material-containing azo groups have been designed and developed, and the binding ability of nano-materials with various amino acids has been characterized by UV-vis and fluorescence titrations. Results indicated that two nano-materials showed the strongest binding ability for homocysteine among twenty normal kinds of amino acids (alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine, glycine, serine, threonine, asparagine, phenylalanine, histidine, tryptophan, proline, lysine, glutamine, tyrosine and homocysteine). The reason for the high sensitivity for homocysteine was that two nano-materials containing an aldehyde group reacted with SH in homocysteine and afforded very stable thiazolidine derivatives. Theoretical investigation further illustrated the possible binding mode in host-guest interaction and the roles of molecular frontier orbitals in molecular interplay. Thus, the two nano-materials can be used as optical sensors for the detection of homocysteine.

  3. Surfactant anchoring and aggregate structure at silica nanoparticles: a persuasive facade for the adsorption of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Sood, Aastha; Mehta, S K

    2014-09-01

    Nanotechnology's aptitude to silhouette matter at the scale of the nanometer has unlocked the flap to new inventions of applications in material science and nanomedicine. Engineered silica nanoparticles are key actor of this strategy. The amphitheatre of silica nanoparticles is inexplicably bilateral. Silica particles play essential function in everyday commercial purposes for instance energy storage, chemical and biological sensors, food processing and catalysis. One of the most appealing applications to emerge in the recent years is the use of silica particles for cleaning up contaminants in groundwater, soil and sediments. Herein this work, surfactant modified silica nanoparticles with unique surface and pore properties as well as high surface areas have been extensively investigated as an alternative for the dye removal. The physical and chemical characterizations of adsorbent have been studied using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. The present investigation aims to explore the comparative effect of different surfactants during the formation of the target composite materials. The effects of various parameters like pH, adsorbent doses, dye concentration, addition of salt have also been investigated. These findings indicate that the nano silica particles are effective materials for dye removal and can be used to alleviate environmental problems. PMID:25924337

  4. Surfactant anchoring and aggregate structure at silica nanoparticles: a persuasive facade for the adsorption of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Savita; Sood, Aastha; Mehta, S K

    2014-09-01

    Nanotechnology's aptitude to silhouette matter at the scale of the nanometer has unlocked the flap to new inventions of applications in material science and nanomedicine. Engineered silica nanoparticles are key actor of this strategy. The amphitheatre of silica nanoparticles is inexplicably bilateral. Silica particles play essential function in everyday commercial purposes for instance energy storage, chemical and biological sensors, food processing and catalysis. One of the most appealing applications to emerge in the recent years is the use of silica particles for cleaning up contaminants in groundwater, soil and sediments. Herein this work, surfactant modified silica nanoparticles with unique surface and pore properties as well as high surface areas have been extensively investigated as an alternative for the dye removal. The physical and chemical characterizations of adsorbent have been studied using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. The present investigation aims to explore the comparative effect of different surfactants during the formation of the target composite materials. The effects of various parameters like pH, adsorbent doses, dye concentration, addition of salt have also been investigated. These findings indicate that the nano silica particles are effective materials for dye removal and can be used to alleviate environmental problems.

  5. Decolorization of azo dye C.I. Reactive Black 5 by ozonation in aqueous solution: influencing factors, degradation products, reaction pathway and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing; Dai, Yong; Han, Xiangyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ozonation treatment of C.I. Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated at various operating parameters. The results showed that the aqueous solution initially containing 200 mg/L RB5 was quickly decolorized at pH 8.0 with an ozone dose of 3.2 g/h. Reaction intermediates with m/z 281, 546, 201, 350, 286 and 222 were elucidated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while sulfate ion, nitrate ion and three carboxylic acids (i.e., oxalic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid) were identified by ion exchange chromatography. Thus, the cleavage of the azo bond and the introduction of OH groups in the corresponding positions were proposed as the predominant reaction pathway. The detachment of sulfonic groups was also commonly observed during the ozonation treatment. The proposed degradation mechanism was confirmed by frontier electron density calculations, suggesting the feasibility of predicting the major events in the whole ozonation process with the computational method. Compared with RB5 degradation, the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) proceeded much more slowly, and approximately 54% TOC was removed after 4 h of ozonation. Acute toxicity tests with Photobacterium phosphoreum showed that the toxicity of reaction solution was firstly increased and then decreased to a negligible level after 160 min.

  6. Decolorization of azo dye C.I. Reactive Black 5 by ozonation in aqueous solution: influencing factors, degradation products, reaction pathway and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing; Dai, Yong; Han, Xiangyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ozonation treatment of C.I. Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated at various operating parameters. The results showed that the aqueous solution initially containing 200 mg/L RB5 was quickly decolorized at pH 8.0 with an ozone dose of 3.2 g/h. Reaction intermediates with m/z 281, 546, 201, 350, 286 and 222 were elucidated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while sulfate ion, nitrate ion and three carboxylic acids (i.e., oxalic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid) were identified by ion exchange chromatography. Thus, the cleavage of the azo bond and the introduction of OH groups in the corresponding positions were proposed as the predominant reaction pathway. The detachment of sulfonic groups was also commonly observed during the ozonation treatment. The proposed degradation mechanism was confirmed by frontier electron density calculations, suggesting the feasibility of predicting the major events in the whole ozonation process with the computational method. Compared with RB5 degradation, the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) proceeded much more slowly, and approximately 54% TOC was removed after 4 h of ozonation. Acute toxicity tests with Photobacterium phosphoreum showed that the toxicity of reaction solution was firstly increased and then decreased to a negligible level after 160 min. PMID:27054721

  7. Polymer complexes. LVII. Supramolecular assemblies of novel polymer complexes of dioxouranium(VI) with some substituted allyl azo dye compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diab, M. A.; El-Sonbati, A. Z.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Balboula, M. Z.

    2013-05-01

    A novel method to synthesize some dioxouranium(VI) polymer complexes of the general formula [UO2(Ln)2(OAc)2] (where HLn = azo allyl rhodanine). The structure of the novel mononuclear dioxoutranium(VI) polymer complexes was characterized using elemental analysis, spectral (electronic, infrared, 1H &13C NMR) studies, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermal analysis. The molar conductivities show that all the polymer complexes are non-electrolytes. The IR showed that the ligand HLn act as bidentate neutral through carbonyl group and imine group nitrogen atom forming thereby a six-membered chelating ring and concomitant formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The υ3 frequency of UO2+2 has been shown to be an excellent molecular probe for studying the coordinating power of the ligands. The values of υ3 of the prepared complexes containing UO2+2 were successfully used to calculate the force constant, FUO (10-8 N/Å) and the bond length RUO (Å) of the Usbnd O bond. A strategy based upon both theoretical and experimental investigations has been adopted. The theoretical aspects are described in terms of the well-known theory of 5d-4f transitions. Wilson's, matrix method, Badger's formula, and Jones and El-Sonbati equations were used to calculate the Usbnd O bond distances from the values of the stretching and interaction force constants. The most probable correlation between Usbnd O force constant to Usbnd O bond distance were satisfactorily discussed in term of Badger's rule and the equations suggested by Jones and El-Sonbati. The effect of Hammet constant is also discussed.

  8. 40 CFR 721.5281 - 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[(2,4-dimethyl-6-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2â²,2â³-nitrilotris...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for...-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris (9CI). (a) Chemical substance...

  9. 40 CFR 721.5281 - 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[(2,4-dimethyl-6-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2â²,2â³-nitrilotris...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for...-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris (9CI). (a) Chemical substance...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5281 - 2-Naphthalenesulfonic acid, 3-[[4-[(2,4-dimethyl-6-sulfophenyl)azo]-2-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-methoxy-5-methylphenyl]azo]-4-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2â²,2â³-nitrilotris...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for...-hydroxy-7-(phenylamino)-, sodium salt, compd. With 2,2′,2″-nitrilotris (9CI). (a) Chemical substance...

  11. Binding of Sudan II and IV to lecithin liposomes and E. coli membranes: insights into the toxicity of hydrophobic azo dyes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Gao, Hong-Wen; Ren, Jiao-Rong; Chen, Ling; Li, Yu-Cheng; Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhao, He-Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Background Sudan red compounds are hydrophobic azo dyes, still used as food additives in some countries. However, they have been shown to be unsafe, causing tumors in the liver and urinary bladder in rats. They have been classified as category 3 human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. A number of hypotheses that could explain the mechanism of carcinogenesis have been proposed for dyes similar to the Sudan red compounds. Traditionally, investigations of the membrane toxicity of organic substances have focused on hydrocarbons, e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and DDT. In contrast to hydrocarbons, Sudan red compounds contain azo and hydroxy groups, which can form hydrogen bonds with the polar head groups of membrane phospholipids. Thus, entry may be impeded. They could have different toxicities from other lipophilic hydrocarbons. The available data show that because these compounds are lipophilic, interactions with hydrophobic parts of the cell are important for their toxicity. Lipophilic compounds accumulate in the membrane, causing expansion of the membrane surface area, inhibition of primary ion pumps and increased proton permeability. Results This work investigated the interactions of the amphiphilic compounds Sudan II and IV with lecithin liposomes and live Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sudan II and IV binding to lecithin liposomes and live E. coli corresponds to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. In the Sudan red compounds – lecithin liposome solutions, the binding ratio of Sudan II to lecithin is 1/31 and that of Sudan IV to 1/314. The binding constant of the Sudan II-lecithin complex is 1.75 × 104 and that of the Sudan IV-lecithin complex 2.92 × 105. Besides, the influences of pH, electrolyte and temperature were investigated and analyzed quantitatively. In the Sudan red compounds – E.coli mixture, the binding ratios of Sudan II and Sudan IV to E.coli membrane phospholipid are 1/29 and 1/114. The binding constants

  12. Assessment of the functionality of a pilot-scale reactor and its potential for electrochemical degradation of calmagite, a sulfonated azo-dye.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shirish; Cluxton, Phillip; Kemper, Mark; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2008-10-01

    Electrochemical degradation (ECD) is a promising technology for in situ remediation of diversely contaminated environmental matrices by application of a low level electric potential gradient. This investigation, prompted by successful bench-scale ECD of trichloroethylene, involved development, parametric characterization and evaluation of a pilot-scale electrochemical reactor for degradation of calmagite, a sulfonated azo-dye used as a model contaminant. The reactor has two chambers filled with granulated graphite for electrodes. The system has electrical potential, current, conductivity, pH, temperature, water-level and flow sensors for automated monitoring. The reactor supports outdoor and fail-safe venting, argon purging, temperature regulation and auto-shutdown for safety. Treatment involves recirculating the contaminated solution through the electrode beds at small flow velocities mimicking low fluid-flux in groundwater and submarine sediments. The first phase of the investigation involved testing of the reactor components, its parametric probes and the automated data acquisition system for performance as designed. The results showed hydraulic stability, consistent pH behavior, marginal temperature rise (<5 degrees C) and overall safe and predictable performance under diverse conditions. Near complete removal of calmagite was seen at 3-10V of applied voltage in 8-10h. The effects of voltage and strength of electrolyte on degradation kinetics have been presented. Further, it was observed from the absorption spectra that as calmagite degrades over time, new peaks appear. These peaks were associated with degradation products identified using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A reaction mechanism for ECD of calmagite has also been proposed.

  13. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: inhibition of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes II and VII with simple aromatic sulfonamides and some azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Carta, Fabrizio; Pothen, Blessy; Maresca, Alfonso; Tiwari, Meena; Singh, Vineet; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2009-08-01

    Several substituted benzenesulfonamides were synthesized by various pathways starting from sulfanilamide. The sulfanilamide diazonium salt was reacted with copper (I) halides, potassium iodide and/or aromatic derivatives, leading to 4-halogeno-, and 4-hydroxy-benzenesulfonamides as well as diazo dyes incorporating sulfamoyl moieties. These sulfonamides were assayed as inhibitors of two physiologically relevant isoforms of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), i.e., the cytosolic CA II (ubiquitous), and CA VII (brain-specific enzyme). Good CA inhibitory activity was detected for some of these derivatives, with inhibition constants (Ki) in the range of 17.5-863 nm against CA II; and 30-4200 nm against CA VII. PMID:19549076

  14. Copper(II)-catalyzed room temperature aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides to acyl-nitroso and azo intermediates, and their Diels-Alder trapping.

    PubMed

    Chaiyaveij, Duangduan; Cleary, Leah; Batsanov, Andrei S; Marder, Todd B; Shea, Kenneth J; Whiting, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    CuCl(2), in the presence of a 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline ligand, is an effective catalyst for the room temperature, aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides, to acyl-nitroso and azo dienophiles respectively, which are efficiently trapped in situ via both inter- and intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reactions with dienes. Both inter- and intramolecular variants of the Diels-Alder reaction are suitable under the reaction conditions using a variety of solvents. Under the same conditions, an acyl hydrazide was also oxidized to give an acyl-azo dienophile which was trapped intramolecularly by a diene. PMID:21644530

  15. Environmental assessment of the degradation potential of mushroom fruit bodies of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. towards synthetic azo dyes and contaminating effluents collected from textile industries in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Prasanna, Apoorva; Manjunath, Sirisha P; Karanth, Soujanya S; Nazre, Ambika

    2016-02-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. is one of the edible mushrooms currently gaining attention as environmental restorer. The present study explores the potential of P. ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. in degradation of textile dyes and effluents. The mushroom cultivation was carried out using paddy bed as substrate. The fully grown mushroom fruit bodies were used as a bioremediation agent against two industrially important azo dyes such as nylon blue and cotton yellow and few effluents collected from various textile industries in Karnataka, India. The ideal growth parameters such as temperature, pH, and dye concentrations for effective degradation were carried out. One of the main enzymes, laccase, responsible for biodegradation, was partially characterized. The degradation was found to be ideal at pH 3.0 and temperature at 26-28 °C. This study demonstrated a percentage degradation of 78.10, 90.81, 82.5, and 64.88 for dye samples such as nylon blue (50 ppm), cotton yellow (350 ppm), KSIC effluents, and Ramanagar effluents at 28 °C within 15th days respectively in comparison with other temperature conditions. Similarly, a percentage degradation of 35.99, 33.33, 76.13 and 25.8 for nylon blue (50 ppm), cotton yellow (350 ppm), Karnataka Silk Industries Corporation (KSIC) effluents and Ramnagar effluents were observed at pH 3.0 within 15 days, respectively (p < 0.05). Thus, the current study concluded that the utilization of P. ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. at ideal environmental conditions is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach for the degradation of various azo dyes and textile effluents which are harmful to the ecosystem. PMID:26818015

  16. Environmental assessment of the degradation potential of mushroom fruit bodies of Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. towards synthetic azo dyes and contaminating effluents collected from textile industries in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Prasanna, Apoorva; Manjunath, Sirisha P; Karanth, Soujanya S; Nazre, Ambika

    2016-02-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. is one of the edible mushrooms currently gaining attention as environmental restorer. The present study explores the potential of P. ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. in degradation of textile dyes and effluents. The mushroom cultivation was carried out using paddy bed as substrate. The fully grown mushroom fruit bodies were used as a bioremediation agent against two industrially important azo dyes such as nylon blue and cotton yellow and few effluents collected from various textile industries in Karnataka, India. The ideal growth parameters such as temperature, pH, and dye concentrations for effective degradation were carried out. One of the main enzymes, laccase, responsible for biodegradation, was partially characterized. The degradation was found to be ideal at pH 3.0 and temperature at 26-28 °C. This study demonstrated a percentage degradation of 78.10, 90.81, 82.5, and 64.88 for dye samples such as nylon blue (50 ppm), cotton yellow (350 ppm), KSIC effluents, and Ramanagar effluents at 28 °C within 15th days respectively in comparison with other temperature conditions. Similarly, a percentage degradation of 35.99, 33.33, 76.13 and 25.8 for nylon blue (50 ppm), cotton yellow (350 ppm), Karnataka Silk Industries Corporation (KSIC) effluents and Ramnagar effluents were observed at pH 3.0 within 15 days, respectively (p < 0.05). Thus, the current study concluded that the utilization of P. ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr.) P. Kumm. at ideal environmental conditions is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach for the degradation of various azo dyes and textile effluents which are harmful to the ecosystem.

  17. Determination of banned 10 azo-dyes in hot chili products by gel permeation chromatography-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Han-Wen; Wang, Feng-Chi; Ai, Lian-Feng

    2007-09-14

    An accurate method based on the use of gel permeation chromatography (GPC)-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry interfaced with electrospray ionization (GPC-LC-ESI-MS/MS) was devised for the simultaneous determination of Sudan (I-IV), Sudan Orange G, Sudan Red B, Sudan Red G, Sudan Red 7B, Butter Yellow and Para Red in hot chili products. A GPC clean-up procedure was developed for simultaneous quantification of 10 dyes in hot chili and hot chili products avoiding some interference and permitting multiple injections without damaging the column. A HPLC was performed on an Inertsil C18 column using a multistep gradient elution with 0.1% formic acid and methanol as the mobile phase. Mass spectral acquisition was done in positive ion mode. Linearity of around three orders in the magnitude of concentration was generally obtained with the correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.9984-0.9997. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for the investigated dyes were in the ranges of 0.1-1.8 and 0.4-5.0 microg/kg depending on matrices, respectively. The recoveries of the 10 synthetic dyes in five matrices ranged from 81.7 to 92.9%. The intra- and inter-day precision (RSDs) was between 2.9-7.8 and 3.9-8.1%, respectively. This method has been applied successfully for the determination of the studied 10 banned dyes in hot chili products.

  18. 40 CFR 721.2140 - Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt. 721.2140 Section 721.2140 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2140 Carbo-poly-cycli-col...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2140 - Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt. 721.2140 Section 721.2140 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2140 Carbo-poly-cycli-col...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2140 - Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt. 721.2140 Section 721.2140 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2140 Carbo-poly-cycli-col...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2140 - Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt. 721.2140 Section 721.2140 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2140 Carbo-poly-cycli-col...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2140 - Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Carbo-poly-cycli-col azo-alkyl-aminoalkyl-carbo-mono-cyclic ester, halogen acid salt. 721.2140 Section 721.2140 Protection of Environment... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2140 Carbo-poly-cycli-col...

  3. Chitosan and chemically modified chitosan beads for acid dyes sorption.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Kamari; Wan Saime, Wan Ngah; Lai Ken, Liew

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities of chitosan and chitosan-EGDE (ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) beads for removing Acid Red 37 (AR 37) and Acid Blue 25 (AB 25) from aqueous solution were examined. Chitosan beads were cross-linked with EGDE to enhance its chemical resistance and mechanical strength. Experiments were performed as a function of pH, agitation period and concentration of AR 37 and AB 25. It was shown that the adsorption capacities of chitosan for both acid dyes were comparatively higher than those of chitosan-EGDE. This is mainly because cross-linking using EGDE reduces the major adsorption sites -NH3+ on chitosan. Langmuir isotherm model showed the best conformity compared to Freundlich and BET. The kinetic experimental data agreed very well to the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The desorption study revealed that after three cycles of adsorption and desorption by NaOH and HCl, both adsorbents retained their promising adsorption abilities. FT-IR analysis proved that the adsorption of acid dyes onto chitosan-based adsorbents was a physical adsorption. Results also showed that chitosan and chitosan-EGDE beads were favourable adsorbers and could be employed as low-cost alternatives for the removal of acid dyes in wastewater treatment. PMID:19634439

  4. A comparative study on decolorization of reactive azo and indigoid dyes by free/immobilized pellets of Trametes versicolor and Funalia trogii.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Seval Cing; Yesilada, Ozfer

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate decolorization of Acid Blue 74 and Reactive Blue 198 dyes by free and immobilized white rot fungal pellets in order to confirm the possibility of practical application via repeated-batch cultivation. Decolorization studies were conducted using free pellets (FP), fungal cells immobilized on activated carbon (IFCAC) and pinewood (IFCP), and also fungal cells entrapped in alginate beads (FCEAB). No additional nitrogen and carbon source was used and high decolorization rates were achieved in only dye-contained media without pH adjustment. Acid Blue 74 was decolorized 96 and 94% within 2 hr by Trametes versicolor and Funalia trogii free pellets, respectively. These values were 87 and 84% for Reactive Blue 198, in this respect. Immobilization of fungal cells on pinewood increased the usability of pellets and the average decolorization efficiency of both dyes. The micro environment changed in the presence of pinewood and increased the stability of immobilized pellets. Decolorization was performed rapidly and efficiently. Laccase activity enhanced with availability of pinewood, and high laccase production with F. trogii was obtained. After separation by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the molecular weight of T versicolor and F. trogii laccase bands was determined 64 and 61 kDa approximately. Green bands were obtained by the activity staining process with laccase substrate (ABTS) after gel renaturation step.

  5. Mutagenicity testing of some commonly used dyes.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, K T; Fulk, G E; Andrews, A W

    1981-01-01

    Seventeen commonly used dyes and 16 of their metabolites or derivatives were tested in the Salmonella-mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutagens active with and without added Aroclor-induced rat liver microsome preparations (S9) were 3-aminopyrene, lithol red, methylene blue (USP), methyl yellow, neutral red, and phenol red. Those mutagenic only with S9 activation were 4-aminopyrazolone, 2,4-dimethylaniline, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl red, and 4-phenyl-azo-1-naphthylamine. Orange II was mutagenic only without added S9. Nonmutagenic azo dyes were allura red, amaranth, ponceau R, ponceau SX, sunset yellow, and tartrazine. Miscellaneous dyes not mutagenic were methyl green, methyl violet 2B, and nigrosin. Metabolites of the azo dyes that were not mutagenic were 1-amino-2-naphthol hydrochloride, aniline, anthranilic acid, cresidine salt, pyrazolone T,R-amino salt (1-amino-2-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic disodium salt), R-salt, Schaeffer's salt (2-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid, sodium salt), sodium naphthionate, sulfanilamide, and sulfanilic acid. 4-Amino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid sodium salt was also not mutagenic. Fusobacterium sp. 2 could reductively cleave methyl yellow to N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine which was then activated to a mutagen. PMID:7039509

  6. Process development for the batch and bulk removal and recovery of a hazardous, water-soluble azo dye (Metanil Yellow) by adsorption over waste materials (Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya).

    PubMed

    Mittal, Alok; Gupta, V K; Malviya, Arti; Mittal, Jyoti

    2008-03-01

    Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya have been used as adsorbents for the removal of a hazardous azo dye-Metanil Yellow from its aqueous solutions. Adsorption of Metanil Yellow on these adsorbents has been studied as function of time, temperature, concentration and pH. Batch adsorption studies, kinetic studies and column operations enabled extraction of lethal dye from wastewaters. Adsorption equilibrium data confirms both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and monolayer coverage of dye over adsorbents. Kinetic data have been employed to calculate specific rate constants, indicating thereby involvement of first order kinetics in the on-going adsorption and activation energy was determined as 0.813 and 1.060 kJ mol(-1) for Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, respectively. For both adsorbents, the adsorption process has been found governing by film diffusion, over the entire concentration range. Column operations have also been performed for the bulk removal of the dye and also to examine the practical utilization of fixed bed adsorption technique in elimination of dangerous effluent. Saturation factors for Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns have been calculated as 99.15 and 99.38%, respectively. Attempts have also been made to regenerate the dye from the exhausted columns using aqueous sodium hydroxide as eluent. PMID:17659833

  7. Toxicity removal assessments related to degradation pathways of azo dyes: Toward an optimization of Electro-Fenton treatment.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Xuan Huong; Nguyen, Thi Van; Yacouba, Zoulkifli Amadou; Zoungrana, Laetitia; Avril, Florent; Petit, Eddy; Mendret, Julie; Bonniol, Valerie; Bechelany, Mikhael; Lacour, Stella; Lesage, Geoffroy; Cretin, Marc

    2016-10-01

    The degradation pathway of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by Electro-Fenton process using carbon felt cathode was investigated via HPLC-UV and LC-MS, IC, TOC analysis and bioassays (Vibrio Fischeri 81.9% Microtox(®) screening tests). The TOC removal of AO7 reached 96.2% after 8 h treatment with the optimal applied current density at -8.3 mA cm(-2) and 0.2 mM catalyst concentration. The toxicity of treated solution increased rapidly to its highest value at the early stage of electrolysis (several minutes), corresponding to the formation of intermediate poisonous aromatic compounds such as 1,2-naphthaquinone (NAPQ) and 1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ). Then, the subsequent formation of aliphatic short-chain carboxylic acids like acetic acid, formic acid, before the complete mineralization, leaded to a non-toxic solution after 270 min for 500 mL of AO7 (1 mM). Moreover, a quantitative analysis of inorganic ions (i.e. ammonium, nitrate, sulfate) produced during the course of degradation could help to verify molar balance with regard to original nitrogen and sulfur elements. To conclude, a clear degradation pathway of AO7 was proposed, and could further be applied to other persistent pharmaceuticals in aquatic environment. PMID:27441990

  8. Multilayer Dye Aggregation at Dye/TiO2 Interface via π…π Stacking and Hydrogen Bond and Its Impact on Solar Cell Performance: A DFT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Xiaogang; Rao, Weifeng; Li, Jingfa

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer dye aggregation at the dye/TiO2 interface of dye-sensitized solar cells is probed via first principles calculations, using p-methyl red azo dye as an example. Our calculations suggest that the multilayer dye aggregates at the TiO2 surface can be stabilized by π…π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions. Compared with previous two-dimensional monolayer dye/TiO2 model, the multilayer dye aggregation model proposed in this study constructs a three-dimensional multilayer dye/TiO2 interfacial structure, and provides a better agreement between experimental and computational results in dye coverage and dye adsorption energy. In particular, a dimer forms by π…π stacking interactions between two neighboring azo molecules, while one of them chemisorbs on the TiO2 surface; a trimer may form by introducing one additional azo molecule on the dimer through a hydrogen bond between two carboxylic acid groups. Different forms of multilayer dye aggregates, either stabilized by π…π stacking or hydrogen bond, exhibit varied optical absorption spectra and electronic properties. Such variations could have a critical impact on the performance of dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:27767196

  9. The Electropolymerization and Characterizations of Acid Red Dye Doped Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Liang, Fei-Yue; Liao, Jia-Xing; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Yi-Ping; Xian, Ze-Yu

    2016-05-01

    The electrochromic properties of an electrochemical polymerized composite consisted of polyaniline doped with acid red dye (PANI-ARD) are reported. The structures of PANIARD were characterized via cycle voltammograms, spectroelectrochemistry and colorimetric analysis. Film of the PANI-ARD composites of different concentrations appears violet, aubergine in the neutral state and darkblue in the oxidized state, which are different from the pure PANI of yellow (-0.8V) and blue (1.0V). The oxidation and reduction response speed of PANI-ARD was a bit lower than those obtained in pure PANI. It is shown that acid dye doping is an effective method to broaden the color change range of the electrochromicmateials.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10633 - Aromatic sulfonic acid amino azo dye salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for... Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N100 respirator with an assigned...

  11. Photoelectrocatalysis based on Ti/TiO2 nanotubes removes toxic properties of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Red 13 and Disperse Orange 1 from aqueous chloride samples.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, E R A; Oliveira, G A R; Grando, M D; Lizier, T M; Zanoni, M V B; Oliveira, D P

    2013-07-30

    This work describes the efficiency of photoelectrocatalysis based on Ti/TiO2 nanotubes in the degradation of the azo dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Red 13 and Disperse Orange 1 and to remove their toxic properties, as an alternative method for the treatment of effluents and water. For this purpose, the discoloration rate, total organic carbon (TOC) removal, and genotoxic, cytotoxic and mutagenic responses were determined, using the comet, micronucleus and cytotoxicity assays in HepG2 cells and the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. In a previous study it was found that the surfactant Emulsogen could contribute to the low mineralization of the dyes (60% after 4 h of treatment), which, in turn, seems to account for the mutagenicity of the products generated. Thus this surfactant was not added to the chloride medium in order to avoid this interference. The photoelectrocatalytic method presented rapid discoloration and the TOC reduction was ≥87% after 240 min of treatment, showing that photoelectrocatalysis is able to mineralize the dyes tested. The method was also efficient in removing the mutagenic activity and cytotoxic effects of these three dyes. Thus it was concluded that photoelectrocatalysis was a promising method for the treatment of aqueous samples.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10108 - Naphthalenedisulfonic acid, hydrozy-[[[(hydroxyl-disulfo-naphthaleneyl)azo]-alkyl(C=1-5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, metal salt (PMN P-04-498) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses...- -alkyl(C=1-5)-(sulfoalkoxy)cyclic]azo]-substituted azo-, metal salt (generic). 721.10108 Section 721... SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances §...

  13. Salicylic Acid-Based Organic Dyes Acting as the Photosensitizer for Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungjun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Han, Ah-Reum; Ko, Kwan-Woo; Eom, Jin Hee; Namgoong, Sung Keon; Lo, Alvie S V; Gordon, Keith C; Yoon, Sungho; Han, Chi-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    A D-π-A metal-free organic dye, featuring salicylic acid as a novel acceptor/anchoring unit, has been designed, synthesized and applied to dye-sensitized solar cell. The detailed photophysical, electrochemical, photovoltaic and sensitizing properties of the organic dye were investigated, in addition to the computational studies of the dye and dye-(TiO2)6 system. A solar cell device using this new organic dye as a sensitizer produced a solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.49% (J(sc) = 6.69 mAcm-2, V(oc) = 0.74 V and ff = 0.70) under 100 mWcm(-2) simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation, demonstrating that the salicylic acid-based organic dye is a suitable alternative to currently used organometallic dyes.

  14. Salicylic Acid-Based Organic Dyes Acting as the Photosensitizer for Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungjun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Han, Ah-Reum; Ko, Kwan-Woo; Eom, Jin Hee; Namgoong, Sung Keon; Lo, Alvie S V; Gordon, Keith C; Yoon, Sungho; Han, Chi-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    A D-π-A metal-free organic dye, featuring salicylic acid as a novel acceptor/anchoring unit, has been designed, synthesized and applied to dye-sensitized solar cell. The detailed photophysical, electrochemical, photovoltaic and sensitizing properties of the organic dye were investigated, in addition to the computational studies of the dye and dye-(TiO2)6 system. A solar cell device using this new organic dye as a sensitizer produced a solar to electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.49% (J(sc) = 6.69 mAcm-2, V(oc) = 0.74 V and ff = 0.70) under 100 mWcm(-2) simulated AM 1.5 G solar irradiation, demonstrating that the salicylic acid-based organic dye is a suitable alternative to currently used organometallic dyes. PMID:27483839

  15. Synthesis and characterization of acrylic type hydrogels containing azo derivatives of 5-amino salicylic acid for colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahkam, M; Doostie, L; Siadat, S O R

    2006-03-01

    pH-sensitive hydrogels are suitable candidates for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, proteins and drugs, due to their ability to respond to environmental pH changes. Terephthalic acid was covalently linked with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), abbreviated as cross-linking agent (CA). Acryloyl ester of 5-[4-(hydroxy phenyl) azo] salicylic acid (HPAS) as an azo derivative of 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) was prepared under mild conditions. The HPAS was covalently linked with acryloyl chloride, abbreviated as APAS. Free radical cross-linking copolymerization of polymerizable azo derivative of 5-ASA (APAS) and methacrylic acid (MAA) in two different molar ratios, with the various ratios CA as cross-linking agent were carried out with using 2, 2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator at the temperature range 60-70 degrees C. The composition of the cross-linked three-dimensional polymers was determined by FTIR spectroscopy. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of the network polymers was determined calorimetrically. The hydrolysis of drug-polymer conjugates was carried out in cellophane membrane dialysis bags containing aqueous buffer solutions (pH 7.4 and pH 1) at 37 degrees C. The effect of copolymer composition on the hydrolytic degradation was studied in simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 1) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. Monitoring of the hydrolysis process by HPLC and UV spectroscopy shows that the azo prodrug (HPAS) was released by hydrolysis of the ester bond located between the HPAS and the polymer chain. The drug-release profiles indicate that amount drug release dependent on the content of MAA groups and crosslinking.

  16. Biodecolorization of recalcitrant dye as the sole sourceof nutrition using Curvularia clavata NZ2 and decolorization ability of its crude enzymes.

    PubMed

    Neoh, Chin Hong; Lam, Chi Yong; Lim, Chi Kim; Yahya, Adibah; Bay, Hui Han; Ibrahim, Zaharah; Noor, Zainura Zainon

    2015-08-01

    Extensive use of recalcitrant azo dyes in textile and paper industries poses a direct threat to the environment due to the carcinogenicity of their degradation products. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of Curvularia clavata NZ2 in decolorization of azo dyes. The ability of the fungus to decolorize azo dyes can be evaluated as an important outcome as existing effluent treatment is unable to remove the dyes effectively. C. clavata has the ability to decolorize Reactive Black 5 (RB5), Acid Orange 7 (AO7), and Congo Red azo dyes, utilizing these as sole sources of carbon and nitrogen. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the extracted RB5's metabolites along with desorption tests confirmed that the decolorization process occurred due to degradation and not merely by adsorption. Enzyme activities of extracellular enzymes such as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), xylanase, laccase, and manganese peroxidase (MnP) were also detected during the decolorization process. Toxicity expressed as inhibition of germination was reduced significantly in fungal-treated azo dye solution when compared with the control. The cultivation of C. clavata under sequential batch system also recorded a decolorization efficiency of above 90%. The crude enzyme secreted by C. clavata also showed excellent ability to decolorize RB5 solutions with concentrations of 100 ppm (88-92%) and 1000 ppm (70-77%) without redox mediator. This proved that extracellular enzymes produced by C. clavata played a major role in decolorization of RB5.

  17. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    PubMed

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  18. Study on the removal of acid dyes using chitosan as a natural coagulant/coagulant aid.

    PubMed

    Zonoozi, M H; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Arami, M

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan was selected as a natural coagulating agent for the removal of acid dyes (Acid Blue 292; AB292, and Acid Red 398; AR398) from dye-containing solutions. The study was organised in two phases. In phase 1, chitosan was used alone as a natural coagulant for the removal of the dyes. For this purpose, the effect of different parameters including pH, chitosan dosage and initial dye concentration on the dye removal efficiency was examined. In phase 2 of the study, the application of chitosan as a natural coagulant aid in conjunction with polyaluminium chloride (PAC) was assessed. According to the results of phase 1, the best removal efficiencies occurred in an acidic pH range (less than 6) for both of the dyes. Also, excellent dye removal results (about 90%) were achieved with relatively low dosages of chitosan (30-35 mg L(-1) for AB292 and 50-60 mg L(-1) for AR398). However, the initial concentration of the dyes severely influenced the coagulation performance of chitosan, which can constrain the performance of chitosan as a natural coagulant. On the basis of the results of phase 2, chitosan, as a natural coagulant aid, noticeably enhanced the dye removal efficiency of PAC, especially in the case of AB292. Small amounts of chitosan (3 or 5 mg L(-1)) enhanced the dye removal efficiency of PAC up to 2.5 times for AB292.

  19. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77μL of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1μgmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body. PMID:26149246

  20. Organic solvent-free air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction for optimized extraction of illegal azo-based dyes and their main metabolite from spices, cosmetics and human bio-fluid samples in one step.

    PubMed

    Barfi, Behruz; Asghari, Alireza; Rajabi, Maryam; Sabzalian, Sedigheh

    2015-08-15

    Air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (AALLME) has unique capabilities to develop as an organic solvent-free and one-step microextraction method, applying ionic-liquids as extraction solvent and avoiding centrifugation step. Herein, a novel and simple eco-friendly method, termed one-step air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (OS-AALLME), was developed to extract some illegal azo-based dyes (including Sudan I to IV, and Orange G) from food and cosmetic products. A series of experiments were investigated to achieve the most favorable conditions (including extraction solvent: 77μL of 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate; sample pH 6.3, without salt addition; and extraction cycles: 25 during 100s of sonication) using a central composite design strategy. Under these conditions, limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, enrichment factors and consumptive indices were in the range of 3.9-84.8ngmL(-1), 0.013-3.1μgmL(-1), 33-39, and 0.13-0.15, respectively. The results showed that -as well as its simplicity, fastness, and use of no hazardous disperser and extraction solvents- OS-AALLME is an enough sensitive and efficient method for the extraction of these dyes from complex matrices. After optimization and validation, OS-AALLME was applied to estimate the concentration of 1-amino-2-naphthol in human bio-fluids as a main reductive metabolite of selected dyes. Levels of 1-amino-2-naphthol in plasma and urinary excretion suggested that this compound may be used as a new potential biomarker of these dyes in human body.

  1. Permanent hair dye-incorporated hyaluronic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Young; Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Da-Hye; Choi, Ki-Choon

    2013-01-01

    We prepared p-phenylenediamine (PDA)-incorporated nanoparticles using hyaluronic acid (HA). PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles have spherical shapes and sizes were less than 300 nm. The results of FT-IR spectra indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between amine group of PDA and carboxyl group of HA. Furthermore, powder-X-ray diffractogram (XRD) measurement showed that intrinsic crystalline peak of PDA disappeared by formation of nanoparticle with HA at XRD measurement. These results indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation. At drug release study, the higher PDA contents induced faster release rate from nanoparticles. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles showed reduced intrinsic toxicity against HaCaT human keratinocyte cells at MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We suggest that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles are promising candidates for novel permanent hair dye. PMID:23088321

  2. Permanent hair dye-incorporated hyaluronic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Young; Jeong, Young-Il; Kim, Da-Hye; Choi, Ki-Choon

    2013-01-01

    We prepared p-phenylenediamine (PDA)-incorporated nanoparticles using hyaluronic acid (HA). PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles have spherical shapes and sizes were less than 300 nm. The results of FT-IR spectra indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between amine group of PDA and carboxyl group of HA. Furthermore, powder-X-ray diffractogram (XRD) measurement showed that intrinsic crystalline peak of PDA disappeared by formation of nanoparticle with HA at XRD measurement. These results indicated that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation. At drug release study, the higher PDA contents induced faster release rate from nanoparticles. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles showed reduced intrinsic toxicity against HaCaT human keratinocyte cells at MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We suggest that PDA-incorporated HA nanoparticles are promising candidates for novel permanent hair dye.

  3. Effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye extracted from Curcuma longa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustia, Yuda Virgantara; Suyitno, Arifin, Zainal; Sutanto, Bayu

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of acidity on the energy level of curcumin dye. The natural dye, curcumin, was synthesized from Curcuma longa L. using a simple extraction technique. The purification of curcumin dye was conducted in a column of chromatography and its characteristics were studied. Next, the purified curcumin dye was added by benzoic acids until various acidities of 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0. The absorbance spectra and the functionality groups found in the dyes were detected by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Meanwhile, the energy level of the dyes, EHOMO and ELUMO was measured by cyclic voltammetry. The best energy level of curcumin dye was achieved at pH 3.5 where Ered = -0.37V, ELUMO = -4.28 eV, Eox = 1.15V, EHOMO = -5.83 eV, and Eband gap = 1.55 eV. Therefore, the purified curcumin dye added by benzoic acid was promising for sensitizing the dye-sensitized solar cells.

  4. Delaminated montmorillonite with iron(III)-TiO₂ species as a photocatalyst for removal of a textile azo-dye from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Torres-Luna, Juan A; Carriazo, José G; Sanabria, Nancy R

    2016-01-01

    A set of mesoporous delaminated montmorillonites containing iron(III)-titanium oxide species was synthesized using two minerals: a bentonite as support and an ilmenite as source of Fe-TiO2 species. Several values of both sulphuric acid concentration and temperature were employed to extract Fe-TiO2 species from an ilmenite. Analyses by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption confirmed the successful formation of delaminated (or exfoliated) mesoporous structures. Optical properties of solids were determined by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and their band gap energy values were also calculated. A small UV-shift of band gap values regarding that of commercial photo-active TiO2 was detected as consequence of the quantum size effect, suggesting that photocatalytic experiments should be performed under UV-radiation assistance. The synthesized solids showed good activity in the photocatalytic oxidation of a textile dye (reactive yellow 145: RY 145), achieving conversions higher than 70% and chemical oxygen demand removal between 60% and 80%.

  5. Optical and thermal properties of azo derivatives of salicylic acid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, M. M.; El-Ghamaz, N. A.; El-Sonbati, A. Z.; Diab, M. A.; El-Bindary, A. A.; Serag, L. S.

    2015-02-01

    N-acryloyl-4-aminosalicylic acid (4-AMSA), monomer (HL) and 5-(4‧-alkyl phenylazo)-N-acryloyl-4-aminosalicylic acid (HLn) are synthesized and characterized with various physico-chemical techniques. Thin films of 5-(4‧-alkyl phenylazo)-N-acryloyl-4-aminosalicylic acid (HLn) are prepared by spin coating technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of 4-aminosalicylic acid (4-ASA) and its derivatives are investigated in powder and thin film forms. Thermal properties of the compounds are investigated by thermogravemetric analysis (TGA). The optical energy gap and the type of optical transition are investigated in the wavelength range (200-2500 nm) for 4-ASA, HL and HLn. The values of fundamental energy gap (Eg) are in the range 3.60-3.69 eV for all compounds and the type of optical transition is found to be indirect allowed. The onset energy gap Eg∗ appeared only for azodye compounds is found to be in the range 0.95-1.55 eV depending on the substituent function groups. The refractive index, n, shows a normal dispersion in the wavelength range 650-2500 nm, while shows anomalous dispersion in the wavelength rang 200-650 nm. The dispersion parameters ε∞, εL, Ed, Eo and N /m∗ are calculated. The photoluminescence phenomena (PL) appear for thin films of 4-ASA and its derivatives show three main emission transitions.

  6. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors. PMID:26362681

  7. Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases: biochemical characteristics and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Takenori; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Suye, Shin-Ichiro; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2015-11-01

    Dye-linked D-amino acid dehydrogenases (Dye-DADHs) catalyze the dehydrogenation of free D-amino acids in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor. Although Dye-DADHs functioning in catabolism of L-alanine and as primary enzymes in electron transport chains are widely distributed in mesophilic Gram-negative bacteria, biochemical and biotechnological information on these enzymes remains scanty. This is in large part due to their instability after isolation. On the other hand, in the last decade, several novel types of Dye-DADH have been found in thermophilic bacteria and hyperthermophilic archaea, where they contribute not only to L-alanine catabolism but also to the catabolism of other amino acids, including D-arginine and L-hydroxyproline. In this minireview, we summarize recent developments in our understanding of the biochemical characteristics of Dye-DADHs and their specific application to electrochemical biosensors.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on Optical Properties of Crosslinkable Azo Chromophore Doped in Poly Amic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, S.; Gharavi, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we have studied the optical properties of a crosslinkable poly amic acid containing Disperse Red 1. The thin films were cured at 130, 160 and 195 °C. The structural and optical properties of the doped films were investigated by using UV-VIS spectra, and Prism Coupling techniques. The composite crosslinks during poling rendering it totally insoluble. A r33 of 1.5 pm/v was obtained after poling.

  9. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  10. Dye decolorization and detoxification by laccase immobilized on porous glass beads.

    PubMed

    Champagne, P-P; Ramsay, J A

    2010-04-01

    The decolorization and detoxification of textile dyes by fungal laccase immobilized on porous glass beads were evaluated. Anthraquinone (Reactive blue 19 and Dispersed blue 3) and indigoid (Acid blue 74) dyes were degraded more rapidly than the azo dyes (Acid red 27 and Reactive black 5). There was no dye sorption to the enzyme bed when decolorization rates were high (>12 microM dye/U-h) but at moderate rates (8 to>0.06 microM/U-h), there was a transient color which disappeared upon prolonged exposure. With Reactive black 5, permanent adsorption occurred most likely because laccase had been totally inactivated. Although laccase treatment was more efficient at decolorizing the anthraquinone dyes, their toxicity (as determined by the Microtox assay) increased while the less efficiently decolorized solutions of azo and indigoid dyes became less toxic. These results demonstrate the potential and limitations of using immobilized laccase to enzymatically decolorize a range of different dye classes and reduce dye toxicity in a single step.

  11. Titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer for sulfonic acid dyes prepared by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Li, Rong; Tan, Jin; Jiang, Zi-Tao

    2013-03-30

    A novel titania-based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized through sol-gel process with sunset yellow (Sun) as template, without use of functional monomer. MIP was used as a solid-phase extraction material for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in beverages. The results showed that MIP exhibited better selectivity, higher recovery and adsorption capacity for the sulfonic acid dyes compared to the non-imprinted polymer (NIP). MIP presented highest extraction selectivity to Sun when pH less than or equal to 3. The adsorption capacity was 485.9 mg g(-1), which was larger than that of NIP (384.7 mg g(-1)). The better clean-up ability demonstrated the capability of MIP for the isolation and enrichment of sulfonic acid dyes in complicated food samples. The mean recoveries for the sulfonic acid dyes on MIP were from 81.9% to 97.2% in spiked soft drink.

  12. Novel amphiphilic polymeric ionic liquid-solid phase micro-extraction membrane for the preconcentration of aniline as degradation product of azo dye Orange G under sonication by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Wei, Xiao-Qing; Du, Chun-Hui; Ma, Xu-Ming; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2014-07-01

    A novel amphiphilic polymeric ionic liquid membrane containing a hydrophilic bromide anion and a hydrophobic carbonyl group was synthesized in dimethylformamide (DMF) systems using the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide (BVImBr) and the methylmethacrylate (MMA) as monomers. The prepared amphiphilic ploy-methylmethacrylate-1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium bromide (MMA-BVImBr) was characterized by a scanning electron microscope and an infrared spectrum instrument. The results of solid-phase micro-extraction membrane (SPMM) experiments showed that the adsorption capacity of membrane was about 0.76μgμg(-1) for aniline. Based on this, a sensitive method for the determination of trace aniline, as a degradation product of azo dye Orange G under sonication, was developed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The calibration curve showed a good linearity ranging from 0.5 to 10.0μgL(-1) with a correlation coefficient value of 0.9998. The limit of quantification was 0.5μgL(-1). The recoveries ranged from 90.6% to 96.1%. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations were less than 8.3% and 10.9%. The developed SPMM-LC-MS/MS method was used successfully for preconcentration of trace aniline produced during the sonication of Orange G solution.

  13. Enhanced decolorization of azo dye in a small pilot-scale anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with biocatalyzed electrolysis system (ABR-BES): a design suitable for scaling-up.

    PubMed

    Cui, Dan; Guo, Yu-Qi; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Wu, Wei-Min; Liang, Bin; Wang, Ai-Jie; Cheng, Hao-Yi

    2014-07-01

    A four-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) incorporated with membrane-less biocatalyzed electrolysis system (BES) was tested for the treatment of azo dye (alizarin yellow R, AYR) wastewater (AYR, 200 mg L(-1); glucose, 1000 mg L(-1)). The ABR-BES was operated without and with external power supply to examine AYR reduction process and reductive intermediates with different external voltages (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 V) and hydraulic retention times (HRT: 8, 6 and 4h). The decolorization efficiency in the ABR-BES (8h HRT, 0.5 V) was higher than that in ABR-BES without electrolysis, i.e. 95.1 ± 1.5% versus 86.9 ± 6.3%. Incorporation of BES with ABR accelerated the consumption of VFAs (mainly acetate) and attenuated biogas (methane) production. Higher power supply (0.7 V) enhanced AYR decolorization efficiency (96.4 ± 1.8%), VFAs removal, and current density (24.1 Am(-3) TCV). Shorter HRT increased volumetric AYR decolorization rates, but decreased AYR decolorization efficiency.

  14. Development of a method for the analysis of seven banned azo-dyes in chilli and hot chilli food samples by pressurised liquid extraction and liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Olga; Yusà, Vicent; León, Nuria; Pastor, Agustín

    2009-04-15

    An automated, confirmatory and sensitive procedure has been developed and validated for the determination of Sudan (I-IV), Sudan Orange G, Sudan Red 7B and Para Red in hot chilli food samples. The proposed method includes pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) with acetone, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) clean-up and detection by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to electrospray ionization in positive mode tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS-MS). The main parameters affecting the performance of the different ionization sources and PLE parameters were previously optimised using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The method was in-house validated on chilli powder and chilli meat. Linear calibrations were obtained with correlation coefficients R(2)>0.999. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of the method were in the ranges of 0.002-0.012 ng g(-1) and 0.006-0.036 ng g(-1), respectively for chilli powder. The decision limit and detection capability were between 0.005-0.022 ng g(-1) and 0.007-0.026 ng g(-1), respectively for chilli meat. Recoveries ranged from 94% to 105%. The applicability of the method to the determination of azo-dyes in hot chilli products was demonstrated.

  15. Plasmachemical degradation of azo dyes by humid air plasma: Yellow Supranol 4 GL, Scarlet Red Nylosan F3 GL and industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalek, F; Gharbi, S; Benstaali, B; Addou, A; Brisset, J L

    2004-05-01

    A recent non-thermal plasma technique (i.e., a gliding arc discharge which generates reactive species at atmospheric pressure) is tested for pollution abatement of dyes dispersed in synthetic solutions and industrial effluents. Yellow Supranol 4 GL (YS) and Scarlet Red Nylosan F3 GL (SRN) are toxic synthetic dyes widely used in the Algerian textile industry and frequently present in liquid wastes of manufacture plants. Classical removal treatment processes are not efficient enough, so that the presence of dyes in liquid effluents may cause serious environmental problems, in connection with reusing waste waters for irrigation. The degradation processes achieved by the oxidising species formed in the plasma are followed by UV/VIS spectroscopy and by chemical oxygen demand measurements. They are almost complete (i.e., 92.5% for YS and 90% for dilute SRN) and rapidly follow pseudo-first-order laws, with overall estimated rate constants 3 x 10(-4) and 4 x 10(-4)s-1 for YS and SRN, respectively. The degradation rate constant for the industrial mixture (i.e., k = 1.45 x 10(-3)s-1) is a mean value for two consecutive steps (210(-3) and 6 x 10(-5)s-1) measured at the absorption peaks of the major constituent dyes, YS and SRN.

  16. Visualizing acidophilic microorganisms in biofilm communities using acid stable fluorescence dyes.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Sina; Arnold, Thuro; Schweder, Bernd; Bernhard, Gert

    2010-07-01

    Bacteria in acidophilic biofilm communities, i.e. acid streamers and snottites, obtained from a subsurface mine in Königstein were visualized by fluorescence microscopy using four new fluorescent dyes (DY-601XL, V07-04118, V07-04146, DY-613). The pH of the bulk solution in which these bacteria thrive was pH 2.6 to 2.9. The new fluorescent dyes were all able to clearly stain and microscopically visualize in-situ the bacteria within the biofilm community without changing pH or background ion concentration. The commonly used fluorescent dyes DAPI and SYTO 59 were also applied for comparison. Both dyes, however, were not able to visualize any bacteria in-situ, since they were not stable under the very acid conditions. In addition, dye V07-04118 and dye DY-613 also possess the ability to stain larger cells which were presumably eukaryotic origin and may be attributed to yeast cells or amoeba-like cells. PCR analyses have shown that the dominant bacterial species in these acidophilic biofilm communities was a gram negative bacterium of the species Ferrovum myxofaciens. The presented four new dyes are ideal for in-situ investigations of microorganisms occurring in very acid conditions, e.g. in acidophilic biofilm communities when in parallel information on pH sensitive incorporated fluorescent heavy metals should be acquired.

  17. Synthesis of magnetically recyclable MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ag nanocatalyst: Its high catalytic performances for azo dyes and nitro compounds reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtan, U.; Amir, Md.; Yıldız, A.; Baykal, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, magnetically recycable MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ag nanocatalyst (MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ag MRCs) has been synthesized through co-precipition and chemical reduction method. XRD analysis confirmed the synthesis of single phase nanoproduct with crystallite size of 10 nm. VSM measurements showed the superparamagnetic property of the product. Catalytic studies showed that MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ag MRC could catalyze the reduction of the various azo compounds like methyl orange (MO), methylene blue (MB), eosin Y (EY), and rhodamine B (RhB) and also aromatic nitro compounds such as 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) and 2-nitroaniline (2-NA). Moreover, the magnetic nanocatalyst showed an excellent reusability properties that remained unchanged after several cycles. Therefore, MnFe2O4@SiO2@Ag is the potential candidate for the application of organic pollutants for wastewater treatment.

  18. Interaction of toxic azo dyes with heme protein: biophysical insights into the binding aspect of the food additive amaranth with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-30

    A biophysical study on the interaction of the food colorant amaranth with hemoglobin was undertaken. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies proposed for an intimate binding interaction between the dye and the protein. The dye quenched the fluorescence of the protein remarkably and the mechanism of quenching was found to be static in nature. Synchronous fluorescence studies suggested that the polarity around the tryptophan residues was altered in the presence of amaranth whereas the polarity around tyrosine residues remained largely unaltered. 3D fluorescence, FTIR and circular dichroism results suggested that the binding reaction caused conformational changes in hemoglobin. The negative far-UV CD bands exhibited a significantly large decrease in magnitude in the presence of amaranth. From calorimetry studies it was established that the binding was driven by a large positive entropic contribution and a small but favorable enthalpy change.

  19. Interaction of toxic azo dyes with heme protein: biophysical insights into the binding aspect of the food additive amaranth with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-30

    A biophysical study on the interaction of the food colorant amaranth with hemoglobin was undertaken. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies proposed for an intimate binding interaction between the dye and the protein. The dye quenched the fluorescence of the protein remarkably and the mechanism of quenching was found to be static in nature. Synchronous fluorescence studies suggested that the polarity around the tryptophan residues was altered in the presence of amaranth whereas the polarity around tyrosine residues remained largely unaltered. 3D fluorescence, FTIR and circular dichroism results suggested that the binding reaction caused conformational changes in hemoglobin. The negative far-UV CD bands exhibited a significantly large decrease in magnitude in the presence of amaranth. From calorimetry studies it was established that the binding was driven by a large positive entropic contribution and a small but favorable enthalpy change. PMID:25725343

  20. Ni/MgAlO regeneration for catalytic wet air oxidation of an azo-dye in trickle-bed reaction.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Ana; Ovejero, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Araceli; Peres, José A; García, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Active nickel catalysts (7 wt%) supported over Mg-Al mixed oxides have been recently developed and it has also been demonstrated that they are also highly selective in Catalytic Wet air Oxidation (CWAO) of dyes. CWAO of Chromotrope 2R (C2R) has been studied using a trickle bed reactor employing temperatures from 100 to 180 °C, liquid flow rates from 0.1 to 0.7 mL min(-1) and initial dye concentration from 10 to 50 ppm. Total pressure and air flow were 25 bar and 300 mL min(-1), respectively. The catalyst showed a very stable activity up to 24 h on stream with an average TOC conversion of 82% at 150 °C and T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1). After the reaction, a 1.1 wt% C of carbonaceous deposit is formed onto the catalyst and a diminution of 30% of the surface area with respect of the fresh catalyst was observed. An increase in the space time gave higher TOC conversions up to T(r)=0.098 g(Ni) min mL(-1), attaining values of 80% at 180 °C. The performance of TOC and dye removal does not decrease after two regeneration cycles. In total, a 57 h effective reaction has been carried out with no loss of catalytic activity. PMID:23246939