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Sample records for azov coastal ecosystem

  1. Estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in productive turbid waters using a Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean—the Azov Sea case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitelson, Anatoly A.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Li, Rong-Rong; Berdnikov, Sergey; Saprygin, Vladislav

    2011-04-01

    We present here the results of chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration estimation using the red and near infrared (NIR) spectral bands of a Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) in productive turbid waters of the Azov Sea, Russia. During the data collection campaign in the summer of 2010 in Taganrog Bay and the Azov Sea, water samples were collected and concentrations of chl-a were measured analytically. The NIR-red models were tuned to optimize the spectral band selections and chl-a concentrations were retrieved from HICO data. The NIR-red three-band model with HICO-retrieved reflectances at wavelengths 684, 700, and 720 nm explained more than 85% of chl-a concentration variation in the range from 19.67 to 93.14 mg m - 3 and was able to estimate chl-a with root mean square error below 10 mg m - 3. The results indicate the high potential of HICO data to estimate chl-a concentration in turbid productive (Case II) waters in real-time, which will be of immense value to scientists, natural resource managers, and decision makers involved in managing the inland and coastal aquatic ecosystems.

  2. The Sea of Azov: Recent abrasion processes and problems of coastal protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Bespalova, L. A.; Ivlieva, O. V.; Tsygankova, A. E.; Kropyanko, L. V.

    2016-12-01

    The abrasion processes of the Sea of Azov have been assessed on the basis of long-term monitoring. The coast has been zoned by the degree of abrasion. The current condition of coast protection measures has been studied.

  3. Late Cenozoic fluvial development within the Sea of Azov and Black Sea coastal plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoshko, A.; Gozhik, P.; Semenenko, V.

    2009-09-01

    Late Cenozoic terrestrial deposits are widespread across the northern coastal regions of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov and represent diverse fluvial, estuarine and deltaic environments. The dating and correlation of these deposits rely on stratigraphically-associated marine index beds, mammalian and molluscan faunas and magnetostratigraphy. In detail the geometries of these sediment bodies are extremely complex, typically varying between localities and representing many cycles of incision and aggradation. However, the overall disposition of the sediments reflects the transition from the uplifting sediment source region to the north and the subsiding depocentre in the interior of the Black Sea to the south. Since the Middle Miocene the area of the Paratethys/Black Sea depocentre has decreased significantly, but since the Middle Pliocene the hinge zone between uplift and subsidence has been located close to the modern coastline. A combination of regional and local differential crustal movements has given rise to the great variety of fluvial sediment bodies, to the erosion-aggradation cycles, different phases and river activity and to the various fluvial landforms that have all been important in landscape development in this region during the past 12 Ma. The fluvial erosion-accumulation cycles (during the upper Serravillian-Messinian, the Zanclean-late Gelasian, and the Pleistocene) and corresponding cycles of relief dissection and planation are reconstructed against a background of local sea-level changes and climatic variations determined from palaeobotanical data. The maximum fluvial incision occurred in the early Zanclean time with alluvial coastal plains, unique in this area, developing in the Gelasian. Increased climatic aridity during the Pleistocene caused a reduction of fluvial activity in comparison with the Late Miocene and Pliocene. The sea-level oscillations and Pleistocene glaciations affected fluvial processes in different ways. The most remarkable

  4. Research of the coastal zone by the airborne laser scanning data (Verbyanaya bay-bar, sea of Azov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Anatoliy V.; Antonenko, Mihail; Boyko, Evgeniy

    2015-06-01

    In the area Verbyanaya bay-bar (Sea of Azov) in an attempt to create large-scale cartographic base and subsequent thematic mapping of the geographical environment components airborne laser scanning and aerial photography were conducted. Airborne laser scanning data formed the basis of a comprehensive study of the coastal zone components. Methodical research apparatus includes receiving and processing technology of laser reflection points, constructing highprecision digital elevation model and raster surfaces. Mosaic of aerial photography is converted into a format mosaic - a geometrically correct image of the terrain. Set of high-precision digital surface models and thematic raster images obtained for specific dates, allows to analyze the dynamic adjustment of components of the coastal zone (shoreline, beach, shore dam with surge prism).

  5. Louisiana coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana's coast and its degradation and restoration are major environmental issues being studied at the National Wetlands Research Center. Coastal ecosystems are vulnerable because of the tremendous amount of human activity that takes place along the coast. Information on ecological processes is essential to guide the development along the coast as well as to protect and restore wildlife habitat.Louisiana has about 40% of coastal wetlands in the lower 48 states; they support fish, waterfowl, and fur-bearing animals as well as unique cultures like that of the Acadians. The fish and wildlife resources of Louisiana's coast produce over $1 billion each year in revenues.But Louisiana has the highest coastal loss rate because of natural and human causes. Over the past three decades, Louisiana has lost as much as 35-40 mi2 (90-104 km2) of coastal wetlands a year.The National Wetlands Research Center is qualified to assess and monitor this ecosystem because of its proximity to the study area, a staff chosen for their expertise in the system, and a number of established partnerships with others who study the areas. The Center is often the lead group in partnerships with universities, other federal agencies, and private entities who study this ecosystem.Most of the Center's research and technology development performed for coastal wetlands are done at the Lafayette headquarters; some work is performed at the National Wetlands Research Center's project office in Baton Rouge, LA.

  6. Acid-labile sulfides in shallow marine bottom sediments: A review of the impact on ecosystems in the Azov Sea, the NE Black Sea shelf and NW Adriatic lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Zakuskina, O. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Acid-labile sulfides (LS) increase in bottom sediments at sites in the Azov Sea, at the NE Black Sea shelf and in the coastal lagoons of NW Adriatic Sea experiencing direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution. Fresh anthropogenic organic matter stimulates the bacterial sulfate reduction and here the rate of the LS production overcomes their loss during the oxidation and pyritization. This results in the expansion of reduced sediment layer up to the bottom surface. The LS concentration in the reduced sediments varies between 300 and 2000 mg S l -1 of wet silt depending on the size of pollution loading and on the rate of sedimentation. In the oxidized sediments away from the direct pollution impact, the LS concentration did not exceed 100-150 mg S l -1. Being a strong cytochrome toxin, the LS adversely affect the coastal ecosystems. The concentrations over 600 mg S l -1 result in quasi total benthic mortality whereas >300-400 mg S l -1 depletes the benthic faunal abundance and taxonomic diversity. Accumulation of the LS in sediments also induces nocturnal hypoxia and stimulates domination of toxic cyanobacteria in the pelagic phytocenoses.

  7. Operational NIR-red Algorithms for Estimating Chlorophyll-a Concentration in Coastal Waters - The Azov Sea Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W.; Gitelson, A. A.; Berdnikov, S.; Saprygin, V.; Bowles, J. H.; Povazhnyi, V.

    2012-12-01

    We present here results that strongly support the use of MERIS-based NIR-red algorithms as standard tools for estimating chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration in turbid productive waters. The study was carried out as one of the steps in testing the potential of the universal applicability of previously developed NIR-red algorithms, which were originally calibrated using a limited set of MERIS imagery and in situ data from the Azov Sea and the Taganrog Bay, Russia, and data that were synthetically generated using a radiative transfer model. We used an extensive set of MERIS imagery and in situ data collected over a period of three years in the Azov Sea and the Taganrog Bay for this validation task. We found that the NIR-red algorithms gave consistently highly accurate estimates of chl-a concentration, with the root mean square error as low as 5.92 mg m-3 for the two-band algorithm and 5.91 mg m-3 for the three-band algorithm for the dataset with chl-a concentrations ranging from 1.09 mg m-3 to 107.82 mg m-3. This obviates the need for case-specific reparameterization of the algorithms, as long as the specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton in the water does not change drastically, and presents a strong case for the use of NIR-red algorithms as standard algorithms that can be routinely applied for near-real-time quantitative monitoring of chl-a concentration in the Azov Sea and the Taganrog Bay, and potentially elsewhere, which will be a real boon to ecologists, natural resource managers and environmental decision-makers. We also present a temporal series of chl-a maps generated using the NIR-red algorithms from images acquired by the space-borne hyperspectral sensor HICO over the Taganrog Bay. The fine spatial resolution (96 m) of HICO images allows for a detailed analysis of the spatial distribution pattern of chl-a, and the fine spectral resolution (5.7 nm) offers a great potential for phytoplankton species discrimination. With the recent demise of MERIS

  8. POLLUTION AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH - ASSESSING ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summers, Kevin. 2004. Pollution and Ecosystem Health - Assessing Ecological Condition of Coastal Ecosystems. Presented at the White Water to Blue Water (WW2BW) Miami Conference, 21-26 March 2004, Miami, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R973).

    Throughout the coastal regions and Large Mari...

  9. POLLUTION AND ECOSYSTEM HEALTH - ASSESSING ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summers, Kevin. 2004. Pollution and Ecosystem Health - Assessing Ecological Condition of Coastal Ecosystems. Presented at the White Water to Blue Water (WW2BW) Miami Conference, 21-26 March 2004, Miami, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R973).

    Throughout the coastal regions and Large Mari...

  10. DIAGNOSING CAUSES OF IMPAIRMENT IN COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engle, Virginia D. and Stephen J. Jordan. In press. Diagnosing Causes of Impairment in Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1008).

    Estuarine and coastal ecosystems are challenge...

  11. DIAGNOSING CAUSES OF IMPAIRMENT IN COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engle, Virginia D. and Stephen J. Jordan. In press. Diagnosing Causes of Impairment in Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1008).

    Estuarine and coastal ecosystems are challenge...

  12. Dry and wet atmospheric deposition of organic carbon in coastal and water areas of the northeastern part of the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, V. V.; Soier, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports on new data focusing on organic carbon contained in aeolian material and precipitation falling on coastal and water areas of the northeastern part of the Sea of Azov. Atmospheric deposition was sampled in 2006-2014. The particulate organic carbon content varied from 4 to 27% in aeolian dust samples. The concentration of the organic carbon dissolved in rainwater was from 1.6 to 4.3 mg C/L, and from 0.9 to 16.6 mg C/L in snow. The particulate organic carbon content varied from 2 to 43% in snow. Intensity of aeolian dust settling decreased from 178 to 33 mg/m2 per day with distance from a source of dust; in contrast, the relative content of organic matter increased. In a spring-summer season the aeolian organic carbon fluxes varied from 12 to 18 mg C/m2 per day in Rostov-on-Don, from 28 to 48 mg C/m2 per day on the Gulf of Taganrog coast, and from 20 to 80 mg C/m2 per day in the water area of the Gulf of Taganrog.

  13. CLASSIFICATION FRAMEWORK FOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO AQUATIC STRESSORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many classification schemes have been developed to group ecosystems based on similar characteristics. To date, however, no single scheme has addressed coastal ecosystem responses to multiple stressors. We developed a classification framework for coastal ecosystems to improve the ...

  14. RESTORING COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS: ABRUPT CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consensus exists that U.S. coastal ecosystems are severely degraded due to a variety of human-factors requiring large financial expenditures to restore and manage. Yet, even as controversy surrounds human factors in ecosystem degradation in the Gulf of Mexico, Chesapeake Bay, an...

  15. Are aliens threatening European aquatic coastal ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten; Olenin, Sergej; Thieltges, David W.

    2006-05-01

    Inshore waters of European coasts have accumulated a high share of non-indigenous species, where a changeable palaeoenvironment has caused low diversity in indigenous biota. Also strongly transformed modern coastal ecosystems seem to assimilate whatever species have been introduced and tolerate the physical regime. Adding non-native species does not have any directional predetermined effects on recipient coastal ecosystems. The status of being a non-native rather refers to a position in evolutionary history than qualify as an ecological category with distinct and consistent properties. Effects of invaders vary between habitats and with the phase of invasion and also with shifting ambient conditions. Although aliens accelerate change in European coastal biota, we found no evidence that they generally impair biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. More often, invaders expand ecosystem functioning by adding new ecological traits, intensifying existing ones and increasing functional redundancy.

  16. Integrated assessment of socio-economic risks of dangerous hydrological phenomena in Russian coastal zones of the Baltic, the Azov and the Black Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemtsov, Stepan; Baburin, Vyacheslav; Goryachko, Mariya; Krylenko, Inna; Yumina, Natalya

    2013-04-01

    according to UNU-EHS methodology: 'exposure' and 'vulnerability', consisting of 'susceptibility', 'coping capacity' and 'adaptive capacity'. Relevant indicators for each block were selected and verified by statistical methods. The authors estimated the share of people potentially exposed to flooding with the help of geographic information system. The authors, using the technique of World Risk Index (2011), calculated sub-indices for each block, and made the maps. Areas with the highest socio-economic risks were identified on the Azov and the Black sea coast: Slavyansky, Krymsky, Krasnoarmeysky, Temryuksky and Primorsko-Akhtarsky municipal districts. On the third stage, the main purpose was to integrate and use both approaches in evaluation of socio-economic risks on micro-geographical level for different categories of the population and different industries (agriculture, utilities, etc.), using 'field' data. Field study was conducted in Slavyansky municipal district of Krasnodar region and included opinion polls, special interviews with businessmen and authorities, collection of municipal statistics and data from companies, etc. Vulnerability maps, speed evacuation maps, maps of possible locations of warning systems and maps of high insurance risks were developed. Proposals for improvement of legislation for coastal zones were prepared. The conducted research has shown the importance of both social ('vulnerability'), and economic ('damage') components of risk assessment. Using the previously discussed methods individually does not bring desired results because of deficiencies of Russian statistics. It is essential for accurate risk assessment to use an 'ensemble' of methods (statistical, field observations, etc.) on micro geographic level. The work has a practical importance for improving safety of local communities.

  17. Patch scales in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broitman, Bernardo R.

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal scales over which ecological processes are coupled to environmental variability is a major challenge for ecologists. Here, I assimilate patterns of oceanographic variability with ecological field studies in an attempt to quantify spatial and temporal scales of coupling. Using coastal time series of chlorophyll-a concentration from remote sensing, the first chapter examines the alongshore extent of coastal regions subject to similar temporal patterns of oceanographic variability in Western North America (WNA) and North-Central Chile (Chile). I found striking interhemispherical differences in the length of coastal sections under similar oceanographic regimes, with the Chile region showing longshore coherency over much smaller spatial scales (˜60 km) than on the coast of WNA (˜140 km). Through a spatial analysis of coastal orientation I suggest that the characteristic length scales may be traced to the geomorphologic character of the ocean margins. The second chapter examines spatial patterns of primary production through long-term means of coastal chlorophyll-a concentration and kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) cover and explores their relationship with coastal geomorphology and sea surface temperature (SST). Spatial analyses showed a striking match in length scales around 180--250 km. Strong anticorrelations at small spatial lags and positive correlations at longer distances suggest little overlap between patches of kelp and coastal chlorophyll-a. In agreement with findings from the previous chapter, I found that coastal patches could be traced back to spatial patterns of coastal geomorphology. Through SST time series and long-term datasets of larval recruitment in Santa Cruz Island, California, the third chapter examines temporal patterns of oceanographic variability as determinants of ecological patterns. SST time series from sites experiencing low larval recruitment rates were dominated by strong temporal variability. These sites

  18. Registration of Azov meadow fescue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    'Azov' meadow fescue [Schedonorus pratensis (Huds.) P. Beauv.; syn. Festuca pratensis Huds.; syn. Lolium pratense (Huds.) Darbysh.] is a synthetic population originating from 1000 parental genotypes. The parents of Azov were selected from ten Russian plant introductions, mostly originating from the...

  19. Ecosystem Services Linking People to Coastal Habitats ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background/Question/Methods: There is a growing need to incorporate and prioritize ecosystem services/condition information into land-use decision making. While there are a number of place-based studies looking at how land-use decisions affect the availability and delivery of coastal services, many of these methods require data, funding and/or expertise that may be inaccessible to many coastal communities. Using existing classification standards for beneficiaries and coastal habitats, (i.e., Final Ecosystem Goods and Services Classification System (FEGS-CS) and Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS)), a comprehensive literature review was coupled with a “weight of evidence” approach to evaluate linkages between beneficiaries and coastal habitat features most relevant to community needs. An initial search of peer-reviewed journal articles was conducted using JSTOR and ScienceDirect repositories identifying sources that provide evidence for coastal beneficiary:habitat linkages. Potential sources were further refined based on a double-blind review of titles, abstracts, and full-texts, when needed. Articles in the final list were then scored based on habitat/beneficiary specificity and data quality (e.g., indirect evidence from literature reviews was scored lower than direct evidence from case studies with valuation results). Scores were then incorporated into a weight of evidence framework summarizing the support for each benefici

  20. Coastal wetlands: an integrated ecosystem approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perillo, G. M. E.; Wolanski, E.; Cahoon, D.R.; Brinson, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are under a great deal of pressure from the dual forces of rising sea level and the intervention of human populations both along the estuary and in the river catchment. Direct impacts include the destruction or degradation of wetlands from land reclamation and infrastructures. Indirect impacts derive from the discharge of pollutants, changes in river flows and sediment supplies, land clearing, and dam operations. As sea level rises, coastal wetlands in most areas of the world migrate landward to occupy former uplands. The competition of these lands from human development is intensifying, making the landward migration impossible in many cases. This book provides an understanding of the functioning of coastal ecosystems and the ecological services that they provide, and suggestions for their management. In this book a CD is included containing color figures of wetlands and estuaries in different parts of the world.

  1. Regime shifts and resilience in China's coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke

    2016-02-01

    Regime shift often results in large, abrupt, and persistent changes in the provision of ecosystem services and can therefore have significant impacts on human wellbeing. Understanding regime shifts has profound implications for ecosystem recovery and management. China's coastal ecosystems have experienced substantial deterioration within the past decades, at a scale and speed the world has never seen before. Yet, information about this coastal ecosystem change from a dynamics perspective is quite limited. In this review, I synthesize existing information on coastal ecosystem regime shifts in China and discuss their interactions and cascading effects. The accumulation of regime shifts in China's coastal ecosystems suggests that the desired system resilience has been profoundly eroded, increasing the potential of abrupt shifts to undesirable states at a larger scale, especially given multiple escalating pressures. Policy and management strategies need to incorporate resilience approaches in order to cope with future challenges and avoid major losses in China's coastal ecosystem services.

  2. Sustainability Of Coastal Fringe Ecosystems Against Anthropogenic Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant-dominated coastal ecosystems provide least 21 ecological services including shoreline protection, contaminant removal and nursery and breeding habitat for biota. The value of these ecological services is as great as $28000/h. These ecosystems which include intertidal wetl...

  3. Sustainability Of Coastal Fringe Ecosystems Against Anthropogenic Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plant-dominated coastal ecosystems provide least 21 ecological services including shoreline protection, contaminant removal and nursery and breeding habitat for biota. The value of these ecological services is as great as $28000/h. These ecosystems which include intertidal wetl...

  4. Global patterns of phytoplankton dynamics in coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paerl, H.; Yin, Kedong; Cloern, J.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific Committee on Ocean Research Working Group 137 Meeting; Hangzhou, China, 17-21 October 2010; Phytoplankton biomass and community structure have undergone dramatic changes in coastal ecosystems over the past several decades in response to climate variability and human disturbance. These changes have short- and long-term impacts on global carbon and nutrient cycling, food web structure and productivity, and coastal ecosystem services. There is a need to identify the underlying processes and measure the rates at which they alter coastal ecosystems on a global scale. Hence, the Scientific Committee on Ocean Research (SCOR) formed Working Group 137 (WG 137), "Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems: A Comparative Analysis of Time Series Observations" (http://wg137.net/). This group evolved from a 2007 AGU-sponsored Chapman Conference entitled "Long Time-Series Observations in Coastal Ecosystems: Comparative Analyses of Phytoplankton Dynamics on Regional to Global Scales.".

  5. The Economic Value of Coastal Ecosystems in California

    EPA Science Inventory

    The status of marine ecosystems affects the well being of human societies. These ecosystems include but are not limited to estuaries, lagoons, reefs, and systems further offshore such as deep ocean vents. The coastal regions that connect terrestrial and marine ecosystems are of p...

  6. The Economic Value of Coastal Ecosystems in California

    EPA Science Inventory

    The status of marine ecosystems affects the well being of human societies. These ecosystems include but are not limited to estuaries, lagoons, reefs, and systems further offshore such as deep ocean vents. The coastal regions that connect terrestrial and marine ecosystems are of p...

  7. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Bertness, Mark D; Bruno, John F; Li, Bo; Chen, Guoqian; Coverdale, Tyler C; Altieri, Andrew H; Bai, Junhong; Sun, Tao; Pennings, Steven C; Liu, Jianguo; Ehrlich, Paul R; Cui, Baoshan

    2014-08-08

    Despite their value, coastal ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic development is not well understood. We compiled a multifaceted dataset to quantify coastal trends and examine the role of economic growth in China's coastal degradation since the 1950s. Although China's coastal population growth did not change following the 1978 economic reforms, its coastal economy increased by orders of magnitude. All 15 coastal human impacts examined increased over time, especially after the reforms. Econometric analysis revealed positive relationships between most impacts and GDP across temporal and spatial scales, often lacking dropping thresholds. These relationships generally held when influences of population growth were addressed by analyzing per capita impacts, and when population density was included as explanatory variables. Historical trends in physical and biotic indicators showed that China's coastal ecosystems changed little or slowly between the 1950s and 1978, but have degraded at accelerated rates since 1978. Thus economic growth has been the cause of accelerating human damage to China's coastal ecosystems. China's GDP per capita remains very low. Without strict conservation efforts, continuing economic growth will further degrade China's coastal ecosystems.

  8. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiang; Bertness, Mark D.; Bruno, John F.; Li, Bo; Chen, Guoqian; Coverdale, Tyler C.; Altieri, Andrew H.; Bai, Junhong; Sun, Tao; Pennings, Steven C.; Liu, Jianguo; Ehrlich, Paul R.; Cui, Baoshan

    2014-01-01

    Despite their value, coastal ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic development is not well understood. We compiled a multifaceted dataset to quantify coastal trends and examine the role of economic growth in China's coastal degradation since the 1950s. Although China's coastal population growth did not change following the 1978 economic reforms, its coastal economy increased by orders of magnitude. All 15 coastal human impacts examined increased over time, especially after the reforms. Econometric analysis revealed positive relationships between most impacts and GDP across temporal and spatial scales, often lacking dropping thresholds. These relationships generally held when influences of population growth were addressed by analyzing per capita impacts, and when population density was included as explanatory variables. Historical trends in physical and biotic indicators showed that China's coastal ecosystems changed little or slowly between the 1950s and 1978, but have degraded at accelerated rates since 1978. Thus economic growth has been the cause of accelerating human damage to China's coastal ecosystems. China's GDP per capita remains very low. Without strict conservation efforts, continuing economic growth will further degrade China's coastal ecosystems. PMID:25104138

  9. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiang; Bertness, Mark D.; Bruno, John F.; Li, Bo; Chen, Guoqian; Coverdale, Tyler C.; Altieri, Andrew H.; Bai, Junhong; Sun, Tao; Pennings, Steven C.; Liu, Jianguo; Ehrlich, Paul R.; Cui, Baoshan

    2014-08-01

    Despite their value, coastal ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic development is not well understood. We compiled a multifaceted dataset to quantify coastal trends and examine the role of economic growth in China's coastal degradation since the 1950s. Although China's coastal population growth did not change following the 1978 economic reforms, its coastal economy increased by orders of magnitude. All 15 coastal human impacts examined increased over time, especially after the reforms. Econometric analysis revealed positive relationships between most impacts and GDP across temporal and spatial scales, often lacking dropping thresholds. These relationships generally held when influences of population growth were addressed by analyzing per capita impacts, and when population density was included as explanatory variables. Historical trends in physical and biotic indicators showed that China's coastal ecosystems changed little or slowly between the 1950s and 1978, but have degraded at accelerated rates since 1978. Thus economic growth has been the cause of accelerating human damage to China's coastal ecosystems. China's GDP per capita remains very low. Without strict conservation efforts, continuing economic growth will further degrade China's coastal ecosystems.

  10. Top 10 principles for designing healthy coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaydos, Joseph K.; Dierauf, Leslie; Kirby, Grant; Brosnan, Deborah; Gilardi, Kirsten; Davis, Gary E.

    2008-01-01

    Like other coastal zones around the world, the inland sea ecosystem of Washington (USA) and British Columbia (Canada), an area known as the Salish Sea, is changing under pressure from a growing human population, conversion of native forest and shoreline habitat to urban development, toxic contamination of sediments and species, and overharvest of resources. While billions of dollars have been spent trying to restore other coastal ecosystems around the world, there still is no successful model for restoring estuarine or marine ecosystems like the Salish Sea. Despite the lack of a guiding model, major ecological principles do exist that should be applied as people work to design the Salish Sea and other large marine ecosystems for the future. We suggest that the following 10 ecological principles serve as a foundation for educating the public and for designing a healthy Salish Sea and other coastal ecosystems for future generations: (1) Think ecosystem: political boundaries are arbitrary; (2) Account for ecosystem connectivity; (3) Understand the food web; (4) Avoid fragmentation; (5) Respect ecosystem integrity; (6) Support nature's resilience; (7) Value nature: it's money in your pocket; (8) Watch wildlife health; (9) Plan for extremes; and (10) Share the knowledge.

  11. Ecosystem services as a common language for coastal ecosystem-based management.

    PubMed

    Granek, Elise F; Polasky, Stephen; Kappel, Carrie V; Reed, Denise J; Stoms, David M; Koch, Evamaria W; Kennedy, Chris J; Cramer, Lori A; Hacker, Sally D; Barbier, Edward B; Aswani, Shankar; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Perillo, Gerardo M E; Silliman, Brian R; Muthiga, Nyawira; Bael, David; Wolanski, Eric

    2010-02-01

    Ecosystem-based management is logistically and politically challenging because ecosystems are inherently complex and management decisions affect a multitude of groups. Coastal ecosystems, which lie at the interface between marine and terrestrial ecosystems and provide an array of ecosystem services to different groups, aptly illustrate these challenges. Successful ecosystem-based management of coastal ecosystems requires incorporating scientific information and the knowledge and views of interested parties into the decision-making process. Estimating the provision of ecosystem services under alternative management schemes offers a systematic way to incorporate biogeophysical and socioeconomic information and the views of individuals and groups in the policy and management process. Employing ecosystem services as a common language to improve the process of ecosystem-based management presents both benefits and difficulties. Benefits include a transparent method for assessing trade-offs associated with management alternatives, a common set of facts and common currency on which to base negotiations, and improved communication among groups with competing interests or differing worldviews. Yet challenges to this approach remain, including predicting how human interventions will affect ecosystems, how such changes will affect the provision of ecosystem services, and how changes in service provision will affect the welfare of different groups in society. In a case study from Puget Sound, Washington, we illustrate the potential of applying ecosystem services as a common language for ecosystem-based management.

  12. Geoscience research databases for coastal Alabama ecosystem management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hummell, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    Effective management of complex coastal ecosystems necessitates access to scientific knowledge that can be acquired through a multidisciplinary approach involving Federal and State scientists that take advantage of agency expertise and resources for the benefit of all participants working toward a set of common research and management goals. Cooperative geostatic investigations have led toward building databases of fundamental scientific knowledge that can be utilized to manage coastal Alabama's natural and future development. These databases have been used to assess the occurrence and economic potential of hard mineral resources in the Alabama EFZ, and to support oil spill contingency planning and environmental analysis for coastal Alabama.

  13. Coastal Residents Perception of Seawater Desalination and Its Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, N.; Paytan, A.; Potts, D. C.

    2016-02-01

    Sufficient freshwater supply is an increasing challenge for coastal communities in California due reduced reliability of water from inland water sources (e.g. Colorado River, Sierra Nevada) and groundwater sources resulting from changes in weather patterns, recurring droughts, and saltwater intrusion. One option to increase resilience of freshwater availability in coastal areas and to mitigate associated water shortage impacts on coastal ecosystems and communities is an investment in new infrastructure like desalination plants. Such an investment, however, is a difficult decision due to uncertainty about drought duration and intensity, and insufficient knowledge about potential negative impacts of desalination facilities on coastal ecosystems and communities. A number of studies have examined biological impacts associated with seawater desalination and brine discharge in coastal areas. What has been lacking, however, is a systematic and scientifically grounded assessment of coastal resident perceptions regarding seawater desalination plants and their potential impacts on the local coastal ecosystems. Such information would be useful for education, information and planning purposes. Our research addresses this knowledge gap. We randomly surveyed a sample of residents in Carlsbad, California, where the first large coastal seawater desalination plant in California has been built, to understand their knowledge and attitudes towards seawater desalination plants. We assessed residents (1) awareness of the plant and the discharge of brine and the information sources for their knowledge, (2) knowledge about the characteristics of brine discharge and its potential impacts on the coastal ecosystem and coastal activities, (3) attitudes towards seawater desalination plants (support or oppose), (4) perception of negative and positive outcomes from the new desalination plant, (5) the influence of socio-demographic characteristics, place attachment, frequency of ocean use, and

  14. Coastal Ecosystems. Project CAPE Teaching Module [with Student Materials].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowal, Michael; And Others

    Intended for grades K-2, this science unit on coastal ecosystems aids teachers in helping students to: (1) identify marine organisms; (2) learn their basic characteristics; and (3) understand the web of interdependence among organisms of the same habitat. The teacher's guide is divided into four sections. The first section gives background…

  15. Coastal Ecosystems. Project CAPE Teaching Module [with Student Materials].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowal, Michael; And Others

    Intended for grades K-2, this science unit on coastal ecosystems aids teachers in helping students to: (1) identify marine organisms; (2) learn their basic characteristics; and (3) understand the web of interdependence among organisms of the same habitat. The teacher's guide is divided into four sections. The first section gives background…

  16. DEVELOPING INDICATORS OF NITROGEN SOURCE IN COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have linked stable isotope ratios of biota to nitrogen source. In particular, ribbed mussels show promise as sensitive indicators of the origins of nitrogen inputs to coastal ecosystems. Here we expand on previous work which demonstrated that mussel isotope ratios...

  17. Macroclimatic change expected to transform coastal wetland ecosystems this century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabler, Christopher A.; Osland, Michael J.; Grace, James B.; Stagg, Camille L.; Day, Richard H.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; From, Andrew; McCoy, Meagan L.; McLeod, Jennie L.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal wetlands, existing at the interface between land and sea, are highly vulnerable to climate change. Macroclimate (for example, temperature and precipitation regimes) greatly influences coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. However, research on climate change impacts in coastal wetlands has concentrated primarily on sea-level rise and largely ignored macroclimatic drivers, despite their power to transform plant community structure and modify ecosystem goods and services. Here, we model wetland plant community structure based on macroclimate using field data collected across broad temperature and precipitation gradients along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. Our analyses quantify strongly nonlinear temperature thresholds regulating the potential for marsh-to-mangrove conversion. We also identify precipitation thresholds for dominance by various functional groups, including succulent plants and unvegetated mudflats. Macroclimate-driven shifts in foundation plant species abundance will have large effects on certain ecosystem goods and services. Based on current and projected climatic conditions, we project that transformative ecological changes are probable throughout the region this century, even under conservative climate scenarios. Coastal wetland ecosystems are functionally similar worldwide, so changes in this region are indicative of potential future changes in climatically similar regions globally.

  18. DEVELOPING INDICATORS OF NITROGEN SOURCE IN COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have linked stable isotope ratios of biota to nitrogen source. In particular, ribbed mussels show promise as sensitive indicators of the origins of nitrogen inputs to coastal ecosystems. Here we expand on previous work which demonstrated that mussel isotope ratios...

  19. Ecosystem Services Linking People to Coastal Habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: There is a growing need to incorporate and prioritize ecosystem services/condition information into land-use decision making. While there are a number of place-based studies looking at how land-use decisions affect the availability and delivery of coa...

  20. Climatic Impacts and resilience of coastal ecosystems and fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, F.

    2012-12-01

    Marine and coastal ecosystems and human communities around the world are impacted by local anthropogenic pressures and by climate change, resulting in decreased ocean productivity, altered food web dynamics, habitat degradation, economic losses, and health and safety risks as a consequence of the changing and more variable climate. Climatic impacts occur both through altered physical conditions and variability, e.g., seawater temperature and sea level, and through a suite of chemical changes, including ocean acidification and hypoxia. In particular, time series analyses have highlighted declines in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the ocean over the last several decades. In addition to these global trends of decreasing DO, hypoxic conditions have been documented at several coastal locations within productive upwelling-driven ecosystems, including the California Current region, resulting in high mortality of ecologically and commercially important nearshore marine species and significant economic losses. The capacity of local ecosystems and associated human communities to adapt to these pressures depends on their resilience, that is the ability of ecosystems to absorb disturbance while retaining function and continuing to provide ecosystem services, and the ability of people to adapt to change in their environment by altering their behaviors and interactions. I will present global assessments of the cumulative impacts of climatic and local anthropogenic pressures on marine ecosystems, and results of interdisciplinary research investigating the current impacts of climate change on coastal marine ecosystems and human communities of the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico, and the influences of local and global feedbacks on the resilience and adaptive capacity of these systems.

  1. Coastal Ecosystems and Climate Change: Is Modeling and Monitoring Enough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T. M.; Walker, H. A.

    2005-05-01

    Many coastal ecosystems are severely degraded due to a variety of human factors, requiring large and expensive monitoring and modeling efforts for restoration and management. Climate variability, including abrupt climate change, is seldom factored into coastal ecosystem management despite growing evidence for climate forcing of precipitation, river discharge, water quality, salinity, turbidity, faunal and phytoplankton dynamics, dissolved oxygen, and other ecosystem processes. We will review evidence from long-term monitoring records, multi-proxy paleoclimatic and paleoecological records, and climatic modeling that suggests that the effects of climate can override local and regional human activities and may potentially diminish the success of restoration efforts. Because ecosystem restoration often involves long-term objectives requiring decades to achieve, our focus will be on examples from sub-tropical and temperate estuaries in North America that show ecosystem response over decadal timescales to variability related to El Niño-Southern Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Climatic variability evident from paleo-records of the past few centuries exceeds that recorded in most 20th century monitoring records. This raises issues about the efficacy of local and regional ecosystem and hydrodynamic models designed to simulate ecosystem response to anthropogenic changes in sediment and nutrient input, fresh-water discharge, and land-use because such models, though tested with rigorous validation procedures, use calibration data sets limited to a few years. Thus, they might not be appropriate for simulating response to climatic extremes on the scale and duration of past events outside their calibration range. Understanding the complexities of ecosystem response to climatic forcing, especially in the context of local and regional ecosystem disturbance, raises formidable challenges, but attempts to integrate climate

  2. Historical overfishing and the recent collapse of coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J B; Kirby, M X; Berger, W H; Bjorndal, K A; Botsford, L W; Bourque, B J; Bradbury, R H; Cooke, R; Erlandson, J; Estes, J A; Hughes, T P; Kidwell, S; Lange, C B; Lenihan, H S; Pandolfi, J M; Peterson, C H; Steneck, R S; Tegner, M J; Warner, R R

    2001-07-27

    Ecological extinction caused by overfishing precedes all other pervasive human disturbance to coastal ecosystems, including pollution, degradation of water quality, and anthropogenic climate change. Historical abundances of large consumer species were fantastically large in comparison with recent observations. Paleoecological, archaeological, and historical data show that time lags of decades to centuries occurred between the onset of overfishing and consequent changes in ecological communities, because unfished species of similar trophic level assumed the ecological roles of overfished species until they too were overfished or died of epidemic diseases related to overcrowding. Retrospective data not only help to clarify underlying causes and rates of ecological change, but they also demonstrate achievable goals for restoration and management of coastal ecosystems that could not even be contemplated based on the limited perspective of recent observations alone.

  3. Influence of Environmental Factors on Vibrio spp. in Coastal Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Crystal N

    2015-06-01

    Various studies have examined the relationships between vibrios and the environmental conditions surrounding them. However, very few reviews have compiled these studies into cohesive points. This may be due to the fact that these studies examine different environmental parameters, use different sampling, detection, and enumeration methodologies, and occur in diverse geographic locations. The current article is one approach to compile these studies into a cohesive work that assesses the importance of environmental determinants on the abundance of vibrios in coastal ecosystems.

  4. USGS: Science to understand and forecast change in coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, M.

    2007-01-01

    The multidisciplinary approach of the US Geological Survey (USGS), a principal science agency of the US Department of the Interior (DOI), to address the complex and cumulative impacts of human activities and natural events on the US coastal ecosystems has been considered remarkable for understanding and forecasting the changes. The USGS helps explain geologic, hydrologic, and biologic systems and their connectivity across landscapes and seascapes along the coastline. The USGS coastal science programs effectively address science and information to other scientists, managers, policy makers, and the public. The USGS provides scientific expertise, capabilities, and services to collaborative federal, regional, and state-led efforts, which are in line with the goals of Ocean Action Plan (OAP) and Ocean Research Priorities Plan (ORPP). The organization is a leader in understanding terrestrial and marine environmental hazards such as earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, and landslides and assessing and forecasting coastal impacts using various specialized visualization techniques.

  5. Diversity of coastal phytoplankton assemblages - Cross ecosystem comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olli, Kalle; Paerl, Hans W.; Klais, Riina

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton plays a massively important role in the oceanic carbon cycling and biogeochemistry. Despite its far-reaching importance, regional cross-ecosystem comparisons remain incomplete because the data sets are often scattered and fragmented. Here we compiled and harmonized decadal scale phytoplankton monitoring data sets from seven geographic regions of the world ocean, covering ca 45 thousand quantitative samples from European, North- and South American coastal waters. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed clear regional clustering of sampling locations, both when using compositional relatedness or phylogenetic turnover of communities. Compositional and phylogenetic relatedness of phytoplankton communities had a strong correlation with salinity and temperature gradients (R2 = 0.6-0.8). The regional taxon richness (S) varied by almost an order of magnitude, and scaled with the ecosystem size (A) according to a power law: S = 62 × A0.35. The compositional turnover of species (beta-diversity) was also positively related to ecosystem size, but also to mean regional salinity.

  6. Resilience to climate change in coastal marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Joanna R; Leslie, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Ecological resilience to climate change is a combination of resistance to increasingly frequent and severe disturbances, capacity for recovery and self-organization, and ability to adapt to new conditions. Here, we focus on three broad categories of ecological properties that underlie resilience: diversity, connectivity, and adaptive capacity. Diversity increases the variety of responses to disturbance and the likelihood that species can compensate for one another. Connectivity among species, populations, and ecosystems enhances capacity for recovery by providing sources of propagules, nutrients, and biological legacies. Adaptive capacity includes a combination of phenotypic plasticity, species range shifts, and microevolution. We discuss empirical evidence for how these ecological and evolutionary mechanisms contribute to the resilience of coastal marine ecosystems following climate change-related disturbances, and how resource managers can apply this information to sustain these systems and the ecosystem services they provide.

  7. Soil respiration flux in northern coastal temperate rainforest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, D. V.; Nay, S. M.; Edwards, R.; Valentine, D. W.; Hood, E. W.

    2009-12-01

    Forest carbon budgets are of increasing concern because of their linkages with changing climate. The potential source strength of northern forested ecosystems is of great interest due to the large carbon stock of these systems, especially the extensive peatlands. Where very few long-term measurements of soil carbon cycles have been made, such as the North Pacific coastal temperate margin, peatlands have potentially large but largely unknown source strengths, particularly through soil respiration. The easily and widely measured factors that influence the metabolism of plants and microorganisms in soils, such as temperature, moisture and substrate quality, must be coupled with a network of plot-scale measurements of soil respiration fluxes in this region in order to produce reasonable models of soil respiration flux across gradients of climate, vegetation and soil types. We designed a study to address this issue and measured soil respiration across a hydrologic gradient to quantify the influence of soil temperature and moisture on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in the coastal temperate rainforest biome. Replicated study sites were established in three common ecosystem types (peatlands, forested wetlands, and upland forest) within three coastal watersheds. In total, nine sites of the three ecosystem types were measured at monthly intervals during the snow-free period between May and November for two years. Soil respiration fluxes during the six-month measurement period were used to construct a respiration flux model for each landscape type. Soil respiration fluxes followed the seasonal temperature pattern in all ecosystem types and also varied with soil saturation as well in uplands. Temperature dependent models of soil respiration flux were best fit to intermediate drainage conditions in forested wetlands and explained up to 85% of the variation in this ecosystem type. Modeled soil respiration estimates were better at low temperatures with high water

  8. Soil respiration flux in northern coastal temperate rainforest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, David; Nay, S. Mark; Edwards, Richard; Valentine, David; Hood, Eran

    2010-05-01

    Forest carbon budgets are of increasing concern because of their linkages with changing climate. The potential source strength of northern forested ecosystems is of great interest due to the large carbon stock of these systems, especially the extensive peatlands. Where very few long-term measurements of soil carbon cycles have been made, such as the North Pacific coastal temperate margin, peatlands have potentially large but largely unknown source strengths, particularly through soil respiration. The easily and widely measured factors that influence the metabolism of plants and microorganisms in soils, such as temperature, moisture and substrate quality, must be coupled with a network of plot-scale measurements of soil respiration fluxes in this region in order to produce reasonable models of soil respiration flux across gradients of climate, vegetation and soil types. We designed a study to address this issue and measured soil respiration across a hydrologic gradient to quantify the influence of soil temperature and moisture on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in the coastal temperate rainforest biome. Replicated study sites were established in three common ecosystem types (peatlands, forested wetlands, and upland forest) within three coastal watersheds. In total, nine sites of the three ecosystem types were measured at monthly intervals during the snow-free period between May and November for two years. Soil respiration fluxes during the six-month measurement period were used to construct a respiration flux model for each landscape type. Soil respiration fluxes followed the seasonal temperature pattern in all ecosystem types and also varied with soil saturation as well in uplands. Temperature dependent models of soil respiration flux were best fit to intermediate drainage conditions in forested wetlands and explained up to 85% of the variation in this ecosystem type. Modeled soil respiration estimates were better at low temperatures with high water

  9. Lignin methoxyl hydrogen isotope ratios in a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Ellsworth, Patricia V.; Sternberg, Leonel da Silveira Lobo

    2013-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotope ratios of plant lignin methoxyl groups have recently been shown to record the hydrogen isotopic composition of meteoric water. Here we extend this technique towards tracing water source variations across a saltwater to freshwater gradient in a coastal, subtropical forest ecosystem. We measure the hydrogen isotopic composition of xylem water (δDxw) and methoxyl hydrogen (δDmethoxyl) to calculate fractionations for coastal mangrove, buttonwood and hammock tree species in Sugarloaf Key, as well as buttonwoods from Miami, both in Florida, USA. Prior studies of the isotopic composition of cellulose and plant leaf waxes in coastal ecosystems have yielded only a weak correlation to source waters, attributed to leaf water effects. Here we find δDmethoxyl values range from -230‰ to -130‰, across a 40‰ range in δDxw with a regression equation of δDmethoxyl ‰ = 1.8 * δDxw - 178‰ (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.0001, n = 74). This is comparable within error to the earlier published relationship for terrestrial trees which was defined across a much larger 125‰ isotopic range in precipitation. Analytical precision for measurements of δD values of pure CH3I by gas chromatography-pyrolysis-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-P-IRMS) is σ = 6‰ (n = 31), which is considerably better than for CH3I liberated through cleavage with HI from lignin with σ = 18‰ (n = 26). Our results establish that δDmethoxyl can record water sources and salinity incursion in coastal ecosystems, where variations sufficiently exceed method uncertainties (i.e., applications with δD excursions >50‰). For the first time, we also report yields of propyl iodide, which may indicate lignin synthesis of propoxyl groups under salt-stress.

  10. The impact of climate change on coastal ecosystems: chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, Virginia; Woodroffe, Colin D.; Nicholls, Robert J.; Forbes, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we stress two important features of coasts and coastal ecosystems. First, these are dynamic systems which continually undergo adjustments, especially through erosion and re-deposition, in response to a range of processes. Many coastal ecosystems adjust naturally at a range of time scales and their potential for response is examined partly by reconstructing how such systems have coped with natural changes of climate and sea level in the geological past. Second, coasts have changed profoundly through the 20th Century due to the impacts of human development (such as urbanisation, port and industrial expansion, shore protection, and the draining and conversion of coastal wetlands), with these development-related drivers closely linked to a growing global population and economy. It remains a challenge to isolate the impacts of climate change and sea-level rise from either the natural trajectory of shoreline change, or the accelerated pathway resulting from other human-related stressors. There exists a danger of overstating the importance of climate change, or overlooking significant interactions of climate change with other drivers.

  11. Accelerating loss of seagrasses across the globe threatens coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Waycott, Michelle; Duarte, Carlos M.; Carruthers, Tim J. B.; Orth, Robert J.; Dennison, William C.; Olyarnik, Suzanne; Calladine, Ainsley; Fourqurean, James W.; Heck, Kenneth L.; Hughes, A. Randall; Kendrick, Gary A.; Kenworthy, W. Judson; Short, Frederick T.; Williams, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems and the services they provide are adversely affected by a wide variety of human activities. In particular, seagrass meadows are negatively affected by impacts accruing from the billion or more people who live within 50 km of them. Seagrass meadows provide important ecosystem services, including an estimated $1.9 trillion per year in the form of nutrient cycling; an order of magnitude enhancement of coral reef fish productivity; a habitat for thousands of fish, bird, and invertebrate species; and a major food source for endangered dugong, manatee, and green turtle. Although individual impacts from coastal development, degraded water quality, and climate change have been documented, there has been no quantitative global assessment of seagrass loss until now. Our comprehensive global assessment of 215 studies found that seagrasses have been disappearing at a rate of 110 km2 yr−1 since 1980 and that 29% of the known areal extent has disappeared since seagrass areas were initially recorded in 1879. Furthermore, rates of decline have accelerated from a median of 0.9% yr−1 before 1940 to 7% yr−1 since 1990. Seagrass loss rates are comparable to those reported for mangroves, coral reefs, and tropical rainforests and place seagrass meadows among the most threatened ecosystems on earth. PMID:19587236

  12. Monitoring Ground-Water Quality in Coastal Ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, John A.; Masterson, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Cape Cod National Seashore (CACO) extends along more than 70 km of Atlantic Ocean open-beach coastline and includes three large saltwater bays - Wellfleet Harbor, Nauset Marsh, and Pleasant Bay (fig. 1). CACO encompasses about 18,000 ha of uplands, lakes, wetlands, and tidal lands (Godfrey and others, 1999) including most habitats typical of the sandy coast in National seashores and parks extending southward from Massachusetts to Florida. In 1995, CACO was selected by the National Park Service (NPS) as a prototype park typifying the Atlantic and Gulf Coast biogeographic region for long-term coastal ecosystem monitoring. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently (2007) assisting the NPS in the development of protocols for a Long-Term Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring Program at the CACO in Massachusetts. The overall purpose of the monitoring program is to characterize both natural and human-induced change in the biological resources of the CACO, over a time scale of decades, in the context of a changing global ecosystem.

  13. Marine ecosystem modeling beyond the box: using GIS to study carbon fluxes in a coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wijnbladh, Erik; Jönsson, Bror Fredrik; Kumblad, Linda

    2006-12-01

    Studies of carbon fluxes in marine ecosystems are often done by using box model approaches with basin size boxes, or highly resolved 3D models, and an emphasis on the pelagic component of the ecosystem. Those approaches work well in the ocean proper, but can give rise to considerable problems when applied to coastal systems, because of the scale of certain ecological niches and the fact that benthic organisms are the dominant functional group of the ecosystem. In addition, 3D models require an extensive modeling effort. In this project, an intermediate approach based on a high resolution (20x20 m) GIS data-grid has been developed for the coastal ecosystem in the Laxemar area (Baltic Sea, Sweden) based on a number of different site investigations. The model has been developed in the context of a safety assessment project for a proposed nuclear waste repository, in which the fate of hypothetically released radionuclides from the planned repository is estimated. The assessment project requires not only a good understanding of the ecosystem dynamics at the site, but also quantification of stocks and flows of matter in the system. The data-grid was then used to set up a carbon budget describing the spatial distribution of biomass, primary production, net ecosystem production and thus where carbon sinks and sources are located in the area. From these results, it was clear that there was a large variation in ecosystem characteristics within the basins and, on a larger scale, that the inner areas are net producing and the outer areas net respiring, even in shallow phytobenthic communities. Benthic processes had a similar or larger influence on carbon fluxes as advective processes in inner areas, whereas the opposite appears to be true in the outer basins. As many radionuclides are expected to follow the pathways of organic matter in the environment, these findings enhance our abilities to realistically describe and predict their fate in the ecosystem.

  14. An Ecological and Economic Assessment Methodology for Coastal Ecosystem Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobre, Ana M.

    2009-07-01

    An adaptation of the Drivers-Pressure-State-Impact-Response methodology is presented in this work. The differential DPSIR (ΔDPSIR) was developed to evaluate impacts on the coastal environment and as a tool for integrated ecosystem management. The aim of the ΔDPSIR is to provide scientifically-based information required by managers and decision-makers to evaluate previously adopted policies, as well as future response scenarios. The innovation of the present approach is to provide an explicit link between ecological and economic information related to the use and management of a coastal ecosystem within a specific timeframe. The application of ΔDPSIR is illustrated through an analysis of developments in a Southwest European coastal lagoon between 1985 and 1995. The value of economic activities dependent on the lagoon suffered a significant reduction (ca. -60%) over that period, mainly due to a decrease in bivalve production. During that decade the pressures from the catchment area were managed (ca. 176 million Euros), mainly through the building of waste water treatment plants. Notwithstanding this, the ecosystem state worsened with respect to abnormal clam mortalities due to a parasite infection and to benthic eutrophication symptoms in specific problematic areas. The negative economic impacts during the decade were estimated between -565 and -315 million Euros, of which 9-49% represent the cost of environmental externalities. Evaluation of these past events indicates that future management actions should focus on reducing the limitation on local clam seeds, which should result in positive impacts to both the local socio-economy and biodiversity.

  15. An ecological and economic assessment methodology for coastal ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Ana M

    2009-07-01

    An adaptation of the Drivers-Pressure-State-Impact-Response methodology is presented in this work. The differential DPSIR (DeltaDPSIR) was developed to evaluate impacts on the coastal environment and as a tool for integrated ecosystem management. The aim of the DeltaDPSIR is to provide scientifically-based information required by managers and decision-makers to evaluate previously adopted policies, as well as future response scenarios. The innovation of the present approach is to provide an explicit link between ecological and economic information related to the use and management of a coastal ecosystem within a specific timeframe. The application of DeltaDPSIR is illustrated through an analysis of developments in a Southwest European coastal lagoon between 1985 and 1995. The value of economic activities dependent on the lagoon suffered a significant reduction (ca. -60%) over that period, mainly due to a decrease in bivalve production. During that decade the pressures from the catchment area were managed (ca. 176 million Euros), mainly through the building of waste water treatment plants. Notwithstanding this, the ecosystem state worsened with respect to abnormal clam mortalities due to a parasite infection and to benthic eutrophication symptoms in specific problematic areas. The negative economic impacts during the decade were estimated between -565 and -315 million Euros, of which 9-49% represent the cost of environmental externalities. Evaluation of these past events indicates that future management actions should focus on reducing the limitation on local clam seeds, which should result in positive impacts to both the local socio-economy and biodiversity.

  16. Severe Storm in the Sea of Azov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A fierce storm struck both the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov on November 11, 2007. According to news reports, as many as 10 ships either sank or ran aground, one of them an oil tanker. The Russian tanker Volganeft-139 was anchored to the sea floor in the Kerch Strait linking the Black and Azov Seas when 108-kilometer- (67-mile-) per-hour winds tore the ship apart. As of November 12, up to 2,000 metric tons of fuel oil had leaked from the ship. On November 11, 2007, the day the storm struck, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of the region. Thick clouds obscure the view of much of the land area, including Ukraine, Belarus, western Russia, and Georgia. Clouds also obscure the Sea of Azov, although skies over the Black Sea are somewhat clearer. Over the Sea of Azov and immediately to the north, the clouds form a vague swirling pattern, suggestive of a low-pressure cyclonic system.

  17. Marine reserves help coastal ecosystems cope with extreme weather.

    PubMed

    Olds, Andrew D; Pitt, Kylie A; Maxwell, Paul S; Babcock, Russell C; Rissik, David; Connolly, Rod M

    2014-10-01

    Natural ecosystems have experienced widespread degradation due to human activities. Consequently, enhancing resilience has become a primary objective for conservation. Nature reserves are a favored management tool, but we need clearer empirical tests of whether they can impart resilience. Catastrophic flooding in early 2011 impacted coastal ecosystems across eastern Australia. We demonstrate that marine reserves enhanced the capacity of coral reefs to withstand flood impacts. Reserve reefs resisted the impact of perturbation, whilst fished reefs did not. Changes on fished reefs were correlated with the magnitude of flood impact, whereas variation on reserve reefs was related to ecological variables. Herbivory and coral recruitment are critical ecological processes that underpin reef resilience, and were greater in reserves and further enhanced on reserve reefs near mangroves. The capacity of reserves to mitigate external disturbances and promote ecological resilience will be critical to resisting an increased frequency of climate-related disturbance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Ecosystem goods and services from Swedish coastal habitats: identification, valuation, and implications of ecosystem shifts.

    PubMed

    Rönnbäck, Patrik; Kautsky, Nils; Pihl, Leif; Troell, Max; Söderqvist, Tore; Wennhage, Håkan

    2007-11-01

    Coastal areas are exposed to a variety of threats due to high population densities and rapid economic development. How will this affect human welfare and our dependence on nature's capacity to provide ecosystem goods and services? This paper is original in evaluating this concern for major habitats (macroalgae, seagrasses, blue mussel beds, and unvegetated soft bottoms) in a temperate coastal setting. More than 40 categories of goods and services are classified into provisional, regulating, and cultural services. A wide variety of Swedish examples is described for each category, including accounts of economic values and the relative importance of different habitats. For example, distinguishing characteristics would be the exceptional importance of blue mussels for mitigation of eutrophication, sandy soft bottoms for recreational uses, and seagrasses and macroalgae for fisheries production and control of wave and current energy. Net changes in the provision of goods and services are evaluated for three cases of observed coastal ecosystem shifts: i) seagrass beds into unvegetated substrate; ii) unvegetated shallow soft bottoms into filamentous algal mat dominance; and iii) macroalgae into mussel beds on hard substrate. The results are discussed in a management context including accounts of biodiversity, interconnectedness of ecosystems, and potential of economic valuation.

  19. Study on the cumulative impact of reclamation activities on ecosystem health in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengcheng; Shi, Honghua; Zheng, Wei; Li, Fen; Peng, Shitao; Ding, Dewen

    2016-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop feasible tools to investigate the cumulative impact of reclamations on coastal ecosystem health, so that the strategies of ecosystem-based management can be applied in the coastal zone. An indicator system and model were proposed to assess the cumulative impact synthetically. Two coastal water bodies, namely Laizhou Bay (LZB) and Tianjin coastal waters (TCW), in the Bohai Sea of China were studied and compared, each in a different phase of reclamations. Case studies showed that the indicator scores of coastal ecosystem health in LZB and TCW were 0.75 and 0.68 out of 1.0, respectively. It can be concluded that coastal reclamations have a historically cumulative effect on benthic environment, whose degree is larger than that on aquatic environment. The ecosystem-based management of coastal reclamations should emphasize the spatially and industrially intensive layout. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of petroleum pollution on aquatic coastal ecosystems in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, E.M. da; Peso-Aguiar, M.C.; Navarro, M.F.T.; Chastinet, C.B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Although oil activities generate numerous forms of environmental impact on biological communities, studies of these impacts on Brazilian coastal ecosystems are rate. Results of tests for the content of oil in sediments and organisms indicate a substantially high rate of degradation. Results for uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves suggested the recent occurrence of oil spills and that these organisms differed in their capabilities to bioconcentrate oil. The mangrove community has suffered constant inputs of oil and has responded with increased numbers of aerial roots, generation of malformed leaves and fruits by plants, and a decrease in litter production. Studies of the impact of oil on rocky shore communities and the toxicity of oil and its by-products to marine organisms have confirmed the results reported in the literature. Presently most of the available studies deal with the macroscopic effects of oil on organisms and have indicated that the nature of oil, climate characteristics, the physical environment, and the structure of the community influence the symptoms of oil contamination in organisms of coastal waters. Long-term studies should be carried out to assess changes in community structure, sublethal effects in populations, and the resilience of contaminated ecosystems.

  1. Recreational impacts on the fauna of Australian coastal marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Nigel; Burgin, Shelley

    2010-11-01

    This paper reviews recent research into the ecological impacts of recreation and tourism on coastal marine fauna in Australia. Despite the high and growing importance of water-based recreation to the Australian economy, and the known fragility of many Australian ecosystems, there has been relatively limited research into the effects of marine tourism and recreation, infrastructure and activities, on aquatic resources. In this paper we have reviewed the ecological impacts on fauna that are caused by outdoor recreation (including tourism) in Australian coastal marine ecosystems. We predict that the single most potentially severe impact of recreation may be the introduction and/or dispersal of non-indigenous species of marine organisms by recreational vessels. Such introductions, together with other impacts due to human activities have the potential to increasingly degrade recreation destinations. In response, governments have introduced a wide range of legislative tools (e.g., impact assessment, protected area reservation) to manage the recreational industry. It would appear, however, that these instruments are not always appropriately applied.

  2. Assessment of Coastal Ecosystem Services for Conservation Strategies in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Min Gon; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that scientific and political consideration for ecosystem services has dramatically increased over the past decade, few studies have focused on marine and coastal ecosystem services for conservation strategies. We used an ecosystem services approach to assess spatial distributions of habitat risks and four ecosystem services (coastal protection, carbon storage, recreation, and aesthetic quality), and explored the tradeoffs among them in coastal areas of South Korea. Additionally, we analyzed how the social and ecological characteristics in coastal areas interact with conservation and development policies by using this approach. We found strong negative associations between the habitat risks and ecosystem services (aquaculture, carbon storage, recreation, and aesthetic quality) across the coastal counties. Our results showed that the intensity of the habitat risks and the provision of ecosystem services were significantly different between reclamation-dominated and conservation-dominated counties, except for coastal vulnerability. A generalized linear model suggested that reclamation projects were dependent on economic efficiency, whereas demographic pressures and habitat conditions influenced the designation of protected areas at a county level. The ecosystem services approach provided guidelines to achieve both sustainable development and environment conservation. By using the approach, we can select the priority areas for developments while we can minimize the degradation of biodiversity and ecosystem services. As cultural ecosystem services are evenly distributed throughout coastal areas of South Korea, decision makers may employ them to improve the conditions of coastal wetlands outside of protected areas. PMID:26221950

  3. Assessment of Coastal Ecosystem Services for Conservation Strategies in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Min Gon; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that scientific and political consideration for ecosystem services has dramatically increased over the past decade, few studies have focused on marine and coastal ecosystem services for conservation strategies. We used an ecosystem services approach to assess spatial distributions of habitat risks and four ecosystem services (coastal protection, carbon storage, recreation, and aesthetic quality), and explored the tradeoffs among them in coastal areas of South Korea. Additionally, we analyzed how the social and ecological characteristics in coastal areas interact with conservation and development policies by using this approach. We found strong negative associations between the habitat risks and ecosystem services (aquaculture, carbon storage, recreation, and aesthetic quality) across the coastal counties. Our results showed that the intensity of the habitat risks and the provision of ecosystem services were significantly different between reclamation-dominated and conservation-dominated counties, except for coastal vulnerability. A generalized linear model suggested that reclamation projects were dependent on economic efficiency, whereas demographic pressures and habitat conditions influenced the designation of protected areas at a county level. The ecosystem services approach provided guidelines to achieve both sustainable development and environment conservation. By using the approach, we can select the priority areas for developments while we can minimize the degradation of biodiversity and ecosystem services. As cultural ecosystem services are evenly distributed throughout coastal areas of South Korea, decision makers may employ them to improve the conditions of coastal wetlands outside of protected areas.

  4. Coastal Ecosystem Integrated Compartment Model (ICM): Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meselhe, E. A.; White, E. D.; Reed, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Compartment Model (ICM) was developed as part of the 2017 Coastal Master Plan modeling effort. It is a comprehensive and numerical hydrodynamic model coupled to various geophysical process models. Simplifying assumptions related to some of the flow dynamics are applied to increase the computational efficiency of the model. The model can be used to provide insights about coastal ecosystems and evaluate restoration strategies. It builds on existing tools where possible and incorporates newly developed tools where necessary. It can perform decadal simulations (~ 50 years) across the entire Louisiana coast. It includes several improvements over the approach used to support the 2012 Master Plan, such as: additional processes in the hydrology, vegetation, wetland and barrier island morphology subroutines, increased spatial resolution, and integration of previously disparate models into a single modeling framework. The ICM includes habitat suitability indices (HSIs) to predict broad spatial patterns of habitat change, and it provides an additional integration to a dynamic fish and shellfish community model which quantitatively predicts potential changes in important fishery resources. It can be used to estimate the individual and cumulative effects of restoration and protection projects on the landscape, including a general estimate of water levels associated with flooding. The ICM is also used to examine possible impacts of climate change and future environmental scenarios (e.g. precipitation, Eustatic sea level rise, subsidence, tropical storms, etc.) on the landscape and on the effectiveness of restoration projects. The ICM code is publically accessible, and coastal restoration and protection groups interested in planning-level modeling are encouraged to explore its utility as a computationally efficient tool to examine ecosystem response to future physical or ecological changes, including the implementation of restoration and protection strategies.

  5. New data on sedimentation and biostratigraphy of ancient and New Azov Deposits (Sea of Azov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Dyuzhova, K. V.; Kovaleva, G. V.; Pol'shin, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    Applying the methods of absolute geochronology and lithology, it has been established that the average sedimentation rate in the Sea of Azov over the last 6000 years (Ancient and New Azov times) varied from 0.2 to 2.0 mm/year. Its minimum values are confined to transit and sediment-starved zones coinciding with the directions of the main marine currents. It has been indicated that changes in the water level of the Sea of Azov occur with lag relative to landscape-climate phases. The obtained data confirm the relation between marine and terrestrial processes occurring in the Sea of Azov region: transgressive phases are preceded by general humidification in adjacent regions, while regressive phases correlate with climate aridization. The biostratigraphic analysis of the Holocene sections examined reveals the unstable behavior of the sea level during their formation. The results of diatom analysis confirm development of the Phanagoria and Korsun Regressions and Nymphea Transgression. Frequent fluctuations of the Sea of Azov the level determined the rhythmical structure of the sedimentary sequence saturated with autochthonous and allochthonous organic matter.

  6. Western rock lobsters ( Panulirus cygnus) in Western Australian deep coastal ecosystems (35-60 m) are more carnivorous than those in shallow coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, Kris I.; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Walker, Diana I.

    2008-08-01

    The western rock lobster ( Panurilus cygnus George.) is a conspicuous consumer in the coastal ecosystems of temperate Western Australia. We used stable isotope analysis and gut content analysis to determine the diet and trophic position of western rock lobsters from mid-shelf coastal ecosystems (35-60 m depth) at three locations. Lobsters were primarily carnivorous, and no consistent differences in diet were detected with varying lobster size, sex or among locations. The main components of the diet were bait (from the fishery) and small crustaceans - crabs and amphipods/isopods. Foliose red algae, bivalves/gastropods and sponges were minor contributors to diet. The diet of lobsters in deep coastal ecosystems differed from the results of previous studies of diets of lobsters from shallow coastal ecosystems. In particular, coralline algae and molluscs - important prey in studies of lobsters from shallow coastal ecosystems - were minor components of the diet. These differences are likely to reflect differences in food availability between these systems and potentially, differences in choice of prey by lobsters that inhabit deeper water. Given the high contribution of bait to lobster diet, bait is likely to be subsidizing lobster production in deep coastal ecosystems during the fishing season.

  7. Numerical study of the Azov Sea level seiche oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Inzhebeikin, Yu. I.

    2009-08-01

    Seiche oscillations of the Azov Sea level are studied on the basis of the developed two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model grounded on the shallow water theory and recent data on the morphometric characteristics of the Sea of Azov. Frequency and spatial characteristics of the first five modes corresponding to seiche oscillations of the Azov Sea level are computed. It is shown that the frequency and spatial characteristics of the first five modes obtained for the Sea of Azov level changes correspond to seiche oscillations. The calculated parameters are compared with the field observations, which show their realistic character.

  8. Seasonal sea surface temperature anomaly prediction for coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles A.; Pegion, Kathy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Alexander, Michael A.; Tommasi, Desiree; Bond, Nicholas A.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Gudgel, Richard G.; Kristiansen, Trond; O'Brien, Todd D.; Xue, Yan; Yang, Xiasong

    2015-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are often both leading indicators and important drivers of marine resource fluctuations. Assessment of the skill of SST anomaly forecasts within coastal ecosystems accounting for the majority of global fish yields, however, has been minimal. This reflects coarse global forecast system resolution and past emphasis on the predictability of ocean basin-scale SST variations. This paper assesses monthly to inter-annual SST anomaly predictions in coastal "Large Marine Ecosystems" (LMEs). We begin with an analysis of 7 well-observed LMEs adjacent to the United States and then examine how mechanisms responsible for prediction skill in these systems are reflected in predictions for LMEs globally. Historical SST anomaly estimates from the 1/4° daily Optimal Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature reanalysis (OISST.v2) were first found to be highly consistent with in-situ measurements for 6 of the 7 U.S. LMEs. Thirty years of retrospective forecasts from climate forecast systems developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (CM2.5-FLOR) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (CFSv2) were then assessed against OISST.v2. Forecast skill varied widely by LME, initialization month, and lead but there were many cases of high skill that also exceeded that of a persistence forecast, some at leads greater than 6 months. Mechanisms underlying skill above persistence included accurate simulation of (a) seasonal transitions between less predictable locally generated and more predictable basin-scale SST variability; (b) seasonal transitions between different basin-scale influences; (c) propagation of SST anomalies across seasons through sea ice; and (d) re-emergence of previous anomalies upon the breakdown of summer stratification. Globally, significant skill above persistence across many tropical systems arises via mechanisms (a) and (b). Combinations of all four mechanisms contribute to less prevalent but nonetheless

  9. Assisted Migration as a Management Tool in Coastal Ecosystems Threatened by Climate Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    FINAL REPORT Assisted Migration as a Management Tool in Coastal Ecosystems Threatened by Climate Change SERDP Project RC-1692 APRIL 2016...09-C-0028 Assisted migration as a management tool in coastal ecosystems threatened by climate change 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...level rise. Studies that explore responses of coastal biota to climate change are needed to develop adaptation strategies, but mechanisms underlying

  10. Airborne Mission Concept for Coastal Ocean Color and Ecosystems Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Hooker, S. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Kudela, R. M.; Palacios, S. L.; Negrey, K.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Dunagan, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    NASA airborne missions in 2011 and 2013 over Monterey Bay, CA demonstrated novel above- and in-water calibration and validation measurements supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The resultant airborne data characterize contemporaneous coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems spanning a next-generation spectral domain (320-875 nm). This airborne instrument suite for calibration, validation, and research flew at the lowest safe altitude (ca. 100 ft or 30 m) as well as higher altitudes (e.g., 6,000 ft or 1,800 m) above the sea surface covering a larger area in a single synoptic sortie than ship-based measurements at a few stations during the same sampling period. Data collection of coincident atmospheric and aquatic properties near the sea surface and at altitude allows the input of relevant variables into atmospheric correction schemes to improve the output of corrected imaging spectrometer data. Specific channels support legacy and next-generation satellite capabilities, and flights are planned to within 30 min of satellite overpass. This concept supports calibration and validation activities of ocean color phenomena (e.g., river plumes, algal blooms) and studies of water quality and coastal ecosystems. The 2011 COAST mission flew at 100 and 6,000 ft on a Twin Otter platform with flight plans accommodating the competing requirements of the sensor suite, which included the Coastal-Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) for the first time. C-AIR (Biospherical Instruments Inc.) also flew in the 2013 OCEANIA mission at 100 and 1,000 ft on the Twin Otter below the California airborne simulation of the proposed NASA HyspIRI satellite system comprised of an imaging spectrometer and thermal infrared multispectral imager on the ER-2 at 65,000 ft (20,000 m). For both missions, the Compact-Optical Profiling System (Biospherical

  11. Pansharpening in coastal ecosystems using Worldview-2 imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarrola-Ulzurrun, Edurne; Marcello-Ruiz, Javier; Gonzalo-Martin, Consuelo

    2016-10-01

    Both climate change and anthropogenic pressure impacts are producing a declining in ecosystem natural resources. In this work, a vulnerable coastal ecosystem, Maspalomas Natural Reserve (Canary Islands, Spain), is analyzed. The development of advanced image processing techniques, applied to new satellites with very high resolution sensors (VHR), are essential to obtain accurate and systematic information about such natural areas. Thus, remote sensing offers a practical and cost-effective means for a good environmental management although some improvements are needed by the application of pansharpening techniques. A preliminary assessment was performed selecting classical and new algorithms that could achieve good performance with WorldView-2 imagery. Moreover, different quality indices were used in order to asses which pansharpening technique gives a better fused image. A total of 7 pansharpening algorithms were analyzed using 6 spectral and spatial quality indices. The quality assessment was implemented for the whole set of multispectral bands and for those bands covered by the wavelength range of the panchromatic image and outside of it. After an extensive evaluation, the most suitable algorithm was the Weighted Wavelet `à trous' through Fractal Dimension Maps technique which provided the best compromise between the spectral and spatial quality for the image. Finally, Quality Map Analysis was performed in order to study the fusion in each band at local level. As conclusion, novel analysis has been conducted covering the evaluation of fusion methods in shallow water areas. Hence, the excellent results provided by this study have been applied to the generation of challenging thematic maps of coastal and dunes protected areas.

  12. Climate warming and estuarine and marine coastal ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, V.S.

    1994-12-31

    Estuaries are physically controlled, resilient coastal ecosystems harboring environmentally tolerant species in diluted seawater. Marine coastal systems are less stressed physically and contain some environmentally less tolerant species. Both systems are biologically productive and economically significant. Because of their complex structure and function, it is difficult to predict accurately the effects of climate change, but some broad generalizations can be made. If climate warming occurs, it will raise sea-level, heat shallow waters, and modify precipitation, wind, and water circulation patterns. Rapid sea-level rise could cause the loss of salt marshes, mangrove swamps, and coral reefs, thus diminishing the ecological roles of these highly productive systems. Warmer waters could eliminate heat-sensitive species from part of their geographical range while allowing heat-tolerant species to expand their range, depending on their ability to disperse. Most thermally influenced losses of species will probably only be local, but changed distributions may lead to changed community function. It is more difficult to predict the effects of modified precipitation, wind, and water circulation patterns, but changes could affect organisms dependent on such patterns for food production (e.g., in upwelling regions) or for retention in estuaries. Aquacultural and fishery-related enterprises would be affected negatively in some regions and positively in others. 73 refs.

  13. GEO-CAPE Coastal Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics White Paper ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water Act protects all navigable waters in the United States (CWA, 1988). The objective of the CWA is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters." This Federal mandate authorizes states, tribes, and U.S. territories, with guidance and oversight from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to develop and implement water quality standards to protect the human and aquatic life uses of the Nation’s waterways. Water quality standards include designated uses, defined as the services that a water body supports such as drinking water, aquatic life, harvestable species, and recreation. These standards under the CWA Section 304(a) are applicable within state waters, defined as less than 3 nautical miles from shore. Therefore, a majority of research by the EPA addresses near-shore coastal waters within 3 nautical miles, estuaries and lakes where applicable water quality regulation could be implemented. Policy makers and environmental managers in EPA’s program and regional offices need tools enabling them to assess the sustainability of watershed ecosystems, and the services they provide, under current and future land use practices. The typical 1km resolution and current Case 1 algorithms of SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS provide limited assessments of near-shore coastal waters, estuaries and lakes. It has proven difficult to adequately resolve and derive products in smaller estuaries or waters in proxim

  14. GEO-CAPE Coastal Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics White Paper ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water Act protects all navigable waters in the United States (CWA, 1988). The objective of the CWA is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters." This Federal mandate authorizes states, tribes, and U.S. territories, with guidance and oversight from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to develop and implement water quality standards to protect the human and aquatic life uses of the Nation’s waterways. Water quality standards include designated uses, defined as the services that a water body supports such as drinking water, aquatic life, harvestable species, and recreation. These standards under the CWA Section 304(a) are applicable within state waters, defined as less than 3 nautical miles from shore. Therefore, a majority of research by the EPA addresses near-shore coastal waters within 3 nautical miles, estuaries and lakes where applicable water quality regulation could be implemented. Policy makers and environmental managers in EPA’s program and regional offices need tools enabling them to assess the sustainability of watershed ecosystems, and the services they provide, under current and future land use practices. The typical 1km resolution and current Case 1 algorithms of SeaWiFS, MODIS, and VIIRS provide limited assessments of near-shore coastal waters, estuaries and lakes. It has proven difficult to adequately resolve and derive products in smaller estuaries or waters in proxim

  15. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  16. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of

  17. Biological mechanisms supporting adaptation to ocean acidification in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Iris E.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Olsen, Ylva S.; Steckbauer, Alexandra; Ramajo, Laura; Moore, Tommy S.; Trotter, Julie A.; McCulloch, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The direct influence of anthropogenic CO2 might play a limited role in pH regulation in coastal ecosystems as pH regulation in these areas can be complex. They experience large variability across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales, with complex external and internal drivers. Organisms influence pH at a patch scale, where community metabolic effects and hydrodynamic processes interact to produce broad ranges in pH, (∼0.3-0.5 pH units) over daily cycles and spatial scales (mm to m) particularly in shallow vegetated habitats and coral reefs where both respiration and photosynthetic activity are intense. Biological interactions at the ecosystem scale, linked to patchiness in habitat landscapes and seasonal changes in metabolic processes and temperature lead to changes of about 0.3-0.5 pH units throughout a year. Furthermore, on the scale of individual organisms, small-scale processes including changes at the Diffusive Boundary Layer (DBL), interactions with symbionts, and changes to the specific calcification environment, induce additional changes in excess of 0.5 pH units. In these highly variable pH environments calcifying organisms have developed the capacity to alter the pH of their calcifying environment, or specifically within critical tissues where calcification occurs, thus achieving a homeostasis. This capacity to control the conditions for calcification at the organism scale may therefore buffer the full impacts of ocean acidification on an organism scale, although this might be at a cost to the individual. Furthermore, in some areas, calcifiers may potentially benefit from changes to ambient seawater pH, where photosynthetic organisms drawdown CO2.

  18. The roles of large top predators in coastal ecosystems: new insights from long term ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Mather, Martha E.; Matich, Philip; Nifong, James C.; Ripple, William J.; Silliman, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    During recent human history, human activities such as overhunting and habitat destruction have severely impacted many large top predator populations around the world. Studies from a variety of ecosystems show that loss or diminishment of top predator populations can have serious consequences for population and community dynamics and ecosystem stability. However, there are relatively few studies of the roles of large top predators in coastal ecosystems, so that we do not yet completely understand what could happen to coastal areas if large top predators are extirpated or significantly reduced in number. This lack of knowledge is surprising given that coastal areas around the globe are highly valued and densely populated by humans, and thus coastal large top predator populations frequently come into conflict with coastal human populations. This paper reviews what is known about the ecological roles of large top predators in coastal systems and presents a synthesis of recent work from three coastal eastern US Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites where long-term studies reveal what appear to be common themes relating to the roles of large top predators in coastal systems. We discuss three specific themes: (1) large top predators acting as mobile links between disparate habitats, (2) large top predators potentially affecting nutrient and biogeochemical dynamics through localized behaviors, and (3) individual specialization of large top predator behaviors. We also discuss how research within the LTER network has led to enhanced understanding of the ecological roles of coastal large top predators. Highlighting this work is intended to encourage further investigation of the roles of large top predators across diverse coastal aquatic habitats and to better inform researchers and ecosystem managers about the importance of large top predators for coastal ecosystem health and stability.

  19. Panel Discussion: U.S. EPA Using Modeling and Ecosystem Services to Enhance Coastal Decision Making

    EPA Science Inventory

    This panel will discuss the research being conducted, and the models being used in three current coastal EPA studies being conducted on ecosystem services in Tampa Bay, the Chesapeake Bay and the Coastal Carolinas. These studies are intended to provide a broader and more compreh...

  20. A Review of Selected Ecosystem Services Supplied by Coastal Wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant ecosystem services derive from the coastal wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes even though they have undergone substantial declines since European settlement. Basin-wide, two-thirds of the original coastal wetlands have been lost, and the remaining 126,000 ha of US...

  1. Estimating the Provision of Ecosystem Services by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulf of Mexico (GOM) coastal wetlands contribute to human well-being by providing many ecosystem services (e.g., commercial and recreational fishery support, protection of coastal communities from storm surge, water quality improvement, and carbon sequestration). The GOM region c...

  2. Estimating the Provision of Ecosystem Services by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulf of Mexico (GOM) coastal wetlands contribute to human well-being by providing many ecosystem services (e.g., commercial and recreational fishery support, protection of coastal communities from storm surge, water quality improvement, and carbon sequestration). The GOM region c...

  3. A Review of Selected Ecosystem Services Supplied by Coastal Wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant ecosystem services derive from the coastal wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes even though they have undergone substantial declines since European settlement. Basin-wide, two-thirds of the original coastal wetlands have been lost, and the remaining 126,000 ha of US...

  4. Panel Discussion: U.S. EPA Using Modeling and Ecosystem Services to Enhance Coastal Decision Making

    EPA Science Inventory

    This panel will discuss the research being conducted, and the models being used in three current coastal EPA studies being conducted on ecosystem services in Tampa Bay, the Chesapeake Bay and the Coastal Carolinas. These studies are intended to provide a broader and more compreh...

  5. Coastal High-resolution Observations and Remote Sensing of Ecosystems (C-HORSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guild, Liane

    2016-01-01

    Coastal benthic marine ecosystems, such as coral reefs, seagrass beds, and kelp forests are highly productive as well as ecologically and commercially important resources. These systems are vulnerable to degraded water quality due to coastal development, terrestrial run-off, and harmful algal blooms. Measurements of these features are important for understanding linkages with land-based sources of pollution and impacts to coastal ecosystems. Challenges for accurate remote sensing of coastal benthic (shallow water) ecosystems and water quality are complicated by atmospheric scattering/absorption (approximately 80+% of the signal), sun glint from the sea surface, and water column scattering (e.g., turbidity). Further, sensor challenges related to signal to noise (SNR) over optically dark targets as well as insufficient radiometric calibration thwart the value of coastal remotely-sensed data. Atmospheric correction of satellite and airborne remotely-sensed radiance data is crucial for deriving accurate water-leaving radiance in coastal waters. C-HORSE seeks to optimize coastal remote sensing measurements by using a novel airborne instrument suite that will bridge calibration, validation, and research capabilities of bio-optical measurements from the sea to the high altitude remote sensing platform. The primary goal of C-HORSE is to facilitate enhanced optical observations of coastal ecosystems using state of the art portable microradiometers with 19 targeted spectral channels and flight planning to optimize measurements further supporting current and future remote sensing missions.

  6. Global climate change impacts on coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico: considerations for integrated coastal management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, John W.; Yáñez-Arancibia, Alejandro; Cowan, James H.; Day, Richard H.; Twilley, Robert R.; Rybczyk, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is important in considerations of integrated coastal management in the Gulf of Mexico. This is true for a number of reasons. Climate in the Gulf spans the range from tropical to the lower part of the temperate zone. Thus, as climate warms, the tropical temperate interface, which is currently mostly offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, will increasingly move over the coastal zone of the northern and eastern parts of the Gulf. Currently, this interface is located in South Florida and around the US-Mexico border in the Texas-Tamaulipas region. Maintaining healthy coastal ecosystems is important because they will be more resistant to climate change.

  7. Geostationary Coastal Ecosystem Dynamics Imager (GEO CEDI) for the GEO Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO CAPE) Mission. Concept Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janz, Scott; Smith, James C.; Mannino, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concepts of the Geostationary Coastal Ecosystem Dynamics Imager (GEO CEDI) which will be used on the GEO Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO CAPE) Mission. The primary science requirements require scans of the U.S. Coastal waters 3 times per day during the daylight hours. Included in the overview are presentations about the systems, the optics, the detectors, the mechanical systems, the electromechanical systems, the electrical design, the flight software, the thermal systems, and the contamination prevention requirements.

  8. Variation in freshwater input to the Eastern US coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, D.; Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E., II; Hughes, R.; Kimbro, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phragmites is one of the most invasive plants in North American wetlands. Although its spread in coastal marshes has been linked by independent studies to urbanization, eutrophication, and salinity change, there is good evidence that these factors may interactively determine invasion success and in turn, the ecosystem services provided by marshes. We hypothesize that the invasion of Phragmites is linked to changes in freshwater inputs due to climate and/or land use change. El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), originating in the sea surface temperature anomalies (warm or cold) in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, is a notable and prominent signal in inter-annual climatic variation. Recent studies shows that the probability of strong El Nino events may increase in the future. In this study, we will investigate the teleconnections between freshwater inputs to the coastal zone along the eastern U.S. and ENSO indices, and attempt to explore the predictability of temporal and spatial variation of freshwater inputs based on ENSO conditions. To quantify changes in freshwater input in this region, hydrologic modeling, remote sensing and field measurements are combined. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) model is used to simulate hourly streamflow from all watersheds from southern Florida to northern Maine draining into the Atlantic Ocean. The modeling effort utilizes satellite precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Product 3B42v7: 2001-current with a 3-hr temporal resolution and 0.25 degree spatial resolution), land surface temperature and vegetation measures (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, products: 2001-current with a monthly temporal resolution and 0.05 degree spatial resolution). To account for land cover change, annual MODIS land cover data and time varying population statics are merged to estimate annual land cover characteristics for each sub-catchment within the study region. Static datasets for soils and ground elevations are

  9. Urbanization, Climate Change, and Changes to Ecosystem Services in Coastal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, P. C.; Costanza, R.; Roman, J.; Kubiszewski, I.

    2011-12-01

    We examine the history and status of ecosystem services in low-lying coastal areas (LLCA's), how they might change in the future in particular because of urbanization and wider environmental and social changes, and what the implications of these changes might be for the migration of humans. We synthesized information from a number of sources on the status and value of ecosystem services in LLCA's, including information about key ecosystems that are likely to be particularly vulnerable to environmental change. We created maps of ecosystem and human population changes in LLCA's and then estimated changes in ecosystem services. We developed four scenarios for future ecosystem and ecosystem services conditions in 2060, based on the four SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) scenarios with additional reference to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the Great Transition Initiative scenarios. The two axes of the SRES scenarios are global vs. regional and material economy vs. environment foci. This allowed an assessment of the plausible range of future uncertainty about ecosystem services in LLCA's and the potential for changes in ecosystem services to drive human migration. Major findings include: 1) Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive on the planet. They provide more than 70% of total global ecosystem services; 2) At the same time, these systems are the most threatened by climate change, human settlement and potential coastward migration; 3) In the mid 1990's, approximately 25 million people were forced to leave their homelands due to the inability to secure a livelihood as ecosystem services declined; 4) In the coming decades, one estimate puts the number at 240-525 million people who may feel impelled to migrate due to loss of ecosystem services; 5) Risk factors for coastal populations include overexploitation of resources, including fisheries; destruction of mangroves, wetlands, and other natural infrastructure; increased storm activity and

  10. An integrated approach to manage coastal ecosystems and prevent marine pollution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, Marco; Bonamano, Simone; Carli, Filippo Maria; Giovacchini, Monica; Madonia, Alice; Mancini, Emanuele; Molino, Chiara; Piermattei, Viviana; Manfredi Frattarelli, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses an integrated approach based on Sea-Use-Map (SUM), backed by a permanent monitoring system (C-CEMS-Civitavecchia Coastal Environmental Monitoring System). This tool supports the management of the marine coastal area, contributing substantially to ecosystem benefits evaluation and to minimize pollution impacts. Within the Blue Growth strategy, the protection of marine ecosystems is considered a priority for the sustainable growth of marine and maritime sectors. To face this issue, the European MSP and MSFD directives (2014/89/EU; 2008/56/EC) strongly promote the adoption of an ecosystem-based approach, paying particular attention to the support of monitoring networks that use L-TER (long-term ecological research) observations and integrate multi-disciplinary data sets. Although not largely used in Europe yet, the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI), developed in 1979 by NOAA (and promoted by IMO in 2010), can be considered an excellent example of ecosystem-based approach to reduce the environmental consequences of an oil spill event in a coastal area. SUM is an ecosystem oriented cartographic tool specifically designed to support the sustainable management of the coastal areas, such as the selection of the best sites for the introduction of new uses or the identification of the coastal areas subjected to potential impacts. It also enables a rapid evaluation of the benefits produced by marine areas as well as of their anthropogenic disturbance. SUM integrates C-CEMS dataset, geomorphological and ecological features and knowledge on the coastal and maritime space uses. The SUM appliance allowed to obtain relevant operational results in the Civitavecchia coastal area (Latium, Italy), characterized by high variability of marine and coastal environments, historical heritage and affected by the presence of a big harbour, relevant industrial infrastructures, and touristic features. In particular, the valuation of marine ecosystem services based on

  11. Will Global Change Effect Primary Productivity in Coastal Ecosystems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Algae are the base of coastal food webs because they provide the source of organic carbon for the remaining members of the community. Thus, the rate that they produce organic carbon to a large extent controls the productivity of the entire ecosystem. Factors that control algal productivity range from the physical (e.g., temperature, light), chemical (e.g., nutrient levels) to the biological (e.g., grazing). Currently, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide surficial fluxes of ultraviolet radiation are rising. Both of these environmental variables can have a profound effect on algal productivity. Atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase surficial levels of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our laboratory and field studies of algal mats and phytoplankton cultures under ambient and elevated levels of pCO2 show that elevated levels of inorganic carbon can cause an increase in photosynthetic rates. In some cases, this increase will cause an increase in phytoplankton numbers. There may be an increase in the excretion of fixed carbon, which in turn may enhance bacterial productivity. Alternatively, in analogy with studies on the effect of elevated pCO2 on plants, the phytoplankton could change their carbon to nitrogen ratios, which will effect the feeding of the planktonic grazers. The seasonal depletion of stratospheric ozone has resulted in elevated fluxes of UVB radiation superimposed on the normal seasonal variation. Present surface UV fluxes have a significant impact on phytoplankton physiology, including the inhibition of the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis, inhibition of nitrogenase activity, inhibition of heterocyst formation, reduction in motility, increased synthesis of the UV-screening pigment scytonemin, and mutation. After reviewing these issues, recent work in our lab on measuring the effect of UV radiation on phytoplankton in the San Francisco Bay Estuary will be presented.

  12. Will Global Change Effect Primary Productivity in Coastal Ecosystems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Algae are the base of coastal food webs because they provide the source of organic carbon for the remaining members of the community. Thus, the rate that they produce organic carbon to a large extent controls the productivity of the entire ecosystem. Factors that control algal productivity range from the physical (e.g., temperature, light), chemical (e.g., nutrient levels) to the biological (e.g., grazing). Currently, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide surficial fluxes of ultraviolet radiation are rising. Both of these environmental variables can have a profound effect on algal productivity. Atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase surficial levels of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our laboratory and field studies of algal mats and phytoplankton cultures under ambient and elevated levels of pCO2 show that elevated levels of inorganic carbon can cause an increase in photosynthetic rates. In some cases, this increase will cause an increase in phytoplankton numbers. There may be an increase in the excretion of fixed carbon, which in turn may enhance bacterial productivity. Alternatively, in analogy with studies on the effect of elevated pCO2 on plants, the phytoplankton could change their carbon to nitrogen ratios, which will effect the feeding of the planktonic grazers. The seasonal depletion of stratospheric ozone has resulted in elevated fluxes of UVB radiation superimposed on the normal seasonal variation. Present surface UV fluxes have a significant impact on phytoplankton physiology, including the inhibition of the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis, inhibition of nitrogenase activity, inhibition of heterocyst formation, reduction in motility, increased synthesis of the UV-screening pigment scytonemin, and mutation. After reviewing these issues, recent work in our lab on measuring the effect of UV radiation on phytoplankton in the San Francisco Bay Estuary will be presented.

  13. Presettlement fire regime and vegetation mapping in Southeastern Coastal Plain forest ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Andrew D. Bailey; Robert Mickler; Cecil Frost

    2007-01-01

    Fire-adapted forest ecosystems make up 95 percent of the historic Coastal Plain vegetation types in the Southeastern United States. Fire suppression over the last century has altered the species composition of these ecosystems, increased fuel loads, and increased wildfire risk. Prescribed fire is one management tool used to reduce fuel loading and restore fire-adapted...

  14. Icefield-to-ocean linkages across the northern Pacific coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neel, Shad; Hood, Eran; Bidlack, Allison L.; Fleming, Sean W.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Arendt, Anthony; Burgess, Evan W.; Sergeant, Christopher J.; Beaudreau, Anne E.; Timm, Kristin; Hayward, Gregory D.; Reynolds, Joel H.; Pyare, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Rates of glacier mass loss in the northern Pacific coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR) are among the highest on Earth, and changes in glacier volume and extent will affect the flow regime and chemistry of coastal rivers, as well as the nearshore marine ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska. Here we synthesize physical, chemical and biological linkages that characterize the northern PCTR ecosystem, with particular emphasis on the potential impacts of glacier change in the coastal mountain ranges on the surface–water hydrology, biogeochemistry, coastal oceanography and aquatic ecology. We also evaluate the relative importance and interplay between interannual variability and long-term trends in key physical drivers and ecological responses. To advance our knowledge of the northern PCTR, we advocate for cross-disciplinary research bridging the icefield-to-ocean ecosystem that can be paired with long-term scientific records and designed to inform decisionmakers.

  15. A HYPOTHESIS-DRIVEN FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING CLIMATE INDUCED CHANGES IN COASTAL FINAL ECOSYSTEM GOODS AND SERVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding how climate change will alter the availability of coastal final ecosystem goods and services (FEGS; such as food provisioning from fisheries, property protection, and recreation) has significant implications for coastal planning and the development of adaptive manag...

  16. A HYPOTHESIS-DRIVEN FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING CLIMATE INDUCED CHANGES IN COASTAL FINAL ECOSYSTEM GOODS AND SERVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding how climate change will alter the availability of coastal final ecosystem goods and services (FEGS; such as food provisioning from fisheries, property protection, and recreation) has significant implications for coastal planning and the development of adaptive manag...

  17. Embedding ecosystem services in coastal planning leads to better outcomes for people and nature

    PubMed Central

    Arkema, Katie K.; Verutes, Gregory M.; Wood, Spencer A.; Clarke-Samuels, Chantalle; Rosado, Samir; Canto, Maritza; Rosenthal, Amy; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Guannel, Gregory; Toft, Jodie; Faries, Joe; Silver, Jessica M.; Griffin, Robert; Guerry, Anne D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent calls for ocean planning envision informed management of social and ecological systems to sustain delivery of ecosystem services to people. However, until now, no coastal and marine planning process has applied an ecosystem-services framework to understand how human activities affect the flow of benefits, to create scenarios, and to design a management plan. We developed models that quantify services provided by corals, mangroves, and seagrasses. We used these models within an extensive engagement process to design a national spatial plan for Belize’s coastal zone. Through iteration of modeling and stakeholder engagement, we developed a preferred plan, currently under formal consideration by the Belizean government. Our results suggest that the preferred plan will lead to greater returns from coastal protection and tourism than outcomes from scenarios oriented toward achieving either conservation or development goals. The plan will also reduce impacts to coastal habitat and increase revenues from lobster fishing relative to current management. By accounting for spatial variation in the impacts of coastal and ocean activities on benefits that ecosystems provide to people, our models allowed stakeholders and policymakers to refine zones of human use. The final version of the preferred plan improved expected coastal protection by >25% and more than doubled the revenue from fishing, compared with earlier versions based on stakeholder preferences alone. Including outcomes in terms of ecosystem-service supply and value allowed for explicit consideration of multiple benefits from oceans and coasts that typically are evaluated separately in management decisions. PMID:26082545

  18. Bubble Stripping as a Tool To Reduce High Dissolved CO2 in Coastal Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Koweek, David A; Mucciarone, David A; Dunbar, Robert B

    2016-04-05

    High dissolved CO2 concentrations in coastal ecosystems are a common occurrence due to a combination of large ecosystem metabolism, shallow water, and long residence times. Many important coastal species may have adapted to this natural variability over time, but eutrophication and ocean acidification may be perturbing the water chemistry beyond the bounds of tolerance for these organisms. We are currently limited in our ability to deal with the geochemical changes unfolding in our coastal ocean. This study helps to address this deficit of solutions by introducing bubble stripping as a novel geochemical engineering approach to reducing high CO2 in coastal marine ecosystems. We use a process-based model to find that air/sea gas exchange rates within a bubbled system are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than within a nonbubbled system. By coupling bubbling-enhanced ventilation to a coastal ecosystem metabolism model, we demonstrate that strategically timed bubble plumes can mitigate exposure to high CO2 under present-day conditions and that exposure mitigation is enhanced in the more acidic conditions predicted by the end of the century. We argue that shallow water CO2 bubble stripping should be considered among the growing list of engineering approaches intended to increase coastal resilience in a changing ocean.

  19. Ecosystem classification for EU habitat distribution assessment in sandy coastal environments: an application in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Maria Laura; Acosta, Alicia T R; Stanisci, Angela; Pirone, Gianfranco; Ciaschetti, Giampiero

    2008-05-01

    Many recent developments in coastal science have gone against the demands of European Union legislation. Coastal dune systems which cover small areas of the earth can host a high level of biodiversity. However, human pressure on coastal zones around the world has increased dramatically in the last 50 years. In addition to direct habitat loss, the rapid extinction of many species that are unique to these systems can be attributed to landscape deterioration through the lack of appropriate management. In this paper, we propose to use of an ecosystem classification technique that integrates potential natural vegetation distribution as a reference framework for coastal dune EU Habitats (92/43) distribution analysis and assessment. As an example, the present study analyses the EU Habitats distribution within a hierarchical ecosystem classification of the coastal dune systems of central Italy. In total, 24 land elements belonging to 8 land units, 5 land facets, 2 land systems and 2 land regions were identified for the coastal dunes of central Italy, based on diagnostic land attributes. In central Italy, coastal dune environments including all the beach area, mobile dunes and all the fixed-dune land elements contain or could potentially hold at least one EU habitat of interest. Almost all dune slack transitions present the potentiality for the spontaneous development of EU woodlands of interest. The precise information concerning these ecosystems distribution and ecological relationships that this method produces, makes it very effective in Natura 2000 European network assessment. This hierarchical ecosystem classification method facilitates the identification of areas to be surveyed and eventually bound, under the implementation of EU Habitat directive (92/43) including areas with highly disturbed coastal dune ecosystems.

  20. Top 10 principles for designing healthy coastal ecosystems like the Salish Sea.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, Joseph K; Dierauf, Leslie; Kirby, Grant; Brosnan, Deborah; Gilardi, Kirsten; Davis, Gary E

    2008-12-01

    Like other coastal zones around the world, the inland sea ecosystem of Washington (USA) and British Columbia (Canada), an area known as the Salish Sea, is changing under pressure from a growing human population, conversion of native forest and shoreline habitat to urban development, toxic contamination of sediments and species, and overharvest of resources. While billions of dollars have been spent trying to restore other coastal ecosystems around the world, there still is no successful model for restoring estuarine or marine ecosystems like the Salish Sea. Despite the lack of a guiding model, major ecological principles do exist that should be applied as people work to design the Salish Sea and other large marine ecosystems for the future. We suggest that the following 10 ecological principles serve as a foundation for educating the public and for designing a healthy Salish Sea and other coastal ecosystems for future generations: (1) Think ecosystem: political boundaries are arbitrary; (2) Account for ecosystem connectivity; (3) Understand the food web; (4) Avoid fragmentation; (5) Respect ecosystem integrity; (6) Support nature's resilience; (7) Value nature: it's money in your pocket; (8) Watch wildlife health; (9) Plan for extremes; and (10) Share the knowledge.

  1. Connecting the Dots: Responses of Coastal Ecosystems to Changing Nutrient Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Empirical relationships between phytoplankton biomass and nutrient concentrations established across a wide range of different ecosystems constitute fundamental quantitative tools for predicting effects of nutrient management plans. Nutrient management plans based on such relationships, mostly established over trends of increasing rather than decreasing nutrient concentrations, assume full reversibility of coastal eutrophication. Monitoring data from 28 ecosystems located in four well-studied regions were analyzed to study the generality of chlorophyll a versus nutrient relationships and their applicability for ecosystem management. We demonstrate significant differences across regions as well as between specific coastal ecosystems within regions in the response of chlorophyll a to changing nitrogen concentrations. We also show that the chlorophyll a versus nitrogen relationships over time constitute convoluted trajectories rather than simple unique relationships. The ratio of chlorophyll a to total nitrogen almost doubled over the last 30–40 years across all regions. The uniformity of these trends, or shifting baselines, suggest they may result from large-scale changes, possibly associated with global climate change and increasing human stress on coastal ecosystems. Ecosystem management must, therefore, develop adaptation strategies to face shifting baselines and maintain ecosystem services at a sustainable level rather than striving to restore an ecosystem state of the past. PMID:21958109

  2. Patterns of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Distribution on Mainland and Island Sandy Coastal Plain Ecosystems in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Iolanda Ramalho; de Souza, Francisco Adriano; da Silva, Danielle Karla Alves; Oehl, Fritz; Maia, Leonor Costa

    2017-04-11

    Although sandy coastal plains are important buffer zones to protect the coast line and maintain biological diversity and ecosystem services, these ecosystems have been endangered by anthropogenic activities. Thus, information on coastal biodiversity and forces shaping coastal biological diversity are extremely important for effective conservation strategies. In this study, we aimed to compare arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities from soil samples collected on the mainland and nearby islands located in Brazilian sandy coastal plain ecosystems (Restingas) to get information about AM fungal biogeography and identify factors shaping these communities. Soil samples were collected in 2013 and 2014 on the beachfront of the tropical sandy coastal plain at six sites (three island and three mainland locations) across the northeast, southeast, and south regions of Brazil. Overall, we recorded 53 AM fungal species from field and trap culture samples. The richness and diversity of AM fungal species did not differ between mainland and island locations, but AM fungal community assemblages were different between mainland and island environments and among most sites sampled. Glomeromycota communities registered from island samples showed higher heterogeneity than communities from mainland samples. Sandy coastal plains harbor diverse AM fungal communities structured by climatic, edaphic, and spatial factors, while the distance from the colonizing source (mainland environments) does not strongly affect the AM fungal communities in Brazilian coastal environments.

  3. Ecosystem Services Transcend Boundaries: Estuaries Provide Resource Subsidies and Influence Functional Diversity in Coastal Benthic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Candida; Thrush, Simon F.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Hewitt, Judi E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Estuaries are highly productive ecosystems that can export organic matter to coastal seas (the ‘outwelling hypothesis’). However the role of this food resource subsidy on coastal ecosystem functioning has not been examined. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the influence of estuarine primary production as a resource subsidy and the influence of estuaries on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in coastal mollusk-dominated sediment communities. Stable isotope values (δ13C, δ15N) demonstrated that estuarine primary production was exported to the adjacent coast and contributed to secondary production up to 4 km from the estuary mouth. Further, isotope signatures of suspension feeding bivalves on the adjacent coast (Dosinia subrosea) closely mirrored the isotope values of the dominant bivalves inside the estuaries (Austrovenus stutchburyi), indicating utilization of similar organic matter sources. However, the food subsidies varied between estuaries; with estuarine suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) dominant at Tairua estuary, while seagrass and fringing vegetation detritus was proportionately more important at Whangapoua estuary, with lesser contributions of estuarine SPOM. Distance from the estuary mouth and the size and density of large bivalves (Dosinia spp.) had a significant influence on the composition of biological traits in the coastal macrobenthic communities, signaling the potential influence of these spatial subsidies on ecosystem functioning. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrated that the locations where ecosystem services like productivity are generated are not necessarily where the services are utilized. Further, we identified indirect positive effects of the nutrient subsidies on biodiversity (the estuarine subsidies influenced the bivalves, which in turn affected the diversity and functional trait composition of the coastal sediment macrofaunal communities). These findings highlight the importance of

  4. Ecosystem services transcend boundaries: estuaries provide resource subsidies and influence functional diversity in coastal benthic communities.

    PubMed

    Savage, Candida; Thrush, Simon F; Lohrer, Andrew M; Hewitt, Judi E

    2012-01-01

    Estuaries are highly productive ecosystems that can export organic matter to coastal seas (the 'outwelling hypothesis'). However the role of this food resource subsidy on coastal ecosystem functioning has not been examined. We investigated the influence of estuarine primary production as a resource subsidy and the influence of estuaries on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in coastal mollusk-dominated sediment communities. Stable isotope values (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) demonstrated that estuarine primary production was exported to the adjacent coast and contributed to secondary production up to 4 km from the estuary mouth. Further, isotope signatures of suspension feeding bivalves on the adjacent coast (Dosinia subrosea) closely mirrored the isotope values of the dominant bivalves inside the estuaries (Austrovenus stutchburyi), indicating utilization of similar organic matter sources. However, the food subsidies varied between estuaries; with estuarine suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) dominant at Tairua estuary, while seagrass and fringing vegetation detritus was proportionately more important at Whangapoua estuary, with lesser contributions of estuarine SPOM. Distance from the estuary mouth and the size and density of large bivalves (Dosinia spp.) had a significant influence on the composition of biological traits in the coastal macrobenthic communities, signaling the potential influence of these spatial subsidies on ecosystem functioning. Our study demonstrated that the locations where ecosystem services like productivity are generated are not necessarily where the services are utilized. Further, we identified indirect positive effects of the nutrient subsidies on biodiversity (the estuarine subsidies influenced the bivalves, which in turn affected the diversity and functional trait composition of the coastal sediment macrofaunal communities). These findings highlight the importance of integrative ecosystem-based management that maintains the

  5. Estimating global "blue carbon" emissions from conversion and degradation of vegetated coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Linwood; Donato, Daniel C; Murray, Brian C; Crooks, Stephen; Jenkins, W Aaron; Sifleet, Samantha; Craft, Christopher; Fourqurean, James W; Kauffman, J Boone; Marbà, Núria; Megonigal, Patrick; Pidgeon, Emily; Herr, Dorothee; Gordon, David; Baldera, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on the high rates of annual carbon sequestration in vegetated coastal ecosystems--marshes, mangroves, and seagrasses--that may be lost with habitat destruction ('conversion'). Relatively unappreciated, however, is that conversion of these coastal ecosystems also impacts very large pools of previously-sequestered carbon. Residing mostly in sediments, this 'blue carbon' can be released to the atmosphere when these ecosystems are converted or degraded. Here we provide the first global estimates of this impact and evaluate its economic implications. Combining the best available data on global area, land-use conversion rates, and near-surface carbon stocks in each of the three ecosystems, using an uncertainty-propagation approach, we estimate that 0.15-1.02 Pg (billion tons) of carbon dioxide are being released annually, several times higher than previous estimates that account only for lost sequestration. These emissions are equivalent to 3-19% of those from deforestation globally, and result in economic damages of $US 6-42 billion annually. The largest sources of uncertainty in these estimates stems from limited certitude in global area and rates of land-use conversion, but research is also needed on the fates of ecosystem carbon upon conversion. Currently, carbon emissions from the conversion of vegetated coastal ecosystems are not included in emissions accounting or carbon market protocols, but this analysis suggests they may be disproportionally important to both. Although the relevant science supporting these initial estimates will need to be refined in coming years, it is clear that policies encouraging the sustainable management of coastal ecosystems could significantly reduce carbon emissions from the land-use sector, in addition to sustaining the well-recognized ecosystem services of coastal habitats.

  6. Causes and consequences of ecosystem service regionalization in a coastal suburban watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Mark B. Green,; Pellerin, Brian A.; Morse, Nathaniel B.; Hopkinson, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The demand for ecosystem services and the ability of natural ecosystems to provide those services evolve over time as population, land use, and management practices change. Regionalization of ecosystem service activity, or the expansion of the area providing ecosystem services to a population, is a common response in densely populated coastal regions, with important consequences for watershed water and nitrogen (N) fluxes to the coastal zone. We link biophysical and historical information to explore the causes and consequences of change in ecosystem service activity—focusing on water provisioning and N regulation—from 1850 to 2010 in a coastal suburban watershed, the Ipswich River watershed in northeastern Massachusetts, USA. Net interbasin water transfers started in the late 1800s due to regionalization of water supply for use by larger populations living outside the Ipswich watershed boundaries, reaching a peak in the mid-1980s. Over much of the twentieth century, about 20 % of river runoff was diverted from reaching the estuary, with greater proportions during drought years. Ongoing regionalization of water supply has contributed to recent declines in diversions, influenced by socioecological feedbacks resulting from the river drying and fish kills. Similarly, the N budget has been greatly perturbed since the suburban era began in the 1950s due to food and lawn fertilizer imports and human waste release. However, natural ecosystems are able to remove most of this anthropogenic N, mitigating impacts on the coastal zone. We propose a conceptual model whereby the amount and type of ecosystem services provided by coastal watersheds in urban regions expand and contract over time as regional population expands and ecosystem services are regionalized. We hypothesize that suburban watersheds can be hotspots of ecosystem service sources because they retain sufficient ecosystem function to still produce services that meet increasing demand from the local population

  7. Responses of coastal ecosystems to environmental variability in emerging countries from the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, Pablo; Calliari, Danilo; Giménez, Luis; Defeo, Omar

    2015-12-01

    Coastal ecosystems supply critical ecological services and benefits to human society (Barbier et al., 2011). Nearly 38% of the global monetary value of annual ecosystem services arises from estuaries, seagrass and algal beds, coral reefs and shelf ecosystems (Costanza et al., 1997). However, these ecosystems are being increasingly affected by multiple drivers acting simultaneously at several spatial and temporal scales (Lotze et al., 2006; Hoegh-Guldberg and Bruno, 2010). Climate change (temperature increase, sea level rise, ocean acidification), human activities (e.g. land use/cover change, pollution, overexploitation, translocation of species), and extreme natural events (storms, floods, droughts) are the most important drivers degrading the resilience of coastal systems. Such factors operate on individual level processes, leading organisms away from their niches (Steinberg, 2013) or modifying rates and phenology (Giménez, 2011; Mackas et al., 2012, Deutsch et al., 2015). All of these influence ecosystem level processes, causing changes in species composition, diversity losses and deterioration of ecosystem functions (Worm et al., 2006; Defeo et al., 2009; Doney et al., 2011; Dornelas et al., 2014). The rate of change in habitats, species distributions and whole ecosystems has accelerated over the past decades as shown, for example, in the increase in the frequency of events of coastal hypoxia (Diaz and Rosenberg, 2008,Vaquer-Sunyer and Duarte, 2008), extensive translocation of species by global shipping (Seebens et al., 2013), and in ecosystem regime shifts (Möllmann et al., 2015 and references therein). Some coastal areas have been transformed into novel ecosystems with physical and biological characteristics outside their natural range of variability (Cloern et al., 2015) while others are likely to become sink areas, limiting the migration of marine species away from warming habitats (Burrows et al., 2014).

  8. Assessment of coastal management options by means of multilayered ecosystem models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobre, Ana M.; Ferreira, João G.; Nunes, João P.; Yan, Xiaojun; Bricker, Suzanne; Corner, Richard; Groom, Steve; Gu, Haifeng; Hawkins, Anthony J. S.; Hutson, Rory; Lan, Dongzhao; Silva, João D. Lencart e.; Pascoe, Philip; Telfer, Trevor; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhu, Mingyuan

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a multilayered ecosystem modelling approach that combines the simulation of the biogeochemistry of a coastal ecosystem with the simulation of the main forcing functions, such as catchment loading and aquaculture activities. This approach was developed as a tool for sustainable management of coastal ecosystems. A key feature is to simulate management scenarios that account for changes in multiple uses and enable assessment of cumulative impacts of coastal activities. The model was applied to a coastal zone in China with large aquaculture production and multiple catchment uses, and where management efforts to improve water quality are under way. Development scenarios designed in conjunction with local managers and aquaculture producers include the reduction of fish cages and treatment of wastewater. Despite the reduction in nutrient loading simulated in three different scenarios, inorganic nutrient concentrations in the bay were predicted to exceed the thresholds for poor quality defined by Chinese seawater quality legislation. For all scenarios there is still a Moderate High to High nutrient loading from the catchment, so further reductions might be enacted, together with additional decreases in fish cage culture. The model predicts that overall, shellfish production decreases by 10%-28% using any of these development scenarios, principally because shellfish growth is being sustained by the substances to be reduced for improvement of water quality. The model outcomes indicate that this may be counteracted by zoning of shellfish aquaculture at the ecosystem level in order to optimize trade-offs between productivity and environmental effects. The present case study exemplifies the value of multilayered ecosystem modelling as a tool for Integrated Coastal Zone Management and for the adoption of ecosystem approaches for marine resource management. This modelling approach can be applied worldwide, and may be particularly useful for the application of

  9. Estimating Global “Blue Carbon” Emissions from Conversion and Degradation of Vegetated Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Brian C.; Crooks, Stephen; Jenkins, W. Aaron; Sifleet, Samantha; Craft, Christopher; Fourqurean, James W.; Kauffman, J. Boone; Marbà, Núria; Megonigal, Patrick; Pidgeon, Emily; Herr, Dorothee; Gordon, David; Baldera, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Recent attention has focused on the high rates of annual carbon sequestration in vegetated coastal ecosystems—marshes, mangroves, and seagrasses—that may be lost with habitat destruction (‘conversion’). Relatively unappreciated, however, is that conversion of these coastal ecosystems also impacts very large pools of previously-sequestered carbon. Residing mostly in sediments, this ‘blue carbon’ can be released to the atmosphere when these ecosystems are converted or degraded. Here we provide the first global estimates of this impact and evaluate its economic implications. Combining the best available data on global area, land-use conversion rates, and near-surface carbon stocks in each of the three ecosystems, using an uncertainty-propagation approach, we estimate that 0.15–1.02 Pg (billion tons) of carbon dioxide are being released annually, several times higher than previous estimates that account only for lost sequestration. These emissions are equivalent to 3–19% of those from deforestation globally, and result in economic damages of $US 6–42 billion annually. The largest sources of uncertainty in these estimates stems from limited certitude in global area and rates of land-use conversion, but research is also needed on the fates of ecosystem carbon upon conversion. Currently, carbon emissions from the conversion of vegetated coastal ecosystems are not included in emissions accounting or carbon market protocols, but this analysis suggests they may be disproportionally important to both. Although the relevant science supporting these initial estimates will need to be refined in coming years, it is clear that policies encouraging the sustainable management of coastal ecosystems could significantly reduce carbon emissions from the land-use sector, in addition to sustaining the well-recognized ecosystem services of coastal habitats. PMID:22962585

  10. Concepts and theoretical specifications of a Coastal Vulnerability Dynamic Simulator (COVUDS): A multi-agent system for simulating coastal vulnerability towards management of coastal ecosystem services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orencio, P. M.; Endo, A.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster-causing natural hazards such as floods, erosions, earthquakes or slope failures were particularly observed to be concentrated in certain geographical regions. In the Asia-pacific region, coastal ecosystems were suffering because of perennial threats driven by chronic fluctuations in climate variability (e.g., typhoons, ENSO), or by dynamically occurring events (e.g., earthquakes, tsunamis). Among the many people that were found prone to such a risky condition were the ones inhabiting near the coastal areas. Characteristically, aside from being located at the forefront of these events, the coastal communities have impacted the resource by the kind of behavioral patterns they exhibited, such as overdependence and overexploitation to achieve their wellbeing. In this paper, we introduce the development of an approach to an assessment of the coupled human- environment using a multi- agent simulation (MAS) model known as Coastal Vulnerability Dynamic Simulator (COVUDS). The COVUDS comprised a human- environmental platform consisting multi- agents with corresponding spatial- based dynamic and static variables. These variables were used to present multiple hypothetical future situations that contribute to the purpose of supporting a more rational management of the coastal ecosystem and their environmental equities. Initially, we present the theoretical and conceptual components that would lead to the development of the COVUDS. These consisted of the human population engaged in behavioral patterns affecting the conditions of coastal ecosystem services; the system of the biophysical environment and changes in patches brought by global environment and local behavioral variations; the policy factors that were important for choosing area- specific interventions; and the decision- making mechanism that integrates the first three components. To guide a future scenario-based application that will be undertaken in a coastal area in the Philippines, the components of the

  11. Ecosystem-based coastal defence in the face of global change.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, Stijn; Meire, Patrick; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Herman, Peter M J; Ysebaert, Tom; De Vriend, Huib J

    2013-12-05

    The risk of flood disasters is increasing for many coastal societies owing to global and regional changes in climate conditions, sea-level rise, land subsidence and sediment supply. At the same time, in many locations, conventional coastal engineering solutions such as sea walls are increasingly challenged by these changes and their maintenance may become unsustainable. We argue that flood protection by ecosystem creation and restoration can provide a more sustainable, cost-effective and ecologically sound alternative to conventional coastal engineering and that, in suitable locations, it should be implemented globally and on a large scale.

  12. Water quality assessment in the Mexican Caribbean: Impacts on the coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Terrones, Laura M.; Null, Kimberly A.; Ortega-Camacho, Daniela; Paytan, Adina

    2015-07-01

    Coastal zones are dominated by economically important ecosystems, and excessive urban, industrial, agricultural, and tourism activities can lead to rapid degradation of those habitats and resources. Groundwater in the Eastern Yucatan Peninsula coastal aquifer discharges directly into the coastal ocean affecting the coral reefs, which are part of the Mesoamerican Coral Reef System. The composition and impacts of groundwater were studied at different coastal environments around Akumal (SE Yucatan Peninsula). Radium isotopes and salinity were used to quantify fresh groundwater and recirculated seawater contributions to the coastal zone. Excess Ra distribution suggests spatially variable discharge rates of submarine groundwater. High NO3- levels and high coliform bacteria densities indicate that groundwater is polluted at some sites. Dissolved phosphorous content is elevated in the winter and during the high tourism season, likely released from untreated sewage discharge and from aquifer sediments under reducing conditions.

  13. Effects of altered offshore food webs on coastal ecosystems emphasize the need for cross-ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Sieben, Katrin; Eklöf, Johan; Ljunggren, Lars; Olsson, Jens; Casini, Michele; Bergström, Ulf

    2011-11-01

    By mainly targeting larger predatory fish, commercial fisheries have indirectly promoted rapid increases in densities of their prey; smaller predatory fish like sprat, stickleback and gobies. This process, known as mesopredator release, has effectively transformed many marine offshore basins into mesopredator-dominated ecosystems. In this article, we discuss recent indications of trophic cascades on the Atlantic and Baltic coasts of Sweden, where increased abundances of mesopredatory fish are linked to increased nearshore production and biomass of ephemeral algae. Based on synthesis of monitoring data, we suggest that offshore exploitation of larger predatory fish has contributed to the increase in mesopredator fish also along the coasts, with indirect negative effects on important benthic habitats and coastal water quality. The results emphasize the need to rebuild offshore and coastal populations of larger predatory fish to levels where they regain their control over lower trophic levels and important links between offshore and coastal systems are restored.

  14. Groundwater-ocean interaction and its effects on coastal ecological processes - are there groundwater-dependant ecosystems in the coastal zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, T. C.

    2013-05-01

    Hydrological land-ocean connectivity is an important driver of coastal ecosystems. Rivers are obvious and visible pathways for terrestrial runoff. The critical role of surface water discharge from rivers to coastal ecosystems has been well documented. Hidden from view, 'downstream' effects of coastal (supra-tidal, intertidal and submarine) groundwater discharge are far less well understood. Whilst hydrological and geochemical processes associated with coastal groundwater discharge have received an increasing amount of scientific attention over the past decade or so, the effects of groundwater flow on productivity, composition, diversity and functioning of coastal ecosystems along the world's shorelines have received little attention to date. Coastal groundwater discharge includes both terrestrial (fresh) groundwater fluxes and the recirculation of seawater through sediments, analogous to hyporheic flow in rivers. I will present an overview over relevant coastal hydrological processes, and will illustrate their ecological effects on examples from diverse tropical coastal ecosystems, e.g. (1) perennial fresh groundwater discharge from coastal sand dune systems permitting growth of freshwater-dependent vegetation in the intertidal zone of the Great Barrier Reef (Australia), (2) recirculation of seawater through mangrove forest floors directly affecting tree health and providing a pathway for carbon export from these ecosystems, (3) the local hydrology of groundwater-fed coastal inlets on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula affecting the movement behaviour of and habitat use by the queen conch Strombus gigas, an economically important species in the Caribbean region. These examples for hydrological-ecological coupling in the coastal zone invite the question if we should not consider these coastal ecosystems to be groundwater-dependent, in analogy to groundwater-dependency in freshwater aquatic systems.

  15. Bubble Stripping as a Tool to Reduce High Dissolved CO2 in Coastal Marine Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koweek, D.; Mucciarone, D. A.; Dunbar, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    High dissolved CO2 concentrations in coastal ecosystems are a common occurrence due to a combination of large ecosystem metabolism and long residence times. Many of the socially, commercially, and recreationally important species may have adapted to this natural variability over time. However, eutrophication and ocean acidification may be perturbing the water chemistry beyond the bounds of tolerance for these organisms. We are currently limited in our ability to deal with the geochemical changes unfolding in our coastal ocean. This study helps to address this deficit of solutions by introducing bubble stripping as a novel geochemical engineering approach to reducing high CO2 in coastal marine ecosystems. We use an empirically validated numerical model to find that air/sea gas exchange rates within a bubbled system are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than within a non-bubbled system. By coupling bubbling-enhanced ventilation to a coastal ecosystem metabolism model, we demonstrate that strategically timed bubble plumes can mitigate exposure to high CO2 under present-day conditions and that exposure mitigation is enhanced in the more acidic conditions predicted by the end of the century. The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emphasizes the need to both adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change and ocean acidification. We believe shallow water bubble stripping could be one approach for reducing high CO2 conditions in coastal ecosystems and should be added to the growing list of engineering approaches intended to increase coastal resilience in a changing ocean.

  16. Past and Future Ecosystem Change in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell, P.

    2017-02-01

    The coastal zone is in a constant state of flux. Long term records of change attest to high amplitude sea level changes. Relative stability though the Late Holocene has allowed for the evolution of barrier dune systems, estuaries and coastal lakes with associated plant and faunal associations. This evolution has been interspersed with changes in the balance between climate driven changes in outflow from catchments. These interactions have been considerably disturbed through the impacts of industrialised people who have diverted and consumed water and invested in infrastructure that has impacted on river flows and the tidal prism in estuaries. This has impacted their provisioning services to humans. It has also impacted their regulating services in that development along the coastline has impacted on the resilience of the littoral zone to absorb natural climate extremes. Looking from the past we can see the pathway to the future and more easily recognise the steps needed to avoid further coastal degradation. This will increasingly need to accommodate the impacts of future climate trends, increased climate extremes and rising seas. Coastal societies would do well to identify their long term pathway to adaptation to the challenges that lie ahead and plan to invest accordingly.

  17. Coastal biodiversity and ecosystem services flows at the landscape scale: The CBESS progamme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, David; Bothwell, John; Bradbury, Richard; Burrows, Michael; Burton, Niall; Emmerson, Mark; Garbutt, Angus; Skov, Martin; Solan, Martin; Spencer, Tom; Underwood, Graham

    2015-04-01

    The health of the European coastline is inextricably linked to the economy and culture of coastal nations but they are sensitive to climate change. As global temperatures increase, sea levels will rise and the forces experienced where land meets sea will become more destructive. Salt marshes, mudflats, beaches will be affected. These landscapes support a wide range of economically valuable animal and plant species, but also act as sites of carbon storage, nutrient recycling, and pollutant capture and amelioration. Their preservation is of utmost importance. Our programme: "A hierarchical approach to the examination of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem service flows across coastal margins" (CBESS) is designed to understand the landscape-scale links between the functions that these systems provide (ecosystem service flows) and the organisms that provide these services (biodiversity stocks) and moves beyond most previous studies, conducted at smaller scales. Our consortium of experts ranges from microbial ecologists, through environmental economists, to mathematical modellers, and organisations (RSPB, BTO, CEFAS, EA) with vested interest in the sustainable use of coastal wetlands. CBESS spans the landscape scale, investigating how biodiversity stocks provide ecosystem services (cf. National Ecosystem Assessment: Supporting services; Provisioning services; Regulating services; and Cultural services). CBESS combined a detailed study of two regional landscapes with a broad-scale UK-wide study to allow both specific and general conclusions to be drawn. The regional study compares two areas of great UK national importance: Morecambe Bay on the west coast and the Essex coastline on the east. We carried out biological and physical surveys at more than 600 stations combined with in situ measures of ecosystem funtction to clarify how biodiversity can provide these important ecosystem functions across scales. This information will be shared with those

  18. Impact of river basin management on coastal water quality and ecosystem services: A southern Baltic estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schernewski, Gerald; Hürdler, Jens; Neumann, Thomas; Stybel, Nardine; Venohr, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication management is still a major challenge in the Baltic Sea region. Estuaries or coastal waters linked to large rivers cannot be managed independently. Nutrient loads into these coastal ecosystems depend on processes, utilisation, structure and management in the river basin. In practise this means that we need a large scale approach and integrated models and tools to analyse, assess and evaluate the effects of nutrient loads on coastal water quality as well as the efficiency of river basin management measures on surface waters and especially lagoons and estuaries. The Odra river basin, the Szczecin Lagoon and its coastal waters cover an area of about 150,000 km² and are an eutrophication hot-spot in the Baltic region. To be able to carry out large scale, spatially integrative analyses, we linked the river basin nutrient flux model MONERIS to the coastal 3D-hydrodynamic and ecosystem model ERGOM. Objectives were a) to analyse the eutrophication history in the river basin and the resulting functional changes in the coastal waters between early 1960's and today and b) to analyse the effects of an optimal nitrogen and phosphorus management scenario in the Oder/Odra river basin on coastal water quality. The models show that an optimal river basin management with reduced nutrient loads (e.g. N-load reduction of 35 %) would have positive effects on coastal water quality and algae biomass. The availability of nutrients, N/P ratios and processes like denitrification and nitrogen-fixation would show spatial and temporal changes. It would have positive consequences for ecosystems functions, like the nutrient retention capacity, as well. However, this optimal scenario is by far not sufficient to ensure a good coastal water quality according to the European Water Framework Directive. A "good" water quality in the river will not be sufficient to ensure a "good" water quality in the coastal waters. Further, nitrogen load reductions bear the risk of increased

  19. Interactions of aquaculture, marine coastal ecosystems, and near-shore waters: A bibliography. Bibliographies and literature of agriculture (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanfman, D.T.; Coleman, D.E.; Tibbitt, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The bibliography contains selected literature citations on the interactions of aquaculture and marine coastal ecosystems. The focus is on aquaculture effluents and their impact on marine coastal ecosystems and waterways as well as the impact of pollutants on aquaculture development. Factors affecting these issues include domestic and industrial wastes, thermal discharges, acid rain, heavy metals, oil spills, and microbial contamination of marine waters and aquatic species. Coastal zone management, environmenal impact of aquaculture, and water quality issues are also included in the bibliography.

  20. Informing policy to protect coastal coral reefs: insight from a global review of reducing agricultural pollution to coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Frederieke J; Schaffelke, Britta; Bartley, Rebecca

    2014-08-15

    The continuing degradation of coral reefs has serious consequences for the provision of ecosystem goods and services to local and regional communities. While climate change is considered the most serious risk to coral reefs, agricultural pollution threatens approximately 25% of the total global reef area with further increases in sediment and nutrient fluxes projected over the next 50 years. Here, we aim to inform coral reef management using insights learned from management examples that were successful in reducing agricultural pollution to coastal ecosystems. We identify multiple examples reporting reduced fluxes of sediment and nutrients at end-of-river, and associated declines in nutrient concentrations and algal biomass in receiving coastal waters. Based on the insights obtained, we recommend that future protection of coral reef ecosystems demands policy focused on desired ecosystem outcomes, targeted regulatory approaches, up-scaling of watershed management, and long-term maintenance of scientifically robust monitoring programs linked with adaptive management. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms and risk of cumulative impacts to coastal ecosystem services: An expert elicitation approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gerald G; Sinner, Jim; Ellis, Joanne; Kandlikar, Milind; Halpern, Benjamin S; Satterfield, Terre; Chan, Kai M A

    2017-09-01

    Coastal environments are some of the most populated on Earth, with greater pressures projected in the future. Managing coastal systems requires the consideration of multiple uses, which both benefit from and threaten multiple ecosystem services. Thus understanding the cumulative impacts of human activities on coastal ecosystem services would seem fundamental to management, yet there is no widely accepted approach for assessing these. This study trials an approach for understanding the cumulative impacts of anthropogenic change, focusing on Tasman and Golden Bays, New Zealand. Using an expert elicitation procedure, we collected information on three aspects of cumulative impacts: the importance and magnitude of impacts by various activities and stressors on ecosystem services, and the causal processes of impact on ecosystem services. We assessed impacts to four ecosystem service benefits - fisheries, shellfish aquaculture, marine recreation and existence value of biodiversity-addressing three main research questions: (1) how severe are cumulative impacts on ecosystem services (correspondingly, what potential is there for restoration)?; (2) are threats evenly distributed across activities and stressors, or do a few threats dominate?; (3) do prominent activities mainly operate through direct stressors, or do they often exacerbate other impacts? We found (1) that despite high uncertainty in the threat posed by individual stressors and impacts, total cumulative impact is consistently severe for all four ecosystem services. (2) A subset of drivers and stressors pose important threats across the ecosystem services explored, including climate change, commercial fishing, sedimentation and pollution. (3) Climate change and commercial fishing contribute to prominent indirect impacts across ecosystem services by exacerbating regional impacts, namely sedimentation and pollution. The prevalence and magnitude of these indirect, networked impacts highlights the need for approaches

  2. ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO POLLUTION ABATEMENT: A FRAMEWORK FOR MEASUREMENT AND ASSESSMENT FOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Responses to Pollution Abatement: A Framework for Measurement and Assessment for Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the 16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. ...

  3. Coastal Zone Ecosystem Services: from science to values and decision making; a case study.

    PubMed

    Luisetti, T; Turner, R K; Jickells, T; Andrews, J; Elliott, M; Schaafsma, M; Beaumont, N; Malcolm, S; Burdon, D; Adams, C; Watts, W

    2014-09-15

    This research is concerned with the following environmental research questions: socio-ecological system complexity, especially when valuing ecosystem services; ecosystems stock and services flow sustainability and valuation; the incorporation of scale issues when valuing ecosystem services; and the integration of knowledge from diverse disciplines for governance and decision making. In this case study, we focused on ecosystem services that can be jointly supplied but independently valued in economic terms: healthy climate (via carbon sequestration and storage), food (via fisheries production in nursery grounds), and nature recreation (nature watching and enjoyment). We also explored the issue of ecosystem stock and services flow, and we provide recommendations on how to value stock and flows of ecosystem services via accounting and economic values respectively. We considered broadly comparable estuarine systems located on the English North Sea coast: the Blackwater estuary and the Humber estuary. In the past, these two estuaries have undergone major land-claim. Managed realignment is a policy through which previously claimed intertidal habitats are recreated allowing the enhancement of the ecosystem services provided by saltmarshes. In this context, we investigated ecosystem service values, through biophysical estimates and welfare value estimates. Using an optimistic (extended conservation of coastal ecosystems) and a pessimistic (loss of coastal ecosystems because of, for example, European policy reversal) scenario, we find that context dependency, and hence value transfer possibilities, vary among ecosystem services and benefits. As a result, careful consideration in the use and application of value transfer, both in biophysical estimates and welfare value estimates, is advocated to supply reliable information for policy making. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coastal ecosystem-based management with nonlinear ecological functions and values.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Koch, Evamaria W; Silliman, Brian R; Hacker, Sally D; Wolanski, Eric; Primavera, Jurgenne; Granek, Elise F; Polasky, Stephen; Aswani, Shankar; Cramer, Lori A; Stoms, David M; Kennedy, Chris J; Bael, David; Kappel, Carrie V; Perillo, Gerardo M E; Reed, Denise J

    2008-01-18

    A common assumption is that ecosystem services respond linearly to changes in habitat size. This assumption leads frequently to an "all or none" choice of either preserving coastal habitats or converting them to human use. However, our survey of wave attenuation data from field studies of mangroves, salt marshes, seagrass beds, nearshore coral reefs, and sand dunes reveals that these relationships are rarely linear. By incorporating nonlinear wave attenuation in estimating coastal protection values of mangroves in Thailand, we show that the optimal land use option may instead be the integration of development and conservation consistent with ecosystem-based management goals. This result suggests that reconciling competing demands on coastal habitats should not always result in stark preservation-versus-conversion choices.

  5. Probability Models for the Distribution of Copepods in Different Coastal Ecosystems Along the Straits of Malacca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias-Peralta, Hazel Monica; Ghodsi, Alireza; Shitan, Mahendran; Yusoff, Fatimah Md.

    Copepods are the most abundant microcrustaceans in the marine waters and are the major food resource for many commercial fish species. In addition, changes in the distribution and population composition of copepods may also serve as an indicator of global climate changes. Therefore, it is important to model the copepod distribution in different ecosystems. Copepod samples were collected from three different ecosystems (seagrass area, cage aquaculture area and coastal waters off shrimp aquaculture farm) along the coastal waters of the Malacca Straits over a one year period. In this study the major statistical analysis consisted of fitting different probability models. This paper highlights the fitting of probability distributions and discusses the adequateness of the fitted models. The usefulness of these fitted models would enable one to make probability statements about the distribution of copepods in three different ecosystems.

  6. Restoration of marine coastal ecosystem health as a new goal for integrated catchment management in Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fu-Liu; Hao, Jun-Yi; Tao, Shu; Dawson, Richard W; Lam, K C; Chen, Yongqin David

    2006-04-01

    This article demonstrates why it is necessary to have the restoration of marine coastal ecosystem health as a new goal for integrated catchment management in the coastal area of Tolo Harbor. The present goal of integrated catchment management (ICM) in the Tolo Harbor is based on water quality objectives. The performance of the ICM plan, the Tolo Harbor Action Plan (THAP), was evaluated using marine coastal ecosystem health indicators including both stress and response indicators. Since the implementation of THAP in 1988, some significant reductions in pollution loading have been observed: reduction of 83% of biological oxygen demand load and 82% of total nitrogen between 1988 and 1999. There has also been an improvement in the health of Tolo Harbor's marine coastal ecosystem as evidenced by trends in physical, chemical, and biological indicators, although reverse fluctuations in some periods exist. However, such improvement can only be considered as the first sign of complete ecosystem health restoration, because ecosystem health covers not only physical, chemical, and biological aspects of an ecosystem, but also ecosystem service functions. The findings support the need to take the restoration and protection of marine coastal ecosystem health as a new goal rather than using water quality objectives. Steps necessary to further improve Tolo Harbor's marine coastal ecosystem health are also discussed.

  7. Late holocene climate changes in the Sea of Azov region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Novenko, E. Yu.; Krasnorutskaya, K. V.

    2012-05-01

    The results of paleoclimatic reconstructions made with the help of the information-statistical method developed by V.A. Klimanov based on palynological data from the Sea of Azov bottom sediments. For the period of the last 3000 years, four phases of warm and dry climates and three phases of relatively cool and humid climates were identified. The latter phases were characterized by wider expansion of tree vegetation in the region around the Sea of Azov. The range of mean annual temperatures between warmer and cooler intervals was about 4°C.

  8. Megacities and large urban agglomerations in the coastal zone: interactions between atmosphere, land, and marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland; Jickells, Tim D; Baklanov, Alexander; Carmichael, Gregory R; Church, Tom M; Gallardo, Laura; Hughes, Claire; Kanakidou, Maria; Liss, Peter S; Mee, Laurence; Raine, Robin; Ramachandran, Purvaja; Ramesh, R; Sundseth, Kyrre; Tsunogai, Urumu; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Zhu, Tong

    2013-02-01

    Megacities are not only important drivers for socio-economic development but also sources of environmental challenges. Many megacities and large urban agglomerations are located in the coastal zone where land, atmosphere, and ocean meet, posing multiple environmental challenges which we consider here. The atmospheric flow around megacities is complicated by urban heat island effects and topographic flows and sea breezes and influences air pollution and human health. The outflow of polluted air over the ocean perturbs biogeochemical processes. Contaminant inputs can damage downstream coastal zone ecosystem function and resources including fisheries, induce harmful algal blooms and feedback to the atmosphere via marine emissions. The scale of influence of megacities in the coastal zone is hundreds to thousands of kilometers in the atmosphere and tens to hundreds of kilometers in the ocean. We list research needs to further our understanding of coastal megacities with the ultimate aim to improve their environmental management.

  9. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Western Region: Coastal ecosystem responses to influences from land and sea, Coastal and Ocean Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Sea otters and the nearshore ecosystems they inhabit-from highly urbanized California to relatively pristine Alaska-are the focus of a new multidisciplinary study by scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and a suite of international, academic and government collaborators. The Coastal Ecosystem Responses to Influences from Land and Sea project will investigate the many interacting variables that influence the health of coastal ecosystems along the Northeast Pacific shore. These ecosystems face unprecedented challenges, with threats arising from the adjacent oceans and lands. From the ocean, challenges include acidification, sea level rise, and warming. From the land, challenges include elevated biological, geological and chemical pollutants associated with burgeoning human populations along coastlines. The implications of these challenges for biological systems are only beginning to be explored. Comparing sea otter population status indicators from around the northeastern Pacific Rim, will begin the process of defining factors of coastal ecosystem health in this broad region.

  10. Ecosystem services provided by a complex coastal region: challenges of classification and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Lisa P.; Sousa, Ana I.; Alves, Fátima L.; Lillebø, Ana I.

    2016-03-01

    A variety of ecosystem services classification systems and mapping approaches are available in the scientific and technical literature, which needs to be selected and adapted when applied to complex territories (e.g. in the interface between water and land, estuary and sea). This paper provides a framework for addressing ecosystem services in complex coastal regions. The roadmap comprises the definition of the exact geographic boundaries of the study area; the use of CICES (Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services) for ecosystem services identification and classification; and the definition of qualitative indicators that will serve as basis to map the ecosystem services. Due to its complexity, the Ria de Aveiro coastal region was selected as case study, presenting an opportunity to explore the application of such approaches at a regional scale. The main challenges of implementing the proposed roadmap, together with its advantages are discussed in this research. The results highlight the importance of considering both the connectivity of natural systems and the complexity of the governance framework; the flexibility and robustness, but also the challenges when applying CICES at regional scale; and the challenges regarding ecosystem services mapping.

  11. Ecosystem services provided by a complex coastal region: challenges of classification and mapping

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Lisa P.; Sousa, Ana I.; Alves, Fátima L.; Lillebø, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of ecosystem services classification systems and mapping approaches are available in the scientific and technical literature, which needs to be selected and adapted when applied to complex territories (e.g. in the interface between water and land, estuary and sea). This paper provides a framework for addressing ecosystem services in complex coastal regions. The roadmap comprises the definition of the exact geographic boundaries of the study area; the use of CICES (Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services) for ecosystem services identification and classification; and the definition of qualitative indicators that will serve as basis to map the ecosystem services. Due to its complexity, the Ria de Aveiro coastal region was selected as case study, presenting an opportunity to explore the application of such approaches at a regional scale. The main challenges of implementing the proposed roadmap, together with its advantages are discussed in this research. The results highlight the importance of considering both the connectivity of natural systems and the complexity of the governance framework; the flexibility and robustness, but also the challenges when applying CICES at regional scale; and the challenges regarding ecosystem services mapping. PMID:26964892

  12. Ecosystem services provided by a complex coastal region: challenges of classification and mapping.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Lisa P; Sousa, Ana I; Alves, Fátima L; Lillebø, Ana I

    2016-03-11

    A variety of ecosystem services classification systems and mapping approaches are available in the scientific and technical literature, which needs to be selected and adapted when applied to complex territories (e.g. in the interface between water and land, estuary and sea). This paper provides a framework for addressing ecosystem services in complex coastal regions. The roadmap comprises the definition of the exact geographic boundaries of the study area; the use of CICES (Common International Classification of Ecosystem Services) for ecosystem services identification and classification; and the definition of qualitative indicators that will serve as basis to map the ecosystem services. Due to its complexity, the Ria de Aveiro coastal region was selected as case study, presenting an opportunity to explore the application of such approaches at a regional scale. The main challenges of implementing the proposed roadmap, together with its advantages are discussed in this research. The results highlight the importance of considering both the connectivity of natural systems and the complexity of the governance framework; the flexibility and robustness, but also the challenges when applying CICES at regional scale; and the challenges regarding ecosystem services mapping.

  13. Characterizing Coastal Ecosystem Service Trade-offs with Future Urban Development in a Tropical City.

    PubMed

    Richards, Daniel R; Friess, Daniel A

    2017-08-23

    With rapid urbanization in the coastal zone and increasing habitat losses, it is imperative to understand how urban development affects coastal biodiversity and ecosystem service provision. Furthermore, it is important to understand how habitat fragments can best be incorporated into broader land use planning and coastal management, in order to maximize the environmental benefits they provide. In this study, we characterized the trade-offs between (a) urban development and individual mangrove environmental indicators (habitat quality and ecosystem services), and (b) between different environmental indicators in the tropical nation of Singapore. A range of biological, biophysical, and cultural indicators, including carbon, charcoal production, support for offshore fisheries, recreation, and habitat quality for a threatened species were quantified using field-based, remote sensing, and expert survey methods. The shape of the trade-off Pareto frontiers was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of environmental indicators for development. When traded off individually with urban development, four out of five environmental indicators were insensitive to development, meaning that relatively minor degradation of the indicator occurred while development was below a certain threshold, although indicator loss accelerated once this threshold was reached. Most of the pairwise relationships between the five environmental indicators were synergistic; only carbon storage and charcoal production, and charcoal production and recreational accessibility showed trade-offs. Trade-off analysis and land use optimization using Pareto frontiers could be a useful decision-support tool for understanding how changes in land use and coastal management will impact the ability of ecosystems to provide environmental benefits.

  14. Impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem by a severe coastal storm.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26(th) of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem.

  15. Hydrogeomorphic factors and ecosystem responses in coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keough, Janet R.; Thompson, Todd A.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1999-01-01

    Gauging the impact of manipulative activities, such as rehabilitation or management, on wetlands requires having a notion of the unmanipulated condition as a reference. And understanding of the reference condition requires knowledge of dominant factors influencing ecosystem processes and biological communities. In this paper, we focus on natural physical factors (conditions and processes) that drive coastal wetland ecosystems of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Great Lakes coastal wetlands develop under conditions of large-lake hydrology and disturbance imposed at a hiearchy of spatial and temporal scales and contain biotic communities adapted to unstable and unpredictable conditions. Coastal wetlands are configured along a continuum of hydrogeomorphic types: open coastal wetlands, drowned river mouth and flooded delta wetlands, and protected wetlands, each developing distinct ecosystem propertics and biotic communities. Hydrogeomorphic factors associated with the lake and watershed operate at a hierarchy of scales: a) local and short-term (seiches and ice action), b) watershed / lakewide / annual (seasonal water-level change), and c) larger or year-to-year and longer (regional and/or greater than one-year). Other physical factors include the unique water quality features of each lake. The aim of this paper is to provide scientists and managers with a framework for considering regional and site-specific geomorphometry and a hierarchy of physical processes in planning management and conservation projects.

  16. Impacts on the Deep-Sea Ecosystem by a Severe Coastal Storm

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Canals, Miquel; Calafat, Antoni M.; Lastras, Galderic; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Menéndez, Melisa; Medina, Raúl; Company, Joan B.; Hereu, Bernat; Romero, Javier; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Major coastal storms, associated with strong winds, high waves and intensified currents, and occasionally with heavy rains and flash floods, are mostly known because of the serious damage they can cause along the shoreline and the threats they pose to navigation. However, there is a profound lack of knowledge on the deep-sea impacts of severe coastal storms. Concurrent measurements of key parameters along the coast and in the deep-sea are extremely rare. Here we present a unique data set showing how one of the most extreme coastal storms of the last decades lashing the Western Mediterranean Sea rapidly impacted the deep-sea ecosystem. The storm peaked the 26th of December 2008 leading to the remobilization of a shallow-water reservoir of marine organic carbon associated with fine particles and resulting in its redistribution across the deep basin. The storm also initiated the movement of large amounts of coarse shelf sediment, which abraded and buried benthic communities. Our findings demonstrate, first, that severe coastal storms are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow water to deep water, thus contributing to its sequestration and, second, that natural, intermittent atmospheric drivers sensitive to global climate change have the potential to tremendously impact the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth, the deep-sea ecosystem. PMID:22295084

  17. Characterizing man-made and natural modifications of microbial diversity and activity in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Hans W; Dyble, Julianne; Twomey, Luke; Pinckney, James L; Nelson, Joshua; Kerkhof, Lee

    2002-08-01

    The impacts of growing coastal pollution and habitat alteration accompanying human encroachment are of great concern at the microbial level, where much of the ocean's primary production and biogeochemical cycling takes place. Coastal ecosystems are also under the influence of natural perturbations such as major storwns and flooding. Distinguishing the impacts of natural and human stressors is essential for understanding environmentally-induced change in microbial diversity and function. The objective of this paper is to discuss the applications and merits of recently developed molecular, ecophysiological and analytical indicators and their utility in examining anthropogenic and climatic impacts on the structure and function of coastal microbial communities. The nitrogen-limited Neuse River Estuary and Pamlico Sound, North Carolina are used as examples of ecosystems experiencing both anthropogenic (i.e., accelerating eutrophication) and climatic stress (increasing frequencies of tropical storms and hurricanes). Additional examples are derived from a coastal monitoring site (LEO) on the Atlantic coast of New Jersey and Galveston Bay, on the Gulf of Mexico. In order to assess structure, function, and trophic state of these and other coastal ecosystems, molecular (DNA and RNA-based) characterizations of the microbial taxa involved in carbon, nitrogen and other nutrient transformations can be combined with diagnostic pigment-based indicators of primary producer groups. Application of these methods can reveal process-level microbial community responses to environmental variability over a range of scales. Experimental approaches combined with strategic monitoring utilizing these methods will facilitate: (a) understanding organismal and community responses to environmental change, and (b) synthesizing these responses in the context of ecosystem models that integrate physical, chemical and biotic variability with environmental controls.

  18. Multiple stressors, nonlinear effects and the implications of climate change impacts on marine coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Judi E; Ellis, Joanne I; Thrush, Simon F

    2016-08-01

    Global climate change will undoubtedly be a pressure on coastal marine ecosystems, affecting not only species distributions and physiology but also ecosystem functioning. In the coastal zone, the environmental variables that may drive ecological responses to climate change include temperature, wave energy, upwelling events and freshwater inputs, and all act and interact at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. To date, we have a poor understanding of how climate-related environmental changes may affect coastal marine ecosystems or which environmental variables are likely to produce priority effects. Here we use time series data (17 years) of coastal benthic macrofauna to investigate responses to a range of climate-influenced variables including sea-surface temperature, southern oscillation indices (SOI, Z4), wind-wave exposure, freshwater inputs and rainfall. We investigate responses from the abundances of individual species to abundances of functional traits and test whether species that are near the edge of their tolerance to another stressor (in this case sedimentation) may exhibit stronger responses. The responses we observed were all nonlinear and some exhibited thresholds. While temperature was most frequently an important predictor, wave exposure and ENSO-related variables were also frequently important and most ecological variables responded to interactions between environmental variables. There were also indications that species sensitive to another stressor responded more strongly to weaker climate-related environmental change at the stressed site than the unstressed site. The observed interactions between climate variables, effects on key species or functional traits, and synergistic effects of additional anthropogenic stressors have important implications for understanding and predicting the ecological consequences of climate change to coastal ecosystems.

  19. Developing a NIDIS Drought Early Warning Information System for Coastal Ecosystems in the Carolinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, L. S.; Dow, K.; Lackstrom, K.; Brennan, A.; Tufford, D. L.; Conrads, P.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Webb, R. S.; Verdin, J. P.; Mcnutt, C. A.; Deheza, V.

    2013-12-01

    The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) is in the process of developing drought early warning systems in areas of the U.S. where the coordination of drought information is critically needed. These regional drought early warning systems will become the backbone of a national drought early warning information system. Plans for the first drought early warning system started in the fall of 2008 in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), with an initial focus on the water supply in the head waters region of the Colorado River and the impacts of changes in the water supply on the UCRB. Since the establishment of the UCRB drought early warning system, other regional programs have begun in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, four regions in the state of California, the Southern Plains, and the Four Corners region. (At this time these are considered pilot drought early warning programs, not full-fledged drought early warning systems such as the UCRB.) Activities in each of these regions are tailored to the needs of stakeholders, and all incorporate hydrometeorological predictions. However, in all of these areas NIDIS has not focused on the specific needs of coastal ecosystems during times of drought. Over the past year, NIDIS has started a pilot drought early warning system that addresses drought in the coastal ecosystems of North and South Carolina. This pilot is being developed in partnership with the Carolinas Integrated Sciences and Assessments (CISA), a NOAA Regional Sciences and Assessments program housed at the University of South Carolina. Currently the focus of the Carolinas pilot includes the promotion of enhanced drought impact reporting to better understand the impacts of low flows on coastal ecosystems and the development of a USGS real-time salinity network for a few coastal gage stations in the Carolinas. The roles of the enhanced drought impact assessments in coastal ecosystems and the knowledge gained from a real

  20. Emerging methods for the study of coastal ecosystem landscape structure and change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Purkis, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Coastal landscapes are heterogeneous, dynamic, and evolve over a range of time scales due to intertwined climatic, geologic, hydrologic, biologic, and meteorological processes, and are also heavily impacted by human development, commercial activities, and resource extraction. A diversity of complex coastal systems around the globe, spanning glaciated shorelines to tropical atolls, wetlands, and barrier islands are responding to multiple human and natural drivers. Interdisciplinary research based on remote-sensing observations linked to process studies and models is required to understand coastal ecosystem landscape structure and change. Moreover, new techniques for coastal mapping and monitoring are increasingly serving the needs of policy-makers and resource managers across local, regional, and national scales. Emerging remote-sensing methods associated with a diversity of instruments and platforms are a key enabling element of integrated coastal ecosystem studies. These investigations require both targeted and synoptic mapping, and involve the monitoring of formative processes such as hydrodynamics, sediment transport, erosion, accretion, flooding, habitat modification, land-cover change, and biogeochemical fluxes.

  1. Assessment on the Vulnerability of Mangrove Ecosystems in the Guangxi Coastal Zone under Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Ge, Z.; Zhang, L.

    2013-12-01

    Sea level rise caused by global climate change will have significant impacts on coastal zone. The mangrove ecosystems occur at the intertidal zone in tropical and subtropical coasts and are particularly sensitive to sea level rise. To study the responses of mangrove ecosystems to sea level rise, assess the impacts of sea level rise on mangrove ecosystem and formulate the feasible and practical mitigation strategies are the important prerequisites for securing the coastal ecosystems. In this research, taking the mangrove ecosystems in the coastal zone of Guangxi province, China as a case study, the potential impacts of sea level rise on the mangrove ecosystems were analyzed by adopting the SPRC (Source-Pathway- Receptor- Consequence) model. An index system for vulnerability assessment on coastal mangrove ecosystems under sea level rise was worked out, in which rate of sea level rise, subsidence/uplift rate, habitat elevation, daily inundation duration, intertidal slope and sedimentation rate were selected as the key indicators according to the IPCC definition of vulnerability, i.e. the aspects of exposure, sensitivity and adaptation. A quantitatively spatial assessment method based on the GIS platform was established by quantifying each indicator, calculating the vulnerability index and grading the vulnerability. The vulnerability assessment based on the sea-level rise rates of the present trend and IPCC A1F1 scenario were performed for three sets of projections of short-term (2030s), mid-term (2050s) and long-term (2100s). The results showed at the present trend of sea level rise rate of 0.27 cm/a, the mangrove ecosystems in the coastal zone of Guangxi was within the EVI score of 0 in the projections of 2030s, 2050s and 2100s, respectively. As the sedimentation and land uplift could offset the rate of sea level rise and the impact of sea level rise on habitats/species of mangrove ecosystems was negligible. While at the A1F1 scenario with a sea level rise rate of 0

  2. Experimental and numerical analysis of coastal protection provided by natural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maza, M.; Lara, J. L.; Losada, I. J.; Nepf, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    The risk of flooding and erosion is increasing for many coastal areas owing to global and regional changes in climate conditions together with increasing exposure and vulnerability. After hurricane Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012) and the tsunami in Indonesia (2004), coastal managers have become interested in low environmental impact alternatives, or nature-based solutions, to protect the coast. Although capacity for coastal ecosystems to damp flow energy has been widely recognized, they have not been firmly considered in the portfolio of coastal protection options. This is mainly due to the complexity of flow-vegetation interaction and of quantifying the value of coastal protection provided by these ecosystems. This complex problem involves different temporal and spatial scales and disciplines, such as engineering, ecology and economics. This work aims to make a step forward in better understanding the physics involved in flow-vegetation interaction leading to new formulations and parameterizations to address some unsolved questions in literature: the representation of plants and field properties; the influence of wave parameters on the relevant processes; the role of the combined effect of waves and currents and the effect of extreme events on vegetation elements. The three main coastal vegetated ecosystems (seagrasses, saltmarshes and mangroves) are studied with an experimental and numerical approach. Experimental analysis is carried out using mimics and real vegetation, considering different flow and vegetation parameters and characterizing flow energy attenuation for the different scenarios. Numerical simulations are performed using 2-D and 3-D Navier-Stokes models in which the effect of vegetation is implemented and validated. These models are used to extend experimental results by simulating different vegetation distributions and analyzing variables such as high-spatial-resolution free surface and velocity data and forces exerted on vegetation elements.

  3. Risk assessment of nitrate and oxytetracycline addition on coastal ecosystem functions.

    PubMed

    Feng-Jiao, Liu; Shun-Xing, Li; Feng-Ying, Zheng; Xu-Guang, Huang; Yue-Gang, Zuo; Teng-Xiu, Tu; Xue-Qing, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms dominate phytoplankton communities in the well-mixed coastal and upwelling regions. Coastal diatoms are often exposed to both aquaculture pollution and eutrophication. But how these exposures influence on coastal ecosystem functions are unknown. To examine these influences, a coastal centric diatom, Conticribra weissflogii was maintained at different concentrations of nitrate (N) and/or oxytetracycline (OTC). Algal density, cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malonaldehyde (MDA) were determined for the assessment of algal biomass, lifetime, nutritional value, photosynthesis and respiration, antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation, respectively. When N addition was combined with OTC pollution, the cell growth cycles were shortened by 56-73%; algal density, SOD activities, the concentrations of chlorophyll a, protein, and MDA varied between 73 and 121%, 19 and 397%, 52 and 693%, 19 and 875%, and 66 and 2733% of the values observed in N addition experiments, respectively. According to P-value analysis, the influence of OTC on algal density and SOD activity was not significant, but the effect on cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, and MDA were significant (P<0.05). The influence of N addition with simultaneous OTC pollution on the above six end points was significant. Algal biomass, lifetime, nutrition, antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation, photosynthesis, and respiration were all affected by the addition of OTC and N. Coastal ecosystem functions were severely affected by N and OTC additions, and the influence was increased in the order: Ncoastal ecosystem functions.

  4. Long-Distance Interactions Regulate the Structure and Resilience of Coastal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Koppel, Johan; van der Heide, Tjisse; Altieri, Andrew H.; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Olff, Han; Silliman, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that spatial interactions are important in structuring coastal ecosystems. Until recently, however, most of this work has been focused on seemingly exceptional systems that are characterized by regular, self-organized patterns. In this review, we document that interactions that operate at long distances, beyond the direct neighborhood of individual organisms, are more common and have much more far-reaching implications for coastal ecosystems than was previously realized. We review studies from a variety of ecosystem types—including cobble beaches, mussel beds, coral reefs, seagrass meadows, and mangrove forests—that reveal a startling interplay of positive and negative interactions between habitats across distances of up to a kilometer. In addition to classical feeding relations, alterations of physical conditions constitute an important part of these long-distance interactions. This entanglement of habitats has crucial implications for how humans manage coastal ecosystems, and evaluations of anthropogenic impact should explicitly address long-distance and system-wide effects before we deem these human activities to be causing little harm.

  5. Long-distance interactions regulate the structure and resilience of coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    van de Koppel, Johan; van der Heide, Tjisse; Altieri, Andrew H; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Olff, Han; Silliman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that spatial interactions are important in structuring coastal ecosystems. Until recently, however, most of this work has been focused on seemingly exceptional systems that are characterized by regular, self-organized patterns. In this review, we document that interactions that operate at long distances, beyond the direct neighborhood of individual organisms, are more common and have much more far-reaching implications for coastal ecosystems than was previously realized. We review studies from a variety of ecosystem types-including cobble beaches, mussel beds, coral reefs, seagrass meadows, and mangrove forests-that reveal a startling interplay of positive and negative interactions between habitats across distances of up to a kilometer. In addition to classical feeding relations, alterations of physical conditions constitute an important part of these long-distance interactions. This entanglement of habitats has crucial implications for how humans manage coastal ecosystems, and evaluations of anthropogenic impact should explicitly address long-distance and system-wide effects before we deem these human activities to be causing little harm.

  6. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in coastal lagoons: Does microbial diversity play any role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Pusceddu, Antonio

    2007-10-01

    Although prokaryotes are small in size, they are a significant biomass component in aquatic ecosystems and play a major role in biogeochemical processes. It is generally assumed that the relative importance of prokaryotes to material and energy fluxes is maximized in low-productivity (oligotrophic) ecosystems and decreases in high-productivity (eutrophic) ecosystems. Lagoon and coastal ecosystems are extremely dynamic, typically highly productive and dominated by macro-size organisms (both macrofauna and macrophytes). As such, their functional characteristics are typically evaluated from a "macrobial" perspective. An efficient ecosystem functioning, with fast nutrient cycling, high productivity, low C accumulation and lack of hypoxic/dystrophic crises is, however, intimately dependent on the interaction between microbial and macrobial organisms. We make here an attempt to relate prokaryote biodiversity (genotype richness, using fingerprinting techniques, ARISA) and ecosystem functioning (using a series of parameters including meiofaunal biomass, prokaryote C production and organic matter turnover rates) in different Mediterranean lagoon systems. The lagoons differed significantly with each other for all the variables. While no relationships were observed between the environmental characteristics of the lagoons and the bacterial diversity, the latter was significantly and positively correlated with the functioning and efficiency of the lagoons. The investigation of the links between microbial diversity and functioning in lagoons is still at its infancy, but these preliminary results suggest that a better understanding of the role of prokaryote diversity on ecosystem functioning and efficiency could open new perspectives for the conservation and management of these highly productive and vulnerable ecosystems.

  7. Comprehensive studies in the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov in the Summer of 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Nabozhenko, M. V.; Shokhin, I. V.; Zolotareva, A. E.; Bulysheva, N. I.; Semin, V. L.; Polshin, V. V.; Povazhnyi, V. V.; Verbitskyi, R. E.; Verbitskyi, E. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. V.; Spiridonov, V. A.; Zalota, A. K.

    2013-05-01

    The shelf zones of the Black Sea, Taman Bay, and the Sea of Azov are currently subjected to gross load related to the impact of invasive species, large-scale construction activities near the coast, intensive recreation activity, water pollution in large cities and ports, active navigation, unreasonable coastal arrangement, and dam construction. Another factor substantially affecting the composition of bottom sediments and, thus, the benthos environment is the terrigenous material carried by rivers in the course of catastrophic overflows. An example is the Kubansk flood in 2012, which significantly affected the sea coast near Novorossiysk, Gelendzhik, and Divnomorsk. The intensive onshore dumping results in the delivery of abundant allochthonous material, bottom silting causing changes in the dominants in the benthos associations, a decrease in the photic layer and the death of the phytobenthos, and also debris formation at the bottom. Debris can play the role of artificial reefs contributory for the formation of periphytic biocoenoses.

  8. A review of mangrove and coastal ecosystems in West Africa and their possible relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, D. M.; Lawson, G. W.

    1990-11-01

    Mangrove forest, which in West Africa covers an area of over 27 000 km 2 of deltas, estuaries and lagoons, is intimately linked to the offshore coastal ecosystem. Regularly influenced and disturbed by seasonal freshwater and diurnal tidal flooding, it exhibits features of an immature ecosystem, namely low species diversity and high productivity. The excess organic production is exploited by many marine species especially fishes and crustaceans that enter the mangrove environment as juveniles and return to the sea as adults for reproductive purposes. The beneficial effects on marine fisheries of this net energy outflow are at risk from anthropogenic influences causing pollution or destruction of the mangrove ecosystem. Intense interdisciplinary work on this problem is in progress on the lagoons of the Ivory Coast but further research on other parts of the West African mangrove ecosystem, especially on the Niger delta, needs to be undertaken to provide the scientific basis for the proper management of this valuable natural resource.

  9. Production and food web efficiency decrease as fishing activity increases in a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh, Pham Viet; Everaert, Gert; Goethals, Peter; Vinh, Chu Tien; De Laender, Frederik

    2015-11-01

    Fishing effort in the Vietnamese coastal ecosystem has rapidly increased from the 1990s to the 2000s, with unknown consequences for local ecosystem structure and functioning. Using ecosystem models that integrate fisheries and food webs we found profound differences in the production of six functional groups, the food web efficiency, and eight functional food web indices between the 1990s (low fishing intensity) and the 2000s (high fishing intensity). The functional attributes (e.g. consumption) of high trophic levels (e.g. predators) were lower in the 2000s than in the 1990s while primary production did not vary, causing food web efficiency to decrease up to 40% with time for these groups. The opposite was found for lower trophic levels (e.g. zooplankton): the functional attributes and food web efficiency increased with time (22 and 10% for the functional attributes and food web efficiency, respectively). Total system throughput, a functional food web index, was about 10% higher in the 1990s than in the 2000s, indicating a reduction of the system size and activity with time. The network analyses further indicated that the Vietnamese coastal ecosystem in the 1990s was more developed (higher ascendancy and capacity), more stable (higher overhead) and more mature (higher ratio of ascendancy and capacity) than in the 2000s. In the 1990s the recovery time of the ecosystem was shorter than in 2000s, as indicated by a higher Finn's cycling index in the 1990s (7.8 and 6.5% in 1990s and 2000s, respectively). Overall, our results demonstrate that the Vietnamese coastal ecosystem has experienced profound changes between the 1990s and 2000s, and emphasise the need for a closer inspection of the ecological impact of fishing.

  10. Comparing marine and terrestrial ecosystems: Implications for the design of coastal marine reserves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Neigel, J.E.; Estes, J.A.; Andelman, S.; Warner, R.R.; Largier, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Concepts and theory for the design and application of terrestrial reserves is based on our understanding of environmental, ecological, and evolutionary processes responsible for biological diversity and sustainability of terrestrial ecosystems and how humans have influenced these processes. How well this terrestrial-based theory can be applied toward the design and application of reserves in the coastal marine environment depends, in part, on the degree of similarity between these systems. Several marked differences in ecological and evolutionary processes exist between marine and terrestrial ecosystems as ramifications of fundamental differences in their physical environments (i.e., the relative prevalence of air and water) and contemporary patterns of human impacts. Most notably, the great extent and rate of dispersal of nutrients, materials, holoplanktonic organisms, and reproductive propagules of benthic organisms expand scales of connectivity among near-shore communities and ecosystems. Consequently, the "openness" of marine populations, communities, and ecosystems probably has marked influences on their spatial, genetic, and trophic structures and dynamics in ways experienced by only some terrestrial species. Such differences appear to be particularly significant for the kinds of organisms most exploited and targeted for protection in coastal marine ecosystems (fishes and macroinvertebrates). These and other differences imply some unique design criteria and application of reserves in the marine environment. In explaining the implications of these differences for marine reserve design and application, we identify many of the environmental and ecological processes and design criteria necessary for consideration in the development of the analytical approaches developed elsewhere in this Special Issue.

  11. [Hydrolytic activity of microorganisms of the Dead Sea coastal ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Varbanets', L D; Matseliukh, O V; Avdiiuk, K V; Hudzenko, O V; Nidialkova, N A; Romanovs'ka, V O; Tashirev, O B

    2014-01-01

    All strains tested are characterized by proteolytic (caseinolytic) activity, while elastase one was revealed only in two Gracilibacillus strains 6T2 and 7Tl. The activity was high enough (23.1 and 34.7 E/Ml, respectively). These values are at the level of bacterial producers which are described in literature: Bacillus mesentericus 316 M (6 E/Ml), Bacillus thuringiensis IMB B-7324 (50-55 E/Ml). The ability of two strains tested to synthesize enzyme, active against elastine, is important, so far as microbial enzyme may be perspective for using in medicine: elastases are able to dissociation of elastin fibres of connective tissues. These two strains display also fibrinolytic activity, however it was insignificant. Six of eight strains studied manifested alpha-amylase activity (0.01 - 1.173 E/Ml). It was shown that no strains, isolated from the Dead Sea costal ecosystems are able to manifest alpha-L-rhamnosidase activity.

  12. Aquatic polymers can drive pathogen transmission in coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Karen; Krusor, Colin; Mazzillo, Fernanda F. M.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Largier, John L.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.; Silver, Mary W.

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous polymers including extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) are fundamental to biophysical processes in aquatic habitats, including mediating aggregation processes and functioning as the matrix of biofilms. Yet insight into the impact of these sticky molecules on the environmental transmission of pathogens in the ocean is limited. We used the zoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii as a model to evaluate polymer-mediated mechanisms that promote transmission of terrestrially derived pathogens to marine fauna and humans. We show that transparent exopolymer particles, a particulate form of EPS, enhance T. gondii association with marine aggregates, material consumed by organisms otherwise unable to access micrometre-sized particles. Adhesion to EPS biofilms on macroalgae also captures T. gondii from the water, enabling uptake of pathogens by invertebrates that feed on kelp surfaces. We demonstrate the acquisition, concentration and retention of T. gondii by kelp-grazing snails, which can transmit T. gondii to threatened California sea otters. Results highlight novel mechanisms whereby aquatic polymers facilitate incorporation of pathogens into food webs via association with particle aggregates and biofilms. Identifying the critical role of invisible polymers in transmission of pathogens in the ocean represents a fundamental advance in understanding and mitigating the health impacts of coastal habitat pollution with contaminated runoff. PMID:25297861

  13. Aquatic polymers can drive pathogen transmission in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Karen; Krusor, Colin; Mazzillo, Fernanda F M; Conrad, Patricia A; Largier, John L; Mazet, Jonna A K; Silver, Mary W

    2014-11-22

    Gelatinous polymers including extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) are fundamental to biophysical processes in aquatic habitats, including mediating aggregation processes and functioning as the matrix of biofilms. Yet insight into the impact of these sticky molecules on the environmental transmission of pathogens in the ocean is limited. We used the zoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii as a model to evaluate polymer-mediated mechanisms that promote transmission of terrestrially derived pathogens to marine fauna and humans. We show that transparent exopolymer particles, a particulate form of EPS, enhance T. gondii association with marine aggregates, material consumed by organisms otherwise unable to access micrometre-sized particles. Adhesion to EPS biofilms on macroalgae also captures T. gondii from the water, enabling uptake of pathogens by invertebrates that feed on kelp surfaces. We demonstrate the acquisition, concentration and retention of T. gondii by kelp-grazing snails, which can transmit T. gondii to threatened California sea otters. Results highlight novel mechanisms whereby aquatic polymers facilitate incorporation of pathogens into food webs via association with particle aggregates and biofilms. Identifying the critical role of invisible polymers in transmission of pathogens in the ocean represents a fundamental advance in understanding and mitigating the health impacts of coastal habitat pollution with contaminated runoff.

  14. Diel and daily fluctuations in virioplankton production in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Winget, Danielle M; Wommack, K Eric

    2009-11-01

    Viruses saturate the world around us, yet a basic understanding of how viral impacts on microbial host organisms vary over days to hours, which typify the replication cycles of aquatic viruses, remains elusive. Thus, diel patterns of viral production (VP) in Chesapeake Bay surface waters were examined on five sampling dates. Day-to-day variations in VP in the Chesapeake and coastal California surface waters were also investigated. Significant variations in VP were detected over 24 h cycles during four of five studies, but rates did not vary significantly over the course of a few days in either location. Diel patterns of VP displayed seasonality with shorter viral assemblage turnover times and shorter times to maximum viral abundance in summer, implying shorter replication cycles for virus-host systems in warmer months. No correlation was found between VP and time of day, likely due to seasonal changes in the diel patterns of VP. This analysis significantly increases our knowledge of the short-term patterning of in situ VP, and thus viral impacts, and suggests that variations in viral biology in response to changes in host communities or physio-chemical properties affect both diel and seasonal cycles and magnitudes of VP.

  15. Oceans and Human Health: Linking Ocean, Organism, and Human Health for Sustainable Management of Coastal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandifer, P. A.; Trtanj, J.; Collier, T. K.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists and policy-makers are increasingly recognizing that sustainable coastal communities depend on healthy and resilient economies, ecosystems, and people, and that the condition or "health" of the coastal ocean and humans are intimately and inextricably connected. A wealth of ecosystem services provided by ocean and coastal environments are crucial for human survival and well being. Nonetheless, the health of coastal communities, their economies, connected ecosystems and ecosystem services, and people are under increasing threats from health risks associated with environmental degradation, climate change, and unwise land use practices, all of which contribute to growing burdens of naturally-occurring and introduced pathogens, noxious algae, and chemical contaminants. The occurrence, frequency, intensity, geographic range, and number and kinds of ocean health threats are increasing, with concomitant health and economic effects and eroding public confidence in the safety and wholesomeness of coastal environments and resources. Concerns in the research and public health communities, many summarized in the seminal 1999 NRC Report, From Monsoons to Microbes and the 2004 final report of the US Commission on Ocean Policy, resulted in establishment of a new "meta-discipline" known as Oceans and Human Health (OHH). OHH brings together practitioners in oceanography, marine biology, ecology, biomedical science, medicine, economics and other social sciences, epidemiology, environmental management, and public health to focus on water- and food-borne causes of human and animal illnesses associated with ocean and coastal systems and on health benefits of seafood and other marine products. It integrates information across multiple disciplines to increase knowledge of ocean health risks and benefits and communicate such information to enhance public safety. Recognizing the need for a comprehensive approach to ocean health threats and benefits, Congress passed the Oceans and

  16. Drought and coastal ecosystems: an assessment of decision maker needs for information

    Treesearch

    Kirsten Lackstrom; Amanda Brennan; Kirstin Dow

    2016-01-01

    The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) is in the process of developing drought early warning systems in areas of the U.S. where the development and coordination of drought information is needed. In summer 2012, NIDIS launched a pilot program in North and South Carolina, addressing the uniqueness of drought impacts on coastal ecosystems.

  17. Ecosystem modeling of coastal acidification and hypoxia and structural uncertainties in the representation of sediment-water exchanges

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical ecosystem models of coastal acidification (CA) and hypoxia have been developed to synthesize current scientific understanding and provide predictions for nutrient management and policy. However, there is not a scientific consensus about the structure of these models an...

  18. A NEW TYPE OF "LAKE EFFECT"? - SEICHE-DRIVEN NUTRIENT INPUT TO A COASTAL GREAT LAKE ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Like tidal influx at the ocean-estuarine discontinuity, the action of seiches upon coastal ecosystems of large lakes is understudied and the complexity warrants an array of biological, chemical, and physical approaches.

  19. Ecosystem modeling of coastal acidification and hypoxia and structural uncertainties in the representation of sediment-water exchanges

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical ecosystem models of coastal acidification (CA) and hypoxia have been developed to synthesize current scientific understanding and provide predictions for nutrient management and policy. However, there is not a scientific consensus about the structure of these models an...

  20. NASA Airborne Missions in Support of Coastal Ecosystems and Water Quality Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Hooker, S. B.; Kudela, R. M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Palacios, S. L.; Myers, J. S.; Livingston, J. M.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Redemann, J.; Clinton, N. E.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Negrey, K.

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, coastal marine ecosystems are exposed to land-based sources of pollution and sedimentation from anthropogenic activities including agriculture and coastal development. Ocean color products from satellite sensors provide information on chlorophyll (phytoplankton pigment), sediments, and colored dissolved organic material. Further, ship-based in-water measurements and emerging airborne measurements provide in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation satellite ocean color sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties of seasonal algal blooms through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems.

  1. Seasonal Trends in Airborne Fungal Spores in Coastal California Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfin, J.; Crandall, S. G.; Gilbert, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne fungal spores cause disease in plants and animals and may trigger respiratory illnesses in humans. In terrestrial systems, fungal sporulation, germination, and persistence are strongly regulated by local meteorological conditions. However, few studies investigate how microclimate affects the spatio-temporal dynamics of airborne spores. We measured fungal aerospora abundance and microclimate at varying spatial and time scales in coastal California in three habitat-types: coast redwood forest, mixed-evergreen forest, and maritime chaparral. We asked: 1) is there a difference in total airborne spore concentration between habitats, 2) when do we see peak spore counts, and 3) do spore densities correlate with microclimate conditions? Fungal spores were caught from the air with a volumetric vacuum air spore trap during the wet season (January - March) in 2013 and 2014, as well as monthly in 2014. Initial results suggest that mixed-evergreen forests exhibit the highest amounts of spore abundance in both years compared to the other habitats. This may be due to either a higher diversity of host plants in mixed-evergreen forests or a rich leaf litter layer that may harbor a greater abundance of saprotrophic fungi. Based on pilot data, we predict that temperature and to a lesser degree, relative humidity, will be important microclimate predictors for high spore densities. These data are important for understanding when and under what weather conditions we can expect to see high levels of fungal spores in the air; this can be useful information for managers who are interested in treating diseased plants with fungicides.

  2. Fusion of High Resolution Multispectral Imagery in Vulnerable Coastal and Land Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Ibarrola-Ulzurrun, Edurne; Gonzalo-Martin, Consuelo; Marcello-Ruiz, Javier; Garcia-Pedrero, Angel; Rodriguez-Esparragon, Dionisio

    2017-01-25

    Ecosystems provide a wide variety of useful resources that enhance human welfare, but these resources are declining due to climate change and anthropogenic pressure. In this work, three vulnerable ecosystems, including shrublands, coastal areas with dunes systems and areas of shallow water, are studied. As far as these resources' reduction is concerned, remote sensing and image processing techniques could contribute to the management of these natural resources in a practical and cost-effective way, although some improvements are needed for obtaining a higher quality of the information available. An important quality improvement is the fusion at the pixel level. Hence, the objective of this work is to assess which pansharpening technique provides the best fused image for the different types of ecosystems. After a preliminary evaluation of twelve classic and novel fusion algorithms, a total of four pansharpening algorithms was analyzed using six quality indices. The quality assessment was implemented not only for the whole set of multispectral bands, but also for the subset of spectral bands covered by the wavelength range of the panchromatic image and outside of it. A better quality result is observed in the fused image using only the bands covered by the panchromatic band range. It is important to highlight the use of these techniques not only in land and urban areas, but a novel analysis in areas of shallow water ecosystems. Although the algorithms do not show a high difference in land and coastal areas, coastal ecosystems require simpler algorithms, such as fast intensity hue saturation, whereas more heterogeneous ecosystems need advanced algorithms, as weighted wavelet 'à trous' through fractal dimension maps for shrublands and mixed ecosystems. Moreover, quality map analysis was carried out in order to study the fusion result in each band at the local level. Finally, to demonstrate the performance of these pansharpening techniques, advanced Object-Based (OBIA

  3. Fusion of High Resolution Multispectral Imagery in Vulnerable Coastal and Land Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ibarrola-Ulzurrun, Edurne; Gonzalo-Martin, Consuelo; Marcello-Ruiz, Javier; Garcia-Pedrero, Angel; Rodriguez-Esparragon, Dionisio

    2017-01-01

    Ecosystems provide a wide variety of useful resources that enhance human welfare, but these resources are declining due to climate change and anthropogenic pressure. In this work, three vulnerable ecosystems, including shrublands, coastal areas with dunes systems and areas of shallow water, are studied. As far as these resources’ reduction is concerned, remote sensing and image processing techniques could contribute to the management of these natural resources in a practical and cost-effective way, although some improvements are needed for obtaining a higher quality of the information available. An important quality improvement is the fusion at the pixel level. Hence, the objective of this work is to assess which pansharpening technique provides the best fused image for the different types of ecosystems. After a preliminary evaluation of twelve classic and novel fusion algorithms, a total of four pansharpening algorithms was analyzed using six quality indices. The quality assessment was implemented not only for the whole set of multispectral bands, but also for the subset of spectral bands covered by the wavelength range of the panchromatic image and outside of it. A better quality result is observed in the fused image using only the bands covered by the panchromatic band range. It is important to highlight the use of these techniques not only in land and urban areas, but a novel analysis in areas of shallow water ecosystems. Although the algorithms do not show a high difference in land and coastal areas, coastal ecosystems require simpler algorithms, such as fast intensity hue saturation, whereas more heterogeneous ecosystems need advanced algorithms, as weighted wavelet ‘à trous’ through fractal dimension maps for shrublands and mixed ecosystems. Moreover, quality map analysis was carried out in order to study the fusion result in each band at the local level. Finally, to demonstrate the performance of these pansharpening techniques, advanced Object

  4. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions Support Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Kudela, R. M.; Hooker, S. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Russell, P. B.; Palacios, S. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Negrey, K.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Broughton, J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA has a continuing requirement to collect high-quality in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation ocean color satellite sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal is to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue spectral domain to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data are accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Flight operations are presented for the instrument payloads using the CIRPAS Twin Otter flown over Monterey Bay during the seasonal fall algal bloom in 2011 (COAST) and 2013 (OCEANIA) to support bio-optical measurements of phytoplankton for coastal zone research.

  5. TNT Degradation by Natural Microbial Assemblages at Frontal Boundaries Between Water Masses in Coastal Ecosystems (ER-2124)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-20

    the Marine Environment, Vol. 2. Academic Press, Orlando. Peale, J ., M. Scalzi, T . Fowler , M.T. Montgomery, T.J. Boyd, and J . G. Mueller. 2015...Between Water Masses in Coastal Ecosystems (ER-2124) June 20, 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Michael T . MonTgoMery ThoMas J ...Natural Microbial Assemblages at Frontal Boundaries Between Water Masses in Coastal Ecosystems (ER-2124) Michael T . Montgomery, Thomas J . Boyd, and

  6. Preliminary analysis of the Jimo coastal ecosystem with the ecopath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2016-12-01

    The Jimo coast encompasses an area of 2157 km2, and the ecosystem is valuable both socially and economically with regional fisheries substantially contributing to the value. A mass-balanced trophic model consisting of 15 functional ecological groups was developed for the coastal ecosystem using the Ecopath model in Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) software (version 6.4.3). The results of the model simulations indicated that the trophic levels of the functional groups varied between 1.0 and 3.76, and the total production of the system was estimated to be 5112.733 t km-2 yr-1 with a total energy transfer efficiency of 17.6%. The proportion of the total flow originating from detritus was estimated to be 48%, whereas that from primary producers was 52%, indicating that the grazing food chain dominated the energy flow. The ratio of total primary productivity to total respiration in the system was 3.78, and the connectivity index was 0.4. The fin cycling index and the mean path length of the energy flow were 4.92% and 2.57%, respectively, which indicated that the ecosystem exhibits relatively low maturity and stability. The mixed trophic impact (MTI) procedure suggested that the ecological groups at lower trophic levels dominated the feeding dynamics in the Jimo coastal ecosystem. Overfishing is thought to be the primary reason for the degeneration of the Jimo coastal ecosystem, resulting in a decline in the abundance of pelagic and demersal fish species and a subsequent shift to the predominance of lower-trophic-level functional groups. Finally, we offered some recommendations for improving current fishery management practices.

  7. The influence of soil salinization on land use changes in azov district of Rostov oblast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukhovich, D. I.; Simakova, M. S.; Kulyanitsa, A. L.; Bryzzhev, A. V.; Koroleva, P. V.; Kalinina, N. V.; Chernousenko, G. I.; Vil'chevskaya, E. V.; Dolinina, E. A.; Rukhovich, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    A retrospective monitoring of changes in land use on cultivated salt-affected soils of Azov district in Rostov oblast for a period from 1968 to 2013 was performed within the framework of the creation of a problem- oriented system of retrospective monitoring of the soil cover and land uses. A higher dynamism of land uses on salt-affected soils in comparison with that on nonsaline soils was shown. A decisive role of the anthropogenic factor in the increasing soil salinization in the region was established. The areas of meadow ecosystems with participation of salt-affected soils considerably increased at the end of the 1960s-the beginning of the 1970s. It is argued that their development with a corresponding worsening of the salt status of regional soils was initiated by the wide-scale planting of shelterbelts in the 1940s and 1950s.

  8. Kinematics and planktonic ecosystem dynamics of a coastal cyclonic eddy in the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenillat, F.; Franks, P. J. S.; Riviere, P.; Capet, X.; Blanke, B.

    2014-12-01

    The highly productive Californian eastern boundary upwelling system exhibits high mesoscale eddy activity. Eddies that are formed at the coast move offshore, entraining and redistributing nearshore nutrients and planktonic organisms. High planktonic biomass can be found in these eddies months after detaching from the coast. The mechanisms driving these patterns, and their ecological impacts are still poorly understood. To characterize and understand the influence of mesoscale eddies on planktonic ecosystems in the California Current System (CCS) we use a numerical approach coupling the Regional Ocean Modeling system (ROMS), at 5 km horizontal resolution, with a multiple size class planktonic ecosystem model (NEMURO). Combining Eulerian and Lagrangian analyses, we were able to follow one specific cyclonic eddy formed in the Southern California Bight as it detached from the coast and migrated offshore. Lagrangian particle tracking allowed us to identify the eddy core where high concentrations of coastal nutrients are found. The Eulerian calculations allowed us to quantify ecosystem properties and dynamics along the particle tracks. We highlight the role of this eddy in altering local planktonic ecosystem dynamics, and contrast those dynamics with the coastal upwelling source waters, and the waters encircling the eddy.

  9. Radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wood, M D; Leah, R T; Jones, S R; Copplestone, D

    2009-06-15

    International intercomparisons of models to assess the impact of ionising radiation on wildlife have identified radionuclide transfer assumptions as a significant source of uncertainty in the modelling process. There is a need to improve the underpinning data sets on radionuclide transfer to reduce this uncertainty, especially for poorly-studied ecosystems such as coastal sand dunes. This paper presents the results of the first published study of radionuclide transfer to invertebrates and small mammals in a coastal sand dune ecosystem. Activity concentrations of (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am are reported for detritivorous, herbivorous, carnivorous and omnivorous biota. Differences in activity concentrations measured in the sand dune biota are related to the trophic level of the organisms and the influence of sea-to-land transfer is apparent in the food chain transfer observed at the site. There are notable differences in the concentration ratios (CRs) calculated for the sand dune biota compared to other terrestrial ecosystems, especially for the small mammals which have CRs that are two orders of magnitude lower than the generic terrestrial ecosystem CRs published by the recent EC EURATOM ERICA project. The lower CRs at the sand dunes may be due to the influence of other cations from the marine environment (e.g. K and Na) on the net radionuclide transfer observed, but further research is required to test this hypothesis.

  10. Underwater Optics in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Coastal Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Pirjo; Ramírez, Jaime; Gómez, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Understanding underwater optics in natural waters is essential in evaluating aquatic primary production and risk of UV exposure in aquatic habitats. Changing environmental conditions related with global climate change, which imply potential contrasting changes in underwater light climate further emphasize the need to gain insights into patterns related with underwater optics for more accurate future predictions. The present study evaluated penetration of solar radiation in six sub-Antarctic estuaries and fjords in Chilean North Patagonian region (39-44°S) and in an Antarctic bay (62°S). Based on vertical diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd), derived from measurements with a submersible multichannel radiometer, average summer UV penetration depth (z1%) in these water bodies ranged 2-11 m for UV-B (313 nm), 4-27 m for UV-A (395 nm), and 7-30 m for PAR (euphotic zone). UV attenuation was strongest in the shallow Quempillén estuary, while Fildes Bay (Antarctica) exhibited the highest transparency. Optically non-homogeneous water layers and seasonal variation in transparency (lower in winter) characterized Comau Fjord and Puyuhuapi Channel. In general, multivariate analysis based on Kd values of UV and PAR wavelengths discriminated strongly Quempillén estuary and Puyuhuapi Channel from other study sites. Spatial (horizontal) variation within the estuary of Valdivia river reflected stronger attenuation in zones receiving river impact, while within Fildes Bay a lower spatial variation in water transparency could in general be related to closeness of glaciers, likely due to increased turbidity through ice-driven processes. Higher transparency and deeper UV-B penetration in proportion to UV-A/visible wavelengths observed in Fildes Bay suggests a higher risk for Antarctic ecosystems reflected by e.g. altered UV-B damage vs. photorepair under UV-A/PAR. Considering that damage repair processes often slow down under cool temperatures, adverse UV impact could be further

  11. Underwater Optics in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Huovinen, Pirjo; Ramírez, Jaime; Gómez, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Understanding underwater optics in natural waters is essential in evaluating aquatic primary production and risk of UV exposure in aquatic habitats. Changing environmental conditions related with global climate change, which imply potential contrasting changes in underwater light climate further emphasize the need to gain insights into patterns related with underwater optics for more accurate future predictions. The present study evaluated penetration of solar radiation in six sub-Antarctic estuaries and fjords in Chilean North Patagonian region (39–44°S) and in an Antarctic bay (62°S). Based on vertical diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd), derived from measurements with a submersible multichannel radiometer, average summer UV penetration depth (z1%) in these water bodies ranged 2–11 m for UV-B (313 nm), 4–27 m for UV-A (395 nm), and 7–30 m for PAR (euphotic zone). UV attenuation was strongest in the shallow Quempillén estuary, while Fildes Bay (Antarctica) exhibited the highest transparency. Optically non-homogeneous water layers and seasonal variation in transparency (lower in winter) characterized Comau Fjord and Puyuhuapi Channel. In general, multivariate analysis based on Kd values of UV and PAR wavelengths discriminated strongly Quempillén estuary and Puyuhuapi Channel from other study sites. Spatial (horizontal) variation within the estuary of Valdivia river reflected stronger attenuation in zones receiving river impact, while within Fildes Bay a lower spatial variation in water transparency could in general be related to closeness of glaciers, likely due to increased turbidity through ice-driven processes. Higher transparency and deeper UV-B penetration in proportion to UV-A/visible wavelengths observed in Fildes Bay suggests a higher risk for Antarctic ecosystems reflected by e.g. altered UV-B damage vs. photorepair under UV-A/PAR. Considering that damage repair processes often slow down under cool temperatures, adverse UV impact could be

  12. A spatial analysis of cultural ecosystem service valuation by regional stakeholders in Florida: a coastal application of the social values for ecosystem services (SolVES) tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffin, Alisa W.; Swett, Robert A.; Cole, Zachary D.

    2012-01-01

    Livelihoods and lifestyles of people throughout the world depend on essential goods and services provided by marine and coastal ecosystems. However, as societal demand increases and available ocean and coastal space diminish, better methods are needed to spatially and temporally allocate ocean and coastal activities such as shipping, energy production, tourism, and fishing. While economic valuation is an important mechanism for doing so, cultural ecosystem services often do not lend themselves to this method. Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey are working collaboratively with the Florida Sea Grant College Program to map nonmonetary values of cultural ecosystem services for a pilot area (Sarasota Bay) in the Gulf of Mexico. The research seeks to close knowledge gaps about the attitudes and perceptions, or nonmonetary values, held by coastal residents toward cultural ecosystem services, and to adapt related, terrestrial-based research methods to a coastal setting. A critical goal is to integrate research results with coastal and marine spatial planning applications, thus making them relevant to coastal planners and managers in their daily efforts to sustainably manage coastal resources. Using information about the attitudes and preferences of people toward places and uses in the landscape, collected from value and preference surveys, the USGS SolVES 2.0 tool will provide quantitative models to relate social values, or perceived nonmonetary values, assigned to locations by survey respondents with the underlying environmental characteristics of those same locations. Project results will increase scientific and geographic knowledge of how Sarasota Bay residents value their area’s cultural ecosystem services.

  13. Metagenomic analysis of the bacterial community of the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, D. G.; Stakheev, V. V.; Chirak, E. L.; Glushchenko, G. Yu.

    2015-09-01

    The taxonomic composition of microorganisms in the Sea of Azov has been estimated by the methods of multiple parallel sequencing. The true level of biological diversity of microorganisms has been shown. The prokaryotic community throughout the Sea of Azov, including the Taganrog Bay, demonstrates the structural features typical of a marine community. Despite the shallowness of the body of water, microbial communities in the Sea of Azov are clearly distinguishable between the surface and bottom clusters.

  14. Climate change impacts on U.S. coastal and marine ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Field, John C.; Boesch, Donald F.; Buddemeier, Robert W.; Burkett, Virginia; Cayan, Daniel R.; Fogarty, Michael; Harwell, Mark A.; Howarth, Robert W.; Mason, Curt; Reed, Denise J.; Royer, Thomas C.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Titus, James G.

    2002-01-01

    Increases in concentrations of greenhouse gases projected for the 21st century are expected to lead to increased mean global air and ocean temperatures. The National Assessment of Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change (NAST 2001) was based on a series of regional and sector assessments. This paper is a summary of the coastal and marine resources sector review of potential impacts on shorelines, estuaries, coastal wetlands, coral reefs, and ocean margin ecosystems. The assessment considered the impacts of several key drivers of climate change: sea level change; alterations in precipitation patterns and subsequent delivery of freshwater, nutrients, and sediment; increased ocean temperature; alterations in circulation patterns; changes in frequency and intensity of coastal storms; and increased levels of atmospheric CO2. Increasing rates of sea-level rise and intensity and frequency of coastal storms and hurricanes over the next decades will increase threats to shorelines, wetlands, and coastal development. Estuarine productivity will change in response to alteration in the timing and amount of freshwater, nutrients, and sediment delivery. Higher water temperatures and changes in freshwater delivery will alter estuarine stratification, residence time, and eutrophication. Increased ocean temperatures are expected to increase coral bleaching and higher CO2 levels may reduce coral calcification, making it more difficult for corals to recover from other disturbances, and inhibiting poleward shifts. Ocean warming is expected to cause poleward shifts in the ranges of many other organisms, including commercial species, and these shifts may have secondary effects on their predators and prey. Although these potential impacts of climate change and variability will vary from system to system, it is important to recognize that they will be superimposed upon, and in many cases intensify, other ecosystem stresses (pollution, harvesting, habitat destruction

  15. Cloud shading and fog drip influence the metabolism of a coastal pine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Mariah S; Park Williams, A; Ambrose, Anthony R; Boot, Claudia M; Bradley, Eliza S; Dawson, Todd E; Schaeffer, Sean M; Schimel, Joshua P; Still, Christopher J

    2013-02-01

    Assessing the ecological importance of clouds has substantial implications for our basic understanding of ecosystems and for predicting how they will respond to a changing climate. This study was conducted in a coastal Bishop pine forest ecosystem that experiences regular cycles of stratus cloud cover and inundation in summer. Our objective was to understand how these clouds impact ecosystem metabolism by contrasting two sites along a gradient of summer stratus cover. The site that was under cloud cover ~15% more of the summer daytime hours had lower air temperatures and evaporation rates, higher soil moisture content, and received more frequent fog drip inputs than the site with less cloud cover. These cloud-driven differences in environmental conditions translated into large differences in plant and microbial activity. Pine trees at the site with greater cloud cover exhibited less water stress in summer, larger basal area growth, and greater rates of sap velocity. The difference in basal area growth between the two sites was largely due to summer growth. Microbial metabolism was highly responsive to fog drip, illustrated by an observed ~3-fold increase in microbial biomass C with increasing summer fog drip. In addition, the site with more cloud cover had greater total soil respiration and a larger fractional contribution from heterotrophic sources. We conclude that clouds are important to the ecological functioning of these coastal forests, providing summer shading and cooling that relieve pine and microbial drought stress as well as regular moisture inputs that elevate plant and microbial metabolism. These findings are important for understanding how these and other seasonally dry coastal ecosystems will respond to predicted changes in stratus cover, rainfall, and temperature.

  16. Urgent and Compelling Need for Coastal and Inland Aquatic Ecosystem Research Using Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, D. B.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Hestir, E.; Turpie, K. R.; Roberts, D. A.; Frouin, R.; Goodman, J.; Schaeffer, B. A.; Franz, B. A.; Humm, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal and inland waters and associated aquatic habitats, including wetlands, mangroves, submerged grasses, and coral reefs, are some of the most productive and diverse ecosystems on the planet. They provide services critical to human health, safety, and prosperity. Yet, they are highly vulnerable to changes in climate and other anthropogenic pressures. With a global population of over seven billion people and climbing, and a warming atmosphere driven by carbon dioxide now in excess of 400 ppb, these services are at risk of rapidly diminishing globally. We know little about how these ecosystems function. We need to characterize short-term changes in the functional biodiversity and biogeochemical cycles of these coastal and wetland ecosystems, from canopy to benthos, and trace these changes to their underlying environmental influences. This requires an observation-based approach that covers coastal and inland aquatic ecosystems in a repeated, synoptic manner. Space-borne sensing systems can provide this capability, supported by coordinated in situ calibration and product validation activities. The design requires high temporal resolution (weekly or better), medium spatial resolution (30 m pixels at nadir to complement Landsat-class sensors), and highly sensitive, ocean-color radiometric quality, high resolution spectroscopy with Visible and Short-Wave IR bands (order of 10 nm or better) to assess both atmospheric correction parameters and land vegetation composition. The strategy needs to include sunglint avoidance schemes, and methods to maximize signal to noise ratios and temporal coverage of aquatic areas. We describe such a system, and urge the U.S. to implement such an observing strategy in the short-term and sustain it for the benefit of humankind.

  17. A meta-analysis of soil salinization effects on nitrogen pools, cycles and fluxes in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghua; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Salinity intrusion caused by land subsidence resulting from increasing groundwater abstraction, decreasing river sediment loads and increasing sea level because of climate change has caused widespread soil salinization in coastal ecosystems. Soil salinization may greatly alter nitrogen (N) cycling in coastal ecosystems. However, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of soil salinization on ecosystem N pools, cycling processes and fluxes is not available for coastal ecosystems. Therefore, we compiled data from 551 observations from 21 peer-reviewed papers and conducted a meta-analysis of experimental soil salinization effects on 19 variables related to N pools, cycling processes and fluxes in coastal ecosystems. Our results showed that the effects of soil salinization varied across different ecosystem types and salinity levels. Soil salinization increased plant N content (18%), soil NH4(+) (12%) and soil total N (210%), although it decreased soil NO3(-) (2%) and soil microbial biomass N (74%). Increasing soil salinity stimulated soil N2 O fluxes as well as hydrological NH4(+) and NO2(-) fluxes more than threefold, although it decreased the hydrological dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) flux (59%). Soil salinization also increased the net N mineralization by 70%, although salinization effects were not observed on the net nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in this meta-analysis. Overall, this meta-analysis improves our understanding of the responses of ecosystem N cycling to soil salinization, identifies knowledge gaps and highlights the urgent need for studies on the effects of soil salinization on coastal agro-ecosystem and microbial N immobilization. Additional increases in knowledge are critical for designing sustainable adaptation measures to the predicted intrusion of salinity intrusion so that the productivity of coastal agro-ecosystems can be maintained or improved and the N losses and pollution of the natural

  18. Developing an optimal sampling design. A case study in a coastal marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kitsiou, D; Tsirtsis, G; Karydis, M

    2001-09-01

    The development of a sampling design for optimising sampling site locations collected from a coastal marine environment has been the purpose of the present work; application of statistical analysis and spatial autocorrelation methods have been carried out. The dataset included data collected from 34 sampling sites spaced out in the Strait of Lesbos, Greece, arranged in a 1 x 1 NM grid. The coastal shallow ecosystem was subdivided into three zones, an inner one (7 stations), a middle one (16 stations) and an offshore zone (11 stations). The standard error of the chlorophyll-a concentrations in each zone has been used as the criterion for the sampling design optimisation, resulting into reallocation of the sampling sites into the three zones. The positions of the reallocated stations have been assessed by estimation of the spatial heterogeneity and anisotropy of chlorophyll-a concentrations using variograms. Study of the variance of the initial dataset of the inner zone taking into account spatial heterogeneity, revealed two different sub-areas and therefore, the number of the inner stations has been reassessed. The proposed methodology eliminates the number of sampling sites and maximises the information of spatial data from marine ecosystems. It is described as a step-by-step procedure and could be widely applied in sampling design concerning coastal pollution problems.

  19. Community Composition of Photosynthetic Picoeukaryotes in a Subtropical Coastal Ecosystem, with Particular Emphasis on Micromonas.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Chi; Chung, Chih-Ching; Chen, Liang-Yin; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Huang, Chin-Yi; Chiang, Kuo-Ping

    2017-05-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) are important constituents in picoplankton communities in many marine ecosystems. However, little is known about their community composition in the subtropical coastal waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. In order to study their taxonomic composition, this study constructed 18S rRNA gene libraries using flow cytometric sorting during the warm season. The results show that, after diatoms, prasinophyte clones are numerically dominant. Within prasinophytes, Micromonas produced the most common sequences, and included clades II, III, IV, and VI. We are establishing the new Micromonas clade VI based on our phylogenetic analysis. Sequences of this clade have previously been retrieved from the South China Sea and Red Sea, indicating a worldwide distribution, but this is the first study to detect clade VI in the coastal waters of Taiwan. The TSA-FISH results indicated that Micromonas clade VI peaked in the summer (~4 × 10(2)  cells/ml), accounting for one-fifth of Micromonas abundance on average. Overall, Micromonas contributed half of Mamiellophyceae abundance, while Mamiellophyceae contributed 40% of PPE abundance. This study demonstrates the importance of Micromonas within the Mamiellophyceae in a subtropical coastal ecosystem. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  20. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current.

    PubMed

    Barth, John A; Menge, Bruce A; Lubchenco, Jane; Chan, Francis; Bane, John M; Kirincich, Anthony R; McManus, Margaret A; Nielsen, Karina J; Pierce, Stephen D; Washburn, Libe

    2007-03-06

    Wind-driven coastal ocean upwelling supplies nutrients to the euphotic zone near the coast. Nutrients fuel the growth of phytoplankton, the base of a very productive coastal marine ecosystem [Pauly D, Christensen V (1995) Nature 374:255-257]. Because nutrient supply and phytoplankton biomass in shelf waters are highly sensitive to variation in upwelling-driven circulation, shifts in the timing and strength of upwelling may alter basic nutrient and carbon fluxes through marine food webs. We show how a 1-month delay in the 2005 spring transition to upwelling-favorable wind stress in the northern California Current Large Marine Ecosystem resulted in numerous anomalies: warm water, low nutrient levels, low primary productivity, and an unprecedented low recruitment of rocky intertidal organisms. The delay was associated with 20- to 40-day wind oscillations accompanying a southward shift of the jet stream. Early in the upwelling season (May-July) off Oregon, the cumulative upwelling-favorable wind stress was the lowest in 20 years, nearshore surface waters averaged 2 degrees C warmer than normal, surf-zone chlorophyll-a and nutrients were 50% and 30% less than normal, respectively, and densities of recruits of mussels and barnacles were reduced by 83% and 66%, respectively. Delayed early-season upwelling and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions.

  1. Balancing the Need to Develop Coastal Areas with the Desire for an Ecologically Functioning Coastal Environment: Is Net Ecosystem Improvement Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2005-03-01

    The global human population is growing exponentially, a majority lives and works near the coast, and coastal commerce and development are critical to the economies of many nations. Hence, coastal areas will continue to be a major focus of development and economic activity. People want and need the economics provided by coastal development but they also want and need the fisheries and social commodities supported by estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Because of these facts, we view the challenge of balancing coastal development with enhancing nearshore marine and estuarine ecosystems (i.e., net ecosystem improvement) as the top priority for coastal researchers in this century. Our restoration research in Pacific Northwest estuaries and participation in the design and mitigation of nearshore structures has largely dealt with these competing goals. To this end, we have applied conceptual models, comprehensive assessment methods, and principles of restoration ecology, conservation biology and adaptive management to incorporate science into decisions about use of estuarine systems. Case studies of Bainbridge Island and the Columbia River demonstrate the use of objective, defensible methods to prioritize estuarine areas for preservation, conservation and restoration. Case studies of Clinton, WA and Port Townsend, WA demonstrate the incorporation of an ecological perspective and technological solutions into design projects that affect the nearshore. Adaptive management has allowed coastal development and restoration uncertainties to be better evaluated, with the information used to improve management decisions. Although unproven on a large scale, we think that these kinds of methods can contribute to the net improvement of already degraded ecosystems. The challenges include applied science to understand the issues, education, incentives, empirical data (not rehashing of reviews), cumulative impact analysis, and an effective adaptive management program. Because the option

  2. Coastal Wetland Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: the Role of Macroclimatic Drivers along the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osland, M. J.; Enwright, N.; Day, R. H.; Gabler, C. A.; Stagg, C. L.; From, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Across the globe, macroclimatic drivers greatly influence coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. However, changing macroclimatic conditions are rarely incorporated into coastal wetland vulnerability assessments. Here, we quantify the influence of macroclimatic drivers upon coastal wetland ecosystems along the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) coast. From a global perspective, the NGOM coast provides several excellent opportunities to examine the effects of climate change upon coastal wetlands. The abundant coastal wetland ecosystems in the region span two major climatic gradients: (1) a winter temperature gradient that crosses temperate to tropical climatic zones; and (2) a precipitation gradient that crosses humid to semi-arid zones. We present analyses where we used geospatial data (historical climate, hydrology, and coastal wetland coverage) and field data (soil, elevation, and plant community composition and structure) to quantify climate-mediated ecological transitions. We identified winter climate and precipitation-based thresholds that separate mangrove forests from salt marshes and vegetated wetlands from unvegetated wetlands, respectively. We used simple distribution and abundance models to evaluate the potential ecological effects of alternative future climate change scenarios. Our results illustrate and quantify the importance of macroclimatic drivers and indicate that climate change could result in landscape-scale changes in coastal wetland ecosystem structure and function. These macroclimate-mediated ecological changes could affect the supply of some ecosystem goods and services as well as the resilience of these ecosystems to stressors, including accelerated sea level rise. Collectively, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating macroclimatic drivers within future-focused coastal wetland vulnerability assessments.

  3. Environmental problem solving in coastal ecosystems: A paradigm shift to sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, William C.

    2008-04-01

    The human ecological footprint now extends to the entire globe, and human impacts are the dominant feature of many ecosystems, resulting in our current era being coined the 'anthropocene'. This is particularly apparent in coastal ecosystems as human populations are increasing rapidly in coastal cities and the ecosystem services in these areas are rapidly being compromised. Science has historically progressed as a series of paradigm shifts and this paper reviews this history of paradigm shifts and makes the case that the next major paradigm shift will be directed at sustainability, resulting in a shift in scientific focus on solving rather than just studying our current environmental problems. Traditionally, science has been extremely effective at data acquisition and then successively less effective at translating this into information, knowledge and finally environmental problem solving. The currently required paradigm shift is to focus on environmental problem solving, filling gaps in knowledge, information and data only as required to solve a particular problem. A key element in turning this process around is better science communication between scientists, key stakeholders and the community. This will require more 'science communicators' who can use credibility, tenacity, creativity and virtue to effect solutions.

  4. Interactive effects of global and regional change on a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, Karsten; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.

    2008-03-01

    Shallow waters and lowland meet at the same level in the Wadden Sea, but are separated by walls of coastal defense. What are the prospects of this coastal ecosystem in a warmer world? We focus on tidal waters and inshore sedimentary bottoms, expect nutrient supply from land to decline and species introductions, temperature and sea level to rise. The effects are interrelated and will have an increasing likelihood of abrupt and irreversible developments. The biotic interactions are hardly predictable but we anticipate the following changes to be more likely than others: blooms of phytoplankton will be weak mainly because of increasing pelagic and benthic grazing pressure, both facilitated by warming. Possibly birds feeding on mollusks will encounter decreasing resource availability while fish-eaters benefit. Extensive reefs of Pacific oysters could facilitate aquatic macrophytes. Sea level rise and concomitant hydrodynamics above tidal flats favor well-anchored suspension feeders as well as burrowing fauna adapted to dynamic permeable sand. With high shares of immigrants from overseas and the south, species richness will increase; yet the ecosystem stability may become lower. We suggest that for the next decades invasions of introduced species followed by warming and declining nutrient supply will be the most pressing factor on the changes in the Wadden Sea ecosystem, and the effects of sea level rise to be the key issue on the scale of the whole century and beyond.

  5. Current status and future prospects for the assessment of marine and coastal ecosystem services: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liquete, Camino; Piroddi, Chiara; Drakou, Evangelia G; Gurney, Leigh; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Charef, Aymen; Egoh, Benis

    2013-01-01

    Research on ecosystem services has grown exponentially during the last decade. Most of the studies have focused on assessing and mapping terrestrial ecosystem services highlighting a knowledge gap on marine and coastal ecosystem services (MCES) and an urgent need to assess them. We reviewed and summarized existing scientific literature related to MCES with the aim of extracting and classifying indicators used to assess and map them. We found 145 papers that specifically assessed marine and coastal ecosystem services from which we extracted 476 indicators. Food provision, in particular fisheries, was the most extensively analyzed MCES while water purification and coastal protection were the most frequently studied regulating and maintenance services. Also recreation and tourism under the cultural services was relatively well assessed. We highlight knowledge gaps regarding the availability of indicators that measure the capacity, flow or benefit derived from each ecosystem service. The majority of the case studies was found in mangroves and coastal wetlands and was mainly concentrated in Europe and North America. Our systematic review highlighted the need of an improved ecosystem service classification for marine and coastal systems, which is herein proposed with definitions and links to previous classifications. This review summarizes the state of available information related to ecosystem services associated with marine and coastal ecosystems. The cataloging of MCES indicators and the integrated classification of MCES provided in this paper establish a background that can facilitate the planning and integration of future assessments. The final goal is to establish a consistent structure and populate it with information able to support the implementation of biodiversity conservation policies.

  6. Current Status and Future Prospects for the Assessment of Marine and Coastal Ecosystem Services: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Liquete, Camino; Piroddi, Chiara; Drakou, Evangelia G.; Gurney, Leigh; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Charef, Aymen; Egoh, Benis

    2013-01-01

    Background Research on ecosystem services has grown exponentially during the last decade. Most of the studies have focused on assessing and mapping terrestrial ecosystem services highlighting a knowledge gap on marine and coastal ecosystem services (MCES) and an urgent need to assess them. Methodology/Principal Findings We reviewed and summarized existing scientific literature related to MCES with the aim of extracting and classifying indicators used to assess and map them. We found 145 papers that specifically assessed marine and coastal ecosystem services from which we extracted 476 indicators. Food provision, in particular fisheries, was the most extensively analyzed MCES while water purification and coastal protection were the most frequently studied regulating and maintenance services. Also recreation and tourism under the cultural services was relatively well assessed. We highlight knowledge gaps regarding the availability of indicators that measure the capacity, flow or benefit derived from each ecosystem service. The majority of the case studies was found in mangroves and coastal wetlands and was mainly concentrated in Europe and North America. Our systematic review highlighted the need of an improved ecosystem service classification for marine and coastal systems, which is herein proposed with definitions and links to previous classifications. Conclusions/Significance This review summarizes the state of available information related to ecosystem services associated with marine and coastal ecosystems. The cataloging of MCES indicators and the integrated classification of MCES provided in this paper establish a background that can facilitate the planning and integration of future assessments. The final goal is to establish a consistent structure and populate it with information able to support the implementation of biodiversity conservation policies. PMID:23844080

  7. Effects of near-future ocean acidification, fishing, and marine protection on a temperate coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Christopher E; Eddy, Tyler D

    2015-02-01

    Understanding ecosystem responses to global and local anthropogenic impacts is paramount to predicting future ecosystem states. We used an ecosystem modeling approach to investigate the independent and cumulative effects of fishing, marine protection, and ocean acidification on a coastal ecosystem. To quantify the effects of ocean acidification at the ecosystem level, we used information from the peer-reviewed literature on the effects of ocean acidification. Using an Ecopath with Ecosim ecosystem model for the Wellington south coast, including the Taputeranga Marine Reserve (MR), New Zealand, we predicted ecosystem responses under 4 scenarios: ocean acidification + fishing; ocean acidification + MR (no fishing); no ocean acidification + fishing; no ocean acidification + MR for the year 2050. Fishing had a larger effect on trophic group biomasses and trophic structure than ocean acidification, whereas the effects of ocean acidification were only large in the absence of fishing. Mortality by fishing had large, negative effects on trophic group biomasses. These effects were similar regardless of the presence of ocean acidification. Ocean acidification was predicted to indirectly benefit certain species in the MR scenario. This was because lobster (Jasus edwardsii) only recovered to 58% of the MR biomass in the ocean acidification + MR scenario, a situation that benefited the trophic groups lobsters prey on. Most trophic groups responded antagonistically to the interactive effects of ocean acidification and marine protection (46%; reduced response); however, many groups responded synergistically (33%; amplified response). Conservation and fisheries management strategies need to account for the reduced recovery potential of some exploited species under ocean acidification, nonadditive interactions of multiple factors, and indirect responses of species to ocean acidification caused by declines in calcareous predators. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Integrating Climate Science, Ecosystem Modeling, and Resource Management to Develop a Coastal Master Plan for Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, D.; Sharon, C.; Knopman, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority of Louisiana (CPRA) asked the RAND Corporation to develop a new Planning Tool to support Louisiana's 2012 Coastal Master Plan. The Planning Tool integrates climate science, ecosystem modeling, and resource management planning to comparing different risk reduction and coastal restoration projects and for developing groups of projects, or alternatives, for consideration for the Master Plan. The Planning Tool presents its results in an interactive visualization environment to support deliberation by CPRA decisionmakers and stakeholders. The Planning Tool uses new standardized estimates of project costs, planning and construction duration, and other project attributes along with science-based model estimates of project effects on risk reduction, land building, and ecosystem services. The Planning Tool considers how outcomes would differ under different future scenarios reflecting climate change, demographics, and other uncertainties. The Planning Tool uses a constrained optimization algorithm to develop a range of alternatives that meet CPRA's desired outcomes with respect to future flood risk reduction, coast-wide land area, and other decision criteria. Beginning in 2011, CPRA used the Planning Tool to compare hundreds of possible hurricane flood risk reduction and coastal restoration projects under several scenarios of long-term future conditions. CPRA next used the Planning Tool to develop and analyze hundreds of different alternatives that together would best meet Louisiana's goals of reducing hurricane flood risk and achieving a sustainable landscape. The Planning Tool then enabled CPRA to specify planning parameters such as total available funding, funding splits between risk reduction and restoration projects, and minimum levels of projected achievement of goals for ecosystem service and risk reduction decision criteria. Using this information, the Planning Tool then identified how those alternatives could be

  9. [Risk assessment of coastal ecosystem in Beibu Gulf, Guangxi of South China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuo-Zhi; Cai, Wen-Gui; Xu, Shan-Nan; Huang, Zi-Rong; Qiu, Yong-Song

    2011-11-01

    Based on the marine ecological investigation in the coastal area of Beibu Gulf, Guangxi in September 2009, a GIS-based evaluation was conducted on the present status of ecological environment quality, including seawater quality, nutrient level, biomass, primary productivity, biodiversity, and ecological buffer capacity, in the area in autumn, and the integrated ecological risk index (ERI) was adopted to assess the risk of the coastal ecosystem in the Gulf. In September 2009, the study area had a better ecological environment quality. Most of the risk indicators were at medium or lower level, and the total area was overall at low ecological risk level. The ERI showed that there was an obvious spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of the ecological risk. The nearer to the harbors, the higher the risk was.

  10. Nutrient dynamics in tropical rivers, estuarine-lagoons, and coastal ecosystems along the eastern Hainan Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. H.; Liu, S. M.; Li, Y. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Ren, J. L.; Zhang, J.

    2013-06-01

    Nutrient dynamics were studied along the eastern Hainan Island based on field observations during 2006-2009, to understand nutrient biogeochemical processes and to have an overview of human perturbations on coastal ecosystems in this tropical region. The concentrations of nutrients in the rivers had seasonal variations enriched with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). High riverine concentrations of nitrate were mainly originated from agricultural fertilizer input. The ratios of DIN : PO43- ranged from 37 to 1063, suggesting preferential PO43- relative to nitrogen in the rivers. The areal yields of dissolved silicate (DSi) varied from 76 to 448 × 103 mol km-2 yr-1 due to erosion over the drainage area, inducing high levels of DSi among worldwide tropical systems. Aquaculture ponds contained high concentrations of NH4+ (up to 157 μM) and DON (up to 130 μM). Particulate phosphorus concentrations (0.5 ∼1.4 μM) were in lower level comparied with estuaries around the world. Particulate silicate levels in rivers and lagoons were lower than global average level. Nutrient biogeochemistry in coastal areas were affected by human activities (e.g. aquaculture, agriculture), as well as natural events such as typhoon. Nutrient concentrations were low because open sea water dispersed land-derived nutrients. Nutrient budgets were built based on a steady-state box model, which showed that riverine fluxes would be magnified by estuarine processes (e.g. regeneration, desorption) in the Wenchanghe/Wenjiaohe Estuary, Wanquan River estuary, and the Laoyehai Lagoon except in the Xiaohai Lagoon. Riverine and groundwater input were the major sources of nutrients to the Xiaohai Lagoon and the Laiyehai Lagoon, respectively. Riverine input and aquaculture effluent were the major sources of nutrients to the eastern coastal of Hainan Island. Nutrient inputs to the coastal ecosystem can be increased by typhoon-induced runoff of rainwater, and phytoplankton bloom in the sea would be

  11. Nutrient dynamics in tropical rivers, lagoons, and coastal ecosystems of eastern Hainan Island, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. H.; Liu, S. M.; Li, Y. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Ren, J. L.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient dynamics based on field observations made along the eastern Hainan Island during the period 2006-2009 were investigated to understand nutrient biogeochemical processes, and to provide an overview of human perturbations of coastal ecosystems in this tropical region. The rivers showed seasonal variations in nutrient concentrations, with enrichment of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved silicate, and depletion of PO43-. High riverine concentrations of nitrate mainly originated from agricultural fertilizer inputs. The DIN : PO43- ratios ranged from 37 to 1063, suggesting preferential depletion of PO43- relative to nitrogen in rivers. Chemical weathering in the drainage area might explain the high levels of dissolved silicate. Aquaculture ponds contained high concentrations of NH4+ and dissolved organic nitrogen. The particulate phosphorus concentrations in the study area were lower than those reported for estuaries worldwide. The particulate silicate levels in rivers and lagoons were lower than the global average level. Nutrient biogeochemistry in coastal areas was affected by human activities (e.g., aquaculture, agriculture), and by natural phenomena including typhoons. The nutrient concentrations in coastal waters were low because of dispersion of land-derived nutrients in the sea. Nutrient budgets were built based on a steady-state box model, which showed that riverine fluxes are magnified by estuarine processes (e.g., regeneration, desorption) in estuaries and Laoyehai Lagoon, but not in Xiaohai Lagoon. Riverine and groundwater inputs were the major sources of nutrients to Xiaohai and Laoyehai lagoons, respectively, and riverine inputs and aquaculture effluents were the major sources for the eastern coast of Hainan Island. Nutrient inputs to the coastal ecosystem increased with typhoon-induced runoff of rainwater, elucidating the important influence of typhoons on small tropical rivers.

  12. Vitamin b(1) and b(12) uptake and cycling by plankton communities in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Koch, Florian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K; Goleski, Jennifer A; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio; Fisher, Nicholas S; Gobler, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    While vitamin B(12) has recently been shown to co-limit the growth of coastal phytoplankton assemblages, the cycling of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems is poorly understood as planktonic uptake rates of vitamins B(1) and B(12) have never been quantified in tandem in any aquatic ecosystem. The goal of this study was to establish the relationships between plankton community composition, carbon fixation, and B-vitamin assimilation in two contrasting estuarine systems. We show that, although B-vitamin concentrations were low (pM), vitamin concentrations and uptake rates were higher within a more eutrophic estuary and that vitamin B(12) uptake rates were significantly correlated with rates of primary production. Eutrophic sites hosted larger bacterial and picoplankton abundances with larger carbon normalized vitamin uptake rates. Although the >2 μm phytoplankton biomass was often dominated by groups with a high incidence of vitamin auxotrophy (dinoflagellates and diatoms), picoplankton (<2 μm) were always responsible for the majority of B(12)-vitamin uptake. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary users of vitamins among the picoplankton during this study. Nutrient/vitamin amendment experiments demonstrated that, in the Summer and Fall, vitamin B(12) occasionally limited or co-limited the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass together with nitrogen. Combined with prior studies, these findings suggest that picoplankton are the primary producers and users of B-vitamins in some coastal ecosystems and that rapid uptake of B-vitamins by heterotrophic bacteria may sometimes deprive larger phytoplankton of these micronutrients and thus influence phytoplankton species succession.

  13. Vitamin B1 and B12 Uptake and Cycling by Plankton Communities in Coastal Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Florian; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K.; Goleski, Jennifer A.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    While vitamin B12 has recently been shown to co-limit the growth of coastal phytoplankton assemblages, the cycling of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems is poorly understood as planktonic uptake rates of vitamins B1 and B12 have never been quantified in tandem in any aquatic ecosystem. The goal of this study was to establish the relationships between plankton community composition, carbon fixation, and B-vitamin assimilation in two contrasting estuarine systems. We show that, although B-vitamin concentrations were low (pM), vitamin concentrations and uptake rates were higher within a more eutrophic estuary and that vitamin B12 uptake rates were significantly correlated with rates of primary production. Eutrophic sites hosted larger bacterial and picoplankton abundances with larger carbon normalized vitamin uptake rates. Although the >2 μm phytoplankton biomass was often dominated by groups with a high incidence of vitamin auxotrophy (dinoflagellates and diatoms), picoplankton (<2 μm) were always responsible for the majority of B12-vitamin uptake. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary users of vitamins among the picoplankton during this study. Nutrient/vitamin amendment experiments demonstrated that, in the Summer and Fall, vitamin B12 occasionally limited or co-limited the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass together with nitrogen. Combined with prior studies, these findings suggest that picoplankton are the primary producers and users of B-vitamins in some coastal ecosystems and that rapid uptake of B-vitamins by heterotrophic bacteria may sometimes deprive larger phytoplankton of these micronutrients and thus influence phytoplankton species succession. PMID:23091470

  14. Interacting coastal based ecosystem services: recreation and water quality in Puget Sound, WA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreitler, Jason; Papenfus, Michael; Byrd, Kristin; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    Coastal recreation and water quality are major contributors to human well-being in coastal regions. They can also interact, creating opportunities for ecosystem based management, ecological restoration, and water quality improvement that can positively affect people and the environment. Yet the effect of environmental quality on human behavior is often poorly quantified, but commonly assumed in coastal ecosystem service studies. To clarify this effect we investigate a water quality dataset for evidence that environmental condition partially explains variation in recreational visitation, our indicator of human behavior. In Puget Sound, WA, we investigate variation in visitation in both visitation rate and fixed effects (FE) models. The visitation rate model relates the differences in annual recreational visitation among parks to environmental conditions, park characteristics, travel cost, and recreational demand. In our FE model we control for all time-invariant unobserved variables and compare monthly variation at the park level to determine how water quality affects visitation during the summer season. The results of our first model illustrate how visitation relates to various amenities and costs. In the FE analysis, monthly visitation was negatively related to water quality while controlling for monthly visitation trends. This indicates people are responding to changes in water quality, and an improvement would yield an increase in the value of recreation. Together, these results could help in prioritizing water quality improvements, could assist the creation of new parks or the modification of existing recreational infrastructure, and provide quantitative estimates for the expected benefits from potential changes in recreational visitation and water quality improvements. Our results also provide an example of how recreational visitation can be quantified and used in ecosystem service assessments.

  15. Interacting coastal based ecosystem services: recreation and water quality in Puget Sound, WA.

    PubMed

    Kreitler, Jason; Papenfus, Michael; Byrd, Kristin; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    Coastal recreation and water quality are major contributors to human well-being in coastal regions. They can also interact, creating opportunities for ecosystem based management, ecological restoration, and water quality improvement that can positively affect people and the environment. Yet the effect of environmental quality on human behavior is often poorly quantified, but commonly assumed in coastal ecosystem service studies. To clarify this effect we investigate a water quality dataset for evidence that environmental condition partially explains variation in recreational visitation, our indicator of human behavior. In Puget Sound, WA, we investigate variation in visitation in both visitation rate and fixed effects (FE) models. The visitation rate model relates the differences in annual recreational visitation among parks to environmental conditions, park characteristics, travel cost, and recreational demand. In our FE model we control for all time-invariant unobserved variables and compare monthly variation at the park level to determine how water quality affects visitation during the summer season. The results of our first model illustrate how visitation relates to various amenities and costs. In the FE analysis, monthly visitation was negatively related to water quality while controlling for monthly visitation trends. This indicates people are responding to changes in water quality, and an improvement would yield an increase in the value of recreation. Together, these results could help in prioritizing water quality improvements, could assist the creation of new parks or the modification of existing recreational infrastructure, and provide quantitative estimates for the expected benefits from potential changes in recreational visitation and water quality improvements. Our results also provide an example of how recreational visitation can be quantified and used in ecosystem service assessments.

  16. Interacting Coastal Based Ecosystem Services: Recreation and Water Quality in Puget Sound, WA

    PubMed Central

    Kreitler, Jason; Papenfus, Michael; Byrd, Kristin; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    Coastal recreation and water quality are major contributors to human well-being in coastal regions. They can also interact, creating opportunities for ecosystem based management, ecological restoration, and water quality improvement that can positively affect people and the environment. Yet the effect of environmental quality on human behavior is often poorly quantified, but commonly assumed in coastal ecosystem service studies. To clarify this effect we investigate a water quality dataset for evidence that environmental condition partially explains variation in recreational visitation, our indicator of human behavior. In Puget Sound, WA, we investigate variation in visitation in both visitation rate and fixed effects (FE) models. The visitation rate model relates the differences in annual recreational visitation among parks to environmental conditions, park characteristics, travel cost, and recreational demand. In our FE model we control for all time-invariant unobserved variables and compare monthly variation at the park level to determine how water quality affects visitation during the summer season. The results of our first model illustrate how visitation relates to various amenities and costs. In the FE analysis, monthly visitation was negatively related to water quality while controlling for monthly visitation trends. This indicates people are responding to changes in water quality, and an improvement would yield an increase in the value of recreation. Together, these results could help in prioritizing water quality improvements, could assist the creation of new parks or the modification of existing recreational infrastructure, and provide quantitative estimates for the expected benefits from potential changes in recreational visitation and water quality improvements. Our results also provide an example of how recreational visitation can be quantified and used in ecosystem service assessments. PMID:23451067

  17. Contribution of Cultural Ecosystem Services to Natural Capital in the coastal area of Civitavecchia (Latium, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, Marco; Madonia, Alice; Tofani, Anna; Molino, Chiara; Manfredi Frattarelli, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Natural Capital evaluation is emerging as a fundamental tool to support the management of natural resources. Indeed, the achievement of the compatibility among their multiple uses, often in conflict in coastal areas, is a priority to avoid the increasing undesirable effects which threat both ecosystems and human health and well-being. It represents the scientific basis for actions needed to enhance the conservation and sustainable use of those systems and their contribution to human well-being. Furthermore the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (called by Kofi Annan in 2000), assessed the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being, and in particular, the analysis method has been centered on the linkages between "ecosystem services" and human well-being. This "Ecosystem Approach" allows to evaluate the consequences of ecosystems changes on human well-being through the assessment of the Ecosystem Services (ES), which are defined as "the benefits that people obtain from ecosystems". These include provisioning services (food, water, timber, etc.), regulating services (climate, floods, disease, etc.); cultural services (recreational, aesthetic and spiritual benefits) and supporting services (soil formation, photosynthesis, nutrient cycling, etc.) Also the reference guidelines for European Environmental Policy (Marine Strategy Framework Directive 2008/56 / EC - MSFD; Maritime Spatial Planning Directive 2014/89 / EC - MSP) are based on the principle of the Ecosystem Approach to define the monitoring criteria of marine and maritime space management ecosystems. The assessment of ES provided by Natural Capital cannot overlook the integration of ecological data with economic and socio-cultural ones, since they are considered as the direct and indirect contributions to human well-being provided by ecosystems. Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES), often omitted in the cost-benefit impact studies, has been receiving increasing interest from the scientific community in order

  18. Embedding ecosystem services in coastal planning leads to better outcomes for people and nature.

    PubMed

    Arkema, Katie K; Verutes, Gregory M; Wood, Spencer A; Clarke-Samuels, Chantalle; Rosado, Samir; Canto, Maritza; Rosenthal, Amy; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Guannel, Gregory; Toft, Jodie; Faries, Joe; Silver, Jessica M; Griffin, Robert; Guerry, Anne D

    2015-06-16

    Recent calls for ocean planning envision informed management of social and ecological systems to sustain delivery of ecosystem services to people. However, until now, no coastal and marine planning process has applied an ecosystem-services framework to understand how human activities affect the flow of benefits, to create scenarios, and to design a management plan. We developed models that quantify services provided by corals, mangroves, and seagrasses. We used these models within an extensive engagement process to design a national spatial plan for Belize's coastal zone. Through iteration of modeling and stakeholder engagement, we developed a preferred plan, currently under formal consideration by the Belizean government. Our results suggest that the preferred plan will lead to greater returns from coastal protection and tourism than outcomes from scenarios oriented toward achieving either conservation or development goals. The plan will also reduce impacts to coastal habitat and increase revenues from lobster fishing relative to current management. By accounting for spatial variation in the impacts of coastal and ocean activities on benefits that ecosystems provide to people, our models allowed stakeholders and policymakers to refine zones of human use. The final version of the preferred plan improved expected coastal protection by >25% and more than doubled the revenue from fishing, compared with earlier versions based on stakeholder preferences alone. Including outcomes in terms of ecosystem-service supply and value allowed for explicit consideration of multiple benefits from oceans and coasts that typically are evaluated separately in management decisions.

  19. The effects of spilled oil on coastal ecosystems: Lessons from the Exxon Valdez spill: Chapter 11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, James L.; Esler, Daniel N.; Rice, Stanley D.; Matkin, Craig O.; Ballachey, Brenda E.; Maslo, Brooke; Lockwood, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Oil spilled from ships or other sources into the marine environment often occurs in close proximity to coastlines, and oil frequently accumulates in coastal habitats. As a consequence, a rich, albeit occasionally controversial, body of literature describes a broad range of effects of spilled oil across several habitats, communities, and species in coastal environments. This statement is not to imply that spilled oil has less of an effect in pelagic marine ecosystems, but rather that marine spills occurring offshore may be less likely to be detected, and associated effects are more difficult to monitor, evaluate, and quantify (Peterson et al., 2012). As a result, we have a much greater awareness of coastal pollution, which speaks to our need to improve our capacities in understanding the ecology of the open oceans. Conservation of coastal ecosystems and assessment of risks associated with oil spills can be facilitated through a better understanding of processes leading to direct and indirect responses of species and systems to oil exposure.It is also important to recognize that oil spilled from ships represents only ~9% of the nearly 700 000 barrels of petroleum that enter waters of North America annually from anthropogenic sources (NRC, 2003). The immediate effects of large spills can be defined as acute, due to the obvious and dramatic effects that are observed. In contrast, the remaining 625 000 barrels that are released each year can be thought of as chronic non-point pollution, resulting from oil entering the coastal ocean as runoff in a more consistent but much less conspicuous rate. In this chapter, we primarily address the effects of large oil spills that occur near coastlines and consider their potential for both acute and chronic effects on coastal communities. As described below, in some instances, the effects from chronic exposure may meet or exceed the more evident acute effects from large spills. Consequently, although quantifying chronic effects

  20. [Resistance of microorganisms of coastal ecosystems of the Dead Sea to extremal factors].

    PubMed

    Romanovskaia, V A; Avdeeva, L V; Gladka, G V; Pritula, I R; Kharkhota, M A; Tashirev, A B

    2013-01-01

    Such extreme factors as UV radiation, high temperature and salinity, and also the small amount of accessible water have an influence on microorganisms of coastal ecosystems of the Dead Sea. Resistance to these factors of the microorganisms isolated from ecosystems of this region (vertical steep gorge around the Dead Sea, clay-salt plain and black highly mineralized muds) is studied. Aerobic, chemoorganotrophic, thermotolerant, moderately halophilic bacteria which, according to their morphological and physiological properties, are similar to species Gracilibacillus halotolerans, Salimicrobium album and genus Caryophanon have been isolated from these ecosystems. All strains grew at 0-10% of NaCl in the medium (one strain--at 15% of NaCl), in the range of 30-50 degrees C. Resistance to UV radiation has been revealed in all the investigated bacteria Lethal doses of UV (LD90 and LD99.99) for spore-forming strains of genus Gracilibacillus were 100-170 and 1100-1500 J/m2, respectively; for strain Salimicrobium 6t1 (does not form spores)--70 and 400 J/m2; for the strain lt4 (genus Caryophanon), forming filamentous (or trychomes)--150 and 1400 J/m2. Some strains of genus Gracilibacillus had strong antagonistic effect on conditionally pathogenic test cultures Staphylococcus aureus 209p and Candida albicans UCM Y-690. It is conceivable that resistance of microorganisms of coastal ecosystems of the Dead Sea to extreme factors was generated under the influence of abiotic (physical and chemical) factors typical of this region.

  1. Managing wastewater effluent to enhance aquatic receiving ecosystem productivity: a coastal lagoon in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daniel A; Imberger, Jörg

    2012-05-30

    Large amounts of waste are generated in urban centers that if properly managed could promote ecological services. In order to promote nutrient cycling and productivity without endangering aquatic ecosystems, management of wastewater treatment and effluent discharges to receiving waters must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. We applied this premise to examine a municipal wastewater treated effluent discharge in a shallow oligotrophic coastal lagoon in Western Australia. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic-ecological modeling (ELCOM-CAEDYM) was used to assess the reaction of ecosystem for effluent quality. Two scenarios were evaluated for the summer 2000-2001 period, the actual or "current" (conventional secondary treatment) and an "alternative" (involving substitution of biological nutrient removal by advanced treatment). The residence time of the simulated numerical domain averaged 8.4 ± 1.3 days. For the current scenario the model successfully estimated phytoplankton biomass, as chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a), that is within field-measured ranges and previously recorded levels. The model was able to reproduce nitrogen as the main limiting nutrient for primary production in the coastal ecosystem. Simulated surface Chl-a means were 0.26 (range 0.19-0.38) μg Chl-a/L for the current scenario and 0.37 (range 0.19-0.67) μg Chl-a/L for the alternative one. Comparison of the alternative scenario with field-measured Chl-a levels suggests moderate primary production increase (16-42%), within local historical variability. These results, suggest that such a scenario could be used, as part of a comprehensive wastewater management optimization strategy, to foster receiving ecosystem's productivity and related ecological services maintaining its oligotrophic state.

  2. Primary production of coral ecosystems in the Vietnamese coastal and adjacent marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tac-An, Nguyen; Minh-Thu, Phan; Cherbadji, I. I.; Propp, M. V.; Odintsov, V. S.; Propp, L. H.

    2013-11-01

    Coral reef ecosystems in coastal waters and islands of Vietnam have high primary production. Average gross primary production (GPP) in coral reef waters was 0.39 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of corals ranged from 3.12 to 4.37 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of benthic microalgae in coral reefs ranged from 2 to 10 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of macro-algae was 2.34 g C m-2 day-1. Therefore, the total of GPP of whole coral reef ecosystems could reach 7.85 to 17.10 g C m-2 day-1. Almost all values of the ratio of photosynthesis to respiration in the water bodies are higher than 1, which means these regions are autotrophic systems. Wire variation of GPP in coral reefs was contributed by species abundance of coral and organisms, nutrient supports and environmental characteristics of coral ecosystems. Coral reefs play an important ecological role of biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in waters around the reefs. These results contribute valuable information for the protection, conservation and sustainable exploitation of the natural resources in coral reef ecosystems in Vietnam.

  3. Environmental conditions and pesticide pollution of two coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Reyes, G G; Villagrana L, C; Alvarez, G L

    1999-11-01

    In December 1997 and April and September 1998, water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and pesticide residues were determined in two coastal ecosystems of Sinaloa, NW Mexico: Ensenada del Pabellón and Bahía de Santa María. These two are considered to be among the greatest shrimp producers in the region. Temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen were similar to those of other ecosystems of this region: high temperatures and salinity in spring and summer (dry season) and lower in winter and the rainy season. Levels of nitrites and phosphates and chlorophyll concentration were relatively higher than those of other ecosystems nearby, probably due to fertilizers used in the agricultural lands surrounding the water bodies studied. The pesticides more frequently detected were BHCalpha, aldrin, endosulfan and parathion. In some cases, pesticides forbidden by Mexican regulations were detected. These results indicate that the ecosystems studied are in a warning condition, because severe biochemical and physiological alterations have been reported in crustaceans exposed to pesticides. Therefore these pesticides could be one cause of the slow growth, diverse pathologies, and mortality in shrimp that have been reported in recent years.

  4. Land-margin ecosystem hydrologic data for the coastal Everglades, Florida, water years 1996-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Gordon H.; Smith, Thomas J.; Balentine, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests and salt marshes dominate the landscape of the coastal Everglades (Odum and McIvor, 1990). However, the ecological effects from potential sea-level rise and increased water flows from planned freshwater Everglades restoration on these coastal systems are poorly understood. The National Park Service (NPS) proposed the South Florida Global Climate Change Project (SOFL-GCC) in 1990 to evaluate climate change and the effect from rising sea levels on the coastal Everglades, particularly at the marsh/mangrove interface or ecotone (Soukup and others, 1990). A primary objective of SOFL-GCC project was to monitor and synthesize the hydrodynamics of the coastal Everglades from the upstream freshwater marsh to the downstream estuary mangrove. Two related hypotheses were set forward (Nuttle and Cosby, 1993): 1. There exists hydrologic conditions (tide, local rainfall, and upstream water deliveries), which characterize the location of the marsh/mangrove ecotone along the marine and terrestrial hydrologic gradient; and 2. The marsh/mangrove ecotone is sensitive to fluctuations in sea level and freshwater inflow from inland areas. Hydrologic monitoring of the SOFL-GCC network began in 1995 after startup delays from Hurricane Andrew (August 1992) and organizational transfers from the NPS to the National Biological Survey (October 1993) and the merger with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biological Research Division in 1996 (Smith, 2004). As the SOFL-GCC project progressed, concern by environmental scientists and land managers over how the diversion of water from Everglades National Park would affect the restoration of the greater Everglades ecosystem. Everglades restoration scenarios were based on hydrodynamic models, none of which included the coastal zone (Fennema and others, 1994). Modeling efforts were expanded to include the Everglades coastal zone (Schaffranek and others, 2001) with SOFL-GCC hydrologic data assisting the ecological modeling needs. In 2002

  5. Assessing the impact of edaphic factors on coastal ecosystem functions in a tropical island using electromagnetic-induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, N. E.; Wuddivira, M.; Oatham, M.

    2013-12-01

    The small islands in the low-lying states of the Caribbean Basin are among the most vulnerable to sea level rise caused by climate change. Bequia, a tropical Grenadine island, is particularly susceptible due to its small land mass, limited natural resources and an economy that is touristic and marine based. Consultation with stakeholders on sustainable livelihoods revealed that degradation of the coastal ecosystem is occurring with progressing time. Consequently, the island is losing its beneficial ecosystem services and its natural attractiveness leading to declining revenue base, increasing food security risk and job losses. We propose that with sea level rise, soil salinity increases further inland leading to degradation of coastal zones and ecosystem functions. Using geophysical techniques and standard sampling procedures we observationally investigated the spatial and temporal impacts of soil salinization due to sea level changes on the ecosystem functions of five coastal areas in the seven square mile island of Bequia. We analyzed soil, tidal, rainfall data and historical aerial imagery to assess the impact of soil salinity on the ecosystem of Bequia. Our results show extreme seasonal salinity variability with increased salinity inland during the dry season months of January to May. This was significantly influenced by the fluctuation of seasonal water content and temperature. A complete time-based analysis ensures the development of adaptation strategies to coastal change for sustainable provisioning of ecosystem services for Bequia and other Caribbean Islands with minimum ecological and economic losses.

  6. The numerical simulation features of the extreme surge occurred in the Sea of Azov on 2013/03/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Vladimir; Diansky, Nikolay; Gusev, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the strong cyclone passed on 2013/03/24 over the southern part of European Russia and contributed to the formation of the strong southwest wind with speeds up to 22 m/s, the east-directed surge wave appeared in the Sea of Azov. The wind surge caused the sea surface height (SSH) rise in the eastern part of the Taganrog Bay. In the observation series for 1881-2013, due to the 3-meter difference between maximum and minimum SSH near Taganrog, the surge happened on 2013/03/24 takes the second position. With using numerical simulation, its reproduction was carried out to study the formation features and find out the requirements for the precision of simulating atmospheric and marine circulation in the Sea of Azov. For this purpose, the three versions of Azov Sea circulation model were implemented on the basis of the ocean circulation model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model), their spatial resolutions are 4 km, 1 km and 250 m. For setting realistic atmospheric forcing over the Sea of Azov, three data types were used: ERA-Interim reanalysis (spatial resolution is 0.75°) and the simulation results of the two regional atmospheric circulation models: RegCM (Regional Climate Model, spatial resolution is 20 km) and WRF (Weather Research Forecast, spatial resolution is 10 km). The main factors of atmospheric forcing forming the extreme sea surges are wind and sea level pressure (SLP). It was shown that only the simulation of the atmospheric forcing with high spatial resolution using the non-hydrostatic WRF model allows one to reproduce the extreme surge with an acceptable accuracy. At the same time, the quality of simulating non-extreme SSH oscillations does not depend on the type of used atmospheric forcing so much, as for extreme ones. It was also shown that increasing the spatial resolution of the INMOM improves the simulation of extreme surge temporal evolution, especially in coastal areas. However, its magnitude is affected by the INMOM

  7. The future of coastal upwelling ecosystems: the impact of potential wind changes on ocean acidification and coastal hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachkar, Z.; Gruber, N.

    2012-04-01

    The upwelling of deep, low pH, and low oxygen water to the surface makes eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) naturally prone to global change induced perturbations such as ocean acidification and ocean deoxygentation related to decreased ocean ventilation. The severity of these chemical perturbations may further be exacerbated in EBUS by the potential increase in upwelling favorable winds induced by global warming. Here, we explore the impact of upwelling-favorable wind changes on modern and future ocean acidification and coastal hypoxia through a comparative study of the California Current System (California CS) and the Canary Current System (Canary CS). To this end, we undertook a series of idealized wind perturbation studies for present-day and year 2050 conditions with eddy-resolving setups of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System - ROMS- to which a nitrogen-based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Detritus-Zooplankton (NPDZ) biogeochemical model was coupled. Our results show that the increase of upwelling favorable winds leads to a substantial shoaling of the hypoxic boundary in the California CS, while the same wind perturbation results in a reduction of the hypoxic water volume in the Canary CS. This is because coastal hypoxia is driven by local remineralization of organic matter on the shelf in the Canary CS, while it is essentially driven by large-scale advection of low oxygen water in the California CS. The intensification of upwelling tends to acerbate ocean acidification in the surface ocean, but mediates it below it, leading to complex change pattern reflecting the intricate interplay between biologically and physically -driven changes in calcium carbonate saturation state. Additionally, our results reveal differential biogeochemical responses to upwelling intensification in the water column and on the continental shelf with, therefore, contrasting implications for the benthic and the pelagic communities of these ecosystems.

  8. Nitrogen Flux in Watersheds: The Role of Soil Distributions in Nitrogen Flux to the Coastal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, W. J.; Gurley, W.; O'Conner, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying the flux of nitrate from different landscape sources in watersheds is important to understand the increased flux of nitrogen to coastal ecosystems. The RiverNet program has measured the nitrate flux in the Neuse River Basin, NC on a 15 minute interval over the past ten years. Discharge and N flux in the basin also has significant inter-annual variations associated with El Nino oscillations modified by the North Atlantic oscillation. To understand how climate oscillations affect discharge and nutrient fluxes, we have continuously mapped nitrate concentrations, with Chlorophyll a and CDOM to understand how nitrogen is transported across landscapes to the coastal ecosystems. Hydric soil spatial distributions are an excellent predictor of nutrient transport in watersheds, and are related to the distribution of biogeochemical “hotspots”. Detailed spatial analysis indicates that nitrate, Chlorophyll a, and CDOM are not spatially coherent and one concentration cannot be used to predict the distribution of the other parameters as suggested by some regulatory agencies. These results also indicate that the contribution of wastewater treatment plants from urban watersheds has been greatly under-estimated in current models while the transport of agricultural nitrogen is controlled by hydric soil distributions and riparian buffer size. Prediction of future changes in discharge and nutrient flux by the modeling of climate oscillations has important implications for water resources policy and drought management for public policy and utility managers.

  9. A Model for Experiential Learning: Coastal Ecosystems of Micronesia in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, A. E.; Ladd, N.; Sachs, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    An intensive undergraduate course taught in Pohnpei (Federated States of Micronesia) June 22nd - July 19, 2013 through the University of Washington Study Abroad Program allowed students to intimately explore estuary, mangrove, seagrass, and coral habitat from a systems perspective. The curriculum was developed in 2010 and 2011 during a similar course taught in nearby Kosrae (Federated States of Micronesia). The course was based on field surveys of several sites from each habitat with assistance from local non-profit groups and Pohnpei government partners. Field surveys were supplemented by lectures from these local agencies or the course instructors. Classroom activities explored the connectivity of coastal ecosystems and how each habitat may be impacted by climate change. The instructors' tropical paleoclimate research objectives further supplemented the curriculum. Additionally, cultural activities facilitated an understanding of social interactions with coastal ecosystems. Students wrote field reports for each habitat and communicated the data to local agencies in an oral presentation. The class activities allowed students to engage in data analysis, interpretation, and communication while being immersed in the unique culture and environment of Micronesia.

  10. Invasive grasses, climate change, and exposure to storm-wave overtopping in coastal dune ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Seabloom, Eric W; Ruggiero, Peter; Hacker, Sally D; Mull, Jeremy; Zarnetske, Phoebe

    2013-03-01

    The world's coastal habitats are critical to human well-being, but are also highly sensitive to human habitat alterations and climate change. In particular, global climate is increasing sea levels and potentially altering storm intensities, which may result in increased risk of flooding in coastal areas. In the Pacific Northwest (USA), coastal dunes that protect the coast from flooding are largely the product of a grass introduced from Europe over a century ago (Ammophila arenaria). An introduced congener (A. breviligulata) is displacing A. arenaria and reducing dune height. Here we quantify the relative exposure to storm-wave induced dune overtopping posed by the A. breviligulata invasion in the face of projected multi-decadal changes in sea level and storm intensity. In our models, altered storm intensity was the largest driver of overtopping extent, however the invasion by A. breviligulata tripled the number of areas vulnerable to overtopping and posed a fourfold larger exposure than sea-level rise over multi-decadal time scales. Our work demonstrates the importance of a transdisciplinary approach that draws on insights from ecology, geomorphology, and civil engineering to assess the vulnerability of ecosystem services in light of global change. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Follicular apoptosis in the mussel (Mytella strigata) as potential indicator of environmental stress in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gasca, Alejandra; Leal-Tarin, Beatriz; Rios-Sicairos, Julian; Hernandez-Cornejo, Rubi; Aguilar-Zarate, Gabriela; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Follicular apoptosis in the tropical mussel Mytella strigata was assessed in three coastal lagoons located in the southern Gulf of California, Mexico. Mussels were collected from three coastal lagoons associated with different scenarios of anthropogenic stress during one year. The gonad of each mussel was dissected, weighed, and sampled for histology and apoptosis analysis by TUNEL labeling. Two apoptotic indices were used: the apoptotic index of cells (AIC) based on the number of follicular cells in apoptosis in one thousand cells counted per gonad, and the apoptotic index of follicles (AIF) based on the number of follicular cells per follicle per gonad. Both indices showed high association with each other for all developmental stages, although AIF seemed to better discriminate among sites. Higher AIF and AIC were observed at the Urias Estuary (1.6 and 1.5 respectively) ranked as highly polluted, followed by Ensenada del Pabellon (0.82 and 0.95 respectively), ranked as moderately polluted, and the Teacapan Estuary (0.57 and 0.76 respectively) ranked as slightly polluted. Our data indicate that the apoptotic index in tropical mussels could be a useful indicator of environmental stress in coastal ecosystems; however, the ecological relevance of follicular apoptosis in polluted environments needs further investigation.

  12. Ecosystem resilience and threshold response in the Galápagos coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Alistair W R; Froyd, Cynthia A; Leng, Melanie J; Milne, Glenn A; Willis, Katherine J

    2011-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a conservative estimate on rates of sea-level rise of 3.8 mm yr(-1) at the end of the 21(st) century, which may have a detrimental effect on ecologically important mangrove ecosystems. Understanding factors influencing the long-term resilience of these communities is critical but poorly understood. We investigate ecological resilience in a coastal mangrove community from the Galápagos Islands over the last 2700 years using three research questions: What are the 'fast and slow' processes operating in the coastal zone? Is there evidence for a threshold response? How can the past inform us about the resilience of the modern system? Palaeoecological methods (AMS radiocarbon dating, stable carbon isotopes (δ(13)C)) were used to reconstruct sedimentation rates and ecological change over the past 2,700 years at Diablas lagoon, Isabela, Galápagos. Bulk geochemical analysis was also used to determine local environmental changes, and salinity was reconstructed using a diatom transfer function. Changes in relative sea level (RSL) were estimated using a glacio-isostatic adjustment model. Non-linear behaviour was observed in the Diablas mangrove ecosystem as it responded to increased salinities following exposure to tidal inundations. A negative feedback was observed which enabled the mangrove canopy to accrete vertically, but disturbances may have opened up the canopy and contributed to an erosion of resilience over time. A combination of drier climatic conditions and a slight fall in RSL then resulted in a threshold response, from a mangrove community to a microbial mat. Palaeoecological records can provide important information on the nature of non-linear behaviour by identifying thresholds within ecological systems, and in outlining responses to 'fast' and 'slow' environmental change between alternative stable states. This study highlights the need to incorporate a long-term ecological perspective when

  13. Uncovering the volatile nature of tropical coastal marine ecosystems in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Exton, Dan A; McGenity, Terry J; Steinke, Michael; Smith, David J; Suggett, David J

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), in particular dimethyl sulphide (DMS) and isoprene, have fundamental ecological, physiological and climatic roles. Our current understanding of these roles is almost exclusively established from terrestrial or oceanic environments but signifies a potentially major, but largely unknown, role for BVOCs in tropical coastal marine ecosystems. The tropical coast is a transition zone between the land and ocean, characterized by highly productive and biodiverse coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangroves, which house primary producers that are amongst the greatest emitters of BVOCs on the planet. Here, we synthesize our existing understanding of BVOC emissions to produce a novel conceptual framework of the tropical marine coast as a continuum from DMS-dominated reef producers to isoprene-dominated mangroves. We use existing and previously unpublished data to consider how current environmental conditions shape BVOC production across the tropical coastal continuum, and in turn how BVOCs can regulate environmental stress tolerance or species interactions via infochemical networks. We use this as a framework to discuss how existing predictions of future tropical coastal BVOC emissions, and the roles they play, are effectively restricted to present day 'baseline' trends of BVOC production across species and environmental conditions; as such, there remains a critical need to focus research efforts on BVOC responses to rapidly accelerating anthropogenic impacts at local and regional scales. We highlight the complete lack of current knowledge required to understand the future ecological functioning of these important systems, and to predict whether feedback mechanisms are likely to regulate or exacerbate current climate change scenarios through environmentally and ecologically mediated changes to BVOC budgets at the ecosystem level. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Impact of groundwater use as heat energy on coastal ecosystem and fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Demands for groundwater as a heat energy source to melt snow is increasing in many coastal snowy areas in Japan because of the lack of laborers for snow removal and the abundance of groundwater resources. The temperature of groundwater is relatively higher in winter than that of the air and river water, therefore it is a useful heat source to melt snow. However, groundwater is also beneficial for the coastal ecosystem and fishery production because of the nutrient discharge by submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), which is one of the water and dissolved material pathways from land to the ocean. Therefore, groundwater is involved in the tradeoff and management conflict existing between energy and food (fisheries). In this study, the impact of groundwater, used as a heat energy source for the melting of snow accumulated on roads, on the coastal ecosystem and fisheries has been analyzed in the snowy areas of Obama City, Fukui Prefecture, Japan. Positive correlation has been found between primary production rates in Obama Bay and radon concentrations which show the magnitude of the submarine groundwater discharge. Therefore, the increase in groundwater pumping on land reduces fishery production in the ocean. Results of 3D numerical simulations of the basin scale groundwater model show a reduction of SGD by 5 percent due to an increase in groundwater pumping by 1.5 times. This reduction of SGD caused a 3.7 ton decrease in fishery production under the aforementioned assumptions. The groundwater-energy-fishery nexus was found in Obama Bay, Japan and the tradeoff between water and food was evaluated.

  15. Oxygen: A Fundamental Property Regulating Pelagic Ecosystem Structure in the Coastal Southeastern Tropical Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Arnaud; Chaigneau, Alexis; Peraltilla, Salvador; Ledesma, Jesus; Graco, Michelle; Monetti, Florian; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2011-01-01

    Background In the southeastern tropical Pacific anchovy (Engraulis ringens) and sardine (Sardinops sagax) abundance have recently fluctuated on multidecadal scales and food and temperature have been proposed as the key parameters explaining these changes. However, ecological and paleoecological studies, and the fact that anchovies and sardines are favored differently in other regions, raise questions about the role of temperature. Here we investigate the role of oxygen in structuring fish populations in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem that has evolved over anoxic conditions and is one of the world's most productive ecosystems in terms of forage fish. This study is particularly relevant given that the distribution of oxygen in the ocean is changing with uncertain consequences. Methodology/Principal Findings A comprehensive data set is used to show how oxygen concentration and oxycline depth affect the abundance and distribution of pelagic fish. We show that the effects of oxygen on anchovy and sardine are opposite. Anchovy flourishes under relatively low oxygen conditions while sardine avoid periods/areas with low oxygen concentration and restricted habitat. Oxygen consumption, trophic structure and habitat compression play a fundamental role in fish dynamics in this important ecosystem. Conclusions/Significance For the ocean off Peru we suggest that a key process, the need to breathe, has been neglected previously. Inclusion of this missing piece allows the development of a comprehensive conceptual model of pelagic fish populations and change in an ocean ecosystem impacted by low oxygen. Should current trends in oxygen in the ocean continue similar effects may be evident in other coastal upwelling ecosystems. PMID:22216315

  16. Introducing mixotrophy into a biogeochemical model describing an eutrophied coastal ecosystem: The Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghyoot, Caroline; Lancelot, Christiane; Flynn, Kevin J.; Mitra, Aditee; Gypens, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    Most biogeochemical/ecological models divide planktonic protists between phototrophs (phytoplankton) and heterotrophs (zooplankton). However, a large number of planktonic protists are able to combine several mechanisms of carbon and nutrient acquisition. Not representing these multiple mechanisms in biogeochemical/ecological models describing eutrophied coastal ecosystems can potentially lead to different conclusions regarding ecosystem functioning, especially regarding the success of harmful algae, which are often reported as mixotrophic. This modelling study investigates, for the first time, the implications for trophic dynamics of including 3 contrasting forms of mixotrophy, namely osmotrophy (using alkaline phosphatase activity, APA), non-constitutive mixotrophy (acquired phototrophy by microzooplankton) and also constitutive mixotrophy. The application is in the Southern North Sea, an ecosystem that faced, between 1985 and 2005, a significant increase in the nutrient supply N:P ratio (from 31 to 81 mole N:P). The comparison with a traditional model shows that, when the winter N:P ratio in the Southern North Sea is above 22 molN molP-1 (as occurred from mid-1990s), APA allows a 3 to 32% increase of annual gross primary production (GPP). In result of the higher GPP, the annual sedimentation increases as well as the bacterial production. By contrast, APA does not affect the export of matter to higher trophic levels because the increased GPP is mainly due to Phaeocystis colonies, which are not grazed by copepods. The effect of non-constitutive mixotrophy depends on light and affects the ecosystem functioning in terms of annual GPP, transfer to higher trophic levels, sedimentation, and nutrient remineralisation. Constitutive mixotrophy in nanoflagellates appears to have little influence on this ecosystem functioning. An important conclusion from this work is that different forms of mixotrophy have different impacts on system dynamics and it is thus important to

  17. Marine Phytophthora species can hamper conservation and restoration of vegetated coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; Man In 't Veld, Willem A; Meffert, Johan P; Bouma, Tjeerd J; van Rijswick, Patricia C J; Heusinkveld, Jannes H T; Orth, Robert J; van Katwijk, Marieke M; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2016-08-31

    Phytophthora species are potent pathogens that can devastate terrestrial plants, causing billions of dollars of damage yearly to agricultural crops and harming fragile ecosystems worldwide. Yet, virtually nothing is known about the distribution and pathogenicity of their marine relatives. This is surprising, as marine plants form vital habitats in coastal zones worldwide (i.e. mangrove forests, salt marshes, seagrass beds), and disease may be an important bottleneck for the conservation and restoration of these rapidly declining ecosystems. We are the first to report on widespread infection of Phytophthora and Halophytophthora species on a common seagrass species, Zostera marina (eelgrass), across the northern Atlantic and Mediterranean. In addition, we tested the effects of Halophytophthora sp. Zostera and Phytophthora gemini on Z. marina seed germination in a full-factorial laboratory experiment under various environmental conditions. Results suggest that Phytophthora species are widespread as we found these oomycetes in eelgrass beds in six countries across the North Atlantic and Mediterranean. Infection by Halophytophthora sp. Zostera, P. gemini, or both, strongly affected sexual reproduction by reducing seed germination sixfold. Our findings have important implications for seagrass ecology, because these putative pathogens probably negatively affect ecosystem functioning, as well as current restoration and conservation efforts. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. SCOR Working Group 137: "Global Patterns of Phytoplankton Dynamics in Coastal Ecosystems": An introduction to the special issue of Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerl, Hans W.; Yin, Kedong; O'Brien, Todd D.

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton form the base of most aquatic food webs and play a central role in assimilation and processing of carbon and nutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorus, silicon, iron and a wide range of trace elements (Reynolds, 2006). In the marine environment, estuarine and coastal ecosystems (jointly termed coastal here) are among the most productive, resourceful and dynamic habitats on Earth (Malone et al., 1999; Day et al., 2012). These ecosystems constitute only ∼10% of the global oceans' surface, but account for over 30% of its primary production (Day et al., 2012). They process vast amounts of nutrients, sediments, carbonaceous, and xenobiotic compounds generated in coastal watersheds, in which approximately 70% of the world's human population resides (Nixon, 1995; Vitousek et al., 1997; NOAA, 2013). Estuarine and coastal ecosystems are also strongly influenced by localized nutrient enrichment from coastal upwelling, with major impacts on the structure and function of phytoplankton communities and the food webs they support (Legendre and Rassoulzadegan, 2012; Paerl and Justić, 2012). In addition, introductions and invasions of exotic plant and animal species have led to significant "top down" mediated changes in phytoplankton community structure and function (Carlton, 1999; Thompson, 2005). Lastly, the coastal zone is the "front line" of climatically-induced environmental change, including warming, altered rainfall patterns, intensities and magnitudes (Trenberth, 2005; IPCC, 2012), which jointly impact phytoplankton community structure and function (Cloern and Jassby, 2012; Hall et al., 2013). The combined effects of these pressures translate into a myriad of changes in phytoplankton production and community structure along geomorphological and geographic gradients (Fig. 1), with cascading quantitative and qualitative impacts on biogeochemical cycling, food web structure and function, water quality and overall resourcefulness and sustainability of these

  19. ROBUST: The ROle of BUffering capacities in STabilising coastal lagoon ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, Rutger; Stal, Lucas J.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.; Herbert, Rodney A.; van Gemerden, Hans; Viaroli, Pierluigi; Cecherelli, Victor-Ugo; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Bartoli, Marco; Giordani, Gianmarco; Azzoni, Roberta; Schaub, Bart; Welsh, David T.; Donnelly, Andrew; Cifuentes, Ana; Antón, Josefa; Finster, Kai; Nielsen, Lise B.; Pedersen, Anne-Grethe Underlien; Neubauer, Anne Turi; Colangelo, Marina A.; Heijs, Sander K.

    2001-12-01

    "Buffer capacities" has been defined in ecology as a holistic concept (e.g., Integration of Ecosystem Theories: A Pattern, second ed. Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1997, 388pp), but we show that it can also be worked out in mechanistic studies. Our mechanistic approach highlights that "buffering capacities" can be depleted progressively, and, therefore, we make a distinction between current and potential "buffering capacities". We have applied this concept to understand the limited "local stability" in seagrass ecosystems and their vulnerability towards structural changes into macro-algal dominated communities. We explored the following processes and studied how they confer buffering capacities to the seagrass ecosystem: (i) net autotrophy is persistent in Zostera noltii meadows where plant assimilation acts as a sink for nutrients, this contrasted with the Ulva system that shifted back and forth between net autotrophy and net heterotrophy; (ii) the Z. noltii ecosystem possesses a certain albeit rather limited capacity to modify the balance between nitrogen fixation and denitrification, i.e., it was found that in situ nitrogen fixation always exceeded denitrification; (iii) the nitrogen demand of organoheterotrophic bacteria in the sediment results in nitrogen retention of N in the sediment and hence a buffer against release of nitrogen compounds from sediments, (iv) habitat diversification in seagrass meadows provides shelter for meiofauna and hence buffering against adverse conditions, (v) sedimentary iron provides a buffer against noxious sulfide (note: bacterial sulfide production is enhanced in anoxic sediment niches by increased organic matter loading). On the other hand, in the coastal system we studied, sedimentary iron appears less important as a redox-coupled buffer system against phosphate loading. This is because most inorganic phosphate is bound to calcium rather than to iron. In addition, our studies have highlighted the importance of plant-microbe interactions

  20. Impacts of climate-driven changes on coastal lagoon ecosystem and related good and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solidoro, Cosimo; Libralato, Simone; Melaku Canu, Donata; Cossarini, Gianpiero; Giorgi, FIlippo

    2014-05-01

    Effects of IPCC climate change scenarios on a temperate coastal lagoon ecosystem, the lagoon of Venice (Italy), along with goods and services provided by this ecosystem are assessed though a downscaling experiment linking regional atmospheric model to local hydrodynamical, biogeochemical, ecosystem and target species population dynamic models. Simulations of spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical properties provide evidence of significant impacts of climate change. Under both the A2 and B2 scenarios we observe a modification of the seasonal precipitation pattern which affects the timing of nutrient inputs to the lagoon and causes a reduction in plankton productivity. Simulations indicate that this changes propagate -along the food web through a multi-path cascade and that overall ecosystem good and services resulting from climatic scenarios significantly differ depending on the dynamics of the extremes (yearly maximum) values. Changes in the nutrient load maximum discharge (scenario A2) favors primary producers that have higher maximum values (peaks) that propagate up in the food web to groups directly related to the grazing food chain. Conversely, small modifications of the timing of the nutrient peaks (as in B2 scenario) implies less exploitation of nutrients by primary producers due to temperature limitations and the enhancement of the groups in the food web that are more related to detritus-based food chain. This implies significant differences on on fisheries landings in future scenarios, even assuming same fishing effort.. Ecological indicators highlighted also divergent changes in food web biodiversity and complexity in the two future scenarios. Simulations also shows that economic activity directly related to target species, such as clam aquaculture activity will suffer , and point to the need for management policies to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change.

  1. Comparative dynamics of pelagic and benthic micro-algae in a coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arnab; Klein, Cécile; Naegelen, Aurore; Claquin, Pascal; Masson, Annick; Legoff, Manon; Amice, Erwan; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Chauvaud, Laurent; Leynaert, Aude

    2013-11-01

    Together with phytoplankton, microphytobenthos (MPB) play an important role in the overall food web structure of coastal ecosystems by regulating nutrient fluxes, oxygen concentration and sediment stability in the ecosystem. Although there are many studies on phytoplankton, MPB dynamics in the subtidal zone are largely unknown. In this study, we carried out a whole-year survey to investigate the seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton and MPB biomass simultaneously in relation to the environmental physico-chemical parameters. We show that phytoplankton and MPB do not follow the same dynamics with MPB being the first to increase in the season. It constitutes a large energy input to the ecosystem from the beginning of spring (with 60% of the total biomass until April). The system then moves from a system dominated by benthic biomass in early spring to a system where the pelagic biomass dominates. Among resources that MPB and phytoplankton have to share, light seems to trigger the MPB bloom as soon as maximum bottom PAR is reached, i.e. one month earlier than the phytoplankton bloom in the water column. With regard to nutrients, the lack of phosphorus can be put forward to explain the decline of MPB biomass at the beginning of April, whereas the phytoplankton decline in the first week of May coincides to silicic acid deficiency. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen then becomes potentially limiting in the water column until the end of October. Competition with macroalgae at the bottom and grazing were also considered as being possible factors for the disparate course of phytoplankton and MPB dynamics. Further investigations are needed to give a more detailed picture on the interactions and feedback loops between MPB and phytoplankton. However, although benthic-pelagic relationships are complex, this study indicates the need to integrate such fundamental coupling to a thorough understanding of ecosystem dynamics and functions.

  2. Fate of the Chinese river-transported carbon: Implication for carbon cycle in the coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Wen, X.; He, N.

    2016-12-01

    Rivers play an important part on C exchange between terrestrial and oceanic, and atmospheric environment. This study systematically qualifies the riverine C export and the C exchange fluxes in the air-sea interface in China's marine ecosystems. we systematically qualify (1) the riverine C export to the Chinese coastal ecosystem and the contributions of C transported from three major rivers to the adjacent coastal area, (2) evaluate the C exchange fluxes subject to the air-sea interface in China's marine ecosystems; and then (3) present a comprehensive analysis on the C cycling in the China seas as well as forecasting how this process will change as the climate change in the future. Based on our estimation, the annual C transport from the river systems to the oceanic bodies in China is 64.35 TgC. In Bohai Sea, the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) is the main form of C influx. The annual amount reaches up to annual 20.79 TgC, which is 65.7% of the total annual C input. In contrast, the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is the main form of C input to the East China Sea. The annual amount reaches up to 10.52 TgC, which is 42.6% of total annual C import. The three major river systems in China contribute 76.9% of the total C transport in China. In details, the Yellow River and the Yangtze River transport 21.71 TgC and 16.3 TgC annually, which accounts for 33.7% and 25.3% of the total annual C transport in China, respectively. The CO2 fluxes of the China seas exhibit great seasonal variations, wherein the winter and spring exhibit as a sink, and autumn and summer exhibit as a source. The China's marine ecosystems can absorb 65.06 TgC annually from the atmosphere. The China seas absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, except the Bohai Sea, which is showing annual net CO2 release. The annual net CO2 uptake from the Yellow Sea, the East China Sea, and the South China Sea are 5.69, 34.61, and 25.55 TgC, respectively.

  3. Petroleum geology of Azov-Black Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, A.; Trofimenko, G.

    1995-08-01

    The main features of tectonics, stratigraphy, paleogeography, lithology, hydrogeology, geothermics and hydrocarbon-bearingness of Azov-Black Sea Region are characterized on the basis of present-day data. Among the most prospective petroliferous complexes one ought to mention: Paleozoic (S - D - C{sub 1}) of Near-Dobrudga foredeep, Triassic - Jurassic of the Black Sea (shelf and continental slope); Lower Cretaceous of the various parts of the Region; Upper Cretaceous of the Black Sea shelf; Paleocene-Eocene of Azov Sea. In addition certain prospects are connected with Precambrian and Paleozoic basements within conjunction zone between Eastern-Europe platform and Scythian plate. Geodynamic evolution of the Region is considered with determination of tension and compression stages and characteristic of the main regularities of diapirs, mud volcanos, swells, horsts and grabens distribution. There determined the most interesting types of hydrocarbon traps connected with various tectonic forms, river and deltaic channels, bars, conturites, carbonate reefs, etc. Paleogeothermic and paleogeodynamic reconstructions allow to determine the main phases of oil and gas accumulation. The most prospective oil-gas-bearing zones and areas are mapped.

  4. Feeding ecology and trophic comparisons of six shark species in a coastal ecosystem off southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bornatowski, H; Braga, R R; Abilhoa, V; Corrêa, M F M

    2014-08-01

    The diets of six shark species, Sphyrna lewini, Sphyrna zygaena, Carcharhinus obscurus, Carcharhinus limbatus, Rhizoprionodon lalandii and Galeocerdo cuvier, were investigated in a subtropical coastal ecosystem of southern Brazil. Stomach content data were obtained to assess foraging niche segregation and ontogenetic shifts in the diets of these sharks. Five of the shark species off the Paraná coast were ichthyophagous, with the exception of S. zygaena, which was teutophagous. With the exception of G. cuvier, which had a generalist diet, the other five species displayed specialization in their feeding. Ontogenetic shifts were observed in C. obscurus and S. lewini with large individuals consuming elasmobranchs. Owing to the diet overlap between C. obscurus and S. lewini, C. obscurus and C. limbatus and R. lalandii and C. limbatus, future studies on the spatial and temporal distributions of these species are needed to understand the extent of competitive interactions.

  5. *d13C composition of primary producers and role of detritus in a freshwater coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keough, J.R.; Hagley, C.A.; Sierszen, M.

    1998-01-01

    Stable-isotope ratio signatures of primary producers in a coastal wetland and in adjacent offshore waters of western Lake Superior indicated that phytoplankton are the primary source of carbon for the grazing food web of this ecosystem. This study outlines the possible roles of other autotrophs in this regard. Isotopic signatures of macrophytes reflected their life-form-associated constraints on diffusion of inorganic carbon. Data indicated that differences between wetland and lake phytoplankton may be explained by the isotopic signatures of their dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) sources. Results of an in situ experiment showed that respiration associated with macrophyte decomposition is capable of enriching surrounding water with significant amounts of *d13C-depleted DIC and lowering the net *d13C ratio of DIC in water in low-turbulence situations. The *d13C ratio for wetland phytoplankton may be depleted relative to pelagic algae because the fixed carbon is derived from decomposing detritus.

  6. Guidelines, processes and tools for coastal ecosystem restoration, with examples from the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Adkins, Jeffery E.; Judd, Chaeli; Anderson, Michael G.; Buenau, Kate E.; Borde, Amy B.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to coastal restoration projects in five phases: planning, implementation, performance assessment, adaptive management, and dissemination of results. Twenty features of the iterative planning process are synthesized. The planning process starts with a vision, a description of the ecosystem and landscape, and goals. A conceptual model and planning objectives are developed, a site is selected using prioritization techniques, and numerical models contribute to preliminary designs as needed. Performance criteria and reference sites are selected and the monitoring program is designed. The monitoring program is emphasized as a tool to assess project performance and identify problems affecting progression toward project goals, in an adaptive management framework. Key approaches to aspects of the monitoring program are reviewed and detailed with project examples. Within the planning process, cost analysis involves budgeting, scheduling, and financing. Finally, documentation is peer reviewed prior to making construction plans and final costing.

  7. Evolving demand for ecosystem services and their impact in a coastal New England watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollheim, W. M.; Green, M. B.; Pellerin, B. A.; Duncan, J. M.; Gettel, G. M.; Hopkinson, C.; Polsky, C.; Pontius, R.

    2009-12-01

    Human demands for ecosystem services (e.g. provision of food and water; regulation of waste) change over space and time as society, economy, and environment evolve. The distribution of population relative to watershed boundaries determines supply and demand of ecosystem services, which in turn affects watershed water and nutrient budgets. A watershed perspective is helpful to assess whether such services are sustainable with respect to freshwater and coastal ecosystems. We determined how demand for three ecosystem services (ES): food production, clean water supply, and removal of excess nutrients has changed over the last two hundred years (1800-present) in the watersheds draining to Plum Island Sound (drainage area = ~600 km2), located in Essex County MA., part of the Boston Metropolitan Area. The watersheds have gone through three distinct phases of ES demand over this period: 1) provision of food and fiber during the agricultural period (1600-1800’s), 2) increasing provision of water during the period of forest regrowth and agricultural abandonment (1880 - 1950), and 3) regulation of nitrogen pollution and provision of water during the suburban period (1950-present). As a result of changing ES, net interbasin nitrogen transfers out of the basin peaked in the mid 1800’s, water exports peaked 1960-1980 (averaging 27% of annual runoff), and net nitrogen transfers into the basin peaked in the 1960’s and stabilized thereafter (averaging 2.5x atmospheric deposition rates). ES provided by the Plum Island basins disproportionately benefited people living outside the basin prior to 1950 (e.g. internal water use was < 10% of total water extracted for domestic consumption), but were increasingly used by people living within the basin in the late 20th century (e.g. internal water use about 25-30% of total withdrawal). However, demands for ES from the Plum Island watersheds have not been accelerating in the recent suburban period despite continued population growth

  8. Introducing mixotrophy into a biogeochemical model describing an eutrophied coastal ecosystem: The Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghyoot, Caroline; Lancelot, Christiane; Flynn, Kevin J.; Mitra, Aditee; Gypens, Nathalie

    2017-09-01

    Most biogeochemical/ecological models divide planktonic protists between phototrophs (phytoplankton) and heterotrophs (zooplankton). However, a large number of planktonic protists are able to combine several mechanisms of carbon and nutrient acquisition. Not representing these multiple mechanisms in biogeochemical/ecological models describing eutrophied coastal ecosystems can potentially lead to different conclusions regarding ecosystem functioning, especially regarding the success of harmful algae, which are often reported as mixotrophic. This modelling study investigates the implications for trophic dynamics of including 3 contrasting forms of mixotrophy, namely osmotrophy (using alkaline phosphatase activity, APA), non-constitutive mixotrophy (acquired phototrophy by microzooplankton) and also constitutive mixotrophy. The application is in the Southern North Sea, an ecosystem that faced, between 1985 and 2005, a significant increase in the nutrient supply N:P ratio (from 31 to 81 mol N:P). The comparison with a traditional model shows that, when the winter N:P ratio in the Southern North Sea is above 22 molN molP-1 (as occurred from mid-1990s), APA allows a 3-32% increase of annual gross primary production (GPP). In result of the higher GPP, the annual sedimentation increases as well as the bacterial production. By contrast, APA does not affect the export of matter to higher trophic levels because the increased GPP is mainly due to Phaeocystis colonies, which are not grazed by copepods. Under high irradiance, non-constitutive mixotrophy appreciably increases annual GPP, transfer to higher trophic levels, sedimentation, and nutrient remineralisation. In this ecosystem, non-constitutive mixotrophy is also observed to have an indirect stimulating effect on diatoms. Constitutive mixotrophy in nanoflagellates appears to have little influence on this ecosystem functioning. An important conclusion from this work is that contrasting forms of mixotrophy have different

  9. Degradation State and Sequestration Potential of Carbon in Coastal Wetlands of Texas: Mangrove Vs. Saltmarsh Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterne, A. M. E.; Kaiser, K.; Louchouarn, P.; Norwood, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The estimated magnitude of the organic carbon (OC) stocks contained in the first meter of US coastal wetland soils represents ~10% of the entire OC stock in US soils (4 vs. 52 Pg, respectively). Because this stock extends to several meters below the surface for many coastal wetlands, it becomes paramount to understand the fate of OC under ecosystem shifts, varying natural environmental constraints, and changing land use. In this project we analyze the major classes of biochemicals including total hydrolysable neutral carbohydrates, enantiomeric amino acids, phenols, and cutins/suberins at two study sites located on the Texas coastline to investigate chemical composition and its controls on organic carbon preservation in mangrove (Avicennia germinans) and saltmarsh grass (Spartina alterniflora) dominated wetlands. Results show neutral carbohydrates and lignin contribute 30-70% and 10-40% of total OC, respectively, in plant litter and surface sediments at both sites. Sharp declines of carbohydrate yields with depth occur parallel to increasing Ac/AlS,V ratios indicating substantial decomposition of both the polysaccharide and lignin components of litter detritus. Contrasts in the compositions and relative abundances of all previously mentioned compound classes are further discussed to examine the role of litter biochemistry in OC preservation. For example, the selective preservation of cellulose over hemicellulose in sediments indicates macromolecular structure plays a key role in preservation between plant types. It is concluded that the chemical composition of litter material controls the composition and magnitude of OC stored in sediments. Ultimately, as these ecosystems transition from one dominant plant type to another, as is currently observed along the Texas coastline, there is the potential for OC sequestration efficiency to shift due to the changing composition of OC input to sediments.

  10. Use of fish parasite species richness indices in analyzing anthropogenically impacted coastal marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzikowski, R.; Paperna, I.; Diamant, A.

    2003-10-01

    The diversity of fish parasite life history strategies makes these species sensitive bioindicators of aquatic ecosystem health. While monoxenous (single-host) species may persist in highly perturbed, extreme environments, this is not necessarily true for heteroxenous (multiple-host) species. As many parasites possess complex life cycles and are transmitted through a chain of host species, their dependency on the latter to complete their life cycles renders them sensitive to perturbed environments. In the present study, parasite communities of grey mullet Liza aurata and Liza ramada (Mugilidae) were investigated at two Mediterranean coastal sites in northern Israel: the highly polluted Kishon Harbor (KH) and the relatively unspoiled reference site, Ma'agan Michael (MM). Both are estuarine sites in which grey mullet are one of the most common fish species. The results indicate that fish at the polluted site had significantly less trematode metacercariae than fish at the reference site. Heteroxenous gut helminths were completely absent at the polluted sampling site. Consequently, KH fish displayed lower mean parasite species richness. At the same time, KH fish mean monoxenous parasite richness was higher, although the prevalence of different monoxenous taxa was variable. Copepods had an increased prevalence while monogenean prevalence was significantly reduced at the polluted site. This variability may be attributed to the differential susceptibility of the parasites to the toxicity of different pollutants, their concentration, the exposure time and possible synergistic effects. In this study, we used the cumulative species curve model that extrapolates "true" species richness of a given habitat as a function of increasing sample size. We considered the heteroxenous and monoxenous species separately for each site, and comparison of curves yielded significant results. It is proposed to employ this approach, originally developed for estimating the "true" parasite

  11. Mixed Layer Depth in the Aegean, Marmara, Black and Azov Seas: Part I: General Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-28

    r.com/ locate / jmarsysMixed layer depth in the Aegean, Marmara, Black and Azov Seas : Part I: General features A. Birol Kara a,⁎, Robert W. Helber a...suffer from lack of input T and S profiles in the Marmara and Azov Seas , thus they may not be representative.MonthlyMLDfields presented in this paper are...Boyer), .V.there has been no study which describes seasonal characteristics of MLD in the Aegean, Marmara, Black and Azov Seas , whose bottom

  12. Valuing the risk reduction of coastal ecosystems in data poor environments: an application in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reguero, B. G.; Toimil, A.; Escudero, M.; Menendez, P.; Losada, I. J.; Beck, M. W.; Secaira, F.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal risks are increasing from both economic growth and climate change. Understanding such risks is critical to assessing adaptation needs and finding cost effective solutions for coastal sustainability. Interest is growing in the role that nature-based measures can play in adapting to climate change. Here we apply and advance a framework to value the risk reduction potential of coastal ecosystems, with an application in a large scale domain, the coast of Quintana Roo, México, relevant for coastal policy and management, but with limited data. We build from simple to use open-source tools. We first assess the hazards using stochastic simulation of historical tropical storms and inferring two scenarios of future climate change for the next 20 years, which include the effect of sea level rise and changes in frequency and intensity of storms. For each storm, we obtain wave and surge fields using parametrical models, corrected with pre-computed static wind surge numerical simulations. We then assess losses on capital stock and hotels and calculate total people flooded, after accounting for the effect of coastal ecosystems in reducing coastal hazards. We inferred the location of major barrier reefs and dune systems using available satellite imagery, and sections of bathymetry and elevation data. We also digitalized the surface of beaches and location of coastal structures from satellite imagery. In a poor data environment, where there is not bathymetry data for the whole of the region, we inferred representative coastal profiles of coral reef and dune sections and validated at available sections with measured data. Because we account for the effect of reefs, dunes and mangroves in coastal profiles every 200 m of shoreline, we are able to estimate the value of such ecosystems by comparing with benchmark simulations when we take them out of the propagation and flood model. Although limited in accuracy in comparison to more complex modeling, this approach is able to

  13. Effects of Land Use Changes on the Ecosystem Service Values of Coastal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Valdez, Vera; Ruiz-Luna, Arturo; Ghermandi, Andrea; Berlanga-Robles, César A.; Nunes, Paulo A. L. D.

    2014-10-01

    Changes in the coastal landscape of Southern Sinaloa (Mexico), between 2000 and 2010, were analyzed to relate spatial variations in wetlands extent with the provision and economic value of the ecosystem services (ES). Remote sensing techniques applied to Landsat TM imagery were used to evaluate land use/land cover changes while the value transfer method was used to assess the value of ES by land cover category. Five wetland types and other four land covers were found as representative of the coastal landscape. Findings reveal a 14 % decrease in the saltmarsh/forested mangrove area and a 12 % increase in the area of shrimp pond aquaculture (artificial wetland) during the study period. ES valuation shows that the total value flow increased by 9 % from 215 to 233 million (2007 USD) during the 10-year period. This increase is explained as result of the high value worldwide assigned to saltmarsh. We recognize limitations in the transfer-based approach in quantifying and mapping ES values in the region, but this method provides with value estimates spatially defined, and also provides some guidance in the preliminary screening of policies and projected development in the context of data-scarce regions.

  14. Effects of land use changes on the ecosystem service values of coastal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Valdez, Vera; Ruiz-Luna, Arturo; Ghermandi, Andrea; Berlanga-Robles, César A; Nunes, Paulo A L D

    2014-10-01

    Changes in the coastal landscape of Southern Sinaloa (Mexico), between 2000 and 2010, were analyzed to relate spatial variations in wetlands extent with the provision and economic value of the ecosystem services (ES). Remote sensing techniques applied to Landsat TM imagery were used to evaluate land use/land cover changes while the value transfer method was used to assess the value of ES by land cover category. Five wetland types and other four land covers were found as representative of the coastal landscape. Findings reveal a 14 % decrease in the saltmarsh/forested mangrove area and a 12 % increase in the area of shrimp pond aquaculture (artificial wetland) during the study period. ES valuation shows that the total value flow increased by 9 % from $215 to $233 million (2007 USD) during the 10-year period. This increase is explained as result of the high value worldwide assigned to saltmarsh. We recognize limitations in the transfer-based approach in quantifying and mapping ES values in the region, but this method provides with value estimates spatially defined, and also provides some guidance in the preliminary screening of policies and projected development in the context of data-scarce regions.

  15. Evaluating the distribution of terrestrial dissolved organic matter in a complex coastal ecosystem using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Youhei; Boyer, Joseph N.; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The coastal zone of the Florida Keys features the only living coral reef in the continental United States and as such represents a unique regional environmental resource. Anthropogenic pressures combined with climate disturbances such as hurricanes can affect the biogeochemistry of the region and threaten the health of this unique ecosystem. As such, water quality monitoring has historically been implemented in the Florida Keys, and six spatially distinct zones have been identified. In these studies however, dissolved organic matter (DOM) has only been studied as a quantitative parameter, and DOM composition can be a valuable biogeochemical parameter in assessing environmental change in coastal regions. Here we report the first data of its kind on the application of optical properties of DOM, in particular excitation emission matrix fluorescence with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC), throughout these six Florida Keys regions in an attempt to assess spatial differences in DOM sources. Our data suggests that while DOM in the Florida Keys can be influenced by distant terrestrial environments such as the Everglades, spatial differences in DOM distribution were also controlled in part by local surface runoff/fringe mangroves, contributions from seasgrass communities, as well as the reefs and waters from the Florida Current. Application of principal component analysis (PCA) of the relative abundance of EEM-PARAFAC components allowed for a clear distinction between the sources of DOM (allochthonous vs. autochthonous), between different autochthonous sources and/or the diagenetic status of DOM, and further clarified contribution of terrestrial DOM in zones where levels of DOM were low in abundance. The combination between EEM-PARAFAC and PCA proved to be ideally suited to discern DOM composition and source differences in coastal zones with complex hydrology and multiple DOM sources.

  16. Ecosystem Resilience and Threshold Response in the Galápagos Coastal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Alistair W. R.; Froyd, Cynthia A.; Leng, Melanie J.; Milne, Glenn A.; Willis, Katherine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a conservative estimate on rates of sea-level rise of 3.8 mm yr−1 at the end of the 21st century, which may have a detrimental effect on ecologically important mangrove ecosystems. Understanding factors influencing the long-term resilience of these communities is critical but poorly understood. We investigate ecological resilience in a coastal mangrove community from the Galápagos Islands over the last 2700 years using three research questions: What are the ‘fast and slow’ processes operating in the coastal zone? Is there evidence for a threshold response? How can the past inform us about the resilience of the modern system? Methodology/Principal Findings Palaeoecological methods (AMS radiocarbon dating, stable carbon isotopes (δ13C)) were used to reconstruct sedimentation rates and ecological change over the past 2,700 years at Diablas lagoon, Isabela, Galápagos. Bulk geochemical analysis was also used to determine local environmental changes, and salinity was reconstructed using a diatom transfer function. Changes in relative sea level (RSL) were estimated using a glacio-isostatic adjustment model. Non-linear behaviour was observed in the Diablas mangrove ecosystem as it responded to increased salinities following exposure to tidal inundations. A negative feedback was observed which enabled the mangrove canopy to accrete vertically, but disturbances may have opened up the canopy and contributed to an erosion of resilience over time. A combination of drier climatic conditions and a slight fall in RSL then resulted in a threshold response, from a mangrove community to a microbial mat. Conclusions/Significance Palaeoecological records can provide important information on the nature of non-linear behaviour by identifying thresholds within ecological systems, and in outlining responses to ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ environmental change between alternative stable states. This study

  17. Tracing the influence of sewage nitrogen in a coastal ecosystem using stable nitrogen isotopes.

    PubMed

    Savage, Candida

    2005-03-01

    This paper reviews the use of stable nitrogen isotopes (delta15N) to delineate the influence of sewage nitrogen (N) in coastal ecosystems, drawing extensively on the case of Himmerfjärden, a Baltic Sea bay that receives 15N-enriched tertiary treated sewage that is discharged mainly as dissolved inorganic N (DIN). Gradients of delta15N in macroalgae (Fucus vesiculosus) and surface sediments traced sewage-derived N to 24 km from the outfall but elevated delta15N values (> 7 per thousand) indicated that the sewage influence was most pronounced within 10 km. Comparison of macroalgal delta15N values before and after enhanced tertiary treatment showed a decrease in the spatial impact of sewage N from about 24 km to 12 km from the outfall and a decrease to more marine delta15N values in more recent growth tissues. Sedimentary delta15N records showed that sewage has had a dominant influence on organic matter production in the bay with dramatic increases in sedimentary delta15N during the years of maximum sewage N loads. In cases where sewage N introduces a distinct isotopic signature into a system and where it has had a dominant influence on organic matter production, delta15N values in biota and sediments can be used to trace the spatial and temporal influence of sewage N in aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Ecosystem legacy of the introduced N2-fixing tree Robinia pseudoacacia in a coastal forest.

    PubMed

    Von Holle, Betsy; Neill, Christopher; Largay, Erin F; Budreski, Katherine A; Ozimec, Barbara; Clark, Sara A; Lee, Krista

    2013-07-01

    Habitat invasibility has been found to increase dramatically following the alteration of ecosystem properties by a nonnative species. Robinia pseudoacacia, black locust, is a nitrogen-fixing, clonal tree species that aggressively invades open habitats and expands outside of plantations worldwide. Robinia pseudoacacia stands in Cape Cod National Seashore were particularly susceptible to a hurricane in 1991 that caused widespread blowdown and a dramatic reduction in Robinia in some stands. We used this change to investigate the lasting ecological effects of this nonnative species on this upland coastal ecosystem. We established replicate clusters of 20 × 20 m field plots within 50 m of each other that contained native pitch pine (Pinus rigida) and oak (Quercus velutina, Q. alba) forest, living Robinia stands, and stands in which Robinia was eliminated or reduced to less than 5% cover by the hurricane. Net nitrification and extractable soil nitrate concentration differed significantly between stand types, in the order Robinia > former Robinia > pine-oak. Nonnative species cover differed significantly between each stand type, in the order Robinia > former Robinia > pine-oak. Invasion of Robinia pseudoacacia increased soil net nitrification and nitrogen availability and precipitated a change in forest species composition that favored nonnative species. The presence of elevated soil nitrogen and nonnative species persisted at least 14 years after the removal of the original invading tree species, suggesting that the invasion of a tree species left a legacy of altered soil biogeochemistry, a higher number of nonnative species, and greater nonnative species cover.

  19. Review: phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year-to-year (but we only found 8 APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of APPP, 958 come from sites

  20. Sea Level Rise Enhanced Halocarbon Production in Low-lying Coastal Ecosystem in the Southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. T.; Conner, W.; Williams, T.; Song, B.

    2010-12-01

    Saltwater tides bring high concentrations of chloride and bromide inland where it mixes with terrestrial humic substances from surrounding forested watersheds and ferric/ferrous ions from shallow groundwater. With all the essential precursors (i.e., chloride, bromide, and humic substances) and catalysts (ferric/ferrous ions with sunlight), low-lying coastal ecosystems could be a hotspot for halocarbon formation. Fluctuating water levels and salinity due to the tidal cycle alter both redox reactions and water chemistry, influencing the formation and fate of halocarbons. A controlled study was conducted to confirm the abiotic formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) by the photo-Fenton reaction and the effects of the precursors on their formation. Four THM species, including chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl), and bromoform (CHBr3), were examined. Sets of aqueous solutions were prepared using filtered Waccamaw River samples and synthesized NaCl / NaBr, and Fe2(SO4)3 and H2O2 solutions. Solutions were enclosed in quartz tubes and exposed for 7 days to natural sunlight. Although total THM formation increased with DOC concentration, the reactivity of C in forming THM was relatively consistent across DOC concentrations, with an average of 2.6 nmol-THM mmol-C-1. The reactivity in forming THMs through the photo-Fenton reaction was significantly lower than that in chlorinated water. Reactivity generally ranged from 3-20 mmol-THM mol-C-1. The differences in reactivity suggested that greater yield of THMs could be produced under the right reaction condition. In particular, the study showed that bromide increases the reactivity of DOC in forming THMs and enhances the formation of brominated THMs. The bromine substitution factor in the NaCl treatment ranged from 19 to 24% but increased to 43 and 46% when NaBr was added. Results suggest that increased salinity and bromide concentration in saltwater-impacted coastal ecosystems could

  1. Salinization of Freshwater-Dependent Coastal Ecosystems: Understanding Landscapes in Transition Along the Leading Edge of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, R. E.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Ardón, M.; Wright, J. P.; BenDor, T.; Bhattachan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is transforming the outer edge of the Southern US coastal plain. Lower-lying parts of this region, characterized by extensive freshwater-dependent ecosystems, will be largely inundated by gradual sea level rise by the end of this century. In the interim, however, ocean waters are already penetrating and influencing freshwater-dependent coastal landscapes due to a combination of human and natural factors. This landward movement of salinity from the coast onto the coastal plain or "saltwater intrusion" is a critical water resource issue representing the leading edge of climate change for many coastal areas. The salinization of surface waters and adjacent lands has implications for crop and timber yields in managed ecosystems, ecosystem carbon sequestration in unmanaged ecosystems, and degradation of coastal water quality due to extraction of soil nutrients by seasalts. With this in mind, we seek to understand more broadly how vulnerability of coastal landscapes to saltwater intrusion shapes and is shaped by both natural and anthropogenic processes. We present a novel framework that couples intensive, in situ monitoring of hydrological and ecological conditions with a geospatial saltwater intrusion vulnerability index (SIVI). We discuss application of this framework to the Albemarle-Pamlico region of coastal North Carolina, where we are learning how climate, natural landscape structure, and human activities interact to mediate or exacerbate the vulnerability of freshwater-dependent lands to saltwater intrusion. We discuss the involvement of stakeholders and local knowledge in the research process as well. This work advances understanding of vulnerability to climate change in coastal regions by moving beyond simple inundation models to gain a more sophisticated understanding of the human and natural processes influencing salinization of surface waters and adjacent lands. As the Albemarle-Pamlico and similar regions worldwide transform in response to and

  2. Fold-thrust dislocations in sedimentary cover of the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, V. I.

    2009-07-01

    As follows from geological and geophysical data, tectonic deformations formed under lateral compression are widespread in the sedimentary cover at the bottom of the Sea of Azov. Fold-thrust dislocations are established in the North Azov Trough on the southern slope of the Ukrainian Shield, in the Azov Swell of the young Scythian Plate, and in the Indol-Kuban Foredeep. The transregional Main Azov Thrust Fault and smaller thrust faults of listric morphology tens of kilometers in extent are known. Asymmetric anticlines are related to their fronts. In plan view, the crests of these anticlines are displaced down the dip of the controlling faults. Folds and thrusts developed in pulsatory manner in the regime of periodically acting tangential compression are recorded in the thickness of the plate complex and stratigraphic and angular unconformities. Some of these dislocations are active and accompanied by anomalously high formation pressure, temperature and hydrochemical anomalies, tectonic brecciation, and mud volcanoes.

  3. Impact of atmospheric circulation fluctuations on the zoobenthos dynamics in the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Gargopa, Yu. M.; Sarvilina, S. V.

    2010-02-01

    The impact of atmospheric circulation fluctuations (Vangengeim’s classification) on the zoobenthos dynamics in the Sea of Azov was studied. The “western” circulation processes lead to zoobenthos biomass decrease, and the opposite pattern was observed when “eastern” circulation processes prevail. A quasiperiodicity with 3-7 to 10-15 year cycles is revealed for the zoobenthos biomass dynamics. These changes are closely connected with the climatically induced increase of the zoobenthos biomass in the Sea of Azov.

  4. Toward a conceptual approach for assessing risks from chemical mixtures and other stressors to coastal ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Syberg, Kristian; Backhaus, Thomas; Banta, Gary; Bruce, Peter; Gustavsson, Mikael; Munns, Wayne R; Rämö, Robert; Selck, Henriette; Gunnarsson, Jonas S

    2017-03-01

    Growth of human populations and increased human activity, particularly in coastal areas, increase pressure on coastal ecosystems and the ecosystem services (ES) they provide. As a means toward being able to assess the impact of multiple stressors on ES, in the present study we propose an 8-step conceptual approach for assessing effects of chemical mixtures and other stressors on ES in coastal areas: step A, identify the relevant problems and policy aims; step B, identify temporal and spatial boundaries; step C, identify relevant ES; step D, identify relevant stressors (e.g., chemicals); step E, translate impacts into ES units; step F, assess cumulative risk in ES units; step G, rank stressors based on their contribution to adverse effects on ES; and step H, implement regulation and management as appropriate and necessary. Two illustrative case studies (Swedish coastal waters and a coastal lagoon in Costa Rica) are provided; one focuses on chemicals that affect human food supply and the other addresses pesticide runoff and trade-offs among ES. The 2 cases are used to highlight challenges of such risk assessments, including use of standardized versus ES-relevant test species, data completeness, and trade-offs among ES. Lessons learned from the 2 case studies are discussed in relation to environmental risk assessment and management of chemical mixtures. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:376-386. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Mixed Layer Depth in the Aegean, Marmara, Black and Azov Seas: Part II: Relation to the Sonic Layer Depth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    r.com/ locate / jmarsysMixed layer depth in the Aegean, Marmara, Black and Azov Seas : Part II: Relation to the sonic layer depth Robert W. Helber a...index terms: The Aegean Sea The Black Sea The Azov Sea Keywords: Sound transmission Mixed layer depth Climatologyt analysis of the seasonal evolution of...the sonic layer depth (SLD) relative to the mixed layer depth (MLD) for the Aegean, Marmara, Black, and Azov Seas . SLD identifies the acoustic ducting

  6. Propagation of the Sea of Azov plume in the Black Sea and its relation with atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, Ivan; Osadchiev, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    This work is devoted to research of the influence of wind forcing on propagation of the Sea of Azov water plume in the Black Sea. The Sea of Azov water is characterized by relatively low salinity and high concentrations of suspended matter, terrigenic nutrients, and anthropogenic pollutants. Thus, the Sea of Azov inflow has significant impacts on physical, chemical, and biological processes in the Black Sea. The increased concentration of the suspended matter in the Sea of Azov plume allows to determine accurately its borders based on remote sensing data. For this purpose, data of the satellite color scanner MERIS/EnviSat with 300-meter spatial resolution were used. Atmospheric forcing on the Sea of Azov plume was investigated with the data of 6-hour reanalysis of winds (MERRA and NCAR/NCEP) with spatial resolution at 1/2 degrees in latitude and 2/3 degrees in longitude. Based on satellite images and wind reanalysis data for 2002-2012 period, it was established that the Azov Sea water inflow is favored by strong N and NE winds, which prevail in the region. It is evident in the processed satellite data that the Sea of Azov plume mainly extends along the east coast of the Crimean peninsula. In some cases under sufficiently strong winds, the Azov waters spread to the southern coast of the Crimea, and sometimes even to its south-west extremity. Factors influencing the propagation of the Azov Sea plume include intensity of water exchange between the Azov and the Black seas, the Rim Current, mesoscale eddies and other dynamic processes. However, the study demonstrated that the influence of wind forcing is dominant. Empirical regressions are derived expressing the dependence of the Azov plume area and its orientation on the magnitude and directions of the wind stress. Satellite-derived statistics of the Azov plume in the Black Sea characteristics are obtained.

  7. Effect of an Invasive Plant and Moonlight on Rodent Foraging Behavior in a Coastal Dune Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; De León, Yesenia L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how invasive plants may alter predator avoidance behaviors is important for granivorous rodents because their foraging can trigger ripple effects in trophic webs. Previous research has shown that European beach grass Ammophila arenaria, an invasive species in coastal California, affects the predation of other seeds by the rodents Microtus californicus, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis. This may be due to lower perceived predation risk by rodents foraging in close proximity to the cover provided by Ammophila, but this mechanism has not yet been tested. We examined the perceived predation risk of rodents by measuring the ‘giving up density’ of food left behind in experimental patches of food in areas with and without abundant cover from Ammophila and under varying amount of moonlight. We found strong evidence that giving up density was lower in the thick uniform vegetation on Ammophila-dominated habitat than it was in the more sparsely and diversely vegetated restored habitat. There was also evidence that moonlight affected giving up density and that it mediated the effects of habitat, although with our design we were unable to distinguish the effects of lunar illumination and moon phase. Our findings illustrate that foraging rodents, well known to be risk-averse during moonlit nights, are also affected by the presence of an invasive plant. This result has implications for granivory and perhaps plant demography in invaded and restored coastal habitats. Future research in this system should work to unravel the complex trophic links formed by a non-native invasive plant (i.e., Ammophila) providing cover favored by native rodents, which likely forage on and potentially limit the recruitment of native and non-native plants, some of which have ecosystem consequences of their own. PMID:25679785

  8. What Role Does Photodegradation Play in Influencing Plant Litter Decomposition and Biogeochemistry in Coastal Marsh Ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobler, M.; White, D. A.; Abbene, M. L.; Burst, S. L.; McCulley, R. L.; Barnes, P. W.

    2016-02-01

    Decomposition is a crucial component of global biogeochemical cycles that influences the fate and residence time of carbon and nutrients in organic matter pools, yet the processes controlling litter decomposition in coastal marshes are not fully understood. We conducted a series of field studies to examine what role photodegradation, a process driven in part by solar UV radiation (280-400 nm), plays in the decomposition of the standing dead litter of Sagittaria lancifolia and Spartina patens, two common species in marshes of intermediate salinity in southern Louisiana, USA. Results indicate that the exclusion of solar UV significantly altered litter mass loss, but the magnitude and direction of these effects varied depending on species, height of the litter above the water surface and the stage of decomposition. Over one growing season, S. lancifolia litter exposed to ambient solar UV had significantly less mass loss compared to litter exposed to attenuated UV over the initial phase of decomposition (0-5 months; ANOVA P=0.004) then treatment effects switched in the latter phase of the study (5-7 months; ANOVA P<0.001). Similar results were found in S. patens over an 11-month period. UV exposure reduced total C, N and lignin by 24-33% in remaining tissue with treatment differences most pronounced in S. patens. Phospholipid fatty-acid analysis (PFLA) indicated that UV also significantly altered microbial (bacterial) biomass and bacteria:fungi ratios of decomposing litter. These findings, and others, indicate that solar UV can have positive and negative net effects on litter decomposition in marsh plants with inhibition of biotic (microbial) processes occurring early in the decomposition process then shifting to enhancement of decomposition via abiotic (photodegradation) processes later in decomposition. Photodegradation of standing litter represents a potentially significant pathway of C and N loss from these coastal wetland ecosystems.

  9. Climate Variability in Coastal Ecosystems - Use of MODIS Land Surface and Sea Surface Temperature Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintalapati, S.; Lakshmi, V.

    2007-12-01

    The intertidal zone, with its complex blend of marine and terrestrial environments, is one of the intensively studied ecosystems, in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution. As climatic conditions change, the geographic limits of the intertidal species will likely move towards more tolerable coastal conditions. Traditionally, understanding climate change effects through species physiologic response have involved use of in situ measurements and thermal engineering models. But these approaches are constrained by their data intensive requirements and may not be suitable for predicting change patterns relevant to large scale species distributions. Satellite remote sensing provides an alternate approach, given the regular global coverage at moderate spatial resolutions. The present study uses six years of land surface temperature (LST) and sea surface temperature (SST) data from MODIS/Terra instrument along various coastlines around the globe - East and West Coast US, Southern Africa, Northern Japan and New Zealand. Apart from the dominant annual cycle in LST and SST, the other seasonal cycles vary from dominant semi-annual cycles in lower latitudes to 1.5 and 2 year cycles at higher latitudes. The monthly anomalies show strong spatial structure at lower latitudes when compared to higher latitudes, with the exception of US east coast, where the spatial structure extended almost along the whole coastline, indicating strong regulation from the Gulf Stream. The patterns along different coast lines are consistent with the atmospheric and ocean circulation patterns existing at those regions. These results suggest that the climatology at the coastal regions can be adequately represented using satellite-based temperature data, thus enabling further research in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution at larger scales.

  10. Characterization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities with respect to zonal vegetation in a coastal dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Ai; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Coastal dune vegetation distributes zonally along the environmental gradients of, e.g., soil disturbance. In the preset study, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in a coastal dune ecosystem were characterized with respect to tolerance to soil disturbance. Two grass species, Elymus mollis and Miscanthus sinensis, are distributed zonally in the seaward and landward slopes, respectively, in the primary dunes in Ishikari, Japan. The seaward slope is severely disturbed by wind, while the landward slope is stabilized by the thick root system of M. sinensis. The roots and rhizosphere soils of the two grasses were collected from the slopes. The soils were sieved to destruct the fungal hyphal networks, and soil trap culture was conducted to assess tolerance of the communities to disturbance, with parallel analysis of the field communities using a molecular ecological tool. In the landward communities, large shifts in the composition and increases in diversity were observed in the trap culture compared with the field, but in the seaward communities, the impact of trap culture was minimal. The landward field community was significantly nested within the landward trap culture community, implying that most members in the field community did not disappear in the trap culture. No nestedness was observed in the seaward communities. These observations suggest that disturbance-tolerant fungi have been preferentially selected in the seaward slope due to severe disturbance in the habitat. Whereas a limited number of fungi, which are not necessarily disturbance-sensitive, dominate in the stable landward slope, but high-potential diversity has been maintained in the habitat.

  11. Effect of an invasive plant and moonlight on rodent foraging behavior in a coastal dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew D; De León, Yesenia L

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how invasive plants may alter predator avoidance behaviors is important for granivorous rodents because their foraging can trigger ripple effects in trophic webs. Previous research has shown that European beach grass Ammophila arenaria, an invasive species in coastal California, affects the predation of other seeds by the rodents Microtus californicus, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Reithrodontomys megalotis. This may be due to lower perceived predation risk by rodents foraging in close proximity to the cover provided by Ammophila, but this mechanism has not yet been tested. We examined the perceived predation risk of rodents by measuring the 'giving up density' of food left behind in experimental patches of food in areas with and without abundant cover from Ammophila and under varying amount of moonlight. We found strong evidence that giving up density was lower in the thick uniform vegetation on Ammophila-dominated habitat than it was in the more sparsely and diversely vegetated restored habitat. There was also evidence that moonlight affected giving up density and that it mediated the effects of habitat, although with our design we were unable to distinguish the effects of lunar illumination and moon phase. Our findings illustrate that foraging rodents, well known to be risk-averse during moonlit nights, are also affected by the presence of an invasive plant. This result has implications for granivory and perhaps plant demography in invaded and restored coastal habitats. Future research in this system should work to unravel the complex trophic links formed by a non-native invasive plant (i.e., Ammophila) providing cover favored by native rodents, which likely forage on and potentially limit the recruitment of native and non-native plants, some of which have ecosystem consequences of their own.

  12. Contrasting ecosystem CO2 fluxes of inland and coastal wetlands: a meta-analysis of eddy covariance data.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weizhi; Xiao, Jingfeng; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Chang'an; Lin, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    Wetlands play an important role in regulating the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) concentrations and thus affecting the climate. However, there is still lack of quantitative evaluation of such a role across different wetland types, especially at the global scale. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare ecosystem CO2 fluxes among various types of wetlands using a global database compiled from the literature. This database consists of 143 site-years of eddy covariance data from 22 inland wetland and 21 coastal wetland sites across the globe. Coastal wetlands had higher annual gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Re ), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) than inland wetlands. On a per unit area basis, coastal wetlands provided large CO2 sinks, while inland wetlands provided small CO2 sinks or were nearly CO2 neutral. The annual CO2 sink strength was 93.15 and 208.37 g C m(-2) for inland and coastal wetlands, respectively. Annual CO2 fluxes were mainly regulated by mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP). For coastal and inland wetlands combined, MAT and MAP explained 71%, 54%, and 57% of the variations in GPP, Re , and NEP, respectively. The CO2 fluxes of wetlands were also related to leaf area index (LAI). The CO2 fluxes also varied with water table depth (WTD), although the effects of WTD were not statistically significant. NEP was jointly determined by GPP and Re for both inland and coastal wetlands. However, the NEP/Re and NEP/GPP ratios exhibited little variability for inland wetlands and decreased for coastal wetlands with increasing latitude. The contrasting of CO2 fluxes between inland and coastal wetlands globally can improve our understanding of the roles of wetlands in the global C cycle. Our results also have implications for informing wetland management and climate change policymaking, for example, the efforts being made by international organizations and enterprises to restore coastal wetlands for

  13. NASA COAST and OCEANIA Airborne Missions in Support of Ecosystem and Water Quality Research in the Coastal Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guild, Liane S.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Kudela, Raphael; Morrow, John; Russell, Philip; Myers, Jeffrey; Dunagan, Stephen; Palacios, Sherry; Livingston, John; Negrey, Kendra; hide

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, coastal marine ecosystems are exposed to land-based sources of pollution and sedimentation from anthropogenic activities including agriculture and coastal development. Ocean color products from satellite sensors provide information on chlorophyll (phytoplankton pigment), sediments, and colored dissolved organic material. Further, ship-based in-water measurements and emerging airborne measurements provide in situ data for the vicarious calibration of current and next generation satellite ocean color sensors and to validate the algorithms that use the remotely sensed observations. Recent NASA airborne missions over Monterey Bay, CA, have demonstrated novel above- and in-water measurement capabilities supporting a combined airborne sensor approach (imaging spectrometer, microradiometers, and a sun photometer). The results characterize coastal atmospheric and aquatic properties through an end-to-end assessment of image acquisition, atmospheric correction, algorithm application, plus sea-truth observations from state-of-the-art instrument systems. The primary goal of the airborne missions was to demonstrate the following in support of calibration and validation exercises for satellite coastal ocean color products: 1) the utility of a multi-sensor airborne instrument suite to assess the bio-optical properties of coastal California, including water quality; and 2) the importance of contemporaneous atmospheric measurements to improve atmospheric correction in the coastal zone. Utilizing an imaging spectrometer optimized in the blue to green spectral domain enables higher signal for detection of the relatively dark radiance measurements from marine and freshwater ecosystem features. The novel airborne instrument, Coastal Airborne In-situ Radiometers (C-AIR) provides measurements of apparent optical properties with high dynamic range and fidelity for deriving exact water leaving radiances at the land-ocean boundary, including radiometrically shallow aquatic

  14. The new Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA) for remote and long-term coastal ecosystem monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mànuel, Antoni; Condal, Fernando; Guillén, Jorge; Nogueras, Marc; del Rio, Joaquin; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Toma, Daniel; Palanques, Albert

    2011-01-01

    A suitable sampling technology to identify species and to estimate population dynamics based on individual counts at different temporal levels in relation to habitat variations is increasingly important for fishery management and biodiversity studies. In the past two decades, as interest in exploring the oceans for valuable resources and in protecting these resources from overexploitation have grown, the number of cabled (permanent) submarine multiparametric platforms with video stations has increased. Prior to the development of seafloor observatories, the majority of autonomous stations were battery powered and stored data locally. The recently installed low-cost, multiparametric, expandable, cabled coastal Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA), located 4 km off of Vilanova i la Gertrú, Barcelona, at a depth of 20 m, is directly connected to a ground station by a telecommunication cable; thus, it is not affected by the limitations associated with previous observation technologies. OBSEA is part of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) infrastructure, and its activities are included among the Network of Excellence of the European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET). OBSEA enables remote, long-term, and continuous surveys of the local ecosystem by acquiring synchronous multiparametric habitat data and bio-data with the following sensors: Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors for salinity, temperature, and pressure; Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for current speed and direction, including a turbidity meter and a fluorometer (for the determination of chlorophyll concentration); a hydrophone; a seismometer; and finally, a video camera for automated image analysis in relation to species classification and tracking. Images can be monitored in real time, and all data can be stored for future studies. In this article, the various components of OBSEA are described, including its hardware (the sensors and the network of marine and land nodes

  15. The New Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA) for Remote and Long-Term Coastal Ecosystem Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Jacopo; Mànuel, Antoni; Condal, Fernando; Guillén, Jorge; Nogueras, Marc; del Rio, Joaquin; Costa, Corrado; Menesatti, Paolo; Puig, Pere; Sardà, Francesc; Toma, Daniel; Palanques, Albert

    2011-01-01

    A suitable sampling technology to identify species and to estimate population dynamics based on individual counts at different temporal levels in relation to habitat variations is increasingly important for fishery management and biodiversity studies. In the past two decades, as interest in exploring the oceans for valuable resources and in protecting these resources from overexploitation have grown, the number of cabled (permanent) submarine multiparametric platforms with video stations has increased. Prior to the development of seafloor observatories, the majority of autonomous stations were battery powered and stored data locally. The recently installed low-cost, multiparametric, expandable, cabled coastal Seafloor Observatory (OBSEA), located 4 km off of Vilanova i la Gertrú, Barcelona, at a depth of 20 m, is directly connected to a ground station by a telecommunication cable; thus, it is not affected by the limitations associated with previous observation technologies. OBSEA is part of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory (EMSO) infrastructure, and its activities are included among the Network of Excellence of the European Seas Observatory NETwork (ESONET). OBSEA enables remote, long-term, and continuous surveys of the local ecosystem by acquiring synchronous multiparametric habitat data and bio-data with the following sensors: Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors for salinity, temperature, and pressure; Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) for current speed and direction, including a turbidity meter and a fluorometer (for the determination of chlorophyll concentration); a hydrophone; a seismometer; and finally, a video camera for automated image analysis in relation to species classification and tracking. Images can be monitored in real time, and all data can be stored for future studies. In this article, the various components of OBSEA are described, including its hardware (the sensors and the network of marine and land nodes

  16. A novel approach to model exposure of coastal-marine ecosystems to riverine flood plumes based on remote sensing techniques.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Devlin, Michelle; Teixeira da Silva, Eduardo; Petus, Caroline; Ban, Natalie C; Pressey, Robert L; Kool, Johnathan; Roberts, Jason J; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Wenger, Amelia S; Brodie, Jon

    2013-04-15

    Increased loads of land-based pollutants are a major threat to coastal-marine ecosystems. Identifying the affected marine areas and the scale of influence on ecosystems is critical to assess the impacts of degraded water quality and to inform planning for catchment management and marine conservation. Studies using remotely-sensed data have contributed to our understanding of the occurrence and influence of river plumes, and to our ability to assess exposure of marine ecosystems to land-based pollutants. However, refinement of plume modeling techniques is required to improve risk assessments. We developed a novel, complementary, approach to model exposure of coastal-marine ecosystems to land-based pollutants. We used supervised classification of MODIS-Aqua true-color satellite imagery to map the extent of plumes and to qualitatively assess the dispersal of pollutants in plumes. We used the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), the world's largest coral reef system, to test our approach. We combined frequency of plume occurrence with spatially distributed loads (based on a cost-distance function) to create maps of exposure to suspended sediment and dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We then compared annual exposure maps (2007-2011) to assess inter-annual variability in the exposure of coral reefs and seagrass beds to these pollutants. We found this method useful to map plumes and qualitatively assess exposure to land-based pollutants. We observed inter-annual variation in exposure of ecosystems to pollutants in the GBR, stressing the need to incorporate a temporal component into plume exposure/risk models. Our study contributes to our understanding of plume spatial-temporal dynamics of the GBR and offers a method that can also be applied to monitor exposure of coastal-marine ecosystems to plumes and explore their ecological influences.

  17. Application of satellite infrared data for mapping of thermal plume contamination in coastal ecosystem of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kang, Yong Q

    2006-03-01

    The 5900 MW Younggwang nuclear power station on the west coast of Korea discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology [KORDI report (2003). Wide area observation of the impact of the operation of Younggwang nuclear power plant 5 and 6, No. BSPI 319-00-1426-3, KORDI, Seoul, Korea]. Here the spatial and temporal characteristics of the thermal plume signature of warm water are reported from a time series (1985-2003) of space-borne, thermal infrared data from Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Sea surface temperature (SST) were characterized using advanced very high resolution radiometer data from the NOAA satellites. These data demonstrated the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in the Younggwang coastal areas. In contrast, the analysis of SST from thematic mapper data using the Landsat-5 and 7 satellites provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. The thermal plume signature was detected from 70 to 100 km to the south of the discharge during the summer monsoon and 50 to 70 km to the northwest during the winter monsoon. The mean detected plume temperature was 28 degrees C in summer and 12 degrees C in winter. The DeltaT varied from 2 to 4 degrees C in winter and 2 degrees C in summer. These values are lower than the re-circulating water temperature (6-9 degrees C). In addition the temperature difference between tidal flats and offshore (SSTtidal flats - SSToffsore) was found to vary from 5.4 to 8.5 degrees C during the flood tides and 3.5 degrees C during the ebb tide. The data also suggest that water heated by direct solar radiation on the tidal flats during the flood tides might have been transported offshore during the ebb tide. Based on these results we suggest that there is an urgent need to protect the health of Younggwang coastal marine ecosystem from the severe thermal impact by the large quantity of warm water discharged from

  18. Byers Peninsula: A reference site for coastal, terrestrial and limnetic ecosystem studies in maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, A.; Camacho, A.; Rochera, C.; Velázquez, D.

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the development of an international and multidisciplinary project funded by the Spanish Polar Programme on Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetlands). The project adopted Byers Peninsula as an international reference site for coastal and terrestrial (including inland waters) research within the framework of the International Polar Year initiative. Over 30 scientists from 12 countries and 26 institutions participated in the field work, and many others participated in the processing of the samples. The main themes investigated were: Holocene changes in climate, using both lacustrine sediment cores and palaeo-nests of penguins; limnology of the lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands; microbiology of microbial mats, ecology of microbial food webs and viral effects on aquatic ecosystems; ornithology, with investigations on a Gentoo penguin rookery ( Pygoscelis papua) as well as the flying ornithofauna; biocomplexity and life cycles of species from different taxonomic groups; analysis of a complete watershed unit from a landscape perspective; and human impacts, specifically the effect of trampling on soil characteristics and biota. Byers Peninsula offers many features as an international reference site given it is one of the largest ice-free areas in the Antarctic Peninsula region, it has a variety of different landscape units, and it hosts diverse aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, the Byers Peninsula is a hotspot for Antarctic biodiversity, and because of its high level of environmental protection, it has been very little affected by human activities. Finally, the proximity to the Spanish polar installations on Livingston Island and the experience derived from previous expeditions to the site make it logistically feasible as a site for ongoing monitoring and research.

  19. Net Ecosystem Fluxes of Methyl Halides from a Coastal Salt Marsh with Invasive Pepperweed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deventer, M. J.; Jiao, Y.; Lewis, J. A.; Weiss, R. F.; Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial emissions of methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) are believed to constitute the `missing' source of these compounds to the atmosphere, but the variability of emission rates from natural ecosystems has led to large uncertainties in scaling up. Since April 2016, surface-atmosphere fluxes for methyl halides have been measured at Suisun Marsh, a coastal salt marsh in northern California, USA. Flux measurements are performed in two ways: tower based relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) for net ecosystem fluxes and static flux chamber measurements for plant-scale fluxes. The study site is invaded by perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium), a methyl halide emitting species, covering a significant part of the flux source area. Both, REA and chamber samples are analyzed for methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) using gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD). The analytical precision [ppt] and REA flux detection limits [μmol m-2 d-1] are on the order of 3.9/0.6 for CH3Cl and 0.01/0.2 for CH3Br. Chamber measurements confirmed that methyl halide emissions of pepperweed are large, but that the native alkali heath (Frankenia salina) is a much stronger emitter, when normalized by biomass. REA measurements show that during the summer, the studied marsh is a substantial methyl halide source with net fluxes of 20 μmol m-2 d-1 (CH3Cl) and 1 μmol m-2 d-1 (CH3Br). Notably, these fluxes are comparable with reported chamber based emissions from southern California salt marshes. Furthermore, a positive response to light and temperature was found. The presentation will also expand on the diurnal variability and seasonality of the measured fluxes.

  20. Iron limitation impact on eddy-induced ecosystem variability in the coastal Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, Jerome; Moore, Andrew M.

    2012-04-01

    A data assimilative, coupled physical-biological model for the northwestern coastal Gulf of Alaska (CGOA) is used to characterize lower trophic level ecosystem response to eddy variability at the shelfbreak over a 5-year period (1998-2002). The ocean circulation component is an implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), the lower trophic level ecosystem component is a six-compartment Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model with iron limitation, and the data assimilation component is the adjoint-based, four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) system available in ROMS. Assimilated observations consist of weekly satellite sea surface height and temperature, as well as bimonthly in situ temperature and salinity measurements. Overall, the model results are in agreement with earlier observational studies, and confirm that eddy-induced cross-shelf transport of biological properties can potentially enhance phytoplankton concentrations in the basin by: (1) alleviating iron limitation on phytoplankton growth by transporting iron-rich shelf waters offshore, and (2) transporting elevated shelf phytoplankton concentrations offshore. Simulated nutrient anomalies during eddy events indicate a substantial increase in dissolved iron concentrations in near-surface waters, thereby suggesting that eddy-induced offshore transport of iron-rich shelf waters is the dominant mechanism regulating locally-generated offshore production in the CGOA high nutrient-low chlorophyll (HNLC) region during eddy events. In fact, for the period 1998-2002, the model results predict that approximately two thirds of the eddy-induced production in the Yakutat/Sitka "eddy corridor" is associated with locally-generated production resulting from alleviated iron limitation conditions on phytoplankton growth. The remaining third can be attributed to eddy-induced offshore export of chlorophyll concentrations of shelf origin.

  1. Is economic valuation of ecosystem services useful to decision-makers? Lessons learned from Australian coastal and marine management.

    PubMed

    Marre, Jean-Baptiste; Thébaud, Olivier; Pascoe, Sean; Jennings, Sarah; Boncoeur, Jean; Coglan, Louisa

    2016-08-01

    Economic valuation of ecosystem services is widely advocated as being useful to support ecosystem management decision-making. However, the extent to which it is actually used or considered useful in decision-making is poorly documented. This literature blindspot is explored with an application to coastal and marine ecosystems management in Australia. Based on a nation-wide survey of eighty-eight decision-makers representing a diversity of management organizations, the perceived usefulness and level of use of economic valuation of ecosystem services, in support of coastal and marine management, are examined. A large majority of decision-makers are found to be familiar with economic valuation and consider it useful - even necessary - in decision-making, although this varies across groups of decision-makers. However, most decision-makers never or rarely use economic valuation. The perceived level of importance and trust in estimated dollar values differ across ecosystem services, and are especially high for values that relate to commercial activities. A number of factors are also found to influence respondent's use of economic valuation. Such findings concur with conclusions from other studies on the usefulness and use of ESV in environmental management decision-making. They also demonstrate the strength of the survey-based approach developed in this application to examine this issue in a variety of contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effluents of Shrimp Farms and Its Influence on the Coastal Ecosystems of Bahía de Kino, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Barraza-Guardado, Ramón H.; Arreola-Lizárraga, José A.; López-Torres, Marco A.; Casillas-Hernández, Ramón; Miranda-Baeza, Anselmo; Magallón-Barrajas, Francisco; Ibarra-Gámez, Cuauhtemoc

    2013-01-01

    The impact on coastal ecosystems of suspended solids, organic matter, and bacteria in shrimp farm effluents is presented. Sites around Bahía de Kino were selected for comparative evaluation. Effluent entering Bahia Kino (1) enters Laguna La Cruz (2). A control site (3) was outside the influence of effluents. Water quality samples were collected every two weeks during the shrimp culture period. Our data show that the material load in shrimp farm effluents changes biogeochemical processes and aquatic health of the coastal ecosystem. Specifically, the suspended solids, particulate organic matter, chlorophyll a, viable heterotrophic bacteria, and Vibrio-like bacteria in the bay and lagoon were two- to three-fold higher than the control site. This can be mitigated by improvements in the management of aquaculture systems. PMID:23861653

  3. New insights into impacts of anthropogenic nutrients on urban ecosystem processes on the Southern California coastal shelf: Introduction and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Meredith D. A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; McLaughlin, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient inputs are one of the most important factors contributing to eutrophication of coastal waters. Coastal upwelling regions are naturally highly variable, exhibiting faster flushing and lower retention times than estuarine systems. As such, these regions are considered more resilient to anthropogenic influences than other coastal waters. Recent studies have shown our perception of the sustainability of these systems may be flawed and that anthropogenic nutrients can have an impact at local and regional spatial scales within these larger upwelling ecosystems. Maintenance of an outfall pipe discharging wastewater effluent to the Southern California Bight (SCB) provided an opportunity to study effects of anthropogenic nutrient inputs on a near-shore coastal ecosystem. The diversion of wastewater effluent from a primary, offshore outfall to a secondary, near-shore outfall set up a large-scale, in situ experiment allowing researchers to track the fate of wastewater plumes as they were ;turned off; in one area and ;turned on; in another. In this introduction to a special issue, we synthesize results of one such wastewater diversion conducted by the Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) during fall 2012. Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) from point-source discharges altered biogeochemical cycling and the community composition of bacteria and phytoplankton. Nitrification of ammonium to nitrate in wastewater effluent close to outfalls constituted a significant source of N utilized by the biological community that should be considered in quantifying ;new; production. The microbial-loop component of the plankton community played a significant role, exemplified by a large response of heterotrophic bacteria to wastewater effluent that resulted in nutrient immobilization within the bacterial food web. This response, combined with the photosynthetic inhibition of phytoplankton due to disinfection byproducts, suppressed phytoplankton responses. Our findings have

  4. Modeled Sea Level Rise Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems at Six Major Estuaries on Florida's Gulf Coast: Implications for Adaptation Planning.

    PubMed

    Geselbracht, Laura L; Freeman, Kathleen; Birch, Anne P; Brenner, Jorge; Gordon, Doria R

    2015-01-01

    The Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) was applied at six major estuaries along Florida's Gulf Coast (Pensacola Bay, St. Andrews/Choctawhatchee Bays, Apalachicola Bay, Southern Big Bend, Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor) to provide quantitative and spatial information on how coastal ecosystems may change with sea level rise (SLR) and to identify how this information can be used to inform adaption planning. High resolution LiDAR-derived elevation data was utilized under three SLR scenarios: 0.7 m, 1 m and 2 m through the year 2100 and uncertainty analyses were conducted on selected input parameters at three sites. Results indicate that the extent, spatial orientation and relative composition of coastal ecosystems at the study areas may substantially change with SLR. Under the 1 m SLR scenario, total predicted impacts for all study areas indicate that coastal forest (-69,308 ha; -18%), undeveloped dry land (-28,444 ha; -2%) and tidal flat (-25,556 ha; -47%) will likely face the greatest loss in cover by the year 2100. The largest potential gains in cover were predicted for saltmarsh (+32,922 ha; +88%), transitional saltmarsh (+23,645 ha; na) and mangrove forest (+12,583 ha; +40%). The Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay study areas were predicted to experience the greatest net loss in coastal wetlands The uncertainty analyses revealed low to moderate changes in results when some numerical SLAMM input parameters were varied highlighting the value of collecting long-term sedimentation, accretion and erosion data to improve SLAMM precision. The changes predicted by SLAMM will affect exposure of adjacent human communities to coastal hazards and ecosystem functions potentially resulting in impacts to property values, infrastructure investment and insurance rates. The results and process presented here can be used as a guide for communities vulnerable to SLR to identify and prioritize adaptation strategies that slow and/or accommodate the changes underway.

  5. Genetic variation within a dominant shrub species determines plant species colonization in a coastal dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Crutsinger, Gregory M; Strauss, Sharon Y; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2010-04-01

    The diversity and structure of plant communities is often determined by the presence and identity of competitively dominant species. Recent studies suggest that intraspecific variation within dominants may also have important community-level consequences. In a coastal dunes ecosystem of northern California, we use a decade-old common garden experiment to test the effects of a genetically based architectural dimorphism within a dominant native shrub, Baccharis pilularis, on plant colonization success and understory plant diversity. We found that erect Baccharis morphs had higher richness and cover of colonizing plant species (both native and exotic species) compared to prostrate morphs, as well as higher biomass of a dominant exotic dune grass (Ammophila arenaria). Trait differences between architectural morphs influenced the abiotic understory environment (light availability, soil surface temperature, and litter depth) and were associated with species colonization success. Taken together, our results demonstrate that incorporating within-species variation, particularly within dominant species, into community ecological research can increase the ability to predict patterns of species diversity and assembly within communities.

  6. Supply-side invasion ecology: characterizing propagule pressure in coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Verling, Emma; Ruiz, Gregory M; Smith, L. David; Galil, Bella; Miller, A. Whitman; Murphy, Kathleen R

    2005-01-01

    The observed rates and deleterious impacts of biological invasions have caused significant alarm in recent years, driving efforts to reduce the risk (establishment) of new introductions. Characterizing the supply of propagules is key to understanding invasion risk and developing effective management strategies. In coastal ecosystems, ships' ballast water is an important transfer mechanism (vector) for marine and freshwater species. Commercial ships exhibit a high degree of variation in ballast water operations that affect both the quantity and quality of propagule supply, and thereby invasion risk. The per-ship inoculation size from ballast water depends upon both the volume discharged and the organism density. Moreover, propagule quality will vary among source regions (ports) and voyage routes, due to differences in species composition and transport conditions, respectively. We show that significant differences exist in (i) the frequency and volume of ballast water discharge among vessel types, (ii) the frequency of vessel types and routes (source regions) among recipient ports, and (iii) the transit success (survivorship) of zooplankton in ballast tanks among voyage routes. Thus, propagule supply is not a simple function of total ship arrivals. For ships, as well as other vectors, variation in propagule quantity and quality must be explicitly considered to estimate invasion risk and advance predictive ability. PMID:16024389

  7. Hurricane impacts on tree mortality and carbon cycling in coastal forest ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. Q.; Negron-Juarez, R. I.; Zeng, H.; Henkel, T. K.; Baker, D. B.; Saatchi, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    Forests recovering from land-use, the encroachment of woody vegetation, and other ecological processes, cause terrestrial ecosystems to act as a net sinks for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Changes in the strength and sign of this sink over the coming decades are difficult to predict. One process that can act to diminish the terrestrial carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity, which transfers greater amounts of biomass from live to dead respiring pools, and shifts the forest size distribution toward smaller average tree size and lower biomass stocks. A number of studies predict an increase in the frequency of extreme weather events and the intensity of tropical cyclones under a warming climate, which may ultimately result in elevated forest disturbance regimes. Here we present a novel synthetic approach combining detailed ecological field investigations with remote sensing image analysis to provide spatially explicit estimates of forest damage, tree mortality, and biomass loss for U.S. landfalling hurricanes. Analysis results for Hurricane Katrina predicted the death and severe structural damage to about 320 million trees, representing a 100 Tg carbon transfer from live to dead biomass. Under the same wind-field, forest susceptibility to damage was highly tree species dependent, with cypress-tupelo swamp forests exhibiting the greatest resistance. Statistical models were useful for separating storm surge from wind effects on coastal forests. Similar analyses are currently underway for Hurricane Gustav, and will also be presented.

  8. Effects of benthos, temperature, and dose on the fate of hexabromocyclododecane in experimental coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Clare; Strid, Anna; von Stedingk, Hans; Gustafsson, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    The authors studied the fate of the brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) added in a particulate suspension to experimental ecosystems assembled from brackish (Baltic Sea) coastal bays. Two experiments examined how benthic macrofauna (over 21 d) and increased temperature (14 d) affected HBCDD concentrations and fractionation of α, β, and γ diastereomers in the water, sediment, and biota. A third experiment run over 3 seasons (231 d), studied the effect of HBCDD dose on the same endpoints. In all treatments of the 3 experiments, HBCDD partitioned mainly to the sediment, and this proportion increased with time. Presence of macrofauna tended to increase the HBCDD concentration in the sediment and decreased its concentration in the water. Increased temperature (+ 5°C) decreased the amount of HBCDD in sediment and water but not in the filter- and deposit-feeding infaunal bivalves (Macoma balthica). The partitioning between water, sediment, and biota was not concentration dependent. In all treatments, sediment became enriched in γ-HBCDD, M. balthica in α-HBCDD, and water in α- and β-HBCDD. Bioaccumulation of HBCDD in M. balthica was high in all experiments (log biota-sediment accumulation factor [BSAF] > 1.25), the α diastereomer contributing the most (log BSAF 2.1-5.2). There is a risk of trophic transfer of HBCDD from benthic to pelagic food webs, as well as secondary poisoning of marine consumers.

  9. Spatial Simulation of Land Use based on Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Storage in Coastal Jiangsu, China

    PubMed Central

    Chuai, Xiaowei; Huang, Xianjin; Wang, Wanjing; Wu, Changyan; Zhao, Rongqin

    2014-01-01

    This paper optimises projected land-use structure in 2020 with the goal of increasing terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage and simulates its spatial distribution using the CLUE-S model. We found the following: The total carbon densities of different land use types were woodland > water area > cultivated land > built-up land > grassland > shallows. Under the optimised land-use structure projected for 2020, coastal Jiangsu showed the potential to increase carbon storage, and our method was effective even when only considering vegetation carbon storage. The total area will increase by reclamation and the original shallows will be exploited, which will greatly increase carbon storage. For built-up land, rural land consolidation caused the second-largest carbon storage increase, which might contribute the most as the rural population will continue to decrease in the future, while the decrease of cultivated land will contribute the most to carbon loss. The area near the coastline has the greatest possibility for land-use change and is where land management should be especially strengthened. PMID:25011476

  10. SICS: the Southern Inland and Coastal System interdisciplinary project of the USGS South Florida Ecosystem Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    State and Federal agencies are working jointly on structural modifications and improved water-delivery strategies to reestablish more natural surface-water flows through the Everglades wetlands and into Florida Bay. Changes in the magnitude, duration, timing, and distribution of inflows from the headwaters of the Taylor Slough and canal C-111 drainage basins have shifted the seasonal distribution and extent of wetland inundation, and also contributed to the development of hypersaline conditions in nearshore embayments of Florida Bay. Such changes are altering biological and vegetative communities in the wetlands and creating stresses on aquatic habitat. Affected biotic resources include federally listed species such as the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, American crocodile, wood stork, and roseate spoonbill. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is synthesizing scientific findings from hydrologic process studies, collecting data to characterize the ecosystem properties and functions, and integrating the results of these efforts into a research tool and management model for this Southern Inland and Coastal System(SICS). Scientists from all four disciplinary divisions of the USGS, Biological Resources, Geology, National Mapping, and Water Resources are contributing to this interdisciplinary project.

  11. Biomagnification and debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in a coastal ecosystem in Tokyo Bay.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Yamada, Toshiko; Matsuo, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Tsuchiya, Kotaro; Takada, Hideshige

    2013-04-01

    By field sampling and laboratory experiments we compared the mechanisms by which polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are biomagnified. We measured PBDEs and PCBs, together with stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes as an index of trophic level, in low-trophic-level organisms collected from a coastal area in Tokyo Bay. PBDEs were biomagnified to a lesser degree than PCBs. The more hydrophobic congeners of each were biomagnified more. However, the depletion of BDE congeners BDE99 and BDE153 from fish was suggested. To study congener-specific biotransformation of halogenated compounds, we conducted an in vitro experiment using hepatic microsomes of two species of fish and five BDE congeners (BDE47, 99, 100, 153, and 154) and five CB congeners with the same substitution positions as the PBDEs. BDE99 and 153 were partially debrominated, but BDE47 and 154 were not debrominated. This congener-specific debromination is consistent with the field results. Both in vitro and field results suggested selective debromination at the meta position. The CB congeners were not transformed in vitro. This result is also consistent with the field results, that PCBs were more biomagnified than PBDEs. We conclude that metabolizability is an important factor in the biomagnification of chemicals, but other factors must be responsible for the lower biomagnification of PBDEs in natural ecosystems.

  12. TNT Degradation by Natural Microbial Assemblages at Frontal Boundaries Between Water Masses in Coastal Ecosystems (ER-2124 Interim Report)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-26

    relatively high organic mangrove lagoon water and lower organic open ocean water. In nature, this may occur with tidal flushing or from a rain event...During this first year of sampling in the Florida Keys, USA, we found that mixing experiments between mangrove lagoon water and open ocean Gulf of...they to migrate from mangrove-dominated lagoon systems to adjacent coastal waterways in tropical ecosystems. Understanding the relationships between

  13. Biological indicators of changes in water quality and habitats of the coastal and estuarine areas of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem; Chapter 11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wachnicka, Anna; Wingard, Georgiana L.; Entry, James A.; Gottlieb, Andrew D.; Jayachandran, Krish; Ogram, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the application of various biological indicators to studying the anthropogenic and natural changes in water quality and habitats that have occurred in the coastal and estuarine areas of the Greater Everglades ecosystem.

  14. Nutrient dynamics and primary production in a pristine coastal mangrove ecosystem: Andaman Islands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, E. N.; Nickodem, K.; Siemann, A. L.; Hoeher, A.; Sundareshwar, P. V.; Ramesh, R.; Purvaja, R.; Banerjee, K.; Manickam, S.; Haran, H.

    2012-12-01

    Mangrove ecosystems play a key role in supporting coastal food webs and nutrient cycles in the coastal zone. Their strategic position between the land and the sea make them important sites for land-ocean interaction. As part of an Indo-US summer field course we investigated changes in the water chemistry in a pristine mangrove creek located at Wright Myo in the Andaman Islands, India. This study was conducted during the wet season (June 2012) to evaluate the influence of the coastal mangrove wetlands on the water quality and productivity in adjoining pelagic waters. Over a full tidal cycle spanning approximately 24 hrs, we measured nutrient concentrations and other ancillary parameters (e.g. dissolved oxygen, turbidity, salinity, etc.) hourly to evaluate water quality changes in incoming and ebbing tides. Nutrient analyses had the following concentration ranges (μM): nitrite 0.2-0.9, nitrate 2.0-11.5, ammonium 1.3-7.5, dissolved inorganic phosphate 0.7-2.8. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen to dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIN/DIP) ratio was very low relative to an optimal ratio, suggesting growth is nitrogen limited. In addition, we conducted primary production assays to investigate the factors that controlled primary production in this pristine creek. The experiment was carried out in situ using the Winkler method at low and high tide. Four-hour incubation of light and dark bottles representing a fixed control, non-fertilized, fertilized with nitrate, and fertilized with phosphate enabled the measurement of both net oxygen production and dark respiration. The low tide experiment suggests the ecosystem is heterotrophic because the oxygen measured in the light bottles was consistently less than that of the dark bottles. This result may be an experimental artifact of placing the glass bottles in the sun for too long prior to incubation, potentially leading to photolysis of large organic molecules in the light bottles. The high tide experiment also displayed

  15. Modelling environmental controls on ecosystem photosynthesis and the carbon isotope composition of ecosystem-respired CO2 in a coastal Douglas-fir forest.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tiebo; Flanagan, Lawrence B; Jassal, Rachhpal S; Black, T Andrew

    2008-04-01

    We developed and applied an ecosystem-scale model that calculated leaf CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance, chloroplast CO2 concentration and the carbon isotope composition of carbohydrate formed during photosynthesis separately for sunlit and shaded leaves within multiple canopy layers. The ecosystem photosynthesis model was validated by comparison to leaf-level gas exchange measurements and estimates of ecosystem-scale photosynthesis from eddy covariance measurements made in a coastal Douglas-fir forest on Vancouver Island. A good agreement was also observed between modelled and measured delta13C values of ecosystem-respired CO2 (deltaR). The modelled deltaR values showed strong responses to variation in photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), air temperature, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and available soil moisture in a manner consistent with leaf-level studies of photosynthetic 13C discrimination. Sensitivity tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of (1) changes in the lag between the time of CO2 fixation and the conversion of organic matter back to CO2; (2) shifts in the proportion of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration; (3) isotope fractionation during respiration; and (4) environmentally induced changes in mesophyll conductance, on modelled delta(R) values. Our results indicated that deltaR is a good proxy for canopy-level C(c)/C(a) and 13C discrimination during photosynthetic gas exchange, and therefore has several applications in ecosystem physiology.

  16. Using remote sensing to assess tsunami-induced impacts on coastal forest ecosystems at the Andaman Sea coast of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, H.; Kaiser, G.; Sterr, H.; Ludwig, R.

    2010-04-01

    The December 2004 tsunami strongly impacted coastal ecosystems along the Andaman Sea coast of Thailand. In this paper tsunami-induced damage of five different coastal forest ecosystems at the Phang-Nga province coast is analysed with a remote sensing driven approach based on multi-date IKONOS imagery. Two change detection algorithms, change vector analysis (CVA) and direct multi-date classification (DMC), are applied and compared regarding their applicability to assess tsunami impacts. The analysis shows that DMC outperforms CVA in terms of accuracy (Kappa values for DMC ranging between 0.947 and 0.950 and between 0.610-0.730 for CVA respectively) and the degree of detail of the created change classes. Results from DMC show that mangroves were the worst damaged among the five forests, with a 55% of directly damaged forest in the study area, followed by casuarina forest and coconut plantation. Additionally this study points out the uncertainties in both methods which are mainly due to a lack of ground truth information for the time between the two acquisition dates of satellite images. The created damage maps help to better understand the way the tsunami impacted coastal forests and give basic information for estimating tsunami sensitivity of coastal forests.

  17. Information Needs Assessment for Coastal and Marine Management and Policy: Ecosystem Services Under Changing Climatic, Land Use, and Demographic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Kaitlin A.; Granek, Elise F.; Lubitow, Amy

    2015-12-01

    Changing climatic, demographic, and land use conditions are projected to alter the provisioning of ecosystem services in estuarine, coastal, and nearshore marine ecosystems, necessitating mitigation and adaptation policies and management. The current paradigm of research efforts occurring in parallel to, rather than in collaboration with, decision makers will be insufficient for the rapid responses required to adapt to and mitigate for projected changing conditions. Here, we suggest a different paradigm: one where research begins by engaging decision makers in the identification of priority data needs (biophysical, economic, and social). This paper uses synthesized interview data to provide insight into the varied demands for scientific research as described by decision makers working on coastal issues in Oregon, USA. The findings highlight the need to recognize (1) the differing framing of ecosystem services by decision makers versus scientists; and (2) the differing data priorities relevant to inland versus coastal decision makers. The findings further serve to highlight the need for decision makers, scientists, and funders to engage in increased communication. This research is an important first step in advancing efforts toward evidence-based decision making in Oregon and provides a template for further research across the US.

  18. Information Needs Assessment for Coastal and Marine Management and Policy: Ecosystem Services Under Changing Climatic, Land Use, and Demographic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Kaitlin A; Granek, Elise F; Lubitow, Amy

    2015-12-01

    Changing climatic, demographic, and land use conditions are projected to alter the provisioning of ecosystem services in estuarine, coastal, and nearshore marine ecosystems, necessitating mitigation and adaptation policies and management. The current paradigm of research efforts occurring in parallel to, rather than in collaboration with, decision makers will be insufficient for the rapid responses required to adapt to and mitigate for projected changing conditions. Here, we suggest a different paradigm: one where research begins by engaging decision makers in the identification of priority data needs (biophysical, economic, and social). This paper uses synthesized interview data to provide insight into the varied demands for scientific research as described by decision makers working on coastal issues in Oregon, USA. The findings highlight the need to recognize (1) the differing framing of ecosystem services by decision makers versus scientists; and (2) the differing data priorities relevant to inland versus coastal decision makers. The findings further serve to highlight the need for decision makers, scientists, and funders to engage in increased communication. This research is an important first step in advancing efforts toward evidence-based decision making in Oregon and provides a template for further research across the US.

  19. Plastic particles in coastal pelagic ecosystems of the Northeast Pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Miriam J; Watson, William; Bowlin, Noelle M; Sheavly, Seba B

    2011-02-01

    , 1-2.5 mm, >2.5-5 mm, >5-10 mm, and >10 mm. Product fragments accounted for the majority of the particles, and most were less than 2.5 mm in size. The ubiquity of such particles in the survey areas and predominance of sizes <2.5 mm implies persistence in these pelagic ecosystems as a result of continuous breakdown from larger plastic debris fragments, and widespread distribution by ocean currents. Detailed investigations of the trophic ecology of individual zooplankton species, and their encounter rates with various size ranges of plastic particles in the marine pelagic environment, are required in order to understand the potential for ingestion of such debris particles by these organisms. Ongoing plankton sampling programs by marine research institutes in large marine ecosystems are good potential sources of data for continued assessment of the abundance, distribution and potential impact of small plastic debris in productive coastal pelagic zones.

  20. Resolving variability of phytoplankton species composition and blooms in coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klais, Riina; Cloern, James E.; Harrison, Paul J.

    2015-09-01

    The contributions to this special volume focus on phytoplankton dynamics in coastal ecosystems, where perturbations from terrestrial, atmospheric, oceanic sources and human activities converge to cause changes in phytoplankton communities. Analyses of phytoplankton time series across the range of coastal sites, either as meta-analyses or single site based studies, complete our general understanding of the ecology of coastal phytoplankton dynamics. The role of short-term variability of the phytoplankton community appears to be more important for the annual primary production than previously thought, especially during the high biomass spring bloom period (Gallegos and Neale, 2015). Diel vertical migration of motile species is commonplace even in shallow and presumably well-mixed estuaries (Hall et al., 2015). Comparing phytoplankton patterns in various sites reveals contrasting long-term trends in the last two decades, reflecting the recent history of economic growth in related coastal areas. In Chesapeake Bay Estuary (US east coast) and Thau Lagoon (southern France), oligotrophication has been achieved by different nutrient reduction measures (Gowen et al., 2015; Harding et al., 2015), while in the Patos Lagoon Estuary (Brazil) and SE coast of Arabian Sea, the last two decades showed signs of eutrophication, following the more recent period of economic growth in the area (Haraguchi et al., 2015; Godhe et al., 2015). The global meta-analyses in this volume exposed the great challenges involved when working with this type of data, due to the diversity of idiosyncrasies characteristic to most phytoplankton time series, for example, the taxonomic practices, cell volume calculations (Harrison et al., 2015), volume to carbon conversions (Carstensen et al., 2015; Olli et al., 2015). But also the diversity of the patterns themselves makes analyses challenging (Carstensen et al., 2015; Thompson et al., 2015). To begin to move towards more similar practices in plankton

  1. Capturing ecosystem services, stakeholders' preferences and trade-offs in coastal aquaculture decisions: a Bayesian belief network application.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Laetitia Helene Marie; Brugere, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    Aquaculture activities are embedded in complex social-ecological systems. However, aquaculture development decisions have tended to be driven by revenue generation, failing to account for interactions with the environment and the full value of the benefits derived from services provided by local ecosystems. Trade-offs resulting from changes in ecosystem services provision and associated impacts on livelihoods are also often overlooked. This paper proposes an innovative application of Bayesian belief networks - influence diagrams - as a decision support system for mediating trade-offs arising from the development of shrimp aquaculture in Thailand. Senior experts were consulted (n = 12) and primary farm data on the economics of shrimp farming (n = 20) were collected alongside secondary information on ecosystem services, in order to construct and populate the network. Trade-offs were quantitatively assessed through the generation of a probabilistic impact matrix. This matrix captures nonlinearity and uncertainty and describes the relative performance and impacts of shrimp farming management scenarios on local livelihoods. It also incorporates export revenues and provision and value of ecosystem services such as coastal protection and biodiversity. This research shows that Bayesian belief modeling can support complex decision-making on pathways for sustainable coastal aquaculture development and thus contributes to the debate on the role of aquaculture in social-ecological resilience and economic development.

  2. Capturing Ecosystem Services, Stakeholders' Preferences and Trade-Offs in Coastal Aquaculture Decisions: A Bayesian Belief Network Application

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Laetitia Helene Marie; Brugere, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    Aquaculture activities are embedded in complex social-ecological systems. However, aquaculture development decisions have tended to be driven by revenue generation, failing to account for interactions with the environment and the full value of the benefits derived from services provided by local ecosystems. Trade-offs resulting from changes in ecosystem services provision and associated impacts on livelihoods are also often overlooked. This paper proposes an innovative application of Bayesian belief networks - influence diagrams - as a decision support system for mediating trade-offs arising from the development of shrimp aquaculture in Thailand. Senior experts were consulted (n = 12) and primary farm data on the economics of shrimp farming (n = 20) were collected alongside secondary information on ecosystem services, in order to construct and populate the network. Trade-offs were quantitatively assessed through the generation of a probabilistic impact matrix. This matrix captures nonlinearity and uncertainty and describes the relative performance and impacts of shrimp farming management scenarios on local livelihoods. It also incorporates export revenues and provision and value of ecosystem services such as coastal protection and biodiversity. This research shows that Bayesian belief modeling can support complex decision-making on pathways for sustainable coastal aquaculture development and thus contributes to the debate on the role of aquaculture in social-ecological resilience and economic development. PMID:24155876

  3. Application of the Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 to benthos in Dutch transitional and coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, W. M. G. M.; Boon, A. R.; Gittenberger, A.; Walvoort, D. J. J.; Lavaleye, M.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Verschoor, A. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 (BEQI2) is the Dutch multi-metric index (MMI) for assessing the status and trend of benthic invertebrates in transitional and coastal waters for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). It contains the same indicators, i.e. species richness, Shannon index and AMBI, as in the multivariate m-AMBI. The latter MMI has been adopted by several European countries in the context of WFD implementation. In contrast to m-AMBI, the BEQI2 calculation procedure has been strongly simplified and consists of two steps, i.e. the separate indicator values are normalized using their long-term reference values resulting in three Ecological Quality Ratios (EQRs), which are subsequently averaged to give one BEQI2 value. Using this method only small numbers of samples need to be analysed by Dutch benthos laboratories annually, without the necessity to co-analyse a larger historical dataset. BEQI2 EQR values appeared to correlate quantitatively very well with m-AMBI EQR values. In addition, a data pooling procedure has been added to the BEQI2 tool which enables the pooling of small core samples (0.01-0.025 m2) into larger standardized data pools of 0.1 m2 in order to meet the data requirements of the AMBI indicator and to obtain comparable reference values. Furthermore, the BEQI2 tool automatically and efficiently converts species synonym names into standardized species names. The BEQI2 tool has been applied to all Dutch benthos data monitored by Rijkswaterstaat in the period of 1991-2010 in the transitional and coastal waters and salt lakes and these results are reported here for the first time. Reference values for species richness and Shannon index (99 percentile values) and AMBI reference values (1 percentile values) were estimated for all water body-ecotopes and are discussed. BEQI2 results for all these water bodies are discussed in view of natural and human pressures. The pressure sensitivity of the BEQI2 for sewage and dredging/dumping, via the

  4. Skill assessment of an integrated modeling system for shallow coastal and estuarine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. Peter; Kim, Taeyun

    2009-02-01

    The predictive skills of an integrated physical-biogeochemical modeling system (CH3D-IMS) for shallow estuarine and coastal ecosystems are assessed using available field data in the Indian River Lagoon estuarine system, Florida during 1998-2000. The cornerstone of the modeling system is the circulation model CH3D (Curvilinear-grid Hydrodynamics in 3D), which is coupled to models of wave (SMB), sediment transport, water quality (nutrients: N, P, and Si, three phytoplankton species, zooplankton, and dissolved oxygen), light attenuation, and seagrass. To resolve the complex geometry and bathymetry of the estuarine system, the modeling system uses a boundary-fitted non-orthogonal curvilinear grid in the horizontal direction and a terrain-following sigma grid in the vertical direction. While water level and salinity data were collected continuously (at 15-min intervals) at 10 fixed stations, most water quality data were collected at much longer time scales (bi-weekly to quarterly) during ship surveys at more than 30 stations. Sediment-water quality data were collected at 24 stations once in 1998. Model skills for hydrodynamic and water quality simulations are assessed in terms of the absolute relative errors and the relative operating characteristic (ROC) scores. Both methods indicate that the modeling system has skills in simulating water level, salinity, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and dissolved nutrients, with the ROC score between 0.6 and 0.862, indicating skills for most of the variables. Skills for simulating total suspended solids (TSS) and particulate nutrients are lacking, with ROC score and: between 0.5-0.6. Simulated diffuse attenuation coefficient, which depends on TSS, chlorophyll a, and dissolved organic matter, has an ROC of 0.55. Using high frequency time-varying field data collected during two episodic events in the study period, the skills of CH3D-IMS improved significantly for both TSS and particulate nutrients. Model skills for particulate

  5. Turf wars: experimental tests for alternative stable states in a two-phase coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Gretchen; Lee, William G; Pritchard, Daniel W; Wilson, J Bastow

    2014-02-01

    Alternative stable states have long been thought to exist in natural communities, but direct evidence for their presence and for the environmental switches that cause them has been scarce. Using a combination of greenhouse and field experiments, we investigated the environmental drivers associated with two distinctive herbaceous communities in coastal ecosystems in New Zealand. In a mosaic unrelated to micro-topography, a community dominated largely by native turf species (notably Leptinella dioica, Samolus repens, and Selliera radicans) alternates with vegetation comprising exotic (i.e., nonnative) pasture species (notably Agrostis stolonifera, Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne, and Trifolium repens). The species of these two communities differ in functional characters related to leaf longevity and growth rate, and occupy soils of differing nitrogen levels. Both spatial and environmental factors influenced the species composition locally. Reciprocal transplants of soil, with and without associated vegetation, showed that a native turf community developed when sward or soil from either community was bounded by turf, and a pasture community developed when sward or soil from either community was surrounded by pasture. In artificial mixed communities in the greenhouse, turf was able to invade the pasture community where the vegetation was clipped to simulate grazing, and also where Trifolium was removed and/or salt spray was applied. The pasture community invaded the turf where Trifolium was present or nitrogen was added. These results were supported by trends in experimentally manipulated field plots, where the amount of turf cover increased when nitrogen was kept low and when salt spray was applied, whereas pasture cover increased in the absence of salt spray. Thus, persistence of the native turf community is dependent on grazing, both directly and via its effect on keeping nitrogen levels low by excluding the exotic, nitrogen-fixing Trifolium, and by exposing the

  6. Light-stress avoidance mechanisms in a Sphagnum-dominated wet coastal Arctic tundra ecosystem in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Zona, D; Oechel, Walter C; Richards, James H; Hastings, Steven; Kopetz, Irene; Ikawa, Hiroki; Oberbauer, Steven

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic experiences a high-radiation environment in the summer with 24-hour daylight for more than two months. Damage to plants and ecosystem metabolism can be muted by overcast conditions common in much of the Arctic. However, with climate change, extreme dry years and clearer skies could lead to the risk of increased photoxidation and photoinhibition in Arctic primary producers. Mosses, which often exceed the NPP of vascular plants in Arctic areas, are often understudied. As a result, the effect of specific environmental factors, including light, on these growth forms is poorly understood. Here, we investigated net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the ecosystem scale, net Sphagnum CO2 exchange (NSE), and photoinhibition to better understand the impact of light on carbon exchange from a moss-dominated coastal tundra ecosystem during the summer season 2006. Sphagnum photosynthesis showed photoinhibition early in the season coupled with low ecosystem NEE. However, later in the season, Sphagnum maintained a significant CO2 uptake, probably for the development of subsurface moss layers protected from strong radiation. We suggest that the compact canopy structure of Sphagnum reduces light penetration to the subsurface layers of the moss mat and thereby protects the active photosynthetic tissues from damage. This stress avoidance mechanism allowed Sphagnum to constitute a significant percentage (up to 60%) of the ecosystem net daytime CO2 uptake at the end of the growing season despite the high levels of radiation experienced.

  7. Body-size spectra of biofilm-dwelling protozoa and their seasonal shift in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Xu, Guangjian; Wang, Zheng; Xu, Henglong

    2016-10-01

    Community-based assessment of protozoa is usually performed at a taxon-dependent resolution. As an inherent 'taxon-free' trait, however, body-size spectrum has proved to be a highly informative indicator to summarize the functional structure of a community in both community research and monitoring programs in aquatic ecosystems. To demonstrate the relationships between the taxon-free resolution of protozoan communities and water conditions, the body-size spectra of biofilm-dwelling protozoa and their seasonal shift and environmental drivers were explored based on an annual dataset collected monthly from coastal waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China. Body sizes were calculated in equivalent spherical diameter (ESD). Among a total of 8 body-size ranks, S2 (19-27μm), S3 (28-36μm), S4 (37-50μm) and S5 (53-71μm) were the top four levels in frequency of occurrence, while rank S1 (13-17μm), S2 and S4 were the dominant levels in abundance. These dominants showed a clear seasonal succession: S2/S4 (spring)→S2/S4 (summer)→S4 (autumn)→S2 (winter) in frequency of occurrence; S1 (spring)→S4 (summer)→S2 (autumn)→S1 (winter) in abundance. Bootstrapped average analysis showed a clear seasonal shift in body-size spectra of the protozoa during a 1-year cycle, and the best-matching analysis demonstrated that the temporal variations in frequency of occurrence and abundance were significantly correlated with water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), alone or in combination with chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nutrients. Thus, the body-size spectra of biofilm-dwelling protozoa were seasonally shaped and might be used as a time and cost efficient bioindicator of water quality in marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental restoration of a salt marsh with some comments on ecological restoration of coastal vegetated ecosystems in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon Joo; Je, Jong Geel; Woo, Han Jun

    2011-03-01

    Since the 1980s, the coastal wetlands in Korea have been rapidly degraded and destroyed mainly due to reclamation and landfills for coastal development. In order to recover damaged coastal environments and to develop wetland restoration technologies, a 4-year study on ecological the restoration of coastal vegetated ecosystems was started in 1998. As one of a series of studies, a small-scale experiment on salt marsh restoration was carried out from April 2000 to August 2001. The experiment was designed to find effective means of ecological restoration through a comparison of the changes in environmental components and species structure between two different experimental plots created using sediment fences, one with and one without small canals. Temporal variation in surface elevation, sedimentary facies, and benthic species were measured seasonally in each plot and in the adjacent natural reference sites. Monthly exposure occurred from 330 cm to mean sea level, which represents the critical tidal level (CTL) at which salt marsh plants colonize. Vegetation, especially Suaeda japonica, colonized the site the following spring and recovered to a similar extent in the natural marshes 16 months later. The sedimentary results indicated that the sediment fences had effects on particle size and sediment accumulation, especially in the plot with small canals. This experiment also showed that tidal height, especially that exceeding the CTL, is an important factor in the recovery of the benthic fauna of salt marshes. From these results, we suggested that designs for the restoration of salt marsh ecosystems must consider the inclusion of a tidal height exceeding CTL, as this may allow reconstruction of the previous natural ecosystem without artificial transplanting.

  9. Oceanographic implications of the Cabo Catoche (Northeast Yucatan) upwelling and its effects on the coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Mendoza, O.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Herrera Silveira, J.; Cárdenas-Palómo, N.; Ruiz, G.

    2013-05-01

    The coasts of the world where upwelling events occur are intrinsically related to the human population, mainly because of their large fisheries, socioeconomic repercussion and implications concerning the health of the ecosystem. In the northeast of the Yucatan Peninsula occurs an upwelling event known as the Yucatan upwelling (YU) associated with the current of the same name. The mechanisms that generate the YU are still under discussion. In terms of seasonality it is agreed that this is annual, occurring between April and September. During spring and summer, the northeast coast of the Peninsula between CaboCatoche and Isla Contoy becomes a productive and diverse pelagic ecosystem, unique to the region. It is classified as a priority marine zone host to close to 59 species protected by the national laws. It is also recognized as an important priority marine site because of its fishery. Also, the largest global aggregation of whale sharks, the world's biggest fish, is found at this site. There is a strong connection between the physical and the biological components of the system, however the coastal extent, seasonality, and magnitude of these processes need to be determined. Therefore an in-situ study was designed in the coastal region of CaboCatoche, where a 50 km transect was positioned along shelf and another across shelf 20 km, where water was collected to determine nutrient concentrations and CTD profiles were casted during the summer of 2007, 2008 and 2011. Two acoustic profilers were installed 12 km from the coast, which recorded currents and temperature by 2 years. Another profiler located 17 km from the coast to recorded data by 8 years. Atmospheric pressure and temperature were measured, as a wind fields from NOAA. Maps were created for the vertical distribution of temperature (18-31°C), salinity (35-38 psu), density (22-27 kg/m3) and chlorophyll (0.05-12.7 mg/m3). Frequency periods were estimated for temperature, currents, wind and atmospheric pressure

  10. Quantitative aspects of inorganic nutrient fluxes in the Gazi Bay (Kenya): implications for coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mwashote, Benjamin M; Jumba, Isaac O

    2002-11-01

    Fluxes of dissolved inorganic nutrients: NH4+, NO2-, NO3-, PO4(3-) and Si(OH)4 from nearshore sediments of Gazi Bay were measured in situ within mangrove, seagrass and coral reef biotopes using benthic flux bell-jar chambers of cross-sectional area 0.066 m2 and volume 0.0132 m3. The objectives were: (1) to determine the influence of benthic fluxes, fluvial discharge and seasonal variations on the nutrient budget in the Bay waters; (2) to determine the effect of tidal and spatial variations on nutrient loads in the water column and (3) to establish the relative importance of the nutrient sources with regard to total community production of the Bay. The directly measured fluxes ranged from -270 to +148 micromol NH4+-N/m2/h; -60 to +63 micromol NO2(-)-N/m2/h; -79 to +41 micromol NO3(-)-N/m2/h; -79 to +75 micromol PO4(3-)-P/m2/h and +30 to +350 micromol Si(OH)4-Si/m2/h for and respectively. It was established that benthic fluxes are the major sources of dissolved inorganic NH4+, NO2- and Si(OH)4 while fluvial sources are important for NO3- and PO4(3-) into Gazi Bay waters. Seasonal variations had an appreciable effect on the PO4(3-) fluxes, N:Si ratio, river nutrient discharge, plankton productivity and important environmental factors such as salinity and temperature. Tidal and spatial variations had no significant effect on nutrient concentrations and net fluxes within the water column. The results imply that benthic fluxes are largely responsible for the nutrient dynamics of the nearshore coastal ecosystems especially where direct terrestrial inputs do not contribute significantly to the nutrient budget.

  11. The contribution of oyster microbiomes to denitrification and nitrous oxide emissions in estuarine and coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfken, A. M.; Song, B.; Smyth, A.

    2016-02-01

    Oysters are important nitrogen transformers in estuaries. Studies have shown that benthic-pelagic coupling by oysters stimulates sedimentary denitrification. The microbiomes living in and on oysters may also have high denitrification activity, generating N2O and N2 as end products. In order to evaluate the importance of oyster microbiome denitrification and its contribution to N2O emission in estuaries, continuous flow experiments with 15NO3- addition were conducted with oyster reef adjacent sediments, live oysters, live oysters with biofilm removed, and oyster shells. Denitrification rates were highest in live oysters, followed by scrubbed oysters, oyster shells, and finally by sediments, with the lowest activity. N2O production followed a similar trend, but with scrubbed oysters and shells being similar. We also found a significant linear correlation between N2 and N2O production, which indicates that denitrification is the source of N2O from oyster and oyster shells. Molecular analysis of microbiomes in oyster shells, guts and gills will be conducted using next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and quantitative PCR assays targeting the functional genes in denitrification. We expect that within live oysters, the anaerobic gut microbiome will have higher abundances of denitrifiers than the shell biofilms or sediments, corresponding to higher denitrification activities in live oysters. This study will demonstrate that enhanced denitrification activity in oysters, in conjunction with sedimentary denitrification stimulated by oyster biodeposits, leads to oyster reefs being nitrogen removal hotspots and potential emission sources of N2O in estuarine and coastal ecosystems. In addition, the importance of microbiome structures in relation to oyster denitrification will be revealed.

  12. Parasites of the grouper fish Epinephelus coioides (Serranidae) as potential environmental indicators in Indonesian coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kleinertz, S; Palm, H W

    2015-01-01

    A total of 195 Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) were studied for fish parasites from Javanese (Segara Anakan lagoon) and Balinese waters. Up to 25 different parasite species belonging to the following taxa: one Ciliata, one Microsporea, five Digenea, one Monogenea, four Cestoda, four Nematoda, one Acanthocephala, one Hirudinea and seven Crustacea were identified with four new host and locality records. The dominant parasites included the monogenean Pseudorhabdosynochus lantauensis (53.3-97.1%), the nematode Spirophilometra endangae (23.3-42.9%), the digenean Didymodiclinus sp. (2.9-40.0%), the nematodes Philometra sp. (22.6-34.3%) and Raphidascaris sp. (2.9-28.6%), and the isopod Alcirona sp. (6.7-31.4%). Regional differences for E. coioides were found in terms of endoparasite diversity, total diversity according to Shannon-Wiener, Simpson index and Evenness. A comparison with published data from Sumatera revealed highest endoparasite diversity (Shannon-Wiener: 1.86/1.67-2.04) and lowest ectoparasite/endoparasite ratio (0.73/0.57-0.88) off the Balinese coast, followed by Lampung Bay, Sumatera (1.84; 0.67), off the coast of Segara Anakan lagoon (1.71; 0.71), and in the lagoon (0.30/0.19-0.66; 0.85/0.67-1.00). The presented data demonstrate the natural range of these parameters and parasite prevalences according to habitat and region, allowing adjustment of the scale that has been used in the visual integration of the parasite parameters into a star graph. The parasite fauna of E. coioides in Segara Anakan lagoon 'improved' from 2004 until 2008/09, possibly related to earlier oil spill events in 2002 and 2004. The use of grouper fish parasites as an early warning system for environmental change in Indonesian coastal ecosystems is discussed.

  13. Organization of marine phenology data in support of planning and conservation in ocean and coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Kathryn A.; Fornwall, Mark D.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Griffis, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    Among the many effects of climate change is its influence on the phenology of biota. In marine and coastal ecosystems, phenological shifts have been documented for multiple life forms; however, biological data related to marine species' phenology remain difficult to access and is under-used. We conducted an assessment of potential sources of biological data for marine species and their availability for use in phenological analyses and assessments. Our evaluations showed that data potentially related to understanding marine species' phenology are available through online resources of governmental, academic, and non-governmental organizations, but appropriate datasets are often difficult to discover and access, presenting opportunities for scientific infrastructure improvement. The developing Federal Marine Data Architecture when fully implemented will improve data flow and standardization for marine data within major federal repositories and provide an archival repository for collaborating academic and public data contributors. Another opportunity, largely untapped, is the engagement of citizen scientists in standardized collection of marine phenology data and contribution of these data to established data flows. Use of metadata with marine phenology related keywords could improve discovery and access to appropriate datasets. When data originators choose to self-publish, publication of research datasets with a digital object identifier, linked to metadata, will also improve subsequent discovery and access. Phenological changes in the marine environment will affect human economics, food systems, and recreation. No one source of data will be sufficient to understand these changes. The collective attention of marine data collectors is needed—whether with an agency, an educational institution, or a citizen scientist group—toward adopting the data management processes and standards needed to ensure availability of sufficient and useable marine data to understand

  14. Carbon sources supporting a diverse fish community in a tropical coastal ecosystem (Gazi Bay, Kenya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyunja, J.; Ntiba, M.; Onyari, J.; Mavuti, K.; Soetaert, K.; Bouillon, S.

    2009-07-01

    Interlinked mangrove-seagrass ecosystems are characteristic features of many tropical coastal areas, where they act as feeding and nursery grounds for a variety of fishes and invertebrates. The autotrophic carbon sources supporting fisheries in Gazi bay (Kenya) were studied in three sites, two located in the tidal creeks flowing through extensive mangrove forests, another site located in the subtidal seagrass meadows, approximately 2.5 km away from the forest. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope composition of 42 fish species, 2 crustacean species and a range of potential primary food sources (e.g., mangroves, seagrasses and epiphytes, macroalgae) were analysed. There was considerable overlap in the δ 13C signatures between fish (-16.1 ± 2.1‰), seagrasses (-15.1 ± 3.0‰), seagrass epiphytes (-13.6 ± 3.3‰), and macroalgae (-20.4 ± 3.1‰). Nevertheless, the signatures for most primary producers were sufficiently distinct to indicate that the dominant carbon sources for fish were mainly derived from the seagrass and their associated epiphytic community, and possibly macroalgae. Mangrove-derived organic matter contributes only marginally to the overall fish food web. Carbon supporting these fish communities was derived directly through grazing by herbivorous and some omnivorous fishes, or indirectly through the benthic food web. Fishes from the mangrove creeks had distinctly lower δ 13C signatures (-16.8 ± 2.0‰) compared to those collected in the adjacent seagrass beds (-14.7 ± 1.7‰). This indicated that these habitats were used as distinct sheltering and feeding zones for the fishes collected, with minimal degree of exchange within the fish communities despite their regular movement pattern.

  15. [Distribution and physicochemical properties of aquatic colloids in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Gu, Li-Jun; Yang, Yi; Liu, Min; Nie, Ming-Hua; Li, Tao; Hou, Li-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFUF) technique was applied for isolating colloids from waters in the Yangtze estuarine and coastal ecosystem. The stability and physicochemical properties of colloids were analyzed quantitatively. Colloidal size and Zeta-potential at XP and WSK station decreased with the increasing pH, and reached the point of zero charge at pH < 2 and pH 3.8, respectively. The colloidal organic carbon (COC) concentration in the collected samples was 7.7-35.7 micromol x L(-1), occupying 7.1% -41.7% of the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (3DEEM) was used to analyze the samples and the results showed tryptophan-like fluorescence peaks, UV fulvic-like fluorescence peaks and humic-like fluorescence peaks. Concentrations of colloidal Na, Mg, K, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn and Ni accounted for 0.33%, 5.7%, 0.975%, 1%, 7.2%, 7%, 11.9%, 15.7%, 5.5%, 10.5% and 11.3% of the dissolved phase in average, and the binding capacity of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Ni with COC was generally higher than that of Na, Mg, K, Ca. There were significant correlations between colloidal size and salinity, between DOC and salinity, and between UOC and salinity, but no linear relationship between COC and salinity was found. The total concentration of trace metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Ni) and COC showed a linear relationship.

  16. Robust Modeling of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes from Coastal Wetland Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, O. I.; Ishtiaq, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many critical wetland biogeochemical processes are still largely unknown or poorly understood at best. Yet, available models for predicting wetland greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes (e.g., CO2, CH4, and N2O) are generally mechanistic in nature. This knowledge gap leads to inappropriate process descriptions or over-parameterizations in existing mechanistic models, which often fail to provide accurate and robust predictions across time and space. We developed a systematic data-analytics and informatics method to identify the dominant controls and quantify the relative linkages of wetland GHG fluxes in relation to various hydro-climatic, sea level, biogeochemical and ecological drivers. The method was applied to data collected from 2012-14 through an extensive field campaign from different blue carbon sites of Waquoit Bay, MA. Multivariate pattern recognition techniques of principal component and factor analyses were employed to identify the dominant controls of wetland GHG fluxes; classifying and grouping process variables based on their similarity and interrelation patterns. Power-law based partial least squares regression models were developed to quantify the relative linkages of major GHGs with different process drivers and stressors, as well as to achieve site-specific predictions of GHG fluxes. Wetland biogeochemical similitude and scaling laws were also investigated to unravel emergent patterns and organizing principles of wetland GHG fluxes. The research findings will guide the development of parsimonious empirical to appropriate mechanistic models for spatio-temporally robust predictions of GHGs fluxes and carbon sequestration from coastal wetland ecosystems. The research is part of two current projects funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation; focusing on wetland data collections, knowledge formation, formulation of robust GHGs prediction models, and development of ecological engineering tools.

  17. Effects of olive oil wastes on river basins and an oligotrophic coastal marine ecosystem: a case study in Greece.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, A; Anastasopoulou, E; Dassenakis, M; Hatzianestis, I; Paraskevopoulou, V; Simboura, N; Rousselaki, E; Drakopoulou, P

    2014-11-01

    This work aims to contribute to the knowledge of the impacts of olive oil waste discharge to freshwater and oligotrophic marine environments, since the ecological impact of olive oil wastes in riverine and coastal marine ecosystems, which are the final repositories of the pollutants, is a great environmental problem on a global scale, mostly concerning all the Mediterranean countries with olive oil production. Messinia, in southwestern Greece, is one of the greatest olive oil production areas in Europe. During the last decade around 1.4×10(6)tons of olive oil mill wastewater has been disposed in the rivers of Messinia and finally entered the marine ecosystem of Messiniakos gulf. The pollution from olive oil mill wastewater in the main rivers of Messinia and the oligotrophic coastal zone of Messiniakos gulf and its effects on marine organisms were evaluated, before, during and after the olive oil production period. Elevated amounts of phenols (36.2-178 mg L(-1)) and high concentrations of ammonium (7.29-18.9 mmol L(-1)) and inorganic phosphorus (0.5-7.48 mmol L(-1)) were measured in small streams where the liquid disposals from several olive oil industries were gathered before their discharge in the major rivers of Messinia. The large number of olive oil units has downgraded the riverine and marine ecosystems during the productive period and a period more than five months is needed for the recovery of the ecosystem. Statistical analysis showed that the enrichment of freshwater and the coastal zone of Messiniakos gulf in ammonia, nitrite, phenols, total organic carbon, copper, manganese and nickel was directly correlated with the wastes from olive oil. Toxicity tests using 24h LC50 Palaemonidae shrimp confirm that olive mill wastewater possesses very high toxicity in the aquatic environment.

  18. Modelling of contemporary sedimentation in the Azov Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokina, V.; Berdnikov, S.; Venevsky, S.

    2009-04-01

    Contemporary sedimentation in the Azov Sea was estimated spatially detailed mathematical model for transport and sedimentation of the particulate matter. The model TRASEAS includes dynamic of suspended and eposited terrigenous matter in water column and at the bottom and accounts for realistic bathymetry. Distinct spatiotemporal features of the terrigenous sedimentation in the second half of the 20th century were recognized. The decrease in the accumulation of terrigenous sediments and diminishing in the areas with a negative balance of the terrigenous matter was found. This was related to the 2.5-fold fall in the volumes of the matter supplied from land. In general, during the second half of the 20thcentury the rate of sedimentation decreased from 1000 to 400 g/m2/year with spatial variation. In the central part of the sea, which is relatively far from source of terrigenous matter, the rate of sedimentation has value of about 300 g/m2/year. In Taganrog Bay and in the inner sea , areas with a negative balance of terrigenous sedimentation increased up to 30%.

  19. Contrasting Patterns of Carbon Flux and Storage in Pine Forest Ecosystems of the Atlantic Coastal Plain: Implications for Ecosystem Restoration and Climate Change Mitigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. R.; Christensen, N.; Cohen, S.; Cunningham, P.

    2015-12-01

    Forest ecosystems in the Southeastern US have high rates of productivity but are underutilized as a medium for the mitigation of atmospheric CO2. In the lower Atlantic coastal plain, three pine species (longleaf [Pinus palustris], loblolly [P. taeda] and pond [P. serotina]) are the dominant overstory trees in a variety of wetland and upland ecosystems. These forest types can exist in close proximity throughout coastal plain landscapes, but exhibit contrasting patterns of productivity, pyrogenic C emissions, and mortality, thereby creating contrasting patterns of C assimilation and long-term C storage. Here, we combine field-based estimates of forest C storage and pyrogenic C emissions with LiDAR-based estimates of forest canopy heights in three contrasting forest ecosystems to 1) model their respective patterns of forest growth, mortality, and decomposition, 2) estimate the contribution of pyrogenic C fluxes to the ecosystem C budget, 3) estimate their potential upper bounds of forest C storage, and 4) model the impacts of current forest management practices and disturbance regimes on long-term forest C storage. Our results suggest that even though longleaf pine forests store comparatively little C in soil or belowground biomass, these forests nevertheless have the highest capacity for long-term C storage, in part due to their longevity. By contrast, while pond pine ecosystems have the highest capacity for long-term belowground C storage, they also have the lowest capacity for long-term aboveground C storage, one that is rarely achieved due to infrequent, high-severity disturbance regimes. Loblolly pine forests, while capable of higher growth rates than either longleaf or pond pine when in early stages of succesion, lack the long-term C storage capabilities of longleaf pine due to earlier senescence. Pyrogenic C emissions in these ecosystems are dominated by the combustion of ground and duff materials and occur over timescales ranging from rapid combustion in fire

  20. Are coastal lagoons physically or biologically controlled ecosystems? Revisiting r vs. K strategies in coastal lagoons and estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Marcos, Concepción; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Pérez-Marcos, María

    2013-11-01

    Environmental stress influences biological assemblages, with species responding to stress by adopting particular life-history strategies (e.g., r vs. K). Coastal lagoons and estuaries are considered naturally stressed and physically controlled systems with frequent environmental disturbances and fluctuations. At the same time, their transitional nature (between terrestrial, freshwater and marine) makes them especially vulnerable to human impacts and land and freshwater inputs. As a result, it is hypothesised that residents of coastal lagoons would display characteristics of r-selected species. The r-strategy involves increased reproductive effort through early reproduction, small and numerous offspring with a large dispersive capability, short lifespan and small adult body size. Together, these traits provide a selective advantage in such unpredictable or short-lived environments. Alternatively, immigrants to coastal lagoons should mostly be K-strategists, with a competitive advantage over the r-strategists, at least on a temporary time scale. These hypotheses were explored using a dataset from 73 Atlanto-Mediterranean sites: 27 estuaries, 42 coastal lagoons and 4 from the sea, obtained from published sources. A detailed analysis of the distributions of the different resident fish species according to lagoon characteristics indicated that in lagoons with a higher marine influence the families Gobiidae, Blenniidae and Syngnathidae were common, while lagoons with freshwater influence are characterized by Cyprinidae and other freshwater species. In analyzing the biological strategies of lagoon species we found that fish assemblages inhabiting marine influenced lagoons were characterized by solitary, necto-benthonic sedentary species. These species are often hermaphroditic, with benthic broods and many exhibit brooding behaviour. This suggests that marine influenced lagoons are dominated by K-strategist species, while r-strategy species will be more common in

  1. Spatial variability of heavy metals in estuarine, mangrove and coastal ecosystems along Parangipettai, Southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Sundaramanickam, Arumugam; Shanmugam, Nadanasabesan; Cholan, Shanmugam; Kumaresan, Saravanan; Madeswaran, Perumal; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2016-11-01

    An elaborate survey on the contamination of heavy metals was carried out in surface sediments of different ecosystems such as Vellar-Coleroon estuarine, Pichavaram mangrove and coastal region of Parangipettai, Southeast coast of India. The study was intended since, the coal based thermal power plant and oil refinery plant are proposed to set up along this coast and aquaculture industries and dredging activities are developing. The parameters such as soil texture, pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Cd, Zn and Ni) concentrations were analyzed for the surface sediments during pre and postmonsoon seasons. Among the metals analyzed, Fe and Mn were found to have dominant as the levels were recorded as 11,804 μg g(-)(1) and 845.2 μg g(-)(1) respectively. A significant correlation was observed between total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metals. In the mangrove ecosystem, the levels of heavy metals found to be maximum indicating that the rich organic matter acts as an efficient binding agent for metals. The overall finding of the present study indicated that the sediments from the entire Vellar-Coleroon estuarine and Pichavaram mangrove ecosystems were found moderately polluted with cadmium metal. The result of cluster analysis indicated disparity in accumulation of heavy metals in sediments of different ecosystems due to the variations in organic matter. The heavy metals were transported from land to coastal through flood during monsoon season reflecting the variations in their levels in different ecosystems at postmonsoon season.

  2. The Ponto Caspian Zoogeographic complex of Cyclopoida in the Caspian, Azov and Black Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monchenko, V. J.

    1998-06-01

    Zoogeographical conclusions are drawn from several years of taxonomic study of the Cyclopoida of the Ponto-Caspian brackish water region. The total Ponto-Caspian complex of Cyclopoida comprises 19 species of which 7 species are endemics to the Caspian provinces and 9 species to the mixohaline waters of the Black and Azov Seas, while 3 species are common to both areas. Of these 19 species 11 are of marine origin. The remaining ones are of freshwater origin. It is shown for the first time that Cyclopoida of the Ponto-Caspian complex are also present in the Black and Azov Seas where they occur together at the same localities with representatives of this complex from other animal groups. As compared with these other groups Cyclopoida show a higher proportion of species endemism in the Black and Azov Seas. Even a case of generic endemism among Cyclopoida is reported for the first time for these seas.

  3. Temporary ice microalgae community in Taganrog Bay of the Azov Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, G. V.; Povazhnyy, V. V.; Zolotareva, A. E.; Makarevich, P. R.; Matishov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The temporary ice algae community in the mixing zone of brackish and fresh waters of the Taganrog Bay of the Azov Sea is described. A high abundance and biomass of planktonic algae and a high chlorophyll a concentration have been registered in samples of under-ice water taken on February 2013. The mass development of the diatom Stephanodiscus hantzschii Grunow blooming on the ice in the eastern part of Taganrog Bay is described for the first time. The quantitative data on the under-ice microalgae community and the related hydrochemistry are published. The obtained results could be used in total productivity estimates in the Azov Sea.

  4. Comparison of acidic deposition to semi-natural ecosystems in Denmark—Coastal heath, inland heath and oak wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Birgitte; Nielsen, Knud Erik

    Acidic deposition to coastal heath, inland heath and oak wood in Denmark was determined from analysis of bulk precipitation and throughfall measurements for up to 3 yrs. The analysis aimed to determine the total annual sulphur and nitrogen deposition to the three different ecosystems. Total nitrogen deposition is especially difficult to assess due to uptake of nitrogen by the canopy, and difficulties in determining the dry deposition of each nitrogen species. An NH x-uptake estimation model is presented which assumes co-deposition of NH x+H + and SO x+NO y and exchange of NH x+H + for the leached Mg 2+, Ca 2+ and K + in the canopy. This approach makes it possible to estimate the dry deposition of reduced nitrogen (NH x). Dry deposited oxidized nitrogen (NO y) still remains unquantified with the throughfall method, and therefore this term is estimated from a generalized micro-meteorological model. Total annual nitrogen deposition was 29.0 kg ha -1 yr -1 for the oak wood, 18.3 kg ha -1 yr -1 for the inland heathland and 13.5 kg ha -1 yr -1 for the coastal heathland. The total annual acidic deposition (the sum of H +, SO x, NO y and NH x) was 3202 mol c ha -1 for the oak wood, 2228 mol c ha -1 for the inland heathland, and 2060 mol c ha -1 for the coastal heathland. However, this acid load has different effects on the ecosystems depending on the actual bio-geochemical reactions. The potential maximum acidification estimated for the oak wood (5512 mol c ha -1 yr -1) was almost twice as high as for the inland heathland (3815 mol c H + ha -1 yr -1) and for the coastal heathland (3383 mol cH + ha -1 yr -1).

  5. Human activities and climate variability drive fast-paced change across the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Abreu, Paulo C.; Carstensen, Jacob; Chauvaud, Laurent; Elmgren, Ragnar; Grall, Jacques; Greening, Holly; Johansson, John O.R.; Kahru, Mati; Sherwood, Edward T.; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong

    2016-01-01

    Time series of environmental measurements are essential for detecting, measuring and understanding changes in the Earth system and its biological communities. Observational series have accumulated over the past 2–5 decades from measurements across the world's estuaries, bays, lagoons, inland seas and shelf waters influenced by runoff. We synthesize information contained in these time series to develop a global view of changes occurring in marine systems influenced by connectivity to land. Our review is organized around four themes: (i) human activities as drivers of change; (ii) variability of the climate system as a driver of change; (iii) successes, disappointments and challenges of managing change at the sea-land interface; and (iv) discoveries made from observations over time. Multidecadal time series reveal that many of the world's estuarine–coastal ecosystems are in a continuing state of change, and the pace of change is faster than we could have imagined a decade ago. Some have been transformed into novel ecosystems with habitats, biogeochemistry and biological communities outside the natural range of variability. Change takes many forms including linear and nonlinear trends, abrupt state changes and oscillations. The challenge of managing change is daunting in the coastal zone where diverse human pressures are concentrated and intersect with different responses to climate variability over land and over ocean basins. The pace of change in estuarine–coastal ecosystems will likely accelerate as the human population and economies continue to grow and as global climate change accelerates. Wise stewardship of the resources upon which we depend is critically dependent upon a continuing flow of information from observations to measure, understand and anticipate future changes along the world's coastlines.

  6. Human activities and climate variability drive fast-paced change across the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cloern, James E; Abreu, Paulo C; Carstensen, Jacob; Chauvaud, Laurent; Elmgren, Ragnar; Grall, Jacques; Greening, Holly; Johansson, John Olov Roger; Kahru, Mati; Sherwood, Edward T; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong

    2016-02-01

    Time series of environmental measurements are essential for detecting, measuring and understanding changes in the Earth system and its biological communities. Observational series have accumulated over the past 2-5 decades from measurements across the world's estuaries, bays, lagoons, inland seas and shelf waters influenced by runoff. We synthesize information contained in these time series to develop a global view of changes occurring in marine systems influenced by connectivity to land. Our review is organized around four themes: (i) human activities as drivers of change; (ii) variability of the climate system as a driver of change; (iii) successes, disappointments and challenges of managing change at the sea-land interface; and (iv) discoveries made from observations over time. Multidecadal time series reveal that many of the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems are in a continuing state of change, and the pace of change is faster than we could have imagined a decade ago. Some have been transformed into novel ecosystems with habitats, biogeochemistry and biological communities outside the natural range of variability. Change takes many forms including linear and nonlinear trends, abrupt state changes and oscillations. The challenge of managing change is daunting in the coastal zone where diverse human pressures are concentrated and intersect with different responses to climate variability over land and over ocean basins. The pace of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems will likely accelerate as the human population and economies continue to grow and as global climate change accelerates. Wise stewardship of the resources upon which we depend is critically dependent upon a continuing flow of information from observations to measure, understand and anticipate future changes along the world's coastlines.

  7. Plankton origin of particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate in a Mediterranean oligotrophic coastal and shallow ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Natacha; Bogé, Gérard; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Jamet, Dominique; Richard, Simone

    2009-03-01

    We report here dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) levels as a function of plankton communities and abiotic factors over a 12-month cycle in the Mediterranean oligotrophic coastal and shallow ecosystem of Niel Bay (N.W. Mediterranean Sea, France). Total particulate DMSP (DMSP p) and DMS concentrations were highly seasonal, peaking during a spring (April) bloom at 8.9 nM and 73.9 nM, respectively. Significant positive correlations were found between total DMSP p concentration and the abundance or biomass of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum compressum (Spearman's rank correlation test: r = 0.704; p = 0.011). Similarly, DMS concentrations peaked during the development of blooms of P. compressum and Gymnodinium sp. There seemed to be a positive relationship between the chlorophyll a to pheopigment ratio and DMS concentrations, suggesting that DMS was released during phytoplankton growth. High DMS levels recorded in the shallow Niel Bay may also result from the activity of benthic macroalgae, and/or macrophytes such as Posidonia spp., or the resuspension of sulfur species accumulating in sediments. The fractionation of particulate DMSP into three size classes (>90 μm, 5-90 μm and 0.2-5 μm) revealed that 5-90 μm DMSP-containing particles made the greatest contribution to the total DMSP p pool (annual mean contribution = 62%), with a maximal contribution in April (96%). This size class consisted mainly of dinoflagellates (annual mean contribution = 68%), with P. compressum and Gymnodinium sp. the predominant species, together accounting for up to 44% of the phytoplankton present. The positive correlation between DMSP concentration in the 5-90 μm size class and the abundance of P. compressum (Spearman's rank correlation test: r = 0.648; p = 0.023) suggests that this phytoplankton species would be the major DMSP producer in Niel Bay. The DMSP collected in the >90 μm fraction was principally associated with zooplankton organisms, dominated by

  8. Managing Data, Provenance and Chaos through Standardization and Automation at the Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, W.

    2013-12-01

    Managing data for a large, multidisciplinary research program such as a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site is a significant challenge, but also presents unique opportunities for data stewardship. LTER research is conducted within multiple organizational frameworks (i.e. a specific LTER site as well as the broader LTER network), and addresses both specific goals defined in an NSF proposal as well as broader goals of the network; therefore, every LTER data can be linked to rich contextual information to guide interpretation and comparison. The challenge is how to link the data to this wealth of contextual metadata. At the Georgia Coastal Ecosystems LTER we developed an integrated information management system (GCE-IMS) to manage, archive and distribute data, metadata and other research products as well as manage project logistics, administration and governance (figure 1). This system allows us to store all project information in one place, and provide dynamic links through web applications and services to ensure content is always up to date on the web as well as in data set metadata. The database model supports tracking changes over time in personnel roles, projects and governance decisions, allowing these databases to serve as canonical sources of project history. Storing project information in a central database has also allowed us to standardize both the formatting and content of critical project information, including personnel names, roles, keywords, place names, attribute names, units, and instrumentation, providing consistency and improving data and metadata comparability. Lookup services for these standard terms also simplify data entry in web and database interfaces. We have also coupled the GCE-IMS to our MATLAB- and Python-based data processing tools (i.e. through database connections) to automate metadata generation and packaging of tabular and GIS data products for distribution. Data processing history is automatically tracked throughout the data

  9. Investigating Ecosystem Pattern and Process Across a Land-Sea Gradient: A New Coastal Margin Observatory in the Pacific Coastal Temperate Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesbrecht, I.; Lertzman, K. P.; Oliver, A. A.; Tank, S. E.; Floyd, B. C.; Frazer, G. W.; Hunt, B. P.; Kellogg, C.; Heger, T.; Levy-Booth, D.; Mohn, W. H.; Hallam, S. J.; Keeling, P.; Sanborn, P.; Brunsting, R.; D'Amore, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial organic matter exported from coastal watersheds influences marine ecosystems and carbon budgets across the globe, yet much is unknown about the fundamental processes of land-sea carbon cycling or system response to climate change. On two outer-coast islands near the center of the Pacific Coastal Temperate Rainforest (PCTR), the Hakai Institute has established a coastal margin observatory to examine the flux of terrestrial organic matter from land to sea - the origins, pathways, processes and marine consequences - in the context of long-term environmental change. The outer-coast PCTR is characterized by an ocean-moderated climate, subdued terrain, extensive wetlands and lower forest productivity than the mountainous mainland coast. Here we give an overview of, and initial results from, a new long-term multi-disciplinary investigation of processes that link PCTR watersheds with the carbon balance and food web of northeastern subarctic Pacific coastal waters. Beginning in 2013, we established year-round sampling and a sensor network to quantify - at high temporal resolution - the amount and character of terrestrial exports from seven focal watersheds on Calvert and Hecate Islands, British Columbia. Early results show that freshwater dissolved organic carbon concentrations are high on average, fluctuate temporally and vary spatially across watersheds. A real-time hydrological sensor network shows rapid responses of stream stages and soil water tables to rainfall inputs. Carbon export can vary greatly with stream discharge in these flashy systems. We use paired marine monitoring stations at stream outlets to concurrently track ocean conditions and to trace terrestrial organic matter. Across a larger set of watersheds, we examine the role of catchment topography, hydrology and composition in controlling biogeochemical exports. On land, we use airborne LiDAR data to evaluate landscape controls on vegetation height - a proxy for forest productivity and biomass

  10. [Multi-scenario simulation and prediction of ecosystem services as affected by urban expansion: A case study in coastal area of Tianjin, North China].

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan-Chun; Yun, Ying-Xia; Miao, Zhan-Tang; Hao, Cui; Li, Hong-yuan

    2013-03-01

    Based on the modified Logistic-CA model, and taking the coastal area of Tianjin as a case, this paper simulated the spatial evolution patterns of ecosystem services as affected by the urban expansion in 2011-2020 under the scenarios of historical extrapolation, endogenous development, and exogenous development. Overall, the total ecosystem services of the study area under the three scenarios were generally the same, and the functional region with the lowest level ecosystem services had the identical spatial pattern. However, the spatial evolution patterns of the ecosystem services of the study area under the three scenarios had a great difference. The functional regions with lower-level ecosystem services grew in a cross-shaped pattern, with the Tanggu downtown as a center, and finally formed a full connectivity area along the Haihe River and coastal zone.

  11. Impacts of the Nutrient Inputs from Riverine on the Dynamic and Community Structure of Fungal-like Protists in the Coastal Ocean Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y.; Wang, G.; Xie, N.

    2016-02-01

    The coastal ocean connects terrestrial (e.g., rivers and estuaries) with oceanic ecosystems and is considered as a major component of global carbon cycles and budgets. The coastal waters are featured with a high biodiversity and high primary production. Because of the excessive primary production, a large fraction of primary organic matter becomes available to consumers as detritus in the coastal waters. Bacterioplankton have long been known to play a key role in the degradation of this detritus, and export and storage of organic matter in the coastal ecosystems. However, the primary and secondary production and the carbon biogeochemical processes in the ecosystems are largely regulated by nutrient inputs from riverine and other anthropogenic activities through heterotrophic microbial communities. Thraustochytrids, commonly known as fungal-like protists, are unicellular heterotrophic protists and are recently acknowledged to play a significant role in ocean carbon cycling. Their abundance exceeds that of bacterioplankton in the most time of the year in the coastal waters of China. Also, their abundance and diversity are largely regulated by nutrients inputs from riverine and other anthropogenic activities. Our findings support that thraustochytrids are a dominant heterotrophic microbial group in the coastal waters. Evidently, thraustochytrids are an import, but neglected, component in microbial carbon biogeochemical processes of the coastal ocean.

  12. Enhanced primary production in summer and winter-spring seasons in a populated NW Mediterranean coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guallar, Carles; Flos, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    Populated coastal ecosystems in the NW Mediterranean present three main characteristics that distinguish them from the open water ecosystem: a sea-land interaction, with freshwater influence from river mouths; a shallow seabed, which facilitates the interaction between the euphotic water column and the sediments; and high anthropogenic pressure, due to submarine sewage discharges. As a result, relatively high nutrient concentrations are measured in these ecosystems, with ammonia being an important fraction. These characteristics entail a different scenario from the open water ecosystem. Here, we present the distribution of phytoplankton primary production in the Barcelona coastal waters during summer and winter-spring seasons, by means of photosynthesis-irradiance experiments using the 14C technique. In winter-spring, stratification of the water column may begin earlier than in open water due to freshwater inputs. Therefore, with the water-column slightly stratified, chlorophyll-a and primary production become localised in the surface layers, due to the lower daily irradiance during this season. In these conditions, Total Primary Production (TPP) values measured ranged between 0.27 and 14.52 mgC m- 3 h- 1. As spring progresses and the stratification develops, surface waters tend to become nutrient depleted and nutrients are mainly localised in bottom waters between the thermocline and the seafloor. Under these conditions, high chlorophyll layers develop near the bottom. With the exception of their nutrient enrichment, these structures, referred to as coastal deep chlorophyll maxima, are comparable to the oceanic deep chlorophyll maxima in temperate oligotrophic seas. The nutrient enrichment is the result of the sediment resuspension from the seabed and the presence of sewage water discharged from the submarine outfall. These structures are highly productive (ca. 60% of water column primary production), comparable to the winter-spring bloom, and are sustained

  13. Use of ensemble prediction technique to estimate the inherent uncertainty in the simulated chlorophyll-a concentration in coastal ecosystems*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meszaros, Lorinc; El Serafy, Ghada

    2017-04-01

    Phytoplankton blooms in coastal ecosystems such as the Wadden Sea may cause mortality of mussels and other benthic organisms. Furthermore, the algal primary production is the base of the food web and therefore it greatly influences fisheries and aquacultures. Consequently, accurate phytoplankton concentration prediction offers ecosystem and economic benefits. Numerical ecosystem models are powerful tools to compute water quality variables including the phytoplankton concentration. Nevertheless, their accuracy ultimately depends on the uncertainty stemming from the external forcings which further propagates and complicates by the non-linear ecological processes incorporated in the ecological model. The Wadden Sea is a shallow, dynamically varying ecosystem with high turbidity and therefore the uncertainty in the Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) concentration field greatly influences the prediction of water quality variables. Considering the high level of uncertainty in the modelling process, it is advised that an uncertainty estimate should be provided together with a single-valued deterministic model output. Through the use of an ensemble prediction system in the Dutch coastal waters the uncertainty in the modelled chlorophyll-a concentration has been estimated. The input ensemble is generated from perturbed model process parameters and external forcings through Latin hypercube sampling with dependence (LHSD). The simulation is carried out using the Delft3D Generic Ecological Model (GEM) with the advance algal speciation module-BLOOM which is sufficiently well validated for primary production simulation in the southern North Sea. The output ensemble is post-processed to obtain the uncertainty estimate and the results are validated against in-situ measurements and Remote Sensing (RS) data. The spatial uncertainty of chlorophyll-a concentration was derived using the produced ensemble spread maps. *This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon

  14. Anthropogenic chemicals as drivers of change for coastal ecosystems: wetlands, mangroves and seagrass habitats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetlands, mangrove and seagrass habitats are rapidly declining worldwide which reduces their many ecological services. This presentation summarizes the results of a literature survey conducted to determine scientific understanding of contaminant uptake and toxicity of non...

  15. Ecology of a key ecosystem engineer on hard coastal infrastructure and natural rocky shores.

    PubMed

    Martins, Gustavo M; Neto, Ana I; Cacabelos, Eva

    2016-02-01

    The numbers of hard coastal artificial structures is increasing worldwide and there is now cumulative evidence that they support assemblages that are less diverse than natural shores. Here we investigated patterns of distribution and demography of the native barnacle Chthamalus stellatus on hard coastal structures and on natural rocky shores. Barnacles were 35% less abundant on hard structures regardless of substratum type (concrete or basalt). On a subset of sites we found that temporal population stability, growth and mortality were similar on natural rocky shores and hard structures. In contrast, barnacles were significantly larger and recruited more onto natural rocky shores. These results emphasise the important role of recruitment in determining the abundance of a key space occupier on hard coastal structures. Experimental work building on these results may generate insights that can be used as guidelines for the management of urbanised coastal areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anthropogenic chemicals as drivers of change for coastal ecosystems: wetlands, mangroves and seagrass habitats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetlands, mangrove and seagrass habitats are rapidly declining worldwide which reduces their many ecological services. This presentation summarizes the results of a literature survey conducted to determine scientific understanding of contaminant uptake and toxicity of non...

  17. Tools and methods for evaluating and refining alternative futures for coastal ecosystem management—the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrd, Kristin B.; Kreitler, Jason R.; Labiosa, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model (PSEPM) is a decision-support tool that uses scenarios to evaluate where, when, and to what extent future population growth, urban growth, and shoreline development may threaten the Puget Sound nearshore environment. This tool was designed to be used iteratively in a workshop setting in which experts, stakeholders, and decisionmakers discuss consequences to the Puget Sound nearshore within an alternative-futures framework. The PSEPM presents three possible futures of the nearshore by analyzing three growth scenarios developed out to 2060: Status Quo—continuation of current trends; Managed Growth—adoption of an aggressive set of land-use management policies; and Unconstrained Growth—relaxation of land-use restrictions. The PSEPM focuses on nearshore environments associated with barrier and bluff-backed beaches—the most dominant shoreforms in Puget Sound—which represent 50 percent of Puget Sound shorelines by length. This report provides detailed methodologies for development of three submodels within the PSEPM—the Shellfish Pollution Model, the Beach Armoring Index, and the Recreation Visits Model. Results from the PSEPM identify where and when future changes to nearshore ecosystems and ecosystem services will likely occur within the three growth scenarios. Model outputs include maps that highlight shoreline sections where nearshore resources may be at greater risk from upland land-use changes. The background discussed in this report serves to document and supplement model results displayed on the PSEPM Web site located at http://geography.wr.usgs.gov/pugetSound/.

  18. Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Ecosystem Restoration Decisions: A Case Study from Coastal Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    of saltmeadow cordgrass (Spartina patens) in Louisiana coastal marshes. Estuaries 20(3): 579-588. Gosselink, J.G. 1984. The ecology of delta marshes...Engineers. Hyfield, E.C.G. 2004. Freshwater and nutrient inputs to a Mississippi River deltaic estuary with river reintroduction. MS Thesis, Louisiana State...Swenson. 2007. Sediment discharge into a subsiding Louisiana deltaic estuary through a Mississippi River diversion. Estuarine, Coastal, and Shelf Science

  19. Methane Cycling and Flux in Mangrove Ecosystems: A Comparison of Natural and Impacted Coastal Lagoons on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M.; Paytan, A.; Miller, L.

    2001-12-01

    Tropical and subtropical wetlands are thought to be the dominant natural source of methane to the atmosphere, and mangrove ecosystems cover approximately 170,000 square kilometers of tropical and sub-tropical land, and dominating approximately 75 percent of the coastline between 25 degrees N and 25 degrees S. Previous studies have shown extremely wide ranges of methane flux from mangrove ecosystems, and have indicated that anthropogenic disturbances such as pollution, sewage discharge, and alteration of freshwater influx can have significant impacts on methane flux from mangrove ecosystems. Due to rapid population growth in tropical and sub-tropical areas and increasing impacts to coastal zones, it is important to obtain information regarding both natural and anthropogenic factors influencing methane cycling and flux within mangrove ecosystems, and to create a better estimate of the contribution of mangrove ecosystems to the global methane budget. Sampling for this study was conducted in three tropical coastal lagoons surrounded by mangrove vegetation located on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The three lagoons, Chelem, Celestun, and Terminos have similar vegetation and underlying geology, and are affected by similar seasonal patterns of temperature and precipitation. Significant differences in groundwater discharge and type and extent of anthropogenic impacts exist between the three lagoons. Chelem has moderate to low pollution and little to no ground water discharge. Celestun has very little pollution and large ground water discharges, while Terminos has relatively high impacts from pollution and human disturbance and varying ground water discharge. Previously reported data from these lagoons show distinct differences in methane concentrations in the sediment and water from Chelem in comparison to the concentrations measured in Celestun. Data collected over three seasons from Chelem and Celestun will be presented, providing information about seasonal variability

  20. Loss of an ecological baseline through the eradication of oyster reefs from coastal ecosystems and human memory.

    PubMed

    Alleway, Heidi K; Connell, Sean D

    2015-06-01

    Oyster reefs form over extensive areas and the diversity and productivity of sheltered coasts depend on them. Due to the relatively recent population growth of coastal settlements in Australia, we were able to evaluate the collapse and extirpation of native oyster reefs (Ostrea angasi) over the course of a commercial fishery. We used historical records to quantify commercial catch of O. angasi in southern Australia from early colonization, around 1836, to some of the last recorded catches in 1944 and used our estimates of catch and effort to map their past distribution and assess oyster abundance over 180 years. Significant declines in catch and effort occurred from 1886 to 1946 and no native oyster reefs occur today, but historically oyster reefs extended across more than 1,500 km of coastline. That oyster reefs were characteristic of much of the coastline of South Australia from 1836 to 1910 appears not to be known because there is no contemporary consideration of their ecological and economic value. Based on the concept of a shifted baseline, we consider this contemporary state to reflect a collective, intergenerational amnesia. Our model of generational amnesia accounts for differences in intergenerational expectations of food, economic value, and ecosystem services of nearshore areas. An ecological system that once surrounded much of the coast and possibly the past presence of oyster reefs altogether may be forgotten and could not only undermine progress towards their recovery, but also reduce our expectations of these coastal ecosystems. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Distribution of macroalgae and seaweed in the Azov Sea, Kerch Strait, and Taman Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanian, O. V.

    2009-06-01

    The analysis of the macroalgae distribution along the salinity gradient in the Azov Sea, the Kerch strait, and Taman Bay during the summer allowed finding two macroalgae complexes. The first complex (brackish) is formed by algae belonging to the Enteromorpha, Cladophora, Rhizoclonium, and Chaetomorpha genera in the Taganrog Gulf. The second complex (marine) with dominating algae belonging to the Enteromorpha, Chaetomorpha, Ceramium, and Polysiphonia inhabits the littoral part of the Azov Sea itself, the Kerch Strait, and Taman Bay. The saprobe analysis of the flora showed that the majority of macroalgae species inhabiting the Azov Sea are represented by meso- and polysaprobes and a small number of oligosaprobe species inhabit the Kerch Strait. The biggest species diversity of macroalgae was noted in the southwestern part of the sea; the value of Shannon’s index was 0.65 in the Taganrog Gulf, 1.04 in the Azov Sea, 1.38 in Taman Bay. The leading role in the littoral communities of Taganrog Gulf belongs to aquatic flowering plants with Potamogeton perfoliatus being dominant; as the salinity increases, the share of such species as P. pectinatus, Zostera marina, Z. noltii, Ruppia maritime, and Zannichellia major starts to increase.

  2. Effects of Sewage Discharge on Trophic State and Water Quality in a Coastal Ecosystem of the Gulf of California

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-González, Héctor Hugo; Arreola-Lizárraga, José Alfredo; Mendoza-Salgado, Renato Arturo; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Lechuga-Deveze, Carlos Hernando; Padilla-Arredondo, Gustavo; Cordoba-Matson, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides evidence of the effects of urban wastewater discharges on the trophic state and environmental quality of a coastal water body in a semiarid subtropical region in the Gulf of California. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and organic matter from urban wastewater primary treatment were estimated. La Salada Cove was the receiving water body and parameters measured during an annual cycle were temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, orthophosphate, and chlorophyll a. The effects of sewage inputs were determined by using Trophic State Index (TRIX) and the Arid Zone Coastal Water Quality Index (AZCI). It was observed that urban wastewater of the city of Guaymas provided 1,237 ton N yr−1 and 811 ton P yr−1 and TRIX indicated that the receiving water body showed symptoms of eutrophication from an oligotrophic state to a mesotrophic state; AZCI also indicated that the environmental quality of the water body was poor. The effects of urban wastewater supply with insufficient treatment resulted in symptoms of eutrophication and loss of ecological functions and services of the coastal ecosystem in La Salada Cove. PMID:24711731

  3. Community-level response of coastal microbial biofilms to ocean acidification in a natural carbon dioxide vent ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Ian; Johnson, Vivienne; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Munn, Colin B; Cunliffe, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The impacts of ocean acidification on coastal biofilms are poorly understood. Carbon dioxide vent areas provide an opportunity to make predictions about the impacts of ocean acidification. We compared biofilms that colonised glass slides in areas exposed to ambient and elevated levels of pCO(2) along a coastal pH gradient, with biofilms grown at ambient and reduced light levels. Biofilm production was highest under ambient light levels, but under both light regimes biofilm production was enhanced in seawater with high pCO(2). Uronic acids are a component of biofilms and increased significantly with high pCO(2). Bacteria and Eukarya denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile analysis showed clear differences in the structures of ambient and reduced light biofilm communities, and biofilms grown at high pCO(2) compared with ambient conditions. This study characterises biofilm response to natural seabed CO(2) seeps and provides a baseline understanding of how coastal ecosystems may respond to increased pCO(2) levels.

  4. [Weight of evidence (WOE) approach and its application in sediment quality assessment of coastal ecosystem: a review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Song, Jin-Ming; Li, Xue-Gang; Yuan, Hua-Mao; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    At present, chemical approaches are the main tools adopted to assess the contaminated sediments along China's coast. However, with the crucial progress of weight of evidence (WOE) approach in both logic and practice, this approach is getting available to be applied in the sediment quality assessment of our coastal ecosystem. By incorporating the levels of evidences such as sediment chemistry, toxicity and benthic community ecology, WOE forms an integrated approach to assess the potential adverse biological effects of environmental stressors mainly toxic substances by reconciling the information from multiple relevant lines of evidences and by weighing the data quality, study design, and other factors, being the sole means currently available to characterize the actual sediment quality and to reach an environmental decision. This paper reviewed the history of sediment quality assessment and the progress of WOE research in coastal sediment, summarized the variety of WOE definitions and interpretive techniques with reliability analysis, and discussed the limitations of WOE in theory and practice. Several improvement suggestions were proposed associated with the prospects of WOE research to advance the coastal sediment quality assessment in China.

  5. Effects of sewage discharge on trophic state and water quality in a coastal ecosystem of the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Vargas-González, Héctor Hugo; Arreola-Lizárraga, José Alfredo; Mendoza-Salgado, Renato Arturo; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina; Lechuga-Deveze, Carlos Hernando; Padilla-Arredondo, Gustavo; Cordoba-Matson, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides evidence of the effects of urban wastewater discharges on the trophic state and environmental quality of a coastal water body in a semiarid subtropical region in the Gulf of California. The concentrations of dissolved inorganic nutrients and organic matter from urban wastewater primary treatment were estimated. La Salada Cove was the receiving water body and parameters measured during an annual cycle were temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, orthophosphate, and chlorophyll a. The effects of sewage inputs were determined by using Trophic State Index (TRIX) and the Arid Zone Coastal Water Quality Index (AZCI). It was observed that urban wastewater of the city of Guaymas provided 1,237 ton N yr(-1) and 811 ton P yr(-1) and TRIX indicated that the receiving water body showed symptoms of eutrophication from an oligotrophic state to a mesotrophic state; AZCI also indicated that the environmental quality of the water body was poor. The effects of urban wastewater supply with insufficient treatment resulted in symptoms of eutrophication and loss of ecological functions and services of the coastal ecosystem in La Salada Cove.

  6. Assessment of Metal Toxicity in Marine Ecosystems: Comparative Toxicity Potentials for Nine Cationic Metals in Coastal Seawater.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan; Rosenbaum, Ralph K; Hauschild, Michael Z

    2016-01-05

    This study is a first attempt to develop globally applicable and spatially differentiated marine comparative toxicity potentials (CTPs) or ecotoxicity characterization factors for metals in coastal seawater for use in life cycle assessment. The toxicity potentials are based exclusively on marine ecotoxicity data and take account of metal speciation and bioavailability. CTPs were developed for nine cationic metals (Cd, Cr(III), Co, Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in 64 large marine ecosystems (LMEs) covering all coastal waters in the world. The results showed that the CTP of a specific metal varies 3-4 orders of magnitude across LMEs, largely due to different seawater residence times. Therefore, the highest toxicity potential for metals was found in the LMEs with the longest seawater residence times. Across metals, the highest CTPs were observed for Cd, Pb, and Zn. At the concentration levels occurring in coastal seawaters, Fe acts not as a toxic agent but as an essential nutrient and thus has CTPs of zero.

  7. Sensitivity to low-temperature events: Implications for CO2 dynamics in subtropical coastal ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Sparkle L. Malone; Jordan Barr; Jose D. Fuentes; Steven F. Oberbauer; Christina L. Staudhammer; Evelyn E. Gaiser; Gregory Starr

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the ecosystem effects of low-temperature events (<5 °C) over 4 years (2009-2012) in subtropical short and long hydroperiod freshwater marsh and mangrove forests within Everglades National Park. To evaluate changes in ecosystem productivity, we measured temporal patterns of CO2 and the normalized difference vegetation index over the study period. Both...

  8. Consumer diversity across kingdoms supports multiple functions in a coastal ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Marc J. S.; Silliman, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    The global biodiversity crisis impairs the valuable benefits ecosystems provide humans. These nature-generated benefits are defined by a multitude of different ecosystem functions that operate simultaneously. Although several studies have simulated species loss in communities and tracked the response of single functions such as productivity or nutrient cycling, these studies have involved relatively similar taxa, and seldom are strikingly different functions examined. With the exception of highly managed ecosystems such as agricultural fields, rarely are we interested in only one function being performed well. Instead, we rely on ecosystems to deliver several different functions at the same time. Here, we experimentally investigated the extinction impacts of dominant consumers in a salt marsh. These consumers are remarkably phylogenetically diverse, spanning two kingdoms (i.e., Animalia and Fungi). Our field studies reveal that a diverse consumer assemblage significantly enhances simultaneous functioning of disparate ecosystem processes (i.e., productivity, decomposition, and infiltration). Extreme functional and phylogenetic differences among consumers underlie this relationship. Each marsh consumer affected at least one different ecosystem function, and each individual function was affected by no more than two consumers. The implications of these findings are profound: If we want ecosystems to perform many different functions well, it is not just number of species that matter. Rather, the presence of species representing markedly different ecologies and biology is also essential to maximizing multiple functions. Moreover, this work emphasizes the need to incorporate both microcomponents and macrocomponents of food webs to accurately predict biodiversity declines on integrated-ecosystem functioning. PMID:24297926

  9. Consumer diversity across kingdoms supports multiple functions in a coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Marc J S; Silliman, Brian R

    2013-12-17

    The global biodiversity crisis impairs the valuable benefits ecosystems provide humans. These nature-generated benefits are defined by a multitude of different ecosystem functions that operate simultaneously. Although several studies have simulated species loss in communities and tracked the response of single functions such as productivity or nutrient cycling, these studies have involved relatively similar taxa, and seldom are strikingly different functions examined. With the exception of highly managed ecosystems such as agricultural fields, rarely are we interested in only one function being performed well. Instead, we rely on ecosystems to deliver several different functions at the same time. Here, we experimentally investigated the extinction impacts of dominant consumers in a salt marsh. These consumers are remarkably phylogenetically diverse, spanning two kingdoms (i.e., Animalia and Fungi). Our field studies reveal that a diverse consumer assemblage significantly enhances simultaneous functioning of disparate ecosystem processes (i.e., productivity, decomposition, and infiltration). Extreme functional and phylogenetic differences among consumers underlie this relationship. Each marsh consumer affected at least one different ecosystem function, and each individual function was affected by no more than two consumers. The implications of these findings are profound: If we want ecosystems to perform many different functions well, it is not just number of species that matter. Rather, the presence of species representing markedly different ecologies and biology is also essential to maximizing multiple functions. Moreover, this work emphasizes the need to incorporate both microcomponents and macrocomponents of food webs to accurately predict biodiversity declines on integrated-ecosystem functioning.

  10. Forest ecosystems of a Lower Gulf Coastal Plainlandscape: multifactor classification and analysis

    Treesearch

    P. Charles Goebel; Brian J. Palik; L. Katherine Kirkman; Mark B. Drew; Larry West; Dee C. Pederson

    2001-01-01

    The most common forestland classification techniques applied in the southeastern United States are vegetation-based. While not completely ignored, the application of multifactor, hierarchical ecosystem classifications are limited despite their widespread use in other regions of the eastern United States. We present one of the few truly integrated ecosystem...

  11. Interaction between Coastal and Oceanic Ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through Predator-Prey Relationship Studies

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Valerie; Fernandez, Emilie; Hoyle, Simon D.; Caillot, Sylvain; Jurado-Molina, Jesus; Andréfouët, Serge; Nicol, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    The Western and Central Pacific Ocean sustains the highest tuna production in the world. This province is also characterized by many islands and a complex bathymetry that induces specific current circulation patterns with the potential to create a high degree of interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems. Based on a large dataset of oceanic predator stomach contents, our study used generalized linear models to explore the coastal-oceanic system interaction by analyzing predator-prey relationship. We show that reef organisms are a frequent prey of oceanic predators. Predator species such as albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) frequently consume reef prey with higher probability of consumption closer to land and in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. For surface-caught-predators consuming reef prey, this prey type represents about one third of the diet of predators smaller than 50 cm. The proportion decreases with increasing fish size. For predators caught at depth and consuming reef prey, the proportion varies with predator species but generally represents less than 10%. The annual consumption of reef prey by the yellowfin tuna population was estimated at 0.8±0.40CV million tonnes or 2.17×1012±0.40CV individuals. This represents 6.1%±0.17CV in weight of their diet. Our analyses identify some of the patterns of coastal-oceanic ecosystem interactions at a large scale and provides an estimate of annual consumption of reef prey by oceanic predators. PMID:22615796

  12. Water-table height and microtopography control biogeochemical cycling in an Arctic coastal tundra ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D. A.; Zona, D.; Raab, T. K.; Bozzolo, F.; Mauritz, M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Drained thaw lake basins (DTLB's) are the dominant land form of the Arctic Coastal Plain in northern Alaska. The presence of continuous permafrost prevents drainage and so water tables generally remain close to the soil surface, creating saturated, suboxic soil conditions. However, ice wedge polygons produce microtopographic variation in these landscapes, with raised areas such as polygon rims creating more oxic microenvironments. The peat soils in this ecosystem store large amounts of organic carbon which is vulnerable to loss as arctic regions continue to rapidly warm, and so there is great motivation to understand the controls over microbial activity in these complex landscapes. Here we report the effects of experimental flooding, along with seasonal and spatial variation in soil chemistry and microbial activity in a DTLB. The flooding treatment generally mirrored the effects of natural landscape variation in water-table height due to microtopography. The flooded portion of the basin had lower dissolved oxygen, lower oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and higher pH, as did lower elevation areas throughout the entire basin. Similarly, soil pore water concentrations of organic carbon and aromatic compounds were higher in flooded and low elevation areas. Dissolved ferric iron (Fe(III)) concentrations were higher in low elevation areas and responded to the flooding treatment in low areas, only. The high concentrations of soluble Fe(III) in soil pore water were explained by the presence of siderophores, which were much more concentrated in low elevation areas. All the aforementioned variables were correlated, showing that Fe(III) is solubilized in response to anoxic conditions. Dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) concentrations were higher in low elevation areas, but showed only subtle and/or seasonally dependent effects of flooding. In anaerobic laboratory incubations, more CH4 was produced by soils from low and flooded areas, whereas anaerobic CO2

  13. Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp., Clostridium perfringens, and Plesiomonas shigelloides in marine and freshwater invertebrates from coastal California ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Miller, W A; Miller, M A; Gardner, I A; Atwill, E R; Byrne, B A; Jang, S; Harris, M; Ames, J; Jessup, D; Paradies, D; Worcester, K; Melli, A; Conrad, P A

    2006-08-01

    The coastal ecosystems of California are highly utilized by humans and animals, but the ecology of fecal bacteria at the land-sea interface is not well understood. This study evaluated the distribution of potentially pathogenic bacteria in invertebrates from linked marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems in central California. A variety of filter-feeding clams, mussels, worms, and crab tissues were selectively cultured for Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli-O157, Clostridium perfringens, Plesiomonas shigelloides, and Vibrio spp. A longitudinal study assessed environmental risk factors for detecting these bacterial species in sentinel mussel batches. Putative risk factors included mussel collection near higher risk areas for livestock or human sewage exposure, adjacent human population density, season, recent precipitation, water temperature, water type, bivalve type, and freshwater outflow exposure. Bacteria detected in invertebrates included Salmonella spp., C. perfringens, P. shigelloides, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio alginolyticus. Overall, 80% of mussel batches were culture positive for at least one of the bacterial species, although the pathogens Campylobacter, E. coli-O157, and Salmonella were not detected. Many of the same bacterial species were also cultured from upstream estuarine and riverine invertebrates. Exposure to human sewage sources, recent precipitation, and water temperature were significant risk factors for bacterial detection in sentinel mussel batches. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that filter-feeding invertebrates along the coast concentrate fecal bacteria flowing from land to sea and show that the relationships between anthropogenic effects on coastal ecosystems and the environmental niches of fecal bacteria are complex and dynamic.

  14. High-resolution chemical and hydrologic records identify environmental factors that control coastal anchialine cave ecosystem function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brankovits, D.; Pohlman, J.; Lapham, L.; Casso, M.; Roth, E.; Lowell, N. S.; Iliffe, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Anchialine caves host a coastal aquifer ecosystem occupied by cave-adapted crustaceans that reside within distinct fresh, brackish and marine waters. Our initial investigation of this subsurface ecotone in the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico) provides stable isotope-based evidence that methane and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are the primary sources of energy and carbon for the food web. However, the frequency of observations is sparse, leaving us 'in the dark' with respect to the temporal dynamics of the ecosystem function. In this study, we obtained undisturbed vertical profiles of methane, DOC and DIC concentration and isotopic composition with the 'Octopipi' water sampler from an anchialine cave located ~8 km from the coastline. To document the temporal variability of methane availability in the cave, we deployed an osmotically-driven pump (OsmoSampler). Data loggers recorded dissolved oxygen (DO), salinity, temperature and current velocities, and a rain gauge recorded precipitation. A high-methane water mass near the ceiling (up to 7795 nM) contained elevated concentration (900 µM), 13C-depleted (-27.8 to -28.2 ‰) DOC, suggesting terrestrial organic matter input from the overlying soils. Low-methane saline water (36 to 84 nM) had lower concentration DOC (15 to 97 µM) with a similar δ13C (-25.9 to -27.2 ‰), suggesting significant terrestrial organic matter consumption or removal with increasing depth, from fresh to saline water, within the water column. Our 6-month water chemistry record reveals high concentrations of methane in the wet season, especially following rainfall events, and relatively lower methane concentrations in the dry season. These observations suggest rain flushes methane generated in overlying anoxic soils into the cave. DO, water level, and groundwater flow patterns were also linked to the precipitation record. These data provide novel insight into the interconnections between external climate forcing and subterranean anchialine

  15. Assessment of Eutrophication Quality in Greek Coastal Ecosystem (Eastern Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, Alexandra; Rousselaki, Eleni; Assimakopoulou, Georgia; Tsapakis, Manolis; Simboura, Nomiki

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean Sea has always been considered as one of the most oligotrophic areas in the world, especially in the Eastern part of the Sea. However, eutrophication problems occur in some coastal areas of the Mediterranean (e.g. eastern coasts of Spain, Gulf of Lions, northern Adriatic Sea, Apulian coasts, Saronikos Gulf, Thessaloniki Bay, northern coasts of Greece, etc.). This work is focused on the assessment of the Eutrophication Quality in different coastal areas of Greece affected by various anthropogenic and natural pressures and was performed under the Water Framework Directive. A network of 28 sampling stations was used during two relevant sampling periods, April - May 2012 and March - April 2013, in the framework of the National Monitoring Project of Greece. The Eutrophication assessment method integrates chemical and biological parameters of the water column. A synthetic Eutrophication Index (E.I.) was produced for the greek coastal areas by Primpas et al. quality classification scheme, combining the concentrations of nutrients (phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia) and chlorophyll-α biomass into a single formula. The E.I. assesses the eutrophication status using a five scale scheme according to the requirements of WFD: (High) less than 0.04; (Good) 0.04-0.38; (moderate) 0.38-0.85; (poor) 0.85-1.51; (bad) >1.51. Nutrient and chlorophyll-a concentrations revealed significant spatial variation among the various coastal areas of Greece influenced by different point and/or diffuse anthropogenic pressures (related to nutrient enrichment), reflecting the level of human-induced impairment where an increase in nutrient loads leads to increased water quality problems. The assessment of E.I showed that during 2012, 32% of the selected coastal areas were characterized as Good, 54% as Moderate and 14% of the selected greek coastal areas were characterized as Poor. During 2012, none of the study areas corresponded to High or Bad eutrophication status. During 2013

  16. Practitioners' views of science needs for the Great Lakes coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pebbles, Victoria; Lillard, Elizabath C.; Seelbach, Paul W.; Fogarty, Lisa Reynolds

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey Great Lake Science Center (USGS-GLSC) and the USGS-Michigan Water Science Center partnered with the Great Lakes Commission (GLC) to conduct a series of four workshops with coastal practitioners and managers across the Great Lakes basin to highlight the need for, and get input on, a Great Lakes regional coastal science strategy. To this end, this report is intended to help guide USGS coastal and nearshore science priorities, but may also help guide other science agencies. The USGS-GLSC partnership on this effort was part of a broader five-year Memorandum of Understanding between the USGS-GLSC and the GLC to enhance communications between coastal science and management communities within the Great Lakes region. This report presents a summary and analysis of participant feedback from the four workshops held in 2014. Participant feedback included participant worksheets as well as interactive drawing sessions, individual notes and group flip chart notes from each workshop. The results are presented as a series of findings that can be used to guide USGS coastal/nearshore science priorities in support of management needs at local, state and regional scales.

  17. Long-term variability of extreme waves in the Caspian, Black, Azov and Baltic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Victor; Dobroliubov, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    In order to study extreme storm waves in the Caspian, Black, Azov and Baltic Sea we used the spectral wave model SWAN. Significant wave height, swell and sea height, direction of propagation, their length and period were calculated with the NCEP/NCAR (1,9°x1,9°, 4-daily) reanalysis wind forcing from 1948 to 2010 in the Caspian, Black and Baltic Seas and with the NCEP/CFSR (0,3°x0,3°, 1 hour) for the period from 1979 to 2010 in the Azov Sea. The calculations were performed on supercomputers of Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU). The spatial resolution of the numerical grid was of order 5 km for the Caspian, Baltic and Black Seas, 2 km for the Azov Sea. These model wave hindcasts were used to calculate interannual and seasonal variability of the storm frequency, location and duration. The Initial Distribution Method and Annual Maxima Series Methods were used to study probable waves of a century reoccurrence. The long-term variability of extreme waves revealed different trends in the investigated seas. The Caspian and Azov seas decreased the storm activity, while in the Baltic Sea the number of storm cases increased and the Black Sea showed no significant trend. The of more than 12 m were observed in two centers in the middle part of the Caspian Sea and in the center of the Baltic Sea. In the Black Sea the extreme waves of the same probability of more than 14 m were found in the region to the south of the Crimean peninsula. In the Azov Sea the highest waves of a century reoccurrence do not exceed 5 m. The work was done in Natural Risk Assessment Laboratory, MSU under contract G.34.31.0007.

  18. Abiotic control of phytoplankton blooms in temperate coastal marine ecosystems: A case study in the South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Paula; Helbling, E Walter; Durán-Romero, Cristina; Cabrerizo, Marco J; Villafañe, Virginia E

    2017-09-05

    Coastal waters of the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO) sustain one of the highest levels of production of the World's ocean, maintained by dense phytoplankton winter blooms that are dominated by large diatoms. These blooms have been associated to calm weather conditions that allow the formation of a shallow and well illuminated upper mixed layer. In Bahía Engaño, a coastal site in Patagonia, Argentina (chosen as a model coastal ecosystem) winter blooms recurrently peaked on June and they were dominated almost entirely by the microplanktonic diatom Odontella aurita. However, during the year 2015, a new wind pattern was observed - with many days of northerly high-speed winds, deviating from the calm winter days observed during a reference period (2001-2014) used for comparison. We determined that this new wind pattern was the most important factor that affected the phytoplankton dynamics, precluding the initiation of a June bloom during 2015 that instead occurred during late winter (August). Furthermore, the 2015 bloom had a higher proportion of nanoplanktonic cells (as compared to the reference period) and it was co-dominated by O. aurita and Thalassiossira spp. Other variables such as nutrient supply and incident solar radiation did not have an important role in limiting and/or initiating the June 2015 bloom, but temperature might have benefited the growth of small cells during August 2015. If these changes in the timing and/or the taxonomic composition of the bloom persist, they may have important consequences for the secondary production and economic services of the coastal SAO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Impact of the Danube River Mouths Geomorphological Processes on the Ecosystem, Coastal Development and Regional Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateescu, Razvan; Malciu, Viorel; Spinu, Alina

    2013-04-01

    The anthropogenic influences on the Danube Delta Coast, with major effect on the evolution of its littoral processes are represented by the perturbation of the longshore sediment transport, due to coastal constructions, and as well due to the decrease of solid discharge, as a consequence of the hydro-technical works/dams extension in the reception basin, as well in the main course of the rivers. Certain vulnerable areas of the Danube Delta Coast are strongly influenced by inland works/development as well as Danube flow regime, at regional and local scale. In the Sulina arm area, the extension of the channel jetties had a double effect, representing the cut-off of the south coast current, carrier of a portion of the solid load on the Chilia arm, and removal of its own load out of the coastal circulation in the offshore currents. The sand dunes dynamics including the sediment changes between submerged shore and dunes system are major issues within the channel entrance. The work presents the results on the impacts of the coastal geomorphological processes of the Danube Delta on navigation and ecological areas. Thus, the variability of the sea-land interface, for a period of several decades, has been revisited on the basis of the historical maps, coastal survey of emerged beach profiles, sand dunes and recent GPS measurement, developed on the Romanian Danube Delta littoral, together with certain impact assessments in the delta areas, including the ecosystem response to shoreline variability, sediment transport on short and medium term, in the context in which the major factor is the Danube discharge, as well the sea-level rise.

  20. Dominance, Biomass and Extinction Resistance Determine the Consequences of Biodiversity Loss for Multiple Coastal Ecosystem Processes

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Thomas W.; Jenkins, Stuart R.; Kingham, Rachel; Kenworthy, Joseph; Hawkins, Stephen J.; Hiddink, Jan G.

    2011-01-01

    Key ecosystem processes such as carbon and nutrient cycling could be deteriorating as a result of biodiversity loss. However, currently we lack the ability to predict the consequences of realistic species loss on ecosystem processes. The aim of this study was to test whether species contributions to community biomass can be used as surrogate measures of their contribution to ecosystem processes. These were gross community productivity in a salt marsh plant assemblage and an intertidal macroalgae assemblage; community clearance of microalgae in sessile suspension feeding invertebrate assemblage; and nutrient uptake in an intertidal macroalgae assemblage. We conducted a series of biodiversity manipulations that represented realistic species extinction sequences in each of the three contrasting assemblages. Species were removed in a subtractive fashion so that biomass was allowed to vary with each species removal, and key ecosystem processes were measured at each stage of community disassembly. The functional contribution of species was directly proportional to their contribution to community biomass in a 1∶1 ratio, a relationship that was consistent across three contrasting marine ecosystems and three ecosystem processes. This suggests that the biomass contributed by a species to an assemblage can be used to approximately predict the proportional decline in an ecosystem process when that species is lost. Such predictions represent “worst case scenarios” because, over time, extinction resilient species can offset the loss of biomass associated with the extinction of competitors. We also modelled a “best case scenario” that accounts for compensatory responses by the extant species with the highest per capita contribution to ecosystem processes. These worst and best case scenarios could be used to predict the minimum and maximum species required to sustain threshold values of ecosystem processes in the future. PMID:22163297

  1. Dominance, biomass and extinction resistance determine the consequences of biodiversity loss for multiple coastal ecosystem processes.

    PubMed

    Davies, Thomas W; Jenkins, Stuart R; Kingham, Rachel; Kenworthy, Joseph; Hawkins, Stephen J; Hiddink, Jan G

    2011-01-01

    Key ecosystem processes such as carbon and nutrient cycling could be deteriorating as a result of biodiversity loss. However, currently we lack the ability to predict the consequences of realistic species loss on ecosystem processes. The aim of this study was to test whether species contributions to community biomass can be used as surrogate measures of their contribution to ecosystem processes. These were gross community productivity in a salt marsh plant assemblage and an intertidal macroalgae assemblage; community clearance of microalgae in sessile suspension feeding invertebrate assemblage; and nutrient uptake in an intertidal macroalgae assemblage. We conducted a series of biodiversity manipulations that represented realistic species extinction sequences in each of the three contrasting assemblages. Species were removed in a subtractive fashion so that biomass was allowed to vary with each species removal, and key ecosystem processes were measured at each stage of community disassembly. The functional contribution of species was directly proportional to their contribution to community biomass in a 1:1 ratio, a relationship that was consistent across three contrasting marine ecosystems and three ecosystem processes. This suggests that the biomass contributed by a species to an assemblage can be used to approximately predict the proportional decline in an ecosystem process when that species is lost. Such predictions represent "worst case scenarios" because, over time, extinction resilient species can offset the loss of biomass associated with the extinction of competitors. We also modelled a "best case scenario" that accounts for compensatory responses by the extant species with the highest per capita contribution to ecosystem processes. These worst and best case scenarios could be used to predict the minimum and maximum species required to sustain threshold values of ecosystem processes in the future.

  2. Historical and contemporary imagery to assess ecosystem change on the Arctic coastal plain of northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tape, Ken D.; Pearce, John M.; Walworth, Dennis; Meixell, Brandt W.; Fondell, Tom F.; Gustine, David D.; Flint, Paul L.; Hupp, Jerry W.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Ward, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we describe and make available a set of 61 georectified aerial images of the Arctic Coastal Plain (taken from 1948 to 2010) that were obtained by the USGS to inform research objectives of the USGS CAE Initiative. Here, we describe the origins, metadata, and public availability of these images that were obtained within four main study areas on the Arctic Coastal Plain: Teshekpuk Lake Special Area, Chipp River, the Colville River Delta, and locations along the Dalton Highway Corridor between the Brooks Range and Deadhorse. We also provide general descriptions of observable changes to the geomorphology of landscapes that are apparent by comparing historical and contemporary images. These landscape changes include altered river corridors, lake drying, coastal erosion, and new vegetation communities. All original and georectified images and metadata are available through the USGS Alaska Science Center Portal (search under ‘Project Name’ using title of this report) or by contacting ascweb@usgs.gov.

  3. Migratory patterns of pelagic fishes and possible linkages between open ocean and coastal ecosystems off the Pacific coast of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, R. J.; McFarlane, G. A.; King, J. R.

    2005-03-01

    We review studies relevant to the migration of pelagic fishes between the coastal and open-ocean ecosystems off the subarctic coast of North America. We review the life history strategies of these migratory fish and to compare to the life history strategies of major coastal migrants. The oceanography in this region is dominated by north and south currents that provide a boundary between the offshore and coastal waters. Commercial fisheries off the west coast of North America are virtually all inshore of this oceanographic separation. Migrations for some species in these major fisheries are also north and south rather than east and west. However, exceptions occur for Pacific salmon, species associated with seamounts, and for transitional pelagic species such as tuna, squid and sharks. Three species of Pacific salmon, sockeye, pink and chum salmon, migrate along the coast in their first marine year and move off shore in the fall and winter in their first marine year. Three other species, coho salmon, chinook salmon, and steelhead trout, also migrate offshore, although they are less abundant and some stocks remain within the coastal regions. Pacific salmon species are a dominant daytime biomass in the surface waters in the offshore areas. It is known that albacore tuna and some sharks migrate between the offshore and coastal areas, but more research is needed to assess the relative importance of these migrations. Although the biomass of species on seamounts is small relative to coastal areas, the similarity in fauna is evidence that there is recruitment from coastal ecosystems.

  4. Nighttime dissolution in a temperate coastal ocean ecosystem increases under acidification.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Gaylord, Brian; Hill, Tessa; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kroeker, Kristy J; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Russell, Ann D; Rivest, Emily B; Sesboüé, Marine; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-18

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) are causing ocean acidification, lowering seawater aragonite (CaCO3) saturation state (Ω arag), with potentially substantial impacts on marine ecosystems over the 21(st) Century. Calcifying organisms have exhibited reduced calcification under lower saturation state conditions in aquaria. However, the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to future ocean acidification remains unknown. Here we assess the community level sensitivity of calcification to local CO2-induced acidification caused by natural respiration in an unperturbed, biodiverse, temperate intertidal ecosystem. We find that on hourly timescales nighttime community calcification is strongly influenced by Ω arag, with greater net calcium carbonate dissolution under more acidic conditions. Daytime calcification however, is not detectably affected by Ω arag. If the short-term sensitivity of community calcification to Ω arag is representative of the long-term sensitivity to ocean acidification, nighttime dissolution in these intertidal ecosystems could more than double by 2050, with significant ecological and economic consequences.

  5. Coastal Prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The coastal prairie, located along the coastal plain of southwestern Louisiana and southcentral Texas, is the southernmost tip of the tallgrass prairie ecosystem so prevalent in the Midwest. The coastal prairie ecosystem once covered as much as 3.8 million ha (9 million acres); today, more than 99% of this land has been lost to agriculture, range improvement, and urbanization. The remainder is highly fragmented and severely threatened by invasions of exotic species and urban sprawl. In Louisiana, the former 1 million ha of coastal prairie have now been reduced to about 100 ha. In Texas, only about 100,000 ha of coastal prairie remain intact.

  6. USING MUSSEL ISOTOPE RATIOS TO ASSESS ANTHROPOGEN NITROGEN INPUTS TO COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio in ribbed mussel (Geukensia demissus) tissue was investigated as an indicator of the source of nitrogen inputs to coastal salt marshes. Mussels fed a diet of 15N enriched algae in the laboratory showed an increase in tissue nitrogen isotope rati...

  7. Human health-related ecosystem services of avian-dense coastal wetlands adjacent to a Western Lake Erie swimming beach.

    PubMed

    Rea, Chris L; Bisesi, Michael S; Mitsch, William; Andridge, Rebecca; Lee, Jiyoung

    2015-03-01

    Wetlands provide many valuable ecosystem services, including water quality improvement to protect downstream aquatic ecosystems such as lakes, rivers, and estuaries. However, their ability to improve water quality to safe levels for direct human exposure while largely surrounded by agricultural lands and hosting large wildlife populations remains unknown. Our aim was to examine the ecosystem service capabilities of an avian-dense coastal wetland surrounded by agricultural lands along the southwestern shore of Lake Erie in Ohio by assessing the quality of water as it flows through the wetland (Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR)) and into Lake Erie beach waters. Our study used total phosphorus and fecal indicator (Escherichia coli) concentrations as water quality metrics across the wetland and at an adjacent Lake Erie swimming beach during the 2012 summer swim season. E. coli and total P levels were consistently highest at the site, where water enters the ONWR (mean E. coli = 507 CFU/100 mL; mean total P = 535 μg/L), and steadily decreased as water flowed through the wetland and into the adjacent beach (mean E. coli = 10 CFU/100 mL; mean total P = 41 μg/L). E. coli and total P showed statistically significant (α = 0.01) correlations with phycocyanin, chlorophyll-a, turbidity, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and pH; total P was also significantly correlated with total N. The results suggest that this wetland may be contributing to improving water quality, which is beneficial for human health as well as to downstream ecosystem health (e.g., limiting eutrophication promoting conditions, etc.).

  8. The trophic position of the alien crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii (crustacea decapoda panopeidae) in the Taman Bay, Sea of Azov community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalota, A. K.; Kolyuchkina, G. A.; Tiunov, A. V.; Biriukova, S. V.; Spiridonov, V. A.

    2017-03-01

    This work concerns the trophic web positioning of the alien crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii and other common marine invertebrate species and fishes in the benthic ecosystem of the shallows of Taman Bay, Sea of Azov. The base of the trophic web in this system is composed of phytoplankton, macrophytes (algae and marine grasses), and reeds that use atmospheric carbon for photosynthesis. Analysis of the isotopic composition of nitrogen and carbon has shown that although marine grasses are dominating primary producers in the shallows of the bay, primary consumers (such as Cerastoderma glaucum, Porifera gen. sp., Gammarus aequicauda, Deshayesorchestia deshayesii and Idotea balthica) only partially use this organic source; instead, they use a combination of different sources of primary production. It has been shown that the food source of the alien crab is primarily of animal origin. In Taman Bay, R. harrisii is on the same trophic level as other carnivores/scavengers: benthic fishes Syngnathus nigrolineatus, Gobius spp. and native crab Pilumnus hirtellus and shrimp Palaemon adspersus.

  9. Contribution of remote sensing data to oil spills monitoring. A pilot study in the Black and Azov Seas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchma, T.

    Oil pollution belongs to the most widespread man-caused emergency situations considerably harming natural ecosystems and different types of economic activity fishing tourism and other About 50 of oil pollution of the World Ocean is on transportation where 75 is on the ordinary process of transportation related to the illicit vessel discharges such as ballasts water tank washings flowing of engine-room and other But this type of pollution can be considerably decreased due to the effective monitoring and penalty system For monitoring of marine pollution the state inspections as a rule use marine or aviation facilities which are quite expensive limited by a day light and weather conditions and cover only a territorial waters The satellites SAR Synthetic Aperture Radar images instead can be used for studding the large equatorials and does not depend on cloud coverage season and daytime Oil discharged in the water damps gravity-capillary waves and changes the slope angle Thus oil spills could be viewed on the SAR images as black spots on an unpolluted sea surface However one of the problems in odder to create an operational integrated space-based monitoring system is an absence of various pilot researches to develop methodological principles for the unified algorithm of monitoring on international level To contribute to this need a pilot research on Oil Spills Monitoring in the Black and Azov Seas was conducted by SSPC Pryroda with a support of European Space Agency under the ERUNET project within the framework of

  10. Assessing pollution in coastal ecosystems: a preliminary survey using the micronucleus test in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Jorge I; Machado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Fernando; d'Amico, Veronica L; Bala, Luis O; Vallarino, Eduardo; Elias, Rodolfo; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2003-05-01

    Mussels Mytilus edulis were sampled at increasing distances from urban effluents in two very different locations, Gijon (northern Spain, Europe, 43 degrees N) and Puerto Madryn (Argentina, South America, 43 degrees S), and from an industry effluent in Puerto Madryn. The micronucleus test was performed on branchial cells. For the three situations, a statistically significant negative association was found between the distance of sampling site from the effluent and the mean number of micronuclei per 1000 cell counts, in a range of distances as short as 300m. The micronucleus test in Mytilidae, here revealed to be sensitive enough to monitor urban pollution, is proposed for routine surveys of pollution as a bioindicator of choice for coastal ecosystems.

  11. The relative importance of light and nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth: A simple index of coastal ecosystem sensitivity to nutrient enrichment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone is now a well-established fact. However, there is still uncertainty about the mechanisms through which nutrient enrichment can disrupt biological communities and ecosystem processes in the coastal zone. For example, while some estuaries exhibit classic symptoms of acute eutrophication, including enhanced production of algal biomass, other nutrient-rich estuaries maintain low algal biomass and primary production. This implies that large differences exist among coastal ecosystems in the rates and patterns of nutrient assimilation and cycling. Part of this variability comes from differences among ecosystems in the other resource that can limit algal growth and production - the light energy required for photosynthesis. Complete understanding of the eutrophication process requires consideration of the interacting effects of light and nutrients, including the role of light availability as a regulator of the expression of eutrophication. A simple index of the relative strength of light and nutrient limitation of algal growth can be derived from models that describe growth rate as a function of these resources. This index can then be used as one diagnostic to classify the sensitivity of coastal ecosystems to the harmful effects of eutrophication. Here I illustrate the application of this diagnostic with light and nutrient measurements made in three California estuaries and two Dutch estuaries.

  12. Coral Reef and Coastal Ecosystems Decision Support Workshop April 27-29, 2010 Caribbean Coral Reef Institute, La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Caribbean Coral Reef Institute (CCRI) hosted a Coral Reef and Coastal Ecosystems Decision Support Workshop on April 27-28, 2010 at the Caribbean Coral Reef Institute in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. Forty-three participants, includin...

  13. Coral Reef and Coastal Ecosystems Decision Support Workshop April 27-29, 2010 Caribbean Coral Reef Institute, La Parguera, Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Caribbean Coral Reef Institute (CCRI) hosted a Coral Reef and Coastal Ecosystems Decision Support Workshop on April 27-28, 2010 at the Caribbean Coral Reef Institute in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. Forty-three participants, includin...

  14. Development of the steppe zone in southern Russia based on the reconstruction from the loess-soil formation in the Don-Azov Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Morozova, T. D.; Borisova, O. K.; Timireva, S. N.; Semenov, V. V.; Kononov, Yu. M.; Titov, V. V.; Tesakov, A. S.; Konstantinov, E..; Kurbanov, R. N.

    2012-08-01

    Herbaceous communities in forest ecosystems on the southern part of the Russian Plain appeared in the Middle Miocene (˜10 Ma BP). In the Late Miocene (˜7 Ma BP), feather-grass steppe associations appeared among them. In the time span of 2.7 to 2.1 Ma BP (i.e., in the Early Quaternary, according to the current chronostratigraphic scale), the steppe zone arose on the southern Russian Plain in the Don-Azov Region. Seven stages of this zone development here have been distinguished throughout the Quaternary. The first one (Eopleistocene-Early Pleistocene) was characterized by savanna-like subtropic ecosystems. Then, in the Middle Pleistocene, the temperate zone ecosystems (tallgrass prairie-like steppes) developed here and were followed by steppe ecosystems close to the modern ones in Central Europe. The ecosystems of rich-species forb steppes developed in the Late Pleistocene. Finally, in the optimum of the modern interglacial (Holocene), steppes became similar to the modern ones here, but with a slightly higher precipitation. The general trend is characterized by reduction in heat and water provision and increase in aridization progressing from earlier to later stages.

  15. A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Christine; Griffin, John N; van de Koppel, Johan; Lamers, Leon P M; Smolders, Alfons J P; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; van der Heide, Tjisse; Silliman, Brian R

    2016-08-18

    Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition experiments indicate this positive effect of mussels on cordgrass was due to mounds enhancing water storage and reducing soil salinity stress. Observations and models then demonstrate that surviving cordgrass patches associated with mussels function as nuclei for vegetative re-growth and, despite covering only 0.1-12% of die-offs, markedly shorten marsh recovery periods. These results indicate that mutualisms, in supporting stress-resistant patches, can play a disproportionately large, keystone role in enhancing ecosystem resilience to climatic extremes.

  16. Behavioral self-organization underlies the resilience of a coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    de Paoli, Hélène; van der Heide, Tjisse; van den Berg, Aniek; Silliman, Brian R; Herman, Peter M J; van de Koppel, Johan

    2017-07-25

    Self-organized spatial patterns occur in many terrestrial, aquatic, and marine ecosystems. Theoretical models and observational studies suggest self-organization, the formation of patterns due to ecological interactions, is critical for enhanced ecosystem resilience. However, experimental tests of this cross-ecosystem theory are lacking. In this study, we experimentally test the hypothesis that self-organized pattern formation improves the persistence of mussel beds (Mytilus edulis) on intertidal flats. In natural beds, mussels generate self-organized patterns at two different spatial scales: regularly spaced clusters of mussels at centimeter scale driven by behavioral aggregation and large-scale, regularly spaced bands at meter scale driven by ecological feedback mechanisms. To test for the relative importance of these two spatial scales of self-organization on mussel bed persistence, we conducted field manipulations in which we factorially constructed small-scale and/or large-scale patterns. Our results revealed that both forms of self-organization enhanced the persistence of the constructed mussel beds in comparison to nonorganized beds. Small-scale, behaviorally driven cluster patterns were found to be crucial for persistence, and thus resistance to wave disturbance, whereas large-scale, self-organized patterns facilitated reformation of small-scale patterns if mussels were dislodged. This study provides experimental evidence that self-organization can be paramount to enhancing ecosystem persistence. We conclude that ecosystems with self-organized spatial patterns are likely to benefit greatly from conservation and restoration actions that use the emergent effects of self-organization to increase ecosystem resistance to disturbance.

  17. Soil Carbon Inputs and Ecosystem Respiration: a Field Priming Experiment in Arctic Coastal Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, L. S.; Zhu, B.; Bimueller, C.; Curtis, J. B.; Chafe, O.; Bill, M.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Torn, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    In Arctic ecosystems, climate change is expected to influence soil carbon stocks through changes in both plant carbon inputs and organic matter decomposition. This study addresses the potential for a priming effect, an interaction between these changes in which root-derived carbon inputs alter SOM decomposition rates via microbial biomass increases, co-metabolism of substrates, induced nitrogen limitation, or other possible mechanisms. The priming effect has been observed in numerous laboratory and greenhouse experiments, and is increasingly included in ecosystem models. Few studies, however, have evaluated the priming effect with in situ field manipulations. In a two-year field experiment in Barrow, Alaska, we tested for a priming effect under natural environmental variability. In September 2014 and August 2015, we added 6.1g of 13C-labeled glucose to 25cm diameter mesocosms, 15cm below the soil surface in the mineral soil layer. Over the following month, we quantified effects on the rate and temperature sensitivity of native (non-glucose) ecosystem respiration and GPP. Following the 2014 treatment, soil samples were collected at 1 and 3 weeks for microbial biomass carbon and 13C/12C analysis, and ion exchange membranes were buried for one week to assess nitrate and ammonium availability. In contrast with many laboratory incubation studies using soils from a broad range of ecosystems, we observed no significant priming effect. In spite of a clear signal of 13C-glucose decomposition in respired CO2 and microbial biomass, we detected no treatment effect on background ecosystem respiration or total microbial biomass carbon. Our findings suggest that glucose taken up by microbes was not used for production of additional SOM-decomposing enzymes, possibly due to stoichiometric limitations on enzyme production. To best inform models representing complex and dynamic ecosystems, this study calls for further research relating theory, laboratory findings, and field

  18. Topography and flooding of coastal ecosystems on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska: Implications for sea level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgenson, Torre; Ely, Craig R.

    2001-01-01

    We measured surface elevations, stage of annual peak flooding, and sedimentation along 10 toposequences across coastal ecosystems on the Yukon-Kuskokwim (Y-K) Delta in western Alaska during 1994-1998 to assess some of the physical processes affecting ecosystem distribution. An ecotype was assigned to each of 566 points, and differences in elevations among 24 ecotypes were analyzed within individual toposequences and across the 40 x 40-km study area. Elevations of vegetated ecotypes along the longest toposequence rose only ~1 m over a distance of 7.5 km, and mean elevations of most ecotype across the study area were within 0.5 m of mean higher-high water (1.47 m). During 1994 to 1998, monitoring of annual peak stage using crest gauges revealed flooding from the highest fall storm surge reached 2.58 m (1.11 m above mean higher-high tide). In each year, only the highest surface was unaffected by flooding. Mean annual sedimentation rates for the various ecotypes were 8.0 ram/y on tidal flats, 1.4 to 3.8 mm/y on the active floodplain, 0.1-0.2 mm/y on the inactive floodplain, and 0 mm/ on the abandoned floodplain. If sea levels in the Bering Sea rise ~0.5 m by 2100, as predicted by some on a global basis, large portions of the coastal margin of the delta could be regularly inundated by water during high tides, and even the highest ecotypes could be affected by storm surges. Predicting the extent of future inundation is difficult, however, because of the changes in the ground-surface elevation through sedimentation, organic matter accumulation, and permafrost development.

  19. USGS capabilities for interdisciplinary investigations in coastal and nearshore ecosystems of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.

    2002-01-01

    People choose to reside, work, and vacation in coastal areas of the Great Lakes because of the lakes' scenic beauty and their historic and cultural features. Great Lakes nearshore areas also constitute a valuable economic resource. Two million anglers added \\$1 billion to the region's economy in 1996. More than 300 million tons of goods were transported out of major Great Lakes ports at a value of \\$3 billion in 1996. A 1998 survey of Lake Erie beaches estimated contributions of $5 million per year to each local economy with a public beach. More than 70 million people yearly visit national, state and provincial parks in the Great Lakes area. Uncontrolled land development, recreational development, invasive species, climate change, water availability, and water-level changes and fluctuations lead a long list of current and potential issues in coastal and nearshore areas. To be effectively addressed, these complex issues require an interdisciplinary approach.

  20. Open sea hydrographic forcing of nutrient and phytoplankton dynamics in a Mediterranean coastal ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arin, Laura; Guillén, Jorge; Segura-Noguera, Mariona; Estrada, Marta

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of inorganic nutrients and phytoplankton was studied along two transects located in the coastal area of Barcelona (NW Mediterranean), from March 2002 to March 2006. Similar seasonal variability patterns were observed in the four annual cycles and in general, the nutrient concentrations were highest in winter and lowest in summer. Two phytoplankton peaks, composed mainly by diatoms and nanoflagellates, were generally detected during the year with the main peak during winter-early spring, linked to different fertilization mechanisms, and a secondary peak generally found in autumn, probably related both to the new availability of nutrients due to the disruption of the thermocline and to freshwater inputs. During the rest of the year, with a stratified water column and low nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton remained at a low abundance and comprised mainly small dinoflagellates, although there was smaller scale variability conditioned by rainfall events and subsequent freshwater discharges. Despite the similarity of the seasonal patterns, there were interannual changes in origin of new nutrient inputs into the coastal zone and in the taxonomic composition of the winter-early spring phytoplankton maxima. The main source of nutrients for the winter-early spring maxima of 2003 and 2004 was river runoff, while fertilization events in the two following winters were mainly due to the intrusion, onto the Barcelona shelf, of intermediate waters in 2005, and of surface offshore waters, which also carried a different phytoplankton community, in 2006. These changes were linked to unusually cold and dry weather in the winters of 2005 and 2006, which resulted in strong vertical mixing and deep water formation events in the NW Mediterranean basin. The overall amount of nutrients provided to the coastal zone by offshore water fertilization was higher (2005) or equal (2006) than that provided by freshwater inputs in 2003 and 2004. Our findings highlight the importance

  1. Understanding the distribution of economic benefits from improving coastal and marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pakalniete, Kristine; Aigars, Juris; Czajkowski, Mikołaj; Strake, Solvita; Zawojska, Ewa; Hanley, Nick

    2017-04-15

    The ecological status of coastal and marine waterbodies world-wide is threatened by multiple stressors, including nutrient inputs from various sources and increasing occurrences of invasive alien species. These stressors impact the environmental quality of the Baltic Sea. Each Baltic Sea country contributes to the stressors and, at the same time, is affected by their negative impacts on water quality. Knowledge about benefits from improvements in coastal and marine waters is key to assessing public support for policies aimed at achieving such changes. We propose a new approach to account for variability in benefits related to differences in socio-demographics of respondents, by using a structural model of discrete choice. Our method allows to incorporate a wide range of socio-demographics as explanatory variables in conditional multinomial logit models without the risk of collinearity; the model is estimated jointly and hence more statistically efficient than the alternative, typically used approaches. We apply this new technique to a study of the preferences of Latvian citizens towards improvements of the coastal and marine environment quality. We find that overall, Latvians are willing to pay for reducing losses of biodiversity, for improving water quality for recreation by reduced eutrophication, and for reducing new occurrences of invasive alien species. However a significant group within the sample seems not to value environmental improvements in the Baltic Sea, and, thus, is unwilling to support costly measures for achieving such improvements. The structural model of discrete choice reveals substantial heterogeneity among Latvians towards changes in the quality of coastal and marine waters of Latvia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Microphytobenthos as an indicator of environmental quality status in intertidal flats: Case study of coastal ecosystem in Pertuis Charentais, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, GuoYing; Yan, HongMei; Dupuy, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Microphytobenthos communities of different sediment types were investigated in intertidal flats of the coastal area around La Rochelle (Pertuis Charentais, France) in July 2014 and January 2015. Biotic variables of biomass, abundance and species composition of microphytobenthos were evaluated together with environmental variables, including irradiance, sediment temperature, grains size, pore water salinity, pH, nutrients, organic matter, water content and heavy metal concentrations in the sediment. The relationships between biotic and environmental parameters showed that: (1) the microphytobenthos biomass and community structures showed significant differences among different sediment types; (2) variation in the microphytobenthos communities were significantly correlated with environmental variables, especially with the heavy metals, grain size, irradiance, pore water salinity, organic matter and concentration of PO43+ and Si(OH)4; (3) the species number and richness were both significantly correlated with organic matter, and (4) the species Entomoneis corrugate, Navicula aitchelbee and Gyrosigma cf.limosum were positively correlated to heavy metals, and so were N. phylleptosoma, Surirella brebissonii to Si(OH)4 and NH4+ concentrations, and G. acuminatum and S. brebissonii to PO43+ and NH4+. It is suggested that the spatial variation in biodiversity of microphytobenthos may reflect environmental quality status in coastal intertidal ecosystems.

  3. Differences in coastal and oceanic SST warming rates along the Canary upwelling ecosystem from 1982 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, F.; deCastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Álvarez, I.

    2012-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) trends were calculated for the Moroccan part (22-33 °N) of the Canary upwelling ecosystem, which is characterized by permanent upwelling. This analysis was carried out from 1982 to 2010 by means of daily SST data with an approximate spatial resolution of 4×4 km. SST trends are not homogeneous either in latitude or longitude. SST trends were observed to increase southward, which can be explained in terms of air temperature (Tair) trends that follow a similar pattern. In addition, remarkable differences in warming trends were observed between coastal and ocean locations at the same latitude (ΔSSTtrend=SSToceantrend-SSTcoasttrend). ΔSSTtrend is positive at most of latitudes showing that the ocean warming rate is higher than the coastal one. The differences between coast and ocean were observed to depend on upwelling index (UI) intensity. Actually, UI calculated for the months with intense upwelling (May-September) showed a no significant positive trend and was significantly correlated (R=0.44; p<0.05) with ΔSST averaged from August to December. In addition, the extended winter EA (December-March) showed a significant correlation (R=0.57; p<0.01) with ΔSST for the months of highest upwelling intensity when a lag of 1 yr was considered between both variables.

  4. Coastal Residents Ocean Literacy about Seawater Desalination and its Impacts on Marine Ecosystems in the Monterey Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraola, S.; Heck, N.; Mirza Ordshahi, B.; Paytan, A.; Petersen, K. L.; Haddad, B.; Potts, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    The current lack of available freshwater in California has brought about the consideration of utilizing seawater desalination to provide a consistent drinking water source for local residents of coastal areas. Public literacy about this technology and its impacts on the ocean is vital to making informed policy decisions about marine resources and ecosystems, which may empower local communities to become more involved stewards of the ocean. Our study evaluates public literacy about seawater desalination and its impacts on the ocean. Data was collected using a questionnaire-based survey from a randomly selected sample of residents and marine stakeholders in coastal communities around Monterey Bay. The study explored (1) self-assessed and accurate knowledge about marine impacts from seawater desalination and (2) what shapes public literacy concerning pertinent ocean issues in communities near a National Marine Sanctuary. Our findings show to what extent the public is prepared to engage in meaningful discussions about marine issues and seawater desalination and if an understanding of the ocean shapes perceptions on saltwater desalination.

  5. Assessing the impact of historical coastal landfill sites on sensitive ecosystems: A case study from Dorset, Southern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njue, C. N.; Cundy, A. B.; Smith, M.; Green, I. D.; Tomlinson, N.

    2012-12-01

    Uncontrolled landfill disposal can cause the release of significant contamination. In Southern England and in other parts of the UK, historical landfills are located along many coastal and estuarine marshes and mudflats. At these sites waste, often significantly contaminated with heavy metals and other contaminants, was dumped with little engineering control and without regard to the surrounding environment. The aim of this study is to investigate the degree to which heavy metals from these historical sites may have contaminated adjacent marshes and mudflats, using the Lodmoor marsh, Dorset, UK as a test site. Surface and sediment core samples were collected from brackish marsh and mudflat areas around the former landfill at Lodmoor, which was operational between 1949 and 1990. Sediment samples were investigated for metallic pollutants, grain size, and mineralogy, and core samples dated via 137Cs and 210Pb. To examine the transfer of heavy metals through the food chain, Phragmites australis leaves were analysed for metallic pollutants. Geochemical data revealed that sediments from the Lodmoor marsh are probably contaminated with Pb. 137Cs dating indicates that concentration maxima for heavy metals correlate to the 1950s and 1960s when landfill activities commenced in Lodmoor. Shallow electromagnetic surveys indicate potential continued leaching from the historic landfill complex. This study indicates the potential for possible landfill-derived contaminants to persist in coastal systems for decades after landfill closure. Over the longer term, it is possible that salinisation and enhanced coastal erosion may cause significant metal release from the landfills and their surrounding sedimentary systems into adjacent ecosystems.

  6. Metagenomic insights into particles and their associated microbiota in a coastal margin ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Holly M.; Smith, Maria W.; Herfort, Lydie

    2014-01-01

    Our previously published research was one of the pioneering studies on the use of metagenomics to directly compare taxonomic and metabolic properties of aquatic microorganisms from different filter size-fractions. We compared size-fractionated water samples representing free-living and particle-attached communities from four diverse habitats in the Columbia River coastal margin, analyzing 12 metagenomes consisting of >5 million sequence reads (>1.6 Gbp). With predicted peptide and rRNA data we evaluated eukaryotic, bacterial and archaeal populations across size fractions and related their properties to attached and free-living lifestyles, and their potential roles in carbon and nutrient cycling. In this focused review, we expand our discussion on the use of high-throughput sequence data to relate microbial community structure and function to the origin, fate and transport of particulate organic matter (POM) in coastal margins. We additionally discuss the potential impact of the priming effect on organic matter cycling at the land-ocean interface, and build a case for the importance, in particle-rich estuaries and coastal margin waters, of microbial activities in low-oxygen microzones within particle interiors. PMID:25250019

  7. Nitrogen dynamic in Eurasian coastal Arctic ecosystem: Insight from nitrogen isotope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Benoit; Bauch, Dorothea; Voss, Maren

    2017-05-01

    Primary productivity is limited by the availability of nitrogen (N) in most of the coastal Arctic, as a large portion of N is released by the spring freshet and completely consumed during the following summer. Thus, understanding the fate of riverine nitrogen is critical to identify the link between dissolved nitrogen dynamic and coastal primary productivity to foresee upcoming changes in the Arctic seas, such as increase riverine discharge and permafrost thaw. Here we provide a field-based study of nitrogen dynamic over the Laptev Sea shelf based on isotope geochemistry. We demonstrate that while most of the nitrate found under the surface freshwater layer is of remineralized origin, some of the nitrate originates from atmospheric input and was probably transported at depth by the mixing of brine-enriched denser water during sea ice formation. Moreover, our results suggest that riverine dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) represents up to 6 times the total riverine release of nitrate and that about 62 to 76% of the DON is removed within the shelf waters. This is a crucial information regarding the near-future impact of climate change on primary productivity in the Eurasian coastal Arctic.

  8. Metagenomic insights into particles and their associated microbiota in a coastal margin ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Simon, Holly M; Smith, Maria W; Herfort, Lydie

    2014-01-01

    Our previously published research was one of the pioneering studies on the use of metagenomics to directly compare taxonomic and metabolic properties of aquatic microorganisms from different filter size-fractions. We compared size-fractionated water samples representing free-living and particle-attached communities from four diverse habitats in the Columbia River coastal margin, analyzing 12 metagenomes consisting of >5 million sequence reads (>1.6 Gbp). With predicted peptide and rRNA data we evaluated eukaryotic, bacterial and archaeal populations across size fractions and related their properties to attached and free-living lifestyles, and their potential roles in carbon and nutrient cycling. In this focused review, we expand our discussion on the use of high-throughput sequence data to relate microbial community structure and function to the origin, fate and transport of particulate organic matter (POM) in coastal margins. We additionally discuss the potential impact of the priming effect on organic matter cycling at the land-ocean interface, and build a case for the importance, in particle-rich estuaries and coastal margin waters, of microbial activities in low-oxygen microzones within particle interiors.

  9. Nighttime dissolution in a temperate coastal ocean ecosystem increases under acidification

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Gaylord, Brian; Hill, Tessa; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Russell, Ann D.; Rivest, Emily B.; Sesboüé, Marine; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) are causing ocean acidification, lowering seawater aragonite (CaCO3) saturation state (Ωarag), with potentially substantial impacts on marine ecosystems over the 21st Century. Calcifying organisms have exhibited reduced calcification under lower saturation state conditions in aquaria. However, the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to future ocean acidification remains unknown. Here we assess the community level sensitivity of calcification to local CO2-induced acidification caused by natural respiration in an unperturbed, biodiverse, temperate intertidal ecosystem. We find that on hourly timescales nighttime community calcification is strongly influenced by Ωarag, with greater net calcium carbonate dissolution under more acidic conditions. Daytime calcification however, is not detectably affected by Ωarag. If the short-term sensitivity of community calcification to Ωarag is representative of the long-term sensitivity to ocean acidification, nighttime dissolution in these intertidal ecosystems could more than double by 2050, with significant ecological and economic consequences. PMID:26987406

  10. Designing coastal conservation to deliver ecosystem and human well-being benefits.

    PubMed

    Annis, Gust M; Pearsall, Douglas R; Kahl, Katherine J; Washburn, Erika L; May, Christopher A; Franks Taylor, Rachael; Cole, James B; Ewert, David N; Game, Edward T; Doran, Patrick J

    2017-01-01

    Conservation scientists increasingly recognize that incorporating human values into conservation planning increases the chances for success by garnering broader project acceptance. However, methods for defining quantitative targets for the spatial representation of human well-being priorities are less developed. In this study we employ an approach for identifying regionally important human values and establishing specific spatial targets for their representation based on stakeholder outreach. Our primary objective was to develop a spatially-explicit conservation plan that identifies the most efficient locations for conservation actions to meet ecological goals while sustaining or enhancing human well-being values within the coastal and nearshore areas of the western Lake Erie basin (WLEB). We conducted an optimization analysis using 26 features representing ecological and human well-being priorities (13 of each), and included seven cost layers. The influence that including human well-being had on project results was tested by running five scenarios and setting targets for human well-being at different levels in each scenario. The most important areas for conservation to achieve multiple goals are clustered along the coast, reflecting a concentration of existing or potentially restorable coastal wetlands, coastal landbird stopover habitat and terrestrial biodiversity, as well as important recreational activities. Inland important areas tended to cluster around trails and high quality inland landbird stopover habitat. Most concentrated areas of importance also are centered on lands that are already conserved, reflecting the lower costs and higher benefits of enlarging these conserved areas rather than conserving isolated, dispersed areas. Including human well-being features in the analysis only influenced the solution at the highest target levels.

  11. Designing coastal conservation to deliver ecosystem and human well-being benefits

    PubMed Central

    Pearsall, Douglas R.; Kahl, Katherine J.; Washburn, Erika L.; May, Christopher A.; Franks Taylor, Rachael; Cole, James B.; Ewert, David N.; Game, Edward T.; Doran, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    Conservation scientists increasingly recognize that incorporating human values into conservation planning increases the chances for success by garnering broader project acceptance. However, methods for defining quantitative targets for the spatial representation of human well-being priorities are less developed. In this study we employ an approach for identifying regionally important human values and establishing specific spatial targets for their representation based on stakeholder outreach. Our primary objective was to develop a spatially-explicit conservation plan that identifies the most efficient locations for conservation actions to meet ecological goals while sustaining or enhancing human well-being values within the coastal and nearshore areas of the western Lake Erie basin (WLEB). We conducted an optimization analysis using 26 features representing ecological and human well-being priorities (13 of each), and included seven cost layers. The influence that including human well-being had on project results was tested by running five scenarios and setting targets for human well-being at different levels in each scenario. The most important areas for conservation to achieve multiple goals are clustered along the coast, reflecting a concentration of existing or potentially restorable coastal wetlands, coastal landbird stopover habitat and terrestrial biodiversity, as well as important recreational activities. Inland important areas tended to cluster around trails and high quality inland landbird stopover habitat. Most concentrated areas of importance also are centered on lands that are already conserved, reflecting the lower costs and higher benefits of enlarging these conserved areas rather than conserving isolated, dispersed areas. Including human well-being features in the analysis only influenced the solution at the highest target levels. PMID:28241018

  12. Middle East coastal ecosystem response to middle-to-late Holocene abrupt climate changes.

    PubMed

    Kaniewski, D; Paulissen, E; Van Campo, E; Al-Maqdissi, M; Bretschneider, J; Van Lerberghe, K

    2008-09-16

    The Holocene vegetation history of the northern coastal Arabian Peninsula is of long-standing interest, as this Mediterranean/semiarid/arid region is known to be particularly sensitive to climatic changes. Detailed palynological data from an 800-cm alluvial sequence cored in the Jableh plain in northwest Syria have been used to reconstruct the vegetation dynamics in the coastal lowlands and the nearby Jabal an Nuşayriyah mountains for the period 2150 to 550 B.C. Corresponding with the 4.2 to 3.9 and 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP abrupt climate changes (ACCs), two large-scale shifts to a more arid climate have been recorded. These two ACCs had different impacts on the vegetation assemblages in coastal Syria. The 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP ACC is drier and lasted longer than the 4.2 to 3.9 cal kyr BP ACC, and is characterized by the development of a warm steppe pollen-derived biome (1100-800 B.C.) and a peak of hot desert pollen-derived biome at 900 B.C. The 4.2 to 3.9 cal kyr BP ACC is characterized by a xerophytic woods and shrubs pollen-derived biome ca. 2050 B.C. The impact of the 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP ACC on human occupation and cultural development is important along the Syrian coast with the destruction of Ugarit and the collapse of the Ugarit kingdom at ca. 1190 to 1185 B.C.

  13. Middle East coastal ecosystem response to middle-to-late Holocene abrupt climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Kaniewski, D.; Paulissen, E.; Van Campo, E.; Al-Maqdissi, M.; Bretschneider, J.; Van Lerberghe, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Holocene vegetation history of the northern coastal Arabian Peninsula is of long-standing interest, as this Mediterranean/semiarid/arid region is known to be particularly sensitive to climatic changes. Detailed palynological data from an 800-cm alluvial sequence cored in the Jableh plain in northwest Syria have been used to reconstruct the vegetation dynamics in the coastal lowlands and the nearby Jabal an Nuşayriyah mountains for the period 2150 to 550 B.C. Corresponding with the 4.2 to 3.9 and 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP abrupt climate changes (ACCs), two large-scale shifts to a more arid climate have been recorded. These two ACCs had different impacts on the vegetation assemblages in coastal Syria. The 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP ACC is drier and lasted longer than the 4.2 to 3.9 cal kyr BP ACC, and is characterized by the development of a warm steppe pollen-derived biome (1100–800 B.C.) and a peak of hot desert pollen-derived biome at 900 B.C. The 4.2 to 3.9 cal kyr BP ACC is characterized by a xerophytic woods and shrubs pollen-derived biome ca. 2050 B.C. The impact of the 3.5 to 2.5 cal kyr BP ACC on human occupation and cultural development is important along the Syrian coast with the destruction of Ugarit and the collapse of the Ugarit kingdom at ca. 1190 to 1185 B.C. PMID:18772385

  14. An integrated modelling methodology to study the impacts of nutrients on coastal aquatic ecosystems in the context of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesce, Marco; Critto, Andrea; Torresan, Silvia; Santini, Monia; Giubilato, Elisa; Pizzol, Lisa; Mercogliano, Paola; Zirino, Alberto; Wei, Ouyang; Marcomini, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    It has been recognized that the increase of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG) due to anthropogenic activities is causing changes in Earth's climate. Global mean temperatures are expected to rise by 0.3 to 4.8 °C by the end of the 21st century, and the water cycle to alter because of changes in global atmospheric moisture. Coastal waterbodies such as estuaries, bays and lagoons together with the ecological and socio-economic services they provide, could be among those most affected by the ongoing changes on climate. Because of their position at the land-sea interface, they are subjected to the combined changes in the physico-chemical processes of atmosphere, upstream land and coastal waters. Particularly, climate change is expected to alter phytoplankton communities by changing their climate and environmental drivers, such as temperature, precipitation, wind, solar radiation and nutrient loadings, and to exacerbate the symptoms of eutrophication events, such as hypoxia, harmful algal blooms (HAB) and loss of habitat. A better understanding of the links between climate-related drivers and phytoplankton is therefore necessary for predicting climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems. In this context, the integration of climate scenarios and environmental models can become a valuable tool for the investigation and prediction of phytoplankton ecosystem dynamics under climate change conditions. In the last decade, the effects of climate change on the environmental distribution of nutrients and the resulting effects on aquatic ecosystems encouraged the conduction of modeling studies at a catchment scale, even though mainly are related to lake ecosystem. The further development of integrated modeling approaches and their application to other types of waterbodies such as coastal waters can be a useful contribution to increase the availability of management tools for ecological conservation and adaptation policies. Here we present the case study of the Zero river basin

  15. Ecosystem-based management and refining governance of wind energy in the Massachusetts coastal zone: A case study approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumin, Enid C.

    While there are as yet no wind energy facilities in New England coastal waters, a number of wind turbine projects are now operating on land adjacent to the coast. In the Gulf of Maine region (from Maine to Massachusetts), at least two such projects, one in Falmouth, Massachusetts, and another on the island of Vinalhaven, Maine, began operation with public backing only to face subsequent opposition from some who were initially project supporters. I investigate the reasons for this dynamic using content analysis of documents related to wind energy facility development in three case study communities. For comparison and contrast with the Vinalhaven and Falmouth case studies, I examine materials from Hull, Massachusetts, where wind turbine construction and operation has received steady public support and acceptance. My research addresses the central question: What does case study analysis of the siting and initial operation of three wind energy projects in the Gulf of Maine region reveal that can inform future governance of wind energy in Massachusetts state coastal waters? I consider the question with specific attention to governance of wind energy in Massachusetts, then explore ways in which the research results may be broadly transferable in the U.S. coastal context. I determine that the change in local response noted in Vinalhaven and Falmouth may have arisen from a failure of consistent inclusion of stakeholders throughout the entire scoping-to-siting process, especially around the reporting of environmental impact studies. I find that, consistent with the principles of ecosystem-based and adaptive management, design of governance systems may require on-going cycles of review and adjustment before the implementation of such systems as intended is achieved in practice. I conclude that evolving collaborative processes must underlie science and policy in our approach to complex environmental and wind energy projects; indeed, collaborative process is fundamental to

  16. The nearshore western Beaufort Sea ecosystem: Circulation and importance of terrestrial carbon in arctic coastal food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunton, Kenneth H.; Weingartner, Thomas; Carmack, Eddy C.

    2006-10-01

    . Calculations from isotopic mixing equations indicate cod from lagoons may derive 70% of their carbon from terrestrial sources. The δ15N values of lagoon fish were also 4‰ lower than coastal specimens, reflective of the lower δ15N values of terrestrially derived nitrogen (0-1.5‰ compared to 5-7‰ for phytoplankton). The role of terrestrial carbon in arctic estuarine food webs is especially important in view of the current warming trend in the arctic environment and the role of advective processes that transport carbon along the nearshore shelf. Biogeochemical studies of the arctic coastal estuarine environment may provide more insights into the function of these biologically complex ecosystems.

  17. Regularities of Corg distribution in bottom sediments of the Russian part of the Sea of Azov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Yu. A.; Dotsenko, I. V.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Belov, A. A.; Loginov, E. A.

    2009-04-01

    The principal regularities were ascertained for the spatiotemporal distribution of organic carbon in the water and bottom sediments of the Russian part of the Sea of Azov. The relationships between allo- and autochthonous organic matter in water and bottom sediments from different parts of the sea aquatic area were found. The behavior of organic carbon in the water-bottom sediments system was characterized as the effect of the variability of hydrochemical, biological, and hydrological factors ad processes.

  18. Contemporary distribution of macrozoobenthic communities of the Yeisk estuary (Taganrog Bay of the Sea of Azov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabozhenko, M. V.; Kovalenko, E. P.

    2011-08-01

    The contemporary distribution of macrozoobenthic communities of the Yeisk estuary is considered. Four basic types of communities are classified. Communities with domination of Tubificidae (Oligochaeta) occupy the greatest part of the estuary. Communities with domination of Amphipoda (Corophiidae) remained only in the northeast part of the reservoir. The unstable hydrological conditions and the absence of clearly expressed horohalinicum lead to mixing of Ponto-Caspian and Azov-Black Sea faunas in the Yeisk estuary.

  19. A keystone mutualism underpins resilience of a coastal ecosystem to drought

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Christine; Griffin, John N.; van de Koppel, Johan; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; van der Heide, Tjisse; Silliman, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Droughts are increasing in severity and frequency, yet the mechanisms that strengthen ecosystem resilience to this stress remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether positive interactions in the form of a mutualism between mussels and dominant cordgrass in salt marshes enhance ecosystem resistance to and recovery from drought. Surveys spanning 250 km of southeastern US coastline reveal spatially dispersed mussel mounds increased cordgrass survival during severe drought by 5- to 25-times. Surveys and mussel addition experiments indicate this positive effect of mussels on cordgrass was due to mounds enhancing water storage and reducing soil salinity stress. Observations and models then demonstrate that surviving cordgrass patches associated with mussels function as nuclei for vegetative re-growth and, despite covering only 0.1–12% of die-offs, markedly shorten marsh recovery periods. These results indicate that mutualisms, in supporting stress-resistant patches, can play a disproportionately large, keystone role in enhancing ecosystem resilience to climatic extremes. PMID:27534803

  20. Socio-Economic Spatial for the Sustainability of the Estuary Ecosystem in Pelabuhanratu Coastal West Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriatna, L.; Supriatna, J.; Harmantyo, D.

    2017-02-01

    An estuary area is a typical ecosystem where a vast array of fish breed to enlarge populations. These regions are made productive by organic material in the form of foodstuff, while receiving sunlight sufficient enough to illuminate the brackish waters. These zones must be protected due to their fertile waters and surrounding fertile land. Estuary areas are threatened by nearby landfill and waste debris along and upstream of the river, which consequently contaminate the estuary zone. Socio-economic conditions of the community also affect the sustainability of the estuary. In this case, the Socio-Economic Spatial Model, based on Geographical Information System (GIS) and trade off analysis, were used to elaborate the ecosystem sustainability in the Cimandiri estuary, West Java. This research also uses the temporal analysis of land use change upstream and monitors the community activity around the estuary. The research showed a change in the spatial and temporal land use consequently altering the watershed and the socio-economic analysis showed the community use of the estuary as unsustainable for the region and ecosystems within.

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls in coastal tropical ecosystems: Distribution, fate and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dodoo, D.K.; Essumang, D.K.; Jonathan, J.W.A.; Bentum, J.K.

    2012-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) though banned still find use in most developing countries including Ghana. PCB congener residues in sediments in the coastal regions of Ghana were determined. Sediment samples (n=80) were collected between June 2008 and March 2009, extracted by the continuous soxhlet extraction using (1:1) hexane-acetone mixture for 24 h and analyzed with a CP 3800 gas chromatogram equipped with {sup 65}Ni electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and a mixed PCBs standard of the ICES 7 as marker, after clean-up. Validation of the efficiency and precision of the extraction and analytical methods were done by extracting samples spiked with 2 ppm ICES PCB standard and a certified reference material 1941b for marine sediments from NIST, USA, and analyzed alongside the samples. Total PCBs detected in sediments during the dry and wet seasons were, respectively, 127 and 112 {mu}g/kg dry weight (dw), with a mean concentration of 120 {mu}g/kg (dw). The composition of PCB homologues in the sediments were dominated by tri-, penta- and tetra-PCBs. There was no correlation between organic carbon (OC) of the sediments and total PCBs content. Risk assessments conducted on the levels indicated that PCB levels in sediments along the coastal region of Ghana poses no significant health risk to humans.

  2. The impact of an Indonesian river system on tropical coastal ecosystems: synthesis of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, P.; Hoitink, A.; Buschman, F.; Tarya, A.; Van Der Vegt, M.; Nagtegaal, R.; Mannaerts, C.

    2011-12-01

    Sediment input by tropical rivers into coastal waters appears to be one of the main driving factors for changes in coastal morphology and ecology. In the present study we focus on the Berau river basin (NE Borneo, Indonesia). The Berau river delta is made up of network of tidal rivers and estuarine channels that debouch into a relatively shallow shelf sea or lagoon with coral reefs. It is one of the most biologically rich marine sites in the world.The transfer of water and sediment from upland river catchments towards coastal waters and its impact on reef systems is studied by an interdisciplinary consortium of Dutch and Indonesian scientists (2006-2012). Local sediment supply varies due to the monsoonal climate and ENSO events but is increasingly affected by human-induced changes in land-use patterns.In our study we focus on the origin, transport and fate of (fresh) water and suspended matter (SPM. At the apex of the channel network, field measurements of flow division suggest that the tidally averaged flow division depends on tidal range. In combination with the results of an idealized hydrodynamic and barotropic junction model we have determined that in particular the depth, length, the e-folding length scale of the channel width and the hydraulic roughness of the channels are crucial factors in the distribution of water and SPM. At tidal junctions though more local (and intratidal) processes will become relevant as well, such as the presence of a secondary circulation. Due to a limited degree of mixing in the estuarine channels, in the river mouth water masses are frequently stratified giving way to the development of buoyant plumes. According to our field measurements and model simulations with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (ECOMSED), it is evident that tidal currents play a major role in the behaviour of these plumes. Tides affect the plume by causing vertical mixing, by stratifying the plume due to tidal straining and by transporting fresh water to

  3. Evaluation of the health status of a coastal ecosystem in southeast Mexico: Assessment of water quality, phytoplankton and submerged aquatic vegetation.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Silveira, Jorge A; Morales-Ojeda, Sara M

    2009-01-01

    The coastal environment of the Yucatan Peninsula (SE, Mexico) includes a wide variety of ecosystems ranging from mangroves to coral reefs, resulting in a heterogeneous landscape. Specifically, the marine system is characterized by environmental differences which respond to regional and local forcing functions such as marine currents and groundwater discharges (GD). Such functional characteristics were used here to define four subregions across the Yucatan coast and diagnose the health status of this coastal marine ecosystem. To achieve this goal, we conducted an analysis and integration of water quality variables, an eutrophic assessment, evaluated changes in submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), and analyzed the community structure and distribution of harmful phytoplankton. The first step was to determine the reference values for each subregion based on data previously collected from 2002 to 2006 along the coast of Yucatan, 200m offshore. The trophic index (TRIX) and Canadian index for aquatic life (CCMEWQI) were used to diagnose each subregion and then the ASSETS approach was conducted for Dzilam and Progreso, sampling localities on each end of the health status continuum (those with the best and worst conditions). Overall, results indicated that the marine coastal ecosystem of Yucatan is in good condition; however, differences were observed between subregions that can be attributed to local forcing functions and human impacts. Specifically, the central region (zone HZII, Progreso-Telchac) showed symptoms of initial eutrophication due to nutrient inputs from human activities. The eastern region (zone HZ III, Dzilam-Las Bocas) showed a meso-eutrophic condition linked to natural groundwater discharges, while the other two subregions western (zone HZI Celestun-Palmar) and caribbean (zone HZ IV Ria Lagartos-El Cuyo) exhibited symptoms of oligo-mesotrophic condition. These findings may be considered baseline information for coastal ecosystem monitoring programs in

  4. Introduction to the special issue on “Understanding and predicting change in the coastal ecosystems of the northern Gulf of Mexico”

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Barras, John A.; Williams, S. Jeffress

    2013-01-01

    The coastal region of the northern Gulf of Mexico owes its current landscape structure to an array of tectonic, erosional and depositional, climatic, geochemical, hydrological, ecological, and human processes that have resulted in some of the world's most complex, dynamic, productive, and threatened ecosystems. Catastrophic hurricane landfalls, ongoing subsidence and erosion exacerbated by sea-level rise, disintegration of barrier island chains, and high rates of wetland loss have called attention to the vulnerability of northern Gulf coast ecosystems, habitats, built infrastructure, and economy to natural and anthropogenic threats. The devastating hurricanes of 2005 (Katrina and Rita) motivated the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program and partnering researchers to pursue studies aimed at understanding and predicting landscape change and the associated storm hazard vulnerability of northern Gulf coast region ecosystems and human communities. Attaining this science goal requires increased knowledge of landscape evolution on geologic, historical, and human time scales, and analysis of the implications of such changes in the natural and built components of the landscape for hurricane impact susceptibility. This Special Issue of the Journal of Coastal Research communicates northern Gulf of Mexico research results that (1) improve knowledge of prior climates and depositional environments, (2) assess broad regional ecosystem structure and change over Holocene to human time scales, (3) undertake process studies and change analyses of dynamic landscape components, and (4) integrate framework, climate, variable time and spatial scale mapping, monitoring, and discipline-specific process investigations within interdisciplinary studies.

  5. Biogenic sediments from coastal ecosystems to beach-dune systems: implications for the adaptation of mixed and carbonate beaches to future sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Falco, Giovanni; Molinaroli, Emanuela; Conforti, Alessandro; Simeone, Simone; Tonielli, Renato

    2017-07-01

    Coastal ecosystems produce and store carbonate particles, which play a significant role in the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas and may contribute to the sediment budget of adjacent beaches. In the nearshore seabed of temperate zones (e.g. Mediterranean Sea and South Australia), marine biogenic carbonates are mainly produced inside seagrass meadows. This study quantifies the contribution of biogenic sediments, mainly produced in Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadows and secondarily in photophilic algal communities, to the sediment budget of a Mediterranean beach-dune system (San Giovanni beach, western Sardinia, western Mediterranean Sea). A set of geophysical, petrographic and sedimentological data was used to estimate the sediment volume and composition of the beach-dune system as a whole. The San Giovanni beach-dune system contains 3 797 000 ± 404 000 t of sediment, 83 % (3 137 000 ± 404 000 t) of which is located in the coastal wedge, 16 % (619 000 ± 88 000 t) in the dune fields and 1 % (41 000 ± 15 000 t) in the subaerial beach. The sediments are composed of mixed modern bioclastic and relict bioclastic and non-bioclastic grains from various sources. The system receives a large input of modern bioclastic grains, mainly composed of rhodophytes, molluscs and bryozoans, which derive from sediment production of present-day carbonate factories, particularly P. oceanica seagrass meadows. Radiocarbon dating of modern bioclastic grains indicated that they were produced during the last 4.37 kyr. This value was used to estimate the long-term deposition rates of modern bioclastic sediments in the various beach compartments. The total deposition rate of modern bioclastic grains is 46 000 ± 5000 t century-1, mainly deposited in the coastal wedge (39 000 ± 4 000 t century-1) and dunes (7000 ± 1000 t century-1), and 46 000 t represents ˜ 1.2 % of the total beach-dune sediment mass. Carbonate production from coastal ecosystems was estimated to be 132 000/307 000 t

  6. Climate change. Climate change and wind intensification in coastal upwelling ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sydeman, W J; García-Reyes, M; Schoeman, D S; Rykaczewski, R R; Thompson, S A; Black, B A; Bograd, S J

    2014-07-04

    In 1990, Andrew Bakun proposed that increasing greenhouse gas concentrations would force intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in eastern boundary current systems that contribute substantial services to society. Because there is considerable disagreement about whether contemporary wind trends support Bakun's hypothesis, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature on upwelling-favorable wind intensification. The preponderance of published analyses suggests that winds have intensified in the California, Benguela, and Humboldt upwelling systems and weakened in the Iberian system over time scales ranging up to 60 years; wind change is equivocal in the Canary system. Stronger intensification signals are observed at higher latitudes, consistent with the warming pattern associated with climate change. Overall, reported changes in coastal winds, although subtle and spatially variable, support Bakun's hypothesis of upwelling intensification in eastern boundary current systems. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Els M; Angelini, Christine; Govers, Laura L; Christianen, Marjolijn J A; Altieri, Andrew H; van der Reijden, Karin J; Silliman, Brian R; van de Koppel, Johan; van der Geest, Matthijs; van Gils, Jan A; van der Veer, Henk W; Piersma, Theunis; de Ruiter, Peter C; Olff, Han; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2016-03-16

    The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and West African tropical seagrass meadows. Results reveal that habitat-modifying species, through non-trophic facilitation rather than their trophic role, enhance species richness across multiple trophic levels, increase the number of interactions per species (link density), but decrease the realized fraction of all possible links within the food web (connectance). Compared to the trophic role of the most highly connected species, we found this non-trophic effects to be more important for species richness and of more or similar importance for link density and connectance. Our findings demonstrate that food webs can be fundamentally shaped by interactions outside the trophic network, yet intrinsic to the species participating in it. Better integration of non-trophic interactions in food web analyses may therefore strongly contribute to their explanatory and predictive capacity.

  8. How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    van der Zee, Els M.; Angelini, Christine; Govers, Laura L.; Christianen, Marjolijn J. A.; Altieri, Andrew H.; van der Reijden, Karin J.; Silliman, Brian R.; van de Koppel, Johan; van der Geest, Matthijs; van Gils, Jan A.; van der Veer, Henk W.; Piersma, Theunis; de Ruiter, Peter C.; Olff, Han; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and West African tropical seagrass meadows. Results reveal that habitat-modifying species, through non-trophic facilitation rather than their trophic role, enhance species richness across multiple trophic levels, increase the number of interactions per species (link density), but decrease the realized fraction of all possible links within the food web (connectance). Compared to the trophic role of the most highly connected species, we found this non-trophic effects to be more important for species richness and of more or similar importance for link density and connectance. Our findings demonstrate that food webs can be fundamentally shaped by interactions outside the trophic network, yet intrinsic to the species participating in it. Better integration of non-trophic interactions in food web analyses may therefore strongly contribute to their explanatory and predictive capacity. PMID:26962135

  9. Protein expression from zooplankton communities in a metal contaminated NW mediterranean coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jean, Natacha; Dumont, Estelle; Durrieu, Gael; Balliau, Thierry; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Personnic, Sébastien; Garnier, Cédric

    2012-09-01

    Bidimensional and monodimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to study protein expression from zooplankton collected in thirteen stations of Toulon Bay (NW Mediterranean). In this ecosystem, Little Bay showed higher trace metal concentrations (13.5-23.8 nM for Cu, 0.73-1.24 nM for Pb, 27.8-58.7 nM for Zn) than Large Bay (Cu 2.2-15.6 nM; Pb 0.19-0.78 nM; Zn 9.0-38.8 nM). Trace metals positively correlated (p < 0.05) with expression of four zooplankton proteins (MW in kDa/pI: 25.0/5.6; 48.8/4.1; 38.2/4.4; 38.3/5.8) and with biomass of Oithona nana, predominant copepod in Little Bay. Sequencing by LC-MS/MS putatively provided zooplankton identity of these proteins: they were cytoskeleton actin, except one protein that was the chaperone calreticulin. We suggest that actin and calreticulin could be regarded as zooplankton markers of metal stress and be involved in a possible tolerance of O. nana to contamination, contributing to its development in a marine perturbed ecosystem.

  10. Phytoplankton bloom dynamics in coastal ecosystems: A review with some general lessons from sustained investigation of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1996-01-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are prominent features of biological variability in shallow coastal ecosystems such as estuaries, lagoons, bays, and tidal rivers. Long-term observation and research in San Francisco Bay illustrates some patterns of phytoplankton spatial and temporal variability and the underlying mechanisms of this variability. Blooms are events of rapid production and accumulation of phytoplankton biomass that are usually responses to changing physical forcings originating in the coastal ocean (e.g., tides), the atmosphere (wind), or on the land surface (precipitation and river runoff). These physical forcings have different timescales of variability, so algal blooms can be short-term episodic events, recurrent seasonal phenomena, or rare events associated with exceptional climatic or hydrologic conditions. The biogeochemical role of phytoplankton primary production is to transform and incorporate reactive inorganic elements into organic forms, and these transformations are rapid and lead to measurable geochemical change during blooms. Examples include the depletion of inorganic nutrients (N, P, Si), supersaturation of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide, shifts in the isotopic composition of reactive elements (C, N), production of climatically active trace gases (methyl bromide, dimethylsulfide), changes in the chemical form and toxicity of trace metals (As, Cd, Ni, Zn), changes in the biochemical composition and reactivity of the suspended particulate matter, and synthesis of organic matter required for the reproduction and growth of heterotrophs, including bacteria, zooplankton, and benthic consumer animals. Some classes of phytoplankton play special roles in the cycling of elements or synthesis of specific organic molecules, but we have only rudimentary understanding of the forces that select for and promote blooms of these species. Mounting evidence suggests that the natural cycles of bloom variability are being altered on a global scale by human

  11. Phytoplankton bloom dynamics in coastal ecosystems: A review with some general lessons from sustained investigation of San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, James E.

    1996-05-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are prominent features of biological variability in shallow coastal ecosystems such as estuaries, lagoons, bays, and tidal rivers. Long-term observation and research in San Francisco Bay illustrates some patterns of phytoplankton spatial and temporal variability and the underlying mechanisms of this variability. Blooms are events of rapid production and accumulation of phytoplankton biomass that are usually responses to changing physical forcings originating in the coastal ocean (e.g., tides), the atmosphere (wind), or on the land surface (precipitation and river runoff). These physical forcings have different timescales of variability, so algal blooms can be short-term episodic events, recurrent seasonal phenomena, or rare events associated with exceptional climatic or hydrologic conditions. The biogeochemical role of phytoplankton primary production is to transform and incorporate reactive inorganic elements into organic forms, and these transformations are rapid and lead to measurable geochemical change during blooms. Examples include the depletion of inorganic nutrients (N, P, Si), supersaturation of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide, shifts in the isotopic composition of reactive elements (C, N), production of climatically active trace gases (methyl bromide, dimethylsulfide), changes in the chemical form and toxicity of trace metals (As, Cd, Ni, Zn), changes in the biochemical composition and reactivity of the suspended particulate matter, and synthesis of organic matter required for the reproduction and growth of heterotrophs, including bacteria, zooplankton, and benthic consumer animals. Some classes of phytoplankton play special roles in the cycling of elements or synthesis of specific organic molecules, but we have only rudimentary understanding of the forces that select for and promote blooms of these species. Mounting evidence suggests that the natural cycles of bloom variability are being altered on a global scale by human

  12. Cascading effects of fishing can alter carbon flow through a temperate coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Anne K; Shears, Nick T; Langlois, Timothy J; Babcock, Russell C

    2008-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that fishing can trigger trophic cascades and alter food web dynamics, yet its effects on ecosystem function remain largely unknown. We used the large-scale experimental framework of four marine reserves, spanning an oceanographic gradient in northeastern New Zealand, to test the extent to which the exploitation of reef predators can alter kelp carbon flux and secondary production. We provide evidence that the reduction of predatory snapper (Pagrus auratus) and lobster (Jasus edwardsii) can lead to an increase in sea urchins (Evechinus chloroticus) and indirect declines in kelp biomass in some locations but not others. Stable carbon isotope ratios (delta13C) of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Perna canaliculus) transplanted in reserve and fished sites within four locations revealed that fishing indirectly reduced the proportion of kelp-derived organic carbon assimilated by filter feeders in two locations where densities of actively grazing sea urchins were 23.7 and 8.3 times higher and kelp biomass was an order of magnitude lower than in non-fished reserve sites. In contrast, in the two locations where fishing had no effect on urchin density or kelp biomass, we detected no effect of fishing on the carbon signature of filter feeders. We show that the effects of fishing on nearshore trophic structure and carbon flux are context-dependent and hinge on large-scale, regional oceanographic factors. Where cascading effects of fishing on kelp biomass were documented, enhanced assimilation of kelp carbon did not result in the magnification of secondary production. Instead, a strong regional gradient in filter feeder growth emerged, best predicted by chlorophyll a. Estimates of kelp contribution to the diet of transplanted consumers averaged 56.9% +/- 6.2% (mean +/- SE) for mussels and 33.8% +/- 7.3% for oysters, suggesting that organic carbon fixed by kelp is an important food source fueling northeastern New Zealand's nearshore food webs

  13. Radionuclide transfer in marine coastal ecosystems, a modelling study using metabolic processes and site data.

    PubMed

    Konovalenko, L; Bradshaw, C; Kumblad, L; Kautsky, U

    2014-07-01

    This study implements new site-specific data and improved process-based transport model for 26 elements (Ac, Ag, Am, Ca, Cl, Cm, Cs, Ho, I, Nb, Ni, Np, Pa, Pb, Pd, Po, Pu, Ra, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Tc, Th, U, Zr), and validates model predictions with site measurements and literature data. The model was applied in the safety assessment of a planned nuclear waste repository in Forsmark, Öregrundsgrepen (Baltic Sea). Radionuclide transport models are central in radiological risk assessments to predict radionuclide concentrations in biota and doses to humans. Usually concentration ratios (CRs), the ratio of the measured radionuclide concentration in an organism to the concentration in water, drive such models. However, CRs vary with space and time and CR estimates for many organisms are lacking. In the model used in this study, radionuclides were assumed to follow the circulation of organic matter in the ecosystem and regulated by radionuclide-specific mechanisms and metabolic rates of the organisms. Most input parameters were represented by log-normally distributed probability density functions (PDFs) to account for parameter uncertainty. Generally, modelled CRs for grazers, benthos, zooplankton and fish for the 26 elements were in good agreement with site-specific measurements. The uncertainty was reduced when the model was parameterized with site data, and modelled CRs were most similar to measured values for particle reactive elements and for primary consumers. This study clearly demonstrated that it is necessary to validate models with more than just a few elements (e.g. Cs, Sr) in order to make them robust. The use of PDFs as input parameters, rather than averages or best estimates, enabled the estimation of the probable range of modelled CR values for the organism groups, an improvement over models that only estimate means. Using a mechanistic model that is constrained by ecological processes enables (i) the evaluation of the relative importance of food and water

  14. Harmful algal toxins of the Florida red tide (Karenia brevis): natural chemical stressors in South Florida coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Pierce, R H; Henry, M S

    2008-10-01

    The Florida red tide is a descriptive name for high concentrations of the harmful marine alga, Karenia brevis. Although most prevalent along the south-west Florida coast, periodic blooms have occurred throughout the entire US and Mexico Gulf coasts and the Atlantic coast to North Carolina. This dinoflagellate produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins, called brevetoxins, that cause severe impacts to natural resources, as well as public health. These naturally produced biotoxins may represent one of the most common chemical stressors impacting South Florida coastal and marine ecosystems. Impacts include massive fish kills, marine mammal, sea turtle and sea bird mortalities, benthic community die-off and public health effects from shellfish contamination and inhalation of air-borne toxins. The primary mode of action is binding to voltage-gated sodium channels causing depolarization of nerve cells, thus interfering with nerve transmission. Other effects include immune depression, bronchial constriction and haemolysis. Parent algal toxins are synthesized within the unicellular organism, others are produced as metabolic products. Recent studies into the composition of brevetoxins in cells, water, air and organisms have shown PbTx-2 to be the primary intracellular brevetoxin that is converted over time to PbTx-3 when the cells are ruptured, releasing extracellular brevetoxins into the environment. Brevetoxins become aerosolized by bubble-mediated transport of extracellular toxins, the composition of which varies depending on the composition in the source water. Bivalved molluscs rapidly accumulate brevetoxins as they filter feed on K. brevis cells. However, the parent algal toxins are rapidly metabolized to other compounds, some of which are responsible for neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). These results provide new insight into the distribution, persistence and impacts of red tide toxins to south-west Florida ecosystems.

  15. Harmful algal toxins of the Florida red tide (Karenia brevis): natural chemical stressors in South Florida coastal ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The Florida red tide is a descriptive name for high concentrations of the harmful marine alga, Karenia brevis. Although most prevalent along the south-west Florida coast, periodic blooms have occurred throughout the entire US and Mexico Gulf coasts and the Atlantic coast to North Carolina. This dinoflagellate produces a suite of polyether neurotoxins, called brevetoxins, that cause severe impacts to natural resources, as well as public health. These naturally produced biotoxins may represent one of the most common chemical stressors impacting South Florida coastal and marine ecosystems. Impacts include massive fish kills, marine mammal, sea turtle and sea bird mortalities, benthic community die-off and public health effects from shellfish contamination and inhalation of air-borne toxins. The primary mode of action is binding to voltage-gated sodium channels causing depolarization of nerve cells, thus interfering with nerve transmission. Other effects include immune depression, bronchial constriction and haemolysis. Parent algal toxins are synthesized within the unicellular organism, others are produced as metabolic products. Recent studies into the composition of brevetoxins in cells, water, air and organisms have shown PbTx-2 to be the primary intracellular brevetoxin that is converted over time to PbTx-3 when the cells are ruptured, releasing extracellular brevetoxins into the environment. Brevetoxins become aerosolized by bubble-mediated transport of extracellular toxins, the composition of which varies depending on the composition in the source water. Bivalved molluscs rapidly accumulate brevetoxins as they filter feed on K. brevis cells. However, the parent algal toxins are rapidly metabolized to other compounds, some of which are responsible for neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). These results provide new insight into the distribution, persistence and impacts of red tide toxins to south-west Florida ecosystems. PMID:18758951

  16. Multpile Drivers of Hypoxia in a Central California Coastal Ecosystem Influence Fish Diversity and Estuarine Nursery Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, B. B.; Levey, M. D.; Fountain, M. C.; Carlisle, A. B.; Chavez, F.; Gleason, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    Along the west coast of the United States, some coastal ecosystems experience hypoxia from both land-based (nutrient loading) and ocean-based (upwelling) drivers. Here we report on drivers of hypoxia from both the land and sea and the climatic factors that regulate hypoxia severity by combining multiple data sets of water quality, climate, and fish that span > 40 years in an estuarine ecosystem in central California, Elkhorn Slough. The combination of these multiple hypoxia drivers ultimately had consequences for flatfish habitat quality and nursery function of the estuary. Remarkably, despite intense and increasing nutrient loading from a watershed characterized by agriculture, the estuary displayed periods of resilience. Variation in dissolved oxygen in the lower part of the estuary, where nutrient loading is most severe, was driven not by nutrient loading, but by annual intensity in upwelling. Yet, variation in dissolved oxygen conditions in the upper part of the estuary was driven by climate, specifically El Niño years increased precipitation which alleviated poor dissolved oxygen conditions, likely due to increased flushing of organic material, a product of eutrophication. Areas of the estuary behind water control structures were characterized by persistent hypoxia, and were devoid of flatfish. In fully tidal sites of the estuary, fish diversity and juvenile flatfish abundance were driven by variation in hypoxia. Finally, hypoxic conditions in the flatfish nursery correlated with lag effects to recruitment and fishery landings for a model flatfish species, English sole (Parophrys vetulus), where > 50% of adults in the offshore fishery have been documented to use Elkhorn Slough as a nursery. These results highlight the importance of understanding the drivers and consequences of hypoxia from multiple sources.

  17. Reprint of Ecological health status of the Lagos wetland ecosystems: Implications for coastal risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboola, Julius I.; Ndimele, Prince E.; Odunuga, Shakirudeen; Akanni, Adeniran; Kosemani, Bosede; Ahove, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    Lagos, a major urban agglomeration in the world is characterized by wetlands and basin for upstream rivers such as Ogun, Oshun and Yewa Rivers. Ongoing environmental pressures exerted by large-scale land reclamation for residential quarters, refuse and sewage dumping, and other uses, however, are suspected to have had a substantial impact on ecological health of the Lagos wetland ecosystems over the last few decades. To determine the impact of these pressures, we examined spatial changes in three wetlands areas- Badore/Langbasa (BL), Festac/Iba/Ijegun (FI) and Ologe/Otto-Awori (OO) through field sample collection and analyses of surface water, sediments, air-water interface gas fluxes and vegetations. Surface water conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS), alkalinity, chloride, biological oxygen demand (BOD), nitrate, phosphate and heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Mn, Pb, Cd, K and Ni) exhibited relative spatial stability while other water quality parameters varied significantly (P < 0.05) across the wetland areas. Also, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contributed to most of the total dissolved solids (TDS) since only DIC correlated significantly with TDS (r = 0.889; P = 0.05, n = 12) and TS (r = 0.891; P = 0.05, n = 12), suggesting a strong capacity for carbon sequestration and carbon sink across the wetland areas. None of the encountered vegetation species are in the vulnerable category of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). There are indications of steady rise in greenhouse gas levels in Lagos since air CO2 value at BL have reached global threshold of 400 ppm with OO and FI closely approaching. We conclude that the Lagos wetland ecosystems, especially OO and FI still have some semblance of natural habitat. However, further destruction and unwise use of the resources could cause damage to physical, chemical, geological and biological processes in nature, which could result to grave socio-economic and cultural consequences to the local

  18. Ecological health status of the Lagos wetland ecosystems: Implications for coastal risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboola, Julius I.; Ndimele, Prince E.; Odunuga, Shakirudeen; Akanni, Adeniran; Kosemani, Bosede; Ahove, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    Lagos, a major urban agglomeration in the world is characterized by wetlands and basin for upstream rivers such as Ogun, Oshun and Yewa Rivers. Ongoing environmental pressures exerted by large-scale land reclamation for residential quarters, refuse and sewage dumping, and other uses, however, are suspected to have had a substantial impact on ecological health of the Lagos wetland ecosystems over the last few decades. To determine the impact of these pressures, we examined spatial changes in three wetlands areas- Badore/Langbasa (BL), Festac/Iba/Ijegun (FI) and Ologe/Otto-Awori (OO) through field sample collection and analyses of surface water, sediments, air-water interface gas fluxes and vegetations. Surface water conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS), alkalinity, chloride, biological oxygen demand (BOD), nitrate, phosphate and heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Fe, Na, Mn, Pb, Cd, K and Ni) exhibited relative spatial stability while other water quality parameters varied significantly (P < 0.05) across the wetland areas. Also, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) contributed to most of the total dissolved solids (TDS) since only DIC correlated significantly with TDS (r = 0.889; P = 0.05, n = 12) and TS (r = 0.891; P = 0.05, n = 12), suggesting a strong capacity for carbon sequestration and carbon sink across the wetland areas. None of the encountered vegetation species are in the vulnerable category of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). There are indications of steady rise in greenhouse gas levels in Lagos since air CO2 value at BL have reached global threshold of 400 ppm with OO and FI closely approaching. We conclude that the Lagos wetland ecosystems, especially OO and FI still have some semblance of natural habitat. However, further destruction and unwise use of the resources could cause damage to physical, chemical, geological and biological processes in nature, which could result to grave socio-economic and cultural consequences to the local

  19. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Temperate Coastal Marine Ecosystems and Fisheries in the Northeast Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Haigh, Rowan; Ianson, Debby; Holt, Carrie A.; Neate, Holly E.; Edwards, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    As the oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 they become more acidic, a problem termed ocean acidification (OA). Since this increase in CO2 is occurring rapidly, OA may have profound implications for marine ecosystems. In the temperate northeast Pacific, fisheries play key economic and cultural roles and provide significant employment, especially in rural areas. In British Columbia (BC), sport (recreational) fishing generates more income than commercial fishing (including the expanding aquaculture industry). Salmon (fished recreationally and farmed) and Pacific Halibut are responsible for the majority of fishery-related income. This region naturally has relatively acidic (low pH) waters due to ocean circulation, and so may be particularly vulnerable to OA. We have analyzed available data to provide a current description of the marine ecosystem, focusing on vertical distributions of commercially harvested groups in BC in the context of local carbon and pH conditions. We then evaluated the potential impact of OA on this temperate marine system using currently available studies. Our results highlight significant knowledge gaps. Above trophic levels 2–3 (where most local fishery-income is generated), little is known about the direct impact of OA, and more importantly about the combined impact of multi-stressors, like temperature, that are also changing as our climate changes. There is evidence that OA may have indirect negative impacts on finfish through changes at lower trophic levels and in habitats. In particular, OA may lead to increased fish-killing algal blooms that can affect the lucrative salmon aquaculture industry. On the other hand, some species of locally farmed shellfish have been well-studied and exhibit significant negative direct impacts associated with OA, especially at the larval stage. We summarize the direct and indirect impacts of OA on all groups of marine organisms in this region and provide conclusions, ordered by immediacy and certainty. PMID

  20. Distribution, structure and function of Nordic eelgrass (Zostera marina) ecosystems: implications for coastal management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Boström, Christoffer; Baden, Susanne; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Dromph, Karsten; Fredriksen, Stein; Gustafsson, Camilla; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Möller, Tiia; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Olesen, Birgit; Olsen, Jeanine; Pihl, Leif; Rinde, Eli

    2014-06-01

    This paper focuses on the marine foundation eelgrass species, Zostera marina, along a gradient from the northern Baltic Sea to the north-east Atlantic. This vast region supports a minimum of 1480 km(2) eelgrass (maximum >2100 km(2)), which corresponds to more than four times the previously quantified area of eelgrass in Western Europe.Eelgrass meadows in the low salinity Baltic Sea support the highest diversity (4-6 spp.) of angiosperms overall, but eelgrass productivity is low (<2 g dw m(-2) d(-1)) and meadows are isolated and genetically impoverished. Higher salinity areas support monospecific meadows, with higher productivity (3-10 g dw m(-2) d(-1)) and greater genetic connectivity. The salinity gradient further imposes functional differences in biodiversity and food webs, in particular a decline in number, but increase in biomass of mesograzers in the Baltic.Significant declines in eelgrass depth limits and areal cover are documented, particularly in regions experiencing high human pressure. The failure of eelgrass to re-establish itself in affected areas, despite nutrient reductions and improved water quality, signals complex recovery trajectories and calls for much greater conservation effort to protect existing meadows.The knowledge base for Nordic eelgrass meadows is broad and sufficient to establish monitoring objectives across nine national borders. Nevertheless, ensuring awareness of their vulnerability remains challenging. Given the areal extent of Nordic eelgrass systems and the ecosystem services they provide, it is crucial to further develop incentives for protecting them. © 2014 The Authors. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effects of ocean acidification on temperate coastal marine ecosystems and fisheries in the northeast Pacific.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Rowan; Ianson, Debby; Holt, Carrie A; Neate, Holly E; Edwards, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    As the oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 they become more acidic, a problem termed ocean acidification (OA). Since this increase in CO2 is occurring rapidly, OA may have profound implications for marine ecosystems. In the temperate northeast Pacific, fisheries play key economic and cultural roles and provide significant employment, especially in rural areas. In British Columbia (BC), sport (recreational) fishing generates more income than commercial fishing (including the expanding aquaculture industry). Salmon (fished recreationally and farmed) and Pacific Halibut are responsible for the majority of fishery-related income. This region naturally has relatively acidic (low pH) waters due to ocean circulation, and so may be particularly vulnerable to OA. We have analyzed available data to provide a current description of the marine ecosystem, focusing on vertical distributions of commercially harvested groups in BC in the context of local carbon and pH conditions. We then evaluated the potential impact of OA on this temperate marine system using currently available studies. Our results highlight significant knowledge gaps. Above trophic levels 2-3 (where most local fishery-income is generated), little is known about the direct impact of OA, and more importantly about the combined impact of multi-stressors, like temperature, that are also changing as our climate changes. There is evidence that OA may have indirect negative impacts on finfish through changes at lower trophic levels and in habitats. In particular, OA may lead to increased fish-killing algal blooms that can affect the lucrative salmon aquaculture industry. On the other hand, some species of locally farmed shellfish have been well-studied and exhibit significant negative direct impacts associated with OA, especially at the larval stage. We summarize the direct and indirect impacts of OA on all groups of marine organisms in this region and provide conclusions, ordered by immediacy and certainty.

  2. Distribution, structure and function of Nordic eelgrass (Zostera marina) ecosystems: implications for coastal management and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Christoffer; Baden, Susanne; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Dromph, Karsten; Fredriksen, Stein; Gustafsson, Camilla; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Möller, Tiia; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Olesen, Birgit; Olsen, Jeanine; Pihl, Leif; Rinde, Eli

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the marine foundation eelgrass species, Zostera marina, along a gradient from the northern Baltic Sea to the north-east Atlantic. This vast region supports a minimum of 1480 km2 eelgrass (maximum >2100 km2), which corresponds to more than four times the previously quantified area of eelgrass in Western Europe.Eelgrass meadows in the low salinity Baltic Sea support the highest diversity (4–6 spp.) of angiosperms overall, but eelgrass productivity is low (<2 g dw m-2 d-1) and meadows are isolated and genetically impoverished. Higher salinity areas support monospecific meadows, with higher productivity (3–10 g dw m-2 d-1) and greater genetic connectivity. The salinity gradient further imposes functional differences in biodiversity and food webs, in particular a decline in number, but increase in biomass of mesograzers in the Baltic.Significant declines in eelgrass depth limits and areal cover are documented, particularly in regions experiencing high human pressure. The failure of eelgrass to re-establish itself in affected areas, despite nutrient reductions and improved water quality, signals complex recovery trajectories and calls for much greater conservation effort to protect existing meadows.The knowledge base for Nordic eelgrass meadows is broad and sufficient to establish monitoring objectives across nine national borders. Nevertheless, ensuring awareness of their vulnerability remains challenging. Given the areal extent of Nordic eelgrass systems and the ecosystem services they provide, it is crucial to further develop incentives for protecting them. © 2014 The Authors. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26167100

  3. Linkages between coastal runoff and the Florida Keys ecosystem: A study of a dark plume event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Vargo, Gabriel A.; Neely, Merrie Beth; Johns, Elizabeth

    2004-08-01

    Using data collected by satellite sensors, rain and river gauges, and ship surveys, we studied the development and wind-driven transport of a dark water plume from near Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to the Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys in mid-October 2003. MODIS and SeaWiFS imagery showed that the patch contained an extensive (~5,500 km2) phytoplankton bloom that formed originally near the central coast of Florida. The data linked the bloom to high nutrient coastal runoff caused by heavy rainfall in June and August. Total N and P required for the bloom, which may contain some Karenia brevis cells, was estimated to be 2.3 × 107 and 1.5 × 106 moles, respectively. The dark color became increasingly dominated by colored dissolved organic matter, toward the Dry Tortugas, where CDOM absorption coefficients (0.08-0.12 m-1 at 400 nm) were 2-3 times higher than the surrounding shelf waters, while chlorophyll and inorganic nutrients decreased to negligible levels.

  4. Lagrangian studies of phytoplankton growth and grazing relationships in a coastal upwelling ecosystem off Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Stukel, Michael R.; Tsyrklevich, Kate

    2009-12-01

    Experimental studies of phytoplankton growth and grazing processes were conducted in the coastal upwelling system off Point Conception, California to test the hypothesis that phytoplankton growth and grazing losses determine, to first order, the local dynamics of phytoplankton in the upwelling circulation. Eight experiments of 3-5 days each were conducted over the course of two cruises in May-June 2006 and April 2007 following the trajectories of satellite-tracked drifters. Rates of phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing were determined by daily in situ dilution incubations at 8 depths spanning the euphotic zone. Mesozooplankton grazing was assessed by gut fluorescence analysis of animals collected from net tows through the euphotic zone. We compared directly the net rates of change observed for the ambient phytoplankton community to the net growth rates predicted from experimental determinations of each process rate. The resulting relationship accounted for 91% of the variability observed, providing strong support for the growth-grazing hypothesis. In addition, grazing by mesozooplankton was unexpectedly high and variable, driving a substantial positive to negative shift in phytoplankton net rate of change between years despite comparable environmental conditions and similar high growth rates and suggesting strong top-down control potential. The demonstrated agreement between net ambient and experimental community changes is an important point of validation for using field data to parameterize models. Data sets of this type may provide an important source of new information and rate constraints for developing better coupled biological-physical models of upwelling system dynamics.

  5. Population regulation of epibenthic species in coastal ecosystems, with implications for latitudinal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Vânia; Bailey, Kevin M.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    The effect of predation on population regulation among (epi)benthic communities along the Atlantic coasts is reviewed. Population regulation requires density-dependent mortality at some phase in the life cycle, which can occur through predation under certain functional (Type III) and numerical feeding responses. Although the potential to induce regulation has been suggested for some epibenthic predators in the coastal zone, studies linking direct observations of predator-prey responses to observed regulation of the prey population are scarce. The identification of Type III functional response curves is mainly restricted to laboratory or cage studies, and the effect is confined to a limited range of prey densities. Numerical responses, especially predator aggregations, may be more common in the natural environment. The response type seems to be affected not only by habitat structure but also by water temperature. Prevailing temperature conditions can affect the functional response type possibly through changes in predator behavior. The effect of temperature on the response curve appears to be species-specific and hence, predator-prey specific. Therefore, no general effect of latitude on population regulation can be expected. Most likely there is a mosaic of predator-prey interactions that depend on local habitat, temperature conditions, multiple species interactions and predator and prey species types. We surmise that any latitudinal pattern in the overall recruitment variability along species distributional range is more likely to result from a trend in controlling rather than regulating factors.

  6. Relationships among multiple trace elements in coastal Casuarina equisetifolia ecosystems on Hainan Island, South China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Bi, Hua; Hung, Lan; Peng, Shaolin; Sheng, Chengde

    2006-01-01

    Forty-six trace elements in coastal Casuarina equisetifolia plant-soil systems at nine sampling sites on Hainan Island were analyzed using ICP-MS. The relationships among the trace elements of the same group or the same periodicity of the Periodic Table in the plants and soils were complex and no consistent patterns were found. More combinations of elements occurred with high positive correlation coefficients within the same periodicity than within the same group of the Periodic Table, and there were more high positive correlations in soils than in plants. However, there were many element combinations in Block d (transition elements) with high positive correlation coefficients in plants. Markedly high positive correlation coefficients between individual rare earth elements and Y and among Zr, Nb, Cd existed in both plants and soils. The dendrograms obtained by cluster analysis show that rare earth elements had very similar occurrence and distribution in both soils and plants. Thus, they behaved as a coherent group of elements both geochemically and biogeochemically. The transition elements were more coherent in plants than in soils.

  7. Spatial and temporal dynamics of multidimensional well-being, livelihoods and ecosystem services in coastal Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Helen; Adger, W. Neil; Ahmad, Sate; Ahmed, Ali; Begum, Dilruba; Lázár, Attila N.; Matthews, Zoe; Rahman, Mohammed Mofizur; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2016-01-01

    Populations in resource dependent economies gain well-being from the natural environment, in highly spatially and temporally variable patterns. To collect information on this, we designed and implemented a 1586-household quantitative survey in the southwest coastal zone of Bangladesh. Data were collected on material, subjective and health dimensions of well-being in the context of natural resource use, particularly agriculture, aquaculture, mangroves and fisheries. The questionnaire included questions on factors that mediate poverty outcomes: mobility and remittances; loans and micro-credit; environmental perceptions; shocks; and women’s empowerment. The data are stratified by social-ecological system to take into account spatial dynamics and the survey was repeated with the same respondents three times within a year to incorporate seasonal dynamics. The dataset includes blood pressure measurements and height and weight of men, women and children. In addition, the household listing includes basic data on livelihoods and income for approximately 10,000 households. The dataset facilitates interdisciplinary research on spatial and temporal dynamics of well-being in the context of natural resource dependence in low income countries. PMID:27824340

  8. Spatial and temporal dynamics of multidimensional well-being, livelihoods and ecosystem services in coastal Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Adams, Helen; Adger, W Neil; Ahmad, Sate; Ahmed, Ali; Begum, Dilruba; Lázár, Attila N; Matthews, Zoe; Rahman, Mohammed Mofizur; Streatfield, Peter Kim

    2016-11-08

    Populations in resource dependent economies gain well-being from the natural environment, in highly spatially and temporally variable patterns. To collect information on this, we designed and implemented a 1586-household quantitative survey in the southwest coastal zone of Bangladesh. Data were collected on material, subjective and health dimensions of well-being in the context of natural resource use, particularly agriculture, aquaculture, mangroves and fisheries. The questionnaire included questions on factors that mediate poverty outcomes: mobility and remittances; loans and micro-credit; environmental perceptions; shocks; and women's empowerment. The data are stratified by social-ecological system to take into account spatial dynamics and the survey was repeated with the same respondents three times within a year to incorporate seasonal dynamics. The dataset includes blood pressure measurements and height and weight of men, women and children. In addition, the household listing includes basic data on livelihoods and income for approximately 10,000 households. The dataset facilitates interdisciplinary research on spatial and temporal dynamics of well-being in the context of natural resource dependence in low income countries.

  9. Modeled Sea Level Rise Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems at Six Major Estuaries on Florida’s Gulf Coast: Implications for Adaptation Planning

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Anne P.; Brenner, Jorge; Gordon, Doria R.

    2015-01-01

    The Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) was applied at six major estuaries along Florida’s Gulf Coast (Pensacola Bay, St. Andrews/Choctawhatchee Bays, Apalachicola Bay, Southern Big Bend, Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor) to provide quantitative and spatial information on how coastal ecosystems may change with sea level rise (SLR) and to identify how this information can be used to inform adaption planning. High resolution LiDAR-derived elevation data was utilized under three SLR scenarios: 0.7 m, 1 m and 2 m through the year 2100 and uncertainty analyses were conducted on selected input parameters at three sites. Results indicate that the extent, spatial orientation and relative composition of coastal ecosystems at the study areas may substantially change with SLR. Under the 1 m SLR scenario, total predicted impacts for all study areas indicate that coastal forest (-69,308 ha; -18%), undeveloped dry land (-28,444 ha; -2%) and tidal flat (-25,556 ha; -47%) will likely face the greatest loss in cover by the year 2100. The largest potential gains in cover were predicted for saltmarsh (+32,922 ha; +88%), transitional saltmarsh (+23,645 ha; na) and mangrove forest (+12,583 ha; +40%). The Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay study areas were predicted to experience the greatest net loss in coastal wetlands The uncertainty analyses revealed low to moderate changes in results when some numerical SLAMM input parameters were varied highlighting the value of collecting long-term sedimentation, accretion and erosion data to improve SLAMM precision. The changes predicted by SLAMM will affect exposure of adjacent human communities to coastal hazards and ecosystem functions potentially resulting in impacts to property values, infrastructure investment and insurance rates. The results and process presented here can be used as a guide for communities vulnerable to SLR to identify and prioritize adaptation strategies that slow and/or accommodate the changes underway. PMID:26207914

  10. Drivers of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems: Discoveries from four decades of study in San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, James E.; Jassby, Alan D.

    2012-12-01

    Poised at the interface of rivers, ocean, atmosphere and dense human settlement, estuaries are driven by a large array of natural and anthropogenic forces. San Francisco Bay exemplifies the fast-paced change occurring in many of the world's estuaries, bays, and inland seas in response to these diverse forces. We use observations from this particularly well-studied estuary to illustrate responses to six drivers that are common agents of change where land and sea meet: water consumption and diversion, human modification of sediment supply, introduction of nonnative species, sewage input, environmental policy, and climate shifts. In San Francisco Bay, responses to these drivers include, respectively, shifts in the timing and extent of freshwater inflow and salinity intrusion, decreasing turbidity, restructuring of plankton communities, nutrient enrichment, elimination of hypoxia and reduced metal contamination of biota, and food web changes that decrease resistance of the estuary to nutrient pollution. Detection of these changes and discovery of their causes through environmental monitoring have been essential for establishing and measuring outcomes of environmental policies that aim to maintain high water quality and sustain services provided by estuarine-coastal ecosystems. The many time scales of variability and the multiplicity of interacting drivers place heavy demands on estuarine monitoring programs, but the San Francisco Bay case study illustrates why the imperative for monitoring has never been greater.

  11. Twelve years of repeated wild hog activity promotes population maintenance of an invasive clonal plant in a coastal dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Callie A; Evans, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    Invasive animals can facilitate the success of invasive plant populations through disturbance. We examined the relationship between the repeated foraging disturbance of an invasive animal and the population maintenance of an invasive plant in a coastal dune ecosystem. We hypothesized that feral wild hog (Sus scrofa) populations repeatedly utilized tubers of the clonal perennial, yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) as a food source and evaluated whether hog activity promoted the long-term maintenance of yellow nutsedge populations on St. Catherine's Island, Georgia, United States. Using generalized linear mixed models, we tested the effect of wild hog disturbance on permanent sites for yellow nutsedge culm density, tuber density, and percent cover of native plant species over a 12-year period. We found that disturbance plots had a higher number of culms and tubers and a lower percentage of native live plant cover than undisturbed control plots. Wild hogs redisturbed the disturbed plots approximately every 5 years. Our research provides demographic evidence that repeated foraging disturbances by an invasive animal promote the long-term population maintenance of an invasive clonal plant. Opportunistic facultative interactions such as we demonstrate in this study are likely to become more commonplace as greater numbers of introduced species are integrated into ecological communities around the world.

  12. Reconstruction of metal pollution and recent sedimentation processes in Havana Bay (Cuba): a tool for coastal ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Asencio, M; Alvarado, J A Corcho; Alonso-Hernández, C; Quejido-Cabezas, A; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Sanchez-Sanchez, M; Gómez-Mancebo, M B; Froidevaux, P; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2011-11-30

    Since 1998 the highly polluted Havana Bay ecosystem has been the subject of a mitigation program. In order to determine whether pollution-reduction strategies were effective, we have evaluated the historical trends of pollution recorded in sediments of the Bay. A sediment core was dated radiometrically using natural and artificial fallout radionuclides. An irregularity in the (210)Pb record was caused by an episode of accelerated sedimentation. This episode was dated to occur in 1982, a year coincident with the heaviest rains reported in Havana over the XX century. Peaks of mass accumulation rates (MAR) were associated with hurricanes and intensive rains. In the past 60 years, these maxima are related to strong El Niño periods, which are known to increase rainfall in the north Caribbean region. We observed a steady increase of pollution (mainly Pb, Zn, Sn, and Hg) since the beginning of the century to the mid 90 s, with enrichment factors as high as 6. MAR and pollution decreased rapidly after the mid 90 s, although some trace metal levels remain high. This reduction was due to the integrated coastal zone management program introduced in the late 90 s, which dismissed catchment erosion and pollution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A multivariate approach to analyzing functional redundancy of marine periphytic ciliates during the colonization process for bioassessment in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangjian; Zhong, Xiaoxiao; Warren, Alan; Xu, Henglong

    2017-04-15

    Functional redundancy is a useful tool for determining functional compensation and for reducing "signal to noise" ratios of full-species datasets in community-based monitoring programs. The functional redundancy of marine periphytic ciliate communities during the colonization process in coastal waters of the Yellow Sea, China, was analyzed using a peeling procedure (BVSTEP). Four response units (RUs) with trophic-functional equivalents were identified from the full 77-species dataset. These RUs, which comprised four, seven, six and six species respectively, represented a clear variation in trophic-functional structures across the levels of functional redundancy. RU1 was dominated by bacterivores, RU2 and RU3 first by bacterivores then by algivores, and RU4 first by non-selectives and bacterivores then by algivores. The colonization process and growth curve of each RU were significantly well-fitted to the MacArthur-Wilson and logistic models, respectively. These results suggest that RUs can be used as changeable trophic-functional equivalents for bioassessment in marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of pre-existing disturbances in the effect of marine reserves on coastal ecosystems: a modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Savina, Marie; Condie, Scott A; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    We have used an end-to-end ecosystem model to explore responses over 30 years to coastal no-take reserves covering up to 6% of the fifty thousand square kilometres of continental shelf and slope off the coast of New South Wales (Australia). The model is based on the Atlantis framework, which includes a deterministic, spatially resolved three-dimensional biophysical model that tracks nutrient flows through key biological groups, as well as extraction by a range of fisheries. The model results support previous empirical studies in finding clear benefits of reserves to top predators such as sharks and rays throughout the region, while also showing how many of their major prey groups (including commercial species) experienced significant declines. It was found that the net impact of marine reserves was dependent on the pre-existing levels of disturbance (i.e. fishing pressure), and to a lesser extent on the size of the marine reserves. The high fishing scenario resulted in a strongly perturbed system, where the introduction of marine reserves had clear and mostly direct effects on biomass and functional biodiversity. However, under the lower fishing pressure scenario, the introduction of marine reserves caused both direct positive effects, mainly on shark groups, and indirect negative effects through trophic cascades. Our study illustrates the need to carefully align the design and implementation of marine reserves with policy and management objectives. Trade-offs may exist not only between fisheries and conservation objectives, but also among conservation objectives.

  15. The Role of Pre-Existing Disturbances in the Effect of Marine Reserves on Coastal Ecosystems: A Modelling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Marie; Condie, Scott A.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    We have used an end-to-end ecosystem model to explore responses over 30 years to coastal no-take reserves covering up to 6% of the fifty thousand square kilometres of continental shelf and slope off the coast of New South Wales (Australia). The model is based on the Atlantis framework, which includes a deterministic, spatially resolved three-dimensional biophysical model that tracks nutrient flows through key biological groups, as well as extraction by a range of fisheries. The model results support previous empirical studies in finding clear benefits of reserves to top predators such as sharks and rays throughout the region, while also showing how many of their major prey groups (including commercial species) experienced significant declines. It was found that the net impact of marine reserves was dependent on the pre-existing levels of disturbance (i.e. fishing pressure), and to a lesser extent on the size of the marine reserves. The high fishing scenario resulted in a strongly perturbed system, where the introduction of marine reserves had clear and mostly direct effects on biomass and functional biodiversity. However, under the lower fishing pressure scenario, the introduction of marine reserves caused both direct positive effects, mainly on shark groups, and indirect negative effects through trophic cascades. Our study illustrates the need to carefully align the design and implementation of marine reserves with policy and management objectives. Trade-offs may exist not only between fisheries and conservation objectives, but also among conservation objectives. PMID:23593432

  16. Consequences of contaminant mixture on the dynamics and functional diversity of bacterioplankton in a southwestern Mediterranean coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Pringault, Olivier; Lafabrie, Céline; Avezac, Murielle; Bancon-Montigny, Chrystelle; Carre, Claire; Chalghaf, Mohamed; Delpoux, Sophie; Duvivier, Adrien; Elbaz-Poulichet, Françoise; Gonzalez, Catherine; Got, Patrice; Leboulanger, Christophe; Spinelli, Sylvie; Hlaili, Asma Sakka; Bouvy, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Contamination of coastal environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants, sometimes in trace levels, that may have significant effects on diversity and function of organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term dynamics of bacterioplankton exposed to natural and artificial mixtures of contaminants. Bacterial communities from a southwestern Mediterranean ecosystem, lagoon and the bay (offshore) of Bizerte were exposed to i) elutriate from resuspension of contaminated sediment, and ii) an artificial mixture of metals and herbicides mimicking the contamination observed during sediment resuspension. Elutriate incubation as well as artificial spiking induced strong enrichments in nutrients (up to 18 times), metals (up to six times) and herbicides (up to 20 times) relative to the in situ concentrations in the offshore station, whereas the increases in contaminants were less marked in the lagoon station. In the offshore waters, the artificial mixture of pollutants provoked a strong inhibition of bacterial abundance, production and respiration and significant modifications of the potential functional diversity of bacterioplankton with a strong decrease of the carbohydrate utilization. In contrast, incubation with elutriate resulted in a stimulation of bacterial activities and abundances, suggesting that the toxic effects of pollutants were modified by the increase in nutrient and DOM concentrations due to the sediment resuspension. The effects of elutriate and the artificial mixture of pollutants on bacterial dynamics and the functional diversity were less marked in the lagoon waters, than in offshore waters, suggesting a relative tolerance of lagoon bacteria against contaminants.

  17. Drivers of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems: Discoveries from four decades of study in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, J.E.; Jassby, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    Poised at the interface of rivers, ocean, atmosphere and dense human settlement, estuaries are driven by a large array of natural and anthropogenic forces. San Francisco Bay exemplifies the fast-paced change occurring in many of the world's estuaries, bays and inland seas in response to these diverse forces. We use observations from this particularly well-studied estuary to illustrate responses to six drivers that are common agents of change where land and sea meet: water consumption and diversion; human modification of sediment supply; introduction of non-native species; sewage input; environmental policy; and climate shifts. In San Francisco Bay, responses to these drivers include, respectively, shifts in the timing and extent of freshwater inflow and salinity intrusion; decreasing turbidity; restructuring of plankton communities; nutrient enrichment; elimination of hypoxia and reduced metal contamination of biota; and food web changes that decrease resistance of the estuary to nutrient pollution. Detection of these changes and discovery of their causes through environmental monitoring have been essential for establishing and measuring outcomes of environmental policies that aim to maintain high water quality and sustain services provided by estuarine-coastal ecosystems. The wide range of variability time scales and the multiplicity of interacting drivers place heavy demands on estuarine monitoring programs. But the San Francisco Bay case study illustrates why the imperative for monitoring has never been greater.

  18. Geochemical and geo-statistical assessment of heavy metal concentration in the sediments of different coastal ecosystems of Andaman Islands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobi, E. P.; Dilipan, E.; Thangaradjou, T.; Sivakumar, K.; Kannan, L.

    2010-04-01

    Spatial distribution of metal concentrations in the surface sediment samples collected from 16 marine locations covering different coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, seagrasses, dead coral and sandy beaches of the Andaman islands, India was studied. pH, EC, sediment grain size and heavy metal (Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) concentrations were determined and contamination factor (CF) and geo-accumulation index (I geo) were calculated to understand the pollution status of the study area based on the background values. CF of different heavy metals has revealed that different metals have different levels of accumulation viz. Al: 0.01-0.22, Mg: 0.38-1.85, Fe: 0.06-0.74, Mn: 0.04-1.18, Cu: 0.18-2.93, Cr: 0.52-12.6, Zn: 0.3-1.39, Ni: 0.06-0.89, Pb: BDL-0.74, Co: 0.1-0.35 and Cd: 2.3-12.9. In general the metal concentration was less in these ecosystems when compared to similar ecosystems of mainland of India. Concentration of some metals like Cr and Cd was comparatively higher than the background values which is an important issue of concern to the coastal managers of the region. Spatial data on heavy metals, collected now, would help the coastal zone managers to identify the vulnerable sites and take remedial actions.

  19. Scales and drivers of seasonal pCO2 dynamics and net ecosystem exchange along the coastal waters of southeastern Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Kanuri, Vishnu Vardhan; Gijjapu, Durga Rao; Munnooru, Kumaraswami; Sura, Appalanaidu; Patra, Sivaji; Vinjamuri, Ranga Rao; Karri, Ramu

    2017-08-15

    The impact of seasonal coastal upwelling on the dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and sea-air fluxes of CO2 along the coastal waters of Kochi was investigated during 2015, as a part of Ecosystem Modelling Project. The surface water pCO2 varied from 396 to 630μatm during the study period. Significant inter-seasonal variations were found in the distribution of physico-chemical variables and surface pCO2. An increase of 102.1μatm of pCO2 was noticed over a two-decade period with a rate of 5.3μatmy(-1). There was an agreement between the fluxes of CO2 and net ecosystem production (NEP) with respect to the trophic status while NEP was higher than CO2 fluxes by a factor of 3.9. The annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was estimated to be 15.02mmolCm(-2)d(-1) indicating that the coastal waters of Kochi are highly heterotrophic in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fisheries impacts on China's coastal ecosystems: Unmasking a pervasive ‘fishing down’ effect

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Intensive fishing can strongly impact marine ecosystems; among other things, it usually causes the mean trophic level of the catches to decline, an indicator of the occurrence of the ‘fishing down’ (FD) phenomenon. Although FD occurs throughout the world oceans, it can easily be masked by diverse factors, which has misled authors as to its generality. In this contribution, which uses the East China Sea as an example, we explore the masking effect on FD of the taxonomic coarseness of catch data, of assuming that individual sizes remain constant after intensive fishing, and the geographic expansion of fisheries. The result showed that all of these masking factors occur in the East China Sea, where only a few species are reported separately and the bulk of the catch is pooled into non-informative ‘mixed fishes’. Also, the small mesh sizes and intensive fishing have reduced the sizes of fish and their trophic levels, while the fisheries have expanded offshore. Overall, taking the masking factors into account, the fishing down effect, i.e., the decline of the mean trophic level of the catch between 1979 and 2014 is in the order of 0.15 TL per decade, i.e., one of the highest estimates of FD in the world. Some ecological implications are presented. PMID:28267755

  1. Trip report: pilot studies of factors linking watershed function and coastal ecosystem health in American Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Medeiros, Arthur C.

    2010-01-01

    Coral reef resources in the territory of American Samoa face significant problems from overfishing, non-point source pollution, global warming, and continuing population growth and development. The islands are still relatively isolated relative to other parts of the Pacific and have managed to avoid some of the more devastating invasive species that have reached other archipelagoes. As a result, there are opportunities for collaborative and integrative research and monitoring programs to help restore and maintain biodiversity and functioning natural ecosystem in the archipelago. We found that the 'Ridge to Reef' paradigm already exists in American Samoa, with a high degree of interagency cooperation and efficient use of limited resources already taking place in the Territory. USGS may be able to make contributions as a partner organization in the Coral Reef Advisory Group (CRAG) through deployment of sediment monitoring instrumentation to supplement stream monitoring by the American Samoa Environmental Protection Agency, by providing high resolution vegetation and land-use maps of main islands, by providing additional support to the American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources and the National Park Service for monitoring of invasive species, by working with members of CRAG to initiate sediment transport studies on Samoan reefs, and by developing new projects on the effects of bacterial contamination and pollutants on coral reef physiology and demography.

  2. Fisheries impacts on China's coastal ecosystems: Unmasking a pervasive 'fishing down' effect.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cui; Pauly, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Intensive fishing can strongly impact marine ecosystems; among other things, it usually causes the mean trophic level of the catches to decline, an indicator of the occurrence of the 'fishing down' (FD) phenomenon. Although FD occurs throughout the world oceans, it can easily be masked by diverse factors, which has misled authors as to its generality. In this contribution, which uses the East China Sea as an example, we explore the masking effect on FD of the taxonomic coarseness of catch data, of assuming that individual sizes remain constant after intensive fishing, and the geographic expansion of fisheries. The result showed that all of these masking factors occur in the East China Sea, where only a few species are reported separately and the bulk of the catch is pooled into non-informative 'mixed fishes'. Also, the small mesh sizes and intensive fishing have reduced the sizes of fish and their trophic levels, while the fisheries have expanded offshore. Overall, taking the masking factors into account, the fishing down effect, i.e., the decline of the mean trophic level of the catch between 1979 and 2014 is in the order of 0.15 TL per decade, i.e., one of the highest estimates of FD in the world. Some ecological implications are presented.

  3. Long-term changes in the benthic communities of the Sea of Azov related to the sedimentation and hydrological regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matishov, G. G.; Shokhin, I. V.; Nabozhenko, M. V.; Pol'Shin, V. V.

    2008-06-01

    The following periods reflected in the composition and distribution of benthic communities are distinguished in the development of the Sea of Azov during the last 80 years: (1) prior to the regulation of the Don River discharge, (2) after its regulation, (3) stabilization of the Don River hydrological regime, and (4) desalination of the sea. The distribution of benthic communities in the Sea of Azov is characterized by concentric patterns, which are distorted due to the changes in the hydrological and oxygen regimes after oxygen depletion. The basic factors that influence the distribution of macrozoobenthic communities are the aeration regime of the sea and the character of the sediment accumulation. The steady distribution of benthic communities composed largely of euryhaline species adapted to the conditions of an unstable salinity in the Sea of Azov shows no correlation with the salinity fluctuations from 9 to 14‰ during the 80-year-long period.

  4. Effect of Changes in Seasonal Rain Regime on Coastal Ecosystem Structure and Aquaculture Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosimo, S.; Melaku Canu, D.; Libralato, S.; Cossarini, G.; Giorgi, F.

    2008-12-01

    A downscaling experiment linked climate forcing produced by a Regional Climate Model for Europe to a 3D high resolution coupled transport biogeochemical model for the Lagoon of Venice, which in turn forced: a) a food web model for evaluation of cascading effects on ecosystem structure and b) a population dynamic bioenergetic filter feeders bivalvae model for evaluation of effects on aquaculture activities. The hierarchy of models was used to compare result for a reference situation (RF, 1961-1990) with results for two future IPCC scenarios (2071-2100), representing market oriented and local sustainability policies (scenarios A2 and B2, respectively). Future climate projections suggest that, locally, annual mean rain will not change much but the seasonal patterns will likely do so. Summer and spring will be more dry and winter and autumn more rainy. This will potentially increase winter nutrient concentrations but -because of unfavourable timing - primary and secondary productions will decrease, and nutrient surplus will be exported from the Lagoon of Venice to the Adriatic Sea. The impacts on higher trophic levels could be softened thanks to presence of alternative energy pathways and role of omnivory. However, in our future scenario of the lagoon food web the suitability for higher trophic level organisms seems lower. A more detailed analysis on clam aquaculture indicates that this activity will suffer the decrease of primary productivity, and point to the need of implementation of proper aquaculture management policies. In the light of adaptive management. These policies cannot be a straightfoward extrapolation of present practises, but need to be defined basing on future conditions.

  5. Assessing the sensitivity of Alaska's Coastal Ecosystem to Changes in Glacier Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oneel, S.; Hood, E. W.; Arendt, A. A.; Sass, L. C.; March, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The timing and magnitude of freshwater discharge to the Gulf of Alaska impacts rates of sea level change and the health of near shore ecosystems and fisheries. Glaciers strongly modulate the freshwater flux into this region and contribute to approximately 50% of its annual freshwater budget. It is generally assumed that persistently negative annual mass balances, forced by recent climate changes, are driving increases in glacier stream discharge. However, increases in runoff also depend on increased mass turnover rates, wherein the amplitude of seasonal mass balance increases due to enhanced snowfall and summer melt intensity. To quantify and partition runoff into the Gulf of Alaska we examine 1966-2010 US Geological Survey glacier mass balance and streamflow records from the Gulkana/Wolverine glaciers located in continental/maritime Alaska climate regimes. We compare annual, summer and winter balances with associated discharge magnitudes at each glacier to determine the primary controls on runoff magnitude and timing. We find that both glaciers have experienced increases in runoff and mass turnover, but only the Gulkana Glacier shows increases in stream discharge due to long term changes in annual mass balance. Conversely, Wolverine Glacier runoff is more sensitive to the amplitude of winter accumulation. The data suggest that changes in summer climate forcing are occurring over broader spatial scales than are changes in winter forcing. The analyses demonstrate that care is warranted when formulating assumptions relating glacier volume change to surface water hydrologic processes. Predicting future changes in runoff and implications for sea level rise, water resources and biological resources in this highly productive region requires that we better understand the processes that produce and modulate glacier runoff.

  6. Coastal Ecosystems of Latin America and the Caribbean. Objectives, Priorities and Activities of Unesco's COMAR Project for the Latin American and Caribbean Region, Caracas, Venezuela, 15-19 November 1982. Unesco Reports in Marine Science 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    To further the knowledge of the resources of coastal ecosystems and the general lines along which they function, Unesco implemented a "Major Interregional Project on Research and Training Leading to the Integrated Management of Coastal Systems" (COMAR). In addition, a proposed regional cooperative program called the "Regional…

  7. Coastal Ecosystems of Latin America and the Caribbean. Objectives, Priorities and Activities of Unesco's COMAR Project for the Latin American and Caribbean Region, Caracas, Venezuela, 15-19 November 1982. Unesco Reports in Marine Science 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    To further the knowledge of the resources of coastal ecosystems and the general lines along which they function, Unesco implemented a "Major Interregional Project on Research and Training Leading to the Integrated Management of Coastal Systems" (COMAR). In addition, a proposed regional cooperative program called the "Regional…

  8. Resistance of a coastal ecosystem to increasing eutrophic conditions: the Bay of Brest (France), a semi-enclosed zone of Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Olivier; Del Amo, Yolanda; Menesguen, Alain; Aminot, Alain; Quequiner, Bernard; Treguer, Paul

    The Bay of Brest is a semi-enclosed coastal ecosystem receiving high nutrients loading from freshwater inputs. In order to analyse the response of phytoplankton stocks to increasing eutrophic conditions, a survey of the annual cycle of hydrographic properties, nutrients and chlorophyll a concentrations, and carbon uptake rates was performed at four stations in 1993. This database has been compared to earlier measurements performed during several comparable surveys within the last 20 years. As compared to the seventies, a doubled nitrate loading is now entering this ecosystem, which is related to increased agricultural activities on the drainage basins, while the geographical origin of the nitrate input has been modified. As a result of these anthropogenic modifications, summer averaged Si/N stoichiometric balance has decreased during the two last decades but, contrary to what has been observed in other coastal ecosystems, phytoplankton stocks have not increased. Several ecological factors have hindered eutrophication: the high hydrodynamic mixing with adjacent marine waters, caused by the macrotidal regime, induces important nutrients losses, temperature and mostly light limit primary production while Si and P high recycling maintain nitrogen limitation in this ecosystem. Conjunction of these non-anthropogenic factors explains the global stability of phytoplankton stocks.