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Sample records for b-adrenergic drugs improves

  1. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  2. DNA encoding an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Weinshank, R.L.; Hartig, P.R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a human alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor. This patent also describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule, wherein the isolated nucleic acid molecule is a DNA molecule and a mammalian cell comprising the DNA molecule.

  3. Molecular evolution of the mammalian alpha 2B adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ole; Willemsen, Diederik; Ursing, Björn M; Arnason, Ulfur; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2002-12-01

    The alpha 2B adrenergic receptor (A2AB) is a heptahelical G protein-coupled receptor for catecholamines. We compared the almost complete coding region (about 1,175 bp) of the A2AB gene from 48 mammalian species, including eight newly determined sequences, representing all the 18 eutherian and two marsupial orders. Comparison of the encoded proteins reveals that residues thought to be involved in agonist binding are highly conserved, as are the regions playing a role in G protein-coupling. The three extracellular loops are generally more variable than the transmembrane domains and two of the intracellular loops, indicating a lower functional constraint. However, the greatest variation is observed in the very long, third intracellular loop, where only a few residues and a polyglutamyl tract are preserved. Although this polyglutamyl domain displays a great variation in length, its presence in all described A2ABs confirms its proposed role in agonist-dependent phosphorylation of the third intracellular loop. Phylogenetic analyses of the A2AB data set, including Bayesian methods, recognized the superordinal clades Afrotheria, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires, in agreement with recent molecular evidence, albeit with lower support. Within Afrotheria, A2AB strongly supports the paenungulate clade and the association of the continental African otter shrew with Malagasy tenrecs. Among Laurasiatheria, A2AB confirms the nesting of whales within the artiodactyls, as a sister group to hippopotamus. Within the Euarchontoglires, there is constant support for rodent monophyly. PMID:12446807

  4. α1B-adrenergic receptors differentially associate with Rab proteins during homologous and heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  5. α1B-Adrenergic Receptors Differentially Associate with Rab Proteins during Homologous and Heterologous Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A.; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B.; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A.; Romero-Ávila, M. Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  6. α1B-adrenergic receptors differentially associate with Rab proteins during homologous and heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  7. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  8. Would decriminalising drugs improve care?

    PubMed

    Riddell, Stephen

    The decriminalisation of illegal drugs is controversial. This article examines the debate in the UK, and argues that a change in the laws would help to remove stigma and consequently change health professionals' attitudes towards drug users and improve services.

  9. The Combination of Marketed Antagonists of α1b-Adrenergic and 5-HT2A Receptors Inhibits Behavioral Sensitization and Preference to Alcohol in Mice: A Promising Approach for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Trovero, Fabrice; David, Sabrina; Bernard, Philippe; Puech, Alain; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-dependence is a chronic disease with a dramatic and expensive social impact. Previous studies have indicated that the blockade of two monoaminergic receptors, α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A, could inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to drugs of abuse, a hallmark of drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in rodents. Here, in order to develop a potential therapeutic treatment of alcohol dependence in humans, we have blocked these two monoaminergic receptors by a combination of antagonists already approved by Health Agencies. We show that the association of ifenprodil (1 mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) (α1-adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists marketed as Vadilex ® and Periactine ® in France, respectively) blocks behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in C57Bl6 mice and to alcohol in DBA2 mice. Moreover, this combination of antagonists inhibits alcohol intake in mice habituated to alcohol (10% v/v) and reverses their alcohol preference. Finally, in order to verify that the effect of ifenprodil was not due to its anti-NMDA receptors property, we have shown that a combination of prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, an α1b-adrenergic antagonist, Mini-Press ® in France) and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg) could also reverse alcohol preference. Altogether these findings strongly suggest that combined prazosin and cyproheptadine could be efficient as a therapy to treat alcoholism in humans. Finally, because α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade also inhibits behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, opioids and tobacco, it cannot be excluded that this combination will exhibit some efficacy in the treatment of addiction to other abused drugs. PMID:26968030

  10. GENETIC VARIATION IN THE ALPHA1B - ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR AND VASCULAR RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Adefurin, Abiodun; Ghimire, Laxmi V.; Kohli, Utkarsh; Muszkat, Mordechai; Sofowora, Gbenga G.; Li, Chun; Levinson, Rebecca T.; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Stein, C. Michael; Kurnik, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    α1B- adrenergic receptors contribute to vasoconstriction in humans. We tested the hypothesis that variation in the ADRA1B gene contributes to interindividual variability and ethnic differences in adrenergic vasoconstriction. We measured dorsal hand vein responses to increasing doses of phenylephrine in 64 Caucasians and 41 African-Americans and genotyped 34 ADRA1B variants. We validated findings in another model of catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction, the increase in mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) during a cold pressor test (CPT). One ADRA1B variant, rs10070745, present in 14 African-American heterozygotes but not in Caucasians, was associated with a lower phenylephrine ED50 (geometric mean [95% CI], 144 [69–299] ng/ml) compared to 27 African-American non-carriers (208 [130–334] ng/ml; P=0.015) and contributed to the ethnic differences in ED50. The same variant was also associated with a greater ΔMAP during CPT (P=0.008). In conclusion, ADRA1B rs10070745 was significantly associated with vasoconstrictor responses after adrenergic stimulation and contributed to the ethnic difference in phenylephrine sensitivity. PMID:27089938

  11. Bronchodilatory and B-adrenergic effects of methanolic and aqueous extracts of Althaea root on isolated tracheobronchial smooth rat muscle

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Behrang; Zare, Mohammad; Noureddini, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The smooth muscle contractions of the tracheobronchial airways are mediated through the balance of adrenergic, cholinergic and peptidergic nervous mechanisms. This research was designed to determine the bronchodilatory and B-adrenergic effects of methanolic and aqueous extracts of root Althaea on the isolated tracheobronchial smooth muscle of the rat. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 116 tracheobronchial sections (5 mm) from 58 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were dissected and divided into 23 groups. The effect of methanolic and aqueous extracts of the root Althaea was assayed at different concentrations (0.2, 0.6, 2.6, 6.6, 14.6 μg/ml) and epinephrine (5 μm) in the presence and absence of propranolol (1 μM) under one g tension based on the isometric method. This assay was recorded in an organ bath containing Krebs-Henseleit solution for tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions using potassium chloride (KCl) (60 mM) induction. Results: Epinephrine (5 μm) alone and root methanolic and aqueous extract concentrations (0.6-14.6 μg/ml) reduced tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions induced using KCl (60 mM) in a dose dependent manner. Propranolol inhibited the antispasmodic effect of epinephrine on tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions, but could not reduce the antispasmodic effect of the root extract concentrations. Conclusion: The methanolic and aqueous extracts of Althaea root inhibited the tracheobronchial smooth muscle contractions of rats in a dose dependent manner, but B-adrenergic receptors do not appear to engage in this process. Understanding the mechanism of this process can be useful in the treatment of pulmonary obstructive diseases like asthma. PMID:25879003

  12. Psychoactive Drugs: Improving Prescribing Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghodse, Hamid, Ed.; Khan, Inayat, Ed.

    This book presents a wide-ranging analysis of what can be done to reduce the misuse of psychoactive drugs without compromising appreciation for their therapeutic value. Emphasis is placed on the need to give physicians guidelines for deciding to whom to prescribe, what to prescribe, how much, and for how long. Chapter 1 provides an introduction…

  13. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems.

  14. alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Doze, Van A; Handel, Evelyn M; Jensen, Kelly A; Darsie, Belle; Luger, Elizabeth J; Haselton, James R; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2009-08-18

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) drugs are used for the treatment of chronic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety-related disorders. Chronic use of TCA drugs increases the expression of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs). Yet, it is unclear whether increased alpha(1)-AR expression contributes to the antidepressant effects of these drugs or if this effect is unrelated to their therapeutic benefit. In this study, mice expressing constitutively active mutant alpha(1A)-ARs (CAM alpha(1A)-AR) or CAM alpha(1B)-ARs were used to examine the effects of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-AR signaling on rodent behavioral models of depression, OCD, and anxiety. CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice, but not CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice, exhibited antidepressant-like behavior in the tail suspension test and forced swim test. This behavior was reversed by prazosin, a selective alpha(1)-AR inverse agonist, and mimicked by chronically treating wild type mice with cirazoline, an alpha(1A)-AR agonist. Marble burying behavior, commonly used to model OCD in rodents, was significantly decreased in CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice but not in CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice. In contrast, no significant differences in anxiety-related behavior were observed between wild type, CAM alpha(1A)-AR, and CAM alpha(1B)-AR animals in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box. This is the first study to demonstrate that alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-ARs differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse. These data suggest that alpha(1A)-ARs may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of depression.

  15. Can pharmacogenomics improve malaria drug policy?

    PubMed

    Roederer, Mary W; McLeod, Howard; Juliano, Jonathan J

    2011-11-01

    Coordinated global efforts to prevent and control malaria have been a tour-de-force for public health, but success appears to have reached a plateau in many parts of the world. While this is a multifaceted problem, policy strategies have largely ignored genetic variations in humans as a factor that influences both selection and dosing of antimalarial drugs. This includes attempts to decrease toxicity, increase effectiveness and reduce the development of drug resistance, thereby lowering health care costs. We review the potential hurdles to developing and implementing pharmacogenetic-guided policies at a national or regional scale for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. We also consider current knowledge on some component drugs of artemisinin combination therapies and ways to increase our understanding of host genetics, with the goal of guiding policy decisions for drug selection.

  16. Can pharmacogenomics improve malaria drug policy?

    PubMed

    Roederer, Mary W; McLeod, Howard; Juliano, Jonathan J

    2011-11-01

    Coordinated global efforts to prevent and control malaria have been a tour-de-force for public health, but success appears to have reached a plateau in many parts of the world. While this is a multifaceted problem, policy strategies have largely ignored genetic variations in humans as a factor that influences both selection and dosing of antimalarial drugs. This includes attempts to decrease toxicity, increase effectiveness and reduce the development of drug resistance, thereby lowering health care costs. We review the potential hurdles to developing and implementing pharmacogenetic-guided policies at a national or regional scale for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. We also consider current knowledge on some component drugs of artemisinin combination therapies and ways to increase our understanding of host genetics, with the goal of guiding policy decisions for drug selection. PMID:22084530

  17. Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A.; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery.

  18. Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J M

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery. PMID:27071376

  19. Drug Utilisation Study in a Tertiary Care Center: Recommendations for Improving Hospital Drug Dispensing Policies

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Niti; Mittal, R.; Singh, I.; Shafiq, Nusrat; Malhotra, S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug therapy accounts for a major portion of health expenditure. A useful strategy for achieving cost efficient healthcare is drug utilisation research as it forms the basis for making amendments in drug policies and helps in rational drug use. The present observational study was conducted to generate data on drug utilization in inpatients of our tertiary care hospital to identify potential targets for improving drug prescribing patterns. Data was collected retrospectively from randomly selected 231 medical records of patients admitted in various wards of the hospital. WHO Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical/Defined Daily Dose methodology was used to assess drug utilisation data and drug prescriptions were analysed by WHO core drug indicators. Antibiotics were prescribed most frequently and also accounted for majority of drug costs. The prescribed daily dose for most of the antibiotics corresponded to defined daily dose reflecting adherence to international recommendations. Brand name prescribing and polypharmacy was very common.78% of the total drugs prescribed were from the National List of Essential Medicines 2003. Restricting the use of newer and costlier antibiotics, branded drugs and number of drugs per prescription could be considered as targets to cut down the cost of drug therapysignificantly. PMID:25284928

  20. Improving Care for the Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Dennis; Gustafson, David; Capoccia, Victor A.; Cotter, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches alcohol and drug treatment programs to apply process improvement strategies and make organizational changes that improve quality of care. Participating programs reduce days to admission, increase retention in care and spread the application of process improvement within their treatment centers. More generally, NIATx provides a framework for addressing the Institute of Medicine’s six dimensions of quality care (i.e., safe, effective, patient-centered, efficient, timely and equitable) in treatments for alcohol, drug and mental health disorders. NIATx and its extensions illustrate how the behavioral health field can respond to the demand for higher quality treatment services. PMID:18259871

  1. Improving drug delivery to solid tumors: priming the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Khawar, Iftikhar Ali; Kim, Jung Ho; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-03-10

    Malignant transformation and growth of the tumor mass tend to induce changes in the surrounding microenvironment. Abnormality of the tumor microenvironment provides a driving force leading not only to tumor progression, including invasion and metastasis, but also to acquisition of drug resistance, including pharmacokinetic (drug delivery-related) and pharmacodynamic (sensitivity-related) resistance. Drug delivery systems exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and active targeting moieties were expected to be able to cope with delivery-related drug resistance. However, recent evidence supports a considerable barrier role of tumors via various mechanisms, which results in imperfect or inefficient EPR and/or targeting effect. The components of the tumor microenvironment such as abnormal tumor vascular system, deregulated composition of the extracellular matrix, and interstitial hypertension (elevated interstitial fluid pressure) collectively or cooperatively hinder the drug distribution, which is prerequisite to the efficacy of nanoparticles and small-molecule drugs used in cancer medicine. Hence, the abnormal tumor microenvironment has recently been suggested to be a promising target for the improvement of drug delivery to improve therapeutic efficacy. Strategies to modulate the abnormal tumor microenvironment, referred to here as "solid tumor priming" (vascular normalization and/or solid stress alleviation leading to improvement in blood perfusion and convective molecular movement), have shown promising results in the enhancement of drug delivery and anticancer efficacy. These strategies may provide a novel avenue for the development of new chemotherapeutics and combination chemotherapeutic regimens as well as reassessment of previously ineffective agents. PMID:25526702

  2. Overcoming limitations in nanoparticle drug delivery: triggered, intravascular release to improve drug penetration into tumors.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Ashley A; Lindner, Lars H; Landon, Chelsea D; Park, Ji-Young; Simnick, Andrew J; Dreher, Matthew R; Das, Shiva; Hanna, Gabi; Park, Won; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Koning, Gerben A; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Needham, David; Dewhirst, Mark W

    2012-11-01

    Traditionally, the goal of nanoparticle-based chemotherapy has been to decrease normal tissue toxicity by improving drug specificity to tumors. The enhanced permeability and retention effect can permit passive accumulation into tumor interstitium. However, suboptimal delivery is achieved with most nanoparticles because of heterogeneities of vascular permeability, which limits nanoparticle penetration. Furthermore, slow drug release limits bioavailability. We developed a fast drug-releasing liposome triggered by local heat that has already shown substantial antitumor efficacy and is in human trials. Here, we show that thermally sensitive liposomes (Dox-TSL) release doxorubicin inside the tumor vasculature. Real-time confocal imaging of doxorubicin delivery to murine tumors in window chambers and histologic analysis of flank tumors illustrates that intravascular drug release increases free drug in the interstitial space. This increases both the time that tumor cells are exposed to maximum drug levels and the drug penetration distance, compared with free drug or traditional pegylated liposomes. These improvements in drug bioavailability establish a new paradigm in drug delivery: rapidly triggered drug release in the tumor bloodstream.

  3. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J; Leslie, Christina S

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  4. Multitask learning improves prediction of cancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Paskov, Ivan; Paskov, Hristo; González, Alvaro J.; Leslie, Christina S.

    2016-01-01

    Precision oncology seeks to predict the best therapeutic option for individual patients based on the molecular characteristics of their tumors. To assess the preclinical feasibility of drug sensitivity prediction, several studies have measured drug responses for cytotoxic and targeted therapies across large collections of genomically and transcriptomically characterized cancer cell lines and trained predictive models using standard methods like elastic net regression. Here we use existing drug response data sets to demonstrate that multitask learning across drugs strongly improves the accuracy and interpretability of drug prediction models. Our method uses trace norm regularization with a highly efficient ADMM (alternating direction method of multipliers) optimization algorithm that readily scales to large data sets. We anticipate that our approach will enhance efforts to exploit growing drug response compendia in order to advance personalized therapy. PMID:27550087

  5. Modifications of Antiepileptic Drugs for Improved Tolerability and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Landmark, Cecilie Johannessen; Johannessen, Svein I.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction A large number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are available today, but they may not be satisfactory regarding clinical efficacy, tolerance, toxicity or pharmacokinetic properties. The purpose of this review is to focus upon the rationale behind the chemical modifications of several recently marketed AEDs or drugs in development and to categorize them according to the main purposes for the improvements: better efficacy or tolerability accompanied by improved pharmacokinetic properties. Material and Method AEDs that have been chemically modified to new derivatives during the last years are reviewed based on recent publications and PubMed-searches. Results and Discussion Improvement in pharmacokinetic parameters may affect both tolerability and efficacy. Modifications to improve tolerability include various valproate analogues, divided into aliphatic amides, cyclic derivatives or amino acid conjugates. Furthermore, there are the carbamazepine analogues oxcarbazepine and eslicarbazepine, the felbamate analogues fluorofelbamate and carisbamate (RWJ 33369), and the lamotrigine analogue JZP-4. The levetiracetam analogues brivaracetam and seletracetam and the derivatives of gabapentin, pregabalin and XP13512, have improved selectivity compared to their parent compounds. Other new drugs have new mechanisms of action related to GABA and glutamate receptors; the glutamate antagonists like topiramate (talampanel and NS-1209), and GABAA receptor agonists, benzodiazepine or progesterone analogues (ELB-139 and ganaxolone). Conclusion Further challenges for development of new AEDs include investigations of target molecules affected by pathophysiological processes and detailed structure-activity relationships with focus on stereoselectivity. These potential drugs may become of importance in future drug therapy in epilepsy and other CNS disorders. PMID:19787095

  6. Drug delivery systems improve pharmaceutical profile and facilitate medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Santella, Thomas M; Finestone, Albert J; Levy, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Innovations in dosage forms and dose delivery systems across a wide range of medications offer substantial clinical advantages, including reduced dosing frequency and improved patient adherence; minimized fluctuation of drug concentrations and maintenance of blood levels within a desired range; localized drug delivery; and the potential for reduced adverse effects and increased safety. The advent of new large-molecule drugs for previously untreatable or only partially treatable diseases is stimulating the development of suitable delivery systems for these agents. Although advanced formulations may be more expensive than conventional dosage forms, they often have a more favorable pharmacologic profile and can be cost-effective. Inclusion of these dosage forms on drug formulary lists may help patients remain on therapy and reduce the economic and social burden of care.

  7. Meditation improves clinicoelectroencephalographic measures in drug-resistant epileptics.

    PubMed

    Deepak, K K; Manchanda, S K; Maheshwari, M C

    1994-03-01

    Eleven adults suffering from drug-resistant epilepsies were given meditation practice, while another nine adults acted as waiting list controls. All patients were on antiepileptic drugs and their serum drug levels were monitored regularly. Patients in the intervention group were given training in meditation, and they practiced meditation 20 minutes a day for one year. They showed a significant reduction in seizure frequency and duration, an increase in the dominant background EEG frequency, a reduction in mean spectral intensity of the 0.7-7.7 Hz segment, and an increment in mean spectral intensity in the 8-12 Hz segment of the EEG. All changes were statistically significant. Control patients did not show significant changes in seizure frequency and duration during the observation period of one year. The results indicate that continued meditation practice is of substantial help in improving the clinicoelectrographic picture in drug-resistant epileptics.

  8. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  9. The Drug Facts Box: Improving the communication of prescription drug information

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lisa M.; Woloshin, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Communication about prescription drugs ought to be a paragon of public science communication. Unfortunately, it is not. Consumers see $4 billion of direct-to-consumer advertising annually, which typically fails to present data about how well drugs work. The professional label—the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) mechanism to get physicians information needed for appropriate prescribing—may also fail to present benefit data. FDA labeling guidance, in fact, suggests that industry omit benefit data for new drugs in an existing class and for drugs approved on the basis of unfamiliar outcomes (such as depression rating scales). The medical literature is also problematic: there is selective reporting of favorable trials, favorable outcomes within trials, and “spinning” unfavorable results to maximize benefit and minimize harm. In contrast, publicly available FDA reviews always include the phase 3 trial data on benefit and harm, which are the basis of drug approval. However, these reviews are practically inaccessible: lengthy, poorly organized, and weakly summarized. To improve accessibility, we developed the Drug Facts Box: a one-page summary of benefit and harm data for each indication of a drug. A series of studies—including national randomized trials—demonstrates that most consumers understand the Drug Facts Box and that it improves decision-making. Despite calls from their own Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Congress (in the Affordable Care Act) to consider implementing boxes, the FDA announced it needs at least 3–5 y more to make a decision. Given its potential public health impact, physicians and the public should not have to wait that long for better drug information. PMID:23942130

  10. The Drug Facts Box: Improving the communication of prescription drug information.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven

    2013-08-20

    Communication about prescription drugs ought to be a paragon of public science communication. Unfortunately, it is not. Consumers see $4 billion of direct-to-consumer advertising annually, which typically fails to present data about how well drugs work. The professional label--the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) mechanism to get physicians information needed for appropriate prescribing--may also fail to present benefit data. FDA labeling guidance, in fact, suggests that industry omit benefit data for new drugs in an existing class and for drugs approved on the basis of unfamiliar outcomes (such as depression rating scales). The medical literature is also problematic: there is selective reporting of favorable trials, favorable outcomes within trials, and "spinning" unfavorable results to maximize benefit and minimize harm. In contrast, publicly available FDA reviews always include the phase 3 trial data on benefit and harm, which are the basis of drug approval. However, these reviews are practically inaccessible: lengthy, poorly organized, and weakly summarized. To improve accessibility, we developed the Drug Facts Box: a one-page summary of benefit and harm data for each indication of a drug. A series of studies--including national randomized trials--demonstrates that most consumers understand the Drug Facts Box and that it improves decision-making. Despite calls from their own Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Congress (in the Affordable Care Act) to consider implementing boxes, the FDA announced it needs at least 3-5 y more to make a decision. Given its potential public health impact, physicians and the public should not have to wait that long for better drug information. PMID:23942130

  11. Stealth Properties to Improve Therapeutic Efficacy of Drug Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Caliceti, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, nanocarriers for drug delivery have emerged as powerful tools with unquestionable potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Many colloidal drug delivery systems are underdevelopment to ameliorate the site specificity of drug action and reduce the systemic side effects. By virtue of their small size they can be injected intravenously and disposed into the target tissues where they release the drug. Nanocarriers interact massively with the surrounding environment, namely, endothelium vessels as well as cells and blood proteins. Consequently, they are rapidly removed from the circulation mostly by the mononuclear phagocyte system. In order to endow nanosystems with long circulation properties, new technologies aimed at the surface modification of their physicochemical features have been developed. In particular, stealth nanocarriers can be obtained by polymeric coating. In this paper, the basic concept underlining the “stealth” properties of drug nanocarriers, the parameters influencing the polymer coating performance in terms of opsonins/macrophages interaction with the colloid surface, the most commonly used materials for the coating process and the outcomes of this peculiar procedure are thoroughly discussed. PMID:23533769

  12. Improved drug therapy: triangulating phenomics with genomics and metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Embracing the complexity of biological systems has a greater likelihood to improve prediction of clinical drug response. Here we discuss limitations of a singular focus on genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, or phenomics—highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each individual technique. In contrast, ‘systems biology’ is proposed to allow clinicians and scientists to extract benefits from each technique, while limiting associated weaknesses by supplementing with other techniques when appropriate. Perfect predictive modeling is not possible, whereas modeling of intertwined phenomic responses using genomic stratification with metabolomic modifications may greatly improve predictive values for drug therapy. We thus propose a novel-integrated approach to personalized medicine that begins with phenomic data, is stratified by genomics, and ultimately refined by metabolomic pathway data. Whereas perfect prediction of efficacy and safety of drug therapy is not possible, improvements can be achieved by embracing the complexity of the biological system. Starting with phenomics, the combination of linking metabolomics to identify common biologic pathways and then stratifying by genomic architecture, might increase predictive values. This systems biology approach has the potential, in specific subsets of patients, to avoid drug therapy that will be either ineffective or unsafe. PMID:25181945

  13. Improved drug therapy: triangulating phenomics with genomics and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Monte, Andrew A; Brocker, Chad; Nebert, Daniel W; Gonzalez, Frank J; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Embracing the complexity of biological systems has a greater likelihood to improve prediction of clinical drug response. Here we discuss limitations of a singular focus on genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, or phenomics-highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each individual technique. In contrast, 'systems biology' is proposed to allow clinicians and scientists to extract benefits from each technique, while limiting associated weaknesses by supplementing with other techniques when appropriate. Perfect predictive modeling is not possible, whereas modeling of intertwined phenomic responses using genomic stratification with metabolomic modifications may greatly improve predictive values for drug therapy. We thus propose a novel-integrated approach to personalized medicine that begins with phenomic data, is stratified by genomics, and ultimately refined by metabolomic pathway data. Whereas perfect prediction of efficacy and safety of drug therapy is not possible, improvements can be achieved by embracing the complexity of the biological system. Starting with phenomics, the combination of linking metabolomics to identify common biologic pathways and then stratifying by genomic architecture, might increase predictive values. This systems biology approach has the potential, in specific subsets of patients, to avoid drug therapy that will be either ineffective or unsafe.

  14. Improved delivery of the natural anticancer drug tetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Ahmad Khan, Saeed; Wang, Kaiping; Schneider, Marc

    2015-02-01

    The study aims at designing a nanoparticle-based delivery system to improve the efficacy of the natural compound tetrandrine against lung cancer. Nanoparticles from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were prepared by the emulsion solvent diffusion method and characterized for their physicochemical properties and drug-loading efficiency. Furthermore, the cellular uptake and the anti-cancerous activity was studied on A549 cell line. To investigate the surface properties and uptake, three different stabilizers were used to analyze the effect on size and zeta potential of nanoparticles as well as the effect on the cellular uptake. Nanoparticles in the size range of 180-200 nm with spherical shape were obtained with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Pluronic-F127 (PF127) and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB), 2%, 1% and 0.1%, respectively. An entrapment efficiency of 50-60% with a loading of 1.5-2% was observed. In vitro release profile at pH 7.4 PBS solution showed a consistent release over 168 h. All particle systems showed an improved performance over the pure drug at the same drug concentration. DMAB stabilized particles demonstrated the most pronounced effect against A549 cells compared to pure drug while PVA stabilized particles were least effective in terms of antitumor activity.

  15. Improved delivery of the natural anticancer drug tetrandrine.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Ahmad Khan, Saeed; Wang, Kaiping; Schneider, Marc

    2015-02-01

    The study aims at designing a nanoparticle-based delivery system to improve the efficacy of the natural compound tetrandrine against lung cancer. Nanoparticles from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were prepared by the emulsion solvent diffusion method and characterized for their physicochemical properties and drug-loading efficiency. Furthermore, the cellular uptake and the anti-cancerous activity was studied on A549 cell line. To investigate the surface properties and uptake, three different stabilizers were used to analyze the effect on size and zeta potential of nanoparticles as well as the effect on the cellular uptake. Nanoparticles in the size range of 180-200 nm with spherical shape were obtained with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), Pluronic-F127 (PF127) and didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB), 2%, 1% and 0.1%, respectively. An entrapment efficiency of 50-60% with a loading of 1.5-2% was observed. In vitro release profile at pH 7.4 PBS solution showed a consistent release over 168 h. All particle systems showed an improved performance over the pure drug at the same drug concentration. DMAB stabilized particles demonstrated the most pronounced effect against A549 cells compared to pure drug while PVA stabilized particles were least effective in terms of antitumor activity. PMID:25510598

  16. Do national medicinal drug policies and essential drug programs improve drug use?: a review of experiences in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ratanawijitrasin, S; Soumerai, S B; Weerasuriya, K

    2001-10-01

    determine whether national drug policies improve drug use. Moreover, no studies have evaluated the effects of major and recent changes, such as increased use of product patents, national pharmaceutical insurance policies, and increased privatization of pharmaceutical products and services. Future studies need to explore the consequences of these emerging developments on drug access and use. Despite the difficulties inherent in evaluation of national policies, stronger research designs can and should be carried out. Interrupted time-series analysis and other more rigorous designs should become standard designs for policy evaluation in the same way that standard treatment guidelines are intended to guide medical practice.

  17. Overcoming cellular and tissue barriers to improve liposomal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Aditya G.

    Forty years of liposome research have demonstrated that the anti-tumor efficacy of liposomal therapies is, in part, driven by three parameters: 1) liposome formulation and lipid biophysics, 2) accumulation and distribution in the tumor, and 3) release of the payload at the site of interest. This thesis outlines three studies that improve on each of these delivery steps. In the first study, we engineer a novel class of zwitterlipids with an inverted headgroup architecture that have remarkable biophysical properties and may be useful for drug delivery applications. After intravenous administration, liposomes accumulate in the tumor by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, the tumor stroma often limits liposome efficacy by preventing distribution into the tumor. In the second study, we demonstrate that depletion of hyaluronan in the tumor stroma improves the distribution and efficacy of DoxilRTM in murine 4T1 tumors. Once a liposome has distributed to the therapeutic site, it must release its payload over the correct timescale. Few facile methods exist to quantify the release of liposome therapeutics in vivo. In the third study, we outline and validate a simple, robust, and quantitative method for tracking the rate and extent of release of liposome contents in vivo. This tool should facilitate a better understanding of the pharmacodynamics of liposome-encapsulated drugs in animals. This work highlights aspects of liposome behavior that have prevented successful clinical translation and proposes alternative approaches to improve liposome drug delivery.

  18. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  19. Improving Patient Understanding of Prescription Drug Label Instructions

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Terry C.; Federman, Alex D.; Bass, Pat F.; Jackson, Robert H.; Middlebrooks, Mark; Parker, Ruth M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Patient misunderstanding of instructions on prescription drug labels is common and a likely cause of medication error and less effective treatment. Objective To test whether the use of more explicit language to describe dose and frequency of use for prescribed drugs could improve comprehension, especially among patients with limited literacy. Design Cross-sectional study using in-person, structured interviews. Patients Three hundred and fifty-nine adults waiting for an appointment in two hospital-based primary care clinics and one federally qualified health center in Shreveport, Louisiana; Chicago, Illinois; and New York, New York, respectively. Measurement Correct understanding of each of ten label instructions as determined by a blinded panel review of patients’ verbatim responses. Results Patient understanding of prescription label instructions ranged from 53% for the least understood to 89% for the most commonly understood label. Patients were significantly more likely to understand instructions with explicit times periods (i.e., morning) or precise times of day compared to instructions stating times per day (i.e., twice) or hourly intervals (89%, 77%, 61%, and 53%, respectively,  < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, dosage instructions with specific times or time periods were significantly more likely to be understood compared to instructions stating times per day (time periods — adjusted relative risk ratio (ARR) 0.42, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.34–0.52; specific times — ARR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49–0.74). Low and marginal literacy remained statistically significant independent predictors of misinterpreting instructions (low - ARR 2.70, 95% CI 1.81–4.03; marginal -ARR 1.66, 95% CI 1.18–2.32). Conclusions Use of precise wording on prescription drug label instructions can improve patient comprehension. However, patients with limited literacy were more likely to misinterpret instructions despite use of more explicit language. PMID

  20. Drug efficiency indices for improvement of molecular docking scoring functions.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Hetényi, Csaba; Maran, Uko

    2010-01-15

    A dataset of protein-drug complexes with experimental binding energy and crystal structure were analyzed and the performance of different docking engines and scoring functions (as well as components of these) for predicting the free energy of binding and several ligand efficiency indices were compared. The aim was not to evaluate the best docking method, but to determine the effect of different efficiency indices on the experimental and predicted free energy. Some ligand efficiency indices, such as DeltaG/W (Wiener index), DeltaG/NoC (number of carbons), and DeltaG/P (partition coefficient), improve the correlation between experimental and calculated values. This effect was shown to be valid across the different scoring functions and docking programs. It also removes the common bias of scoring functions in favor of larger ligands. For all scoring functions, the efficiency indices effectively normalize the free energy derived indices, to give values closer to experiment. Compound collection filtering can be done prior or after docking, using pharmacokinetic as well as pharmacodynamic profiles. Achieving these better correlations with experiment can improve the ability of docking scoring functions to predict active molecules in virtual screening.

  1. Improvement of chemotherapeutic drug efficacy by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Mihailidou, Chrysovalantou; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2015-04-01

    Tunicamycin (TUN), an inhibitor of protein glycosylation and therefore a potent stimulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has been used to improve anticancer drug efficacy, but the underlying mechanism remains obscure. In this study, we show that acute administration of TUN in mice induces the unfolded protein response and suppresses the levels of P21, a cell cycle regulator with anti-apoptotic activity. The inhibition of P21 after ER stress appears to be C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)-dependent because in CHOP-deficient mice, TUN not only failed to suppress, but rather induced the expression of P21. Results of promoter-activity reporter assays using human cancer cells and mouse fibroblasts indicated that the regulation of P21 by CHOP operates at the level of transcription and involves direct binding of CHOP transcription factor to the P21 promoter. The results of cell viability and clonogenic assays indicate that ER-stress-related suppression of P21 expression potentiates caspase activation and sensitizes cells to doxorubicin treatment, while administration of TUN to mice increases the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapy for HepG2 liver and A549 lung cancers.

  2. Improving Outcomes in State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs

    PubMed Central

    Linas, Benjamin P.; Losina, Elena; Rockwell, Annette; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Cranston, Kevin; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) provide antiretroviral medications to patients with no access to medications. Resource constraints limit many ADAPs' ability to meet demand for services. Objective To determine ADAP eligibility criteria that minimize morbidity and mortality and contain costs. Methods We used Discrete Event Simulation to model the progression of HIV-infected patients and track utilization of an ADAP. Outcomes included five-year mortality and incidence of first opportunistic infection or death, and time to starting ART. We compared expected outcomes for two policies: 1) first-come, first-served (FCFS) eligibility for all with CD4 count ≤350/μl (current standard), and 2) CD4 count prioritized eligibility for those with CD4 counts below a defined threshold. Results In the base case, prioritizing patients with CD4 counts ≤250/μl led to lower five-year mortality than FCFS eligibility [2.77 vs. 3.27 deaths/1,000 person months], and to a lower incidence of first opportunistic infection or death [5.55 vs. 6.98 events/1,000 person months]. CD4-based eligibility reduced the time to starting ART for patients with CD4 counts ≤200/μl. In sensitivity analyses, CD4-based eligibility consistently led to lower morbidity and mortality than FCFS eligibility. Conclusions When resources are limited, programs that provide ART can improve outcomes by prioritizing patients with low CD4 counts. PMID:19561518

  3. Systems pharmacology modeling: an approach to improving drug safety.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jane P F; Fontana, Robert J; Price, Nathan D; Sangar, Vineet

    2014-01-01

    Advances in systems biology in conjunction with the expansion in knowledge of drug effects and diseases present an unprecedented opportunity to extend traditional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling/analysis to conduct systems pharmacology modeling. Many drugs that cause liver injury and myopathies have been studied extensively. Mitochondrion-centric systems pharmacology modeling is important since drug toxicity across a large number of pharmacological classes converges to mitochondrial injury and death. Approaches to systems pharmacology modeling of drug effects need to consider drug exposure, organelle and cellular phenotypes across all key cell types of human organs, organ-specific clinical biomarkers/phenotypes, gene-drug interaction and immune responses. Systems modeling approaches, that leverage the knowledge base constructed from curating a selected list of drugs across a wide range of pharmacological classes, will provide a critically needed blueprint for making informed decisions to reduce the rate of attrition for drugs in development and increase the number of drugs with an acceptable benefit/risk ratio.

  4. Herb–Drug Interactions: Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Scott J.; Argikar, Aneesh A.; Lin, Yvonne S.; Nagar, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a usage history that predates written records and the perception that “natural” ensures safety, herbal products have increasingly been incorporated into Western health care. Consumers often self-administer these products concomitantly with conventional medications without informing their health care provider(s). Such herb–drug combinations can produce untoward effects when the herbal product perturbs the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or transporters. Despite increasing recognition of these types of herb–drug interactions, a standard system for interaction prediction and evaluation is nonexistent. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying herb–drug interactions remain an understudied area of pharmacotherapy. Evaluation of herbal product interaction liability is challenging due to variability in herbal product composition, uncertainty of the causative constituents, and often scant knowledge of causative constituent pharmacokinetics. These limitations are confounded further by the varying perspectives concerning herbal product regulation. Systematic evaluation of herbal product drug interaction liability, as is routine for new drugs under development, necessitates identifying individual constituents from herbal products and characterizing the interaction potential of such constituents. Integration of this information into in silico models that estimate the pharmacokinetics of individual constituents should facilitate prospective identification of herb–drug interactions. These concepts are highlighted with the exemplar herbal products milk thistle and resveratrol. Implementation of this methodology should help provide definitive information to both consumers and clinicians about the risk of adding herbal products to conventional pharmacotherapeutic regimens. PMID:24335390

  5. Improved collagen bilayer dressing for the controlled release of drugs.

    PubMed

    Sripriya, Ramasamy; Kumar, Muthusamy Senthil; Sehgal, Praveen Kumar

    2004-08-15

    A novel bilayer dressing has been developed from bovine succinylated collagen. The dressing contains an antibiotic, Ciprofloxacin, for both immediate and time-regulated release for controlling the infection, as the infected open wounds need special care. The dressing consists of a sponge and a film, both prepared from succinylated bovine collagen. The sponge has a smooth surface on one side; its rough surface on the other side forms the bilayer system with the film. Both sponge and film act as an anionic reservoir to hold the cationic Ciprofloxacin. The drug, after dispersing in poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidione) (PVP) solution is allowed to spread in the bilayer system by diffusion. The drug stays in the bilayer system because of ionic binding, but starts releasing when comes in contact with the wound. Release of the drug is immediate, but it is regulated by ionic binding between the drug and succinylated collagen. The wound exudates, and there is a polarity-controlled release of the drug from the bilayer system. The PVP and bilayer system permits only time-regulated release, and the system lasts up to 5 days with therapeutically sufficient drug availability.

  6. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  7. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Santiago; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs) is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs), decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure), adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR). Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate. PMID:26068584

  8. Pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the improved solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Puneet; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-03-18

    The impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been devastating with nearly 7400 new infections every day. Although, the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has made a tremendous contribution in reducing the morbidity and mortality in developed countries, the situation in developing countries is still grim with millions of people being infected by this disease. The new advancements in the field of nanotechnology based drug delivery systems hold promise to improve the situation. These nanoscale systems have been successfully employed in other diseases such as cancer, and therefore, we now have a better understanding of the practicalities and technicalities associated with their clinical development. Nanotechnology based approaches offer some unique opportunities specifically for the improvement of water solubility, stability, bioavailability and targeting of antiretroviral drugs. This review presents discussion on the contribution of pure drug and polymer based nanotechnologies for the delivery anti-HIV drugs.

  9. Drugs and diagnostic innovations to improve global health.

    PubMed

    Peeling, Rosanna W; Nwaka, Solomon

    2011-09-01

    Infectious diseases remain the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Affordable effective drugs and diagnostics are critical for patient management and disease control but the development of new drugs and diagnostics is too slow to keep up with the emergence and spread of infectious diseases around the world. Innovative collaborative research and development involving disease endemic countries and developed countries are urgently needed to accelerate progress along the path from discovery to product adoption. These emerging approaches and the need for increased investment in human and financial resources to support them are discussed.

  10. Coupling of drug containing liposomes to microbubbles improves ultrasound triggered drug delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Cool, Steven K; Geers, Bart; Roels, Stefan; Stremersch, Stephan; Vanderperren, Katrien; Saunders, Jimmy H; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Demeester, Joseph; Sanders, Niek N

    2013-12-28

    Local extravasation and triggered drug delivery by use of ultrasound and microbubbles is a promising strategy to target drugs to their sites of action. In the past we have developed drug loaded microbubbles by coupling drug containing liposomes to the surface of microbubbles. Until now the advantages of this drug loading strategy have only been demonstrated in vitro. Therefore, in this paper, microbubbles with indocyanine green (ICG) containing liposomes at their surface or a mixture of ICG-liposomes and microbubbles was injected intravenously in mice. Immediately after injection the left hind leg was exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound and the ICG deposition was monitored 1, 4 and 7 days post-treatment by in vivo fluorescence imaging. In mice that received the ICG-liposome loaded microbubbles the local ICG deposition was, at each time point, about 2-fold higher than in mice that received ICG-liposomes mixed with microbubbles. We also showed that the perforations in the blood vessels allow the passage of ICG-liposomes up to 5h after microbubble and ultrasound treatment. An increase in tissue temperature to 41°C was observed in all ultrasound treated mice. However, ultrasound tissue heating was excluded to cause the local ICG deposition. We concluded that coupling of drug containing liposomes to microbubbles may increase ultrasound mediated drug delivery in vivo.

  11. Improving smooth muscle cell exposure to drugs from drug-eluting stents at early time points: a variable compression approach.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Barry M; Cunnane, Eoghan M; Denny, William J; Carroll, Grainne T; Walsh, Michael T

    2014-08-01

    The emergence of drug-eluting stents (DES) as a viable replacement for bare metal stenting has led to a significant decrease in the incidence of clinical restenosis. This is due to the transport of anti-restenotic drugs from within the polymer coating of a DES into the artery wall which arrests the cell cycle before restenosis can occur. The efficacy of DES is still under close scrutiny in the medical field as many issues regarding the effectiveness of DES drug transport in vivo still exist. One such issue, that has received less attention, is the limiting effect that stent strut compression has on the transport of drug species in the artery wall. Once the artery wall is compressed, the stents ability to transfer drug species into the arterial wall can be reduced. This leads to a reduction in the spatial therapeutic transfer of drug species to binding sites within the arterial wall. This paper investigates the concept of idealised variable compression as a means of demonstrating how such a stent design approach could improve the spatial delivery of drug species in the arterial wall. The study focused on assessing how the trends in concentration levels changed as a result of artery wall compression. Five idealised stent designs were created with a combination of thick struts that provide the necessary compression to restore luminal patency and thin uncompressive struts that improve the transport of drugs therein. By conducting numerical simulations of diffusive mass transport, this study found that the use of uncompressive struts results in a more uniform spatial distribution of drug species in the arterial wall.

  12. [Preparation of two poor water soluble drugs - nanoporous ZnO solid dispersions and the mechanism of drug dissolution improvement].

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Sun, Chang-shan; Zhi, Zhuang-zhi; Wang, Yan; Chang, Di; Wang, Si-ling; Jiang, Tong-ying

    2011-11-01

    Nanoporous ZnO was used as a carrier to prepare drug solid dispersion, the mechanism of which to improve the drug dissolution was also studied. Nanoporous ZnO, obtained through chemical deposition method, was used as a carrier to prepare indomethacin and cilostazol solid dispersions by melt-quenching method, separately. The results of scanning electron microscope, surface area analyzer, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimeter and X-ray diffraction showed that drugs were implanted into nanopores of ZnO by physical adsorption effect and highly dispersed into nanopores of ZnO in amorphous form, moreover, these nanopores strongly inhibited amorphous recrystallization in the condition of 45 degrees C and 75% RH. In addition, the results of the dissolution tested in vitro exhibited that the accumulated dissolutions of indomethacin and cilostazol solid dispersions achieved about 90% within 5 min and approximately 80% within 30 min. It was indicated in this study that the mechanism of drug dissolution improvement was associated with the effects of nanoporous ZnO carrier on increasing drug dispersion, controlling drug in nanopores as amorphous form and inhibiting amorphous recrystallization. PMID:22260037

  13. [New pediatric drug dosage aids. Improving patient safety].

    PubMed

    Strauß, J M

    2016-03-01

    Dosing errors when administering medicine to children occur often and are due, e.g., to the commonly required dilution of the drugs, misjudgment of the patient's weight, confusion between drugs with similar names, and inadequate communication. Various aids (e.g., measuring tapes and dilution tables) have been designed to avoid mistakes to the greatest extent possible. In daily clinical practice, books and pocket cards are still used for rapid orientation. Use of smartphone-based apps continues to increase, whereby the user is ultimately responsible for their validity. In clinical practice, the simplest possible strategies should be used. A culture that encourages disclosure of errors is useful in order to optimize processes and avoid future errors.

  14. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  15. Improved pH-dependent drug release and oral exposure of telmisartan, a poorly soluble drug through the formation of drug-aminoclay complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Shao, Yating; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2014-08-25

    Telmisartan (TEL) belongs to BCS class II (low solubility/high permeability) and exhibits the pH-dependent drug release. Since 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay) can intercalate or adsorb the negatively charged molecules via the electrostatic interaction, TEL-aminoclay complex was synthesized to improve the pH dependent drug release and the oral exposure of TEL. Co-precipitation method was adopted to incorporate TEL into aminoclay with the variation of drug/aminoclay ratios, and then dissolution profiles of TEL from TEL-aminoclay complex were evaluated at different pHs. Structural characterization was performed by XRD, ATR-FTIR, and TEM, indicating the electrostatic interaction between TEL and the surface of the aminoclay lamellae. Furthermore, drug crystallinity was changed to an amorphous form via the molecular interactions between TEL and aminoclay. TEL exhibited rapid and complete dissolution at pH 1.2 within 15 min from all the tested formulations. However, while the untreated powder indicated negligible dissolution at pH 4 and pH 6.8, the formation of drug-clay complex significantly improved the dissolution rate as well as the extent of drug release at the higher pHs. In addition, following an oral administration of TEL-aminoclay, Cmax and AUC of TEL increased by about 8 and 5 fold respectively, while Tmax was shorten. The results suggest that formation of aminoclay complex should be promising to enhance the bioavailability of a poorly soluble drug, TEL.

  16. 78 FR 8446 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research; Prescription Drug Labeling Improvement and Enhancement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... prescription drug labeling in 1979 (44 FR 37434, June 26, 1979). However, over the ensuing 25 years, labeling... content and format requirements for labeling to make it easier to access, read, and use (71 FR 3922.... \\2\\ See Sec. 201.56(c). The Agency adopted this approach because research conducted during the...

  17. Student nurses need more than maths to improve their drug calculating skills.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kerri

    2007-05-01

    Nurses need to be able to calculate accurate drug calculations in order to safely administer drugs to their patients (NMC, 2002). Studies have shown however that nurses do not always have the necessary skills to calculate accurate drug dosages and are potentially administering incorrect dosages of drugs to their patients (Hutton, M. 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application. Nursing Standard 13(11), 35-38; Kapborg, I. 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, Student Nurses and Physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4), 389-395; O'Shea, E. 1999. Factors contributing to medication errors: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing 8, 496-504; Wilson, A. 2003. Nurses maths: researching a practical approach. Nursing Standard 17(47), 33-36). The literature indicates that in order to improve drug calculations strategies need to focus on both the mathematical skills and conceptual skills of student nurses so they can interpret clinical data into drug calculations to be solved. A study was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of implementing several strategies which focussed on developing the mathematical and conceptual skills of student nurses to improve their drug calculation skills. The study found that implementing a range of strategies which addressed these two developmental areas significantly improved the drug calculation skills of nurses. The study also indicates that a range of strategies has the potential ensuring that the skills taught are retained by the student nurses. Although the strategies significantly improved the drug calculation skills of student nurses, the fact that only 2 students were able to achieve 100% in their drug calculation test indicates a need for further research into this area.

  18. Modified-chitosan nanoparticles: Novel drug delivery systems improve oral bioavailability of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Khdair, Ayman; Hamad, Islam; Alkhatib, Hatim; Bustanji, Yasser; Mohammad, Mohammad; Tayem, Rabab; Aiedeh, Khaled

    2016-10-10

    The efficacy of most anticancer drugs is highly limited in vivo due mainly to poor pharmacokinetics behavior including poor bioavailability after extravascular administration. We have developed novel chitosan-modified polymeric nanoparticles for oral as well as i.v. administration. Nanoparticles were developed utilizing the double emulsion solvent evaporation technique for sustained delivery of various anticancer drugs. Chitosan diacetate (CDA) and chitosan triacetate (CTA) polymers were previously modified in our laboratory and used as novel matrix. Nanoparticles, loaded with various anticancer drugs, were characterized for particle size using dynamic light scattering as well as transmission electron microscopy and net surface charge using dynamic light scattering. Particles size was below 100nm in diameter and zeta potential ranged - (25-30). Encapsulation efficiency of anticancer drugs varied considerably and was dependent on the physicochemical characteristics of the encapsulated drug. However, chitosan triacetate nanoparticles showed relatively higher encapsulation efficiency than chitosan diacetate nanoparticles. In vitro release of encapsulated drugs was sustained over a period of 14days. Nanoparticles enhanced cellular accumulation of encapsulated drugs, compared to the free drugs, in vitro in MCF-7 and Caco-II tumor cell lines. In conclusion, diacetate and triacetate chitosan are novel polymers that can be used to formulate nanoparticles which efficiently encapsulated anticancer drugs, and sustained the release and enhanced tumor cellular uptake of these drugs. Further, chitosan triacetate nanoparticles enhanced oral bioavailability of doxorubicin. CDA and CTA nanoparticles can be used to efficiently deliver anticancer drugs and improve their in vivo profile. PMID:27473308

  19. Improving drug retention in liposomes by aging with the aid of glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Falconer, James R; Baguley, Bruce C; Shaw, John P; Kanamala, Manju; Xu, Hongtao; Wang, Guangji; Liu, Jianping; Wu, Zimei

    2016-05-30

    This paper describes a novel method to improve drug retention in liposomes for the poorly water-soluble (lipophilic) model drug asulacrine (ASL). ASL was loaded in the aqueous phase of liposomes and the effects of aging conditions and drug loading levels on drug retention were investigated using an in vitro bio-relevant drug release test established in this study. The status of intra-liposomal drug was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Pharmacokinetics and venous tolerance of the formulations were simultaneously studied in rabbits following one-hour intravenous infusion via the ear vein. The presence of glucose during aging was found to be crucial to accelerate drug precipitation and to stabilize the liposomal membrane with high drug loading (8.9% over 4.5% w/w) as a prerequisite. Although no drug crystals were detected, DSC showed a lower phase-transition peak in the glucose-assisted aged ASL-liposomes, indicating interaction of phospholipids with the sugar. Cryo-TEM revealed more 'coffee bean' like drug precipitate in the ASL-liposomes aged in the glucose solution. In rabbits, these liposomes gave rise to a 1.9 times longer half-life than the fresh liposomes, with no venous irritation observed. Inducing and stabilizing drug precipitation in the liposome cores by aging in the presence of sugar provided an easy approach to improve drug retention in liposomes. The study also highlighted the importance of bio-relevance of in vitro release methods to predict in vivo drug release. PMID:27021465

  20. [The importance of clinical data management in improvement of drug evaluation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of clinical data is drawing more attention in drug development in China, the clinical data management is not good enough in the clinical trials right now. With the development of internet and progress of information technology, especially with the setup of the state innovation strategy for drug development, it is necessary and urgent to improve the clinical data quality. Good data quality is the primary basis of technical evaluation of drug at the marketing authorization. So Center for Drug Evaluation of CFDA has made some endeavors to enhance data management in the clinical trials in recent years. This article is focused on these aspects of data managment. PMID:26911033

  1. [The importance of clinical data management in improvement of drug evaluation].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Wang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of clinical data is drawing more attention in drug development in China, the clinical data management is not good enough in the clinical trials right now. With the development of internet and progress of information technology, especially with the setup of the state innovation strategy for drug development, it is necessary and urgent to improve the clinical data quality. Good data quality is the primary basis of technical evaluation of drug at the marketing authorization. So Center for Drug Evaluation of CFDA has made some endeavors to enhance data management in the clinical trials in recent years. This article is focused on these aspects of data managment.

  2. Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Marsh, V M; Mutemi, W M; Willetts, A; Bayah, K; Were, S; Ross, A; Marsh, K

    2004-04-01

    Recent global malaria control initiatives highlight the potential role of drug retailers to improve access to early effective malaria treatment. We report on the findings and discuss the implications of an educational programme for rural drug retailers and communities in Kenya between 1998 and 2001 in a study population of 70,000. Impact was evaluated through annual household surveys of over-the-counter (OTC) drug use and simulated retail client surveys in an early (1999) and a late (2000) implementation area. The programme achieved major improvements in drug selling practices. The proportion of OTC anti-malarial drug users receiving an adequate dose rose from 8% (n = 98) to 33% (n = 121) between 1998 and 1999 in the early implementation area. By 2001, and with the introduction of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine group drugs in accordance with national policy, this proportion rose to 64% (n = 441) across the early and late implementation areas. Overall, the proportion of shop-treated childhood fevers receiving an adequate dose of a recommended anti-malarial drug within 24 h rose from 1% (n = 681) to 28% (n = 919) by 2001. These findings strongly support the inclusion of private drug retailers in control strategies aiming to improve prompt effective treatment of malaria. PMID:15078263

  3. [Is there an improvement of drug safety in Germany in recent years?].

    PubMed

    Völkel, M; Bussmann-Rolfes, A; Frölich, J C

    2009-11-01

    The goal of drug therapy to prolong life or to improve the quality of life can be accomplished by modern drug therapy to a respectable degree. However, the risks of drug therapy have increased through more specific drugs and lead to often surprisingly multi-faceted side effects as in the case of biologicals. We have performed a systematic review of meta analyses, clinical studies, and reviews of the last five years concerned with adverse drug reactions (ADR) and adverse drug events (ADE). From these data emerges a distinct lack of reliable studies for Germany on incidence, severity and preventability of ADR and ADE; however, there are indications of their increase as is also evident from other countries. There are indications also for a better incidence management culture and better documentation. The step to utilize computerized physician order entry and decision support systems is a proven method to reduce medication related problems, leading also to reduction of in-hospital time and reduced drug expenses. Taking this decisive step to improve drug safety requires an appreciation of the magnitude of the problem and the determination to change an established but inferior system of drug administration in a fundamental way. PMID:19798475

  4. Systems biology-embedded target validation: improving efficacy in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Drieke; Minke, Benedikt A; Fitzmaurice, William; Kholodenko, Boris N; Kolch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is faced with a range of challenges with the ever-escalating costs of drug development and a drying out of drug pipelines. By harnessing advances in -omics technologies and moving away from the standard, reductionist model of drug discovery, there is significant potential to reduce costs and improve efficacy. Embedding systems biology approaches in drug discovery, which seek to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of potential drug targets in a network context, will reduce attrition rates by earlier target validation and the introduction of novel targets into the currently stagnant market. Systems biology approaches also have the potential to assist in the design of multidrug treatments and repositioning of existing drugs, while stratifying patients to give a greater personalization of medical treatment.

  5. Oral anticancer drugs: mechanisms of low bioavailability and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Stuurman, Frederik E; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2013-06-01

    The use of oral anticancer drugs has increased during the last decade, because of patient preference, lower costs, proven efficacy, lack of infusion-related inconveniences, and the opportunity to develop chronic treatment regimens. Oral administration of anticancer drugs is, however, often hampered by limited bioavailability of the drug, which is associated with a wide variability. Since most anticancer drugs have a narrow therapeutic window and are dosed at or close to the maximum tolerated dose, a wide variability in the bioavailability can have a negative impact on treatment outcome. This review discusses mechanisms of low bioavailability of oral anticancer drugs and strategies for improvement. The extent of oral bioavailability depends on many factors, including release of the drug from the pharmaceutical dosage form, a drug's stability in the gastrointestinal tract, factors affecting dissolution, the rate of passage through the gut wall, and the pre-systemic metabolism in the gut wall and liver. These factors are divided into pharmaceutical limitations, physiological endogenous limitations, and patient-specific limitations. There are several strategies to reduce or overcome these limitations. First, pharmaceutical adjustment of the formulation or the physicochemical characteristics of the drug can improve the dissolution rate and absorption. Second, pharmacological interventions by combining the drug with inhibitors of transporter proteins and/or pre-systemic metabolizing enzymes can overcome the physiological endogenous limitations. Third, chemical modification of a drug by synthesis of a derivative, salt form, or prodrug could enhance the bioavailability by improving the absorption and bypassing physiological endogenous limitations. Although the bioavailability can be enhanced by various strategies, the development of novel oral products with low solubility or cell membrane permeability remains cumbersome and is often unsuccessful. The main reasons are

  6. Oral anticancer drugs: mechanisms of low bioavailability and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Stuurman, Frederik E; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M

    2013-06-01

    The use of oral anticancer drugs has increased during the last decade, because of patient preference, lower costs, proven efficacy, lack of infusion-related inconveniences, and the opportunity to develop chronic treatment regimens. Oral administration of anticancer drugs is, however, often hampered by limited bioavailability of the drug, which is associated with a wide variability. Since most anticancer drugs have a narrow therapeutic window and are dosed at or close to the maximum tolerated dose, a wide variability in the bioavailability can have a negative impact on treatment outcome. This review discusses mechanisms of low bioavailability of oral anticancer drugs and strategies for improvement. The extent of oral bioavailability depends on many factors, including release of the drug from the pharmaceutical dosage form, a drug's stability in the gastrointestinal tract, factors affecting dissolution, the rate of passage through the gut wall, and the pre-systemic metabolism in the gut wall and liver. These factors are divided into pharmaceutical limitations, physiological endogenous limitations, and patient-specific limitations. There are several strategies to reduce or overcome these limitations. First, pharmaceutical adjustment of the formulation or the physicochemical characteristics of the drug can improve the dissolution rate and absorption. Second, pharmacological interventions by combining the drug with inhibitors of transporter proteins and/or pre-systemic metabolizing enzymes can overcome the physiological endogenous limitations. Third, chemical modification of a drug by synthesis of a derivative, salt form, or prodrug could enhance the bioavailability by improving the absorption and bypassing physiological endogenous limitations. Although the bioavailability can be enhanced by various strategies, the development of novel oral products with low solubility or cell membrane permeability remains cumbersome and is often unsuccessful. The main reasons are

  7. Investigation on fabrication process of dissolving microneedle arrays to improve effective needle drug distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Yao, Gangtao; Dong, Pin; Gong, Zihua; Li, Ge; Zhang, Kejian; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-01-23

    The dissolving microneedle array (DMNA) offers a novel potential approach for transdermal delivery of biological macromolecular drugs and vaccines, because it can be as efficient as hypodermic injection and as safe and patient compliant as conventional transdermal delivery. However, effective needle drug distribution is the main challenge for clinical application of DMNA. This study focused on the mechanism and control of drug diffusion inside DMNA during the fabrication process in order to improve the drug delivery efficiency. The needle drug loading proportion (NDP) in DMNAs was measured to determine the influences of drug concentration gradient, needle drying step, excipients, and solvent of the base solution on drug diffusion and distribution. The results showed that the evaporation of base solvent was the key factor determining NDP. Slow evaporation of water from the base led to gradual increase of viscosity, and an approximate drug concentration equilibrium was built between the needle and base portions, resulting in NDP as low as about 6%. When highly volatile ethanol was used as the base solvent, the viscosity in the base rose quickly, resulting in NDP more than 90%. Ethanol as base solvent did not impact the insertion capability of DMNAs, but greatly increased the in vitro drug release and transdermal delivery from DMNAs. Furthermore, the drug diffusion process during DMNA fabrication was thoroughly investigated for the first time, and the outcomes can be applied to most two-step molding processes and optimization of the DMNA fabrication. PMID:25446513

  8. Pharmacogenetics: data, concepts and tools to improve drug discovery and drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tzvetkov, Mladen V.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the human genome is a most important cause of variable response to drugs and other xenobiotics. Susceptibility to almost all diseases is determined to some extent by genetic variation. Driven by the advances in molecular biology, pharmacogenetics has evolved within the past 40 years from a niche discipline to a major driving force of clinical pharmacology, and it is currently one of the most actively pursued disciplines in applied biomedical research in general. Nowadays we can assess more than 1,000,000 polymorphisms or the expression of more than 25,000 genes in each participant of a clinical study – at affordable costs. This has not yet significantly changed common therapeutic practices, but a number of physicians are starting to consider polymorphisms, such as those in CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, TPMT and VKORC1, in daily medical practice. More obviously, pharmacogenetics has changed the practices and requirements in preclinical and clinical drug research; large clinical trials without a pharmacogenomic add-on appear to have become the minority. This review is about how the discipline of pharmacogenetics has evolved from the analysis of single proteins to current approaches involving the broad analyses of the entire genome and of all mRNA species or all metabolites and other approaches aimed at trying to understand the entire biological system. Pharmacogenetics and genomics are becoming substantially integrated fields of the profession of clinical pharmacology, and education in the relevant methods, knowledge and concepts form an indispensable part of the clinical pharmacology curriculum and the professional life of pharmacologists from early drug discovery to pharmacovigilance. PMID:18224312

  9. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining. PMID:25744369

  10. 3D Pharmacophoric Similarity improves Multi Adverse Drug Event Identification in Pharmacovigilance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Santiago; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Hripcsak, George

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drugs events (ADEs) detection constitutes a considerable concern in patient safety and public health care. For this reason, it is important to develop methods that improve ADE signal detection in pharmacovigilance databases. Our objective is to apply 3D pharmacophoric similarity models to enhance ADE recognition in Offsides, a pharmacovigilance resource with drug-ADE associations extracted from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We developed a multi-ADE predictor implementing 3D drug similarity based on a pharmacophoric approach, with an ADE reference standard extracted from the SIDER database. The results showed that the application of our 3D multi-type ADE predictor to the pharmacovigilance data in Offsides improved ADE identification and generated enriched sets of drug-ADE signals. The global ROC curve for the Offsides ADE candidates ranked with the 3D similarity score showed an area of 0.7. The 3D predictor also allows the identification of the most similar drug that causes the ADE under study, which could provide hypotheses about mechanisms of action and ADE etiology. Our method is useful in drug development, screening potential adverse effects in experimental drugs, and in drug safety, applicable to the evaluation of ADE signals selected through pharmacovigilance data mining.

  11. Biocompatible polymer coating of titania nanotube arrays for improved drug elution and osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Aw, Moom Sinn; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Losic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infection, extensive inflammation and poor osseointegration have been identified as the major reasons for [early] orthopaedic implant failures based on titanium. Creating implants with drug-eluting properties to locally deliver drugs is an appealing way to address some of these problems. To improve properties of titanium for orthopaedic applications, this study explored the modification of titanium surfaces with titaniananotube (TNT) arrays, and approach that combines drug delivery into bone and potentially improved bone integration. A titania layer with an array of nanotube structures (∼120 nm in diameter and 50 μm in length) was synthesized on titanium surfaces by electrochemical anodization and loaded with the water-insoluble anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. A simple dip-coating process of polymer modification formed thin biocompatible polymer films over the drug-loaded TNTs to create TNTs with predictable drug release characteristics. Two biodegradable and antibacterial polymers, chitosan and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), were tested for their ability to extend the drug release time of TNTs and produce favourable bone cell adhesion properties. Dependent on polymer thickness, a significant improvement in the drug release characteristics was demonstrated, with reduced burst release (from 77% to >20%) and extended overall release from 4 days to more than 30 days. Excellent osteoblast adhesion and cell proliferation on polymer-coated TNTs compared with uncoated TNTs were also observed. These results suggest that polymer-modified implants with a TNT layer are capable of delivering a drug to a bone site over an extended period and with predictable kinetics. In addition, favourable bone cell adhesion suggests that such an implant would have good biocompatibility. The described approach is broadly applicable to a wide range of drugs and implants currently used in orthopaedic practice. PMID:21930254

  12. Improved bioavailability of a water-insoluble drug by inhalation of drug-containing maltosyl-β-cyclodextrin microspheres using a four-fluid nozzle spray drier.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Tetsuya; Kano, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Norimitsu; Tagami, Tatsuaki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    We previously developed a unique four-fluid nozzle spray drier that can produce water-soluble microspheres containing water-insoluble drug nanoparticles in one step without any common solvent between the water-insoluble drug and water-soluble carrier. In the present study, we focused on maltosyl-β-cyclodextrin (malt-β-CD) as a new water-soluble carrier and it was investigated whether drug/malt-β-CD microspheres could improve the bioavailability compared with our previously reported drug/mannitol (MAN) microspheres. The physicochemical properties of bare drug microparticles (ONO-2921, a model water-insoluble drug), drug/MAN microspheres, and drug/malt-β-CD microspheres were evaluated. In vitro aerosol performance, in vitro dissolution rate, and the blood concentration profiles after intratracheal administration were compared between these formulations. The mean diameter of both drug/MAN and drug/malt-β-CD microspheres was approximately 3-5 μm and both exhibited high aerosol performance (>20% in stages 2-7), but drug/malt-β-CD microspheres had superior release properties. Drug/malt-β-CD microspheres dissolved in an aqueous phase within 2 min, while drug/MAN microspheres failed to dissolve in 30 min. Inhalation of drug/malt-β-CD microspheres enhanced the area under the curve of the blood concentration curve by 15.9-fold than that of bare drug microparticles and by 6.1-fold than that of drug/MAN microspheres. Absolute bioavailability (pulmonary/intravenous route) of drug/malt-β-CD microspheres was also much higher (42%) than that of drug/MAN microspheres (6.9%). These results indicate that drug/malt-β-CD microspheres prepared by our four-fluid nozzle spray drier can improve drug solubility and pulmonary delivery.

  13. Delivering therapy to target: improving the odds for successful drug development.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin L; Sampson, John H

    2016-07-01

    The direct delivery of drugs and other agents into tissue (in contrast to systemic administration) has been used in clinical trials for brain cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral tumors. However, continuing evidence suggests that clinical efficacy depends on adequate delivery to a target. Inadequate delivery may have doomed otherwise effective drugs, through failure to distinguish drug inefficacy from poor distribution at the target. Conventional pretreatment clinical images of the patient fail to reveal the complexity and diversity of drug transport pathways in tissue. We discuss the richness of these pathways and argue that development and patient treatment can be sped up and improved by: using quantitative as well as 'real-time' imaging; customized simulations using data from that imaging; and device designs that optimize the drug-device combination. PMID:27403630

  14. Drug Use Measurement: Strengths, Limitations, and Recommendations for Improvement. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Program Evaluation and Methodology Div.

    In response to a Congressional request, the General Accounting Office (GAO) investigated drug use measurement by reporting the drug use patterns of targeted groups in three nationally prominent drug studies, assessing the methodological strengths and limitations of the studies, and developing recommendations for the improvement of drug prevalence…

  15. Assembling nanoparticle coatings to improve the drug delivery performance of lipid based colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Barnes, Timothy J.; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A.

    2012-02-01

    Lipid based colloids (e.g. emulsions and liposomes) are widely used as drug delivery systems, but often suffer from physical instabilities and non-ideal drug encapsulation and delivery performance. We review the application of engineered nanoparticle layers at the interface of lipid colloids to improve their performance as drug delivery systems. In addition we focus on the creation of novel hybrid nanomaterials from nanoparticle-lipid colloid assemblies and their drug delivery applications. Specifically, nanoparticle layers can be engineered to enhance the physical stability of submicron lipid emulsions and liposomes, satbilise encapsulated active ingredients against chemical degradation, control molecular transport and improve the dermal and oral delivery characteristics, i.e. increase absorption, bioavailability and facilitate targeted delivery. It is feasible that hybrid nanomaterials composed of nanoparticles and colloidal lipids are effective encapsulation and delivery systems for both poorly soluble drugs and biological drugs and may form the basis for the next generation of medicines. Additional pre-clinical research including specific animal model studies are required to advance the peptide/protein delivery systems, whereas the silica lipid hybrid systems have now entered human clinical trials for poorly soluble drugs.

  16. Assembling nanoparticle coatings to improve the drug delivery performance of lipid based colloids.

    PubMed

    Simovic, Spomenka; Barnes, Timothy J; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2012-02-21

    Lipid based colloids (e.g. emulsions and liposomes) are widely used as drug delivery systems, but often suffer from physical instabilities and non-ideal drug encapsulation and delivery performance. We review the application of engineered nanoparticle layers at the interface of lipid colloids to improve their performance as drug delivery systems. In addition we focus on the creation of novel hybrid nanomaterials from nanoparticle-lipid colloid assemblies and their drug delivery applications. Specifically, nanoparticle layers can be engineered to enhance the physical stability of submicron lipid emulsions and liposomes, satbilise encapsulated active ingredients against chemical degradation, control molecular transport and improve the dermal and oral delivery characteristics, i.e. increase absorption, bioavailability and facilitate targeted delivery. It is feasible that hybrid nanomaterials composed of nanoparticles and colloidal lipids are effective encapsulation and delivery systems for both poorly soluble drugs and biological drugs and may form the basis for the next generation of medicines. Additional pre-clinical research including specific animal model studies are required to advance the peptide/protein delivery systems, whereas the silica lipid hybrid systems have now entered human clinical trials for poorly soluble drugs.

  17. Hybrid systems based on "drug - in cyclodextrin - in nanoclays" for improving oxaprozin dissolution properties.

    PubMed

    Mura, Paola; Maestrelli, Francesca; Aguzzi, Carola; Viseras, César

    2016-07-25

    A combined approach based on drug complexation with cyclodextrins, and complex entrapment in nanoclays has been investigated, to join in a single delivery system the benefits of these carriers and potentiate their ability to improve the dissolution properties of oxaprozin (OXA), a poorly water-soluble anti-inflammatory drug. Based on previous studies, randomly methylated ß-cyclodextrin (RAMEB) was chosen as the most effective cyclodextrin for OXA complexation. Adsorption equilibrium studies performed on three different clays (sepiolite, attapulgite, bentonite) allowed selection of sepiolite (SV) for its greater adsorption power towards OXA. DSC and XRPD studies indicated drug amorphization in both binary OXA-RAMEB coground and OXA-SV cofused products, due to its complexation or very fine dispersion in the clay structure, respectively. The drug amorphous state was maintained also in the ternary OXA-RAMEB-SV cofused system. Dissolution studies evidenced a clear synergistic effect of RAMEB complexation and clay nanoencapsulation in improving the OXA dissolution properties, with an almost 100% increase in percent dissolved and dissolution efficiency compared to the OXA-RAMEB coground system. Therefore, the proposed combined approach represents an interesting tool for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of poorly soluble drugs, and reducing the CD amount necessary for obtaining the desired drug solubility and dissolution rate increase. PMID:27188644

  18. Improving the prediction of the brain disposition for orally administered drugs using BDDCS

    PubMed Central

    Broccatelli, Fabio; Larregieu, Caroline A.; Cruciani, Gabriele; Oprea, Tudor I.; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2012-01-01

    In modeling blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage, in silico models have yielded ~80% prediction accuracy, and are currently used in early drug discovery. Being derived from molecular structural information only, these models do not take into account the biological factors responsible for the in vivo outcome. Passive permeability and P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) efflux have been successfully recognized to impact xenobiotic extrusion from the brain, as Pgp is known to play a role in limiting the BBB penetration of oral drugs in humans. However, these two properties alone fail to explain the BBB penetration for a significant number of marketed central nervous system (CNS) agents. The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) has proved useful in predicting drug disposition in the human body, particularly in the liver and intestine. Here we discuss the value of using BDDCS to improve BBB predictions of oral drugs. BDDCS class membership was integrated with in vitro Pgp efflux and in silico permeability data to create a simple 3-step classification tree that accurately predicted CNS disposition for more than 90% of 153 drugs in our data set. About 98% of BDDCS class 1 drugs were found to markedly distribute throughout the brain; this includes a number of BDDCS class 1 drugs shown to be Pgp substrates. This new perspective provides a further interpretation of how Pgp influences the sedative effects of H1-histamine receptor antagonists. PMID:22261306

  19. [New therapeutic strategies to improve control of arterial hypertension and simplify the regimen of drug treatment].

    PubMed

    Segura de La Morena, Julián; García Donaire, José Antonio; Ruilope Urioste, Luis Miguel

    2010-05-15

    Hypertension is a public health problem of first magnitude, because of its high prevalence and the associated increase in cardiovascular and renal complications. For this reason, achieving adequate pressure control in a high percentage of patients is a priority for any health system. In our country there have been numerous studies examining the degree of control of hypertension. The percentage of patients achieving adequate control has increased progressively, but the margin of improvement is still very important. Among the factors that have contributed to this improved control is the use of antihypertensive drugs in combination, free or fixed. This article reviews the progress made in controlling hypertension, in which the combined use of antihypertensive drugs has played a key role and future therapeutic options to further improve the pressure control, with special attention to the fixed combination three antihypertensive drugs.

  20. Improving drug candidates by design: a focus on physicochemical properties as a means of improving compound disposition and safety.

    PubMed

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2011-09-19

    The development of small molecule drug candidates from the discovery phase to a marketed product continues to be a challenging enterprise with very low success rates that have fostered the perception of poor productivity by the pharmaceutical industry. Although there have been significant advances in preclinical profiling that have improved compound triaging and altered the underlying reasons for compound attrition, the failure rates have not appreciably changed. As part of an effort to more deeply understand the reasons for candidate failure, there has been considerable interest in analyzing the physicochemical properties of marketed drugs for the purpose of comparing with drugs in discovery and development as a means capturing recent trends in drug design. The scenario that has emerged is one in which contemporary drug discovery is thought to be focused too heavily on advancing candidates with profiles that are most easily satisfied by molecules with increased molecular weight and higher overall lipophilicity. The preponderance of molecules expressing these properties is frequently a function of increased aromatic ring count when compared with that of the drugs launched in the latter half of the 20th century and may reflect a preoccupation with maximizing target affinity rather than taking a more holistic approach to drug design. These attributes not only present challenges for formulation and absorption but also may influence the manifestation of toxicity during development. By providing some definition around the optimal physicochemical properties associated with marketed drugs, guidelines for drug design have been developed that are based largely on calculated parameters and which may readily be applied by medicinal chemists as an aid to understanding candidate quality. The physicochemical properties of a molecule that are consistent with the potential for good oral absorption were initially defined by Lipinski, with additional insights allowing further

  1. Can Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Improve Success Rates in CNS Drug Discovery?

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Becerra, Lino

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The bar for developing new treatments for CNS disease is getting progressively higher and fewer novel mechanisms are being discovered, validated and developed. The high costs of drug discovery necessitate early decisions to ensure the best molecules and hypotheses are tested in expensive late stage clinical trials. The discovery of brain imaging biomarkers that can bridge preclinical to clinical CNS drug discovery and provide a ‘language of translation’ affords the opportunity to improve the objectivity of decision-making. Areas Covered This review discusses the benefits, challenges and potential issues of using a science based biomarker strategy to change the paradigm of CNS drug development and increase success rates in the discovery of new medicines. The authors have summarized PubMed and Google Scholar based publication searches to identify recent advances in functional, structural and chemical brain imaging and have discussed how these techniques may be useful in defining CNS disease state and drug effects during drug development. Expert opinion The use of novel brain imaging biomarkers holds the bold promise of making neuroscience drug discovery smarter by increasing the objectivity of decision making thereby improving the probability of success of identifying useful drugs to treat CNS diseases. Functional imaging holds the promise to: (1) define pharmacodynamic markers as an index of target engagement (2) improve translational medicine paradigms to predict efficacy; (3) evaluate CNS efficacy and safety based on brain activation; (4) determine brain activity drug dose-response relationships and (5) provide an objective evaluation of symptom response and disease modification. PMID:21765857

  2. Development of a core drug list towards improving prescribing education and reducing errors in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma; Pryce Roberts, Adele; Wilde, Kirsty; Walton, Hannah; Suri, Sati; Rull, Gurvinder; Webb, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    AIM To develop a core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs to support prescribing education. METHODS A retrospective analysis of prescribing data from primary care in England (2006 and 2008) and from two London Teaching Hospitals (2007 and 2009) was performed. A survey of prescribing by foundation year 1 (FY1) doctors in 39 NHS Trusts across London was carried out. RESULTS A core list of 100 commonly prescribed drugs comprising ≥0.1% prescriptions in primary and/or secondary care was developed in 2006/7. The core list remained stable over 2 years. FY1 doctors prescribed 65% drugs on the list at least monthly. Seventy-six% of FY1 doctors did not regularly prescribe any drugs not on the core list. There was a strong correlation between prescribing frequency (prescriptions for each drug class expressed as percentage of all prescriptions written) and error rate described in the EQUIP study (errors made when prescribing each drug class expressed as a percentage of all errors made), n= 39, r= 0.861, P= 0.000. CONCLUSIONS Our core drug list identifies drugs that are commonly used and associated with error and is stable over at least 2 years. This list can now be used to develop learning resources and training programmes to improve prescribing of drugs in regular use. Complementary skills required for prescribing less familiar drugs must be developed in parallel. Ongoing research is required to monitor the effect of new training initiatives on prescribing error and patient safety. PMID:21219399

  3. Quality of drug prescribing in older patients: is there a problem and can we improve it?

    PubMed

    Scott, I; Jayathissa, S

    2010-01-01

    Older patients are at high risk of suboptimal prescribing (overuse, underuse and misuse of drugs), which can lead to serious adverse drug reactions (ADR). About one in four patients admitted to hospital are prescribed at least one inappropriate medication and up to 20% of all inpatient deaths are attributed to potentially preventable ADR. Lists of drugs to avoid (unnecessary or where risks outweigh benefits) and drugs not to be omitted (strong indications if there are no contraindications) can assist in identifying suboptimal prescribing although, to date, no trials have established the ability of such screening, by itself, to improve prescribing quality. Remedial strategies proven to be effective in randomized trials include detailed appraisal of medication lists by multidisciplinary teams, which involve geriatricians and close liaison with specialist clinical pharmacists. A multifaceted quality improvement strategy is proposed that includes an aspirational target of no more than five different drugs be regularly prescribed to vulnerable older patients. Achieving this target involves prioritizing drug selection on the basis of strength of indication which may run counter to current disease-specific clinical guideline recommendations based on trials that have excluded most older patients. Such a strategy is worthy of further evaluation in a multicentre randomized trial. PMID:19712203

  4. [Improve the accessibility of essential drugs for the populations of one medical region in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Ridde, Valéry; Nitièma, Abdoulaye P; Dadjoari, Moussa

    2005-01-01

    Despite the formulation of the Bamako initiative in 1992 in Burkina Faso, not until 2001 and the launching of a project by a nongovernmental organization was the policy really implemented in a region of the country. One of the goals of this policy is to improve access to health care by using generic essential drugs. The objective of this article is to summarize the results of the evaluation of the project's ability to improve the population's access to drugs. The project lasted three years (2001-2003) and the interventions took place in 41 basic health centres of three districts. According to WHO, improving access to drugs requires consideration of four essential factors: rational use, affordable prices, financial viability, and effectiveness of the distribution. The average number of drugs prescribed per prescription sheet (n = 1061) was 2.4; 93% of the drugs were prescribed by their generic name (international non-proprietary names); 44% of infant diarrheas were treated with oral rehydration salt. National drug prices were respected but not the directives aiming at exempting from payment or subsidizing certain population sub-groups (children, indigents). The average annual cash flow of the basic health centres was 1.2 million F CFA and it increased by 854% compared to the beginning of the project. The cost-recovery scheme for administrative expenses was 106%. The average annual availability of the 10 essential drugs was 89%. Utilization rates increased (0.13 in 1999 to 0.21 in 2003) but not significantly differently than in other basic health centres of the area not supported by the project (p = 0.084). The project succeeded in improving access to these drugs for the overall population but not for the worst-off. The drugs are now geographically available for all and financially accessible for those who can afford to pay. The intervention strategy supported the sustainability of the project's activities but much remains to be done to provide the poorest with

  5. Nanostructured lipid carriers: An emerging platform for improving oral bioavailability of lipophilic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saba; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed; Khan, Sana; Narang, Ramandeep Singh; Narang, Jasjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays exploration of novel lipid-based formulations is akin to a magnet for researchers worldwide for improving the in vivo performance of highly lipophilic drugs. Over the last few years, new compositions of lipids have been developed, and the probable bioavailability enhancement has been investigated. We reviewed the most recent data dealing with backlogs of conventional lipid-based formulations such as physical instability, limited drug loading capacities, drug expulsion during storage along with all the possible hindrances resulting in poor absorption of highly lipophilic drugs such as P-glycoprotein efflux, extensive metabolism by cytochrome P450 etc. In tandem with these aspects, an exclusive formulation approach has been discussed in detail in this paper. Therefore, this review focuses on resolving the concerned ambiguity with successful oral administration of highly lipophilic drugs through designing novel lipidic formulations (nanostructured lipid carriers [NLC]) that constitute a blend of solid and liquid lipids. The article highlights the potential role of such formulation in normalizing the in vivo fate of poorly soluble drugs. Finally, the present manuscript discusses the dominance of NLC over other lipid-based formulations and provides a perspective of how they defeat and overcome the barriers that lead to the poor bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:26682188

  6. Nanostructured lipid carriers: An emerging platform for improving oral bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saba; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed; Khan, Sana; Narang, Ramandeep Singh; Narang, Jasjeet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays exploration of novel lipid-based formulations is akin to a magnet for researchers worldwide for improving the in vivo performance of highly lipophilic drugs. Over the last few years, new compositions of lipids have been developed, and the probable bioavailability enhancement has been investigated. We reviewed the most recent data dealing with backlogs of conventional lipid-based formulations such as physical instability, limited drug loading capacities, drug expulsion during storage along with all the possible hindrances resulting in poor absorption of highly lipophilic drugs such as P-glycoprotein efflux, extensive metabolism by cytochrome P450 etc. In tandem with these aspects, an exclusive formulation approach has been discussed in detail in this paper. Therefore, this review focuses on resolving the concerned ambiguity with successful oral administration of highly lipophilic drugs through designing novel lipidic formulations (nanostructured lipid carriers [NLC]) that constitute a blend of solid and liquid lipids. The article highlights the potential role of such formulation in normalizing the in vivo fate of poorly soluble drugs. Finally, the present manuscript discusses the dominance of NLC over other lipid-based formulations and provides a perspective of how they defeat and overcome the barriers that lead to the poor bioavailability of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:26682188

  7. Improving Predictive Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Mechanistic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William; Young, John F.; Corley, Rick A.; Dorman, David C.; Conolly, Rory B.; Knudsen, Thomas; Erstad, Brian L.; Luecke, Richard H.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Timchalk, Chuck; Mattison, Donald R.

    2005-07-26

    A workshop was conducted on November 18?19, 2004, to address the issue of improving predictive models for drug delivery to developing humans. Although considerable progress has been made for adult humans, large gaps remain for predicting pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) outcome in children because most adult models have not been tested during development. The goals of the meeting included a description of when, during development, infants/children become adultlike in handling drugs. The issue of incorporating the most recent advances into the predictive models was also addressed: both the use of imaging approaches and genomic information were considered. Disease state, as exemplified by obesity, was addressed as a modifier of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during development. Issues addressed in this workshop should be considered in the development of new predictive and mechanistic models of drug kinetics and dynamics in the developing human.

  8. Targeting drug transport mechanisms for improving platinum-based cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen HW; Chen, Wen-Chung; Liang, Zhang-Dong; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Long, Yan; Aiba, Isamu; Fu, Siqing; Broaddus, Russell; Liu, Jinsong; Feun, Lynn G; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents remain important chemotherapeutic agents for treating many human malignancies. Elevated expression of the human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1), resulting in enhanced Pt drug transport into cells, has been shown to be associated with improved treatment efficacy. Thus, targeting hCtr1 upregulation is an attractive strategy for improving the treatment efficacy of Pt-based cancer chemotherapy. Area covered Regulation of hCtr1 expression by cellular copper homeostasis is discussed. Association of elevated hCtr1 expression with intrinsic sensitivity of ovarian cancer to Pt drugs is presented. Mechanism of copper-lowering agents in enhancing hCtr1-mediated cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin, cDDP) transport is reviewed. Applications of copper chelation strategy in overcoming cDDP resistance through enhanced hCtr1 expression are evaluated. Expert opinion While both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms of hCtr1 regulation by cellular copper bioavailability have been proposed, detailed molecular insights into hCtr1 regulation by copper homeostasis remain needed. Recent clinical study using a copper-lowering agent in enhancing hCtr1-mediated drug transport has achieved incremental improvement in overcoming Pt drug resistance. Further improvements in identifying predictive measures in the subpopulation of patients that can benefit from the treatment are needed. PMID:26004625

  9. DrugE-Rank: improving drug–target interaction prediction of new candidate drugs or targets by ensemble learning to rank

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qingjun; Gao, Junning; Wu, Dongliang; Zhang, Shihua; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying drug–target interactions is an important task in drug discovery. To reduce heavy time and financial cost in experimental way, many computational approaches have been proposed. Although these approaches have used many different principles, their performance is far from satisfactory, especially in predicting drug–target interactions of new candidate drugs or targets. Methods: Approaches based on machine learning for this problem can be divided into two types: feature-based and similarity-based methods. Learning to rank is the most powerful technique in the feature-based methods. Similarity-based methods are well accepted, due to their idea of connecting the chemical and genomic spaces, represented by drug and target similarities, respectively. We propose a new method, DrugE-Rank, to improve the prediction performance by nicely combining the advantages of the two different types of methods. That is, DrugE-Rank uses LTR, for which multiple well-known similarity-based methods can be used as components of ensemble learning. Results: The performance of DrugE-Rank is thoroughly examined by three main experiments using data from DrugBank: (i) cross-validation on FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) approved drugs before March 2014; (ii) independent test on FDA approved drugs after March 2014; and (iii) independent test on FDA experimental drugs. Experimental results show that DrugE-Rank outperforms competing methods significantly, especially achieving more than 30% improvement in Area under Prediction Recall curve for FDA approved new drugs and FDA experimental drugs. Availability: http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/DrugE-Rank Contact: zhusf@fudan.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307615

  10. Production of nanosuspensions as a tool to improve drug bioavailability: focus on topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Francesco; Schlich, Michele; Pireddu, Rosa; Corrias, Francesco; Fadda, Anna Maria; Sinico, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades nanosizing technology has become one of the most successful formulation approaches for improving the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs, which show a low oral absorption due to low dissolution velocity. Nanocrystals are nanoparticles of pure drug, without any matrix material, with an average diameter below 1 µm (typically in the range of 200-500 nm), which can be prepared in both water and non-water media as colloidal nanosuspensions stabilized using surfactants or polymers. The reduction of the drug particle diameter below 1 µm increases the dissolution velocity by increasing the particle surface and decreasing the diffusion layer thickness. Nanosuspension production processes involve two different approaches such as bottom-up (drug nanocrystal precipitation) and top-down (drug particle disintegration) technologies or a combination of two. Within these main approaches, a variety of possible techniques to achieve particle size reduction have been proposed by different research groups from both industry and academia. Even though nanosuspensions formulations have been especially studied for oral and parenteral administration, nanocrystals have showed a great potential also for topical delivery through alternative routes such as dermal, pulmonary and ocular route. The purpose of this review is to describe the main technologies used to produce nanosuspensions as well as to explore the most significant results and progresses obtained by application of drug nanocrystal formulations through topical routes.

  11. A comparative study on the nanoparticles for improved drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Nosrat O; Ghavidast, Atefeh; Amirmahani, Najmeh

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted considerable recent interest for diverse biomedical applications because of the unique properties of the nanomaterials. It is already known that one of the major advances in the relative application of nanoparticles is the recognition of the steric stabilization which can increase the particle stability in the biological environment and provide the opportunities of the application of nanoparticles in the development of drug delivery systems (DDSs) for achieving drug targeting and controlled drug release. To facilitate their use in such applications, the appropriate design of surface ligands on these nanoparticles is necessary. In view of these, functionalized nanoparticles through surface modification can be utilized to specifically interact with the target molecules on the cell membrane or intracellular ones. This review briefly presents self-assembled nanoparticles with molecules of therapeutic significance with two strategies. The first strategy attempts to improve the placement of the drugs using conjugating the appropriate ligands or adding targeting moieties to the DDS. The second strategy utilizes trigger-controlled drug-release, which restricts drug release at the targeted site to kill cancer cells by externally controlled mechanisms. Among external stimulations, conveniently light has attracted much interest because it, as an orthogonal external stimulus, gives spatiotemporal control of payload release. PMID:27498233

  12. Market access of cancer drugs in European countries: improving resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Kim; Huys, Isabelle; Casteels, Minne; De Nys, Katelijne; Simoens, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Public health systems need to make well-founded choices in order to distribute their scarce resources in the most efficient way. Given the number of cancer patients, public/private investments in oncology research, the growing number of new anti-cancer agents and consequent budget impact of cancer care, market access of cancer drugs has become delicate over the last decade. Furthermore, decision makers are challenged by ethical objections and endeavour to provide fair and equal access to treatments for cancer patients. The aim of this study is to generate an overview of market access procedures for cancer drugs in eight European countries and formulate advice for improvement of resource allocation. Results are obtained through a literature review and a qualitative questionnaire and validated by experts with proven knowledge about procedures for price setting and reimbursement of drugs. Diverse measures are applied in the studied countries to optimize reimbursement of cancer drugs such as adjusted cost-effectiveness threshold, regulations for off-label use and new market access agreements. Additionally, innovative cancer drugs are excluded from explicit cost control measures such as payback of budget excess by pharmaceutical companies and lump-sum payments per diagnostic related groups (DRG) in the hospital. The results suggest that cancer is prioritized above other disease areas. Further research is necessary to address the question if society attaches higher value to cancer drugs than to treatments for other diseases.

  13. A new and improved method for the preparation of drug nanosuspension formulations using acoustic mixing technology.

    PubMed

    Leung, Dennis H; Lamberto, David J; Liu, Lina; Kwong, Elizabeth; Nelson, Todd; Rhodes, Timothy; Bak, Annette

    2014-10-01

    Drug discovery and development is a challenging area. During the drug optimization process, available drug compounds often have poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, making the proper in vivo evaluation of these compounds difficult. To address these challenges, drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble compounds have emerged as a promising formulation approach. Herein, we report on a new drug sparing technology utilizing low shear acoustic mixing to rapidly identify optimized nanosuspension formulations for a wide range of compounds with dramatically improved material and time efficiencies. This approach has several key advantages over typical methods of preparing nanoparticles, including miniaturization of the milling process, the ability to evaluate multiple formulation conditions in a high throughput manner, and direct translation to optimized formulation scale-up for in vivo studies. Furthermore, there are additional benefits obtained with this new approach resulting in nanosuspension formulations with significant stability and physical property enhancements over those obtained using traditional media milling techniques. These advantages make this approach highly suitable for the rapid evaluation of potential drug candidates in the discovery and development space.

  14. Design and optimization of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for improved bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhongcheng; Hou, Xuefeng; Jia, Xiao-bin

    2016-01-01

    Background The main purpose of this research was to design a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for improving the bioavailability of cyclovirobuxine D as a poorly water-soluble drug. Materials and methods Solubility trials, emulsifying studies, and pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were used to screen the SNEDDS formulations. The optimized drug-loaded SNEDDS was prepared at a mass ratio of 3:24:38:38 for cyclovirobuxine D, oleic acid, Solutol SH15, and propylene glycol, respectively. The optimized formulation was characterized in terms of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic parameters compared with marketed cyclovirobuxine D tablets. Results The optimized cyclovirobuxine-D-loaded SNEDDS was spontaneously dispersed to form a nanoemulsion with a globule size of 64.80±3.58 nm, which exhibited significant improvement of drug solubility, rapid absorption rate, and enhanced area under the curve, together with increased permeation and decreased efflux. Fortunately, there was a nonsignificant cytotoxic effect toward Caco-2 cells. The relative bioavailability of SNEDDS was 200.22% in comparison with market tablets, in rabbits. Conclusion SNEDDS could be a potential candidate for an oral dosage form of cyclovirobuxine D with improved bioavailability. PMID:27418807

  15. Comprehensive summary--Predict-IV: A systems toxicology approach to improve pharmaceutical drug safety testing.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefan O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Jennings, Paul; Testai, Emanuela; Bois, Frederic

    2015-12-25

    This special issue of Toxicology in Vitro is dedicated to disseminating the results of the EU-funded collaborative project "Profiling the toxicity of new drugs: a non animal-based approach integrating toxicodynamics and biokinetics" (Predict-IV; Grant 202222). The project's overall aim was to develop strategies to improve the assessment of drug safety in the early stage of development and late discovery phase, by an intelligent combination of non animal-based test systems, cell biology, mechanistic toxicology and in silico modeling, in a rapid and cost effective manner. This overview introduces the scope and overall achievements of Predict-IV. PMID:25450741

  16. Comprehensive summary--Predict-IV: A systems toxicology approach to improve pharmaceutical drug safety testing.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefan O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Jennings, Paul; Testai, Emanuela; Bois, Frederic

    2015-12-25

    This special issue of Toxicology in Vitro is dedicated to disseminating the results of the EU-funded collaborative project "Profiling the toxicity of new drugs: a non animal-based approach integrating toxicodynamics and biokinetics" (Predict-IV; Grant 202222). The project's overall aim was to develop strategies to improve the assessment of drug safety in the early stage of development and late discovery phase, by an intelligent combination of non animal-based test systems, cell biology, mechanistic toxicology and in silico modeling, in a rapid and cost effective manner. This overview introduces the scope and overall achievements of Predict-IV.

  17. Improvement in solubility of poor water-soluble drugs by solid dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Swati; Mathew, George; Joseph, Lincy

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended to combine recent literature on solid dispersion technology for solubility enhancement with special emphasis on mechanism responsible for the same by solid dispersion, various preparation methods, and evaluation parameters. Solubility behavior is the most challenging aspect for various new chemical entities as 60% of the new potential products possess solubility problems. This is the biggest reason for new drug molecules not reaching to the market or not reaches to full potential. There are various techniques to enhance the drug solubility such as particle size reduction, nanosuspension, use of surfactants, salt formation, solid dispersion, etc. From this article it may be concluded that solid dispersion is an important approach for improvement of bioavailability of poor water-soluble drugs. PMID:23071955

  18. Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems as a tool to improve solubility and bioavailability of resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Balata, Gehan F; Essa, Ebtessam A; Shamardl, Hanan A; Zaidan, Samira H; Abourehab, Mohammed AS

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a nonflavonoid polyphenolic compound which has a broad range of desirable biological actions which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, cardioprotective, and antitumor activities. However, there is concern that the bioavailability of resveratrol may limit some of its clinical utility. So, the aim of this study was to enhance the dissolution rate and oral hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of resveratrol. This was achieved using self-emulsifying drug delivery system. The solubility of resveratrol was determined in various oils, surfactants, and cosurfactants. Phase diagram was plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsification regions using olive oil, Tween 80, and propylene glycol. The prepared self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations were tested for thermodynamic stability, emulsification efficiency, droplet size, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release. Self-emulsification time averaged 17–99 seconds without precipitation and the mean droplet sizes ranged from 285 to 823 nm with overall zeta potential of −2.24 to −15.4 mv. All formulations improved drug dissolution in relation to unprocessed drug with a trend of decreased dissolution parameters with increasing oil content. The optimized formula, F19, with dissolution efficiency of 94% compared to only 42% of pure drug was used to study the in vivo hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of resveratrol in diabetic-induced albino rats and comparing these effects with that of pure resveratrol in different doses. Treatment with the optimized formula, F19, at 10 mg/kg had significant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic-induced albino rats which were nearly similar to the high dose (20 mg/kg) of unprocessed resveratrol. From the study, it was concluded that formulation F19 has good emulsification property with uniform globule size, satisfactory in vitro drug release profile, and significant in vivo hypoglycemic effects which identify future

  19. Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems as a tool to improve solubility and bioavailability of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Balata, Gehan F; Essa, Ebtessam A; Shamardl, Hanan A; Zaidan, Samira H; Abourehab, Mohammed As

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a nonflavonoid polyphenolic compound which has a broad range of desirable biological actions which include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, cardioprotective, and antitumor activities. However, there is concern that the bioavailability of resveratrol may limit some of its clinical utility. So, the aim of this study was to enhance the dissolution rate and oral hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effect of resveratrol. This was achieved using self-emulsifying drug delivery system. The solubility of resveratrol was determined in various oils, surfactants, and cosurfactants. Phase diagram was plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsification regions using olive oil, Tween 80, and propylene glycol. The prepared self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations were tested for thermodynamic stability, emulsification efficiency, droplet size, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release. Self-emulsification time averaged 17-99 seconds without precipitation and the mean droplet sizes ranged from 285 to 823 nm with overall zeta potential of -2.24 to -15.4 mv. All formulations improved drug dissolution in relation to unprocessed drug with a trend of decreased dissolution parameters with increasing oil content. The optimized formula, F19, with dissolution efficiency of 94% compared to only 42% of pure drug was used to study the in vivo hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of resveratrol in diabetic-induced albino rats and comparing these effects with that of pure resveratrol in different doses. Treatment with the optimized formula, F19, at 10 mg/kg had significant hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic-induced albino rats which were nearly similar to the high dose (20 mg/kg) of unprocessed resveratrol. From the study, it was concluded that formulation F19 has good emulsification property with uniform globule size, satisfactory in vitro drug release profile, and significant in vivo hypoglycemic effects which identify future opportunities

  20. [Improvement of intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs by various sugar esters].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akira; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Effects of sucrose fatty acid esters (sugar esters) on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs were examined by an in situ closed loop method in rats. 5(6)-Carboxyfluorescein (CF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) with various molecular weights were used as model drugs of poorly absorbable drugs. The absorption of CF from the rat small intestine was significantly enhanced in the presence of various sugar esters and a maximal absorption enhancing effect was observed in the presence of 0.5%(w/v) S-1670. The absorption enhancing effect of S-1670 in the small intestine decreased as the molecular weights of drugs increased. Moreover, we evaluated the intestinal membrane damage with or without various sugar esters. These sugar esters (0.5%(w/v)) did not increase the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), suggesting that these sugar esters did not cause serious membrane damage to the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, these sugar esters increased membrane fluidity of lipid layers of the intestinal brush border membranes and decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells. Therefore, these findings suggested that these sugar esters might improve the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs via a transcellular and a paracellular pathways.

  1. Controlled release drug delivery systems to improve post-operative pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhusal, Prabhat; Harrison, Jeff; Sharma, Manisha; Jones, David S; Hill, Andrew G; Svirskis, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Over 230 million surgical procedures are conducted worldwide each year with numbers increasing. Pain, undesirable inflammation and infection are common complications experienced by patients following surgery. Opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), local anaesthetics (LAs) and antibiotics are the commonly administered drugs peri-operatively to manage these complications. Post-operative pharmacotherapy is typically achieved using immediate-release dosage forms of drugs, which lead to issues around fluctuating plasma concentrations, systemic adverse effects and poor patient adherence. Controlled release (CR) systems for certain medicines including opioids, NSAIDs and antibiotics have demonstrably enhanced treatment efficacy in the post-surgical setting. However, challenges remain to ensure patient safety while achieving individual therapeutic needs. Newer CR systems in the research and development pipeline have a high level of control over medicine release, which can be initiated, tuned or stopped on-demand. Future systems will self-regulate drug release in response to biological markers providing precise individualized therapy. In this review, we cover currently adopted CR systems in post-operative pharmacotherapy, including drug eluting medical devices, and highlight a series of examples of novel CR technologies that have the potential for translation into post-surgical settings to improve medication efficacy and enhance post-surgical recovery.

  2. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP. PMID:26664367

  3. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of dipyridamole: preparation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhong, Haijun; He, Jing; Xie, Baogang; Liu, Fen; Xu, Helin; Liu, Minmin; Xu, Chunlian

    2011-07-01

    Dipyridamole shows poor and variable bioavailability after oral administration due to pHdependent solubility, low biomembrane permeability as well as being a substrate of P-glycoprotein. In order to improve the oral absorption of dipyridamole, a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for dipyridamole was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The optimum formulation was 18% oleic acid, 12% Labrafac lipophile WL 1349, 42% Solutol HS 15 and 28% isopropyl alcohol. It was found that the performance of self-microemulsification with the combination of oleic acid and Labrafac lipophile WL 1349 increased compared with just one oil. The results obtained from an in vitro dissolution assay indicated that dipyridamole in SMEDDS dissolved rapidly and completely in pH 6.8 aqueous media, while the commercial drug tablet was less soluble. An oral bioavailability study in rats showed that dipyridamole in the SMEDDS formulation had a 2.06-fold increased absorption compared with the simple drug suspension. It was evident that SMEDDS may be an effective approach to improve the oral absorption for drugs having pH-dependent solubility.

  4. Solid Dispersion Approach Improving Dissolution Rate of Stiripentol: a Novel Antiepileptic Drug.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Samar

    2015-01-01

    Some drugs have low bioavailability due to their poor aqueous solubility and/or slow dissolution rate in biological fluids. Stiripentol (STP) is a novel anticonvulsant drug that is structurally unrelated to the currently available antiepileptics. It has poor aqueous solubility and its solubility has to be enhanced accordingly. Polyethyleneglycol 6000 (PEG-6000) is commonly utilized as a hydrophilic carrier for poorly water soluble drugs in order to improve their bioavailability. STP and PEG-6000 binary system was obtained by physical mixture, solvent evaporation, co-evaporation and melting methods using different weight ratios. The properties of the prepared binary systems were evaluated using dissolution rate, phase solubility, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies. The FTIR spectroscopic studies showed the stability of STP and absence of STP-PEG-6000 interaction. The DSC and SEM studies indicated the amorphous state of STP in its binary systems with PEG-6000. Dissolution profile of STP was significantly improved via complexation with PEG-6000 as compared with the pure drug. The binary system which was prepared using melting method showed the highest dissolution rate. The promising results of the prepared binary systems open the avenue for further oral formulation of STP.

  5. Overcoming intratumor heterogeneity of polygenic cancer drug resistance with improved biomarker integration.

    PubMed

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2012-12-01

    Improvements in technology and resources are helping to advance our understanding of cancer-initiating events as well as factors involved with tumor progression, adaptation, and evasion of therapy. Tumors are well known to contain diverse cell populations and intratumor heterogeneity affords neoplasms with a diverse set of biologic characteristics that can be used to evolve and adapt. Intratumor heterogeneity has emerged as a major hindrance to improving cancer patient care. Polygenic cancer drug resistance necessitates reconsidering drug designs to include polypharmacology in pursuit of novel combinatorial agents having multitarget activity to overcome the diverse and compensatory signaling pathways in which cancer cells use to survive and evade therapy. Advances will require integration of different biomarkers such as genomics and imaging to provide for more adequate elucidation of the spatially varying location, type, and extent of diverse intratumor signaling molecules to provide for a rationale-based personalized cancer medicine strategy. PMID:23308059

  6. Overcoming Intratumor Heterogeneity of Polygenic Cancer Drug Resistance with Improved Biomarker Integration1

    PubMed Central

    Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in technology and resources are helping to advance our understanding of cancer-initiating events as well as factors involved with tumor progression, adaptation, and evasion of therapy. Tumors are well known to contain diverse cell populations and intratumor heterogeneity affords neoplasms with a diverse set of biologic characteristics that can be used to evolve and adapt. Intratumor heterogeneity has emerged as a major hindrance to improving cancer patient care. Polygenic cancer drug resistance necessitates reconsidering drug designs to include polypharmacology in pursuit of novel combinatorial agents having multitarget activity to overcome the diverse and compensatory signaling pathways in which cancer cells use to survive and evade therapy. Advances will require integration of different biomarkers such as genomics and imaging to provide for more adequate elucidation of the spatially varying location, type, and extent of diverse intratumor signaling molecules to provide for a rationale-based personalized cancer medicine strategy. PMID:23308059

  7. Improvement of bone marrow fibrosis with ruxolitinib: will this finding change our perception of the drug?

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-08-01

    Ruxolitinib, a JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, has been tested and approved for the treatment of primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Reduction of spleen volume and improvement of constitutional symptoms and quality of life have been reported as the major findings in sponsored randomized clinical trials. Recent data indicated that the drug improves bone marrow fibrosis and that different targets may be involved in this response. These new data, which require confirmation in prospective trials, may change our perspectives and therapeutic strategies for this disease.

  8. Improvement of bone marrow fibrosis with ruxolitinib: will this finding change our perception of the drug?

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-08-01

    Ruxolitinib, a JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor, has been tested and approved for the treatment of primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Reduction of spleen volume and improvement of constitutional symptoms and quality of life have been reported as the major findings in sponsored randomized clinical trials. Recent data indicated that the drug improves bone marrow fibrosis and that different targets may be involved in this response. These new data, which require confirmation in prospective trials, may change our perspectives and therapeutic strategies for this disease. PMID:25915176

  9. New generation antiepileptic drugs: what do they offer in terms of improved tolerability and safety?

    PubMed

    French, Jacqueline A; Gazzola, Deana M

    2011-08-01

    Over the last two decades a total of 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been introduced to the US market. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have yielded information about each drug's efficacy, tolerability, and safety profile; however, few studies have compared the newer generation AEDs directly with the older generation. Comparative studies are not always straightforward in their interpretation, as many characteristics of drugs, both favorable and unfavorable, may not be highlighted by such studies. In general, findings from the literature suggest that the newer generation AEDs (including vigabatrin, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, tiagabine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, pregabalin, rufinamide, and lacosamide) enjoy both improved tolerability and safety compared with older agents such as phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate. This is partially supported by some of the findings of the QSS and the TTA Committee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), whose review of four AEDs (gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, and tiagabine) is discussed. Briefly, when compared with carbamazepine, lamotrigine was better tolerated; topiramate adverse events (AEs) were fairly comparable to carbamazepine and valproate; and tiagabine compared with placebo was associated with a higher discontinuation rate due to AEs. The findings of the SANAD trial are also presented; when administered to patients with partial epilepsy, carbamazepine was most likely to fail due to AEs, and lamotrigine and gabapentin were least likely to fail due to AEs. When administered to patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, topiramate was most frequently associated with AE-related discontinuation, followed by valproate; and while valproate was the most efficacious drug in this arm of the study, lamotrigine was more tolerable. What makes the SANAD study valuable and somewhat unique is its head-to-head comparison of one drug with another. Such

  10. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  11. Improving pharmaceutical innovation by building a more comprehensive database on drug development and use.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory W; Cazé, Alexis; Romine, Morgan H; Audibert, Céline; Leff, Jonathan S; McClellan, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    New drugs and biologics have had a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases. However, available measures suggest that pharmaceutical innovation has remained relatively flat, despite substantial growth in research and development spending. We review recent literature on pharmaceutical innovation to identify limitations in measuring and assessing innovation, and we describe the framework and collaborative approach we are using to develop more comprehensive, publicly available metrics for innovation. Our research teams at the Brookings Institution and Deerfield Institute are collaborating with experts from multiple areas of drug development and regulatory review to identify and collect comprehensive data elements related to key development and regulatory characteristics for each new molecular entity approved over the past several decades in the United States and the European Union. Subsequent phases of our effort will add data on downstream product use and patient outcomes and will also include drugs that have failed or been abandoned in development. Such a database will enable researchers to better analyze the drivers of drug innovation, trends in the output of new medicines, and the effect of policy efforts designed to improve innovation.

  12. Improved therapeutic entities derived from known generics as an unexplored source of innovative drug products.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Sven; Klebovich, Imre; Antal, István; Blume, Henning H; Magyar, Kálmán; Németh, György; Paál, Tamás L; Stumptner, Willibald; Thaler, György; Van de Putte, Armand; Shah, Vinod P

    2011-11-20

    With a New Drug Application (NDA) innovative drug therapies are reaching the market in a specific dosage form for one or more clinically proven indications of which after expiration of the patent or the data exclusivity copies are launched using Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDA). Advanced therapies that emerged from launched molecules during their product life-cycle have gained considerable attention as clinical practice provides evidence for additional therapeutic values, patient centric delivery systems show improved therapeutic outcomes or emerging technologies offer efficiency gains in manufacturing or access to emerging markets. The USA and European regulatory framework has set reasonable regulations in place for these "Supergenerics" or "hybrid" applications. While these regulations are relatively recent the pharmaceutical industry is just starting to use this route for their product development and life-cycle management. From a clinical perspective the potential for advanced product development have been demonstrated. Yet, there is still a lag of common understanding between the different stakeholders regarding the development, application process and commercial incentive in developing enhanced therapeutic entities based on existing drug products for the market.

  13. Improved therapeutic entities derived from known generics as an unexplored source of innovative drug products.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Sven; Klebovich, Imre; Antal, István; Blume, Henning H; Magyar, Kálmán; Németh, György; Paál, Tamás L; Stumptner, Willibald; Thaler, György; Van de Putte, Armand; Shah, Vinod P

    2011-11-20

    With a New Drug Application (NDA) innovative drug therapies are reaching the market in a specific dosage form for one or more clinically proven indications of which after expiration of the patent or the data exclusivity copies are launched using Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDA). Advanced therapies that emerged from launched molecules during their product life-cycle have gained considerable attention as clinical practice provides evidence for additional therapeutic values, patient centric delivery systems show improved therapeutic outcomes or emerging technologies offer efficiency gains in manufacturing or access to emerging markets. The USA and European regulatory framework has set reasonable regulations in place for these "Supergenerics" or "hybrid" applications. While these regulations are relatively recent the pharmaceutical industry is just starting to use this route for their product development and life-cycle management. From a clinical perspective the potential for advanced product development have been demonstrated. Yet, there is still a lag of common understanding between the different stakeholders regarding the development, application process and commercial incentive in developing enhanced therapeutic entities based on existing drug products for the market. PMID:21968337

  14. Improving pharmaceutical innovation by building a more comprehensive database on drug development and use.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory W; Cazé, Alexis; Romine, Morgan H; Audibert, Céline; Leff, Jonathan S; McClellan, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    New drugs and biologics have had a tremendous impact on the treatment of many diseases. However, available measures suggest that pharmaceutical innovation has remained relatively flat, despite substantial growth in research and development spending. We review recent literature on pharmaceutical innovation to identify limitations in measuring and assessing innovation, and we describe the framework and collaborative approach we are using to develop more comprehensive, publicly available metrics for innovation. Our research teams at the Brookings Institution and Deerfield Institute are collaborating with experts from multiple areas of drug development and regulatory review to identify and collect comprehensive data elements related to key development and regulatory characteristics for each new molecular entity approved over the past several decades in the United States and the European Union. Subsequent phases of our effort will add data on downstream product use and patient outcomes and will also include drugs that have failed or been abandoned in development. Such a database will enable researchers to better analyze the drivers of drug innovation, trends in the output of new medicines, and the effect of policy efforts designed to improve innovation. PMID:25646113

  15. The evolution of drugs on schistosoma treatment: looking to the past to improve the future.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Pitta, Maira Galdino; da Rocha Pitta, Marina Galdino; de Melo Rêgo, Moacyr Jesus Barreto; Galdino, Suely Lins

    2013-04-01

    Schistosomiasis is a devastating worldwide widespread tropical disease that currently affects more than 230 million people, making it an issue of great socioeconomic and public health importance. Unfortunatelly there is a single drug for the treatment of all forms of schistosomiasis, praziquantel, which was introduced in therapy in 1980. The article goes by antimony compounds, emetine, hydantoin, nitrofurans, lucanthone, hycanthone, oxamniquine derivatives and organophosphates until it finally gets to praziquantel derivatives. The intent of this review is to provide a panorama of drugs that were and are being used in human chemotherapy looking to the past to improve rational design drugs in the future. Not only clinical used compounds will be shown but also synthesized and tested compounds in vitro and in vivo in animal models which haven't yet to be used in humans. Prospects for drug discovery and vaccines to be used in the treatment and prevention of schistosomiasis, clinical trials, concerns about the resistance/decreased effectiveness of the treatment, and patent database will also be discussed. At the end of the review the reader will notice that much has been done but much still needs to be done yet. PMID:23373654

  16. AC and DC electrospinning of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose with polyethylene oxides as secondary polymer for improved drug dissolution.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Farkas, Balázs; Verreck, Geert; Mensch, Jürgen; Borbás, Enikő; Nagy, Brigitta; Marosi, György; Nagy, Zsombor Kristóf

    2016-05-30

    Alternating current electrospinning (ACES) capable to reach multiple times higher specific productivities than widely used direct current electrospinning (DCES) was investigated and compared with DCES to prepare drug-loaded formulations based on one of the most widespread polymeric matrix used for commercialized pharmaceutical solid dispersions, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 2910 (HPMC). In order to improve the insufficient spinnability of HPMC (both with ACES and DCES) polyethylene oxide (PEO) as secondary polymer with intense ACES activity was introduced into the electrospinning solution. Different grades of this polymer used at as low concentrations in the fibers as 0.1% or less enabled the production of high quality HPMC-based fibrous mats without altering its physicochemical properties remarkably. Increasing concentrations of higher molecular weight PEOs led to the thickening of fibers from submicronic diameters to several microns of thickness. ACES fibers loaded with the poorly water-soluble model drug spironolactone were several times thinner than drug-loaded fibers prepared with DCES in spite of the higher feeding rates applied. The amorphous HPMC-based fibers with large surface area enhanced the dissolution of spironolactone significantly, the presence of small amounts of PEO did not affect the dissolution rate. The presented results confirm the diverse applicability of ACES, a novel technique to prepare fibrous drug delivery systems. PMID:26997426

  17. AC and DC electrospinning of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose with polyethylene oxides as secondary polymer for improved drug dissolution.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Attila; Farkas, Balázs; Verreck, Geert; Mensch, Jürgen; Borbás, Enikő; Nagy, Brigitta; Marosi, György; Nagy, Zsombor Kristóf

    2016-05-30

    Alternating current electrospinning (ACES) capable to reach multiple times higher specific productivities than widely used direct current electrospinning (DCES) was investigated and compared with DCES to prepare drug-loaded formulations based on one of the most widespread polymeric matrix used for commercialized pharmaceutical solid dispersions, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 2910 (HPMC). In order to improve the insufficient spinnability of HPMC (both with ACES and DCES) polyethylene oxide (PEO) as secondary polymer with intense ACES activity was introduced into the electrospinning solution. Different grades of this polymer used at as low concentrations in the fibers as 0.1% or less enabled the production of high quality HPMC-based fibrous mats without altering its physicochemical properties remarkably. Increasing concentrations of higher molecular weight PEOs led to the thickening of fibers from submicronic diameters to several microns of thickness. ACES fibers loaded with the poorly water-soluble model drug spironolactone were several times thinner than drug-loaded fibers prepared with DCES in spite of the higher feeding rates applied. The amorphous HPMC-based fibers with large surface area enhanced the dissolution of spironolactone significantly, the presence of small amounts of PEO did not affect the dissolution rate. The presented results confirm the diverse applicability of ACES, a novel technique to prepare fibrous drug delivery systems.

  18. New generation antiepileptic drugs: what do they offer in terms of improved tolerability and safety?

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Deana M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades a total of 11 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have been introduced to the US market. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have yielded information about each drug’s efficacy, tolerability, and safety profile; however, few studies have compared the newer generation AEDs directly with the older generation. Comparative studies are not always straightforward in their interpretation, as many characteristics of drugs, both favorable and unfavorable, may not be highlighted by such studies. In general, findings from the literature suggest that the newer generation AEDs (including vigabatrin, felbamate, gabapentin, lamotrigine, tiagabine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, zonisamide, pregabalin, rufinamide, and lacosamide) enjoy both improved tolerability and safety compared with older agents such as phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate. This is partially supported by some of the findings of the QSS and the TTA Committee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), whose review of four AEDs (gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, and tiagabine) is discussed. Briefly, when compared with carbamazepine, lamotrigine was better tolerated; topiramate adverse events (AEs) were fairly comparable to carbamazepine and valproate; and tiagabine compared with placebo was associated with a higher discontinuation rate due to AEs. The findings of the SANAD trial are also presented; when administered to patients with partial epilepsy, carbamazepine was most likely to fail due to AEs, and lamotrigine and gabapentin were least likely to fail due to AEs. When administered to patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, topiramate was most frequently associated with AE-related discontinuation, followed by valproate; and while valproate was the most efficacious drug in this arm of the study, lamotrigine was more tolerable. What makes the SANAD study valuable and somewhat unique is its head-to-head comparison of one drug with another. Such

  19. Accelerated Approval of Cancer Drugs: Improved Access to Therapeutic Breakthroughs or Early Release of Unsafe and Ineffective Drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Richey, Elizabeth A.; Lyons, E. Alison; Nebeker, Jonathan R.; Shankaran, Veena; McKoy, June M.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Nonzee, Narissa; Trifilio, Steven; Sartor, Oliver; Benson, Al B.; Carson, Kenneth R.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Gilchrist-Scott, Douglas; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Tallman, Martin S.; West, Dennis P.; Hirschfeld, Steven; Grillo-Lopez, Antonio J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated approval (AA) was initiated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to shorten development times of drugs for serious medical illnesses. Sponsors must confirm efficacy in postapproval trials. Confronted with several drugs that received AA on the basis of phase II trials and for which confirmatory trials were incomplete, FDA officials have encouraged sponsors to design AA applications on the basis of interim analyses of phase III trials. Methods We reviewed data on orphan drug status, development time, safety, and status of confirmatory trials of AAs and regular FDA approvals of new molecular entities (NMEs) for oncology indications since 1995. Results Median development times for AA NMEs (n = 19 drugs) and regular-approval oncology NMEs (n = 32 drugs) were 7.3 and 7.2 years, respectively. Phase III trials supported efficacy for 75% of regular-approval versus 26% of AA NMEs and for 73% of non–orphan versus 45% of orphan drug approvals. AA accounted for 78% of approvals for oncology NMEs between 2001 and 2003 but accounted for 32% in more recent years. Among AA NMEs, confirmatory trials were nine-fold less likely to be completed for orphan drug versus non–orphan drug indications. Postapproval, black box warnings were added to labels for four oncology NMEs (17%) that had received AA and for two oncology NMEs (9%) that had received regular approval. Conclusion AA oncology NMEs are safe and effective, although development times are not accelerated. A return to endorsing phase II trial designs for AA for oncology NMEs, particularly for orphan drug indications, may facilitate timely FDA approval of novel cancer drugs. PMID:19636013

  20. A Novel Combined Approach of Short-Chain Sphingolipids and Thermosensitive Liposomes for Improved Drug Delivery to Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Azadeh; Pedrosa, Lilia R C; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Dadashzadeh, Simin; Koning, Gerben A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the advantages of liposomal drug delivery, the bioavailability of the chemotherapeutic drugs to tumor cells is limited by their slow release from nanocarriers and low drug permeability across cell membranes. Drug encapsulation into stealth thermosensitive liposomes can improve drug delivery to tumors by combining efficient accumulation at tumors and the active release of the payload following remote heat triggering. Short-chain sphingolipids are known to enhance cellular uptake of amphiphilic drugs. We hypothesized that short-chain sphingolipids could be utilized to further improve intracellular drug delivery from a thermoresponsive formulation by enhancing the cell membrane passage of released drug. The following two strategies were investigated: (1) co-delivery of C8-glucosylceramide and doxorubicin within the thermosensitive liposomes and (2) pretreatment with glucosylceramide-enriched drug-free liposomes and subsequent treatment with doxorubicin loaded thermosensitive liposomes. Liposomes were prepared and extensively characterized. Drug uptake, cell cytotoxicity and live cell imaging were performed under normothermic and hyperthermic conditions in melanoma cells. In these studies, hyperthermia improved drug delivery from doxorubicin loaded thermosensitive formulations. However, the results from cell experiments indicated that there was no additional benefit in the co-delivery strategy using doxorubicin loaded glucosylceramide-enriched thermosensitive liposomes. In contrast, cellular studies showed significantly higher doxorubicin internalization in the pretreatment strategy. One-hour exposure of the cells to C8-glucosylceramide before applying hyperthermia caused improved doxorubicin uptake and cytotoxicity as well as an almost instantaneous cellular entry of the doxorubicin released from thermosensitive liposomes. This novel, two-step drug delivery approach can be potentially beneficial for the intracellular delivery of cell impermeable

  1. Improving drug loading of mucosal solvent cast films using a combination of hydrophilic polymers with amoxicillin and paracetamol as model drugs.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Mani, Justine; Kianfar, Farnoosh

    2013-01-01

    Solvent cast mucosal films with improved drug loading have been developed by combining carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), sodium alginate (SA), and carrageenan (CAR) using paracetamol and amoxicillin as model drugs and glycerol (GLY) as plasticizer. Films were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), folding resilience, swelling capacity, mucoadhesivity, and drug dissolution studies. SA, CMC, and GLY (5 : 3 : 6) films showed maximum amoxicillin loading of 26.3% whilst CAR, CMC, and GLY (1 : 2 : 3) films had a maximum paracetamol loading of 40%. XRPD analysis showed different physical forms of the drugs depending on the amount loaded. Films containing 29.4% paracetamol and 26.3% amoxicillin showed molecular dispersion of the drugs while excess paracetamol was observed on the film surface when the maximum 40% was loaded. Work of adhesion was similar for blank films with slightly higher cohesiveness for CAR and CMC based films, but the differences were significant between paracetamol and amoxicillin containing films. The stickiness and cohesiveness for drug loaded films were generally similar with no significant differences. The maximum percentage cumulative drug release was 84.65% and 70.59% for paracetamol and amoxicillin, respectively, with anomalous case two transport mechanism involving both drug diffusion and polymer erosion.

  2. Systematic Development of Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems of Atorvastatin with Improved Bioavailability Potential

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fariba; Islam, Md. Saiful; Roni, Monzurul Amin; Jalil, Reza-Ul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) with a high drug load of poorly water-soluble atorvastatin for the enhancement of dissolution and oral bioavailability. Solubility of atorvastatin in oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant was determined. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed by the aqueous titration method, and formulations were developed based on the optimum excipient combinations. A high drug load (10% w/w) was achieved with a combination of oleic acid, Tween 80, and polyethylene glycol 400, ensuring the maximum dissolution property (in the case of SES6). Effects of lipids and surfactants on physical properties of SEDDS such as in vitro emulsification efficiency in terms of self-emulsification time, emulsion droplet size, and percent transmittance were measured. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a higher amount of surfactants significantly increased dissolution of ATV while decreasing emulsion droplet size and emulsification time. About a four-fold increase in dissolution was achieved by SEDDS compared to pure ATV powder. Overall, this study suggests that dissolution and oral bioavailability of ATV could be improved by SEDDS technology. PMID:23264948

  3. A Comparative Examination of two Fmoc Removal Reagents for Process Improvement to Produce Peptide Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, K.; Davis, M.

    The importance of peptides as therapeutics has been recognized since they were found responsible for a wide variety of biological functions. The recent approval of peptide drugs such as Byetta® (Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), Fuzeon® (Hoffman-LaRoche Inc.), Integrelin™ (CDR Therapeutics, Inc.), Natrecor® (SCIOS Inc.), Symlin® (Amylin), Teriparatide, and Ziconotide, etc., which demonstrated applications for treatment of such problems as bone metabolism disorders, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, viral infections and severe chronic pain control, has further endorsed the growing interest in peptides as a potential drug. This growing trend for peptide drugs has drawn our attention for their production in a cost-effective manner. To do so, the improvement in the quality of crude peptides during synthesis, the most critical parameter in the process, is important to prevent yield losses during the more expensive purification step. To accomplish it, we decided to examine the efficacy of the commonly used nucleophilic base piperidine and non-neucleophilic base DBU (1,8-Diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene) for the complete removal of Fmoc group during the synthesis of peptides. According to our investigation, application of piperidine was found more effective than DBU in solid phase synthesis. Details of the investigation will be discussed.

  4. Pharmacokinetic strategies to improve drug penetration and entrapment within solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Aljehani, Zekra K; Gazzaz, Rana W; Fakhri, Sarah H; Jabbad, Aisha H; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-12-10

    Despite the discovery of a large number of anticancer agents, cancer still remains among the leading causes of death since the middle of the twentieth century. Solid tumors possess a high degree of genetic instability and emergence of treatment resistance. Tumor resistance has emerged for almost all approved anticancer drugs and will most probably emerge for newly discovered anticancer agents as well. The use of pharmacokinetic approaches to increase anticancer drug concentrations within the solid tumor compartment and prolong its entrapment might diminish the possibility of resistance emergence at the molecular pharmacodynamic level and might even reverse tumor resistance. Several novel treatment modalities such as metronomic therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, vascular disrupting agents and tumor priming have been introduced to improve solid tumor treatment outcomes. In the current review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic aspect of these treatment modalities in addition to other older treatment modalities, such as extracellular matrix dissolving agents, extracellular matrix synthesis inhibitors, chemoembolization and cellular efflux pump inhibition. Many of these strategies showed variable degrees of success/failure; however, reallocating these modalities based on their influence on the intratumoral pharmacokinetics might improve their understanding and treatment outcomes. PMID:26342660

  5. Efficient nuclear drug translocation and improved drug efficacy mediated by acidity-responsive boronate-linked dextran/cholesterol nanoassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Yi; Lei, Qi; Yang, Bin; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Xuli; Zeng, Xuan; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-06-01

    The present study reported a lysosome-acidity-targeting bio-responsive nanovehicle self-assembled from dextran (Dex) and phenylboronic acid modified cholesterol (Chol-PBA), aiming at the nucleus-tropic drug delivery. The prominent advantage of this assembled nanoconstruction arose from its susceptibility to acidity-labile dissociation concurrently accompanied with the fast liberation of encapsulated drugs, leading to efficient nuclear drug translocation and consequently favorable drug efficacy. By elaborately exploiting NH4Cl pretreatment to interfere with the cellular endosomal acidification progression, this study clearly evidenced at a cellular level the strong lysosomal-acidity dependency of nuclear drug uptake efficiency, which was shown to be the main factor influencing the drug efficacy. The boronate-linked nanoassembly displayed nearly no cytotoxicity and can remain structural stability under the simulated physiological conditions including 10% serum and the normal blood sugar concentration. The cellular exposure to cholesterol was found to bate the cellular uptake of nanoassembly in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a cholesterol-associated mechanism of the intracellular internalization. The in vivo antitumor assessment in xenograft mouse models revealed the significant superiority of DOX-loaded Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly over the controls including free DOX and the DOX-loaded non-sensitive Dex-Chol, as reflected by the more effective tumor-growth inhibition and the better systematic safety. In terms of the convenient preparation, sensitive response to lysosomal acidity and efficient nuclear drug translocation, Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly derived from natural materials shows promising potentials as the nanovehicle for nucleus-tropic drug delivery especially for antitumor agents. More attractively, this study offers a deeper insight into the mechanism concerning the contribution of acidity-responsive delivery to the enhanced chemotherapy performance. PMID

  6. Efficient nuclear drug translocation and improved drug efficacy mediated by acidity-responsive boronate-linked dextran/cholesterol nanoassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Yi; Lei, Qi; Yang, Bin; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Qiu, Wen-Xiu; Wang, Xuli; Zeng, Xuan; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-06-01

    The present study reported a lysosome-acidity-targeting bio-responsive nanovehicle self-assembled from dextran (Dex) and phenylboronic acid modified cholesterol (Chol-PBA), aiming at the nucleus-tropic drug delivery. The prominent advantage of this assembled nanoconstruction arose from its susceptibility to acidity-labile dissociation concurrently accompanied with the fast liberation of encapsulated drugs, leading to efficient nuclear drug translocation and consequently favorable drug efficacy. By elaborately exploiting NH4Cl pretreatment to interfere with the cellular endosomal acidification progression, this study clearly evidenced at a cellular level the strong lysosomal-acidity dependency of nuclear drug uptake efficiency, which was shown to be the main factor influencing the drug efficacy. The boronate-linked nanoassembly displayed nearly no cytotoxicity and can remain structural stability under the simulated physiological conditions including 10% serum and the normal blood sugar concentration. The cellular exposure to cholesterol was found to bate the cellular uptake of nanoassembly in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a cholesterol-associated mechanism of the intracellular internalization. The in vivo antitumor assessment in xenograft mouse models revealed the significant superiority of DOX-loaded Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly over the controls including free DOX and the DOX-loaded non-sensitive Dex-Chol, as reflected by the more effective tumor-growth inhibition and the better systematic safety. In terms of the convenient preparation, sensitive response to lysosomal acidity and efficient nuclear drug translocation, Dex/Chol-PBA nanoassembly derived from natural materials shows promising potentials as the nanovehicle for nucleus-tropic drug delivery especially for antitumor agents. More attractively, this study offers a deeper insight into the mechanism concerning the contribution of acidity-responsive delivery to the enhanced chemotherapy performance.

  7. Preparation and in vitro/in vivo characterization of tranilast-AMP clay complex for improving drug dissolution and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Shao, Yating; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to develop an effective oral formulation of tranilast (TL), a poorly soluble anti-inflammatory drug, via the formation of drug complex with 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (AMP clay) and improve the pH-dependent drug dissolution and bioavailability of TL. The drug-clay complex (TL-AMP complex) was prepared by co-precipitation method and its structural properties were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The dissolution profiles of TL-AMP complex were evaluated at different pHs. The formation of TL-AMP complex significantly improved the dissolution rate as well as the extent of drug release at acidic pHs, while the dissolution of untreated TL was negligible at pH 1.2 and 4.0. TL-AMP complex also achieved faster drug release than untreated drug (about 90 vs 30 % within 30 min) at pH 6.8. After oral administration to rats, TL-AMP complex enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) oral drug exposure and increased Cmax and AUC by six- and threefolds, respectively, compared to untreated TL. In conclusion, TL-AMP complex may be promising to improve the pH-dependent dissolution as well as bioavailability of TL.

  8. Recreational drug use in the Asia Pacific region: improvement in our understanding of the problem through the UNODC programmes.

    PubMed

    Dargan, P I; Wood, D M

    2012-09-01

    Until recently, there were limited data available on the epidemiology of recreational drug use in the Asia Pacific region. However, in the last few years, a number of United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) programmes have improved data collection networks, particularly in East and Southeast Asia. There are still significant data gaps from some countries, including India and China, and data reported from some countries in the region are based on expert estimates on recreational drug use rather than formally collected data. However, the availability of improved epidemiological data has enabled many countries in the region, both individually and through regional UNODC programmes, to start to understand the issues that need to be addressed. We will summarise in this mini-review the data available within the UNODC World Drug Report and from the other UNODC programmes in the region on the production and use of recreational drugs in the Asia Pacific region.

  9. Exploiting the Immunomodulatory Properties of Chemotherapeutic Drugs to Improve the Success of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Kelly; Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is gaining momentum in the clinic. The current challenge is to understand why a proportion of cancer patients do not respond to cancer immunotherapy, and how this can be translated into the rational design of combinatorial cancer immunotherapy strategies aimed at maximizing success of immunotherapy. Here, we discuss how tumors orchestrate an immunosuppressive microenvironment, which contributes to their escape from immune attack. Relieving the immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients is an attractive strategy to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. Since the clinical availability of drugs specifically targeting immunosuppressive cells or mediators is still limited, an alternative strategy is to use conventional chemotherapy drugs with immunomodulatory properties to improve cancer immunotherapy. We summarize the preclinical and clinical studies that illustrate how the anti-tumor T cell response can be enhanced by chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppressive networks. Treatment strategies aimed at combining chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppression and T cell-boosting checkpoint inhibitors provide an attractive and clinically feasible approach to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy, and to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Diphenylether-Modified 1,2-Diamines with Improved Drug Properties for Development against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Foss, Marie H; Pou, Sovitj; Davidson, Patrick M; Dunaj, Jennifer L; Winter, Rolf W; Pou, Sovijja; Licon, Meredith H; Doh, Julia K; Li, Yuexin; Kelly, Jane X; Dodean, Rozalia A; Koop, Dennis R; Riscoe, Michael K; Purdy, Georgiana E

    2016-07-01

    New treatments for tuberculosis infection are critical to combat the emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We report the characterization of a diphenylether-modified adamantyl 1,2-diamine that we refer to as TBL-140, which has a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC99) of 1.2 μg/mL. TBL-140 is effective against drug-resistant Mtb and nonreplicating bacteria. In addition, TBL-140 eliminates expansion of Mtb in cell culture infection assays at its MIC. To define the mechanism of action of this compound, we performed a spontaneous mutant screen and biochemical assays. We determined that TBL-140 treatment affects the proton motive force (PMF) by perturbing the transmembrane potential (ΔΨ), consistent with a target in the electron transport chain (ETC). As a result, treated bacteria have reduced intracellular ATP levels. We show that TBL-140 exhibits greater metabolic stability than SQ109, a structurally similar compound in clinical trials for treatment of MDR-TB infections. Combined, these results suggest that TBL-140 should be investigated further to assess its potential as an improved therapeutic lead against Mtb. PMID:27626102

  11. Recent advances in drug delivery strategies for improved therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Ravindra Dhar; Saneja, Ankit; Gupta, Prasoon K; Gupta, Prem N

    2016-10-10

    Gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine; dFdC) is an efficacious anticancer agent acting against a wide range of solid tumors, including pancreatic, non-small cell lung, bladder, breast, ovarian, thyroid and multiple myelomas. However, short plasma half-life due to metabolism by cytidine deaminase necessitates administration of high dose, which limits its medical applicability. Further, due to its hydrophilic nature, it cannot traverse cell membranes by passive diffusion and, therefore, enters via nucleoside transporters that may lead to drug resistance. To circumvent these limitations, macromolecular prodrugs and nanocarrier-based formulations of Gemcitabine are gaining wide recognition. The nanoformulations based approaches by virtue of their controlled release and targeted delivery have proved to improve bioavailability, increase therapeutic efficacy and reduce adverse effects of the drug. Furthermore, the combination of Gemcitabine with other anticancer agents as well as siRNAs using nanocarriers has also been investigated in order to enhance its therapeutic potential. This review deals with challenges and recent advances in the delivery of Gemcitabine with particular emphasis on macromolecular prodrugs and nanomedicines.

  12. Improvement of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines pharmacokinetic properties: nanosystem approaches for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vignaroli, Giulia; Calandro, Pierpaolo; Zamperini, Claudio; Coniglio, Federica; Iovenitti, Giulia; Tavanti, Matteo; Colecchia, David; Dreassi, Elena; Valoti, Massimo; Schenone, Silvia; Chiariello, Mario; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines are a class of compounds with a good activity against several cancer cell lines. Despite the promising anticancer activity, these molecules showed a poor aqueous solubility. This issue could threat the future development of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines as clinical drug candidates. With the aim of improving their solubility profile and consequently their pharmacokinetic properties, we have chosen four compounds (1–4) on the base of their anti-neuroblastoma activity and we have developed albumin nanoparticles and liposomes for the selected candidates. Albumin nanoparticles and liposomes were prepared and characterized regarding size and ζ-potential distribution, polidispersity index, entrapment efficiency and activity against SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. The most promising nanosystem, namely LP-2, was chosen to perform further studies: confocal microscopy, stability and drug release in physiological conditions, and biodistribution. Altogether, the obtained data strongly indicate that the encapsulation of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines in liposomes represent an effective method to overcome the poor water solubility. PMID:26898318

  13. Melt dispersion granules: formulation and evaluation to improve oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs - a case study with valsartan.

    PubMed

    Chella, Naveen; Tadikonda, Ramarao

    2015-06-01

    Solid dispersion (SD) technique is a promising strategy to improve the solubility and dissolution of BCS class II drugs. However, only few products are marketed till today based on SD technology due to poor flow properties and stability. The present work was intended to solve these problems by using combination approach, melt dispersion and surface adsorption technologies. The main aim of the present work is to improve the absorption in the stomach (at lower pH) where the absorption window exists for the drug by improving the dissolution, resulting in the enhancement of oral bioavailability of poorly soluble, weakly acidic drug with pH dependant solubility, i.e. valsartan. Melt dispersion granules were prepared in different ratios using different carriers (Gelucire 50/13, PEG 8000 and Pluronic F-68) and lactose as an adsorbent. Similarly, physical mixtures were also prepared at corresponding ratios. The prepared dispersion granules and physical mixtures were characterized by FTIR, DSC and in vitro dissolution studies. DSC studies revealed reduction in the crystallinity with a possibility of presence of amorphous character of drug in the dispersion granules. From dissolution studies, valsartan Gelucire dispersion (GSD4; 1:4 ratio) showed complete drug release in 30 min against the plain drug which showed only 11.31% of drug release in 30 min. Pharmacokinetic studies of optimized formulation in male Wistar rats showed 2.65-fold higher bioavailability and 1.47-fold higher Cmax compared to pure drug. The melt dispersion technology has the potential to improve dissolution and the bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. PMID:24796274

  14. Validity of Psoriatic Arthritis and Capture of Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in The Health Improvement Network

    PubMed Central

    Ogdie, Alexis; Alehashemi, Sara; Jon Love, Thorvardur; Jiang, Yihui; Haynes, Kevin; Hennessy, Sean; Choi, Hyon; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the validity of diagnostic codes for psoriatic arthritis in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) and to examine the agreement between General Practitioner (GP) report and prescription records for Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs). Methods Questionnaires were sent to the GPs of 100 randomly selected patients with at least one medical record code for psoriatic arthritis. The positive predictive value (PPV) for a GP confirmed diagnosis was calculated and alternative algorithms were examined to determine which method resulted in the highest PPV. Results The PPV for a single code for psoriatic arthritis was 85% (95%CI: 75.8–91.7%). Adding a prescription for a DMARD increased the PPV to 91% but with a substantial loss in sensitivity. Agreement between GPs and prescription data for use of an oral DMARD was 69%. Conclusions The diagnosis codes for psoriatic arthritis used in THIN are valid. All prescriptions for DMARDs may not be accounted for in THIN. PMID:25044030

  15. Hetero-modification of TRAIL trimer for improved drug delivery and in vivo antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li-Qiang; Zhao, Wen-Bin; Lai, Jun; Ding, Ding; Wei, Xiao-Yue; Li, Yang-Yang; Liu, Wen-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yue; Xu, Ying-Chun; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Poor pharmacokinetics and resistance within some tumor cell lines have been the major obstacles during the preclinical or clinical application of TRAIL (tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand). The half-life of TRAIL114-281 (114 to 281 amino acids) was revealed to be no more than 30 minutes across species. Therefore maleimido activated PEG (polyethylene glycol) and MMAE (Monomethyl Auristatin E) were applied to site-specifically conjugate with the mutated cysteines from different monomers of TRAIL successively, taking advantage of steric effects involved within TRAIL mutant conjugations. As a result, TRAIL trimer was hetero-modified for different purposes. And the resulting PEG-TRAIL-vcMMAE conjugate exhibited dramatically improved half-life (11.54 h), favourable in vivo targeting capability and antitumor activities while no sign of toxicity in xenograft models, suggesting it’s a viable therapeutic and drug delivery strategy. PMID:26445897

  16. Bioerodable PLGA-Based Microparticles for Producing Sustained-Release Drug Formulations and Strategies for Improving Drug Loading.

    PubMed

    Han, Felicity Y; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Whittaker, Andrew K; Smith, Maree T

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is the most widely used biomaterial for microencapsulation and prolonged delivery of therapeutic drugs, proteins and antigens. PLGA has excellent biodegradability and biocompatibility and is generally recognized as safe by international regulatory agencies including the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. The physicochemical properties of PLGA may be varied systematically by changing the ratio of lactic acid to glycolic acid. This in turn alters the release rate of microencapsulated therapeutic molecules from PLGA microparticle formulations. The obstacles hindering more widespread use of PLGA for producing sustained-release formulations for clinical use include low drug loading, particularly of hydrophilic small molecules, high initial burst release and/or poor formulation stability. In this review, we address strategies aimed at overcoming these challenges. These include use of low-temperature double-emulsion methods to increase drug-loading by producing PLGA particles with a small volume for the inner water phase and a suitable pH of the external phase. Newer strategies for producing PLGA particles with high drug loading and the desired sustained-release profiles include fabrication of multi-layered microparticles, nanoparticles-in-microparticles, use of hydrogel templates, as well as coaxial electrospray, microfluidics, and supercritical carbon dioxide methods. Another recent strategy with promise for producing particles with well-controlled and reproducible sustained-release profiles involves complexation of PLGA with additives such as polyethylene glycol, poly(ortho esters), chitosan, alginate, caffeic acid, hyaluronic acid, and silicon dioxide. PMID:27445821

  17. Bioerodable PLGA-Based Microparticles for Producing Sustained-Release Drug Formulations and Strategies for Improving Drug Loading

    PubMed Central

    Han, Felicity Y.; Thurecht, Kristofer J.; Whittaker, Andrew K.; Smith, Maree T.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is the most widely used biomaterial for microencapsulation and prolonged delivery of therapeutic drugs, proteins and antigens. PLGA has excellent biodegradability and biocompatibility and is generally recognized as safe by international regulatory agencies including the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. The physicochemical properties of PLGA may be varied systematically by changing the ratio of lactic acid to glycolic acid. This in turn alters the release rate of microencapsulated therapeutic molecules from PLGA microparticle formulations. The obstacles hindering more widespread use of PLGA for producing sustained-release formulations for clinical use include low drug loading, particularly of hydrophilic small molecules, high initial burst release and/or poor formulation stability. In this review, we address strategies aimed at overcoming these challenges. These include use of low-temperature double-emulsion methods to increase drug-loading by producing PLGA particles with a small volume for the inner water phase and a suitable pH of the external phase. Newer strategies for producing PLGA particles with high drug loading and the desired sustained-release profiles include fabrication of multi-layered microparticles, nanoparticles-in-microparticles, use of hydrogel templates, as well as coaxial electrospray, microfluidics, and supercritical carbon dioxide methods. Another recent strategy with promise for producing particles with well-controlled and reproducible sustained-release profiles involves complexation of PLGA with additives such as polyethylene glycol, poly(ortho esters), chitosan, alginate, caffeic acid, hyaluronic acid, and silicon dioxide. PMID:27445821

  18. Improving toxicity screening and drug development by using genetically defined strains.

    PubMed

    Festing, Michael F W

    2010-01-01

    According to the US Food and Drugs Administration (Food and Drug Administration (2004) Challenge and opportunity on the critical path to new medical products.) "The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing". This increases the cost of new drugs as clinical trials are even more expensive than pre-clinical testing.One relatively easy way of improving toxicity testing is to improve the design of animal experiments. A fundamental principle when designing an experiment is to control all variables except the one of interest: the treatment. Toxicologist and pharmacologists have widely ignored this principle by using genetically heterogeneous "outbred" rats and mice, increasing the chance of false-negative results. By using isogenic (inbred or F1 hybrid, see Note 1) rats and mice instead of outbred stocks the signal/noise ratio and the power of the experiments can be increased at little extra cost whilst using no more animals. Moreover, the power of the experiment can be further increased by using more than one strain, as this reduces the chance of selecting one which is resistant to the test chemical. This can also be done without increasing the total number of animals by using a factorial experimental design, e.g. if the ten outbred animals per treatment group in a 28-day toxicity test were replaced by two animals of each of five strains (still ten animals per treatment group) selected to be as genetically diverse as possible, this would increase the signal/noise ratio and power of the experiment. This would allow safety to be assessed using the most sensitive strain.Toxicologists should also consider making more use of the mouse instead of the rat. They are less costly to maintain, use less test substance, there are many inbred and genetically modified strains, and it is easier to identify gene loci controlling variation in response to xenobiotics in this species.We demonstrate

  19. Improving toxicity screening and drug development by using genetically defined strains.

    PubMed

    Festing, Michael F W

    2010-01-01

    According to the US Food and Drugs Administration (Food and Drug Administration (2004) Challenge and opportunity on the critical path to new medical products.) "The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing". This increases the cost of new drugs as clinical trials are even more expensive than pre-clinical testing.One relatively easy way of improving toxicity testing is to improve the design of animal experiments. A fundamental principle when designing an experiment is to control all variables except the one of interest: the treatment. Toxicologist and pharmacologists have widely ignored this principle by using genetically heterogeneous "outbred" rats and mice, increasing the chance of false-negative results. By using isogenic (inbred or F1 hybrid, see Note 1) rats and mice instead of outbred stocks the signal/noise ratio and the power of the experiments can be increased at little extra cost whilst using no more animals. Moreover, the power of the experiment can be further increased by using more than one strain, as this reduces the chance of selecting one which is resistant to the test chemical. This can also be done without increasing the total number of animals by using a factorial experimental design, e.g. if the ten outbred animals per treatment group in a 28-day toxicity test were replaced by two animals of each of five strains (still ten animals per treatment group) selected to be as genetically diverse as possible, this would increase the signal/noise ratio and power of the experiment. This would allow safety to be assessed using the most sensitive strain.Toxicologists should also consider making more use of the mouse instead of the rat. They are less costly to maintain, use less test substance, there are many inbred and genetically modified strains, and it is easier to identify gene loci controlling variation in response to xenobiotics in this species.We demonstrate

  20. The upright posture improves plantar stepping and alters responses to serotonergic drugs in spinal rats

    PubMed Central

    Sławińska, Urszula; Majczyński, Henryk; Dai, Yue; Jordan, Larry M

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury have employed robotic means of positioning rats above a treadmill such that the animals are held in an upright posture and engage in bipedal locomotor activity. However, the impact of the upright posture alone, which alters hindlimb loading, an important variable in locomotor control, has not been examined. Here we compared the locomotor capabilities of chronic spinal rats when placed in the horizontal and upright postures. Hindlimb locomotor movements induced by exteroceptive stimulation (tail pinching) were monitored with video and EMG recordings. We found that the upright posture alone significantly improved plantar stepping. Locomotor trials using anaesthesia of the paws and air stepping demonstrated that the cutaneous receptors of the paws are responsible for the improved plantar stepping observed when the animals are placed in the upright posture. We also tested the effectiveness of serotonergic drugs that facilitate locomotor activity in spinal rats in both the horizontal and upright postures. Quipazine and (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) improved locomotion in the horizontal posture but in the upright posture either interfered with or had no effect on plantar walking. Combined treatment with quipazine and 8-OH-DPAT at lower doses dramatically improved locomotor activity in both postures and mitigated the need to activate the locomotor CPG with exteroceptive stimulation. Our results suggest that afferent input from the paw facilitates the spinal CPG for locomotion. These potent effects of afferent input from the paw should be taken into account when interpreting the results obtained with rats in an upright posture and when designing interventions for restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury. PMID:22351637

  1. The upright posture improves plantar stepping and alters responses to serotonergic drugs in spinal rats.

    PubMed

    Sławińska, Urszula; Majczyński, Henryk; Dai, Yue; Jordan, Larry M

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies on the restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury have employed robotic means of positioning rats above a treadmill such that the animals are held in an upright posture and engage in bipedal locomotor activity. However, the impact of the upright posture alone, which alters hindlimb loading, an important variable in locomotor control, has not been examined. Here we compared the locomotor capabilities of chronic spinal rats when placed in the horizontal and upright postures. Hindlimb locomotor movements induced by exteroceptive stimulation (tail pinching) were monitored with video and EMG recordings. We found that the upright posture alone significantly improved plantar stepping. Locomotor trials using anaesthesia of the paws and air stepping demonstrated that the cutaneous receptors of the paws are responsible for the improved plantar stepping observed when the animals are placed in the upright posture.We also tested the effectiveness of serotonergic drugs that facilitate locomotor activity in spinal rats in both the horizontal and upright postures. Quipazine and (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) improved locomotion in the horizontal posture but in the upright posture either interfered with or had no effect on plantar walking. Combined treatment with quipazine and 8-OH-DPAT at lower doses dramatically improved locomotor activity in both postures and mitigated the need to activate the locomotor CPG with exteroceptive stimulation. Our results suggest that afferent input from the paw facilitates the spinal CPG for locomotion. These potent effects of afferent input from the paw should be taken into account when interpreting the results obtained with rats in an upright posture and when designing interventions for restoration of locomotion after spinal cord injury.

  2. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs improve autonomic neuropathy in arthritis: DIANA study.

    PubMed

    Syngle, Ashit; Verma, Inderjeet; Krishan, Pawan; Garg, Nidhi; Syngle, Vijaita

    2015-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathy (AN) is a risk predictor for sudden cardiac death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, the impact of most commonly employed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy on autonomic neuropathy in rheumatic diseases is not known. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of DMARDs on autonomic neuropathy in RA and AS. We performed autonomic function assessment in 60 patients in this open-label, 12-week pilot study including 42 patients with RA, 18 with AS, and 30 aged-matched healthy subjects. The methodology included assessment of cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests according to Ewing. Parasympathetic dysfunction was established by performing three tests: heart rate response to deep breathing, standing, and Valsalva tests. Sympathetic dysfunction was examined by applying two tests: blood pressure response to standing and handgrip tests. Sudomotor function was assessed by Sudoscan. Cardiovascular reflex tests were impaired significantly among the patients as compared to healthy subjects (p < 0.05). Autonomic neuropathy was more pronounced in biologic-naive RA and AS patients. After treatment with combination synthetic DMARDs, parasympathetic, and sudomotor dysfunction significantly (p < 0.05) improved in RA and AS. Biologic DMARDs significantly improved parasympathetic, sympathetic and peripheral sympathetic autonomic neuropathy (p < 0.05) in biologic-naive RA and AS patients. In conclusion, synthetic DMARDs improved parasympathetic and sudomotor dysfunction in both DMARD-naive RA and AS patients. However, biologic DMARDs improved parasympathetic, sympathetic and sudomotor dysfunction to a greater extent than synthetic DMARDs in both RA and AS patients. PMID:24928343

  3. Improved methodology for identifying the teratogenic potential in early drug development of hERG channel blocking drugs.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, M F; Danielsson, C; Sköld, A-C; Johansson, A; Blomgren, B; Wilson, J; Khan, K M; Bengtsson, E; Kultima, K; Webster, W S; Danielsson, B R

    2010-04-01

    Drugs blocking the potassium current IKr of the heart (via hERG channel-inhibition) have the potential to cause hypoxia-related teratogenic effects. However, this activity may be missed in conventional teratology studies because repeat dosing may cause resorptions. The aim of the present study was to investigate an alternative protocol to reveal the teratogenic potential of IKr-blocking drugs. The IKr blocker astemizole, given as a single dose (80 mg/kg) on gestation day (GD) 13 to pregnant rats caused digital defects. In whole rat embryo culture (2h) on GD 13, astemizole caused a decrease in embryonic heart rate at 20 nM, and arrhythmias at 200-400 nM. Cetirizine, without IKr-blocking properties, did not affect the rat embryonic heart in vitro. The present study shows that single dose testing on sensitive days of development, together with whole embryo culture, can be a useful methodology to better characterize the teratogenic potential of IKr-blocking drugs. PMID:20144703

  4. Improvement of content uniformity of d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate as an oily drug in granules by emulsification.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshiteru; Takeno, Masaki

    2006-06-01

    To elucidate the effects of an oily drug emulsification on its content uniformity in granules obtained by wet granulation with a high-shear mixer, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate (VE) was emulsified with hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC-L) solution (mean diameter of the VE droplets was 1.3 microm). When VE was added to the mixing powder as the emulsion, nuclei rich in VE were not formed and then the content of VE was fairly uniform throughout the granules even at 2 min granulation. We found that the oily drug poor content uniformity could be improved significantly by adding an emulsified drug to the powder in granulation process. PMID:16723312

  5. A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial to improve antiepileptic drug adherence in young children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Modi, Avani C; Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Mann, Krista A; Rausch, Joseph R

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim was to examine the preliminary efficacy of a family tailored problem-solving intervention to improve antiepileptic drug (AED) adherence in families of children with new-onset epilepsy. Secondary aims were to assess changes in targeted mechanisms and treatment feasibility and acceptability. Fifty families (M(age) = 7.6 ± 3.0; 80% Caucasian; 42% idiopathic localization related) completed baseline questionnaires and were given an electronic monitor to observe daily AED adherence. If adherence was ≤ 95% in the first 7 months of the study, families were randomized (Supporting Treatment Adherence Regimens (STAR): n = 11; Treatment as Usual (TAU): n = 12). Twenty-one families were not randomized due to adherence being ≥95%. The STAR intervention included four face-to-face and two telephone problem-solving sessions over 8 weeks. Significant group differences in adherence were found during active intervention (weeks 4-6; TAU = -12.0 vs. STAR = 18.1, p < 0.01; and weeks session 6-8: TAU = -9.7 vs. STAR = 15.3, p < 0.05). Children who received the STAR intervention exhibited improved adherence compared to children in the TAU group during active treatment. Significant changes in epilepsy knowledge and management were noted for the STAR group. Families expressed benefitting from the STAR intervention. Future studies should include a larger sample size and booster intervention sessions to maintain treatment effects over time.

  6. Improvement of physicochemical properties of an antiepileptic drug by salt engineering.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Zidan, Ahmed S; Samy, Raghu; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-09-01

    The focus of the present investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of using cyclamic salt of lamotrigine in order to improve its solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR). The salt was prepared by solution crystallization method and characterized chemically by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton ((1)H) and carbon ((13)C) nuclear magnetic resonance (liquid and solid, NMR) spectroscopy, physically by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermally by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), physicochemically for solubility, IDR, solution and solid-state stability, and polymorphism by solution recrystallization and slurry conversion studies. The FTIR, NMR, PXRD, DSC, and TGA spectra and thermograms indicated the salt formation. The salt formation increased lamotrigine solubility by 19-fold and IDR by 4.9-fold in water. The solution and solid-state stability were similar to parent molecule and were resistant to polymorphic transformation. In conclusion, cyclamic salt of lamotrigine provides another potential avenue for the pharmaceutical development of lamotrigine with improved physicochemical properties especially for pediatric population. It is also possible that appropriate dosage forms can be formulated with much lower drug amount and better safety profile than existing products. PMID:22588676

  7. Quercetin-containing self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for improving oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh Huyen; Guo, Yi; Song, Donghui; Bruno, Richard S; Lu, Xiuling

    2014-03-01

    Quercetin is a dietary flavonoid with potential chemoprotective effects, but has low bioavailability because of poor aqueous solubility and low intestinal absorption. A quercetin-containing self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (Q-SNEDDS) was developed to form oil-in-water nanoemulsions in situ for improving quercetin oral bioavailability. On the basis of the quercetin solubility, emulsifying ability, and stability after dispersion in an aqueous phase, an optimal SNEDDS consisting of castor oil, Tween® 80, Cremophor® RH 40, and PEG 400 (20:16:34:30, w/w) was identified. Upon mixing with water, Q-SNEDDS formed a nanoemulsion having a droplet size of 208.8 ± 4.5 nm and zeta potential of -26.3 ± 1.2 mV. The presence of Tween® 80 and PEG 400 increased quercetin solubility and maintained supersaturated quercetin concentrations (5 mg/mL) for >1 month. The optimized Q-SNEDDS significantly improved quercetin transport across a human colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cell monolayer. Fluorescence imaging demonstrated rapid absorption of the Q-SNEDDS within 40 min of oral ingestion. Following oral administration of Q-SNEDDS in rats (15 mg/kg), the area under the concentration curve and maximum concentration of plasma quercetin after 24 h increased by approximately twofold and threefold compared with the quercetin control suspension. These data suggest that this Q-SNEDDS formulation can enhance the solubility and oral bioavailability of quercetin for appropriate clinical application.

  8. Improved Adherence to Modern Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV Infected Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Bikaramjit; Milloy, M-J; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among injection drug users (IDU) is often sub-optimal, yet little is known about changes in patterns of adherence since the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996. We sought to assess levels of optimal adherence to ART among IDU in a setting of free and universal HIV care. Methods Data was collected through a prospective cohort study of HIV-positive IDU in Vancouver, British Columbia. We calculated the proportion of individuals achieving at least 95% adherence in the year following initiation of ART from 1996 to 2009. Results Among 682 individuals who initiated ART, the median age was 37 (31–44) years with 248 (36.4%) female participants. The proportion achieving at least 95% adherence increased over time from 19.3% in 1996 to 65.9% in 2009 (Cochrane-Armitage test for trend: p < 0.001). In a logistic regression model examining factors associated with 95% adherence, initiation year was statistically significant (Odds Ratio = 1.08, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.03–1.13, p < 0.001 per year after 1996) after adjustment for a range of drug use variables and other potential confounders. Conclusions The proportion of IDU achieving at least 95% adherence during the first year of ART has consistently increased over a 13-year period. Although improved tolerability and convenience of modern ART regimens likely explain these positive trends, by the end of the study period a substantial proportion of IDU still had sub-optimal adherence demonstrating the need for additional adherence support strategies. PMID:22551168

  9. Production of Inhalable Submicrometer Aerosols from Conventional Mesh Nebulizers for Improved Respiratory Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Spence, Benjamin M.; Holbrook, Landon T.; Mossi, Karla M.; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Submicrometer and nanoparticle aerosols may significantly improve the delivery efficiency, dissolution characteristics, and bioavailability of inhaled pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to explore the formation of submicrometer and nanometer aerosols from mesh nebulizers suitable for respiratory drug delivery using experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Mesh nebulizers were coupled with add-on devices to promote aerosol drying and the formation of submicrometer particles, as well as to control the inhaled aerosol temperature and relative humidity. Cascade impaction experiments were used to determine the initial mass median aerodynamic diameters of 0.1% albuterol aerosols produced by the AeroNeb commercial (4.69 μm) and lab (3.90 μm) nebulizers and to validate the CFD model in terms of droplet evaporation. Through an appropriate selection of flow rates, nebulizers, and model drug concentrations, submicrometer and nanometer aerosols could be formed with the three devices considered. Based on CFD simulations, a wire heated design was shown to overheat the airstream producing unsafe conditions for inhalation if the aerosol was not uniformly distributed in the tube cross-section or if the nebulizer stopped producing droplets. In comparison, a counter-flow heated design provided sufficient thermal energy to produce submicrometer particles, but also automatically limited the maximum aerosol outlet temperature based on the physics of heat transfer. With the counter-flow design, submicrometer aerosols were produced at flow rates of 5, 15, and 30 LPM, which may be suitable for various forms of oral and nasal aerosol delivery. Thermodynamic conditions of the aerosol stream exiting the counter-flow design were found be in a range of 21-45 °C with relative humidity greater than 40% in some cases, which was considered safe for direct inhalation and advantageous for condensational growth delivery. PMID:22707794

  10. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs improve cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Syngle, Ashit; Verma, Inderjeet; Krishan, Pawan; Syngle, Vijaita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a significant risk predictor for sudden cardiac death in autoimmune rheumatic diseases. As yet, there is no therapeutic treatment of CAN in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Even now, the impact of the most commonly employed disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy on CAN in PsA is not known. Hence, we investigated the impact of DMARDs on CAN in PsA. Methods: In this prospective, cross-sectional study, 20 patients of PsA and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. CAN was diagnosed by applying the five cardiovascular reflex tests according to Ewing. Parasympathetic dysfunction was established by performing three tests: heart-rate response to deep breathing, standing, and Valsalva tests. Sympathetic dysfunction was examined by applying two tests: blood pressure response to standing, and handgrip tests. Disease severity was assessed by the 28-joint-count disease activity score (DAS-28) and the disease activity score in psoriatic arthritis (DAPSA). Results: Cardiovascular reflex tests were impaired significantly among the PsA patients compared with well-matched healthy subjects (p < 0.05). Parasympathetic dysfunction was more prominent than sympathetic dysfunction. After 12 weeks treatment, parasympathetic dysfunction (heart rate response to deep breath and standing) significantly (p < 0.05) improved in patients with PsA, while there was no significant improvement in sympathetic function. Conclusion: These study results suggests parasympathetic autonomic dysfunction is more prominent than sympathetic dysfunction in PsA. Synthetic DMARDs improved parasympathetic dysfunction in PsA. PMID:27047572

  11. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  12. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria João; Neves, José das; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drug therapy plays a cornerstone role in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Despite obvious advances over the past 3 decades, new approaches toward improved management of infected individuals are still required. Drug distribution to the central nervous system (CNS) is required in order to limit and control viral infection, but the presence of natural barrier structures, in particular the blood-brain barrier, strongly limits the perfusion of anti-HIV compounds into this anatomical site. Nanotechnology-based approaches may help providing solutions for antiretroviral drug delivery to the CNS by potentially prolonging systemic drug circulation, increasing the crossing and reducing the efflux of active compounds at the blood-brain barrier, and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular drug delivery. After an initial overview on the basic features of HIV infection of the CNS and barriers to active compound delivery to this anatomical site, this review focuses on recent strategies based on antiretroviral drug-loaded solid nanoparticles and drug nanosuspensions for the potential management of HIV infection of the CNS.

  13. Nanoparticle-based drug delivery to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria João; Neves, José das; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral drug therapy plays a cornerstone role in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Despite obvious advances over the past 3 decades, new approaches toward improved management of infected individuals are still required. Drug distribution to the central nervous system (CNS) is required in order to limit and control viral infection, but the presence of natural barrier structures, in particular the blood–brain barrier, strongly limits the perfusion of anti-HIV compounds into this anatomical site. Nanotechnology-based approaches may help providing solutions for antiretroviral drug delivery to the CNS by potentially prolonging systemic drug circulation, increasing the crossing and reducing the efflux of active compounds at the blood–brain barrier, and providing cell/tissue-targeting and intracellular drug delivery. After an initial overview on the basic features of HIV infection of the CNS and barriers to active compound delivery to this anatomical site, this review focuses on recent strategies based on antiretroviral drug-loaded solid nanoparticles and drug nanosuspensions for the potential management of HIV infection of the CNS. PMID:24741312

  14. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J

    2015-08-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy.

  15. Aminoalkylmethacrylate copolymer E improves oral bioavailability of YM466 by suppressing drug-bile interaction.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Shigeo; Kondo, Hiromu; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Sako, Kazuhiro; Ogawara, Ken-Ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out polymeric compounds that can inhibit the interaction between YM466, a novel anticoagulant, and bile to improve its oral bioavailability. In vitro ultrafiltration method using extract gall powder was useful to detect the formation of insoluble complex of YM466 with bile and also used to select a polymer that can inhibit the interaction between YM466 and bile. The in vitro studies revealed that aminoalkylmethacrylate (AAM) copolymer E, a polymethacrylate, dose-dependently inhibited the interaction between YM466 and bile and that this polymer could interact with bile salt, but not with YM466, possibly by electrostatic and/or hydrophobic interactions. The coadministration of AAM copolymer E with YM466 to rats dose-dependently increased the plasma concentration of YM466 and it was found that the oral dose of the polymer three times of YM466 (polymer to drug ratio in weight, P-D ratio, 3) significantly increased AUC0-1 h of YM466 to 2.6-fold of that of YM466 alone. Considering the condition of therapeutic use of YM466 and the maximum tolerated dose of the polymer, the formulation of P-D ratio 3 would be clinically practical and promising from the viewpoint of safety.

  16. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26350600

  17. Improving the systemic drug delivery efficacy of nanoparticles using a transferrin variant for targeting.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ricky Y T; Tsuji, Takuma; Wang, Stephanie J; Wang, Juntian; Liu, Christina T; Kamei, Daniel T

    2014-04-28

    Targeted therapy for the treatment of cancers using nanoparticles (NPs) decorated with transferrin (Tf) has been relatively successful, as several such nanocarriers are currently undergoing clinical trials. However, since native Tf has a low probability of delivering its payload due to its short residence time in the cell, or low cellular association, there is room to significantly improve the potency of current systems. We pioneered the redesign of this targeting ligand by altering the ligand-metal interaction, as suggested by our mathematical model, and here we present the first study to investigate the enhanced therapeutic efficacy of NPs conjugated to our engineered oxalate Tf. Our mathematical model was first used to predict that NPs conjugated to oxalate Tf will exhibit a higher degree of cellular association compared to native Tf-conjugated NPs. Our in vitro trafficking experiments validated the model prediction, and subsequent in vitro and in vivo efficacy studies demonstrated that this increase in cellular association further translates into an enhanced ability to deliver chemotherapeutics. Our findings signify the importance of the cellular trafficking properties of targeting ligands, as they may significantly influence therapeutic potency when such ligands are conjugated to NPs. Given the early success of a number of native Tf-conjugated NPs in clinical trials, there is potential for using Tf-variant based therapeutics in systemic drug delivery applications for cancer treatment.

  18. Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems Designed to Improve Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yuchen; Moon, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated great therapeutic potential of educating and unleashing our own immune system for cancer treatment. However, there are still major challenges in cancer immunotherapy, including poor immunogenicity of cancer vaccines, off-target side effects of immunotherapeutics, as well as suboptimal outcomes of adoptive T cell transfer-based therapies. Nanomaterials with defined physico-biochemical properties are versatile drug delivery platforms that may address these key technical challenges facing cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Nanoparticle systems have been shown to improve targeted delivery of tumor antigens and therapeutics against immune checkpoint molecules, amplify immune activation via the use of new stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials, and augment the efficacy of adoptive cell therapies. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art in nanoparticle-based strategies designed to potentiate cancer immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines with subunit antigens (e.g., oncoproteins, mutated neo-antigens, DNA and mRNA antigens) and whole-cell tumor antigens, dendritic cell-based vaccines, artificial antigen-presenting cells, and immunotherapeutics based on immunogenic cell death, immune checkpoint blockade, and adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26350600

  19. Lipid nanoparticles with no surfactant improve oral absorption rate of poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Yuka; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-07-15

    A pharmacokinetic study was performed in rats to evaluate the oral absorption ratios of nanoparticle suspensions containing the poorly water-soluble compound nifedipine (NI) and two different types of lipids, including hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. NI-lipid nanoparticle (LN) suspensions with a mean particle size of 48.0 nm and a zeta potential of -57.2 mV were prepared by co-grinding combined with a high-pressure homogenization process. The oral administration of NI-LN suspensions to rats led to a significant increase in the NI plasma concentration, and the area under the curve (AUC) value was found to be 108 min μg mL⁻¹, indicating a 4-fold increase relative to the NI suspensions. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the NI-LN suspensions with those of the NI solution prepared using only the surfactant polysorbate 80 revealed that although the AUC and bioavailability (59%) values were almost identical, a rapid absorption rate was still observed in the NI-LN suspensions. These results therefore indicated that lipid nanoparticles prepared using only two types of phospholipid with a mean particle size of less than 50 nm could improve the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug.

  20. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  1. A modified emulsion gelation technique to improve buoyancy of hydrogel tablets for floating drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2015-10-01

    The use of buoyant or floating hydrogel tablets is of particular interest in the sustained release of drugs to the stomach. They have an ability to slow the release rates of drugs by prolonging their absorption window in the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study we synthesized bioactive hydrogels that have sustainable release rates for drugs in the stomach based on a hydrogel preparation technique that employs emulsifying surfactants. The emulsion gelation technique, which encapsulates oil droplets within the hydrogels during crosslinking, was used to decrease their specific gravity in aqueous environments, resulting in floating drug release depots. Properties such as swelling, buoyancy, density and drug release were manipulated by changing the polymer concentrations, surfactant percentages and the oil:polymer ratios. The relationship between these properties and the hydrogel's floating lag time was documented. The potential for this material to be used as a floating drug delivery system was demonstrated.

  2. Improving psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia: design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuropsychiatric symptoms are highly prevalent in nursing home patients with dementia. Despite modest effectiveness and considerable side effects, psychotropic drugs are frequently prescribed for these neuropsychiatric symptoms. This raises questions whether psychotropic drugs are appropriately prescribed. The aim of the PROPER (PRescription Optimization of Psychotropic drugs in Elderly nuRsing home patients with dementia) II study is to investigate the efficacy of an intervention for improving the appropriateness of psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia. Methods/design The PROPER II study is a multi-center cluster randomized controlled, pragmatic trial using parallel groups. It has a duration of eighteen months and four six-monthly assessments. Six nursing homes will participate in the intervention and six will continue care as usual. The nursing homes will be located throughout the Netherlands, each participating with two dementia special care units with an average of fifteen patients per unit, resulting in 360 patients. The intervention consists of a structured and repeated multidisciplinary medication review supported by education and continuous evaluation. It is conducted by pharmacists, physicians, and nurses and consists of three components: 1) preparation and education, 2) conduct, and 3) evaluation/guidance. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with appropriate psychotropic drug use. Secondary outcomes are the overall frequency of psychotropic drug use, neuropsychiatric symptoms, quality of life, activities of daily living, psychotropic drug side effects and adverse events (including cognition, comorbidity, and mortality). Besides, a process analysis on the intervention will be carried out. Discussion This study is expected to improve the appropriateness of psychotropic drug prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients with dementia by introducing a structured and repeated

  3. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics. PMID:26792983

  4. Design and evaluation of novel interferon lambda analogs with enhanced antiviral activity and improved drug attributes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Debin; Zhao, Mingzhi; Dong, Liwei; Zhao, Lu; Zou, Mingwei; Sun, Hetong; Zhang, Mengying; Liu, Hongyu; Zou, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Type III interferons (IFNs) (also called IFN-λ: IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2, IFN-λ3, and IFN-λ4) are critical players in the defense against viral infection of mucosal epithelial cells, where the activity of type I IFNs is weak, and unlike type I IFNs that are associated with severe and diverse side effects, type III IFNs cause minimal side effects due to the highly restricted expression of their receptors, and thus appear to be promising agents for the treatment and prevention of respiratory and gastrointestinal viral infection. However, the antiviral potency of natural type III IFNs is weak compared to type I and, although IFN-λ3 possesses the highest bioactivity among the type III IFNs, IFN-λ1, instead of IFN-λ3, is being developed as a therapeutic drug due to the difficulty to express IFN-λ3 in the prokaryotic expression system. Here, to develop optimal IFN-λ molecules with improved drug attributes, we designed a series of IFN-λ analogs by replacing critical amino acids of IFN-λ1 with the IFN-λ3 counterparts, and vice versa. Four of the designed analogs were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with high yield and were easily purified from inclusion bodies. Interestingly, all four analogs showed potent activity in inducing the expression of the antiviral genes MxA and OAS and two of them, analog-6 and -7, displayed an unexpected high potency that is higher than that of type I IFN (IFN-α2a) in activating the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-luciferase reporter. Importantly, both analog-6 and -7 effectively inhibited replication of hepatitis C virus in Huh-7.5.1 cells, with an IC50 that is comparable to that of IFN-α2a; and consistent with the roles of IFN-λ in mucosal epithelia, both analogs potently inhibited replication of H3N2 influenza A virus in A549 cells. Together, these studies identified two IFN-λ analogs as candidates to be developed as novel antiviral biologics.

  5. A carrier-mediated prodrug approach to improve the oral absorption of antileukemic drug decitabine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youxi; Sun, Jin; Gao, Yikun; Jin, Ling; Xu, Youjun; Lian, He; Sun, Yongbing; Sun, Yinghua; Liu, Jianyu; Fan, Rui; Zhang, Tianhong; He, Zhonggui

    2013-08-01

    Decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DAC) is a novel DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome, acute and chronic myeloid leukemia. However, it exhibits a low oral bioavailability (only 9% in mice), because of low permeability across the intestine membrane and rapid metabolism to inactive metabolite. To utilize the carrier-mediated prodrug approach for improved absorption of decitabine, a series of amino acid-decitabine conjugates were synthesized to target the intestinal membrane transporter, hPepT1. The Caco-2 permeability of the prodrugs was screened, and two l-val (aliphatic, compound 4a) and l-phe (aromatic, compound 4c) prodrugs with higher permeability were selected for further studies. The uptake of Gly-Sar by Caco-2 cells could be competitively inhibited by compounds 4a and 4c, with IC50 being 2.20 ± 0.28 mM and 3.46 ± 0.16 mM, respectively. The uptake of compounds 4a and 4c was markedly increased in the leptin-treated Caco-2 cells compared with the control Caco-2 cells, suggesting that hPepT1-mediated transport contributes to oral absorption of compounds 4a and 4c. The prodrugs were evaluated for their stability in various phosphate buffers, rat plasma, tissue homogenates, and gastrointestinal fluids. Compounds 4a and 4c were stable in gastrointestinal tract at pH 6.0 but could be quickly converted into DAC in plasma and tissue homogenates after absorption. The oral absolute bioavailability of DAC was 46.7%, 50.9%, and 26.9% after compounds 4a, 4c, and DAC were orally administered to rats at a dose of 15 mg/kg, respectively. The bioavailability of compounds 4a and 4c in rats was both reduced to about 32% when orally coadministrated with typical hPepT1 substrate Gly-Sar (150 mg/kg). Overall, compounds 4a and 4c can significantly enhance the intestinal membrane permeability of DAC, followed by rapid and mostly bioactivation to parent drug in intestinal and hepatic tissues before entry into systemic circulation

  6. Strategic approaches for improving entrapment of hydrophilic peptide drugs by lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Jiang, Sai-Ping; Du, Yong-Zhong; Miao, Jing; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Hu, Fu-Qiang

    2009-05-01

    In order to introduce hydrophilic peptide drugs into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), a technique of combining hydrophobic ion pairing (HIP) and non-aqueous oil-in-oil (O/O) emulsion-evaporation was developed. Leuprolide (LR) was selected as the model drug, while sodium stearate (SA-Na) was used as the negative charged ion pairing material. The formation of leuprolide-sodium stearate (LR-SA-Na) complex was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was observed that when the molar ratio of SA-Na/LR reached 2/1, ca 88.5% LR was incorporated into the hydrophobic ion complexes with SA-Na. Compared with the conventional method of solvent diffusion in an aqueous system, the efficiency of LR drug entrapment with SLN increased from 28.0% to 74.6% by the combined technique of HIP and O/O emulsion-evaporation. In vitro drug release tests revealed that employing technique of HIP obviously reduced the burst release and slowed down the rate of drug release. At meanwhile, applying the method of non-aqueous O/O emulsion-evaporation, the longer time of drug release but relatively higher drug burst release ratio was observed in comparison with those by the solvent diffusion method in an aqueous system. The drug entrapment and release behaviors of LR-SA-Na SLN prepared by the O/O emulsion-evaporation method suggested that it could potentially be exploited as an oral delivery system for leuprolide.

  7. Improving community health and safety in Canada through evidence-based policies on illegal drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Evan; McKinnon, Moira; Strang, Robert; Kendall, Perry R

    2012-01-01

    Illegal drug use remains a serious threat to community health in Canada, yet there has been a remarkable discordance between scientific evidence and policy in this area, with most resources going to drug use prevention and drug law enforcement activities that have proven ineffective. Conversely, evidence-based drug treatment programs have been chronically underfunded, despite their cost-effectiveness. Similarly, various harm reduction strategies, such as needle exchange, supervised injecting programs and opioid substitution therapy, have also proven effective at reducing drug-related harm but receive limited government support. Accordingly, Canadian society would greatly benefit from reorienting its drug policies on addiction, with consideration of addiction as a health issue, rather than primarily a criminal justice issue. In this context, and in light of the simple reality that drug prohibition has not effectively reduced the availability of most illegal drugs and has instead contributed to a vast criminal enterprise and related violence, among other harms, alternatives should be prioritized for evaluation. PMID:22567081

  8. An injectable hybrid nanoparticle-in-oil-in-water submicron emulsion for improved delivery of poorly soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wenquan; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2012-01-01

    Poor drugability problems are commonly seen in a class of chemical entities with poor solubility in water and oil, and moreover, physicochemical instability of these compounds poses extra challenges in design of dosage forms. Such problems contribute a significant high failure rate in new drug development. A hybrid nanoparicle-in-oil-in-water (N/O/W) submicron emulsion was proposed for improved delivery of poorly soluble and unstable drugs (e.g., dihydroartemisinin (DHA)). DHA is known for its potent antimalarial effect and antitumor activity. However, its insolubility and instability impose big challenges for formulations, and so far, no injectable dosage forms are clinically available yet. Therefore, an injectable DHA N/O/W system was developed. Unlike other widely-explored systems (e.g., liposomes, micelles, and emulsions), in which low drug load and only short-term storage are often found, the hybrid submicron emulsion possesses three-fold higher drug-loading capacity than the conventional O/W emulsion. Of note, it can be manufactured into a freeze-drying form and can render its storage up to 6 months even in room temperature. The in vivo studies demonstrated that the PK profiles were significantly improved, and this injectable system was effective in suppressing tumor growth. The strategy provides a useful solution to effective delivery of such a class of drugs. PMID:22502598

  9. An injectable hybrid nanoparticle-in-oil-in-water submicron emulsion for improved delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wenquan; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2012-04-01

    Poor drugability problems are commonly seen in a class of chemical entities with poor solubility in water and oil, and moreover, physicochemical instability of these compounds poses extra challenges in design of dosage forms. Such problems contribute a significant high failure rate in new drug development. A hybrid nanoparicle-in-oil-in-water (N/O/W) submicron emulsion was proposed for improved delivery of poorly soluble and unstable drugs (e.g., dihydroartemisinin (DHA)). DHA is known for its potent antimalarial effect and antitumor activity. However, its insolubility and instability impose big challenges for formulations, and so far, no injectable dosage forms are clinically available yet. Therefore, an injectable DHA N/O/W system was developed. Unlike other widely-explored systems (e.g., liposomes, micelles, and emulsions), in which low drug load and only short-term storage are often found, the hybrid submicron emulsion possesses three-fold higher drug-loading capacity than the conventional O/W emulsion. Of note, it can be manufactured into a freeze-drying form and can render its storage up to 6 months even in room temperature. The in vivo studies demonstrated that the PK profiles were significantly improved, and this injectable system was effective in suppressing tumor growth. The strategy provides a useful solution to effective delivery of such a class of drugs.

  10. Preparation and characterization of TAM-loaded HPMC/PAN composite fibers for improving drug-release profiles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaxia; Yu, Dengguang; Zhang, Xiaofei; Branford-White, Christopher; Zhu, Limin

    2011-01-01

    The present paper reports the preparation and characterization of composite hydroxypropyl methylcellulose/polyacrylonitrile (HPMC/PAN)-medicated fibers via a wet spinning technique. Tamoxifen (TAM) was selected as a model drug. Numerous analyses were conducted to characterize the mechanical, structure and morphology properties of the composite fibers. The drug content and in vitro dissolution behavior were also investigated. SEM images showed that the TAM-loaded HPMC/PAN composite fibers had a finger-like outer skin and a porous structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that there was a good compatibility between polymer and drug. Results from X-ray diffraction and DSC suggested that most of the incorporated TAM was evenly distributed in the fiber matrix in an amorphous state, except for a minority that aggregated on the surface of fibers. The drug content in the fibers was lower than that in the spinning solution and about 10% of TAM was lost during spinning process. In vitro dissolution results indicated that, compared to TAM-PAN fibers, HPMC/PAN composite systems had weaker initial burst release effects and more drug-loading. The combination of hydrophilic polymer HPMC with PAN could improve the performance of polymer matrix composite fibers in regulating the drug-release profiles.

  11. Next generation sequencing improves detection of drug resistance mutations in infants after PMTCT failure

    PubMed Central

    FISHER, Randall G.; SMITH, Davey M.; MURRELL, Ben; SLABBERT, Ruhan; KIRBY, Bronwyn M.; EDSON, Clair; COTTON, Mark F.; HAUBRICH, Richard H.; KOSAKOVSKY POND, Sergei L.; VAN ZYL, Gert U.

    2014-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows the detection of minor variant HIV drug resistance mutations (DRMs). However data from new NGS platforms after Prevention-of-Mother-to Child-Transmission (PMTCT) regimen failure are limited. Objective To compare major and minor variant HIV DRMs with Illumina MiSeq and Life Technologies Ion Personal Genome machine (PGM) in infants infected despite a PMTCT regimen. Study Design We conducted a cross-sectional study of NGS for detecting DRMs in infants infected despite a zidovudine (AZT) and Nevirapine (NVP) regimen, before initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy. Sequencing was performed on PCR products from plasma samples on PGM and MiSeq platforms. Bioinformatic analyses were undertaken using a codon-aware version of the Smith-Waterman mapping algorithm and a mixture multinomial error filtering statistical model. Results Of 15 infants, tested at a median age of 3.4 months after birth, 2 (13%) had non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) DRMs (K103N and Y181C) by bulk sequencing, whereas PGM detected 4 (26%) and MiSeq 5 (30%). NGS enabled the detection of additional minor variant DRMs in the infant with K103N. Coverage and instrument quality scores were higher with MiSeq, increasing the confidence of minor variant calls. Conclusions NGS followed by bioinformatic analyses detected multiple minor variant DRMs in HIV-1 RT among infants where PMTCT failed. The high coverage of MiSeq and high read quality improved the confidence of identified DRMs and may make this platform ideal for minor variant detection. PMID:25542470

  12. Biological evaluation of endophytic fungus, Chaetomium globosum JN711454, as potential candidate for improving drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Selim, Khaled A; El-Beih, Ahmed A; Abdel-Rahman, Tahany M; El-Diwany, Ahmed I

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this research work focused on investigating the biological and chemical aspects of endophytic fungus Chaetomium globosum, for pharmaceutical purposes to improve the drug discovery process. The endophytic C. globosum was isolated from healthy leaves of Egyptian medicinal plant Adiantum capillus-veneris collected from Saint Katherine Protectorate, Sinai, Egypt. The identification of C. globosum was on the basis of classical and molecular taxonomy. Gene encoding for 18S rRNA was partially sequenced, submitted to the GenBank and got the accession number JN711454, to resolve the phylogenetic relations with fungal ancestor using phylogenetic tree. To explore the biosynthetic power of endophytic C. globosum JN711454, the fungus was cultivated over five different media, oatmeal, rice, yeast malt glucose, potato dextrose agar (PDA) and Czapek's dox media, for 3 weeks at 30 °C, followed by extraction with different solvents, ethyl acetate (EA), and methanol. The ethyl acetate extract of C. globosum cultivated on PDA medium was the most potent extract. It showed strong antioxidant activity with EC50 11.5 μg/ml, potent anticancer activity with 55 % toxicity toward HepG-2 cells at 100 μg/ml and 66 % cytotoxicity to FGC4 cells at 250 μg/ml, promising butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activities (>85 %), and moderate antimicrobial and stopped the attachment of HSV-2 virus to VERO cells. The metabolomic profiling of PDA-EA extract using LC-MS revealed the presence of several metabolites to which the observed bioactivities could be attributed. Here we report for the first time inhibitory activity of endophytic C. globosum JN711454 secondary metabolites to butyrylcholinesterase, one of neuro hydrolase enzymes that play a major role in development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23775636

  13. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. [Multiple Drug Resistance (MDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1990-10-15

    The overall objective of this work was to promote nuclear medicine applications in oncology. This is being done by improving the scientific basis of diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up with cyclotron-produced tracers. For diagnostic use, positron-emitting isotopes such as Ga-66 and I-124 are being used. Initial studies on the characterization of He-4 particle energies required for Ga-66 production have been completed. Parameters for I-124 radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies have been determined; the labelled antibodies have been used in animal studies using positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify antibody concentration within tumors in vivo. Imaging physics studies have demonstrated that I-124 can be quantitatively imaged by PET, even in the presence of 100-told greater concentrations of I-131. Measurement of concentrations of label in vivo has been accomplished in nuclei mice bearing neuroblastoma tumors and nude rats bearing human ovarian cancer cells. These studies have major implications for both the quantification of dosimetry and quantification kinetic assessment of anti-tumor antibody localization in vivo. For treatment of tumors, F-18 has been incorporated in 2-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose and 5-fluoro uridine, and O-15 labelled water has been produced. Reagents incorporating C-11 and N-13 are under development. In a related area, C-14 labelled colchicine is being studied as a means of assaying cells for multiple drug resistance (MDR). Cells expressing MDR are shown to retain significantly less C-14 colchiene. This suggest that colchiene retention may be of useful probe in modelling and studying MDR development in human tumors. The precursor required for producing C-11 colchicine has also been synthesized. 11 refs. (MHB)

  14. Lectin bioconjugates trigger urothelial cytoinvasion--a glycotargeted approach for improved intravesical drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Neutsch, L; Eggenreich, B; Herwig, E; Marchetti-Deschmann, M; Allmaier, G; Gabor, F; Wirth, M

    2012-10-01

    A unique structural and functional configuration renders the human urothelium, one of the hardest to overcome biological barriers, and accounts for critical shortcomings in the adjuvant localized therapy of bladder cancer and other severe medical conditions. Strategies to improve intravesical drug absorption are urgently sought, but so far have hardly adopted biorecognitive delivery vectors that are more specifically tailored to the natural characteristics of the target site. The efficient cytoinvasion of uropathogenic bacteria, mediated via a mannose-directed FimH lectin adhesin, and malignancy-dependent differences in bladder cell glycosylation point to considerable unrealized potential of lectins as targeting vectors on the molecular/functional and recognitive level. Here, we outline the ability of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) to induce endocytosis of conjugated payload in human urothelial SV-HUC-1 cells after stable adhesion to internalizing receptors. A panel of model bioconjugates was prepared by covalently coupling one to six WGA units to fluorescein-labeled bovine serum albumin (fBSA). Cytoadhesive capacity was found to directly correlate to the degree of modification up to a critical threshold of on average three targeting ligands per conjugate. The highly specific, glycan-triggered interaction proved essential for endosomal sorting and was followed by rapid (<60min) and extensive (>40%) internalization. fBSA/WGA bioconjugates were processed analogously to the free lectin, irrespective of the significantly higher molecular weight (100-300kD). Durable entrapment of conjugates in acidic, perinuclear compartments without kiss-and-run recycling to the plasma membrane was found in both single cells and monolayers. Our results assign promising potential to glycotargeted delivery concepts in the intravesical setting and offer new perspectives for the application of complex biologicals in the urinary tract. PMID:22889683

  15. Improving Co-Amorphous Drug Formulations by the Addition of the Highly Water Soluble Amino Acid, Proline

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Katrine Tarp; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Grohganz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug amino acid mixtures were previously shown to be a promising approach to create physically stable amorphous systems with the improved dissolution properties of poorly water-soluble drugs. The aim of this work was to expand the co-amorphous drug amino acid mixture approach by combining the model drug, naproxen (NAP), with an amino acid to physically stabilize the co-amorphous system (tryptophan, TRP, or arginine, ARG) and a second highly soluble amino acid (proline, PRO) for an additional improvement of the dissolution rate. Co-amorphous drug-amino acid blends were prepared by ball milling and investigated for solid state characteristics, stability and the dissolution rate enhancement of NAP. All co-amorphous mixtures were stable at room temperature and 40 °C for a minimum of 84 days. PRO acted as a stabilizer for the co-amorphous system, including NAP–TRP, through enhancing the molecular interactions in the form of hydrogen bonds between all three components in the mixture. A salt formation between the acidic drug, NAP, and the basic amino acid, ARG, was found in co-amorphous NAP–ARG. In comparison to crystalline NAP, binary NAP–TRP and NAP–ARG, it could be shown that the highly soluble amino acid, PRO, improved the dissolution rate of NAP from the ternary co-amorphous systems in combination with either TRP or ARG. In conclusion, both the solubility of the amino acid and potential interactions between the molecules are critical parameters to consider in the development of co-amorphous formulations. PMID:25025400

  16. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking.

  17. Directly acting drugs prostacyclin or nitroglycerine and endothelin receptor blocker bosentan improve cell engraftment in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Bahde, Ralf; Kapoor, Sorabh; Bandi, Sriram; Bhargava, Kuldeep K.; Palestro, Christopher J.; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    To optimize strategies for liver-directed cell therapy prevention of initial transplanted cell losses is particularly important for subsequent liver repopulation. After cell transplantation in hepatic sinusoids, perturbations in hepatic microcirculation along with changes in various liver cell types are among the earliest changes. Therefore, for advancing further concepts in cell engraftment, we studied vascular and related events in the liver after transplanting syngeneic hepatocytes into dipeptidyl peptidase IV-deficient rats. We treated rats with vascular drugs to define whether deleterious cell transplantation-induced events could be controlled followed by improvements in transplanted cell engraftment and proliferation. We found cell transplantation altered liver gene expression related to vessel tone, inflammation, cell adhesion, thrombosis, or tissue damage/remodeling. This was due to hepatic ischemia, endothelial injury and activation of neutrophils, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells. Treatment of rats before cell transplantation with angiotensin converting enzyme blocker, lisinopril, or angiotensin II receptor blocker, losartan, did not improve cell engraftment. By contrast, direct-acting nitroglycerine or prostacyclin improved cell engraftment and also kinetics of liver repopulation. These drugs lowered hepatic ischemia and inflammation. Whereas pretreatment of rats with the dual endothelin-1 receptor blocker, bosentan, improved cell engraftment independently of hepatic ischemia or inflammation, without improving liver repopulation. However, incubation of hepatocytes with bosentan protected cells from cytokine toxicity in vitro and produced superior cell engraftment and proliferation in vivo. We concluded that cell transplantation-induced changes in hepatic microcirculation contributed to transplanted cell clearances from liver. Vascular drugs, such as nitroglycerine, prostacyclin and bosentan, offer opportunities for improving cell therapy results

  18. Using multiple cause-of-death data to improve surveillance of drug-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, David L.; Yokoi-Shelton, Mieko L.; Zosel, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Context Many state and local areas are affected by the national epidemic of drug-related mortality, which recently has shown signs of a rising licit-to-illicit drug death ratio. Appropriate local public health surveillance can help to monitor and control this epidemic. Objective Using our state as an example, we sought to illustrate how to describe the changes in drug death rates, causes, and circumstances. In contrast to most other surveillance reports, our approach includes both drug-induced and drug-related deaths and both demographic and socioeconomic decedent characteristics. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting All residents of the State of Wisconsin. Participants Decedents from 1999–2008. Main outcome measure Annual numbers and population-based rates of deaths due to drugs, including both identified and unidentified drugs. Information was obtained from death certificates with any of approximately 270 underlying, immediate, or contributing cause of death codes from the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision. Results Drug-related death rates increased during much of the 10-year study period, and the ratio of male to female deaths rose. The median age at death from drug-related causes was 43 years. Opioid analgesic poisoning surpassed cocaine and heroin poisoning as the most frequent type of fatal drug poisoning. Of all 4828 deaths from drug-related causes--virtually all of which were certified by a county medical examiner or coroner--3,410 (71%) were unintentional, and 1,053 (22%) were suicide. The unintentional-to-suicide death rate ratio grew from 1.6 to 3.5 during the study period. Methadone-related deaths increased from 10 in 1999 to 118 in 2008 (1080%), while benzodiazepine-related deaths rose from 23 to 106 (361%). Conclusions Although premature deaths from drug use and abuse continue to rise, in some states even surpassing motor vehicle crash deaths, multiple cause of death information from death certificates is available to monitor

  19. Improving drug discovery with high-content phenotypic screens by systematic selection of reporter cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Liu, Shanshan; Coster, Adam D.; Posner, Bruce A.; Altschuler, Steven J.; Wu, Lani F.

    2015-01-01

    High-content, image-based screens enable the identification of compounds that induce cellular responses similar to those of known drugs but through different chemical structures or targets. A central challenge in designing phenotypic screens is choosing suitable imaging biomarkers. Here we present a method for systematically identifying optimal reporter cell lines for annotating compound libraries (ORACLs), whose phenotypic profiles most accurately classify a training set of known drugs. We generate a library of fluorescently tagged reporter cell lines, and let analytical criteria determine which among them—the ORACL—best classifies compounds into multiple, diverse drug classes. We demonstrate that an ORACL can functionally annotate large compound libraries across diverse drug classes in a single-pass screen and confirm high prediction accuracy via orthogonal, secondary validation assays. Our approach will increase the efficiency, scale and accuracy of phenotypic screens by maximizing their discriminatory power. PMID:26655497

  20. Molecular Aspects of Mucoadhesive Carrier Development for Drug Delivery and Improved Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Peppas, Nicholas A; Thomas, J. Brock; McGinity, James

    2011-01-01

    Although the oral route remains the most favored route of drug administration, major scientific obstacles prevent the effective and efficient delivery of low-molecular-mass drugs, peptides and proteins that exhibit poor solubility and permeability. Mucoadhesive dosage forms and the associated drug carriers have the ability to interact at a molecular level with the mucus gel layer that lines the epithelial surfaces of the major absorptive regions of the body. This interaction provides an increased residence time of the therapeutic formulation while localizing the drug at the site of administration. Such local, non-specific targeting leads to an increase in both oral absorption and bioavailability. Fundamental understanding of the biological processes encountered along the gastrointestinal tract can provide a sufficient engineer of carriers that are capable to provide this increase in residence time. Here we discuss the theoretical framework for achieving mucoadhesive systems as related to biomaterials science and the structure of the biomaterials used. PMID:19105897

  1. Influence networks based on coexpression improve drug target discovery for the development of novel cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for novel molecularly targeted drugs will continue to rise as we move forward toward the goal of personalizing cancer treatment to the molecular signature of individual tumors. However, the identification of targets and combinations of targets that can be safely and effectively modulated is one of the greatest challenges facing the drug discovery process. A promising approach is to use biological networks to prioritize targets based on their relative positions to one another, a property that affects their ability to maintain network integrity and propagate information-flow. Here, we introduce influence networks and demonstrate how they can be used to generate influence scores as a network-based metric to rank genes as potential drug targets. Results We use this approach to prioritize genes as drug target candidates in a set of ER + breast tumor samples collected during the course of neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. We show that influential genes, those with high influence scores, tend to be essential and include a higher proportion of essential genes than those prioritized based on their position (i.e. hubs or bottlenecks) within the same network. Additionally, we show that influential genes represent novel biologically relevant drug targets for the treatment of ER + breast cancers. Moreover, we demonstrate that gene influence differs between untreated tumors and residual tumors that have adapted to drug treatment. In this way, influence scores capture the context-dependent functions of genes and present the opportunity to design combination treatment strategies that take advantage of the tumor adaptation process. Conclusions Influence networks efficiently find essential genes as promising drug targets and combinations of targets to inform the development of molecularly targeted drugs and their use. PMID:24495353

  2. Improving the assessment of heart toxicity for all new drugs through translational regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Johannesen, L; Vicente, J; Gray, R A; Galeotti, L; Loring, Z; Garnett, C E; Florian, J; Ugander, M; Stockbridge, N; Strauss, D G

    2014-05-01

    Fourteen drugs have been removed from the market worldwide because they cause torsade de pointes. Most drugs that cause torsade can be identified by assessing whether they block the human ether à gogo related gene (hERG) potassium channel and prolong the QT interval on the electrocardiogram. In response, regulatory agencies require new drugs to undergo "thorough QT" studies. However, some drugs block hERG potassium channels and prolong QT with minimal torsade risk because they also block calcium and/or sodium channels. Through analysis of clinical and preclinical data from 34 studies submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration and by computer simulations, we demonstrate that by dividing the QT interval into its components of depolarization (QRS), early repolarization (J-Tpeak), and late repolarization (Tpeak-Tend), along with atrioventricular conduction delay (PR), it may be possible to determine which hERG potassium channel blockers also have calcium and/or sodium channel blocking activity. This translational regulatory science approach may enable innovative drugs that otherwise would have been labeled unsafe to come to market.

  3. Drug monitoring in child and adolescent psychiatry for improved efficacy and safety of psychopharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehler-Wex, Claudia; Kölch, Michael; Kirchheiner, Julia; Antony, Gisela; Fegert, Jörg M; Gerlach, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Most psychotropic drugs used in the treatment of children and adolescents are applied "off label" with a direct risk of under- or overdosing and a delayed risk of long-term side effects. The selection of doses in paediatric psychiatric patients requires a consideration of pharmacokinetic parameters and the development of central nervous system, and warrants specific studies in children and adolescents. Because these are lacking for most of the psychotropic drugs applied in the Child and Adolescent and Psychiatry, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a valid tool to optimise pharmacotherapy and to enable to adjust the dosage of drugs according to the characteristics of the individual patient. Multi-centre TDM studies enable the identification of age- and development-dependent therapeutic ranges of blood concentrations and facilitate a highly qualified standardized documentation in the child and adolescent health care system. In addition, they will provide data for future research on psychopharmacological treatment in children and adolescents, as a baseline for example for clinically relevant interactions with various co-medications. Therefore, a German-Austrian-Swiss "Competence Network on Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry" was founded [1] introducing a comprehensive internet data base for the collection of demographic, safety and efficacy data as well as blood concentrations of psychotropic drugs in children and adolescents. PMID:19358696

  4. Repurposing an old drug to improve the safety and use of tissue plasminogen activator for acute ischemic stroke: Minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C; Fagan, Susan

    2014-01-01

    There is only 1 US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for acute ischemic stroke: tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Due to a short time window and fear of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), tPA remains underutilized. There is great interest in developing combination drugs to use with tPA to improve the odds of a favorable recovery and to reduce the risk of ICH. Minocycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic that has been found to be a neuroprotective agent in preclinical ischemic stroke models. Minocycline inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-9, a biomarker for ICH associated with tPA use. Minocycline is also an anti-inflammatory agent and inhibits poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase- 1. Minocycline has been safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:20575623

  5. Effectiveness of the behavior change intervention to improve harm reduction self-efficacy among people who inject drugs in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pawa, Duangta; Areesantichai, Chitlada

    2016-01-01

    Background People who inject drugs (PWID) in Thailand reported unsafe injection practices resulting in injection-related health consequences. Harm reduction self-efficacy plays an important role and could be improved to reduce harm associated with injecting drugs. Evidence-based interventions targeting PWID are needed. This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the behavior change intervention within the PWID population. Methods The behavior change intervention, Triple-S, was designed to improve harm reduction self-efficacy among PWID. This quasi-experimental study was a pre- and post-comparison with a control group design. Participants were PWID, aged 18–45 years, and located in Bangkok. Changes in harm reduction self-efficacy of the intervention group were compared with the control group using paired and independent t-test. Results Most of PWID were male (84%), had a secondary school and lower education (71%), were single, and had a mean age of 41 years. They had been injecting drugs for an average of 20 years, and the median of drug injections per week was ten times in the past month. Pre- and post-intervention effects were measured and results showed that the intervention group reported improvement in harm reduction self-efficacy in negative emotional conditions (P=0.048). Conclusion Our findings suggest that Triple-S intervention can significantly improve harm reduction self-efficacy in negative emotional conditions. The results may suggest the importance of behavior change intervention, especially when integrated with services provided by drop-in centers. The intervention can be further developed to cover other harm reduction behaviors and improve harm reduction self-efficacy. PMID:27660503

  6. Effectiveness of the behavior change intervention to improve harm reduction self-efficacy among people who inject drugs in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pawa, Duangta; Areesantichai, Chitlada

    2016-01-01

    Background People who inject drugs (PWID) in Thailand reported unsafe injection practices resulting in injection-related health consequences. Harm reduction self-efficacy plays an important role and could be improved to reduce harm associated with injecting drugs. Evidence-based interventions targeting PWID are needed. This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the behavior change intervention within the PWID population. Methods The behavior change intervention, Triple-S, was designed to improve harm reduction self-efficacy among PWID. This quasi-experimental study was a pre- and post-comparison with a control group design. Participants were PWID, aged 18–45 years, and located in Bangkok. Changes in harm reduction self-efficacy of the intervention group were compared with the control group using paired and independent t-test. Results Most of PWID were male (84%), had a secondary school and lower education (71%), were single, and had a mean age of 41 years. They had been injecting drugs for an average of 20 years, and the median of drug injections per week was ten times in the past month. Pre- and post-intervention effects were measured and results showed that the intervention group reported improvement in harm reduction self-efficacy in negative emotional conditions (P=0.048). Conclusion Our findings suggest that Triple-S intervention can significantly improve harm reduction self-efficacy in negative emotional conditions. The results may suggest the importance of behavior change intervention, especially when integrated with services provided by drop-in centers. The intervention can be further developed to cover other harm reduction behaviors and improve harm reduction self-efficacy.

  7. Improved oral absorption of dutasteride via Soluplus®-based supersaturable self-emulsifying drug delivery system (S-SEDDS).

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yeom, Dong Woo; Song, Ye Seul; Cho, Ha Ra; Choi, Yong Seok; Kang, Myung Joo; Choi, Young Wook

    2015-01-15

    A novel supersaturable self-emulsifying drug delivery system (S-SEDDS) was formulated to improve the oral absorption of dutasteride (DTS), a 5α-reductase inhibitor that is poorly water-soluble. A supersaturable system was prepared by employing Soluplus(®) (polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer) as a precipitation inhibitor with a conventional SEDDS vehicle consisted of Capryol™ 90, Cremophor(®) EL and Transcutol(®) HP (DTS:SEDDS vehicle:Soluplus(®)=1.0:67.6:10.0 w/v/w). In an in vitro dissolution test in a non-sink condition, the drug dissolution rate from SEDDS was rapidly increased to 72% for an initial period of 5min, but underwent rapid drug precipitation within 2h, decreasing the amount of drug dissolved to one-seventh of its original amount. On the other hand, S-SEDDS resulted in a slower crystallization of DTS by virtue of a precipitation inhibitor, maintaining a 3 times greater dissolution rate after 2h compared to SEDDS. In an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats, the S-SEDDS formulation exhibited 3.9-fold greater area-under-curve value than that of the drug suspension and 1.3-fold greater than that of SEDDS. The maximum plasma concentration of S-SEDDS was 5.6- and 2.0-fold higher compared to drug suspension and SEDDS, respectively. The results of this study suggest that the novel supersaturable system may be a promising tool for improving the physicochemical property and oral absorption of the 5α-reductase inhibitor. PMID:25437113

  8. Natural flavonoids silymarin and quercetin improve the brain distribution of co-administered P-gp substrate drugs.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar Reddy, D; Khurana, Amit; Bale, Swarna; Ravirala, Ramu; Samba Siva Reddy, V; Mohankumar, M; Godugu, Chandraiah

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a well known efflux transporter in the blood brain barrier inhibits the uptake of substrate drugs into brain. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of natural product based P-gp inhibitors on brain penetration of various CNS drugs which are P-gp substrates. In this study, we have evaluated the inhibitory effects of natural bioflavonoids (quercetin and silymarin) on P-gp by using digoxin and quinidine as model P-gp model substrate drugs. In vitro inhibitory effects were evaluated in Caco-2 cell lines using digoxin as a model drug and in vivo P-gp inhibiting effect was evaluated in mice model using quinidine as model drug. The accumulation and bidirectional transport of digoxin in Caco-2 cells was determined in presence and absence of quercetin and silymarin. Elacridar was used as standard P-gp inhibitor and used to compare the inhibitory effects of test compounds. The apical to basolateral transport of digoxin was increased where as basolateral to apical transport of digoxin was decreased in concentration dependent manner in the presence of elacridar, quercetin and silymarin. After intravenous administration of P-gp inhibitors, brain levels of quinidine were estimated using LC-MS method. Increased brain uptake was observed with quercetin (2.5-fold) and silymarin (3.5-fold). Though the brain penetration potential of P-gp substrates was lower than that observed in elacridar, both quercetin and silymarin improved plasma quinidine levels. Caco-2 permeability studies and brain uptake indicate that both quercetin and silymarin can inhibit P-gp mediated efflux of drug into brain. Our results suggest that both silymarin and quercetin could potentially increase the brain distribution of co-administered drugs that are P-gp substrates.

  9. Natural flavonoids silymarin and quercetin improve the brain distribution of co-administered P-gp substrate drugs.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar Reddy, D; Khurana, Amit; Bale, Swarna; Ravirala, Ramu; Samba Siva Reddy, V; Mohankumar, M; Godugu, Chandraiah

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a well known efflux transporter in the blood brain barrier inhibits the uptake of substrate drugs into brain. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of natural product based P-gp inhibitors on brain penetration of various CNS drugs which are P-gp substrates. In this study, we have evaluated the inhibitory effects of natural bioflavonoids (quercetin and silymarin) on P-gp by using digoxin and quinidine as model P-gp model substrate drugs. In vitro inhibitory effects were evaluated in Caco-2 cell lines using digoxin as a model drug and in vivo P-gp inhibiting effect was evaluated in mice model using quinidine as model drug. The accumulation and bidirectional transport of digoxin in Caco-2 cells was determined in presence and absence of quercetin and silymarin. Elacridar was used as standard P-gp inhibitor and used to compare the inhibitory effects of test compounds. The apical to basolateral transport of digoxin was increased where as basolateral to apical transport of digoxin was decreased in concentration dependent manner in the presence of elacridar, quercetin and silymarin. After intravenous administration of P-gp inhibitors, brain levels of quinidine were estimated using LC-MS method. Increased brain uptake was observed with quercetin (2.5-fold) and silymarin (3.5-fold). Though the brain penetration potential of P-gp substrates was lower than that observed in elacridar, both quercetin and silymarin improved plasma quinidine levels. Caco-2 permeability studies and brain uptake indicate that both quercetin and silymarin can inhibit P-gp mediated efflux of drug into brain. Our results suggest that both silymarin and quercetin could potentially increase the brain distribution of co-administered drugs that are P-gp substrates. PMID:27652191

  10. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking. PMID:2405657

  11. Polymer-Based Prodrugs: Improving Tumor Targeting and the Solubility of Small Molecule Drugs in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dragojevic, Sonja; Ryu, Jung Su; Raucher, Drazen

    2015-12-04

    The majority of anticancer drugs have poor aqueous solubility, produce adverse effects in healthy tissue, and thus impose major limitations on both clinical efficacy and therapeutic safety of cancer chemotherapy. To help circumvent problems associated with solubility, most cancer drugs are now formulated with co-solubilizers. However, these agents often also introduce severe side effects, thereby restricting effective treatment and patient quality of life. A promising approach to addressing problems in anticancer drug solubility and selectivity is their conjugation with polymeric carriers to form polymer-based prodrugs. These polymer-based prodrugs are macromolecular carriers, designed to increase the aqueous solubility of antitumor drugs, can enhance bioavailability. Additionally, polymer-based prodrugs approach exploits unique features of tumor physiology to passively facilitate intratumoral accumulation, and so improve chemodrug pharmacokinetics and pharmacological properties. This review introduces basic concepts of polymer-based prodrugs, provides an overview of currently emerging synthetic, natural, and genetically engineered polymers that now deliver anticancer drugs in preclinical or clinical trials, and highlights their major anticipated applications in anticancer therapies.

  12. Novel polyvinylpyrrolidones to improve delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs: from design to synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Niemczyk, Anna I; Williams, Adrian C; Rawlinson-Malone, Clare F; Hayes, Wayne; Greenland, Barnaby W; Chappell, David; Khutoryanskaya, Olga; Timmins, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone is widely used in tablet formulations with the linear form acting as a wetting agent and disintegrant, whereas the cross-linked form is a superdisintegrant. We have previously reported that simply mixing the commercial cross-linked polymer with ibuprofen disrupted drug crystallinity with consequent improvements in drug dissolution behavior. In this study, we have designed and synthesized novel cross-linking agents containing a range of oligoether moieties that have then been polymerized with vinylpyrrolidone to generate a suite of novel excipients with enhanced hydrogen-bonding capabilities. The polymers have a porous surface and swell in the most common solvents and in water, properties that suggest their value as disintegrants. The polymers were evaluated in simple physical mixtures with ibuprofen as a model poorly water-soluble drug. The results show that the novel PVPs induce the drug to become "X-ray amorphous", which increased dissolution to a greater extent than that seen with commercial cross-linked PVP. The polymers stabilize the amorphous drug with no evidence for recrystallization seen after 20 weeks of storage. PMID:22738427

  13. Dual-drug delivery by porous silicon nanoparticles for improved cellular uptake, sustained release, and combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Fang; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Hagström, Marja V; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2015-04-01

    Dual-drug delivery of antiangiogenic and chemotherapeutic drugs can enhance the therapeutic effect for cancer therapy. Conjugation of methotrexate (MTX) to porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles (MTX-PSi) with positively charged surface can improve the cellular uptake of MTX and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Herein, MTX-PSi conjugates sustained the release of MTX up to 96 h, and the released fragments including MTX were confirmed by mass spectrometry. The intracellular distribution of the MTX-PSi nanoparticles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Compared to pure MTX, the MTX-PSi achieved similar inhibition of cell proliferation in folate receptor (FR) over-expressing U87 MG cancer cells, and a higher effect in low FR-expressing EA.hy926 cells. Nuclear fragmentation analysis demonstrated programmed cell apoptosis of MTX-PSi in the high/low FR-expressing cancer cells, whereas PSi alone at the same dose had a minor effect on cell apoptosis. Finally, the porous structure of MTX-PSi enabled a successful concomitant loading of another anti-angiogenic hydrophobic drug, sorafenib, and considerably enhanced the dissolution rate of sorafenib. Overall, the MTX-PSi nanoparticles can be used as a platform for combination chemotherapy by simultaneously enhancing the dissolution rate of a hydrophobic drug and sustaining the release of a conjugated chemotherapeutic drug.

  14. The influence of aqueous content in small scale salt screening--improving hit rate for weakly basic, low solubility drugs.

    PubMed

    Tarsa, Peter B; Towler, Christopher S; Woollam, Grahame; Berghausen, Jörg

    2010-09-11

    Salt screening and selection is a well established approach for improving the properties of drug candidates, including dissolution rate and bioavailability. Typically during early development only small amounts of compound are available for solid state profiling, including salt screening. In order to probe large areas of experimental space, high-throughput screening is utilized and is often designed in a way to search for suitable crystallization parameters within hundreds or even thousands of conditions. However, the hit rate in these types of screens can be very low. In order to allow for selection of a salt form early within the drug development process whilst using smaller amounts of compounds, a screening procedure taking into account the compounds properties and the driving forces for salt formation is described. Experiments were carried out on the model compounds clotrimazole, cinnarizine itraconazole and atropine. We found an increase in crystalline hit rate for water-insoluble drugs crystallized from solutions that included at least 10% aqueous content. Conversely it was observed that compounds with greater water solubility did not benefit from aqueous content in salt screening, instead organic solvents lead to more crystalline screening hits. Results from four model compounds show that the inclusion of an aqueous component to the salt reaction can enhance the chance of salt formation and significantly improve the crystalline hit rate for low water soluble drugs.

  15. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer. PMID:27324595

  16. The effect of HPMCAS functional groups on drug crystallization from the supersaturated state and dissolution improvement.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2014-04-10

    The inhibitory effect on drug crystallization in aqueous solution was evaluated using various forms of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). HPMCAS suppressed crystallization of carbamazepine (CBZ), nifedipine (NIF), mefenamic acid, and dexamethasone. The inhibition of drug crystallization mainly derived from molecular level hydrophobic interactions between the drug and HPMCAS. HPMCAS with a lower succinoyl substituent ratio strongly suppressed drug crystallization. The inhibition of crystallization was affected by pH, with the CBZ crystallization being inhibited at a higher pH due to the hydrophilization of HPMCAS derived from succinoyl ionization. The molecular mobility of CBZ in an HPMCAS solution was evaluated by 1D-(1)H NMR and relaxation time measurements. CBZ mobility was strongly suppressed in the HPMCAS solutions where strong inhibitory effects on CBZ crystallization were observed. The mobility suppression of CBZ in the HPMCAS solution was derived from intermolecular interactions between CBZ and HPMCAS leading to an inhibition of crystallization. The effect of HPMCAS on the drug dissolution rate was evaluated using an NIF/HPMCAS solid dispersion. The dissolution rate of NIF was increased when HPMCAS with a higher succinoyl substituent ratio was used.

  17. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer. PMID:27324595

  18. Novel application of hydrophobin in medical science: a drug carrier for improving serum stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liqiang; Xu, Haijin; Li, Ying; Song, Dongmin; Wang, Xiangxiang; Qiao, Mingqiang; Gong, Min

    2016-01-01

    Multiple physiological properties of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) ensure that it is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. However, the in vivo half-life of GLP-1 is short because of rapid degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and renal clearance. The poor serum stability of GLP-1 has significantly limited its clinical utility, although many studies are focused on extending the serum stability of this molecule. Hydrophobin, a self-assembling protein, was first applied as drug carrier to stabilize GLP-1 against protease degradation by forming a cavity. The glucose tolerance test clarified that the complex retained blood glucose clearance activity for 72 hours suggesting that this complex might be utilized as a drug candidate administered every 2–3 days. Additionally, it was found that the mutagenesis of hydrophobin preferred a unique pH condition for self-assembly. These findings suggested that hydrophobin might be a powerful tool as a drug carrier or a pH sensitive drug-release compound. The novel pharmaceutical applications of hydrophobin might result in future widespread interest in hydrophobin. PMID:27212208

  19. Nanocarriers and their Actions to Improve Skin Permeability and Transdermal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nauman R; Harun, Mohd S; Nawaz, Asif; Harjoh, Nurulaini; Wong, Tin W

    2015-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is impeded by the natural barrier of epidermis namely stratum corneum. This limits the route to transport of drugs with a log octanol-water partition coefficient of 1 to 3, molecular weight of less than 500 Da and melting point of less than 200°C. Nanotechnology has received widespread investigation as nanocarriers are deemed to be able to fluidize the stratum corneum as a function of size, shape, surface charges, and hydrophilicity-hydrophobicity balance, while delivering drugs across the skin barrier. This review provides an overview and update on the latest designs of liposomes, ethosomes, transfersomes, niosomes, magnetosomes, oilin- water nanoemulsions, water-in-oil nanoemulsions, bicontinuous nanoemulsions, covalently crosslinked polysaccharide nanoparticles, ionically crosslinked polysaccharide nanoparticles, polyelectrolyte coacervated nanoparticles and hydrophobically modified polysaccharide nanoparticles with respect to their ability to fuse or fluidize lipid/protein/tight junction regimes of skin, and effect changes in skin permeability and drug flux. Universal relationships of nanocarrier size, zeta potential and chemical composition on transdermal permeation characteristics of drugs will be developed and discussed. PMID:25925113

  20. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-06-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer.

  1. Nanoparticle Drug Loading as a Design Parameter to Improve Docetaxel Pharmacokinetics and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Schorzman, Allison N.; Finniss, Mathew C.; Bowerman, Charles J.; Peng, Lei; Luft, J. Christopher; Madden, Andrew; Wang, Andrew Z.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) drug loading is one of the key defining characteristics of a NP formulation. However, the effect of NP drug loading on therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics has not been thoroughly evaluated. Herein, we characterized the efficacy, toxicity and pharmacokinetic properties of NP docetaxel formulations that have differential drug loading but are otherwise identical. Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT®), a soft-lithography fabrication technique, was used to formulate NPs with identical size, shape and surface chemistry, but with variable docetaxel loading. The lower weight loading (9%-NP) of docetaxel was found to have a superior pharmacokinetic profile and enhanced efficacy in a murine cancer model when compared to that of a higher docetaxel loading (20%-NP). The 9%-NP docetaxel increased plasma and tumor docetaxel exposure and reduced liver, spleen and lung exposure when compared to that of 20%-NP docetaxel. PMID:23899444

  2. A community effort to assess and improve drug sensitivity prediction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Costello, James C; Heiser, Laura M; Georgii, Elisabeth; Gönen, Mehmet; Menden, Michael P; Wang, Nicholas J; Bansal, Mukesh; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Hintsanen, Petteri; Khan, Suleiman A; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Honkela, Antti; Aittokallio, Tero; Wennerberg, Krister; Collins, James J; Gallahan, Dan; Singer, Dinah; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Kaski, Samuel; Gray, Joe W; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-01

    Predicting the best treatment strategy from genomic information is a core goal of precision medicine. Here we focus on predicting drug response based on a cohort of genomic, epigenomic and proteomic profiling data sets measured in human breast cancer cell lines. Through a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) project, we analyzed a total of 44 drug sensitivity prediction algorithms. The top-performing approaches modeled nonlinear relationships and incorporated biological pathway information. We found that gene expression microarrays consistently provided the best predictive power of the individual profiling data sets; however, performance was increased by including multiple, independent data sets. We discuss the innovations underlying the top-performing methodology, Bayesian multitask MKL, and we provide detailed descriptions of all methods. This study establishes benchmarks for drug sensitivity prediction and identifies approaches that can be leveraged for the development of new methods.

  3. A community effort to assess and improve drug sensitivity prediction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Costello, James C; Heiser, Laura M; Georgii, Elisabeth; Gönen, Mehmet; Menden, Michael P; Wang, Nicholas J; Bansal, Mukesh; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Hintsanen, Petteri; Khan, Suleiman A; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Honkela, Antti; Aittokallio, Tero; Wennerberg, Krister; Collins, James J; Gallahan, Dan; Singer, Dinah; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Kaski, Samuel; Gray, Joe W; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the best treatment strategy from genomic information is a core goal of precision medicine. Here we focus on predicting drug response based on a cohort of genomic, epigenomic and proteomic profiling data sets measured in human breast cancer cell lines. Through a collaborative effort between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Dialogue on Reverse Engineering Assessment and Methods (DREAM) project, we analyzed a total of 44 drug sensitivity prediction algorithms. The top-performing approaches modeled nonlinear relationships and incorporated biological pathway information. We found that gene expression microarrays consistently provided the best predictive power of the individual profiling data sets; however, performance was increased by including multiple, independent data sets. We discuss the innovations underlying the top-performing methodology, Bayesian multitask MKL, and we provide detailed descriptions of all methods. This study establishes benchmarks for drug sensitivity prediction and identifies approaches that can be leveraged for the development of new methods. PMID:24880487

  4. Drug-eluting coronary stents – focus on improved patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jaffery, Zehra; Prasad, Amit; Lee, John H; White, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    The development of stent has been a major advance in the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of balloon angioplasty. Subsequently, neointimal hyperplasia within the stent leading to in-stent restenosis emerged as a major obstacle in long-term success of percutaneous coronary intervention. Recent introduction of drug-eluting stents is a major breakthrough to tackle this problem. This review article summarizes stent technology, reviews progress of drug-eluting stents and discusses quality of life, patient satisfaction, and acceptability of percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:22915977

  5. Hydroxypropyl-sulfobutyl-β-cyclodextrin improves the oral bioavailability of edaravone by modulating drug efflux pump of enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Wen-Ting; Lu, Ya-Peng; Tao, Qing; Guo, Miao; Lu, Yu; Ren, Yong; Yu, Shu-Qin

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of hydroxypropyl-sulfobutyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-SBE-βCD) on the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of edaravone, and identify its mechanism of action. We devised HP-SBE-βCD as a carrier and modulator of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux pump, and edaravone as a model drug, and prepared edaravone/HP-SBE-βCD inclusion complex. HP-SBE-βCD improved the water solubility and enhanced the bioavailability of edaravone by 10.3-fold in rats. Then, in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion showed that HP-SBE-βCD had an effect of improving the permeability and inhibiting the efflux of edaravone. Furthermore, the effects of HP-SBE-βCD on Pgp were achieved through interfering with the lipid raft and depleting the cholesterol of enterocytes membrane. From the results, we presented the novel mechanisms. First, edaravone/HP-SBE-βCD had a lower release from the inclusion compound to protect edaravone from the low pH of the stomach. Then, HP-SBE-βCD modulated the membrane microenvironment of intestinal absorption epithelial cells. At last, the result was that HP-SBE-βCD enhanced the absorption of edaravone by interfering with Pgp. In conclusion, HP-SBE-βCD improves the bioavailability of drug not only because of its enhancing water solubility of the drug, but also because it modulates the Pgp-mediated efflux from enterocytes.

  6. QbD-Oriented Development of Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems (SNEDDS) of Valsartan with Improved Biopharmaceutical Performance.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Shantanu; Beg, Sarwar; Katare, O P; Sharma, Gajanand; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present studies were to develop the systematically optimized selfnanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of valsartan employing the holistic QbD approach. The quality profile target product (QTPP) was defined and critical quality attributes (CQAs) earmarked. Preformulation studies including the equilibrium solubility and pseudoternary phase titration studies facilitated the selection of suitable lipids and emulgents for formulation of SNEDDS. Risk assessment and factor screening studies facilitated the selection of Lauroglycol FCC and Capmul MCM L8 (i.e., lipid), Tween 40 and Tween 80 (i.e., emulgent) as the critical material attributes (CMAs) for SNEDDS prepared using medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) and long-chain triglycerides (LCTs). A central composite design (CCD) was employed for systematic optimization of SNEDDS, taking globule size (Dnm), drug release in 10 min (Q10min) and amount permeated in 45 min (%Perm45min) as the CQAs. Design space was generated using apt mathematical models to embark upon the optimized formulations and validation of the QbD. In situ SPIP studies revealed significant improvement in the absorptivity and permeability parameters of SNEDDS owing to the inhibition of P-gp/MRP2 efflux vis-à-vis the conventional marketed formulation and pure drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies corroborated marked enhancement in the oral bioavailability drug from SNEDDS vis-à-vis the marketed formulation. Establishment of various levels of in vitro/in vivo correlations (IVIVC) indicated excellent goodness of fit between the in vitro drug release data with the in vivo absorption parameters. In a nutshell, the present studies report successful QbD-based development of MCT and LCT-SNEDDS of valsartan with improved biopharmaceutical performance.

  7. 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate as an organoclay based drug carrier for improving the bioavailability of flurbiprofen

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Choi, Soo-Kyung; Shin, Hyun-Jae; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an oral delivery system using clay-based organic–inorganic hybrid materials to improve the bioavailability of the drug, flurbiprofen, which is poorly soluble in water. 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (AMP clay) was synthesized by a one-pot direct sol-gel method, and then flurbiprofen (FB) was incorporated into AMP clay (FB-AMP) at different drug/clay ratios. The structural characteristics of AMP and FB-AMP formulation were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Among tested formulations, FB-AMP(3), dramatically increased the dissolution of FB and achieved rapid and complete drug release within 2 hours. More than 60% of FB was released from FB-AMP(3) after 30 minutes; the drug was completely dissolved in the water within 2 hours. Under the acidic condition (pH 1.2), FB-AMP(3) also increased the dissolution of FB by up to 47.1% within 1 hour, which was three-fold higher than that of untreated FB. Furthermore, following an oral administration of FB-AMP(3) to Sprague-Dawley rats, the peak plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve of FB increased two-fold, and the time to reach the peak plasma concentration was shortened compared with that in the untreated FB. This result suggests that the oral drug delivery system using clay-based organic–inorganic hybrid material might be useful to improve the bioavailability of FB. PMID:24204143

  8. 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate as an organoclay based drug carrier for improving the bioavailability of flurbiprofen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Choi, Soo-Kyung; Shin, Hyun-Jae; Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an oral delivery system using clay-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials to improve the bioavailability of the drug, flurbiprofen, which is poorly soluble in water. 3-aminopropyl functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (AMP clay) was synthesized by a one-pot direct sol-gel method, and then flurbiprofen (FB) was incorporated into AMP clay (FB-AMP) at different drug/clay ratios. The structural characteristics of AMP and FB-AMP formulation were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Among tested formulations, FB-AMP(3), dramatically increased the dissolution of FB and achieved rapid and complete drug release within 2 hours. More than 60% of FB was released from FB-AMP(3) after 30 minutes; the drug was completely dissolved in the water within 2 hours. Under the acidic condition (pH 1.2), FB-AMP(3) also increased the dissolution of FB by up to 47.1% within 1 hour, which was three-fold higher than that of untreated FB. Furthermore, following an oral administration of FB-AMP(3) to Sprague-Dawley rats, the peak plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve of FB increased two-fold, and the time to reach the peak plasma concentration was shortened compared with that in the untreated FB. This result suggests that the oral drug delivery system using clay-based organic-inorganic hybrid material might be useful to improve the bioavailability of FB.

  9. A Patient Education Program to Improve Adherence Rates with Antituberculosis Drug Regimens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An incentive scheme to reward positive health behaviors (adherence to antituberculosis drug regimens) was tested with 88 active and 117 preventive patients randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Preventive patients who received incentives were significantly more likely to continue care and had higher adherence levels. Actives showed…

  10. Improvement of the Prediction of Drugs Demand Using Spatial Data Mining Tools.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M Isabel; Cubillas, Juan José; Feito, Francisco R

    2016-01-01

    The continued availability of products at any store is the major issue in order to provide good customer service. If the store is a drugstore this matter reaches a greater importance, as out of stock of a drug when there is high demand causes problems and tensions in the healthcare system. There are numerous studies of the impact this issue has on patients. The lack of any drug in a pharmacy in certain seasons is very common, especially when some external factors proliferate favoring the occurrence of certain diseases. This study focuses on a particular drug consumed in the city of Jaen, southern Andalucia, Spain. Our goal is to determine in advance the Salbutamol demand. Advanced data mining techniques have been used with spatial variables. These last have a key role to generate an effective model. In this research we have used the attributes that are associated with Salbutamol demand and it has been generated a very accurate prediction model of 5.78% of mean absolute error. This is a very encouraging data considering that the consumption of this drug in Jaen varies 500% from one period to another.

  11. Biomimickry of UPEC Cytoinvasion: A Novel Concept for Improved Drug Delivery in UTI

    PubMed Central

    Pichl, Clara Maria; Dunkl, Bernhard; Brauner, Bernhard; Gabor, Franz; Wirth, Michael; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. In an increasing number of cases, pathogen (multi-)resistance hampers durable treatment success via the standard therapies. On the functional level, the activity of urinary excreted antibiotics is compromized by the efficient tissue colonization mechanism of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Advanced drug delivery systems aim at exploiting a glycan-mediated targeting mechanism, similar to the UPEC invasion pathway, to increase bioavailability. This may be realized by conjugation of intravesically applied drugs or drug carriers to chosen plant lectins. Higher local drug concentrations in or nearby bacterial reservoirs may be gained, with higher chances for complete eradication. In this study, preliminary parameters to clarify the potential of this biorecognitive approach were evaluated. Glycan-triggered interaction cascades and uptake processes of several plant lectins with distinct carbohydrate specificities were characterized, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) could be identified as the most promising targeter for crossing the urothelial membrane barrier. In partially differentiated primary cells, intracellular accumulation sites were largely identical for GlcNAc- and Mannose-specific lectins. This indicates that WGA-mediated delivery may also enter host cells via the FimH-dependent uptake pathway. PMID:26861401

  12. Integrating HCV services for drug users: a model to improve engagement and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Diana L; Zweben, Joan E

    2007-10-01

    Although the majority of prevalent and incident cases of hepatitis C are related to injection drug use, drug users often find it difficult to access treatment services because of concerns about adherence and treatment candidacy. In response to the growing epidemic, OASIS, a nonprofit community clinic, developed a successful peer-based HCV group that allowed us to engage, educate, test, and treat hepatitis C in large numbers of drug users, the majority of whom have multiple potential barriers to intervention. Integrating services for hepatitis C, addiction, mental health, and psychosocial problems, the model involves a collaboration of medical providers and peer educators and incorporates elements of other proven behavioural models, including self-help groups, therapeutic communities, and peer interventions. Our results indicate that this peer-based model is successful at engaging, educating, and treating a diverse spectrum of chaotic drug users. We conclude that an integrated, peer-based approach to intervention can engage even the most challenging addicted patients with hepatitis C, and can facilitate their successful screening and treatment.

  13. Pure enantiomers of 2-arylpropionic acids: tools in pain research and improved drugs in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Brune, K; Geisslinger, G; Menzel-Soglowek, S

    1992-10-01

    The mode of action of aspirinlike drugs in pain is widely referred to as inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Salicylic acid, however, at low doses, is an analgesic but not a potent anti-inflammatory agent. This "enigma" may be resolved by recent findings employing 2-arylpropionic acids. Pure enantiomers of these chiral drugs show a different pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile. Using pure enantiomers of flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and ketoprofen, we could show that (1) R-enantiomers of these drugs are inverted to S-enantiomers to a different degree in different species, including humans, (2) the pharmacokinetic parameters of both pure enantiomers differ in a drug- and a species-specific manner, and (3) both enantiomers exert differential analgesic effects. It appears particularly interesting that R-flurbiprofen, for instance, which is not or only to a small extent inverted in humans and rats, is practically devoid of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition in vitro. Consequently, in line with current thinking, R-flurbiprofen is not toxic to the gastrointestinal tract and shows no anti-inflammatory effects. In contrast to current concepts, however, this enantiomer does exert analgesic activity in different models of pain and nociception. It is concluded that R-flurbiprofen and, possibly, other R-enantiomers of 2-arylpropionic acids may exert novel analgesic effects independently of peripheral prostaglandin synthesis inhibition in inflamed tissue.

  14. Have VET Reforms Resulted in Improvements in Quality? Illustrations from the Alcohol and Other Drugs Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Ann; Kostadinov, Victoria; White, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Australian vocational education and training (VET) has undergone major reforms since the 1990s, including the introduction of competency based training (CBT) and the "streamlining" of qualifications. This paper examines the impact of these reforms, using the alcohol and other drugs sector as a case illustration. A survey of alcohol and…

  15. Improving drug treatment services for Hispanics: research gaps and scientific opportunities.

    PubMed

    Alegría, Margarita; Page, J Bryan; Hansen, Helena; Cauce, Ana Mari; Robles, Rafaela; Blanco, Carlos; Cortes, Dharma E; Amaro, Hortensia; Morales, Armando; Berry, Paige

    2006-09-01

    Delivery of services to Hispanic drug users remains a great challenge, as shown by low service access and retention, and disproportionate negative consequences of drug abuse in the Hispanic population. This paper provides a critical analysis of current services research on Hispanics with drug abuse problems, identifies gaps in the knowledge, and offers recommendations for scientific opportunities to address these gaps, focusing on four central needs: (1) the need to understand the circumstances of Hispanics in their own communities (i.e., community context); (2) the need to develop and test service delivery models tailored to Hispanics' circumstances and special needs; (3) the need to remove client, provider, and system barriers to utilization; and (4) the need to establish links between drug abuse services, social services, and other service sectors to optimize treatment outcomes. The authors suggest an approach that begins with a focus on the local Hispanic community and builds understanding of the cultural context, inclusion of indigenous resources, recognition of barriers to enrollment and retention, and coordination of related services.

  16. Biomimickry of UPEC Cytoinvasion: A Novel Concept for Improved Drug Delivery in UTI.

    PubMed

    Pichl, Clara Maria; Dunkl, Bernhard; Brauner, Bernhard; Gabor, Franz; Wirth, Michael; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-02-04

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. In an increasing number of cases, pathogen (multi-)resistance hampers durable treatment success via the standard therapies. On the functional level, the activity of urinary excreted antibiotics is compromized by the efficient tissue colonization mechanism of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Advanced drug delivery systems aim at exploiting a glycan-mediated targeting mechanism, similar to the UPEC invasion pathway, to increase bioavailability. This may be realized by conjugation of intravesically applied drugs or drug carriers to chosen plant lectins. Higher local drug concentrations in or nearby bacterial reservoirs may be gained, with higher chances for complete eradication. In this study, preliminary parameters to clarify the potential of this biorecognitive approach were evaluated. Glycan-triggered interaction cascades and uptake processes of several plant lectins with distinct carbohydrate specificities were characterized, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) could be identified as the most promising targeter for crossing the urothelial membrane barrier. In partially differentiated primary cells, intracellular accumulation sites were largely identical for GlcNAc- and Mannose-specific lectins. This indicates that WGA-mediated delivery may also enter host cells via the FimH-dependent uptake pathway.

  17. Crosslinked chitosan-dextran sulfate nanoparticle for improved topical ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chaiyasan, Wanachat; Srinivas, Sangly P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the benefits of chitosan-dextran sulfate nanoparticles (CDNs) as a topical ocular delivery system with lutein as a model drug. Methods CDNs were developed by polyelectrolyte complexation of positively charged chitosan (CS) and negatively charged dextran sulfate (DS). 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) and polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) were used as co-crosslinking and stabilizing agents, respectively. The influence of these on the properties of CDNs, including drug release and mucoadhesiveness, was examined. The chemical stability of lutein in CDNs (LCDNs) was also examined. Results Typically, LCDNs showed a spherical shape, possessing a mean size of ~400 nm with a narrow size distribution. The entrapment efficiency of lutein was in the range of 60%–76%. LCDNs possessing a positive surface charge (+46 mV) were found to be mucoadhesive. The release profile of LCDNs followed Higuchi’s square root model, suggesting drug release by diffusion from the polymer matrix. Lutein in LCDNs showed increased chemical stability during storage compared to its solution form. Conclusions These characteristics of CDNs make them suitable for drug delivery to the ocular surface. PMID:26604662

  18. Dissolution improvement of solid self-emulsifying drug delivery systems of fenofibrate using an inorganic high surface adsorption material.

    PubMed

    Shazly, Gamal; Mohsin, Kazi

    2015-03-01

    Solidification of lipid formulations using adsorbents is a recent technique attracting great interest due to its favourable properties including flexibility in dose division, reduction of intra-subject and inter-subject variability, improvement in efficacy/safety profile and enhancement of physical/ chemical stability. The current study aims to convert liquid self-emulsifying/nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS/SNEDDS) into solid SEDDS/SNEDDS and to assess how adsorption of the drug onto an inorganic high surface area material, NeusilinR grade US2 (NUS2), affects its in vitro dissolution performance. Lipid formulation classification systems (LFCS) Type III formulations were designed for the model anti-cholesterol drug fenofibrate. NUS2 was used to solidify the SEDDS/SNEDDS. Particle size and SEM analyses of solid SEDDS/SNEDDS powder were carried out to investigate the adsorption efficiency. In vitro dissolution studies were conducted to compare the developed formulations with the marketed product. The results of characterization studies showed that the use of 50% (m/m) adsorbent resulted in superior flowability and kept the drug stable is amorphous state. Dissolution studies allow the conclusion that the formulation containing a surfactant of higher water solubility (particularly, Type IIIB SNEDDS) has comparably faster and higher release profiles than Type IIIA (SEDDS) and marketed product. PMID:25781702

  19. The role of media and communication in improving the use of drugs and other technologies.

    PubMed

    Sitthi-amorn, C; Ngamvithayapongse, J

    1998-01-01

    Policy makers, health care providers, and the general public need valid information about the benefits and harmful effects of drugs and technologies to be able to make rational choices in their acquisition, distribution, and use. Effective communication is important for quality choices of drugs and other technologies. In effective communication, the choice of messages and media must correspond to the culture and beliefs of the target groups to make them comprehend and adopt the conclusions. Messages must be presented on a regular basis. Most regulatory agencies do not have enough resources to mount effective communication programs. Private advertising agencies and other stakeholders have definite roles. Valid knowledge must be the basis of dialogues to reduce emotional disputes among various benefit groups in society.

  20. Natural products to improve quality of life targeting for colon drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjo

    2012-03-01

    The colon is largely being investigated as a site for administration of protein and peptides, which are degraded by digestive enzymes in the upper GIT. Also for local diseases of the colon such as inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and ameobiasis, drug administration to the site of action can not only reduce the dose to be administered, but also decrease the side effects. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) such as Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Intestinal bacteria initiate the activation of intestinal inflammatory processes, which are mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. Increased chemokine expression has also been observed in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Future trials of specific agents capable of inhibiting chemokine synthesis and secretion or blocking chemokine-chemokine receptor interaction will be important to study in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Many important bioactive compounds have been discovered from natural sources using bioactivity directed fractionation and isolation (BDFl) Continuing discovery has also been facilitated by the recent development of new bioassay methods. These bioactive compounds are mostly plant secondary metabolites, and many naturally occurring pure compounds have become medicines, dietary supplements, and other useful commercial products. The present review includes various approaches investigated for colon drug delivery and their site specificity. To achieve successful colonic delivery, a drug needs to be protected from absorption and the environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract and then be abruptly released into the proximal colon, which is considered the optimum site for colon targeted delivery of drugs.

  1. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid: design and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Xin; Dou, Jinfeng; Zhai, Guangxi; Su, Lequn

    2013-01-01

    Oleanolic acid is a poorly water-soluble drug with low oral bioavailability. A self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) has been developed to enhance the solubility and oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid. The formulation design was optimized by solubility assay, compatibility tests, and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The morphology, droplet size distribution, zeta potential, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and refractive index of a SMEDDS loaded with oleanolic acid were studied in detail. Compared with oleanolic acid solution, the in vitro release of oleanolic acid from SMEDDS showed that the drug could be released in a sustained manner. A highly selective and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographymass spectrometry method was developed for determination of oleanolic acid in rat plasma. This method was used for a pharmacokinetic study of an oleanolic acid-loaded SMEDDS compared with the conventional tablet in rats. Promisingly, a 5.07-fold increase in oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid was achieved for the SMEDDS compared with the marketed product in tablet form. Our studies illustrate the potential use of a SMEDDS for delivery of oleanolic acid via the oral route. PMID:23966781

  2. Multifunctional SMA-based smart inhaler system for improved aerosol drug delivery: design and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausley, Matthew E.; Seelecke, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This paper documents the development of a prototype smart aerosol drug inhaler system using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators. Unlike conventional dispersed-release inhalers, the smart inhaler system releases the aerosol drug in a very small area within the mouth inlet. Kleinstreuer and Zhang [1] have found that controlled release in the mouth inlet increases drug efficiency and allows targeting of specific sites within the lung. The methodology has been validated numerically and experimentally using fixed-exit position inhalers. The design presented in this work, however, allows for variation of nozzle exit position using SMA wire actuators in a combined actuator/sensor role. In contrast to other possible mechanisms, SMA wires are lightweight, require low power, and are the least obstructive to the flow of air through the inhaler. The dual actuator/sensor nature of the SMA wires (via resistance measurement) further simplifies the design. Solutions and insights into several SMA actuator design challenges are presented. SMA wire actuator characteristics such as achievable stroke and their effect on the design are highlighted. Consideration of actuator force requirements and the capabilities of SMA wires and studied. The problems posed by the thermal characteristics of SMA wires and innovative solutions are reported.

  3. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid: design and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Xin; Dou, Jinfeng; Zhai, Guangxi; Su, Lequn

    2013-01-01

    Oleanolic acid is a poorly water-soluble drug with low oral bioavailability. A self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) has been developed to enhance the solubility and oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid. The formulation design was optimized by solubility assay, compatibility tests, and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The morphology, droplet size distribution, zeta potential, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and refractive index of a SMEDDS loaded with oleanolic acid were studied in detail. Compared with oleanolic acid solution, the in vitro release of oleanolic acid from SMEDDS showed that the drug could be released in a sustained manner. A highly selective and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographymass spectrometry method was developed for determination of oleanolic acid in rat plasma. This method was used for a pharmacokinetic study of an oleanolic acid-loaded SMEDDS compared with the conventional tablet in rats. Promisingly, a 5.07-fold increase in oral bioavailability of oleanolic acid was achieved for the SMEDDS compared with the marketed product in tablet form. Our studies illustrate the potential use of a SMEDDS for delivery of oleanolic acid via the oral route.

  4. Alendronate-Loaded Modified Drug Delivery Lipid Particles Intended for Improved Oral and Topical Administration.

    PubMed

    Ochiuz, Lacramioara; Grigoras, Cristian; Popa, Marcel; Stoleriu, Iulian; Munteanu, Corneliu; Timofte, Daniel; Profire, Lenuta; Grigoras, Anca Giorgiana

    2016-01-01

    The present paper focuses on solid lipid particles (SLPs), described in the literature as the most effective lipid drug delivery systems that have been introduced in the last decades, as they actually combine the advantages of polymeric particles, hydrophilic/lipophilic emulsions and liposomes. In the current study, we present our most recent advances in the preparation of alendronate (AL)-loaded SLPs prepared by hot homogenization and ultrasonication using various ratios of a self-emulsifying lipidic mixture of Compritol 888, Gelucire 44/14, and Cremophor A 25. The prepared AL-loaded SLPs were investigated for their physicochemical, morphological and structural characteristics by dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared spectroscopy, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Entrapment efficacy and actual drug content were assessed by a validated HPLC method. In vitro dissolution tests performed in simulated gastro-intestinal fluids and phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4 revealed a prolonged release of AL of 70 h. Additionally, release kinetics analysis showed that both in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and in phosphate buffer solution, AL is released from SLPs based on equal ratios of lipid excipients following zero-order kinetics, which characterizes prolonged-release drug systems. PMID:27367664

  5. Quality improvement in breast cancer project: compliance with antiresorptive agents and changing patterns of drug use.

    PubMed

    Borden, Charles P; Shapiro, Charles L; Ramirez, Maria Teresa; Kotur, Linda; Farrar, William

    2014-02-01

    The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute participated in NCCN's Quality Improvement in Breast Cancer initiative. The Opportunities for Improvement (OFI) team elected to improve concordance with the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer recommendation that all patients diagnosed with skeletal metastases receive bisphosphonates. Assembling a multidisciplinary team of clinicians, researchers, and administrative stakeholders, the OFI team followed Six Sigma's approach to problem-solving known as DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control). Baseline concordance was 79%, which was below the recommended target range. Initial analysis quickly revealed that 5 cases were concordant, resulting in a new baseline of 89%. The key root cause identified for the remaining gap was lack of documentation. The solution included education regarding documentation for existing staff, in addition to hard-wiring the material into new physician orientation, discussion of all patients with bone disease at tumor board meetings, and improved consistency with use of the new electronic medical record system. After implementation, the reported concordance was 92%, and the lack of documentation problem decreased from 11% in the baseline study to 6%. The team concluded that use of the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database as an opportunity for clinical quality improvement initiatives not only is possible but also should be an essential element of any clinical program looking to continuously improve. PMID:24614050

  6. Rewarding results: Improving the quality of treatment for people with alcohol and drug problems.

    PubMed

    2004-03-01

    Substance use disorders are the nation's number one health problem, and lie at the root of many public safety and workplace issues. Improving quality of treatment is as important as improving access to treatment. Leadership for improvement must come from many sources: Congress, SAMHSA, state legislatures, state and local treatment agencies, criminal justice, welfare and other public agencies, employers and managed care organizations, providers, and community leaders. We hope that our report helps leaders see ways to improve treatment quality. Our recommendations can be summed up in a single phrase: reward results. We recognize that there are many avenues for treatment quality improvement, including training, credentialing, best practice dissemination, work force development, facility licensing standards, improvement and implementation of new models for treatment of dual diagnosis patients. We believe, however, that rewarding results is essential to motivating action for improvement. We also believe that if providers receive rewards for improved results, they will creatively open new avenues for improvement--a focus on results gives greater freedom than more detailed mandates for change. Finally, we believe that rewards for result may lead to a restructured treatment system with greater stability and correspondingly greater capacity to improve. While we have placed central emphasis on the role of institutional buyers and managers of care, we believe that the voices of patients and families must be heard. People who have progressed to the stage of recovery, and their families, often have essential insight into what did and did not work for them--their personal stories are frequently compelling and persuasive. We also believe that providers of treatment for substance use disorders are profoundly committed to serving their patients, and often have great understanding of what works. Wise managers will listen very carefully and systematically to the voices of consumers

  7. Roles of dextrans on improving lymphatic drainage for liposomal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linglin; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Min; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chenyu; Gu, Bing; Liu, Yu; Wei, Gang; Zhong, Gaoren; Lu, Weiyue

    2010-04-01

    Our aim was to develop a novel liposomal drug delivery system containing dextrans to reduce undesirable retention of antineoplastic agents and thus alleviate local tissue damage. At the cell level, diethylaminoethyl-dextran (DEAE-Dx) showed the strongest inhibiting effect on liposome uptake by macrophages among tested dextrans. The distribution of radiolabeled liposomes mixed with dextrans in injection site and draining lymph node was investigated in rats after subcutaneous injection. DEAE-Dx substantially reduced the undesired local retention and promoted the draining of liposome into lymphatics, which was further confirmed by confocal microscopy images revealing the substantial prevention of rhodamine B-labelled liposome sequestration by macrophages in normal lymph node in rats. Pharmacokinetic data indicated the accelerated drainage of liposome through lymphatics back to systemic circulation by mixing with DEAE-Dx. In the toxicological study in rabbits, DEAE-Dx alleviated the local tissue damage caused by liposomal doxorubicin. In conclusion, dextrans, particularly DEAE-Dx, could efficiently enhanced liposomes drainage into lymphatics, which proves themselves as promising adjuvants for lymphatic-targeted liposomal drug delivery system.

  8. Structural Basis of Resistance to Anti-Cytochrome bc1 Complex Inhibitors: Implication for Drug Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Lothar; Yu, Chang-An; Xia, Di

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance has devastating economic and social consequences, a testimonial of which is the rise and fall of inhibitors against the respiratory component cytochrome bc1 complex, a time tested and highly effective target for disease control. Unfortunately, the mechanism of resistance is a multivariate problem, including primarily mutations in the gene of the cytochrome b subunit but also activation of alternative pathways of ubiquinol oxidation and pharmacokinetic effects. There is a considerable interest in designing new bc1 inhibitors with novel modes of binding and lower propensity to induce the development of resistance. The accumulation of crystallographic data of bc1 complexes with and without inhibitors bound provides the structural basis for rational drug design. In particular, the cytochrome b subunit offers two distinct active sites that can be targeted for inhibition - the quinol oxidation site and the quinone reduction site. This review brings together available structural information of inhibited bc1 by various quinol oxidation- and reduction-site inhibitors, the inhibitor binding modes, conformational changes upon inhibitor binding of side chains in the active site and large scale domain movements of the iron-sulfur protein subunit. Structural data analysis provides a clear understanding of where and why existing inhibitors fail and points towards promising alternatives. PMID:23688079

  9. Structural basis of resistance to anti-cytochrome bc₁ complex inhibitors: implication for drug improvement.

    PubMed

    Esser, Lothar; Yu, Chang-An; Xia, Di

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance has devastating economic and social consequences, a testimonial of which is the rise and fall of inhibitors against the respiratory component cytochrome bc₁ complex, a time tested and highly effective target for disease control. Unfortunately, the mechanism of resistance is a multivariate problem, including primarily mutations in the gene of the cytochrome b subunit but also activation of alternative pathways of ubiquinol oxidation and pharmacokinetic effects. There is a considerable interest in designing new bc₁ inhibitors with novel modes of binding and lower propensity to induce the development of resistance. The accumulation of crystallographic data of bc₁ complexes with and without inhibitors bound provides the structural basis for rational drug design. In particular, the cytochrome b subunit offers two distinct active sites that can be targeted for inhibition - the quinol oxidation site and the quinone reduction site. This review brings together available structural information of inhibited bc₁ by various quinol oxidation- and reductionsite inhibitors, the inhibitor binding modes, conformational changes upon inhibitor binding of side chains in the active site and large scale domain movements of the iron-sulfur protein subunit. Structural data analysis provides a clear understanding of where and why existing inhibitors fail and points towards promising alternatives.

  10. Improved network performance via antagonism: From synthetic rescues to multi-drug combinations

    PubMed Central

    Motter, Adilson E

    2010-01-01

    Recent research shows that a faulty or sub-optimally operating metabolic network can often be rescued by the targeted removal of enzyme-coding genes – the exact opposite of what traditional gene therapy would suggest. Predictions go as far as to assert that certain gene knockouts can restore the growth of otherwise nonviable gene-deficient cells. Many questions follow from this discovery: What are the underlying mechanisms? How generalizable is this effect? What are the potential applications? Here, I approach these questions from the perspective of compensatory perturbations on networks. Relations are drawn between such synthetic rescues and naturally occurring cascades of reaction inactivation, as well as their analogs in physical and other biological networks. I specially discuss how rescue interactions can lead to the rational design of antagonistic drug combinations that select against resistance and how they can illuminate medical research on cancer, antibiotics, and metabolic diseases. PMID:20127700

  11. Further characterization of theobroma oil-beeswax admixtures as lipid matrices for improved drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Attama, A A; Schicke, B C; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2006-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in lipid based drug delivery systems due to factors such as better characterization of lipidic excipients and formulation versatility and the choice of different drug delivery systems. It is important to know the thermal characteristics, crystal habit, texture, and appearance of a new lipid matrix when determining its suitability for use in certain pharmaceutical application. It is line with this that this research was embarked upon to characterize mixtures of beeswax and theobroma oil with a view to applying their admixtures in drug delivery systems such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers. Admixtures of theobroma oil and beeswax were prepared to contain 25% w/w, 50% w/w, and 75% w/w of theobroma oil. The admixtures were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and isothermal heat conduction microcalorimetry (IMC). The melting behavior and microstructures of the lipid admixtures were monitored by polarized light microscopy (PLM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the internal structures of the lipid bases. DSC traces indicated that the higher melting peaks were roughly constant for the different admixtures, but lower melting peaks significantly increased (p < 0.05). The admixture containing 25% w/w of theobroma oil possessed highest crystallinity index of 95.6%. WAXD studies indicated different reflections for the different lipid matrices. However, new interferences were detected for all the lipid matrix admixtures between 2theta = 22.0 degrees and 2theta = 25.0 degrees. The lipid matrices containing 50% w/w and 25% w/w of theobroma oil showed absence of the weak reflection characteristic of pure theobroma oil, while there was disappearance of the strong intensity reflection of beeswax in all the lipid matrix admixtures at all stages of the study. PLM micrographs revealed differences with regard to

  12. Could treatment of iron deficiency both improve ADHD and reduce cardiovascular risk during treatment with ADHD drugs?

    PubMed

    Parisi, Pasquale; Villa, Maria Pia; Donfrancesco, Renato; Miano, Silvia; Paolino, Maria Chiara; Cortese, Samuele

    2012-08-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood-onset neuropsychiatric conditions. Despite extensive research, the etiopathophysiological factors underlying ADHD are not completely understood. It has been suggested that iron deficiency may contribute to ADHD symptoms severity. Whereas evidence from studies based on serum ferritin measures, a marker of peripheral iron status, is somewhat mixed, preliminary recent evidence suggests a deficiency of brain iron in individuals with ADHD. Therefore, it has been proposed that either a deficiency of peripheral iron or a dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier, in the presence of normal peripheral iron levels, may contribute to low brain iron levels, which, in turn, would increase the risk for ADHD symptoms in a subgroup of individuals with this disorder. It has also been found that individuals with ADHD may be at increased risk of severe cardiovascular events during treatment with ADHD drugs, although the extent to which this occurs in ADHD patients compared to non-ADHD individuals is still matter of investigation. Since iron depletion has been recently reported as a risk factor for adverse prognosis in heart failure, iron deficiency might contribute both to ADHD symptoms severity before treatment and to increased risk of severe cardiovascular events during treatment with ADHD drugs in a selected subgroup of patients. Therefore, we hypothesize that the effective treatment of iron deficiency might lead both to improvement of ADHD symptoms severity and to a decrease of the risk of cardiovascular events during treatment with ADHD drugs. If empirical studies confirm this hypothesis, the clinician would be advised to systematically check iron status and effectively treat iron deficiency before starting a pharmacological treatment with ADHD drugs.

  13. Improvement of drug dose calculations by classroom teaching or e-learning: a randomised controlled trial in nurses

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Bjoerg O; Daehlin, Gro K; Johansson, Inger; Farup, Per G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Insufficient skills in drug dose calculations increase the risk for medication errors. Even experienced nurses may struggle with such calculations. Learning flexibility and cost considerations make e-learning interesting as an alternative to classroom teaching. This study compared the learning outcome and risk of error after a course in drug dose calculations for nurses with the two methods. Methods In a randomised controlled open study, nurses from hospitals and primary healthcare were randomised to either e-learning or classroom teaching. Before and after a 2-day course, the nurses underwent a multiple choice test in drug dose calculations: 14 tasks with four alternative answers (score 0–14), and a statement regarding the certainty of each answer (score 0–3). High risk of error was being certain that incorrect answer was correct. The results are given as the mean (SD). Results 16 men and 167 women participated in the study, aged 42.0 (9.5) years with a working experience of 12.3 (9.5) years. The number of correct answers after e-learning was 11.6 (2.0) and after classroom teaching 11.9 (2.0) (p=0.18, NS); improvement were 0.5 (1.6) and 0.9 (2.2), respectively (p=0.07, NS). Classroom learning was significantly superior to e-learning among participants with a pretest score below 9. In support of e-learning was evaluation of specific value for the working situation. There was no difference in risk of error between groups after the course (p=0.77). Conclusions The study showed no differences in learning outcome or risk of error between e-learning and classroom teaching in drug dose calculations. The overall learning outcome was small. Weak precourse knowledge was associated with better outcome after classroom teaching. PMID:25344483

  14. Self-microemulsifying drug-delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of pranlukast hemihydrate: preparation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Myoung-Ki; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Cho, Young-Ho; Kim, Hak-Hyung; Lee, Gye-Won

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to develop and evaluate a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for improving the oral absorption of a pranlukast hemihydrate (PLH), a very poorly water-soluble drug. An efficient self-microemulsifying vehicle for PLH was selected and optimized using solubility testing and phase diagram construction. The formulations were characterized by assessing self-emulsification performance, droplet size analysis, in vitro drug release characteristics and formulation stability studies. Optimized formulations for in vitro dissolution and bioavailability assessment were Triethylcitrate (TEC; 10%), Tween 20 (50%), Span 20 (25%), triethanolamine (5%), and benzyl alcohol (10%). The SMEDDS readily released the lipid phase to form a fine oil-in-water microemulsion with a narrow distribution size. Saturated solubilities of PLH from SMEDDS in water, pH 4.0 and 6.8, were over 150 times greater than that of plain PLH. The release of 100% PLH from SMEDDS was considerably greater compared to only 1.12% in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) from plain PLH after 2 hours. The PLH suspension with 0.5% sodium carboxymethylcellulose or 3% PLH-loaded SMEDDS was administrated at a dose of 40 mg/kg as PLH to fasted rats. The absorption of PLH from SMEDDS resulted in about a threefold increase in bioavailability compared with plain PLH aqueous suspension. Our studies illustrated that the potential use of the new SMEDDS can be used as a possible alternative to oral delivery of a poorly water-soluble drug such as PLH. PMID:23326192

  15. Pegylation improves the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of small-molecule drugs hydrolyzable by esterases: a study of phospho-Ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Mattheolabakis, George; Wong, Chi C; Sun, Yu; Amella, Carol A; Richards, Robert; Constantinides, Panayiotis P; Rigas, Basil

    2014-10-01

    Esterase hydrolysis of drugs can accelerate their elimination, thereby limiting their efficacy. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) covalently attached to drugs (pegylation) is known to improve the efficiency of many drugs. Using as a test agent the novel phospho-ibuprofen (PI), we examined whether pegylation of PI could abrogate its hydrolytic degradation by esterases; PI, known to inhibit colon cancer growth, has a carboxylic ester hydrolyzable by carboxylesterases (CES). We covalently attached mPEG-2000 to PI (PI-PEG) and studied its stability by exposing it to cells overexpressing CES and by administering it to mice. We also evaluated PI-PEG's anticancer efficacy in human colon cancer xenografts and in Apc(min/+) mice. PI-PEG was stable in the presence of cells overexpressing CES1 or CES2, whereas PI was extensively hydrolyzed (90.2 ± 0.7%, 14.3 ± 1.1%, mean ± S.E.M.). In mice, PI was nearly completely hydrolyzed. Intravenous administration of PI-PEG resulted in significant levels in blood and in colon cancer xenografts (xenograft values in parentheses): area under the curve for 0-24 hours = 2351 (2621) (nmol/g) × h; Cmax = 1965 (886) nmol/g; Tmax = 0.08 (2) hour. The blood levels of ibuprofen, its main hydrolytic product, were minimal. Compared with controls, PI-PEG inhibited the growth of the xenografts by 74.8% (P < 0.01) and reduced intestinal tumor multiplicity in Apc(min/+) mice by 73.1% (P < 0.01), prolonging their survival (100% versus 55.1% of controls; P = 0.013). Pegylation protects PI from esterase hydrolysis and improves its pharmacokinetics. In preclinical models of colon cancer, PI-PEG is a safe and efficacious agent that merits further evaluation.

  16. Hot Melt Extruded Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Posaconazole with Improved Bioavailability: Investigating Drug-Polymer Miscibility with Advanced Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0–72) and Cmax of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0–72) and Cmax higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension. PMID:25143935

  17. Hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion of posaconazole with improved bioavailability: investigating drug-polymer miscibility with advanced characterisation.

    PubMed

    Fule, Ritesh; Amin, Purnima

    2014-01-01

    Invasive antifungal infections are reasons for morbidity and mortality in immunogenic patients worldwide. Posaconazole is a most promising antifungal agent against all types of invasive infections with high % of cure rate. The marketed suspension formulation has low bioavailability and is needed to be taken with food. In this paper, PCZ hot melt extruded amorphous solid dispersion (SD) with immediate release and improved bioavailability was prepared using Soluplus (Sol) as primary carrier for solubilization. Surfactants such as PEG 400, Lutrol F27, Lutrol F68, and TPGS are also used in combination with Soluplus to improve the physicochemical performance of the formulation when it comes in contact with GI (gastrointestinal) fluid. Drug-polymer miscibility of SD was investigated using advanced techniques. In the in vivo study, the AUC(0-72) and C(max) of PCZ/Soluplus were 11.5 and 11.74 time higher than those of pure PCZ. The formulation of the extrudate SD had an AUC(0-72) and C(max) higher than those with the commercial capsule (Noxafil). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies were carried out using in silico molecular modelling to understand the drug-polymer intermolecular behaviour. The results of this research ensure enhanced dissolution and bioavailability of the solid dispersion of PCZ prepared by HME compared with the PCZ suspension.

  18. An integrated approach to improved toxicity prediction for the safety assessment during preclinical drug development using Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noor, Fozia Niklas, Jens Mueller-Vieira, Ursula Heinzle, Elmar

    2009-06-01

    Efficient and accurate safety assessment of compounds is extremely important in the preclinical development of drugs especially when hepatotoxicty is in question. Multiparameter and time resolved assays are expected to greatly improve the prediction of toxicity by assessing complex mechanisms of toxicity. An integrated approach is presented in which Hep G2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes are compared in frequently used cytotoxicity assays for parent compound toxicity. The interassay variability was determined. The cytotoxicity assays were also compared with a reliable alternative time resolved respirometric assay. The set of training compounds consisted of well known hepatotoxins; amiodarone, carbamazepine, clozapine, diclofenac, tacrine, troglitazone and verapamil. The sensitivity of both cell systems in each tested assay was determined. Results show that careful selection of assay parameters and inclusion of a kinetic time resolved assay improves prediction for non-metabolism mediated toxicity using Hep G2 cells as indicated by a sensitivity ratio of 1. The drugs with EC{sub 50} values 100 {mu}M or lower were considered toxic. The difference in the sensitivity of the two cell systems to carbamazepine which causes toxicity via reactive metabolites emphasizes the importance of human cell based in-vitro assays. Using the described system, primary rat hepatocytes do not offer advantage over the Hep G2 cells in parent compound toxicity evaluation. Moreover, respiration method is non invasive, highly sensitive and allows following the time course of toxicity. Respiration assay could serve as early indicator of changes that subsequently lead to toxicity.

  19. Melting Point Distribution Analysis of Globally Approved and Discontinued Drugs: A Research for Improving the Chance of Success of Drug Design and Discovery.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fei; Kong, Qingya; Ni, Wei; Xu, Xiang; Ling, Dazheng; Lu, Zhengyu; Li, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The melting point (MP), an easily accessible physical parameter, has considerable potential for the judgment of drug-like properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no useful guidelines for understanding the relationship between the MP and drug-like properties. To this end, we have constructed the largest MP database (experimental value) of globally approved drugs (3164 organic small-molecule drugs) and discontinued drugs (417 organic small-molecule drugs) and subsequently extracted six subdatabases from the whole approved database and two subdatabases from the discontinued database. The MP distribution statistics and analysis of approved drugs reveal five noteworthy observations; moreover, the MP distribution statistics and analysis of discontinued drugs further supplement these criteria. In addition, the comparison of molecular weight (MW) versus MP and Clog P versus MP distributions of different classes of approved drugs indicated that the MWs and Clog P values of most drugs in the optimal MP range were not more than 500 and 5, respectively, implying the MP distribution criterion was in accordance with Lipinski's rule of five.

  20. Melting Point Distribution Analysis of Globally Approved and Discontinued Drugs: A Research for Improving the Chance of Success of Drug Design and Discovery.

    PubMed

    Mao, Fei; Kong, Qingya; Ni, Wei; Xu, Xiang; Ling, Dazheng; Lu, Zhengyu; Li, Jian

    2016-08-01

    The melting point (MP), an easily accessible physical parameter, has considerable potential for the judgment of drug-like properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no useful guidelines for understanding the relationship between the MP and drug-like properties. To this end, we have constructed the largest MP database (experimental value) of globally approved drugs (3164 organic small-molecule drugs) and discontinued drugs (417 organic small-molecule drugs) and subsequently extracted six subdatabases from the whole approved database and two subdatabases from the discontinued database. The MP distribution statistics and analysis of approved drugs reveal five noteworthy observations; moreover, the MP distribution statistics and analysis of discontinued drugs further supplement these criteria. In addition, the comparison of molecular weight (MW) versus MP and Clog P versus MP distributions of different classes of approved drugs indicated that the MWs and Clog P values of most drugs in the optimal MP range were not more than 500 and 5, respectively, implying the MP distribution criterion was in accordance with Lipinski's rule of five. PMID:27547646

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 blockade can improve efficacy of VEGF-targeting drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Batalla, Isabel; Cubas-Cordova, Miguel; Udonta, Florian; Wroblewski, Mark; Waizenegger, Jonas S.; Janning, Melanie; Sawall, Stefanie; Gensch, Victoria; Zhao, Lin; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Pantel, Klaus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Loges, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapies were approved for different cancers. However, significant primary and secondary resistance hampers efficacy in several tumor types including breast cancer. Thus, we need to develop clinically applicable strategies to enhance efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs. We report that anti-angiogenic therapies can induce upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and of its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in breast cancer models. Upon Cox-2 inhibition PGE2 levels were normalized and efficacy of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (anti-VEGFR-2) antibodies and sunitinib was enhanced. Interestingly, both treatments exerted additive anti-angiogenic effects. Following Cox-2 inhibition, we observed reduced infiltration of tumors with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and lower levels of pro-angiogenic factors active besides the VEGF axis including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2). Mechanistic studies indicated that Cox-2 inhibition reduced PGE2-induced migration and proliferation of CAFs via inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt. Hence, Cox-2 inhibition can increase efficacy of anti-angiogenic treatments and our findings might pave the road for clinical investigations of concomitant blockade of Cox-2 and VEGF-signaling. PMID:25849942

  2. Inhaler technique: facts and fantasies. A view from the Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mark L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Barnes, P J; Broeders, M; Corrigan, C J; Chawes, B L; Corbetta, L; Dubus, J C; Hausen, Th; Lavorini, F; Roche, N; Sanchis, J; Usmani, Omar S; Viejo, J; Vincken, W; Voshaar, Th; Crompton, G K; Pedersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals tasked with advising patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) how to use inhaler devices properly and what to do about unwanted effects will be aware of a variety of commonly held precepts. The evidence for many of these is, however, lacking or old and therefore in need of re-examination. Few would disagree that facilitating and encouraging regular and proper use of inhaler devices for the treatment of asthma and COPD is critical for successful outcomes. It seems logical that the abandonment of unnecessary or ill-founded practices forms an integral part of this process: the use of inhalers is bewildering enough, particularly with regular introduction of new drugs, devices and ancillary equipment, without unnecessary and pointless adages. We review the evidence, or lack thereof, underlying ten items of inhaler ‘lore’ commonly passed on by health professionals to each other and thence to patients. The exercise is intended as a pragmatic, evidence-informed review by a group of clinicians with appropriate experience. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature; rather, we aim to stimulate debate, and to encourage researchers to challenge some of these ideas and to provide new, updated evidence on which to base relevant, meaningful advice in the future. The discussion on each item is followed by a formal, expert opinion by members of the ADMIT Working Group. PMID:27098045

  3. Inhaler technique: facts and fantasies. A view from the Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT).

    PubMed

    Levy, Mark L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Barnes, P J; Broeders, M; Corrigan, C J; Chawes, B L; Corbetta, L; Dubus, J C; Hausen, Th; Lavorini, F; Roche, N; Sanchis, J; Usmani, Omar S; Viejo, J; Vincken, W; Voshaar, Th; Crompton, G K; Pedersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals tasked with advising patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) how to use inhaler devices properly and what to do about unwanted effects will be aware of a variety of commonly held precepts. The evidence for many of these is, however, lacking or old and therefore in need of re-examination. Few would disagree that facilitating and encouraging regular and proper use of inhaler devices for the treatment of asthma and COPD is critical for successful outcomes. It seems logical that the abandonment of unnecessary or ill-founded practices forms an integral part of this process: the use of inhalers is bewildering enough, particularly with regular introduction of new drugs, devices and ancillary equipment, without unnecessary and pointless adages. We review the evidence, or lack thereof, underlying ten items of inhaler 'lore' commonly passed on by health professionals to each other and thence to patients. The exercise is intended as a pragmatic, evidence-informed review by a group of clinicians with appropriate experience. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature; rather, we aim to stimulate debate, and to encourage researchers to challenge some of these ideas and to provide new, updated evidence on which to base relevant, meaningful advice in the future. The discussion on each item is followed by a formal, expert opinion by members of the ADMIT Working Group. PMID:27098045

  4. Mixed PEG-PE/Vitamin E Tumor-Targeted Immunomicelles as Carriers for Poorly Soluble Anti-Cancer Drugs: Improved Drug Solubilization and Enhanced In Vitro Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Rupa R.; Sawant, Rishikesh M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2008-01-01

    Two poorly soluble, potent anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were successfully solubilized by mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) and vitamin E. Drug containing micelles were additionally modified with anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5), which can specifically bring micelles to tumor cells in vitro. The optimized micelles had an average size of about 13-to-22 nm and the immuno-modification of micelles did not significantly change it. The solubilization of both drugs by the mixed micelles was more efficient than by micelles made of PEG-PE alone. Solubilization of camptothecin in micelles prevented also the hydrolysis of active lactone form of the drug to inactive carboxylate form. Drug loaded mixed micelles and mAb 2C5-immunomicelles demonstrated significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity than free drug against various cancer cell lines. PMID:18583114

  5. Nanomedicine-nanoemulsion formulation improves safety and efficacy of the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel according to preclinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Lee, King C; Maturo, Claudia; Rodriguez, Robert; Nguyen, Hoang-Lan; Shorr, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Paclitaxel is an important anticancer drug and is currently used to treat a variety of cancers, including ovarian carcinomas, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. The objectives of the studies were to assess and compare the safety and efficacy of EmPAC (a newly developed nanoemulsion formulation of paclitaxel) versus Taxol (the injectable formulation of paclitaxel involving the use of polyethylated or polyoxyl castor oil currently used in the clinic). The objectives were also to investigate the mechanism for the improved safety and efficacy of EmPAC over Taxol. These results showed that EmPAC had better anti-tumor efficacy than Taxol, according to in vitro cell culture studies and studies in animal tumor models. EmPAC had improved anti-tumor efficacy even in tumor cell lines that are known to be multi-drug resistant. Part of the mechanism of action for the improved efficacy may be related to EmPAC inducing greater cellular uptake of paclitaxel into tumor cells than Taxol did, according to the in vitro cell culture radioactive-labeled studies and in vitro cell culture antibody studies. It may also partly be because EmPAC delivered more paclitaxel to the tumor mass than Taxol, while the delivery of paclitaxel to other tissues (e.g., blood, muscle, liver, spleen, kidney and lung) were similar between the two formulations of paclitaxel, according to studies in animals with tumor xenograft. EmPAC also had better safety than Taxol according to toxicology studies in rabbits. This may be because EmPAC does not contain the toxic ingredients used in formulating Taxol (such as polyethylated or polyoxyl castor oil). These results support the clinical development of the nanoemulsion formulation of paclitaxel.

  6. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  7. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production.

    PubMed

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  8. Improving the translation of analgesic drugs to the clinic: animal models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Percie du Sert, N; Rice, A S C

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains an area of considerable unmet clinical need. Research based on preclinical animal models has failed to deliver truly novel treatment options, questioning the predictive value of these models. This review addresses the shortcomings of rodent in vivo models commonly used in the field and highlights approaches which could increase their predictivity, including more clinically relevant assays, outcome measures and animal characteristics. The methodological quality of animal studies also needs to be improved. Low internal validity and incomplete reporting lead to a waste of valuable research resources and animal lives, and ultimately prevent an objective assessment of the true predictivity of in vivo models. PMID:24527763

  9. Improving drug abuse treatment delivery through adoption of harmonized electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Ghitza, Udi E; Sparenborg, Steven; Tai, Betty

    2011-07-01

    A great divide currently exists between mainstream health care and specialty substance use disorders (SUD) treatment, concerning the coordination of care and sharing of medical information. Improving the coordination of SUD treatment with other disciplines of medicine will benefit SUD patients. The development and use of harmonized electronic health record systems (EHR) containing standardized person-level information will enable improved coordination of healthcare services. We attempt here to illuminate the urgent public health need to develop and implement at the national level harmonized EHR including data fields containing standardized vocabulary/terminologies relevant to SUD treatment. The many advantages and barriers to harmonized EHR implementation in SUD treatment service groups, and pathways to their successful implementation, are also discussed. As the US Federal Government incentivizes Medicare and Medicaid Service providers nationwide for "meaningful use" of health information technology (HIT) systems, relevant stakeholders may face relatively large and time-consuming processes to conform their local practices to meet the federal government's "meaningful use" criteria unless they proactively implement data standards and elements consistent with those criteria. Incorporating consensus-based common data elements and standards relevant to SUD screening, diagnosis, and treatment into the federal government's "meaningful use" criteria is an essential first step to develop necessary infrastructure for effective coordination of HIT systems among SUD treatment and other healthcare service providers to promote collaborative-care implementation of cost-effective, evidence-based treatments and to support program evaluations.

  10. Melting Point Distribution Analysis of Globally Approved and Discontinued Drugs: A Research for Improving the Chance of Success of Drug Design and Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Fei; Kong, Qingya; Ni, Wei; Xu, Xiang; Ling, Dazheng; Lu, Zhengyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The melting point (MP), an easily accessible physical parameter, has considerable potential for the judgment of drug‐like properties. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no useful guidelines for understanding the relationship between the MP and drug‐like properties. To this end, we have constructed the largest MP database (experimental value) of globally approved drugs (3164 organic small‐molecule drugs) and discontinued drugs (417 organic small‐molecule drugs) and subsequently extracted six subdatabases from the whole approved database and two subdatabases from the discontinued database. The MP distribution statistics and analysis of approved drugs reveal five noteworthy observations; moreover, the MP distribution statistics and analysis of discontinued drugs further supplement these criteria. In addition, the comparison of molecular weight (MW) versus MP and Clog P versus MP distributions of different classes of approved drugs indicated that the MWs and Clog P values of most drugs in the optimal MP range were not more than 500 and 5, respectively, implying the MP distribution criterion was in accordance with Lipinski's rule of five. PMID:27547646

  11. Lipid nanoparticles for improved topical application of drugs for skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Mehnert, Wolfgang; Korting, Hans-Christian

    2007-07-10

    Due to the lower risk of systemic side effects topical treatment of skin disease appears favourable, yet the stratum corneum counteracts the penetration of xenobiotics into viable skin. Particulate carrier systems may mean an option to improve dermal penetration. Since epidermal lipids are found in high amounts within the penetration barrier, lipid carriers attaching themselves to the skin surface and allowing lipid exchange between the outermost layers of the stratum corneum and the carrier appear promising. Besides liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) have been studied intensively. Here we describe the potential of these carrier systems and compare the dermal uptake from SLN and NLC to the one of alternative vehicle systems. A special focus is upon the interactions of active ingredients and the lipid matrix as well as the quantification of dermal penetration. PMID:17544165

  12. An improved approach to the analysis of drug-protein binding by distance geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldblum, A.; Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1986-01-01

    The calculation of side chain centers of coordinates and the subsequent generation of side chain-side chain and side chain-backbone distance matrices is suggested as an improved method for viewing interactions inside proteins and for the comparison of protein structures. The use of side chain distance matrices is demonstrated with free PTI, and the use of difference distance matrices for side chains is shown for free and trypsin-bound PTI as well as for the X-ray structures of trypsin complexes with PTI and with benzamidine. It is found that conformational variations are reflected in the side chain distance matrices much more than in the standard C-C distance representations.

  13. Cardiac Valve Noise Reduction by Non-Drug Interventions Improves the Sleep Quality of Patients after Mechanical Cardiac Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Le; Huang, Xizhen; Jiang, Fei; Lin, Fen; Ye, Qingyang; Lin, Jianling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of non-drug interventions on the sleep quality of patients after mechanical cardiac valve implantation. Methods: In this prospective, randomized, controlled trial, 64 patients scheduled for mechanical mitral valve replacement were recruited. Patients underwent cognitive behavioral therapy and wore noise cancelling earplugs and eye mask. Sleep quality was evaluated on the 4th after admission and the 5th days after operation. The primary outcome was the total sleep quality score differences between the 4th day after admission and the 5th day after operation. Results: All patients had been suffering from poor sleep quality for a month before admission. There was no difference between both groups on the 4th day after admission. Overall sleep quality in the intervention group was better than in the control group on the 5th day after operation. The subjective sleep quality of the patients in each group was significantly lower on the 5th day after the operation than on the 4th day after admission (P <0.05). Conclusion: Non-drug intervention could improve the sleep quality of patients after mechanical cardiac valve implantation and help the postoperative recovery of the patients. (Trial registration: ChiCTR-TRC-14004405, 21 March 2014.) PMID:26853244

  14. Improving DNA double-strand repair inhibitor KU55933 therapeutic index in cancer radiotherapy using nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xi; Lara, Haydee; Wagner, Kyle T.; Saripalli, Srinivas; Hyder, Syed Nabeel; Foote, Michael; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina; Caster, Joseph M.; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2015-11-01

    Radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment. Because of its importance, there has been high interest in developing agents and strategies to further improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. DNA double-strand repair inhibitors (DSBRIs) are among the most promising agents to improve radiotherapy. However, their clinical translation has been limited by their potential toxicity to normal tissue. Recent advances in nanomedicine offer an opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the proof of principle by developing and evaluating nanoparticle (NP) formulations of KU55933, a DSBRI. We engineered a NP formulation of KU55933 using nanoprecipitation method with different lipid polymer nanoparticle formulation. NP KU55933 using PLGA formulation has the best loading efficacy as well as prolonged drug release profile. We demonstrated that NP KU55933 is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro using clonogenic assay and is more effective as a radiosensitizer than free KU55933 in vivo using mouse xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Western blots and immunofluorescence showed NP KU55933 exhibited more prolonged inhibition of DNA repair pathway. In addition, NP KU55933 leads to lower skin toxicity than KU55933. Our study supports further investigations using NP to deliver DSBRIs to improve cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  15. Improving DNA double-strand repair inhibitor KU55933 therapeutic index in cancer radiotherapy using nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xi; Lara, Haydee; Wagner, Kyle T; Saripalli, Srinivas; Hyder, Syed Nabeel; Foote, Michael; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z

    2015-12-21

    Radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment. Because of its importance, there has been high interest in developing agents and strategies to further improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. DNA double-strand repair inhibitors (DSBRIs) are among the most promising agents to improve radiotherapy. However, their clinical translation has been limited by their potential toxicity to normal tissue. Recent advances in nanomedicine offer an opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the proof of principle by developing and evaluating nanoparticle (NP) formulations of KU55933, a DSBRI. We engineered a NP formulation of KU55933 using nanoprecipitation method with different lipid polymer nanoparticle formulation. NP KU55933 using PLGA formulation has the best loading efficacy as well as prolonged drug release profile. We demonstrated that NP KU55933 is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro using clonogenic assay and is more effective as a radiosensitizer than free KU55933 in vivo using mouse xenograft models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Western blots and immunofluorescence showed NP KU55933 exhibited more prolonged inhibition of DNA repair pathway. In addition, NP KU55933 leads to lower skin toxicity than KU55933. Our study supports further investigations using NP to deliver DSBRIs to improve cancer radiotherapy treatment.

  16. The utility of self-emulsifying oil formulation to improve the poor solubility of the anti HIV drug CSIC

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CSIC (5-chloro-3-phenylsulfonylindole-2-carboxamide), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) has not been advanced as a therapeutic anti-HIV candidate drug due to its low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. Objective The objective of this work was to formulate CSIC into self-emulsifying oil formulations for the purpose of improving its aqueous solubility and evaluating in vitro antiretroviral activity. Methods CSIC self-emulsifying oil formulations (SEFs) were formulated and evaluated for droplet size, zeta potential, polydispersity index (PDI), viscosity, emulsification time, stability and bioactivity. Results Results showed significantly improved solubility of CSIC in the SEFs.The concentration of co-surfactant affected the droplet size, zeta potential and polydispersity index. In vitro bioactivity studies showed that the CSIC SEFs retained full anti-HIV activity. Conclusion The in vitro data from this first attempt to formulate CSIC SEFs suggest that improvement on the aqueous solubility of CSIC through this delivery system may accentuate its antiretroviral effectiveness in vivo via bioavailability enhancement. The formulation is therefore intended as an oral anti-HIV agent for prophylactic and therapeutic uses. PMID:23721408

  17. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  18. Proceedings of the 2013 CINP summit: innovative partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anthony George; Hongaard-Andersen, Peter; Moscicki, Richard A; Sahakian, Barbara; Quirion, Rémi; Krishnan, K Ranga Rama; Race, Tim

    2014-12-25

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and, in particular, mental health disorders, are becoming recognized as the health challenge of the 21(st) century. Currently, at least 10% of the global population is affected by a mental health disorder, a figure that is set to increase year on year. Meanwhile, the rate of development of new CNS drugs has not increased for many years, despite unprecedented levels of investment. In response to this state of affairs, the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum (CINP) convened a summit to discuss ways to reverse this disturbing trend through new partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery. The objectives of the Summit were to explore the issues affecting the value chain (i.e. the chain of activities or stakeholders that a company engages in/with to deliver a product to market) in brain research, thereby gaining insights from key stakeholders and developing actions to address unmet needs; to identify achievable objectives to address the issues; to develop action plans to bring about measurable improvements across the value chain and accelerate CNS drug discovery; and finally, to communicate recommendations to governments, the research and development community, and other relevant stakeholders. Summit outputs include the following action plans, aligned to the pressure points within the brain research-drug development value chain: Code of conduct dealing with conflict of interest issues, Prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment, Linking science and regulation, Patient involvement in trial design, definition of endpoints, etc., Novel trial design, Reproduction and confirmation of data, Update of intellectual property (IP) laws to facilitate repurposing and combination therapy (low priority), Large-scale, global patient registries, Editorials on nomenclature, biomarkers, and diagnostic tools, and Public awareness, with brain disease advocates to attend G8 meetings and World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual meetings in

  19. Improvements in HIV treatment outcomes among indigenous and non-indigenous people who use illicit drugs in a Canadian setting

    PubMed Central

    Milloy, M-J; King, Alexandra; Kerr, Thomas; Adams, Evan; Samji, Hasina; Guillemi, Silvia; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In many settings worldwide, members of indigenous groups experience a disproportionate burden of HIV. In Canada, there is an urgent need to improve HIV treatment outcomes for indigenous people living with HIV (IPLWH), to not only reduce HIV/AIDS-associated morbidity and mortality but also curb elevated rates of viral transmission. Thus, by comparing indigenous and non-indigenous participants in an ongoing longitudinal cohort of HIV-positive people who use illicit drugs, we sought to investigate longitudinal changes in three HIV treatment indicators for IPLWH who use illicit drugs during a community-wide treatment-as-prevention (TasP) initiative in British Columbia, Canada. Methods We used data from the ACCESS study, an ongoing observational prospective cohort of HIV-positive illicit drug users recruited from community settings in Vancouver, British Columbia. Cohort data are linked to comprehensive retrospective and prospective clinical records in a setting of no-cost HIV/AIDS treatment and care. We used multivariable generalized estimating equations (GEE) to evaluate longitudinal changes in the proportion of participants with exposure to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the previous 180 days, optimal adherence to ART (i.e. ≥95% vs. <95%) and non-detectable HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL <50 copies/mL plasma). Results Between 2005 and 2014, 845 individuals were recruited, including 326 (39%) self-reporting any indigenous ancestry, and contributed 6732 interviews and 13,495 VL measurements. Among indigenous participants, the proportion with recent ART increased from 51 to 94% and non-detectable VL from 23 to 65%. In multivariable models, later interview period was positively associated with recent ART (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.16 per interview period, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11 to 1.20) and non-detectable VL (AOR=1.07, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.10). In adjusted models comparing indigenous and non-indigenous participants, we did not observe differences

  20. Proceedings of the 2013 CINP Summit: Innovative Partnerships to Accelerate CNS Drug Discovery for Improved Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Hongaard-Andersen, Peter; Moscicki, Richard A.; Sahakian, Barbara; Quirion, Rémi; Krishnan, K. Ranga Rama; Race, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and, in particular, mental health disorders, are becoming recognized as the health challenge of the 21st century. Currently, at least 10% of the global population is affected by a mental health disorder, a figure that is set to increase year on year. Meanwhile, the rate of development of new CNS drugs has not increased for many years, despite unprecedented levels of investment. In response to this state of affairs, the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum (CINP) convened a summit to discuss ways to reverse this disturbing trend through new partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery. The objectives of the Summit were to explore the issues affecting the value chain (i.e. the chain of activities or stakeholders that a company engages in/with to deliver a product to market) in brain research, thereby gaining insights from key stakeholders and developing actions to address unmet needs; to identify achievable objectives to address the issues; to develop action plans to bring about measurable improvements across the value chain and accelerate CNS drug discovery; and finally, to communicate recommendations to governments, the research and development community, and other relevant stakeholders. Summit outputs include the following action plans, aligned to the pressure points within the brain research-drug development value chain: Code of conduct dealing with conflict of interest issues,Prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment,Linking science and regulation,Patient involvement in trial design, definition of endpoints, etc.,Novel trial design,Reproduction and confirmation of data,Update of intellectual property (IP) laws to facilitate repurposing and combination therapy (low priority),Large-scale, global patient registries,Editorials on nomenclature, biomarkers, and diagnostic tools, andPublic awareness, with brain disease advocates to attend G8 meetings and World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual meetings in Davos

  1. Proceedings of the 2013 CINP summit: innovative partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anthony George; Hongaard-Andersen, Peter; Moscicki, Richard A; Sahakian, Barbara; Quirion, Rémi; Krishnan, K Ranga Rama; Race, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and, in particular, mental health disorders, are becoming recognized as the health challenge of the 21(st) century. Currently, at least 10% of the global population is affected by a mental health disorder, a figure that is set to increase year on year. Meanwhile, the rate of development of new CNS drugs has not increased for many years, despite unprecedented levels of investment. In response to this state of affairs, the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum (CINP) convened a summit to discuss ways to reverse this disturbing trend through new partnerships to accelerate CNS drug discovery. The objectives of the Summit were to explore the issues affecting the value chain (i.e. the chain of activities or stakeholders that a company engages in/with to deliver a product to market) in brain research, thereby gaining insights from key stakeholders and developing actions to address unmet needs; to identify achievable objectives to address the issues; to develop action plans to bring about measurable improvements across the value chain and accelerate CNS drug discovery; and finally, to communicate recommendations to governments, the research and development community, and other relevant stakeholders. Summit outputs include the following action plans, aligned to the pressure points within the brain research-drug development value chain: Code of conduct dealing with conflict of interest issues, Prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment, Linking science and regulation, Patient involvement in trial design, definition of endpoints, etc., Novel trial design, Reproduction and confirmation of data, Update of intellectual property (IP) laws to facilitate repurposing and combination therapy (low priority), Large-scale, global patient registries, Editorials on nomenclature, biomarkers, and diagnostic tools, and Public awareness, with brain disease advocates to attend G8 meetings and World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual meetings in

  2. Improved efficiency access control equipment and explosive, weapons and drug abuse detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, A.; Milford, A.; Woollven, J.

    1985-01-01

    The second generation portal explosives detector has been designed with increased detection capability and convenience in service. The method of detection and performance relative to the first generation is described. A novel method of auto-calibration and self diagnosis is described and results are discussed. Improvements in convenience of operation have been achieved and operating space and costs reduced by combining metal detection capability, together with explosives detection. This allows both alarm signal and diagnostic outputs to be combined on a single remote panel in the guard room, and reduces the number of guards needed to man the access control. This type of access control is entirely a defensive measure against attack but a further additional feature is proposed which will also check the state of mind of all personnel passing through the check point. Any person suffering from the effect of narcotic or alcohol will be detected by their inability to reproduce their normal signature. A new method of signature analysis in five dimensions is described together with proposals for integrating the check without increasing the time in the test area. Some recent results on the effects of alcohol on signature reproduction is given.

  3. Deoxyadenosine family: improved synthesis, DNA damage and repair, analogs as drugs.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Himadri; Kar, Indrani; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2013-08-01

    Improved synthesis of 2'-deoxyadenosine using Escherichia coli overexpressing some enzymes and gram-scale chemical synthesis of 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates reported recently are described in this review. Other topics include DNA damage induced by chromium(VI), Fenton chemistry, photoinduction with lumazine, or by ultrasound in neutral solution; 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine isomers as potential biomarkers; and a recapitulation of purine 5',8-cyclonucleoside studies. The mutagenicities of some products generated by oxidizing 2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, nucleotide pool sanitization, and translesion synthesis are also reviewed. Characterizing cross-linking between nucleosides in opposite strands of DNA and endonuclease V-mediated deoxyinosine excision repair are discussed. The use of purine nucleoside analogs in the treatment of rarer chronic lymphoid leukemias is reviewed. Some analogs at the C8 position induced delayed polymerization arrest during HIV-1 reverse transcription. The susceptibility of clinically metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis to two analogs, toyocamycin and 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine, were tested in vitro. GS-9148, a dAMP analog, was translocated to the priming site in a complex with reverse transcriptase and double-stranded DNA to gain insight into the mechanism of reverse transcriptase inhibition. PMID:25436589

  4. Improved tumor-targeting drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy by cationic liposome modified with truncated bFGF peptide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xianhuo; Wang, Yongsheng; Yang, Li; Hu, Jia; Xiao, Wenjing; Fu, Afu; Cai, Lulu; Li, Xia; Ye, Xia; Liu, Yalin; Wu, Wenshuang; Shao, Ximing; Mao, Yongqiu; Wei, Yuquan; Chen, Lijuan

    2010-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs), overexpressed on the surface of a variety of tumor cells and on tumor neovasculature in situ, are potential targets for tumor- and vascular-targeting therapy. This study aimed to develop a FGFR-mediated drug delivery system to target chemotherapeutic agents to FGFR-overexpressed tumor cells and tumor neovasculature endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Here we designed a truncated human basic fibroblast growth factor peptide (tbFGF), which was attached to the surface of cationic liposomal doxorubicin (LPs-DOX) and paclitaxel (LPs-PTX) via electrostatic force. Then we characterized the tbFGF-modified liposome (tbFGF-LPs) and examined internalization of doxorubicin in tumor cells (TRAMP-C1, B16) and HUVEC cells in vitro. In vivo, we evaluated the biodistribution and antitumor efficacy of tbFGF-LPs-DOX and tbFGF-LPs-PTX in C57BL/6J mice bearing TRAMP-C1 prostate carcinoma and B16 melanoma, respectively. The tbFGF-LPs-DOX significantly improved the uptake of doxorubicin in TRAMP-C1, B16 and HUVEC cells, respectively. Biodistribution study in B16 tumor-bearing mice showed that tbFGF-LPs-PTX achieved 7.1-fold (72.827+/-7.321mgh/L vs 10.292+/-0.775mgh/L, mean+/-SD, P<0.01) accumulation of paclitaxel in tumor tissue than those of free paclitaxel. More importantly, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with tbFGF-LPs-DOX and tbFGF-LPs-PTX showed the significant inhibition in tumor growth and improvement in survival rate as compared with mice treated with free and liposomal drugs in TRAMP-C1 and B16 tumor models, respectively. Furthermore, repeated intravenous administration of tbFGF-LPs-DOX/PTX did not induce anti-bFGF antibodies. These results suggested that this FGFR-mediated drug delivery system may provide a new treatment strategy for tumors which overexpress FGFRs. PMID:20307599

  5. A machine learning based method to improve docking scoring functions and its application to drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Kinnings, Sarah L.; Liu, Nina; Tonge, Peter J.; Jackson, Richard M.; Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Docking scoring functions are notoriously weak predictors of binding affinity. They typically assign a common set of weights to the individual energy terms that contribute to the overall energy score, however, these weights should be gene family-dependent. In addition, they incorrectly assume that individual interactions contribute towards the total binding affinity in an additive manner. In reality, noncovalent interactions often depend on one another in a nonlinear manner. In this paper we show how the use of support vector machines (SVMs), trained by associating sets of individual energy terms retrieved from molecular docking with the known binding affinity of each compound from high-throughput screening experiments, can be used to improve the correlation between known binding affinities and those predicted by the docking program eHiTS. We construct two prediction models; a regression model trained using IC50 values from BindingDB, and a classification model trained using active and decoy compounds from the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD). Moreover, to address the issue of overrepresentation of negative data in high-throughput screening data sets, we have designed a multiple-planar SVM training procedure for the classification model. The increased performance that both SVMs give when compared with the original eHiTS scoring function highlights the potential for using nonlinear methods when deriving overall energy scores from their individual components. We apply the above methodology to train a new scoring function for direct inhibitors of M.tuberculosis (M.tb) InhA. By combining ligand binding site comparison with the new scoring function, we propose that phosphodiesterase inhibitors can potentially be repurposed to target M.tb InhA. Our methodology may be applied to other gene families for which target structures and activity data are available, as demonstrated in the work presented here. PMID:21291174

  6. [Rising attention to the market to ratio meet demand of improving efficiency of pharmaceutical circulation--based on complicated variety and specification of drugs].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoxing; Sun, Lihua

    2010-05-01

    Analyzing the complicated variety and specification of drugs and the objective demand of pharmaceutical circulation, to seek out the key factors in improving the efficiency of pharmaceutical circulation, for putting forward suggestions to promote the development of pharmaceutical circulation in China. The conclusion is drawed from industrial organization theory and successful experience of foreign countries, high market attention met with the demand of complicated variety and specification of drugs in pharmaceutical circulation.

  7. Evaluation of ion exchange processes in drug-eluting embolization beads by use of an improved flow-through elution method.

    PubMed

    Swaine, Tanya; Tang, Yiqing; Garcia, Pedro; John, Jasmine; Waters, Laura J; Lewis, Andrew L

    2016-10-10

    An improved method for evaluating drug release behaviour of drug-eluting embolization beads (DEBs) was developed utilizing an open-loop flow-through system, in which the beads were packed into an occlusive mass within the system and extracted with a flowing elution medium over time. Glass beads were introduced into the beads mass in order to ensure laminar flow, reduce dead volume and improve reproducibility by compensating for swelling phenomena. The effects of glass bead ratio, elution medium flow rate and ion concentration, DEB size and drug concentration and drug type (doxorubicin and irinotecan) were evaluated using DEB composed of a sulfonate-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (DC Bead™) as the test article. The rate and amount of drug elution from the packed beads was affected by flow rate, the bead size and initial loading dose. The raw data from the concentration profile analysis provided valuable information to reveal the drug elution behaviour akin to the pharmacokinetic data observed for embolized beads (yielding in vitro Cmax and tmax data) which was complementary to the normal cumulative data obtained. A good correlation with historical reported in vivo data validated the usefulness of the method for predicting in vivo drug elution behaviour.

  8. Evaluation of ion exchange processes in drug-eluting embolization beads by use of an improved flow-through elution method.

    PubMed

    Swaine, Tanya; Tang, Yiqing; Garcia, Pedro; John, Jasmine; Waters, Laura J; Lewis, Andrew L

    2016-10-10

    An improved method for evaluating drug release behaviour of drug-eluting embolization beads (DEBs) was developed utilizing an open-loop flow-through system, in which the beads were packed into an occlusive mass within the system and extracted with a flowing elution medium over time. Glass beads were introduced into the beads mass in order to ensure laminar flow, reduce dead volume and improve reproducibility by compensating for swelling phenomena. The effects of glass bead ratio, elution medium flow rate and ion concentration, DEB size and drug concentration and drug type (doxorubicin and irinotecan) were evaluated using DEB composed of a sulfonate-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (DC Bead™) as the test article. The rate and amount of drug elution from the packed beads was affected by flow rate, the bead size and initial loading dose. The raw data from the concentration profile analysis provided valuable information to reveal the drug elution behaviour akin to the pharmacokinetic data observed for embolized beads (yielding in vitro Cmax and tmax data) which was complementary to the normal cumulative data obtained. A good correlation with historical reported in vivo data validated the usefulness of the method for predicting in vivo drug elution behaviour. PMID:27523788

  9. Preparation of a novel starch-derived three-dimensional ordered macroporous carbon for improving the dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of water-insoluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Chao; Hao, Yanna; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Qiu, Yang; Jiang, Jie; Yu, Tong; Ji, Peng

    2016-01-25

    In our study, soluble starch was applied as a novel carbon source for preparing three-dimensional ordered macroporous carbon (3DOMC) using monodisperse silica nanospheres as the hard template. The 3DOMC was used as an insoluble drug carrier when it was found that it could markedly improve the water solubility of felodipine (FDP). The structural features of 3DOMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 3DOMC structure was found to have a higher drug loading than microporous and mesoporous structures, and the interconnected nanostructure effectively inhibited the formation of drug crystals. FDP, belonging to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System II (BCSII), was chosen as the model drug and was loaded into the 3DOMC structure by solvent evaporation. The state of FDP in the 3DOMC structure was characterized by powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results obtained showed that FDP was present in the pores in an amorphous or microcrystalline state. In vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that 3DOMC could significantly improve the drug dissolution rate, but the FDP-3DOMC self-made common tablets had the disadvantage of a burst effect. For this reason, osmotic pump technology was used to control the drug release rate. We developed a potentially useful insoluble drug carrier for pharmaceutical applications.

  10. Large-scale combining signals from both biomedical literature and the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) to improve post-marketing drug safety signal detection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Independent data sources can be used to augment post-marketing drug safety signal detection. The vast amount of publicly available biomedical literature contains rich side effect information for drugs at all clinical stages. In this study, we present a large-scale signal boosting approach that combines over 4 million records in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and over 21 million biomedical articles. Results The datasets are comprised of 4,285,097 records from FAERS and 21,354,075 MEDLINE articles. We first extracted all drug-side effect (SE) pairs from FAERS. Our study implemented a total of seven signal ranking algorithms. We then compared these different ranking algorithms before and after they were boosted with signals from MEDLINE sentences or abstracts. Finally, we manually curated all drug-cardiovascular (CV) pairs that appeared in both data sources and investigated whether our approach can detect many true signals that have not been included in FDA drug labels. We extracted a total of 2,787,797 drug-SE pairs from FAERS with a low initial precision of 0.025. The ranking algorithm combined signals from both FAERS and MEDLINE, significantly improving the precision from 0.025 to 0.371 for top-ranked pairs, representing a 13.8 fold elevation in precision. We showed by manual curation that drug-SE pairs that appeared in both data sources were highly enriched with true signals, many of which have not yet been included in FDA drug labels. Conclusions We have developed an efficient and effective drug safety signal ranking and strengthening approach We demonstrate that large-scale combining information from FAERS and biomedical literature can significantly contribute to drug safety surveillance. PMID:24428898

  11. Up-Conversion Y2O3:Yb(3+),Er(3+) Hollow Spherical Drug Carrier with Improved Degradability for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Sun, Wentong; Liu, Huifang; Jin, Yi; Li, Zhenhua; Liang, Xing-Jie; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-09-28

    The rare earth hollow spheres with up-conversion luminescence properties have shown potential applications in drug delivery and bioimaging fields. However, there have been few reports for the degradation properties of rare earth oxide drug carriers. Herein, uniform and well-dispersed Y2O3:Yb(3+),Er(3+) hollow spheres (YOHSs) have been fabricated by a general Pechini sol-gel process with melamine formaldehyde colloidal spheres as template. The novel YOHSs with up-conversion luminescence has good drug loading amount and drug-release efficiency; moreover, it exhibits pH-responsive release patterns. In particular, the YOHSs sample exhibits low cytotoxicity and excellent degradable properties in acid buffer. After the sample was loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX), the antitumor result in vitro indicates that YOHS-DOX might be effective in cancer treatment. The animal imaging test also reveals that the YOHSs drug carrier can be used as an outstanding luminescent probe for bioimaging in vivo application prospects. The results suggest that the degradable drug carrier with up-conversion luminescence may enhance the delivery efficiency of drugs and improve the cancer therapy in clinical applications. PMID:27589262

  12. Up-Conversion Y2O3:Yb(3+),Er(3+) Hollow Spherical Drug Carrier with Improved Degradability for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ge, Kun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Sun, Wentong; Liu, Huifang; Jin, Yi; Li, Zhenhua; Liang, Xing-Jie; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-09-28

    The rare earth hollow spheres with up-conversion luminescence properties have shown potential applications in drug delivery and bioimaging fields. However, there have been few reports for the degradation properties of rare earth oxide drug carriers. Herein, uniform and well-dispersed Y2O3:Yb(3+),Er(3+) hollow spheres (YOHSs) have been fabricated by a general Pechini sol-gel process with melamine formaldehyde colloidal spheres as template. The novel YOHSs with up-conversion luminescence has good drug loading amount and drug-release efficiency; moreover, it exhibits pH-responsive release patterns. In particular, the YOHSs sample exhibits low cytotoxicity and excellent degradable properties in acid buffer. After the sample was loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX), the antitumor result in vitro indicates that YOHS-DOX might be effective in cancer treatment. The animal imaging test also reveals that the YOHSs drug carrier can be used as an outstanding luminescent probe for bioimaging in vivo application prospects. The results suggest that the degradable drug carrier with up-conversion luminescence may enhance the delivery efficiency of drugs and improve the cancer therapy in clinical applications.

  13. The encapsulation of idarubicin within liposomes using the novel EDTA ion gradient method ensures improved drug retention in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gubernator, Jerzy; Chwastek, Grzegorz; Korycińska, Mariola; Stasiuk, Maria; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Lewrick, Felicitas; Süss, Regine; Kozubek, Arkadiusz

    2010-08-17

    The purpose of this study was to design a new stable liposomal formulation for the anticancer drug idarubicin. Idarubicin is a relatively hydrophobic member of the anthracycline family. It exhibits pronounced bilayer interactions leading to rapid in vivo drug release from liposomes. This rapid drug leakage is due to the presence of cholesterol and charged lipids in the liposomal bilayer. Therefore, a novel method of remote drug loading was developed to prevent rapid drug release from PEGylated cholesterol-containing liposomes. This method uses EDTA disodium or diammonium salt as an agent to form low solubility complexes between the drug and EDTA molecules inside the liposomes, thus yielding improved drug retention. The efficiency of idarubicin encapsulation is close to 98% at a drug to lipid molar ratio of 1:5. An in vitro long-term storage experiment confirmed the high stability of the liposomes. The in vivo studies also showed the superiority of the new idarubicin formulation over the recently used remote loading methods. The plasma level of idarubicin was much higher when EDTA liposomes were used. The presented results fully demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method of idarubicin encapsulation over existing methods. The method offers the possibility of encapsulating not only all the anthracyclines, but also other weakly amphiphilic bases within the liposomes. PMID:20510316

  14. Anti-infective Activity of 2-Cyano-3-Acrylamide Inhibitors with Improved Drug-Like Properties against Two Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Karla D; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Sun, Duxin; Wen, Bo; He, Miao; Sun, Hanshi; O'Riordan, Mary X D; Wobus, Christiane E

    2016-07-01

    Due to the rise of antibiotic resistance and the small number of effective antiviral drugs, new approaches for treating infectious diseases are urgently needed. Identifying targets for host-based therapies represents an emerging strategy for drug discovery. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a central mode of signaling in the eukaryotic cell and may be a promising target for therapies that bolster the host's ability to control infection. Deubiquitinase (DUB) enzymes are key regulators of the host inflammatory response, and we previously demonstrated that a selective DUB inhibitor and its derivative promote anti-infective activities in host cells. To find compounds with anti-infective efficacy but improved toxicity profiles, we tested a library of predominantly 2-cyano-3-acrylamide small-molecule DUB inhibitors for anti-infective activity in macrophages against two intracellular pathogens: murine norovirus (MNV) and Listeria monocytogenes We identified compound C6, which inhibited DUB activity in human and murine cells and reduced intracellular replication of both pathogens with minimal toxicity in cell culture. Treatment with C6 did not significantly affect the ability of macrophages to internalize virus, suggesting that the anti-infective activity interferes with postentry stages of the MNV life cycle. Metabolic stability and pharmacokinetic assays showed that C6 has a half-life in mouse liver microsomes of ∼20 min and has a half-life of approximately 4 h in mice when administered intravenously. Our results provide a framework for targeting the host ubiquitin system in the development of host-based therapies for infectious disease. Compound C6 represents a promising tool with which to elucidate the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to infection. PMID:27139470

  15. Endothelial differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells is improved by epigenetic modifying drug BIX-01294.

    PubMed

    Culmes, Mihaela; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Burgkart, Rainer; Nüssler, Andreas K; Guenther, Michael; Wagner, Ernst; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2013-02-01

    Chromatin remodeling plays an essential role in regulation of gene transcription. Consequently, targeted changes in chromatin may also augment pluripotency of somatic cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of epigenetic drug BIX-01294 (BIX), a histone G9a inhibitor, on DNA methylation, expression of pluripotency genes POU5F1 (isoform a), NANOG, KLF4, and CMYC in mesenchymal stem cells, and the ability to increase their differentiation potential into endothelial cells (ECs). Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) were isolated from abdominal adipose tissue. Cells were pre-treated with BIX for 48h and further differentiated in endothelial medium for 7 and 14 days. Global DNA methylation was determined by MethyLight application, expression of genes for pluripotency, endothelial and angiogenic markers by SYBRGreen-based real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry, and immunobloting. Following treatment with BIX, DNA methylation status of AdMSCs was significantly reduced by 53% (p=0.008), the expression of POU5F1 and NANOG was increased by 2.2-fold (p=0.016) and 1.5-fold (p<0.001), respectively. Furthermore, BIX pre-treatment improved the differentiation capacity of AdMSCs into ECs and significantly increased expression of several endothelial markers and factors involved in blood vessel formation: VCAM-1, PECAM-1, von Willebrand factor, VEGFR-2, PDGF, and ANG-1 in comparison with AdMSCs without BIX pre-treatment. In the present study we demonstrate that epigenetic modifying drug BIX-01294 is able to increase the ability of AdMSCs to differentiate into ECs engaging DNA and histone methylation. Hence, BIX-01294 might serve as a simple tool to increase the differentiation potential of AdMSCs. PMID:23246144

  16. Submicron-Bubble-Enhanced Focused Ultrasound for Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption and Improved CNS Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Chien-Yu; Lee, Ya-Hsuan; Huang, Chih-Ying; Ma, Yan-Jung; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been proven to induce transient blood–brain barrier opening (BBB-opening). However, FUS-induced inertial cavitation of microbubbles can also result in erythrocyte extravasations. Here we investigated whether induction of submicron bubbles to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB-opening and thereby eliminate erythrocyte extravasations in a rat brain model. FUS was delivered with acoustic pressures of 0.1–4.5 MPa using either in-house manufactured submicron bubbles or standard SonoVue microbubbles. Wideband and subharmonic emissions from bubbles were used to quantify inertial and stable cavitation, respectively. Erythrocyte extravasations were evaluated by in vivo post-treatment magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging, and finally by histological confirmation. We found that excitation of submicron bubbles with resonant frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) can greatly limit inertial cavitation while enhancing stable cavitation. The BBB-opening was mainly caused by stable cavitation, whereas the erythrocyte extravasation was closely correlated with inertial cavitation. Our technique allows extensive reduction of inertial cavitation to induce safe BBB-opening. Furthermore, the safety issue of BBB-opening was not compromised by prolonging FUS exposure time, and the local drug concentrations in the brain tissues were significantly improved to 60 times (BCNU; 18.6 µg versus 0.3 µg) by using chemotherapeutic agent-loaded submicron bubbles with FUS. This study provides important information towards the goal of successfully translating FUS brain drug delivery into clinical use. PMID:24788566

  17. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S

    2016-10-21

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  18. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  19. Improving Drug Design: An Update on Recent Applications of Efficiency Metrics, Strategies for Replacing Problematic Elements, and Compounds in Nontraditional Drug Space.

    PubMed

    Meanwell, Nicholas A

    2016-04-18

    Drug discovery and development is a complex and lengthy enterprise that suffers from high rates of candidate attrition at all stages of the process. The physical, biological, and toxicological properties of a drug candidate are inextricably linked to its structure, and once a molecule has been synthesized, all subsequent studies along the development path are focused only on assessing and understanding its properties in greater detail. Unfortunately, a full prediction of the biological properties of a molecule from an analysis of its 2- or 3-dimensional structure is currently beyond our expertise. This backdrop mandates that considerable care be taken at the design stage if a molecule is to be successful in testing a mechanistic concept underlying a disease process and to progress into late stage clinical trials and, ultimately, marketing approval. While there are multiple potential causes of candidate attrition, an introspective analysis of drug design practices over the past decade has focused attention on the perception that contemporary molecules are unnecessarily obese, burdened by high molecular weight and excessive lipophilicity. This practice is believed to have its roots in the singular pursuit of enhancing potency during lead optimization rather than adopting a more holistic approach to drug design that gives broader consideration to how structural features affect developability properties. In an effort to provide the medicinal chemistry community with practical guideposts to enhancing compound quality in the drug design phase and which can readily be applied, a series of efficiency indices have been proposed that attempt to define aspects of compound quality in the context of a series of physicochemical parameters. Of these metrics, lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE or LipE), which provides an index of the dependence of the potency of a molecule on its intrinsic lipophilicity, has been characterized as the most robust metric that has potential for broad

  20. Modified Release and Improved Stability of Unstable BCS II Drug by Using Cyclodextrin Complex as Carrier To Remotely Load Drug into Niosomes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Liandi; Wu, Delin; Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Minmin; Liu, Hongchun; Wang, Caifen; Gui, Shuangying; Geng, Meiyu; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-01-01

    In answering to the challenge of enzymatic unstability of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class II drugs, an effective remote loading strategy was developed to successfully incorporate the drug-cyclodextrin (CD) complex into niosomes to modify the release and stability of a drug candidate, pseudolaric acid B (PAB). Judged by binding constants, and combined solubilization effects of pH and CD complexation on PAB at different pH, the complex internalization driven by a transmembrane pH gradient (from 2.0 to 7.4) and the dynamic shifting of PAB-CD complexation equilibrium at this gradient were introduced. The transfer of PAB-CD complex into the internal aqueous phase of niosomes at 60 °C was primarily verified by synchrotron radiation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The remote loading samples behaved as retarded release at pH 5.8, 6.8, and 7.4, for which the stability of PAB in rat plasma was significantly enhanced (about 8.1-fold), in comparison with niosomes prepared by the passive and lipid bilayer loading of PAB. The drug-carrier interaction based release modeling was further fitted, and the convection rate constant (ks) and free energy difference between free and bound states (ΔG) indicated the strongest PAB-carrier interactions in remote loading niosomes. The remote loading strategy also reduced the CD-cholesterol interaction and provided better physical stability of the system. In conclusion, the remote loading of drug-CD complex into niosomes provides advantages to modify the release and enhance the stability of unstable BCS class II drug. PMID:26569615

  1. Specialty drug coupons lower out-of-pocket costs and may improve adherence at the risk of increasing premiums.

    PubMed

    Starner, Catherine I; Alexander, G Caleb; Bowen, Kevin; Qiu, Yang; Wickersham, Peter J; Gleason, Patrick P

    2014-10-01

    Expenditures for specialty drugs account for more than 25 percent of total US drug spending and have been increasing at more than 13 percent annually. We examined insurers' role in maintaining the affordability and accessibility of specialty drugs while maximizing their value. We conducted two analyses: one using an administrative claims database with information on more than ten million commercially insured patients and another using the same database combined with the drug prescription records from a specialty pharmacy. First, we examined the prevalence of specialty drug coupons and the degree to which these reduced patients' out-of-pocket costs, focusing on 264,801 prescriptions. Second, we quantified the association between the magnitude of out-of-pocket costs for specialty drugs and patients' abandonment of their new or restarted therapy, focusing on a group of nearly 16,000 patients. We found that drug coupons accounted for $21.2 million of patients' $35.3 million annual out-of-pocket costs. In the vast majority of cases, coupons reduced monthly cost sharing to less than $250, a point at which patients were far less likely to abandon therapy with biologic anti-inflammatory drugs or with drugs for multiple sclerosis. However, by reducing cost sharing, coupons may also circumvent efforts to encourage patients to use the most cost-effective drugs.

  2. A Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-EDTA-doped structurally controllable hollow mesoporous carbon for improving the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and in vivo tracing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Zhao, Yating; Cui, Yu; Yue, Yang; Gao, Yikun; Zhao, Qinfu; Liu, Jie; Wang, Siling

    2016-08-01

    A structurally controllable fluorescence-labeled hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) was simply prepared to improve the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and further trace their delivery process in vivo. The hollow structure was derived from an inverse replica process using mesoporous silica as a template and the fluorescent label was prepared by doping the carboxylated HMC with a confinement of Eu(3+)/Gd(3+)-EDTA. The physicochemical properties of the composites were systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectra tests prior to studying their effects on drug-release behavior and biodistribution. As a result, the thickness of the carrier's shell was adjusted from 70 nm to 130 nm and the maximum drug loading was up to 73.6%. The model drug carvedilol (CAR) showed sustained release behavior compared to CAR commercial capsules, and the dissolution rate slowed down as the shells got thicker. AUC0-48h and Tmax were enlarged 2.2 and 6.5 fold, respectively, which demonstrated that oral bioavailability was successfully improved. Bioimaging tests showed that the novel carbon vehicle had a long residence time in the gastrointestinal tract. In short, the newly designed HMC is a promising drug carrier for both oral bioavailability improvement and in vivo tracing. PMID:27334550

  3. A Eu3+/Gd3+-EDTA-doped structurally controllable hollow mesoporous carbon for improving the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and in vivo tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Zhao, Yating; Cui, Yu; Yue, Yang; Gao, Yikun; Zhao, Qinfu; Liu, Jie; Wang, Siling

    2016-08-01

    A structurally controllable fluorescence-labeled hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) was simply prepared to improve the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and further trace their delivery process in vivo. The hollow structure was derived from an inverse replica process using mesoporous silica as a template and the fluorescent label was prepared by doping the carboxylated HMC with a confinement of Eu3+/Gd3+-EDTA. The physicochemical properties of the composites were systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectra tests prior to studying their effects on drug-release behavior and biodistribution. As a result, the thickness of the carrier’s shell was adjusted from 70 nm to 130 nm and the maximum drug loading was up to 73.6%. The model drug carvedilol (CAR) showed sustained release behavior compared to CAR commercial capsules, and the dissolution rate slowed down as the shells got thicker. AUC0-48h and Tmax were enlarged 2.2 and 6.5 fold, respectively, which demonstrated that oral bioavailability was successfully improved. Bioimaging tests showed that the novel carbon vehicle had a long residence time in the gastrointestinal tract. In short, the newly designed HMC is a promising drug carrier for both oral bioavailability improvement and in vivo tracing.

  4. Can mobile phone messages to drug sellers improve treatment of childhood diarrhoea?--A randomized controlled trial in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Willa; Woodman, Benjamin; Chatterji, Minki

    2015-03-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc are the recommended treatment in developing countries for the management of uncomplicated diarrhoea in children under five (World Health Organization and UNICEF 2004). However, drug sellers often recommend costly and unnecessary treatments instead. This article reports findings from an experiment to encourage licensed chemical sellers (LCS) in Ghana to recommend ORS and zinc for the management of childhood diarrhoea. The intervention consisted of mobile phone text messages (Short Message Service or SMS) sent to a randomly assigned group of LCS who had been trained on the diarrhoea management protocols recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The SMS campaign comprised informational messages and interactive quizzes sent over an 8-week period. The study measured the impact of the SMS messages on both reported and actual practices. Analysis of data from both face-to-face interviews and mystery client visits shows that the SMS intervention improved providers' self-reported practices but not their actual practices. The study also finds that actual practices deviate substantially from reported practices. PMID:25759456

  5. Mitigating the threat of artemisinin resistance in Africa: improvement of drug-resistance surveillance and response systems

    PubMed Central

    Talisuna, Ambrose O; Karema, Corine; Ogutu, Bernhards; Juma, Elizabeth; Logedi, John; Nyandigisi, Andrew; Mulenga, Modest; Mbacham, Wilfred F; Roper, Cally; Guerin, Philippe J; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Snow, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has emerged in western Cambodia and has been detected in western Thailand. The situation is ominously reminiscent of the emergence of resistance to chloroquine and to sulfadoxine–pyrimethamine several decades ago. Artemisinin resistance is a major threat to global public health, with the most severe potential effects in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease burden is highest and systems for monitoring and containment of resistance are inadequate. The mechanisms that underlie artemisinin resistance are not fully understood. The main phenotypic trait associated with resistance is a substantial delay in parasite clearance, so far reported in southeast Asia but not in Africa. One of the pillars of the WHO global plan for artemisinin resistance containment is to increase monitoring and surveillance. In this Personal View, we propose strategies that should be adopted by malaria-endemic countries in Africa: resource mobilisation to reactivate regional surveillance networks, establishment of baseline parasite clearance profiles to serve as benchmarks to track emerging artemisinin resistance, improved data sharing to allow pooled analyses to identify rare events, modelling of risk factors for drug resistance, and development and validation of new approaches to monitor resistance. PMID:23099083

  6. Improved drug delivery properties of PVDF membranes functionalized with beta-cyclodextrin--application to guided tissue regeneration in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Boschin, F; Blanchemain, N; Bria, M; Delcourt-Debruyne, E; Morcellet, M; Hildebrand, H F; Martel, B

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a membrane for guided tissue regeneration applicable in periodontology that could release antimicrobial agent during the healing period. Our strategy consisted to graft beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), a molecule that is known to form inclusion complexes with a large variety of drugs, onto PVDF membranes. Grafting occurred by using citric acid that provoked a crosslinking reaction of beta-CD, and the resulting polymer was imprisoned into the porous structure of the PVDF membrane. The reaction produced a weight increase of the membrane, the range of which depended on the temperature and on the time of curing applied in the process. The biological behavior of the membranes evaluated by proliferation and vitality tests showed good proliferation and improved activity of L132 epithelial cells on the raw and on the grafted membranes. Doxycyclin (DOX) and chlorhexidine (CHX) were used as antimicrobial agents. Their inclusion into the beta-CD cavity in aqueous solutions was confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. After the impregnation of the membranes with DOX and CHX, their release was studied in vitro in batch type experiments and measured by UV spectrophotometry. Low amounts of DOX and CHX were delivered from the raw membranes within the first few hours of tests. Grafted membranes, however, delivered DOX and CHX in larger quantities within 24 h and 10 days respectively. PMID:16758457

  7. Improving drug accumulation and photothermal efficacy in tumor depending on size of ICG loaded lipid-polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengfei; Zheng, Mingbin; Yue, Caixia; Luo, Zhenyu; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Sheng, Zonghai; Zheng, Cuifang; Cai, Lintao

    2014-07-01

    A key challenge to strengthen anti-tumor efficacy is to improve drug accumulation in tumors through size control. To explore the biodistribution and tumor accumulation of nanoparticles, we developed indocyanine green (ICG) loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) -lecithin-polyethylene glycol (PEG) core-shell nanoparticles (INPs) with 39 nm, 68 nm and 116 nm via single-step nanoprecipitation. These INPs exhibited good monodispersity, excellent fluorescence and size stability, and enhanced temperature response after laser irradiation. Through cell uptake and photothermal efficiency in vitro, we demonstrated that 39 nm INPs were more easily be absorbed by pancreatic carcinoma tumor cells (BxPC-3) and showed better photothermal damage than that of 68 nm and 116 nm size of INPs. Simultaneously, the fluorescence of INPs offered a real-time imaging monitor for subcellular locating and in vivo metabolic distribution. Near-infrared imaging in vivo and photothermal therapy illustrated that 68 nm INPs showed the strongest efficiency to suppress tumor growth due to abundant accumulation in BxPC-3 xenograft tumor model. The findings revealed that a nontoxic, size-dependent, theranostic INPs model was built for in vivo cancer imaging and photothermal therapy without adverse effect.

  8. Can mobile phone messages to drug sellers improve treatment of childhood diarrhoea?--A randomized controlled trial in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Willa; Woodman, Benjamin; Chatterji, Minki

    2015-03-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc are the recommended treatment in developing countries for the management of uncomplicated diarrhoea in children under five (World Health Organization and UNICEF 2004). However, drug sellers often recommend costly and unnecessary treatments instead. This article reports findings from an experiment to encourage licensed chemical sellers (LCS) in Ghana to recommend ORS and zinc for the management of childhood diarrhoea. The intervention consisted of mobile phone text messages (Short Message Service or SMS) sent to a randomly assigned group of LCS who had been trained on the diarrhoea management protocols recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). The SMS campaign comprised informational messages and interactive quizzes sent over an 8-week period. The study measured the impact of the SMS messages on both reported and actual practices. Analysis of data from both face-to-face interviews and mystery client visits shows that the SMS intervention improved providers' self-reported practices but not their actual practices. The study also finds that actual practices deviate substantially from reported practices.

  9. Experience with the use of the Codonics Safe Label System(™) to improve labelling compliance of anaesthesia drugs.

    PubMed

    Ang, S B L; Hing, W C; Tung, S Y; Park, T

    2014-07-01

    The Codonics Safe Labeling System(™) (http://www.codonics.com/Products/SLS/flash/) is a piece of equipment that is able to barcode scan medications, read aloud the medication and the concentration and print a label of the appropriate concentration in the appropriate colour code. We decided to test this system in our facility to identify risks, benefits and usability. Our project comprised a baseline survey (25 anaesthesia cases during which 212 syringes were prepared from 223 drugs), an observational study (47 cases with 330 syringes prepared) and a user acceptability survey. The baseline compliance with all labelling requirements was 58%. In the observational study the compliance using the Codonics system was 98.6% versus 63.8% with conventional labelling. In the user acceptability survey the majority agreed the Codonics machine was easy to use, more legible and adhered with better security than the conventional preprinted label. However, most were neutral when asked about the likelihood of flexibility and customisation and were dissatisfied with the increased workload. Our findings suggest that the Codonics labelling machine is user-friendly and it improved syringe labelling compliance in our study. However, staff need to be willing to follow proper labelling workflow rather than batch label during preparation. Future syringe labelling equipment developers need to concentrate on user interface issues to reduce human factor and workflow problems. Support logistics are also an important consideration prior to implementation of any new labelling system. PMID:24967766

  10. Improved oral bioavailability of capsaicin via liposomal nanoformulation: preparation, in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Wang, Miaomiao; Zhang, Jiajia; Peng, Wei; Firempong, Caleb Kesse; Deng, Wenwen; Wang, Qilong; Wang, Shicheng; Shi, Feng; Yu, Jiangnan; Xu, Ximing; Zhang, Weiming

    2015-04-01

    This study innovatively prepared an effective capsaicin-loaded liposome, a nanoformulation with fewer irritants, for oral administration. The in vitro and in vivo properties of the liposomal encapsulation were investigated and the potential possibility of oral administration evaluated. The liposomal agent composed of phospholipid, cholesterol, sodium cholate and isopropyl myristate was prepared using film-dispersion method. A level A in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) was established for the first time, which demonstrated an excellent IVIVC of both formulated and free capsaicin in oral administration. Physicochemical characterizations including mean particle size, zeta (ζ) potential and average encapsulation efficiency of capsaicin-loaded liposome were found to be 52.2 ± 1.3 nm, -41.5 ± 2.71 mv and 81.9 ± 2.43 %, respectively. In vivo, liposomal encapsulation allowed a 3.34-fold increase in relative bioavailability compared to free capsaicin. The gastric mucosa irritation studies indicated that the liposomal system was a safe carrier for oral administration. These results support the fact that capsaicin, an effective drug for the treatment of neuropathic pain, could be encapsulated in liposome for improved oral bioavailability. The excellent IVIVC of capsaicin-loaded liposome could also be a promising tool in liposomal formulation development with an added advantage of reduced animal testing.

  11. Physical characterizations and sustained release profiling of gastroretentive drug delivery systems with improved floating and swelling capabilities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chen; Ho, Hsiu-O; Lee, Tzu-Yu; Sheu, Ming-Thau

    2013-01-30

    The aim was to develop gastroretentive drug delivery systems (GRDDSs) by combining floating and swelling. GRDDS tablets formulated with hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), chitosan (CS) and sodium bicarbonate (SB) for evaluating floating capacity (floating lag time and duration) and swelling characteristics. CS was used because it was swellable in acidic media and biocompatible. Losartan was incorporated into the optimized formulations for sustained release profiling. Results demonstrated that for those formulations at HEC:CS ratio of 5:5 containing CS, both the floating lag time and floating duration were optimal and reached the preferred swelling effect and sustain for 24h. Adding SB improved the floating capabilities for all ratios of HEC:CS, but reduced the swelling ability for those formulations containing a higher portion of low viscosity grade CS. Sustained release profiles for losartan in those formulations were achievable, using all viscosity grades of CS at all examined HEC:CS ratios; however, it is more adjustable at different HEC:CS ratios when using a lower viscosity grade of CS. Optimized GRDDS formulations for losartan composed of an equivalent ratio of HEC to CS with 20mg SB resulted in the tablets floating for more than 16 h and an adjustable sustained release profile. PMID:23237874

  12. Improved Prediction of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes Through Simulations of Dynamics and Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, M Cummins; Sobie, E A

    2016-10-01

    The ventricular arrhythmia Torsades de Pointes (TdP) is a common form of drug-induced cardiotoxicity, but prediction of this arrhythmia remains an unresolved issue in drug development. Current assays to evaluate arrhythmia risk are limited by poor specificity and a lack of mechanistic insight. We addressed this important unresolved issue through a novel computational approach that combined simulations of drug effects on dynamics with statistical analysis and machine-learning. Drugs that blocked multiple ion channels were simulated in ventricular myocyte models, and metrics computed from the action potential and intracellular (Ca(2+) ) waveform were used to construct classifiers that distinguished between arrhythmogenic and nonarrhythmogenic drugs. We found that: (1) these classifiers provide superior risk prediction; (2) drug-induced changes to both the action potential and intracellular (Ca(2+) ) influence risk; and (3) cardiac ion channels not typically assessed may significantly affect risk. Our algorithm demonstrates the value of systematic simulations in predicting pharmacological toxicity.

  13. Project Self-Esteem: A Parent Involvement Program for Improving Self-Esteem and Preventing Drug and Alcohol Abuse, K-6. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sandy; Bielen, Peggy

    This guide presents Project Self-Esteem, a program for improving self-esteem and preventing drug and alcohol abuse in kindergarten through grade 6. Chapter I presents the team leader's guide and discusses introducing the program to the principal, school staff, and parents. Chapter II focuses on kindergarten and includes lessons on being a friend…

  14. Ionotropic Cross-linked Carbo-protein Micro Matrix System: An Approach for Improvement of Drug Release, Compaction and Tableting behavior of Losartan Potassium.

    PubMed

    Khandai, Madhusmruti; Chakraborty, Santanu; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research work is to develop carbo-protein polymeric complex based sustain release microspheres of losartan potassium and investigate the ability of this dosage form to improve the flowability, compressibility and tableting properties of losartan potassium. The influence of silk sericin, alginate and its blend on various physicochemical parameters and in vitro drug release pattern were studied to optimize the concentration of polymeric blend required for 12 h. sustain release. Optimized batch was subjected to different flowability, compressibility and tableting properties studies to observe the effects of carbo-protein microspheres on flow properties. Results indicated that the concentration of sericin was found to be the main influential factor for prolonged drug release. Different micromeritic studies revealed that the poor flowability and compressibility properties of pure losartan potassium were significantly improved by this algino-sericin microspheric dosage form. Research findings also revealed that plasticity, die filling behavior and tableting properties of the pure drug were significantly improved by this microsphere formulation. So these prospective results concluded that carbo-protein polymeric microspheres helps to sustain the drug release for prolong hours as well as improve the flowability, compressibility and tableting properties of losartan potassium.

  15. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S

    2016-10-21

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX. PMID:27640312

  16. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidases Improves Drug Diffusion and Increases Efficacy of Cytotoxic Treatment in 3D Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Friedrich; Röhrig, Florian; Vorlová, Sandra; Gätzner, Sabine; Kuhn, Anja; Ergün, Süleyman; Henke, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are characterized by a rigid, highly cross-linked extracellular matrix (ECM), which impedes homogeneous drug distribution and potentially protects malignant cells from exposure to therapeutics. Lysyl oxidases are major contributors to tissue stiffness and the elevated expression of these enzymes observed in most cancers might influence drug distribution and efficacy. We examined the effect of lysyl oxidases on drug distribution and efficacy in 3D in vitro assay systems. In our experiments elevated lysyl oxidase activity was responsible for reduced drug diffusion under hypoxic conditions and consequently impaired cytotoxicity of various chemotherapeutics. This effect was only observed in 3D settings but not in 2D-cell culture, confirming that lysyl oxidases affect drug efficacy by modification of the ECM and do not confer a direct desensitizing effect. Both drug diffusion and efficacy were strongly enhanced by inhibition of lysyl oxidases. The results from the in vitro experiments correlated with tumor drug distribution in vivo, and predicted response to therapeutics in murine tumor models. Our results demonstrate that lysyl oxidase activity modulates the physical barrier function of ECM for small molecule drugs influencing their therapeutic efficacy. Targeting this process has the potential to significantly enhance therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of malignant diseases. PMID:26620400

  17. Understanding the Assessment of Psychotropic Drug Harms in Clinical Trials to Improve Social Workers' Role in Medication Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Shannon; Cohen, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to facilitate social work practitioners' understanding of how psychotropic drug harms are assessed in clinical trials and to make specific suggestions for social workers' increased involvement in detecting drug harms in their clients. The authors undertook a comprehensive review of interdisciplinary…

  18. ESI-Q-TOF structural characterization of prominent MS/MS product ions of veterinary drugs for improved regulatory monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction The misuse of veterinary drugs in animal production could result in a negative impact on food safety, drug resistance, and in the environment. Consequently, countries around the world have regulated their use, which requires effective methods for the qualitative and quantitative residu...

  19. The Anti-Fasciolasis Properties of Silver Nanoparticles Produced by Trichoderma harzianum and Their Improvement of the Anti-Fasciolasis Drug Triclabendazole

    PubMed Central

    Gherbawy, Youssuf A.; Shalaby, Ismail M.; Abd El-sadek, Mahmoud Syed; Elhariry, Hesham M.; Banaja, AbdelElah A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, new strains of Fasciola demonstrated drug resistance, which increased the need for new drugs or improvement of the present drugs. Nanotechnology is expected to open some new opportunities to fight and prevent diseases using an atomic scale tailoring of materials. The ability to uncover the structure and function of biosystems at the nanoscale, stimulates research leading to improvement in biology, biotechnology, medicine and healthcare. The size of nanomaterials is similar to that of most biological molecules and structures; therefore, nanomaterials can be useful for both in vivo and in vitro biomedical research and applications. Therefore, this work aimed to isolate fungal strains from Taif soil samples, which have the ability to synthesize silver nanoparticles. The fungus Trichoderma harzianum, when challenged with silver nitrate solution, accumulated silver nanoparticles (AgNBs) on the surface of its cell wall in 72 h. These nanoparticles, dislodged by ultrasonication, showed an absorption peak at 420 nm in a UV-visible spectrum, corresponding to the plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. The transmission electron micrographs of dislodged nanoparticles in aqueous solution showed the production of reasonably monodisperse silver nanoparticles (average particle size: 4.66 nm) by the fungus. The percentage of non hatching eggs treated with the Triclabendazole drug was 69.67%, while this percentage increased to 89.67% in combination with drug and AgNPs. PMID:24196355

  20. A long-term three dimensional liver co-culture system for improved prediction of clinically relevant drug-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinova, Radina; Boess, Franziska; Suter, Laura; Weiser, Thomas; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    observed in vivo. ► 3D liver co-cultures can detect species-specific drug toxicity observed in vivo. ► This in vitro model may improve assessment of human relevance of preclinical findings.

  1. Microemulsions containing long-chain oil ethyl oleate improve the oral bioavailability of piroxicam by increasing drug solubility and lymphatic transportation simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qiao; Song, Jia; You, Xiuhua; Xu, Dongling; Wang, Kexin; Song, Jiaqi; Guo, Qin; Li, Pengyu; Wu, Chuanbin; Hu, Haiyan

    2016-09-25

    Drug solubility and lymphatic transport enhancements are two main pathways to improve drug oral bioavailability for microemulsions. However, it is not easy to have both achieved simultaneously because excipients used for improving lymphatic transport were usually insufficient in forming microemulsions and solubilizing drugs. Our research is to explore whether ethyl oleate, an oil effective in developing microemulsions with desired solubilizing capability, could increase bioavailability to a higher extent by enhancing lymphatic transport. As a long-chain oil, ethyl oleate won larger microemulsion area than short-chain tributyrin and medium-chain GTCC. In contrast, long-chain soybean oil failed to prepare microemulsions. The solubility of piroxicam in ethyl oleate microemulsions (ME-C) increased by about 30 times than in water. ME-C also won significantly higher AUC0-t compared with tributyrin microemulsions (ME-A) and GTCC microemulsions (ME-B). Oral bioavailability in ME-C decreased by 38% after lymphatic transport was blocked by cycloheximide, severer than those in ME-A and ME-B (8% and 34%). These results suggest that improving lymphatic transport and solubility simultaneously might be a novel strategy to increase drug oral bioavailability to a higher extent than increasing solubility only. Ethyl oleate is a preferred oil candidate due to its integrated advantages of high solubilizing capability, large microemulsion area and effective lymphatic transport. PMID:27473280

  2. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety: a cross-sectional survey in the private sector in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Clarke, Siân E; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S; Magnussen, Pascal; LaRussa, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the private health sector in Uganda. Methods A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop characteristics, training of staff in management of pneumonia, availability of guidelines and basic equipment, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged <5 years. The main study outcome was the proportion of private health facilities prescribing an antibiotic. Results A total of 170 registered drug shops were surveyed between August and October 2014. The majority of drug shops, 93.5% were prescribing antibiotics, especially amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (septrin). The professional qualification of a provider was significantly associated with this practice, p=0.04; where lower cadre staff (nursing assistants and enrolled nurses) overprescribed antibiotics. A third, 29.4% of drug shop providers reported that antibiotics were the first-line treatment for children with diarrhoea; yet the standard guideline is to give oral rehydration salts and zinc tablets. Only few providers, 8.2%, had training on antibiotics, with 10.6% on pneumonia case management. Further to this, 7.1% drug shops had WHO-Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines, and a negligible proportion (<1%) had respiratory timers and baby weighing scales. Although the majority of providers, 82.4%, knew severe signs and symptoms of pneumonia, few, 17.6%, knew that amoxicillin was the first-line drug for treatment of pneumonia in children according to the guidelines. Conclusions There is urgent need to regulate drug shop practices of prescribing and selling

  3. Development of a large-scale chemogenomics database to improve drug candidate selection and to understand mechanisms of chemical toxicity and action.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Brigitte; Tugendreich, Stuart; Pearson, Cecelia I; Ayanoglu, Eser; Baumhueter, Susanne; Bostian, Keith A; Brady, Lindsay; Browne, Leslie J; Calvin, John T; Day, Gwo-Jen; Breckenridge, Naiomi; Dunlea, Shane; Eynon, Barrett P; Furness, L Mike; Ferng, Joe; Fielden, Mark R; Fujimoto, Susan Y; Gong, Li; Hu, Christopher; Idury, Radha; Judo, Michael S B; Kolaja, Kyle L; Lee, May D; McSorley, Christopher; Minor, James M; Nair, Ramesh V; Natsoulis, Georges; Nguyen, Peter; Nicholson, Simone M; Pham, Hang; Roter, Alan H; Sun, Dongxu; Tan, Siqi; Thode, Silke; Tolley, Alexander M; Vladimirova, Antoaneta; Yang, Jian; Zhou, Zhiming; Jarnagin, Kurt

    2005-09-29

    Successful drug discovery requires accurate decision making in order to advance the best candidates from initial lead identification to final approval. Chemogenomics, the use of genomic tools in pharmacology and toxicology, offers a promising enhancement to traditional methods of target identification/validation, lead identification, efficacy evaluation, and toxicity assessment. To realize the value of chemogenomics information, a contextual database is needed to relate the physiological outcomes induced by diverse compounds to the gene expression patterns measured in the same animals. Massively parallel gene expression characterization coupled with traditional assessments of drug candidates provides additional, important mechanistic information, and therefore a means to increase the accuracy of critical decisions. A large-scale chemogenomics database developed from in vivo treated rats provides the context and supporting data to enhance and accelerate accurate interpretation of mechanisms of toxicity and pharmacology of chemicals and drugs. To date, approximately 600 different compounds, including more than 400 FDA approved drugs, 60 drugs approved in Europe and Japan, 25 withdrawn drugs, and 100 toxicants, have been profiled in up to 7 different tissues of rats (representing over 3200 different drug-dose-time-tissue combinations). Accomplishing this task required evaluating and improving a number of in vivo and microarray protocols, including over 80 rigorous quality control steps. The utility of pairing clinical pathology assessments with gene expression data is illustrated using three anti-neoplastic drugs: carmustine, methotrexate, and thioguanine, which had similar effects on the blood compartment, but diverse effects on hepatotoxicity. We will demonstrate that gene expression events monitored in the liver can be used to predict pathological events occurring in that tissue as well as in hematopoietic tissues.

  4. Near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) analysis of drug-loading rate and particle size of risperidone microspheres by improved chemometric model.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia; Xie, Jing; Li, Chenliang; Lu, Jia-Hui; Meng, Qing-Fan; Yang, Zhaogang; Lee, Robert J; Wang, Di; Teng, Le-Sheng

    2014-09-10

    Microspheres have been developed as drug carriers in controlled drug delivery systems for years. In our present study, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is applied to analyze the particle size and drug loading rate in risperidone poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Various batches of risperidone PLGA microspheres were designed and prepared successfully. The particle size and drug-loading rate of all the samples were determined by a laser diffraction particle size analyzer and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. Monte Carlo algorithm combined with partial least squares (MCPLS) method was applied to identify the outliers and choose the numbers of calibration set. Furthermore, a series of preprocessing methods were performed to remove signal noise in NIR spectra. Moving window PLS and radical basis function neural network (RBFNN) methods were employed to establish calibration model. Our data demonstrated that PLS-developed model was only suitable for drug loading analysis in risperidone PLGA microspheres. Comparatively, RBFNN-based predictive models possess better fitting quality, predictive effect, and stability for both drug loading rate and particle size analysis. The correlation coefficients of calibration set (Rc(2)) were 0.935 and 0.880, respectively. The performance of optimum RBFNN models was confirmed by independent verification test with 15 samples. Collectively, our method is successfully performed to monitor drug-loading rate and particle size during risperidone PLGA microspheres preparation.

  5. Formulation Strategies to Improve the Bioavailability of Poorly Absorbed Drugs with Special Emphasis on Self-Emulsifying Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shweta; Kesarla, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Poorly water-soluble drug candidates are becoming more prevalent. It has been estimated that approximately 60–70% of the drug molecules are insufficiently soluble in aqueous media and/or have very low permeability to allow for their adequate and reproducible absorption from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) following oral administration. Formulation scientists have to adopt various strategies to enhance their absorption. Lipidic formulations are found to be a promising approach to combat the challenges. In this review article, potential advantages and drawbacks of various conventional techniques and the newer approaches specifically the self-emulsifying systems are discussed. Various components of the self-emulsifying systems and their selection criteria are critically reviewed. The attempts of various scientists to transform the liquid self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) to solid-SEDDS by adsorption, spray drying, lyophilization, melt granulation, extrusion, and so forth to formulate various dosage forms like self emulsifying capsules, tablets, controlled release pellets, beads, microspheres, nanoparticles, suppositories, implants, and so forth have also been included. Formulation of SEDDS is a potential strategy to deliver new drug molecules with enhanced bioavailability mostly exhibiting poor aqueous solubility. The self-emulsifying system offers various advantages over other drug delivery systems having potential to solve various problems associated with drugs of all the classes of biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). PMID:24459591

  6. 'Stealth' lipid-based formulations: poly(ethylene glycol)-mediated digestion inhibition improves oral bioavailability of a model poorly water soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Orlagh M; Williams, Hywel D; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-10-28

    supersaturation in comparison to digestible counterparts. This trend was also reflected in vivo, where the relative bioavailability of drug after administration in two stealth LBFs increased to 120% and 182% in comparison to analogous digestible (non-stealth) formulations. The results of the current study indicate that self-assembled "stealth" LBFs have potential as a novel means of improving LBF performance.

  7. 'Stealth' lipid-based formulations: poly(ethylene glycol)-mediated digestion inhibition improves oral bioavailability of a model poorly water soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Orlagh M; Williams, Hywel D; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-10-28

    supersaturation in comparison to digestible counterparts. This trend was also reflected in vivo, where the relative bioavailability of drug after administration in two stealth LBFs increased to 120% and 182% in comparison to analogous digestible (non-stealth) formulations. The results of the current study indicate that self-assembled "stealth" LBFs have potential as a novel means of improving LBF performance. PMID:25058571

  8. Improving brain drug targeting through exploitation of the nose-to-brain route: a physiological and pharmacokinetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Badhan, R K S; Kaur, M; Lungare, S; Obuobi, S

    2014-01-01

    With an ageing population and increasing prevalence of central-nervous system (CNS) disorders new approaches are required to sustain the development and successful delivery of therapeutics into the brain and CNS. CNS drug delivery is challenging due to the impermeable nature of the brain microvascular endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and which prevent the entry of a wide range of therapeutics into the brain. This review examines the role intranasal delivery may play in achieving direct brain delivery, for small molecular weight drugs, macromolecular therapeutics and cell-based therapeutics, by exploitation of the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways. This approach is thought to deliver drugs into the brain and CNS through bypassing the BBB. Details of the mechanism of transfer of administrated therapeutics, the pathways that lead to brain deposition, with a specific focus on therapeutic pharmacokinetics, and examples of successful CNS delivery will be explored.

  9. New formulation approaches to improve solubility and drug release from fixed dose combinations: case examples pioglitazone/glimepiride and ezetimibe/simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Taupitz, Thomas; Dressman, Jennifer B; Klein, Sandra

    2013-05-01

    Low aqueous solubility is often a limiting aspect to the bioavailability of poorly soluble, but highly permeable drugs (class II compounds according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System - BCS) administered in single drug products or as fixed dose combinations. The aim of the present series of experiments was to improve the solubility and dissolution of two fixed dose combination formulations (FDC), each consisting of two BCS class II drugs. The first FDC contained a weak acid (glimepiride) and a weak base (pioglitazone), while the second FDC contained two compounds (simvastatin and ezetimibe) that are essentially non-ionised over the physiological pH range. The formulation approaches used were as follows: (a) an inclusion complex with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD), (b) a solid dispersion with Soluplus, a new highly water soluble polyvinyl caprolactam - polyvinyl acetate - polyethylene glycol graft copolymer and (c) a ternary inclusion complex with both HP-β-CD and Soluplus. Solid state analysis was performed for the pure drugs, and all formulations using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The in vitro performance of the different formulation approaches, as gauged by solubility and dissolution experiments, was compared with that of the marketed products containing the respective fixed dose combinations, Tandemact 30 mg/4 mg tablets and Inegy 10 mg/40 mg tablets. The FDCs of the pure drugs and the marketed products showed very poor (and especially for pioglitazone, strongly pH-dependent) dissolution. By contrast, all binary and ternary inclusion complexes showed enhanced release for both drugs in the FDC. The ternary inclusion complex generated synergistic improvement in solubility and dissolution results for both FDCs. For example, in pH conditions of the fasted small intestine after a test duration of 240 min, we observed 100% dissolution of both drugs from the ternary pioglitazone/glimepiride (30 mg/4 mg) complex formulation, whereas from the

  10. Improvement in chemical and physical stability of fluvastatin drug through hydrogen bonding interactions with different polymer matrices.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, G Z; Papadimitriou, S; Karavas, E; Georgarakis, E; Docoslis, A; Bikiaris, D

    2009-01-01

    Solid dispersions of Fluvastatin with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), eudragit RS100 (Eud), and chitosan (CS) as drug carrier matrices, were prepared using different techniques in order to evaluate their effect on Fluvastatin stability during storage. The characterization of the three different systems was performed with the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray diffractometry (WAXD). It was revealed that amorphization of the drug occurred in all of the solid dispersions of Fluvastatin as a result of drug dissolution into polymer matrices and due to physical interactions (hydrogen bonding) between the polymer matrix and Fluvastatin. This was established through the use of FTIR spectroscopy. SEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy showed that Fluvastatin was interspersed to the polymer matrices in the form of molecular dispersion and nanodispersion, too. The finding that completely different polymer matrices, used here as drug carriers, produce completely different dissolution profiles for each one of the solid dispersions, suggests that each matrix follows a different drug release mechanism. Hydrogen bonding interactions as in the case of CS/Fluva solid dispersions lead to controlled release profiles. All formulations were subjected to accelerated aging in order to evaluate Fluvastatin stability. From by-products analysis it was found that Fluvastatin is very unstable during storage and anti-isomer as well as lactones are the main formed by-products. On the other hand, solid dispersions due to the evolved interactions of their reactive groups with Fluvastatin provide a sufficient physical and chemical stability. The extent of interactions seems to play the most important role in the drug stabilization.

  11. Zebrafish assessment of cognitive improvement and anxiolysis: filling the gap between in vitro and rodent models for drug development.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish can provide a valuable animal model to screen potential cognitive enhancing and anxiolytic drugs. They are economical and can provide a relatively quick indication of possible functional efficacy. In as much as they have a complex nervous system and elaborate behavioral repertoire, zebrafish can provide a good intermediate model between in vitro receptor and cell-based assays and classic mammalian models for drug screening. In addition, the variety of molecular tools available in zebrafish makes them outstanding models for helping to determine the neuromolecular mechanisms for psychoactive drugs. However, to use zebrafish as a translational model we must have validated, sensitive and efficient behavioral tests. In a series of studies, our lab has developed tests of cognitive function and stress response, which are sensitive to drug effects in a similar manner as rodent models and humans for cognitive enhancement and alleviating stress response. In particular, the three-chamber task for learning and memory was shown to be sensitive to the cognitive enhancing effects of nicotine and has been useful in helping to determine neural mechanisms crucial for nicotinic-induced cognitive enhancement. The novel tank diving test was shown to be a valid and efficient test of stress response. It is sensitive to the reduction in stress-related behaviors due to the amxiolytic drugs diazepam and buspirone but not chlordiazepoxide. Nicotine also causes stress alleviating effects which can be interpreted as anxiolytic effects. Zebrafish models of behavioral pharmacology can be useful to efficiently screen test compounds for drug development and can be useful in helping to determine the mechanisms crucial for new therapeutic treatments of neurobehavioral impairments.

  12. Zebrafish assessment of cognitive improvement and anxiolysis: Filling the gap between in vitro and rodent models for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish can provide a valuable animal model to screen potential cognitive enhancing and anxiolytic drugs. They are economical and can provide a relatively quick indication of possible functional efficacy. In as much as they have a complex nervous system and elaborate behavioral repertoire, zebrafish can provide a good intermediate model between in vitro receptor and cell-based assays and classic mammalian models for drug screening. In addition, the variety of molecular tools available in zebrafish makes them outstanding models for helping to determine the neuromolecular mechanisms for psychoactive drugs. However, to use zebrafish as a translational model we must have validated, sensitive and efficient behavioral tests. In a series of studies, our lab has developed tests of cognitive function and stress response, which are sensitive to drug effects in a similar manner as rodent models and humans for cognitive enhancement and alleviating stress response. In particular, the three-chamber task for learning and memory was shown to be sensitive to the cognitive enhancing effects of nicotine and has been useful in helping to determine neural mechanisms crucial for nicotinic-induced cognitive enhancement. The novel tank diving test was shown to be a valid and efficient test of stress response. It is sensitive to the reduction of stress-related behaviors of the anxiolytic drugs diazepam and buspirone but not chlordiazepoxide. Nicotine also causes stress alleviating effects which can be interpreted as anxiolytic effects. Zebrafish models of behavioral pharmacology can be useful to efficiently screen test compounds for drug development and can be useful for helping to determine the mechanisms crucial for new therapeutic treatments of neurobehavioral impairments. PMID:21615262

  13. Encapsulation of zinc-rifampicin complex into transferrin-conjugated silver quantum-dots improves its antimycobacterial activity and stability and facilitates drug delivery into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Sahu, Rojalin; Panda, Jagannath; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, there is an urgent need to enhance the efficacy of existing agents and also to develop more efficient drug delivery systems. Here, we synthesized a novel anti-TB drug complex consisting of zinc and rifampicin (Zn-RIF), and encapsulated it into transferrin-conjugated silver quantum-dots (Zn-RIF-Tf-QD) to improve delivery in macrophages. Successful synthesis of Zn-RIF and Zn-RIF-Tf-QD was confirmed by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, TEM, FTIR, photoluminescence, XRD, XPS, and NMR. The sizes of silver QDs and transferrin-conjugated QDs were found to be in the range of 5–20 nm. Activity assays showed that Zn-RIF-Tf-QD exhibited 10-fold higher antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis-BCG as compared to Zn-RIF, RIF and Zn. Immunofluorescence studies showed that Zn-RIF-Tf-QD-conjugates were actively endocytosed by macrophages and dendritic cells, but not by lung epithelial cells. Treatment with Zn-RIF-Tf-QD efficiently killed mycobacteria residing inside macrophages without exhibiting cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Moreover, the conjugates remained stable for upto 48 h, were taken up into the late endosomal compartment of macrophages, and released the drug in a sustainable manner. Our data demonstrate that Zn-RIF-Tf-QDs have a great potential as anti-TB drugs. In addition, transferrin-conjugated QDs may constitute an effective drug delivery system for tuberculosis therapy. PMID:27113139

  14. Encapsulation of zinc-rifampicin complex into transferrin-conjugated silver quantum-dots improves its antimycobacterial activity and stability and facilitates drug delivery into macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Sahu, Rojalin; Panda, Jagannath; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the chemotherapy of tuberculosis, there is an urgent need to enhance the efficacy of existing agents and also to develop more efficient drug delivery systems. Here, we synthesized a novel anti-TB drug complex consisting of zinc and rifampicin (Zn-RIF), and encapsulated it into transferrin-conjugated silver quantum-dots (Zn-RIF-Tf-QD) to improve delivery in macrophages. Successful synthesis of Zn-RIF and Zn-RIF-Tf-QD was confirmed by UV/Vis-spectroscopy, TEM, FTIR, photoluminescence, XRD, XPS, and NMR. The sizes of silver QDs and transferrin-conjugated QDs were found to be in the range of 5-20 nm. Activity assays showed that Zn-RIF-Tf-QD exhibited 10-fold higher antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis-BCG as compared to Zn-RIF, RIF and Zn. Immunofluorescence studies showed that Zn-RIF-Tf-QD-conjugates were actively endocytosed by macrophages and dendritic cells, but not by lung epithelial cells. Treatment with Zn-RIF-Tf-QD efficiently killed mycobacteria residing inside macrophages without exhibiting cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Moreover, the conjugates remained stable for upto 48 h, were taken up into the late endosomal compartment of macrophages, and released the drug in a sustainable manner. Our data demonstrate that Zn-RIF-Tf-QDs have a great potential as anti-TB drugs. In addition, transferrin-conjugated QDs may constitute an effective drug delivery system for tuberculosis therapy. PMID:27113139

  15. Drug delivery systems and liver targeting for the improved pharmacotherapy of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    In spite of the progress made in vaccine and antiviral therapy development, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, with more than 400 million people chronically infected worldwide. Antiviral therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues and/or immunomodulating peptides is the only option to control and prevent the progression of the disease in chronic hepatitis B (CHB)-infected patients. So far, the current antiviral monotherapy remains unsatisfactory because of the low efficacy and the development of drug resistance mutants. Moreover, viral rebound is frequently observed following therapy cessation, since covalent closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is not removed from hepatocytes by antiviral therapy. First, this review describes the current pharmacotherapy for the management of CHB and the new drug candidates being investigated. Then, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver parenchyma are discussed. Finally, perspectives in the design of a more efficient pharmacotherapy to eradicate the virus from the host are addressed.

  16. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural,…

  17. Perhaps More Consideration of Pavlovian-Operant Interaction May Improve the Clinical Efficacy of Behaviorally Based Drug Treatment Programs.

    PubMed

    Troisi, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse remains costly. Drug-related cues can evoke cue-reactivity and craving, contributing to relapse. The Pavlovian extinction-based cue-exposure therapy (CET) has not been very successful in treating drug abuse. A functional operant analysis of complex rituals involved in CET is outlined and reinterpreted as an operant heterogeneous chain maintained by observing responses, conditioned reinforcers, and discriminative stimuli. It is further noted that operant functions are not predicated on Pavlovian processes but can be influenced by them in contributing to relapse; several empirical studies from the animal and human literature highlight this view. Cue-reactivity evoked by Pavlovian processes is conceptualized as an operant establishing/motivating operation. CET may be more effective in incorporating an operant-based approach that takes into account the complexity of Pavlovian-operant interaction. Extinction of the operant chain coupled with the shaping of alternative behaviors is proposed as an integrated therapy. It is proposed that operant-based drug abuse treatments (contingency management, voucher programs, and the therapeutic work environment) might consider incorporating cue-reactivity, as establishing/motivating operations, to increase long-term success-a hybrid approach based on Pavlovian-operant interaction.

  18. Non-Drug Interventions for Improving Classroom Behavior and Social Functioning of Young Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliff, David

    This paper explores research on use of medication and non-drug interventions to modify the behavior of preschool children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It begins by discussing the symptoms of ADHD, neurological differences between children with ADHD and those without ADHD, and expected adolescent and adult outcomes for…

  19. Drug delivery systems and liver targeting for the improved pharmacotherapy of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    In spite of the progress made in vaccine and antiviral therapy development, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, with more than 400 million people chronically infected worldwide. Antiviral therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues and/or immunomodulating peptides is the only option to control and prevent the progression of the disease in chronic hepatitis B (CHB)-infected patients. So far, the current antiviral monotherapy remains unsatisfactory because of the low efficacy and the development of drug resistance mutants. Moreover, viral rebound is frequently observed following therapy cessation, since covalent closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is not removed from hepatocytes by antiviral therapy. First, this review describes the current pharmacotherapy for the management of CHB and the new drug candidates being investigated. Then, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver parenchyma are discussed. Finally, perspectives in the design of a more efficient pharmacotherapy to eradicate the virus from the host are addressed. PMID:20333454

  20. Perhaps More Consideration of Pavlovian–Operant Interaction May Improve the Clinical Efficacy of Behaviorally Based Drug Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Troisi, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse remains costly. Drug-related cues can evoke cue-reactivity and craving, contributing to relapse. The Pavlovian extinction-based cue-exposure therapy (CET) has not been very successful in treating drug abuse. A functional operant analysis of complex rituals involved in CET is outlined and reinterpreted as an operant heterogeneous chain maintained by observing responses, conditioned reinforcers, and discriminative stimuli. It is further noted that operant functions are not predicated on Pavlovian processes but can be influenced by them in contributing to relapse; several empirical studies from the animal and human literature highlight this view. Cue-reactivity evoked by Pavlovian processes is conceptualized as an operant establishing/motivating operation. CET may be more effective in incorporating an operant-based approach that takes into account the complexity of Pavlovian–operant interaction. Extinction of the operant chain coupled with the shaping of alternative behaviors is proposed as an integrated therapy. It is proposed that operant-based drug abuse treatments (contingency management, voucher programs, and the therapeutic work environment) might consider incorporating cue-reactivity, as establishing/motivating operations, to increase long-term success—a hybrid approach based on Pavlovian–operant interaction. PMID:25346551

  1. Analysis of physicochemical properties of ternary systems of oxaprozin with randomly methylated-ß-cyclodextrin and l-arginine aimed to improve the drug solubility.

    PubMed

    Mennini, Natascia; Maestrelli, Francesca; Cirri, Marzia; Mura, Paola

    2016-09-10

    The influence of l-arginine on the complexing and solubilizing power of randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin (RameβCD) towards oxaprozin, a very poorly soluble anti-inflammatory drug, was examined. The interactions between the components were investigated both in solution, by phase-solubility analysis, and in the solid state, by differential scanning calorimetry, FTIR and X-ray powder diffractometry. The morphology of the solid products was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results of phase-solubility studies indicated that addition of arginine enhanced the RameβCD complexing and solubilizing power of about 3.0 and 4.5 times, respectively, in comparison with the binary complex (both at pH≈6.8). The effect of arginine was not simply additive, but synergistic, being the ternary system solubility higher than the sum of those of the respective drug-CD and drug-arginine binary systems. Solid equimolar ternary systems were prepared by physical mixing, co-grinding, coevaporation and kneading techniques, to explore the effect of the preparation method on the physicochemical properties of the final products. The ternary co-ground product exhibited a dramatic increase in both drug dissolution efficiency and percent dissolved at 60min, whose values (83.6 and 97.1, respectively) were about 3 times higher than the sum of those given by the respective drug-CD and drug-aminoacid binary systems. Therefore, the ternary co-ground system with arginine and RameβCD appears as a very valuable product for the development of new more effective delivery systems of oxaprozin, with improved safety and bioavailability. PMID:27454086

  2. Aqueous coating dispersion (pseudolatex) of zein improves formulation of sustained-release tablets containing very water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Li, X N; Guo, H X; Heinamaki, J

    2010-05-01

    Zein is an alcohol soluble protein of corn origin that exhibits hydrophobic properties. Pseudolatexes are colloidal dispersions containing spherical solid or semisolid particles less than 1 microm in diameter and can be prepared from any existing thermoplastic water-insoluble polymer. The novel plasticized film-coating pseudolatex of zein was studied in formulation of sustained-release tablets containing very water-soluble drug. Film formation of plasticized aqueous dispersion was compared with film forming properties of plasticized organic solvent system (ethanol) of zein. The water vapor permeability (WVP), water uptake and erosion, and moisture sorption were evaluated with free films. The tablets containing metoprolol tartrate as a model drug were used in pan-coating experiments. Aqueous film coatings plasticized with PEG 400 exhibited very low water uptake. No significant difference in WVP, moisture sorption and erosion were found between aqueous films and organic solvent-based films of zein plasticized with PEG 400. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) images on microstructure of films showed that colloidal particle size of zein in the aqueous films was smaller than that observed in the solvent-based films. In addition, the aqueous-based films were more compact and smoother than the respective solvent-based films. The aqueous zein-coated tablets containing very water-soluble drug (metoprolol tartrate) exhibited clear sustained-release dissolution profiles in vitro, while the respective solvent-based film-coated tablets showed much faster drug release. Furthermore, aqueous zein-coated tablets had lower water absorption at high humidity conditions. In conclusion, the plasticized aqueous dispersion (pseudolatex) of zein can be used for moisture resistant film coating of sustained-release tablets containing very water-soluble drug. PMID:20129615

  3. The anti-hypertensive drug prazosin inhibits glioblastoma growth via the PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Assad Kahn, Suzana; Costa, Silvia Lima; Gholamin, Sharareh; Nitta, Ryan T; Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Fève, Marie; Zeniou, Maria; Coelho, Paulo Lucas Cerqueira; El-Habr, Elias; Cadusseau, Josette; Varlet, Pascale; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Devaux, Bertrand; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude; Cheshier, Samuel H; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Haiech, Jacques; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Chneiweiss, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    A variety of drugs targeting monoamine receptors are routinely used in human pharmacology. We assessed the effect of these drugs on the viability of tumor-initiating cells isolated from patients with glioblastoma. Among the drugs targeting monoamine receptors, we identified prazosin, an α1- and α2B-adrenergic receptor antagonist, as the most potent inducer of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cell death. Prazosin triggered apoptosis of glioblastoma-initiating cells and of their differentiated progeny, inhibited glioblastoma growth in orthotopic xenografts of patient-derived glioblastoma-initiating cells, and increased survival of glioblastoma-bearing mice. We found that prazosin acted in glioblastoma-initiating cells independently from adrenergic receptors. Its off-target activity occurred via a PKCδ-dependent inhibition of the AKT pathway, which resulted in caspase-3 activation. Blockade of PKCδ activation prevented all molecular changes observed in prazosin-treated glioblastoma-initiating cells, as well as prazosin-induced apoptosis. Based on these data, we conclude that prazosin, an FDA-approved drug for the control of hypertension, inhibits glioblastoma growth through a PKCδ-dependent mechanism. These findings open up promising prospects for the use of prazosin as an adjuvant therapy for glioblastoma patients. PMID:27138566

  4. Preparation and characterization of aligned porous PCL/zein scaffolds as drug delivery systems via improved unidirectional freeze-drying method.

    PubMed

    Fereshteh, Zeinab; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Bagri, Akbar; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2016-11-01

    A novel type of drug-delivery scaffold based on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and zein blends was prepared by improved unidirectional freeze-drying. Scaffolds with tube-like pore structure and high porosity, up to 89%, were obtained by adjusting the concentration of the PCL and zein solutions. Characters of the prepared scaffolds, such as microstructural, porosity, and compressive strength, were evaluated. The hydrophilicity and the degradability of the composite films were investigated in contact with phosphate buffer saline (PBS). It was found that the presence of zein accelerates the degradation rate of the scaffolds in the period time of investigation (28days). The results showed an acceptable way for controlling the in vitro degradation behavior of PCL composite scaffolds by adapting the concentration of zein. In vitro protein release and degradation results revealed that the absolute weight loss of the PCL/zein scaffolds exhibited an increasing trend by increasing the amount of zein concentration in the scaffolds. The drug delivery capability of the scaffolds was tested using tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH). Sustained release of the drug was obtained, and it was found that the proportion of zein in the scaffold had a great impact on the drug release kinetics. The results demonstrated the potential of the PCL/zein biocomposite scaffolds as a suitable candidate in tissue engineering strategies for bone defect treatment. PMID:27524061

  5. β-Lapachone and Paclitaxel Combination Micelles with Improved Drug Encapsulation and Therapeutic Synergy as Novel Nanotherapeutics for NQO1-Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Kuan; Liu, Chun; Gao, Jinming; Qian, Feng

    2015-11-01

    β-Lapachone (LPC) is a novel cytotoxic agent that is bioactivated by NADP(H): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), an enzyme elevated in a variety of tumors, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, and breast cancer. Despite its unique mechanism of action, its clinical evaluation has been largely hindered by low water solubility, short blood half-life, and narrow therapeutic window. Although encapsulation into poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PEG-PLA) micelles could modestly improve its solubility and prolong its half-life, the extremely fast intrinsic crystallization tendency of LPC prevents drug loading higher than ∼2 wt %. The physical stability of the LPC-loaded micelles is also far from satisfactory for further development. In this study, we demonstrate that paclitaxel (PTX), a front-line drug for many cancers, can provide two functions when coencapsulated together with LPC in the PEG-PLA micelles; first, as a strong crystallization inhibitor for LPC, thus to significantly increase the LPC encapsulation efficiency in the micelle from 11.7 ± 2.4% to 100.7 ± 2.2%. The total drug loading efficiency of both PTX and LPC in the combination polymeric micelle reached 100.3 ± 3.0%, and the drug loading density reached 33.2 ± 1.0%. Second, the combination of LPC/PTX demonstrates strong synergistic cytotoxicity effect against the NQO1 overexpressing cancer cells, including A549 NSCLC cells, and several pancreatic cancer cells (combination index <1). In vitro drug release study showed that LPC was released faster than PTX either in phosphate-buffered saline (PH = 7.4) or in 1 M sodium salicylate, which agrees with the desired dosing sequence of the two drugs to exert synergistic pharmacologic effect at different cell checkpoints. The PEG-PLA micelles coloaded with LPC and PTX offer a novel nanotherapeutic, with high drug loading, sufficient physical stability, and biological synergy to increase drug delivery efficiency

  6. Drugs, nutrients, and phytoactive principles improving the health span of rodent models of human age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Michel; Picard, Frédéric; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2012-02-01

    Rodents are often the species of choice to examine the effect of drugs on survival and on the progression of specific diseased tissues. This statement is also true for research laboratories working in the field of nutrition and aging. In addition to diets that can reduce the life expectancy of rodents, such as diabetogenic or high-fat diets, genetically modified rodents exhibiting different accelerated age-associated diseases also provide important biologic tools to decipher the impact of drugs, nutrients, or phytoactive compounds on their health and life span. This review covers some of the chemicals believed to decelerate the appearance of age-related diseases in different rodent models. Such chemicals include antioxidants, anti-inflammatory molecules, modulators of metabolic sensors, calorie restriction mimetics, and vegetal polyphenolic compounds that affect mitochondrial functions, cellular proliferation or differentiation as well as cell functionality.

  7. An improved approach to measuring drug innovation finds steady rates of first-in-class pharmaceuticals, 1987-2011.

    PubMed

    Lanthier, Michael; Miller, Kathleen L; Nardinelli, Clark; Woodcock, Janet

    2013-08-01

    For more than a decade, industry analysts and policy makers have raised concerns about declining pharmaceutical innovation, citing declining numbers of new molecular entities (NMEs) approved in the United States each year. Yet there is little consensus on whether this is the best measure of "innovation." We examined NME approvals during 1987-2011 and propose the three distinct subcategories of NMEs--first-in-class, advance-in-class, and addition-to-class--to provide more nuanced and informative insights into underlying trends. We found that trends in NME approvals were largely driven by addition-to-class, or "me too," drug approvals, while first-in-class approvals remained fairly steady over the study period. Moreover, the higher proportion of first-in-class drug approvals over the most recent decade is an encouraging sign of the health of the industry as a whole.

  8. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices.

  9. Adverse drug reactions in veterinary patients associated with drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Mealey, Katrina L

    2013-09-01

    For many drugs used in veterinary practice, plasma and tissue concentrations are highly dependent on the activity of drug transporters. This article describes how functional changes in drug transporters, whether mediated by genetic variability or drug-drug interactions, affect drug disposition and, ultimately, drug safety and efficacy in veterinary patients. A greater understanding of species, breed, and individual (genetic) differences in drug transporter function, as well as drug-drug interactions involving drug transporters, will result in improved strategies for drug design and will enable veterinarians to incorporate individualized medicine in their practices. PMID:23890239

  10. Formulation and statistical optimization of self-microemulsifying drug delivery system of eprosartan mesylate for improvement of oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Dangre, Pankaj; Gilhotra, Ritu; Dhole, Shashikant

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation is aimed to design a statistically optimized self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) of eprosartan mesylate (EM). Preliminary screening was carried out to find a suitable combination of various excipients for the formulation. A 3(2) full factorial design was employed to determine the effect of various independent variables on dependent (response) variables. The independent variables studied in the present work were concentration of oil (X 1) and the ratio of S mix (X 2), whereas the dependent variables were emulsification time (s), globule size (nm), polydispersity index (pdi), and zeta potential (mV), and the multiple linear regression analysis (MLRA) was employed to understand the influence of independent variables on dependent variables. Furthermore, a numerical optimization technique using the desirability function was used to develop a new optimized formulation with desired values of dependent variables. The optimized SMEDDS formulation of eprosartan mesylate (EMF-O) by the above method exhibited emulsification time, 118.45 ± 1.64 s; globule size, 196.81 ± 1.29 nm; zeta potential, -9.34 ± 1.2 mV, and polydispersity index, 0.354 ± 0.02. For the in vitro dissolution study, the optimized formulation (EMF-O) and pure drug were separately entrapped in the dialysis bag, and the study indicated higher release of the drug from EMF-O. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in Wistar rats using PK solver software revealed 2.1-fold increment in oral bioavailability of EM from EMF-O, when compared with plain suspension of pure drug. PMID:27465619

  11. Integrating risk minimization planning throughout the clinical development and commercialization lifecycle: an opinion on how drug development could be improved

    PubMed Central

    Morrato, Elaine H; Smith, Meredith Y

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical risk minimization programs are now an established requirement in the regulatory landscape. However, pharmaceutical companies have been slow to recognize and embrace the significant potential these programs offer in terms of enhancing trust with health care professionals and patients, and for providing a mechanism for bringing products to the market that might not otherwise have been approved. Pitfalls of the current drug development process include risk minimization programs that are not data driven; missed opportunities to incorporate pragmatic methods and market-based insights, outmoded tools and data sources, lack of rapid evaluative learning to support timely adaption, lack of systematic approaches for patient engagement, and questions on staffing and organizational infrastructure. We propose better integration of risk minimization with clinical drug development and commercialization work streams throughout the product lifecycle. We articulate a vision and propose broad adoption of organizational models for incorporating risk minimization expertise into the drug development process. Three organizational models are discussed and compared: outsource/external vendor, embedded risk management specialist model, and Center of Excellence. PMID:25750537

  12. A new self-microemulsifying mouth dissolving film to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lu; Yi, Tao; Liu, Ying

    2013-09-01

    A new self-microemulsifying mouth dissolving film (SMMDF) for poorly water-soluble drugs such as indomethacin was developed by incorporating self-microemulsifying components with solid carriers mainly containing microcrystalline cellulose, low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose and hypromellose. The uniformity of dosage units of the preparation was acceptable according to the criteria of Chinese Pharmacopoeia 2010. The SMMDF was disintegrated within 20 s after immersion into water, released completely at 5 min in the dissolution medium and achieved microemulsion particle size of 28.81 ± 3.26 nm, which was similar to that of liquid self- microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS). Solid state characterization of the SMMDF was performed by SEM, DSC and X-ray powder diffraction. Results demonstrated that indomethacin in the SMMDF was in the amorphous state, which might be due to self-microemulsifying ingredients. Pharmacokinetic parameters in rats including T(max), C(max), AUC were similar between the SMMDF and liquid SMEDDS. AUC and C(max) from the SMMDF were significantly higher than those from the common mouth dissolving film or the conventional tablet, and Tmax from SMMDF group was also significantly decreased. These findings suggest that the SMMDF is a new promising dosage form, showing notable characteristics of convenience, quick onset of action and enhanced oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  13. Glycan-mediated uptake in urothelial primary cells: Perspectives for improved intravesical drug delivery in urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Pichl, Clara Maria; Feilhauer, Sophie; Schwaigerlehner, Rose-Marie; Gabor, Franz; Wirth, Michael; Neutsch, Lukas

    2015-11-30

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections. Despite a wide range of therapeutic options, treatment success is compromised by multiresistance and the efficient mechanism of tissue colonization of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). In advanced drug delivery systems, a similar, glycan-mediated targeting mechanism may be realized by conjugating the drug to a plant lectin. This may lead to the drug being more efficiently accumulated at the desired site of action, the bacterial reservoirs. In this study, we aimed at elucidating the potential of this biorecognitive approach. Glycan-triggered interaction cascades and uptake processes of several plant lectins with distinct carbohydrate specificities were characterized using single cells and monolayer culture. Due to pronounced cytoadhesive and cytoinvasive properties, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) emerged as a promising targeter in porcine urothelial primary cells. The lectin-cell interaction proved highly stabile in artificial urine, simulating the conditions in actual application. Colocalisation studies with internalized WGA and lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) revealed that intracellular accumulation sites were largely identical for GlcNAc- and Mannose-specific lectins. This indicates that WGA-mediated delivery may indeed constitute a potent tool to reach bacteria taken up via a FimH-triggered invasion process. Existing pitfalls in intravesical treatment schedules may soon be overcome. PMID:26383837

  14. Life Skills Interventions to Improve Social Confidence, Self-Management, and Protection against Drug Use in Rural Elementary School Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Tymes, Deborah D; Outlaw, Kerri L; Hamilton, Bernita K

    2016-01-01

    This pilot project evaluated the effectiveness of a life skills training program for elementary-school-aged children for development of social confidence, self-management, and general social and drug resistance skills. The setting was a rural community after-school program. Children participated in 30-min weekly sessions for 8 weeks. Pre- and posttest scores were analyzed to determine effectiveness of the program. Results showed improvements in antismoking and antidrinking attitudes and use of self-management and general social skills, and social confidence in conflict situations. The life skills training intervention serves as a potential supplement to community programs for the prevention of behaviors such as bullying, smoking and drug use among elementary school aged children. PMID:26813051

  15. Solubilities of crystalline drugs in polymers: an improved analytical method and comparison of solubilities of indomethacin and nifedipine in PVP, PVP/VA, and PVAc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ye; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Yu, Lian

    2010-09-01

    A previous method for measuring solubilities of crystalline drugs in polymers has been improved to enable longer equilibration and used to survey the solubilities of indomethacin (IMC) and nifedipine (NIF) in two homo-polymers [polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)] and their co-polymer (PVP/VA). These data are important for understanding the stability of amorphous drug-polymer dispersions, a strategy actively explored for delivering poorly soluble drugs. Measuring solubilities in polymers is difficult because their high viscosities impede the attainment of solubility equilibrium. In this method, a drug-polymer mixture prepared by cryo-milling is annealed at different temperatures and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry to determine whether undissolved crystals remain and thus the upper and lower bounds of the equilibrium solution temperature. The new annealing method yielded results consistent with those obtained with the previous scanning method at relatively high temperatures, but revised slightly the previous results at lower temperatures. It also lowered the temperature of measurement closer to the glass transition temperature. For D-mannitol and IMC dissolving in PVP, the polymer's molecular weight has little effect on the weight-based solubility. For IMC and NIF, the dissolving powers of the polymers follow the order PVP > PVP/VA > PVAc. In each polymer studied, NIF is less soluble than IMC. The activities of IMC and NIF dissolved in various polymers are reasonably well fitted to the Flory-Huggins model, yielding the relevant drug-polymer interaction parameters. The new annealing method yields more accurate data than the previous scanning method when solubility equilibrium is slow to achieve. In practice, these two methods can be combined for efficiency. The measured solubilities are not readily anticipated, which underscores the importance of accurate experimental data for developing predictive models.

  16. Novel in situ self-assembly nanoparticles for formulating a poorly water-soluble drug in oral solid granules, improving stability, palatability, and bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shujie; Pham, Kevin; Li, Diana; Penzak, Scott R; Dong, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid-based nanotechnology to formulate poorly water-soluble drugs in oral solid granules to improve stability, palatability, and bioavailability. Materials and methods In one method, we prepared ritonavir (RTV) nanoparticles (NPs) by a microemulsion-precursor method and then converted the RTV NPs to solid granules by wet granulation to produce RTV NP-containing granules. In the other innovative method, we did not use water in the formulation preparation, and discovered novel in situ self-assembly nanoparticles (ISNPs). We prepared RTV ISNP granules that did not initially contain NPs, but spontaneously produced RTV ISNPs when the granules were introduced to water with gentle agitation. We fully characterized these RTV nanoformulations. We also used rats to test the bioavailability of RTV ISNP granules. Finally, an Astree electronic tongue was used to assess the taste of the RTV ISNP granules. Results RTV NP-containing granules only had about 1% drug loading of RTV in the solid granules. In contrast, RTV ISNP granules achieved over 16% drug loading and were stable at room temperature over 24 weeks. RTV ISNPs had particle size between 160 nm and 300 nm with narrow size distribution. RTV ISNPs were stable in simulated gastric fluid for 2 hours and in simulated intestinal fluid for another 6 hours. The data from the electronic tongue showed that the RTV ISNP granules were similar in taste to blank ISNP granules, but were much different from RTV solution. RTV ISNP granules increased RTV bioavailability over 2.5-fold compared to RTV solution. Conclusion We successfully discovered and developed novel ISNPs to manufacture RTV ISNP granules that were reconstitutable, stable, and palatable, and improved RTV bioavailability. The novel ISNP nanotechnology is a platform to manufacture oral solid dosage forms for poorly water-soluble drugs, especially for pediatric formulation development. PMID:27103803

  17. Combined treatment of L1CAM antibodies and cytostatic drugs improve the therapeutic response of pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Heiner; Dieckmann, Chantal; Korniienko, Olena; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Kiefel, Helena; Salnikov, Alexey; Krüger, Achim; Altevogt, Peter; Sebens, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    The adhesion molecule L1CAM (CD171) accounts for enhanced motility, invasiveness and chemoresistance of tumor cells and represents a novel marker for various tumor entities including pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma. Recently, we showed that L1CAM inhibition increases the apoptotic response of tumor cells towards cytostatic drugs pointing to the potential of L1CAM to serve as a chemosensitizer in anti-cancer therapy. Thus, the present study evaluated the therapeutic potential of combined treatment with L1CAM antibodies and chemotherapeutic drugs in pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma model systems in vivo. Two L1CAM-specific antibodies (L1-14.10 and L1-9.3/2a) exhibiting high binding affinity to the L1CAM expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line Colo357 and the ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3ip were used for treatment. The combined therapy of SCID mice with either L1CAM antibody and gemcitabine and paclitaxel, respectively, reduced the growth of subcutaneously grown Colo357 or SKOV3ip tumors more efficiently than treatment with the cytostatic drug alone or in combination with control IgG. This was accompanied by an increased number of apoptotic tumor cells along with an elevated procaspase-8 expression. Furthermore, a lowered activation of NF-κB along with a reduced expression of VEGF and a diminished number of CD31-positive blood vessels were observed in tumors after combined therapy compared to control treatments, while the infiltration of F4/80-positive macrophages increased. Overall, these data provide new insights into the mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of L1CAM-blocking antibodies in vivo and support the suitability of L1CAM as a target for chemosensitization and of L1CAM-interfering antibodies as an appropriate tool to increase the therapeutic response of pancreatic and ovarian carcinoma.

  18. [Drug-induced dementia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taro; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Many drugs have been reported to induce not only delirium but also cognitive impairment. Some types of drugs are reported to induce dementia, and prolonged hypotension or hypoglycemia induced by overuse of antihypertensive drugs or oral antidiabetic drugs could result in dementia. Recently, taking multiple drugs with anticholinergic activity are reported to cause cognitive decline and anticholinergic burden should be avoided especially in patients with dementia. Drug-induced dementia can be prevented by avoiding polypharmacy and adhering to the saying 'start low and go slow' . Early diagnosis of drug-induced dementia and withdrawal of the offending drug is essential to improve cognitive function. PMID:27025096

  19. AZ17: a new bispecific drug targeting IL-6 and IL-23 with potential clinical use--improves psoriasis in a human xenograft transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Shanebeck, Kurt; Brady, William; Van Brunt, Michael P; King, Gordon; Marelli, Marcello; Slagle, Paul; Xu, Hengyu; Nairn, Natalie W; Johnson, Jeffrey; Wang, Aijun A; Li, Gary; Thornton, Kenneth C; Dam, Tomas N; Grabstein, Kenneth H

    2015-10-01

    Targeting more than one molecule in multifactorial diseases involving several disease mediators may provide improved therapeutic efficacy. Psoriasis is a multifactorial disease in which interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-23 are important disease mediators because they facilitate development of Th17 cells; widely accepted to be associated with psoriasis. To meet the need for new therapeutics, we aimed to create a clinically relevant bispecific drug, by combining the inhibitory properties of anti-IL-6 and anti-IL-23 antibodies, exhibiting high affinity, high stability and the ability to be produced in high yield. The bispecific molecule AZ17 was created by combining high affinity binding domains originating from monoclonal antibodies targeting human IL-6 and IL-23. To allow for high and efficient production, AZ17 was assembled by site-specific bioconjugation from two individual single chain fragment variables that were synthesized separately in Escherichia coli. To improve stability and extend pharmacokinetics, a flexible poly-ethylene glycol molecule was used as linker. In preclinical psoriasis models, AZ17 reduced IL-23-induced ear inflammation and improved psoriasis in a xenograft transplantation model where psoriasis skin is transplanted onto immune-deficient mice. The data presented here suggest AZ17 to be a promising drug candidate in psoriasis and other inflammatory diseases associated with Th17 cell development.

  20. Improvement of cognitive flexibility and cingulate blood flow correlates after atypical antipsychotic treatment in drug-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Bernardo M; Garolera, Maite; Ariza, Mar; Pareto, Deborah; Salamero, Manel; Valles, Vicenç; Delgado, Luis; Alberni, Joan

    2011-12-30

    The aim of this study was to examine the changes in cognitive flexibility and associated cerebral blood flow in the anterior cingulate lobe of drug-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia who were treated with atypical antipsychotics for 6 weeks. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images were obtained from 8 healthy subjects both at rest and while performing the flexibility subtest of the TAP (Test for Attentional Performance). SPECT images were obtained in parallel from 8 first-episode drug-naive schizophrenic patients while they were performing the same task both before and after 6 weeks of neuroleptic treatment. In the control group, an increase in the perfusion indices of the dorsal section of the anterior cingulate gyrus was observed in the activation condition. Task performance was altered and the level of perfusion of the brain region related to the task execution was significantly decreased in the patients at baseline. After treatment, there was a significant improvement in both task performance and the level of perfusion of the dorsal section of the anterior cingulate. We conclude that treatment with second-generation neuroleptics improves cognitive flexibility, and there was a relationship between such improvements and normalization of perfusion indices of the involved brain areas.

  1. Towards improved solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs: cryogenic co-grinding of piroxicam with carrier polymers.

    PubMed

    Penkina, Anna; Semjonov, Kristian; Hakola, Maija; Vuorinen, Sirpa; Repo, Timo; Yliruusi, Jouko; Aruväli, Jaan; Kogermann, Karin; Veski, Peep; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (SDs) open up exciting opportunities in formulating poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). In the present study, novel catalytic pretreated softwood cellulose (CPSC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were investigated as carrier polymers for preparing and stabilizing cryogenic co-ground SDs of poorly water-soluble piroxicam (PRX). CPSC was isolated from pine wood (Pinus sylvestris). Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used for characterizing the solid-state changes and drug-polymer interactions. High-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the particle size and surface morphology of starting materials and final cryogenic co-ground SDs. In addition, the molecular aspects of drug-polymer interactions and stabilization mechanisms are presented. The results showed that the carrier polymer influenced both the degree of amorphization of PRX and stabilization against crystallization. The cryogenic co-ground SDs prepared from PVP showed an enhanced dissolution rate of PRX, while the corresponding SDs prepared from CPSC exhibited a clear sustained release behavior. In conclusion, cryogenic co-grinding provides a versatile method for preparing amorphous SDs of poorly water-soluble APIs. The solid-state stability and dissolution behavior of such co-ground SDs are to a great extent dependent on the carrier polymer used. PMID:26065533

  2. Improvement of antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs through linkage to certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M

    2014-10-01

    RAB1 5 is a lead antibacterial agent in which trimethoprim is linked to phthalazine moiety. Similarly, our strategy in this research depends on the interconnection between some sulfa drugs and certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds in an attempt to enhance their antibacterial activity. This approach was achieved through the combination of 4-substituted phthalazin-1(2H)-ones 9a, b or 14a, b with sulfanilamide 1a, sulfathiazole 1b or sulfadiazine 1c through amide linkers 6a, b to produce the target compounds 10a-d and 15a-e, respectively. The antibacterial activity of the newly synthesized compounds showed that all tested compounds have antibacterial activity higher than that of their reference sulfa drugs 1a-c. Compound 10c represented the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC = 0.39 μmol/mL. Moreover, compound 10d displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium with MIC = 0.39 and 0.78 μmol/mL, respectively.

  3. Improving sensitivity by large-volume sample stacking using the electroosmotic flow pump to analyze some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by capillary electrophoresis in water samples.

    PubMed

    Macià, Alba; Borrull, Francesc; Aguilar, Carme; Calull, Marta

    2003-08-01

    Large-volume sample stacking using the electroosmotic flow (EOF) pump (LVSEP) has been used to analyze some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in water samples. With methanol as the run buffer solvent to suppress the EOF, sensitivity was enhanced by 80-100-fold. The sample for the analysis of real water sample was pretreated by solid-phase extraction (SPE). When the method was based on off-line SPE-LVSEP-CE, sensitivity improved by as much as 1000 times.

  4. PolySearch2: a significantly improved text-mining system for discovering associations between human diseases, genes, drugs, metabolites, toxins and more.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifeng; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David

    2015-07-01

    PolySearch2 (http://polysearch.ca) is an online text-mining system for identifying relationships between biomedical entities such as human diseases, genes, SNPs, proteins, drugs, metabolites, toxins, metabolic pathways, organs, tissues, subcellular organelles, positive health effects, negative health effects, drug actions, Gene Ontology terms, MeSH terms, ICD-10 medical codes, biological taxonomies and chemical taxonomies. PolySearch2 supports a generalized 'Given X, find all associated Ys' query, where X and Y can be selected from the aforementioned biomedical entities. An example query might be: 'Find all diseases associated with Bisphenol A'. To find its answers, PolySearch2 searches for associations against comprehensive collections of free-text collections, including local versions of MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, Wikipedia full-text articles and US Patent application abstracts. PolySearch2 also searches 14 widely used, text-rich biological databases such as UniProt, DrugBank and Human Metabolome Database to improve its accuracy and coverage. PolySearch2 maintains an extensive thesaurus of biological terms and exploits the latest search engine technology to rapidly retrieve relevant articles and databases records. PolySearch2 also generates, ranks and annotates associative candidates and present results with relevancy statistics and highlighted key sentences to facilitate user interpretation.

  5. PolySearch2: a significantly improved text-mining system for discovering associations between human diseases, genes, drugs, metabolites, toxins and more

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yifeng; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David

    2015-01-01

    PolySearch2 (http://polysearch.ca) is an online text-mining system for identifying relationships between biomedical entities such as human diseases, genes, SNPs, proteins, drugs, metabolites, toxins, metabolic pathways, organs, tissues, subcellular organelles, positive health effects, negative health effects, drug actions, Gene Ontology terms, MeSH terms, ICD-10 medical codes, biological taxonomies and chemical taxonomies. PolySearch2 supports a generalized ‘Given X, find all associated Ys’ query, where X and Y can be selected from the aforementioned biomedical entities. An example query might be: ‘Find all diseases associated with Bisphenol A’. To find its answers, PolySearch2 searches for associations against comprehensive collections of free-text collections, including local versions of MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, Wikipedia full-text articles and US Patent application abstracts. PolySearch2 also searches 14 widely used, text-rich biological databases such as UniProt, DrugBank and Human Metabolome Database to improve its accuracy and coverage. PolySearch2 maintains an extensive thesaurus of biological terms and exploits the latest search engine technology to rapidly retrieve relevant articles and databases records. PolySearch2 also generates, ranks and annotates associative candidates and present results with relevancy statistics and highlighted key sentences to facilitate user interpretation. PMID:25925572

  6. PolySearch2: a significantly improved text-mining system for discovering associations between human diseases, genes, drugs, metabolites, toxins and more.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifeng; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David

    2015-07-01

    PolySearch2 (http://polysearch.ca) is an online text-mining system for identifying relationships between biomedical entities such as human diseases, genes, SNPs, proteins, drugs, metabolites, toxins, metabolic pathways, organs, tissues, subcellular organelles, positive health effects, negative health effects, drug actions, Gene Ontology terms, MeSH terms, ICD-10 medical codes, biological taxonomies and chemical taxonomies. PolySearch2 supports a generalized 'Given X, find all associated Ys' query, where X and Y can be selected from the aforementioned biomedical entities. An example query might be: 'Find all diseases associated with Bisphenol A'. To find its answers, PolySearch2 searches for associations against comprehensive collections of free-text collections, including local versions of MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, Wikipedia full-text articles and US Patent application abstracts. PolySearch2 also searches 14 widely used, text-rich biological databases such as UniProt, DrugBank and Human Metabolome Database to improve its accuracy and coverage. PolySearch2 maintains an extensive thesaurus of biological terms and exploits the latest search engine technology to rapidly retrieve relevant articles and databases records. PolySearch2 also generates, ranks and annotates associative candidates and present results with relevancy statistics and highlighted key sentences to facilitate user interpretation. PMID:25925572

  7. Antimicrobial drug use and risk factors associated with treatment incidence and mortality in Swiss veal calves reared under improved welfare conditions.

    PubMed

    Lava, M; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Steiner, A; Meylan, M

    2016-04-01

    Ninety-one Swiss veal farms producing under a label with improved welfare standards were visited between August and December 2014 to investigate risk factors related to antimicrobial drug use and mortality. All herds consisted of own and purchased calves, with a median of 77.4% of purchased calves. The calves' mean age was 29±15days at purchasing and the fattening period lasted at average 120±28 days. The mean carcass weight was 125±12kg. A mean of 58±33 calves were fattened per farm and year, and purchased calves were bought from a mean of 20±17 farms of origin. Antimicrobial drug treatment incidence was calculated with the defined daily dose methodology. The mean treatment incidence (TIADD) was 21±15 daily doses per calf and year. The mean mortality risk was 4.1%, calves died at a mean age of 94±50 days, and the main causes of death were bovine respiratory disease (BRD, 50%) and gastro-intestinal disease (33%). Two multivariable models were constructed, for antimicrobial drug treatment incidence (53 farms) and mortality (91 farms). No quarantine, shared air space for several groups of calves, and no clinical examination upon arrival at the farm were associated with increased antimicrobial treatment incidence. Maximum group size and weight differences >100kg within a group were associated with increased mortality risk, while vaccination and beef breed were associated with decreased mortality risk. The majority of antimicrobial treatments (84.6%) were given as group treatments with oral powder fed through an automatic milk feeding system. Combination products containing chlortetracycline with tylosin and sulfadimidine or with spiramycin were used for 54.9%, and amoxicillin for 43.7% of the oral group treatments. The main indication for individual treatment was BRD (73%). The mean age at the time of treatment was 51 days, corresponding to an estimated weight of 80-100kg. Individual treatments were mainly applied through injections (88.5%), and included

  8. Sonication-Based Improvement of the Physicochemical Properties of Guar Gum as a Potential Substrate for Modified Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Siddique Akber; Cencetti, Claudia; Carafa, Maria; Mazzuca, Claudia; Capitani, Donatella; Coviello, Tommasina

    2013-01-01

    Guar Gum is a natural polysaccharide that, due to its physicochemical properties, is extensively investigated for biomedical applications as a matrix for modified drug delivery, but it is also used in the food industry as well as in cosmetics. A commercial sample of Guar Gum was sonicated for different periods of time, and the reduction in the average molecular weight was monitored by means of viscometric measurements. At the same time, the rheological behaviour was also followed, in terms of viscoelasticity range, flow curves, and mechanical spectra. Sonicated samples were used for the preparation of gels in the presence of borate ions. The effect of borax on the new samples was investigated by recording mechanical spectra, flow curves, and visible absorption spectra of complexes with Congo Red. The anisotropic elongation, observed in previous studies with tablets of Guar Gum and borax, was remarkably reduced when the sonicated samples were used for the preparation of the gels. PMID:23984426

  9. Improving sensitivity in microchip electrophoresis coupled to ESI-MS/MS on the example of a cardiac drug mixture.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Fabian; Scholl, Tobias; Ohla, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2014-07-01

    A comprehensive study for a sensitivity optimization in MCE with mass spectrometric detection is presented. As a text mixture, we chose a mixture of the cardiac drugs propranolol, bisoprolol, lidocaine, procaine and studied the effect of different chip layouts and experimental parameters with the aim of achieving both high sensitivity in MS detection and adequate chip electrophoretic separation. An important aspect was a comparison of microfluidic layouts containing various sheath-flow channels with that avoiding sheath-flow junctions on-chip. We utilized glass chips with monolithically integrated nanospray emitter tips coupled dead volume-free to an IT mass spectrometer running in fragmentation mode (MS(n) ). With this setup, detection limits down to 0.6 ng/mL for the model compound propranolol were achieved.

  10. Sonication-based improvement of the physicochemical properties of Guar Gum as a potential substrate for modified drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Siddique Akber; Matricardi, Pietro; Cencetti, Claudia; Di Meo, Chiara; Carafa, Maria; Mazzuca, Claudia; Palleschi, Antonio; Capitani, Donatella; Alhaique, Franco; Coviello, Tommasina

    2013-01-01

    Guar Gum is a natural polysaccharide that, due to its physicochemical properties, is extensively investigated for biomedical applications as a matrix for modified drug delivery, but it is also used in the food industry as well as in cosmetics. A commercial sample of Guar Gum was sonicated for different periods of time, and the reduction in the average molecular weight was monitored by means of viscometric measurements. At the same time, the rheological behaviour was also followed, in terms of viscoelasticity range, flow curves, and mechanical spectra. Sonicated samples were used for the preparation of gels in the presence of borate ions. The effect of borax on the new samples was investigated by recording mechanical spectra, flow curves, and visible absorption spectra of complexes with Congo Red. The anisotropic elongation, observed in previous studies with tablets of Guar Gum and borax, was remarkably reduced when the sonicated samples were used for the preparation of the gels. PMID:23984426

  11. Sonication-based improvement of the physicochemical properties of Guar Gum as a potential substrate for modified drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Siddique Akber; Matricardi, Pietro; Cencetti, Claudia; Di Meo, Chiara; Carafa, Maria; Mazzuca, Claudia; Palleschi, Antonio; Capitani, Donatella; Alhaique, Franco; Coviello, Tommasina

    2013-01-01

    Guar Gum is a natural polysaccharide that, due to its physicochemical properties, is extensively investigated for biomedical applications as a matrix for modified drug delivery, but it is also used in the food industry as well as in cosmetics. A commercial sample of Guar Gum was sonicated for different periods of time, and the reduction in the average molecular weight was monitored by means of viscometric measurements. At the same time, the rheological behaviour was also followed, in terms of viscoelasticity range, flow curves, and mechanical spectra. Sonicated samples were used for the preparation of gels in the presence of borate ions. The effect of borax on the new samples was investigated by recording mechanical spectra, flow curves, and visible absorption spectra of complexes with Congo Red. The anisotropic elongation, observed in previous studies with tablets of Guar Gum and borax, was remarkably reduced when the sonicated samples were used for the preparation of the gels.

  12. Cyclization of a cell-penetrating peptide via click-chemistry increases proteolytic resistance and improves drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Reichart, Florian; Horn, Mareike; Neundorf, Ines

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report synthesis and biological evaluation of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), that is partly cyclized via a triazole bridge. Recently, beneficious properties have been reported for cyclized peptides concerning their metabolic stability and intracellular uptake. A CPP based on human calcitonin was used in this study, and side chain cyclization was achieved via copper catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction. Cell viability studies in several cell-lines revealed no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, efficient uptake in breast cancer MCF-7 cells could be determined. Moreover, preliminary studies using this novel peptide as drug transporter for daunorubicin were performed. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27197760

  13. Exploring Weak Ligand–Protein Interactions by Long-Lived NMR States: Improved Contrast in Fragment-Based Drug Screening**

    PubMed Central

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Williams, Glyn; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Ligands that have an affinity for protein targets can be screened very effectively by exploiting favorable properties of long-lived states (LLS) in NMR spectroscopy. In this work, we describe the use of LLS for competitive binding experiments to measure accurate dissociation constants of fragments that bind weakly to the ATP binding site of the N-terminal ATPase domain of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a therapeutic target for cancer treatment. The LLS approach allows one to characterize ligands with an exceptionally wide range of affinities, since it can be used for ligand concentrations [L] that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the dissociation constants KD. This property makes the LLS method particularly attractive for the initial steps of fragment-based drug screening, where small molecular fragments that bind weakly to a target protein must be identified, which is a difficult task for many other biophysical methods. PMID:25196717

  14. Nanoparticles incorporating pH-responsive surfactants as a viable approach to improve the intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Daniele R; Scheeren, Laís E; Pilar Vinardell, M; Mitjans, Montserrat; Rosa Infante, M; Rolim, Clarice M B

    2015-12-01

    The pH-responsive delivery systems have brought new advances in the field of functional nanodevices and might allow more accurate and controllable delivery of specific cargoes, which is expected to result in promising applications in different clinical therapies. Here we describe a family of chitosan-TPP (tripolyphosphate) nanoparticles (NPs) for intracellular drug delivery, which were designed using two pH-sensitive amino acid-based surfactants from the family N(α),N(ε)-dioctanoyl lysine as bioactive compounds. Low and medium molecular weight chitosan (LMW-CS and MMW-CS, respectively) were used for NP preparation, and it was observed that the size distribution for NPs with LMW-CS were smaller (~168 nm) than that for NPs prepared with MMW-CS (~310 nm). Hemolysis assay demonstrated the pH-dependent biomembrane disruptional capability of the constructed NPs. The nanostructures incorporating the surfactants cause negligible membrane permeabilization at pH7.4. However, at acidic pH, prevailing in endosomes, membrane-destabilizing activity in an erythrocyte lysis assay became evident. When pH decreased to 6.6 and 5.4, hemolytic capability of chitosan NPs increased along with the raise of concentration. Furthermore, studies with cell culture showed that these pH-responsive NPs displayed low cytotoxic effects against 3T3 fibroblasts. The influence of chitosan molecular weight, chitosan to TPP weight ratio, nanoparticle size and nature of the surfactant counterion on the membrane-disruptive properties of nanoparticles was discussed in detail. Altogether, the results achieved here showed that by inserting the lysine-based amphiphiles into chitosan NPs, pH-sensitive membranolytic and potentially endosomolytic nanocarriers were developed, which, therefore, demonstrated ideal feasibility for intracellular drug delivery.

  15. A long-term fatty fish intervention improved executive function in inpatients with antisocial traits and a history of alcohol and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anita L; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Grung, Bjørn; Thayer, Julian F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of fatty fish consumption on cognitive functioning in a group of inpatients characterized by antisocial behavior. Eighty-three male forensic inpatients participated in this study. Participants were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group (e.g., meat, chicken, pork). One decision-making task, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), and one planning task, the Tower of Hanoi (ToH), were administered before (pre-test) and at the end of the intervention period (post-test). For the IGT the Fish group showed improved performance from pre- to post- test. Moreover, the Fish group showed significantly better performance than the Control group on the IGT at post-test. The Fish group also demonstrated improved performance from pre- to post-test on the ToH; however, this was limited to participants with a history of substance abuse. Further, the improvement was only significant for tasks with high working memory load (5-7 move problems), and not for tasks with low working memory load (1-4 move problems). The Control group showed no improvement on any of the tasks regardless of alcohol or drug abuse history. The present study suggests that regular fatty fish consumption may improve executive functions in forensic inpatients with antisocial traits and a history of substance abuse. Thus, the current results may have important implications with regard to health care interventions. PMID:26032440

  16. The Drug Education Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, John C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Examines the problems of alcoholism, smoking and drug addiction and their influence on students. Suggests that intermediate and secondary schools can assist in alcohol and tobacco (the two legal drugs) programs through improved educational methods. (Author/RK)

  17. An international perspective on using opioid substitution treatment to improve hepatitis C prevention and care for people who inject drugs: structural barriers and public health potential

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, David C.; Jordan, Ashly E.; Uuskula, Anneli; Huong, Duong Thi; Masson, Carmen L.; Schackman, Bruce R.; Des Jarlais, Don C.

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are central to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic. Opioid substitution treatment (OST) of opioid dependence has the potential to play a significant role in the public health response to HCV by serving as an HCV prevention intervention, by treating non-injection opioid dependent people who might otherwise transition to non-sterile drug injection, and by serving as a platform to engage HCV infected PWID in the HCV care continuum and link them to HCV treatment. This paper examines programmatic, structural and policy considerations for using OST as a platform to improve the HCV prevention and care continuum in 3 countries—the United States, Estonia and Viet Nam. In each country a range of interconnected factors affects the use OST as a component of HCV control. These factors include 1) that OST is not yet provided on the scale needed to adequately address illicit opioid dependence, 2) inconsistent use of OST as a platform for HCV services, 3) high costs of HCV treatment and health insurance policies that affect access to both OST and HCV treatment, and 4) the stigmatization of drug use. We see the following as important for controlling HCV transmission among PWID: 1) maintaining current HIV prevention efforts, 2) expanding efforts to reduce the stigmatization of drug use, 3) expanding use of OST as part of a coordinated public health approach to opioid dependence, HIV prevention, and HCV control efforts, 4) reductions in HCV treatment costs and expanded health system coverage to allow population level HCV treatment as prevention and OST as needed. The global expansion of OST and use of OST as a platform for HCV services should be feasible next steps in the public health response to the HCV epidemic, and is likely to be critical to efforts to eliminate or eradicate HCV. PMID:26050614

  18. An international perspective on using opioid substitution treatment to improve hepatitis C prevention and care for people who inject drugs: Structural barriers and public health potential.

    PubMed

    Perlman, David C; Jordan, Ashly E; Uuskula, Anneli; Huong, Duong Thi; Masson, Carmen L; Schackman, Bruce R; Des Jarlais, Don C

    2015-11-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are central to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic. Opioid substitution treatment (OST) of opioid dependence has the potential to play a significant role in the public health response to HCV by serving as an HCV prevention intervention, by treating non-injection opioid dependent people who might otherwise transition to non-sterile drug injection, and by serving as a platform to engage HCV infected PWID in the HCV care continuum and link them to HCV treatment. This paper examines programmatic, structural and policy considerations for using OST as a platform to improve the HCV prevention and care continuum in 3 countries-the United States, Estonia and Viet Nam. In each country a range of interconnected factors affects the use OST as a component of HCV control. These factors include (1) that OST is not yet provided on the scale needed to adequately address illicit opioid dependence, (2) inconsistent use of OST as a platform for HCV services, (3) high costs of HCV treatment and health insurance policies that affect access to both OST and HCV treatment, and (4) the stigmatization of drug use. We see the following as important for controlling HCV transmission among PWID: (1) maintaining current HIV prevention efforts, (2) expanding efforts to reduce the stigmatization of drug use, (3) expanding use of OST as part of a coordinated public health approach to opioid dependence, HIV prevention, and HCV control efforts, (4) reductions in HCV treatment costs and expanded health system coverage to allow population level HCV treatment as prevention and OST as needed. The global expansion of OST and use of OST as a platform for HCV services should be feasible next steps in the public health response to the HCV epidemic, and is likely to be critical to efforts to eliminate or eradicate HCV.

  19. Development of a solidified self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SMEDDS) for atorvastatin calcium with improved dissolution and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Dong Woo; Son, Ho Yong; Kim, Jin Han; Kim, Sung Rae; Lee, Sang Gon; Song, She Hyon; Chae, Bo Ram; Choi, Young Wook

    2016-06-15

    To improve the dissolution and oral bioavailability (BA) of atorvastatin calcium (ATV), we previously introduced an optimized self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) using Capmul(®) MCM (oil), Tween(®) 20 (surfactant), and tetraglycol (cosurfactant). In this study, various solid carriers were employed to develop a solidified SMEDDS (S-SMEDDS): mannitol (M) and lactose (L) as water-soluble carriers, and Sylysia(®) 350 (S) and Aerosil(®) 200 (A) as water-insoluble carriers. Maximum solidifying capacities (SCmax) of water-insoluble carriers were significantly greater than those of water-soluble carriers were. The resultant powders were free flowing with an angle of repose <40° and Carr's index 5-20%, regardless of the solid carrier types. S-SMEDDS with mannitol (S(M)-SMEDDS) or lactose (S(L)-SMEDDS) had a smaller droplet size and greater dissolution than S-SMEDDS with Sylysia(®) 350 (S(S)-SMEDDS) or Aerosil(®) 200 (S(A)-SMEDDS). Following oral administration of various formulations to rats at a dose equivalent to 25mg/kg of ATV, plasma drug levels were measured by LC-MS/MS. The relative BAs (RBAs) of SMEDDS, S(M)-SMEDDS, and S(S)-SMEDDS were 345%, 216%, and 160%, respectively, compared to that of ATV suspension. Additionally, at a reduced dose of ATV equivalent to 5mg/kg, the RBAs of S(M)-SMEDDS and S(S)-SMEDDS compared to that of SMEDDS were 101% and 65%, respectively. These results suggest that S(M)-SEMDDS offers great potential for the development of solid dosage forms with improved oral absorption of drugs with poor water solubility. PMID:27125455

  20. A simple green route to obtain poly(vinyl alcohol) electrospun mats with improved water stability for use as potential carriers of drugs.

    PubMed

    López-Córdoba, Alex; Castro, Guillermo R; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biocompatible and nontoxic polymer. However, because of its low water-resistance, some applications for PVA-based materials are limited (e.g., drug delivery systems and wound dressings). In the current work, PVA mats containing tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) were successfully developed by electrospinning. In order to improve the water stability of the systems, the cross-linking of the PVA matrix was induced by citric acid (CA) addition together with heating treatments (150°C or 190°C for 3min). TC presence led to a strong increase in the electrical conductivity of the blends and as a result, fibers with about 44% lower diameter (270nm) than that of the corresponding unloaded mats (485nm) were obtained. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated that TC was well distributed along the PVA nanofibers. The mats were evaluated by FTIR, which revealed chemical interactions between PVA hydroxyl groups and CA carboxylic ones. The treatment at 150°C for 3min proved to be the more suitable for the preparation of TC-containing mats with improved water resistance, maintaining the TC antimicrobial activity against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus almost unaltered. These mats showed a burst release of TC, giving around 95% of the drug within the first hour of immersion in water. PMID:27612766

  1. A simple green route to obtain poly(vinyl alcohol) electrospun mats with improved water stability for use as potential carriers of drugs.

    PubMed

    López-Córdoba, Alex; Castro, Guillermo R; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biocompatible and nontoxic polymer. However, because of its low water-resistance, some applications for PVA-based materials are limited (e.g., drug delivery systems and wound dressings). In the current work, PVA mats containing tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) were successfully developed by electrospinning. In order to improve the water stability of the systems, the cross-linking of the PVA matrix was induced by citric acid (CA) addition together with heating treatments (150°C or 190°C for 3min). TC presence led to a strong increase in the electrical conductivity of the blends and as a result, fibers with about 44% lower diameter (270nm) than that of the corresponding unloaded mats (485nm) were obtained. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated that TC was well distributed along the PVA nanofibers. The mats were evaluated by FTIR, which revealed chemical interactions between PVA hydroxyl groups and CA carboxylic ones. The treatment at 150°C for 3min proved to be the more suitable for the preparation of TC-containing mats with improved water resistance, maintaining the TC antimicrobial activity against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus almost unaltered. These mats showed a burst release of TC, giving around 95% of the drug within the first hour of immersion in water.

  2. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Philipp A; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R; Ideker, Trey

    2015-08-15

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition.

  3. An improved cryopreservation method for porcine buccal mucosa in ex vivo drug permeation studies using Franz diffusion cells.

    PubMed

    Amores, Sonia; Domenech, José; Colom, Helena; Calpena, Ana C; Clares, Beatriz; Gimeno, Álvaro; Lauroba, Jacinto

    2014-08-18

    The use of isolated animal models to assess percutaneous absorption of molecules is frequently reported. The porcine buccal mucosa has been proposed as a substitute for the buccal mucosa barrier on ex vivo permeability studies avoiding unnecessary sacrifice of animals. But it is not always easy to obtain fresh buccal mucosa. Consequently, human and porcine buccal mucosa is sometimes frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen, but this procedure is not always feasible. One cheaper and simpler alternative is to freeze the buccal mucosa of freshly slaughtered pigs in a mechanical freezer, using DMSO and albumin as cryoprotective agents. This study compared the ex vivo permeability parameters of propranolol hydrochloride through porcine buccal mucosa using a Franz diffusion cell system and HPLC as detection method. The freezing effects on drug permeability parameters were evaluated. Equally histological studies were performed. Furthermore, the use of the parameter transmucosal water loss (TMWL) as an indicator of the buccal mucosa integrity was evaluated just as transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is utilized for skin integrity. The results showed no difference between fresh and frozen mucosal flux, permeability coefficient or lag time of propranolol. However, statistical significant difference in TMWL between fresh and frozen mucosa was observed. PMID:24813111

  4. Lessons Learned and Potentials for Improvement in CNS Drug Development: ISCTM Section on Designing the Right Series of Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Bruce J.; Brannan, Stephen K.; Krystal, Andrew K.; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Mahableshwarkar, Atul; Sachs, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Once a molecule has been characterized as engaging an identified target at the appropriate location (affinity and potency), the next step involves designing experiments that will determine its pharmacodynamic activities both for efficacy (on target) and safety-tolerability (on/off target). Two expert presentations focused on looking back at completed programs and two concentrated on looking forward at ongoing programs. Specific discussions pertain to assessment of pharmacologic agonists (mGluR2/3, k-opiate, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) and antagonists (orexin and cannabinoid) in disorders of cognition, mood, and anxiety. Advanced experimental study designs using genetics to guide a treatment trial in Alzheimer’s disease and neural target-based approaches as the primary outcome measure in the National Institute of Mental Health-sponsored Fast-Fail Trials (FAST)-Mood and Anxiety Spectrum Disorders (MAS) initiative for depression showcases novel methodological approaches. Of interest, some of these initiatives were successful, while others were not, and two are currently ongoing. In conclusion, methodologies that were utilized and are currently employed to reach a successful clinical drug trial outcome are appreciated, and in case of failure, approaches to reviewing programs to enable learning that would be helpful to future programs are brought forth. This article is based on proceedings from the “Designing the Right Series of Experiments” session, which was held during the International Society for Clinical Trials Meeting (ISCTM) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 30 to October 2, 2013. PMID:25977837

  5. Beyond Agar: Gel Substrates with Improved Optical Clarity and Drug Efficiency and Reduced Autofluorescence for Microbial Growth Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Philipp A.; McElfresh, Cameron; Wong, Lily R.

    2015-01-01

    Agar, a seaweed extract, has been the standard support matrix for microbial experiments for over a century. Recent developments in high-throughput genetic screens have created a need to reevaluate the suitability of agar for use as colony support, as modern robotic printing systems now routinely spot thousands of colonies within the area of a single microtiter plate. Identifying optimal biophysical, biochemical, and biological properties of the gel support matrix in these extreme experimental conditions is instrumental to achieving the best possible reproducibility and sensitivity. Here we systematically evaluate a range of gelling agents by using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model microbe. We find that carrageenan and Phytagel have superior optical clarity and reduced autofluorescence, crucial for high-resolution imaging and fluorescent reporter screens. Nutrient choice and use of refined Noble agar or pure agarose reduce the effective dose of numerous selective drugs by >50%, potentially enabling large cost savings in genetic screens. Using thousands of mutant yeast strains to compare colony growth between substrates, we found no evidence of significant growth or nutrient biases between gel substrates, indicating that researchers could freely pick and choose the optimal gel for their respective application and experimental condition. PMID:26070672

  6. Why a Combination of WP 631 and Epo B is an Improvement on the Drugs Singly - Involvement in the Cell Cycle and Mitotic Slippage.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Barbara; Rogalska, Aneta; Forma, Ewa; Brys, Magdalena; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies clearly demonstrated that a combination of WP 631 and Epo B has higher activity against ovarian cancer cells than either of these compounds used separately. In order to fully understand the exact mechanism of action in combination, we assessed effects on the cell cycle of SKOV-3 cells. We evaluated three control points essential for WP 631 and Epo B action to determine which cell cycle-regulating proteins (CDK1/cyclin B complex, EpCAM or HMGB1) mediate activity. The effects of the drug on the cell cycle were measured based on the nuclear DNA content using flow cytometry. Expression of cell cycle-regulating genes was analyzed using real-time PCR. It was discovered that WP 631, at the tested concentration, did not affect the SKOV-3 cell cycle. Epo B caused significant G2/M arrest, whereas the drug combination induced stronger apoptosis and lower mitotic arrest than Epo B alone. This is very important information from the point of view of the fight against cancer, as, while mitotic arrest in Epo B-treated cells could be overcame after DNA damage repair, apoptosis which occurs after mitotic slippage in combination-treated cells is irreversible. It clearly explains the higher activity of the drug combination in comparison to Epo B alone. Epo B acts via the CDK1/cyclin B complex and has the ability to inhibit CDK1, which may be a promising strategy for ovarian cancer treatment in the future. The drug combination diminishes EpCAM and HMGB1 expression to a greater degree than either WP 631 and Epo B alone. Owing to the fact that the high expression of these two proteins is a poor prognostic factor for ovarian cancer, a decrease in their expression, observed in our studies, may result in improved efficacy of cancer therapy. The presented findings show that the combination of WP 631 and Epo B is a better therapeutic option than either of these drugs alone. PMID:27039763

  7. Are interventions for improving the quality of services provided by specialized drug shops effective in sub-Saharan Africa? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wafula, Francis N.; Goodman, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We set out to determine effectiveness of interventions for improving the quality of services provided by specialized drug shops in sub-Saharan Africa. Data sources We searched PubMed, CAB Abstracts, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Eldis databases and websites for organizations such as WHO and Management Sciences for Health. Finally, we searched manually through the references of retrieved articles. Study selection Our search strategy included randomized trials, time-series studies and before and after studies evaluating six interventions; education, peer review, reorganizing administrative structures, incentives, regulation and legislation. Data extraction We extracted information on design features, participants, interventions and outcomes assessed studies for methodological quality, and extracted results, all using uniform checklists. Results of data synthesis We obtained 10 studies, all implementing educational interventions. Outcome measures were heterogeneous and included knowledge, communication and dispensing practices. Education improved knowledge across studies, but gave mixed results on communication between sellers and clients, dispensing of appropriate treatments and referring of patients to health facilities. Profit incentives appeared to constrain behaviour change in certain instances, although cases of shops adopting practices at the expense of sales revenue were also reported. Conclusion Evidence suggests that knowledge and practices of pharmacies and drug shops can be improved across a range of diseases and countries/regions, although variations were reported across studies. Profit incentives appear to bear some influence on the level of success of interventions. More work is required to extend the geographical base of evidence, investigate cost-effectiveness and evaluate sustainability of interventions over periods longer than 1 year. PMID:20430823

  8. Improved solubility and bioactivity of theophylline (a bronchodilator drug) through its new nitrate salt analysed by experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary Novena, L.; Suresh Kumar, S.; Athimoolam, S.

    2016-07-01

    Synthesis, crystal structure, vibrational spectroscopy, quantum chemical studies and biological activity of the new semi organic compound, Theophyllinium Nitrate [C7H9N4 O2)+. (NO3)-], are reported here. Crystals of Theophyllinium nitrate (TN) were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique. The crystal packing is dominated by N-H···O intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The cations and anions are aggregated almost parallel leading to a lamellar structure. This molecular aggregation features two alternate hydrogen bonded chain C22(8) and C21(6) motifs. Further, a bifurcated ring R12(4) motifs is also seen. This aggregated molecular sheets are parallel to (2 bar 06) and (20 6 bar) planes of the crystal. The solubility test is carried out to enhance the physico-chemical activity of the compound. The atomic charge distribution on different atoms of TN has been calculated by Mulliken charge analysis. A detailed interpretation of FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of TN show that most of the bands are matching between the experimental and theoretical methods. The strong intensity bands and shifting of bands due to intermolecular hydrogen bonds are also investigated. The NBO analysis is carried out to elucidate the stability of the molecule and charge delocalization within the molecule. The HOMO-LUMO analysis reveals molecular stability and chemical reactivity of the present compound. Also, the compound was examined for its antibacterial activity and found to exhibit notable activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This shows that the present compound is a good candidate for the antimicrobial agent apart from its inherent Bronchodilator drug property. Hence, the new compound (TN) may be a good alternative for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and bacterial infections.

  9. [Ureter drugs].

    PubMed

    Raynal, G; Bellan, J; Saint, F; Tillou, X; Petit, J

    2008-03-01

    Many improvements have been made recently in the field of the ureteral smooth muscle pharmacology. After a brief summary on physiological basis, we review what is known about effects on ureter of different drugs class. In a second part, we review clinical applications for renal colic analgesia, calculi expulsive medical therapy, ESWL adjuvant treatment and preoperative treatment before retrograde access. There are now sufficient data on NSAID and alpha-blockers. beta-agonists, especially for beta3 selective ones, and topical drugs before retrograde access are interesting and should be further evaluated.

  10. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen’s egg test–chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery. PMID:25670897

  11. The combination of glycerol metabolic engineering and drug resistance marker-aided genome shuffling to improve very-high-gravity fermentation performances of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Mei; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Liu, Tian-Zhe; Tao, Xiang-Lin; Feng, Ming-Guang; Min, Hang; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2012-03-01

    A challenge associated with the ethanol productivity under very-high-gravity (VHG) conditions, optimizing multi-traits (i.e. byproduct formation and stress tolerance) of industrial yeast strains, is overcome by a combination of metabolic engineering and genome shuffling. First, industrial strain Y12 was deleted with a glycerol exporter Fps1p and hetero-expressed with glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, resulting in the modified strain YFG12 with lower glycerol yield. Second, YFG12 was subjected to three rounds of drug resistance marker-aided genome shuffling to increase its ethanol tolerance, and the best shuffled strain TS5 was obtained. Compared with wild strain Y12, shuffled strain TS5 not only decreased glycerol formation by 14.8%, but also increased fermentation rate and ethanol yield by 3.7% and 7.6%, respectively. Moreover, the system of genetic modification and Cre/loxP in aid of three different drug-resistance markers presented in the study significantly improved breeding efficiency and will facilitate the application of breeding technologies in prototrophic industrial microorganisms.

  12. Electropolymerized tricopolymer based on N-pyrrole derivatives as a primer coating for improving the performance of a drug-eluting stent.

    PubMed

    Okner, Regina; Shaulov, Yulia; Tal, Noam; Favaro, Gregory; Domb, Abraham J; Mandler, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The coating of medical implants by polymeric films aims at increasing their biocompatibility as well as providing a durable matrix for the controlled release of a drug. In many cases, the coating is divided into a primer layer, which bridges between the medical implant and the drug-eluting matrix. The primer coating must be very carefully designed in order to provide optimal interactions with the surface of the medical implant and the outer layer. Here we present a simple and versatile approach for designing the primer layer based on electropolymerization of a carefully chosen blend of three different pyrrole derivatives: N-methylpyrrole (N-me), N-(2-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (PPA), and the butyl ester of N-(2-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (BuOPy). The composition and physical properties of the primer layer were studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a nano scratch tester. The latter provides the in-depth analysis of the adhesion and viscoelasticity of the coating. AFM phase imaging reveals a uniform distribution of the three monomers forming rough morphology. This primer layer significantly improved the morphology, stability, and paclitaxel release profile of a paclitaxel-eluting matrix based on methyl and lauryl methacrylates.

  13. Improvement of insulin sensitivity by a novel drug, BGP-15, in insulin-resistant patients: a proof of concept randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Literáti-Nagy, B; Kulcsár, E; Literáti-Nagy, Zs; Buday, B; Péterfai, E; Horváth, T; Tory, K; Kolonics, A; Fleming, A; Mandl, J; Korányi, L

    2009-05-01

    The efficacy and safety of the new drug, BGP-15, were compared with placebo in insulin-resistant patients in a 28-day dose-ranging study. Forty-seven nondiabetic patients with impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of treatment with 200 or 400 mg of BGP-15 or placebo. Insulin resistance was determined by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique and homeostasis model assessment method, and beta-cell function was measured by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Each BGP-15 dose significantly increased whole body insulin sensitivity (M-1, p=0.032), total body glucose utilization (M-2, p=0.035), muscle tissue glucose utilization (M-3, p=0.040), and fat-free body mass glucose utilization (M-4, p=0.038) compared to baseline and placebo. No adverse drug effects were observed during treatment. BGP-15 at 200 or 400 mg significantly improved insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic patients during treatment compared to placebo and was safe and well-tolerated. This was the first clinical study demonstrating the insulin-sensitizing effect of a molecule, which is considered as a co-inducer of heat shock proteins.

  14. Development of a fast high performance liquid chromatographic screening system for eight antidiabetic drugs by an improved methodology of in-silico robustness simulation.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Hatem I; Abdel-Salam, Randa A; Haddad, Ghada M

    2015-06-19

    Robustness of RP-HPLC methods is a crucial method quality attribute which has gained an increasing interest throughout the efforts to apply quality by design concepts in analytical methodology. Improvement to design space modeling approaches to represent method robustness was the goal of many previous works. Modeling of design spaces regarding to method robustness fulfils quality by design essence of ensuring method validity throughout the design space. The current work aimed to describe an improvement to robustness modeling of design spaces in context of RP-HPLC method development for screening of eight antidiabetic drugs. The described improvement consisted of in-silico simulation of practical robustness testing procedures thus had the advantage of modeling design spaces with higher confidence in estimated of method robustness. The proposed in-silico robustness test was performed as a full factorial design of simulated method conditions deliberate shifts for each predicted point in knowledge space with modeling error propagation. Design space was then calculated as zones exceeding a threshold probability to pass the simulated robustness testing. Potential design spaces were mapped for three different stationary phases as a function of gradient elution parameters, pH and ternary solvent ratio. A robust and fast separation for the eight compounds within less than 6 min was selected and confirmed through experimental robustness testing. The effectiveness of this approach regarding definition of design spaces with ensured robustness and desired objectives was demonstrated.

  15. A Systems-Pharmacology Analysis of Herbal Medicines Used in Health Improvement Treatment: Predicting Potential New Drugs and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianling; Pei, Mengjie; Zheng, Chunli; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Yang, Ling

    2013-01-01

    For thousands of years, tonic herbs have been successfully used all around the world to improve health, energy, and vitality. However, their underlying mechanisms of action in molecular/systems levels are still a mystery. In this work, two sets of tonic herbs, so called Qi-enriching herbs (QEH) and Blood-tonifying herbs (BTH) in TCM, were selected to elucidate why they can restore proper balance and harmony inside body, organ and energy system. Firstly, a pattern recognition model based on artificial neural network and discriminant analysis for assessing the molecular difference between QEH and BTH was developed. It is indicated that QEH compounds have high lipophilicity while BTH compounds possess high chemical reactivity. Secondly, a systematic investigation integrating ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) prediction, target fishing and network analysis was performed and validated on these herbs to obtain the compound-target associations for reconstructing the biologically-meaningful networks. The results suggest QEH enhance physical strength, immune system and normal well-being, acting as adjuvant therapy for chronic disorders while BTH stimulate hematopoiesis function in body. As an emerging approach, the systems pharmacology model might facilitate to understand the mechanisms of action of the tonic herbs, which brings about new development for complementary and alternative medicine. PMID:24369484

  16. Co-overexpression of geraniol-10-hydroxylase and strictosidine synthase improves anti-cancer drug camptothecin accumulation in Ophiorrhiza pumila

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lijie; Ni, Xiaoling; Ji, Qian; Teng, Xiaojuan; Yang, Yanru; Wu, Chao; Zekria, David; Zhang, Dasheng; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) belongs to a group of monoterpenoidindole alkaloids (TIAs) and its derivatives such as irinothecan and topothecan have been widely used worldwide for the treatment of cancer, giving rise to rapidly increasing market demands. Genes from Catharanthus roseus encoding strictosidine synthase (STR) and geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), were separately and simultaneously introduced into Ophiorrhiza pumila hairy roots. Overexpression of individual G10H (G lines) significantly improved CPT production with respect to non-transgenic hairy root cultures (NC line) and single STR overexpressing lines (S lines), indicating that G10H plays a more important role in stimulating CPT accumulation than STR in O. pumila. Furthermore, co-overexpression of G10H and STR genes (SG Lines) caused a 56% increase on the yields of CPT compared to NC line and single gene transgenic lines, showed that simultaneous introduction of G10H and STR can produce a synergistic effect on CPT biosynthesis in O. pumila. The MTT assay results indicated that CPT extracted from different lines showed similar anti-tumor activity, suggesting that transgenic O. pumila hairy root lines could be an alternative approach to obtain CPT. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the enhancement of CPT production in O. pumila employing a metabolic engineering strategy. PMID:25648209

  17. Genetic and pharmacological modulation of the steroid sulfatase axis improves response control; comparison with drugs used in ADHD.

    PubMed

    Davies, William; Humby, Trevor; Trent, Simon; Eddy, Jessica B; Ojarikre, Obah A; Wilkinson, Lawrence S

    2014-10-01

    Maladaptive response control is a feature of many neuropsychiatric conditions, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As ADHD is more commonly diagnosed in males than females, a pathogenic role for sex-linked genes has been suggested. Deletion or point mutation of the X-linked STS gene, encoding the enzyme steroid sulfatase (STS) influences risk for ADHD. We examined whether deletion of the Sts gene in the 39,X(Y*)O mouse model, or pharmacological manipulation of the STS axis, via administration of the enzyme substrate dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate or the enzyme inhibitor COUMATE, influenced behavior in a novel murine analog of the stop-signal reaction time task used to detect inhibitory deficits in individuals with ADHD. Unexpectedly, both the genetic and pharmacological treatments resulted in enhanced response control, manifest as highly specific effects in the ability to cancel a prepotent action. For all three manipulations, the effect size was comparable to that seen with the commonly used ADHD therapeutics methylphenidate and atomoxetine. Hence, converging genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that the STS axis is involved in inhibitory processes and can be manipulated to give rise to improvements in response control. While the precise neurobiological mechanism(s) underlying the effects remain to be established, there is the potential for exploiting this pathway in the treatment of disorders where failures in behavioral inhibition are prominent.

  18. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  19. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided. PMID:12165187

  20. Improving the de-agglomeration and dissolution of a poorly water soluble drug by decreasing the agglomerate strength of the cohesive powder.

    PubMed

    Allahham, Ayman; Stewart, Peter J; Das, Shyamal C

    2013-11-30

    Influence of ternary, poorly water-soluble components on the agglomerate strength of cohesive indomethacin mixtures during dissolution was studied to explore the relationship between agglomerate strength and extent of de-agglomeration and dissolution of indomethacin (Ind). Dissolution profiles of Ind from 20% Ind-lactose binary mixtures, and ternary mixtures containing additional dibasic calcium phosphate (1% or 10%; DCP), calcium sulphate (10%) and talc (10%) were determined. Agglomerate strength distributions were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation of particle size, work of cohesion and packing fraction distributions. The agglomerate strength of Ind decreased from 1.19 MPa for the binary Ind mixture to 0.84 MPa for 1DCP:20Ind mixture and to 0.42 MPa for 1DCP:2Ind mixture. Both extent of de-agglomeration, demonstrated by the concentration of the dispersed indomethacin distribution, and extent of dispersion, demonstrated by the particle size of the dispersed indomethacin, were in descending order of 1DCP:2Ind>1DCP:20Ind>binary Ind. The addition of calcium sulphate dihydrate and talc also reduced the agglomerate strength and improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of indomethacin. While not definitively causal, the improved de-agglomeration and dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug by poorly water soluble components was related to the agglomerate strength of the cohesive matrix during dissolution.

  1. Critical analysis of India's National Mission on Medicinal Plants (NMMP) in providing access to quality botanical drugs to improve public health

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rahi; Rao, Bakul

    2015-01-01

    Drugs play an important role in improving health of the population. Medicinal plants help in addressing the health issues of a large section of the population – especially the low and middle-income people. However, there are some concerns about the supply, efficacy and safety in using them. This study reviews India's major initiative toward medicinal plants namely, the National Mission on Medicinal Plants to meet medicinal plants challenges. The study analyzed the mission's probable shortcomings due to its design and operational details. This study used “content analysis” approach for analysis of mission's publicly available documents, viz. “Operational guidelines” and its two amendments. The study identified prevalent 28 shortcomings in the original document related to clarity of the document; accountability, transparency and stakeholders’ representation. These challenges were partially addressed in two amendments, which indicate persistence of shortcomings in design and operational details. The mission can help in improving and strengthening the Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy program by addressing those shortcomings. PMID:26604556

  2. Methadone maintenance treatment programme reduces criminal activity and improves social well-being of drug users in China: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hua-Min; Li, Xiao-Yan; Chow, Eric P F; Li, Tong; Xian, Yun; Lu, Yi-Hua; Tian, Tian; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    .2%) at 6 months, then to 59.8% (95% CI 52.4% to 66.8%) and 75.0% (95% CI 69.0% to 80.2%) at 12 months after treatment initiation, respectively. Conclusions MMT has significantly reduced criminal activity, and improved employment rate and social well-being, of clients of the MMT programme. MMT is an effective measure to help drug users to resume societal and familial functions in China. PMID:25573521

  3. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram improves cognitive deficits via CaM kinase II and protein kinase C activation in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Tagashira, Hideaki; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) shows degeneration of the cholinergic system in the medial septum, thereby eliciting down-regulation of the olfactory function in patients. We have previously reported that olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice show hippocampus-dependent memory impairment as assessed by memory-related behavioral tasks and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In the present study, we focused whether novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug sunifiram improves both memory impairment and depression observed in OBX mice. OBX mice were administered once a day for 7-12 days with sunifiram (0.01-1.0mg/kg p.o.) from 10 days after operation with or without gavestinel (10mg/kg i.p.), which is glycine-binding site inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The spatial reference memory assessed by Y-maze and short-term memory assessed by novel object recognition task were significantly improved by sunifiram treatment in OBX mice. Sunifiram also restored hippocampal LTP injured in OBX mice without treatment with gavestinel. By contrast, sunifiram treatment did not ameliorate the depressive behaviors assessed by tail suspension task in OBX mice. Notably, sunifiram treatment restored CaMKIIα (Thr-286) autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation in the hippocampal CA1 region from OBX mice to the levels of control mice. Likewise, sunifiram treatment improved PKCα (Ser-657) autophosphorylation and NR1 (Ser-896) phosphorylation to the control levels. Stimulation of CaMKII and PKC autophosphorylation by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with gavestinel. However, sunifiram treatment did not affect the phosphorylation of CaMKIV (Thr-196) and ERK. Taken together, sunifiram ameliorates OBX-induced deficits of memory-related behaviors and impaired LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region via stimulation of glycine-binding site of NMDAR.

  4. The α2B adrenergic receptor is mutant in cortical myoclonus and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    De Fusco, Maurizio; Vago, Riccardo; Striano, Pasquale; Di Bonaventura, Carlo; Zara, Federico; Mei, Davide; Kim, Min Seuk; Muallem, Shmuel; Chen, Yunjia; Wang, Qin; Guerrini, Renzo; Casari, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Objective Autosomal dominant cortical myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) is characterized by distal, fairly rhythmic myoclonus and epilepsy with variable severity. We have previously mapped the disease locus on chromosome 2p11.1-q12.2 by genome-wide linkage analysis. Additional pedigrees affected by similar forms of epilepsy have been associated to chromosome 8q, 5p and 3q, but none of the causing genes has been identified. We aim at identifying the mutant gene responsible for this epileptic form. Methods Genes included in the ADCME critical region were prioritized and directly sequenced. Co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence and electrophysiology approaches on transfected human cells have been utilized for testing the functional significance of the identified mutation. Results Here we show that mutation in the α2-adrenergic receptor subtype B (α2B-AR) associates to ADCME by identifying a novel in-frame insertion/deletion in two Italian families. The mutation alters several conserved residues of the third intracellular (3i) loop, neither hampering the α2B-AR plasma membrane localization nor the arrestin-mediated internalization capacity, but altering the binding with the scaffolding protein spinophilin upon neurotransmitter activation. Spinophilin, in turn, regulates interaction of GPCRs with Regulators of G proteins Signaling proteins. Accordingly, the mutant α2B-AR increases the epinephrine-stimulated calcium signaling. Interpretation The identified mutation is responsible for ADCME, as the loss of α2B-AR/spinophilin interaction causes a gain of function effect. This work implicates for the first time the α-adrenergic system in human epilepsy and opens new ways for understanding the molecular pathway of epileptogenesis, widening the spectrum of possible therapeutic targets. PMID:24114805

  5. Spinophilin Is Indispensable for the α2B Adrenergic Receptor-Elicited Hypertensive Response.

    PubMed

    Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Lu, Roujian; Peng, Ning; Gannon, Mary; Wyss, J Michael; Jiao, Kai; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The α2 adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes are important for blood pressure control. When activated, the α2A subtype elicits a hypotensive response whereas the α2B subtype mediates a hypertensive effect that counteracts the hypotensive response by the α2A subtype. We have previously shown that spinophilin attenuates the α2AAR-dependent hypotensive response; in spinophilin null mice, this response is highly potentiated. In this study, we demonstrate that spinophilin impedes arrestin-dependent phosphorylation and desensitization of the α2BAR subtype by competing against arrestin binding to this receptor subtype. The Del301-303 α2BAR, a human variation that shows impaired phosphorylation and desensitization and is linked to hypertension in certain populations, exhibits preferential interaction with spinophilin over arrestin. Furthermore, Del301-303 α2BAR-induced ERK signaling is quickly desensitized in cells without spinophilin expression, showing a profile similar to that induced by the wild type receptor in these cells. Together, these data suggest a critical role of spinophilin in sustaining α2BAR signaling. Consistent with this notion, our in vivo study reveals that the α2BAR-elicited hypertensive response is diminished in spinophilin deficient mice. In arrestin 3 deficient mice, where the receptor has a stronger binding to spinophilin, the same hypertensive response is enhanced. These data suggest that interaction with spinophilin is indispensable for the α2BAR to elicit the hypertensive response. This is opposite of the negative role of spinophilin in regulating α2AAR-mediated hypotensive response, suggesting that spinophilin regulation of these closely related receptor subtypes can result in distinct functional outcomes in vivo. Thus, spinophilin may represent a useful therapeutic target for treatment of hypertension.

  6. Drug allergies

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  7. Drug Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  8. Pomegranate seed oil nanoemulsions improve the photostability and in vivo antinociceptive effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luana Mota; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Cervi, Verônica Ferrari; Gehrcke, Mailine; Barbieri, Allanna Valentini; Zborowski, Vanessa Angonesi; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Cruz, Letícia

    2016-08-01

    The combination of pomegranate seed oil and ketoprofen in nanoemulsions aiming to improve the antinociceptive effect was evaluated according to the writhing test and Complete Freud's Adjuvant induced paw inflammation in mice. The formulations showed adequate characteristics and improved ketoprofen's photostability against UVC radiation exposure. The dialysis bag technique showed that 100% of the drug was released from the nanoemulsions after 3h and the oil amount had no influence on the releasing. Furthermore, time- and dose-response curves were obtained to determine the antinociceptive effect of the formulations. In the post-test, the nanoemulsion containing ketoprofen significantly reduced abdominal constrictions in time-response curve, showing effect up to 12h while the free ketoprofen showed effect up to 3h. In addition, the blank nanoemulsion presented a reduction of abdominal constriction up to 1h of pre-treatment. Regarding the dose-response curve, the free ketoprofen presents effect at 0.5mg/Kg dose and nanoemulsion at 1.0mg/Kg dose. Time- and dose-response curves were performed to determine the antinociceptive effect in inflammatory pain. After the evaluation of mechanical allodynia testing at the Von Frey Hair, the free ketoprofen showed effect up to 6h while nanoemulsions presented effect up to 10h. Moreover, acute toxicity was performed with ALT and AST activity evaluations and urea levels. After 7 days of treatment, no toxic effects for nanoemulsions were found. In conclusion, ketoprofen-loaded pomegranate seed oil nanoemulsions presented adequate characteristics and a high antinociceptive activity in the animal models tested.

  9. Pomegranate seed oil nanoemulsions improve the photostability and in vivo antinociceptive effect of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luana Mota; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Cervi, Verônica Ferrari; Gehrcke, Mailine; Barbieri, Allanna Valentini; Zborowski, Vanessa Angonesi; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Cruz, Letícia

    2016-08-01

    The combination of pomegranate seed oil and ketoprofen in nanoemulsions aiming to improve the antinociceptive effect was evaluated according to the writhing test and Complete Freud's Adjuvant induced paw inflammation in mice. The formulations showed adequate characteristics and improved ketoprofen's photostability against UVC radiation exposure. The dialysis bag technique showed that 100% of the drug was released from the nanoemulsions after 3h and the oil amount had no influence on the releasing. Furthermore, time- and dose-response curves were obtained to determine the antinociceptive effect of the formulations. In the post-test, the nanoemulsion containing ketoprofen significantly reduced abdominal constrictions in time-response curve, showing effect up to 12h while the free ketoprofen showed effect up to 3h. In addition, the blank nanoemulsion presented a reduction of abdominal constriction up to 1h of pre-treatment. Regarding the dose-response curve, the free ketoprofen presents effect at 0.5mg/Kg dose and nanoemulsion at 1.0mg/Kg dose. Time- and dose-response curves were performed to determine the antinociceptive effect in inflammatory pain. After the evaluation of mechanical allodynia testing at the Von Frey Hair, the free ketoprofen showed effect up to 6h while nanoemulsions presented effect up to 10h. Moreover, acute toxicity was performed with ALT and AST activity evaluations and urea levels. After 7 days of treatment, no toxic effects for nanoemulsions were found. In conclusion, ketoprofen-loaded pomegranate seed oil nanoemulsions presented adequate characteristics and a high antinociceptive activity in the animal models tested. PMID:27088191

  10. From many deaths to some few cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis: travelling with the systems quality improvement model in Lacs Health District, Togo

    PubMed Central

    Afanvi, Kossivi Agbelenko

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of every tuberculosis (TB) treatment program is a high treatment success rate. Treatment success is extremely important because, when the rate is high, it significantly contributes to declining numbers of new cases by reducing the number and period of infectious cases, TB morbidity and mortality, and prevents the emergence of resistant strains. Our aim was to decrease TB mortality by increasing pulmonary TB patients’ treatment success rate to at least 85 % in Lacs Health District by end of July 2014. A systems and dialogic analysis of the public health system related to TB patients’ treatment revealed that it was not performing well; we found weak coverage and quality of TB services, a poorly-functioning TB health information system, poor-performing health workforce, poor availability of HIV tests and antiretroviral for TB patients, and low degree of patients’ participation in their care. We redesigned the system to correct those weaknesses. The effectiveness of these changes was monitored using plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles. We increased TB patient success rate from 80% to 95% between February 2012 and July 2014.The mortality rate dropped from 13% to 3% and the failure to follow-up rate dropped from 3% to 2%. In conclusion, district health systems performance depends on factors such as the closeness of services to population; skilled workforce; the ability to collect and analyze data and use information for action; population empowerment, and good management and improvement capabilities of management team especially the public health director. High TB patients’ success rate depends also on the availability of antiretroviral drugs. It is highly important that every district health management team member develops improvement capabilities. PMID:26734412

  11. Liquid and solid self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems for improving the oral bioavailability of andrographolide from a crude extract of Andrographis paniculata.

    PubMed

    Sermkaew, Namfa; Ketjinda, Wichan; Boonme, Prapaporn; Phadoongsombut, Narubodee; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn

    2013-11-20

    The purpose of this study was to develop self-microemulsifying formulations of an Andrographis paniculata extract in liquid and pellet forms for an improved oral delivery of andrographolide. The optimized liquid self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was composed of A. paniculata extract (11.1%), Capryol 90 (40%), Cremophor RH 40 (40%) and Labrasol (8.9%). This liquid SMEDDS was further adsorbed onto colloidal silicon dioxide and microcrystalline cellulose, and converted to SMEDDS pellets by the extrusion/spheronization technique. The microemulsion droplet sizes of the liquid and pellet formulations after dilution with water were in the range of 23.4 and 30.3 nm. The in vitro release of andrographolide from the liquid SMEDDS and SMEDDS pellets was 97.64% (SD 1.97%) and 97.74% (SD 3.36%) within 15 min, respectively while the release from the initial extract was only 10%. The oral absorption of andrographolide was determined in rabbits. The C(max) value of andrographolide from the A. paniculata extract liquid SMEDDS and SMEDDS pellet formulations (equivalent to 17.5mg/kg of andrographolide) was 6-fold and 5-fold greater than the value from the initial extract in aqueous suspension (equivalent to 35 mg/kg of andrographolide), respectively. In addition, the AUC(0-12h) was increased 15-fold by the liquid SMEDDS and 13-fold by the SMEDDS pellets compared to the extract in aqueous suspension, respectively. The results clearly indicated that the liquid and solid SMEDDS could be effectively used to improve the dissolution and oral bioavailability that would also enable a reduction in the dose of the poorly water soluble A. paniculata extract.

  12. A conceptually new treatment approach for relapsed glioblastoma: Coordinated undermining of survival paths with nine repurposed drugs (CUSP9) by the International Initiative for Accelerated Improvement of Glioblastoma Care

    PubMed Central

    Kast, Richard E.; Boockvar, John A.; Brüning, Ansgar; Cappello, Francesco; Chang, Wen-Wei; Cvek, Boris; Dou, Q. Ping; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Efferth, Thomas; Focosi, Daniele; Ghaffari, Seyed H.; Karpel-Massler, Georg; Ketola, Kirsi; Khoshnevisan, Alireza; Keizman, Daniel; Magné, Nicolas; Marosi, Christine; McDonald, Kerrie; Muñoz, Miguel; Paranjpe, Ameya; Pourgholami, Mohammad H.; Sardi, Iacopo; Sella, Avishay; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.; Tuccori, Marco; Wang, Weiguang; Wirtz, Christian R.; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis in recurrent glioblastoma we developed a treatment protocol based on a combination of drugs not traditionally thought of as cytotoxic chemotherapy agents but that have a robust history of being well-tolerated and are already marketed and used for other non-cancer indications. Focus was on adding drugs which met these criteria: a) were pharmacologically well characterized, b) had low likelihood of adding to patient side effect burden, c) had evidence for interfering with a recognized, well-characterized growth promoting element of glioblastoma, and d) were coordinated, as an ensemble had reasonable likelihood of concerted activity against key biological features of glioblastoma growth. We found nine drugs meeting these criteria and propose adding them to continuous low dose temozolomide, a currently accepted treatment for relapsed glioblastoma, in patients with recurrent disease after primary treatment with the Stupp Protocol. The nine adjuvant drug regimen, Coordinated Undermining of Survival Paths, CUSP9, then are aprepitant, artesunate, auranofin, captopril, copper gluconate, disulfiram, ketoconazole, nelfinavir, sertraline, to be added to continuous low dose temozolomide. We discuss each drug in turn and the specific rationale for use- how each drug is expected to retard glioblastoma growth and undermine glioblastoma's compensatory mechanisms engaged during temozolomide treatment. The risks of pharmacological interactions and why we believe this drug mix will increase both quality of life and overall survival are reviewed. PMID:23594434

  13. Self-microemulsifying drug-delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of 20(S)-25-methoxyl-dammarane-3β, 12β, 20-triol: preparation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuang; Shi, Cai-Hong; Zhang, Xiangrong; Tang, Xiaojiao; Suo, Hao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble compound 20(S)-25-methoxydammarane-3β;12β;20-triol (25-OCH3-PPD). Optimized SMEDDS formulations for 25-OCH3-PPD contained Cremophor® EL (50%) as the surfactant, glycerin (20%) as the cosurfactant, and Labrafil® M1944 (30%) as the oil. The SMEDDS were characterized by morphological observation and mean droplet size. The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of the 25-OCH3-PPD suspension and SMEDDS were evaluated and compared in rats. The plasma concentrations of 25-OCH3-PPD and its main metabolite, 25-OH-PPD, were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The relative bioavailability of SMEDDS was dramatically enhanced by an average of 9.8-fold compared with the suspension. Improved solubility and lymphatic transport may contribute to this enhanced bioavailability. Our studies highlight the promise of SMEDDS for the delivery of 25-OCH3-PPD via the oral route. PMID:24611008

  14. Drug discovery in jeopardy

    PubMed Central

    Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Despite striking advances in the biomedical sciences, the flow of new drugs has slowed to a trickle, impairing therapeutic advances as well as the commercial success of drug companies. Reduced productivity in the drug industry is caused mainly by corporate policies that discourage innovation. This is compounded by various consequences of mega-mergers, the obsession for blockbuster drugs, the shift of control of research from scientists to marketers, the need for fast sales growth, and the discontinuation of development compounds for nontechnical reasons. Lessons from the past indicate that these problems can be overcome, and herein, new and improved directions for drug discovery are suggested. PMID:17080187

  15. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds.

  16. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds. PMID:26296082

  17. A novel liposomal irinotecan formulation with significant anti-tumour activity: use of the divalent cation ionophore A23187 and copper-containing liposomes to improve drug retention.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Euan; Alnajim, Jehan; Anantha, Malathi; Zastre, Jason; Yan, Hong; Webb, Murray; Waterhouse, Dawn; Bally, Marcel

    2008-03-01

    We determined whether the method used to encapsulate irinotecan into 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine/cholesterol (DSPC/Chol; 55:45 mol%) liposomes influenced: (i) irinotecan release rate and (ii) therapeutic efficacy. DSPC/Chol (55:45 mol%) liposomes were prepared with: (i) unbuffered CuSO4; (ii) buffered (pH 7.5) CuSO4; (iii) unbuffered MnSO4 and the ionophore A23187 (exchanges internal metal2+ with external 2H+ to establish and maintain a transmembrane pH gradient); and (iv) unbuffered CuSO4 and ionophore A23187. All formulations exhibited >98% irinotecan encapsulation (0.2 drug-to-lipid molar ratio; 10 min incubation at 50 degrees C). Following a single intravenous injection (100mg/kg irinotecan) into Balb/c mice, the unbuffered CuSO4 plus A23187 formulation mediated a half-life of irinotecan release of 44.4h; a >or=4-fold increase compared to the other liposome formulations. This surprising observation demonstrated that the CuSO4 plus A23187 formulation enhanced irinotecan retention compared to the MnSO4 plus A23187 formulation, indicating the importance of the divalent metal. A single dose of the CuSO4 plus A23187 formulation (50mg/kg irinotecan) mediated an 18-fold increase in median T-C (the difference in days for treated and control subcutaneous human LS 180 adenocarcinoma xenografts to increase their initial volume by 400%) when compared to a comparable dose of Camptosar. Improved irinotecan retention was associated with increased therapeutic activity. PMID:17904831

  18. How effective are drug treatments for children with ADHD at improving on-task behaviour and academic achievement in the school classroom? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vibhore; Brogan, Ellen; Mulvaney, Caroline; Grainge, Matthew; Stanton, Wendy; Sayal, Kapil

    2013-04-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a significant impact on children's classroom behaviour, daily functioning and experience of school life. However, the effects of drug treatment for ADHD on learning and academic achievement are not fully understood. This review was undertaken to describe the effects of methylphenidate, dexamfetamine, mixed amfetamine salts and atomoxetine on children's on-task behaviour and their academic performance, and to perform a meta-analysis to quantify these effects. Nine electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials comparing drug treatment for ADHD against (i) no drug treatment, (ii) baseline (in crossover trials), or (iii) placebo; reporting outcomes encompassing measures of educational achievement within the classroom environment. Forty-three studies involving a pooled total of 2,110 participants were identified for inclusion. Drug treatment benefited children in the amount of school work that they completed, by up to 15%, and less consistently improved children's accuracy in specific types of academic assignments, such as arithmetic. Similar improvements were seen in classroom behaviour, with up to 14% more of children's time spent "on task". Methylphenidate, dexamfetamine and mixed amfetamine formulations all showed beneficial effects on children's on-task behaviour and academic work completion. Atomoxetine was examined in two studies, and was found to have no significant effect. These review findings suggest that medication for ADHD has the potential to improve children's learning and academic achievement. PMID:23179416

  19. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  20. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases. PMID:20437123

  1. Ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaudana, Ripal; Ananthula, Hari Krishna; Parenky, Ashwin; Mitra, Ashim K

    2010-09-01

    Ocular drug delivery has been a major challenge to pharmacologists and drug delivery scientists due to its unique anatomy and physiology. Static barriers (different layers of cornea, sclera, and retina including blood aqueous and blood-retinal barriers), dynamic barriers (choroidal and conjunctival blood flow, lymphatic clearance, and tear dilution), and efflux pumps in conjunction pose a significant challenge for delivery of a drug alone or in a dosage form, especially to the posterior segment. Identification of influx transporters on various ocular tissues and designing a transporter-targeted delivery of a parent drug has gathered momentum in recent years. Parallelly, colloidal dosage forms such as nanoparticles, nanomicelles, liposomes, and microemulsions have been widely explored to overcome various static and dynamic barriers. Novel drug delivery strategies such as bioadhesive gels and fibrin sealant-based approaches were developed to sustain drug levels at the target site. Designing noninvasive sustained drug delivery systems and exploring the feasibility of topical application to deliver drugs to the posterior segment may drastically improve drug delivery in the years to come. Current developments in the field of ophthalmic drug delivery promise a significant improvement in overcoming the challenges posed by various anterior and posterior segment diseases.

  2. Hydrophobic ion pairing of a minocycline/Ca(2+)/AOT complex for preparation of drug-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with improved sustained release.

    PubMed

    Holmkvist, Alexander Dontsios; Friberg, Annika; Nilsson, Ulf J; Schouenborg, Jens

    2016-02-29

    Polymeric nanoparticles is an established and efficient means to achieve controlled release of drugs. Incorporation of minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, into biodegradable nanoparticles may therefore provide an efficient means to combat foreign body reactions to implanted electrodes in the brain. However, minocycline is commonly associated with poor encapsulation efficiencies and/or fast release rates due to its high solubility in water. Moreover, minocycline is unstable under conditions of low and high pH, heat and exposure to light, which exacerbate the challenges of encapsulation. In this work drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by a modified emulsification-solvent-diffusion technique and characterized for size, drug encapsulation and in vitro drug release. A novel hydrophobic ion pair complex of minocycline, Ca(2+) ions and the anionic surfactant AOT was developed to protect minocycline from degradation and prolong its release. The optimized formulation resulted in particle sizes around 220 nm with an entrapment efficiency of 43% and showed drug release over 30 days in artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The present results constitute a substantial increase in release time compared to what has hitherto been achieved for minocycline and indicate that such particles might provide useful for sustained drug delivery in the CNS. PMID:26773599

  3. Treatment with a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug after calving did not improve milk production, health, or reproduction parameters in pasture-grazed dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Meier, S; Priest, N V; Burke, C R; Kay, J K; McDougall, S; Mitchell, M D; Walker, C G; Heiser, A; Loor, J J; Roche, J R

    2014-05-01

    Previous research results have indicated an increase in pregnancy rate in pasture-grazed cows treated with a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) 3 to 4 wk postcalving, when a high proportion of nucleated cells from within the uterus were polymorphonucleated; however, no effect on milk production was detected. It was hypothesized that this lack of effect on milk production was because the administration of the NSAID was too late after calving. The aims of the current study were to evaluate the timing of administering a propionic acid-derived NSAID (i.e., carprofen) on milk production, metabolic status, uterine health, and reproductive performance. Six-hundred and thirty-nine cows (134 primiparous and 505 multiparous) calving between July 4 and September 5, 2012, in 2 herds (herd 1: n=228; herd 2: n=411) were enrolled. Using a randomized block design, cows were allocated to 1 of 3 treatment groups as they calved: (1) no treatment (control; n=221), (2) NSAID administered on d 1, 3, and 5 postcalving (early; n=214), and (3) NSAID administered on d 19, 21, and 23 postcalving (late; n=204). Milk production and composition, and body condition were determined weekly. Blood was sampled at 4 time points (1 precalving and 3 postcalving) to determine the effects of treatment on indicators of metabolic health and energy status. Uterine health was determined by measuring the proportion of nucleated cells that were polymorphonucleated following cytobrush sampling of the uterus between d 13 to 24 and d 30 to 49 postcalving. Irrespective of timing of application, NSAID did not affect milk production, body weight, or body condition during early lactation. Treatment with an NSAID 19 to 23 d postcalving increased the proportion of cows submitted for breeding during the first 3 wk of the seasonal breeding program (control: 85%, early: 83%, and late: 92%), but did not affect conception or pregnancy rates. No detectable effect of treatment on uterine health or circulating

  4. Combinatorial nanocarrier based drug delivery approach for amalgamation of anti-tumor agents in bresat cancer cells: an improved nanomedicine strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Chandran; Rayappan, Kathirvel; Thangam, Ramar; Bhanumathi, Ramasamy; Shanthi, Krishnamurthy; Vivek, Raju; Thirumurugan, Ramasamy; Bhattacharyya, Atanu; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Gunasekaran, Palani; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy of multiple drugs through a single system is exhibiting high therapeutic effects. We investigate nanocarrier mediated inhibitory effects of topotecan (TPT) and quercetin (QT) on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDA-MB-231) and multi drug resistant (MDR) type breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with respect to cellular uptake efficiency and therapeutic mechanisms as in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) pores used for loading TPT; the outer of the nanoparticles was decorated with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA)-Chitosan (CS) as anionic inner-cationic outer layer respectively and conjugated with QT. Subsequently, grafting of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide on the surface of nanocarrier (CPMSN) thwarted the uptake by normal cells, but facilitated their uptake in cancer cells through integrin receptor mediated endocytosis and the dissociation of nanocarriers due to the ability to degrade of CS and PAA in acidic pH, which enhance the intracellular release of drugs. Subsequently, the released drugs induce remarkable molecular activation as well as structural changes in tumor cell endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and mitochondria that can trigger cell death. The valuable CPMSNs may open up new avenues in developing targeted therapeutic strategies to treat cancer through serving as an effective drug delivery podium. PMID:27725731

  5. Floating lipid beads for the improvement of bioavailability of poorly soluble basic drugs: in-vitro optimization and in-vivo performance in humans.

    PubMed

    Abouelatta, Samar M; Aboelwafa, Ahmed A; Khalil, Rawia M; ElGazayerly, Omaima N

    2015-01-01

    The challenge in developing oral drug delivery systems of poorly soluble basic drugs is primarily due to their pH dependent solubility. Cinnarizine (CNZ), a model for a poorly soluble basic drug, has pH dependent solubility; where it dissolves readily at low pH in the stomach and exhibits a very low solubility at pH values greater than 4. It is also characterized by a short half life of 3-6h, which requires frequent daily administration resulting in poor patient compliance. In an attempt to solve these problems, extended release floating lipid beads were formulated. A 2(4) full factorial design was utilized for optimization of the effects of various independent variables; lipid:drug ratio, % Pluronic F-127, % Sterotex, and Gelucire 43/01:Gelucire 50/13 ratio, on the loading efficiency and release of CNZ from the lipid beads. In-vivo pharmacokinetic study of the optimized CNZ-lipid beads compared to Stugeron® (reference standard) was performed in healthy human volunteers. A promising approach for enhancing the bioavailability of the poorly soluble basic drug, CNZ, utilizing novel and simple floating lipid beads was successfully developed. Zero order release profile of CNZ was achieved for 12h. Mean AUC0-24 and AUC0-∞ of the optimized CNZ-loaded lipid beads were 4.23 and 6.04 times that of Stugeron® tablets respectively.

  6. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  7. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  8. Environmental Management Approach to Improve College Student and Community Relations to Reduce Binge and High-Risk Alcohol Use and Other Drug Problems. Prevention Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A central feature of the U.S. Department of Education's Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention is the promotion of multiple prevention strategies that affect campus and surrounding community environments as a whole and can, thereby, have a large-scale effect on the entire campus community. In outlining the…

  9. Step 7: educates staff in nondrug methods of pain relief and does not promote use of analgesic, anesthetic drugs: the coalition for improving maternity services:.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Romano, Amy; Woolley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Step 7 of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care insures that staff are knowledgeable about nondrug methods of pain relief and that analgesic or anesthetic drugs are not promoted unless required to correct a complication. The rationales for compliance and systematic reviews are presented on massage, hypnosis, hydrotherapy, and the use of opioids, regional analgesia, and anesthesia. PMID:18523667

  10. Using Rich Data on Comorbidities in Case-Control Study Design with Electronic Health Record Data Improves Control of Confounding in the Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that the case-control study design, unlike the self-controlled study design, performs poorly in controlling confounding in the detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from administrative claims and electronic health record (EHR) data, resulting in biased estimates of the causal effects of drugs on health outcomes of interest (HOI) and inaccurate confidence intervals. Here we show that using rich data on comorbidities and automatic variable selection strategies for selecting confounders can better control confounding within a case-control study design and provide a more solid basis for inference regarding the causal effects of drugs on HOIs. Four HOIs are examined: acute kidney injury, acute liver injury, acute myocardial infarction and gastrointestinal ulcer hospitalization. For each of these HOIs we use a previously published reference set of positive and negative control drugs to evaluate the performance of our methods. Our methods have AUCs that are often substantially higher than the AUCs of a baseline method that only uses demographic characteristics for confounding control. Our methods also give confidence intervals for causal effect parameters that cover the expected no effect value substantially more often than this baseline method. The case-control study design, unlike the self-controlled study design, can be used in the fairly typical setting of EHR databases without longitudinal information on patients. With our variable selection method, these databases can be more effectively used for the detection of ADRs. PMID:27716785

  11. Comparison of the Effects of Cooperative Learning and Traditional Learning Methods on the Improvement of Drug-Dose Calculation Skills of Nursing Students Undergoing Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basak, Tulay; Yildiz, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of cooperative learning and traditional learning methods on the development of drug-calculation skills. Design: Final-year nursing students ("n" = 85) undergoing internships during the 2010-2011 academic year at a nursing school constituted the study group of this…

  12. Drug companies, UNAIDS make drugs available.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) initiative is working with several drug companies and four countries on a pilot program to build a health infrastructure that provides affordable drugs to insure that combination therapies are used appropriately. The countries involved in the program are Uganda, Chile, Vietnam and Cote d'Ivoire, and the drug companies are Glaxo Wellcome, Hoffmann-La Roche, and Virco NV. Each country agreed to form national HIV/AIDS drug advisory boards, and non-profit companies will act as clearinghouses. Financing will come from the pharmaceutical companies, local health ministries, and a $1 million grant from UNAIDS. The program will be evaluated in terms of improvements to overall health care delivery, number of people treated, the impact on emergency care, and the rate of illness and death.

  13. Driving forces for drug loading in drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The loading capacity of a drug carrier is determined essentially by intermolecular interactions between drugs and carrier materials. In this review, the process of drug loading is described in detail based on the differences in the driving force for drug incorporation, including hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, Pi-Pi stacking and van der Waals force. Modifying drug-loading sites of carrier materials with interacting groups aiming at tailoring drug-carrier interactions is reviewed by highlighting its importance for improving in vitro properties such as the loading capacity, release behaviour and stability. Other factors affecting drug loading, methods employed to predict the encapsulation capacity and the techniques to verify intermolecular interactions are also discussed to inform the readers of all-sided information on drug-loading processes and theories. The drug carriers can be designed more reasonably with the better understanding of the nature and interacting mechanism of intermolecular interactions.

  14. Safety of obesity drugs.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Frank L; Caruso, Mary K

    2005-11-01

    The safety of obesity drugs has historically been poor. This and the stigmatisation of obesity in society ensured that a higher standard of safety for obesity drugs must be met. The authors review the safety disasters of obesity drugs that were withdrawn. The authors then review the safety of presently available drugs--benzphetamine, phendimetrazine, diethylpropion, phentermine, sibutramine and orlistat. The safety of rimonabant, a drug with a pending new drug application that has an independent effect on metabolic syndrome, is also reviewed. The authors compare the stage of obesity drug development to that of hypertension in the 1950s. As new and safer drugs with more downstream mechanisms are developed that have independent effects on the cardiovascular risks associated with obesity, third party reimbursement for obesity medicine is likely to improve. This may lead to obesity being treated like hypertension and other chronic diseases with long-term medication. With improved technological tools, the authors believe this process will be more rapid for obesity than it was for hypertension.

  15. Post-Surgical Analgesia in Rainbow Trout: Is Reduced Cardioventilatory Activity a Sign of Improved Animal Welfare or the Adverse Effects of an Opioid Drug?

    PubMed Central

    Gräns, Albin; Sandblom, Erik; Kiessling, Anders; Axelsson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The use of fish models in biomedical research is increasing. Since behavioural and physiological consequences of surgical procedures may affect experimental results, these effects should be defined and, if possible, ameliorated. Thus, the use of post-surgical analgesia should be considered after invasive procedures also in fish, but presently, little information exists on the effects of analgesics in fish. This study assessed the effects of an opioid drug, buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg IM), on resting ventilation and heart rates during 7 days of postsurgical recovery in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at 10°C by non-invasively recording bioelectric potentials from the fish via electrodes in the water. Baseline ventilation and heart rates were considerably lower compared to previously reported values for rainbow trout at 10°C, possibly due to the non-invasive recording technique. Buprenorphine significantly decreased both ventilation and heart rates further, and the effects were most pronounced at 4–7 days after anaesthesia, surgical procedures and administration of the drug. Somewhat surprisingly, the same effects of buprenorphine were seen in the two control groups that had not been subject to surgery. These results indicate that the reductions in ventilation and heart rates are not caused by an analgesic effect of the drug, but may instead reflect a general sedative effect acting on both behaviour as well as e.g. central control of ventilation in fishes. This resembles what has previously been demonstrated in mammals, although the duration of the drug effect is considerably longer in this ectothermic animal. Thus, before using buprenorphine for postoperative analgesic treatment in fish, these potentially adverse effects need further characterisation. PMID:24736526

  16. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing. PMID:27441421

  17. Drug Debacle.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-07-01

    Medicaid's Vendor Drug Program is under examination by the Texas Legislature. TMA's Physicians Medicaid Congress is seizing the opportunity to call for an administrative overhaul of a drug benefit physicians describe as unnecessarily complicated and confusing.

  18. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  19. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  20. Generic Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs. There are a few other differences— like color, shape, size, or taste—but they do not ... different . Brand-name drugs are often advertised by color and shape. Remember the ads for the “purple ...

  1. A Structure–Property Relationship Study of the Well-Defined Telodendrimers to Improve Hemocompatibility of Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of telodendrimer (a linear polyethyelene glycol-block-dendritic oligo-cholic acid) have been synthesized via a bottom-up approach to optimize the hemocompatibility of the nanocarrier. Numbers of hydrophilic glycerol groups were introduced onto the polar surface of cholic acid to reduce the plasma membrane lytic activity of telodendrimers. An interesting result was observed: only an optimum number of glycerol introduced could reduce the hemolytic properties of the nanocarrier; on the contrary, more glycerols or the amino-glycerol substitution onto cholic acid significantly increased the hemolytic properties of the nanocarriers. To further elucidate the structure–property relationship, the molecular dynamic approach was used to simulate the conformation of the subunits of telodendrimers with different glycerol substitution, and the binding energies and the polar surface areas of the hairpin conformations were calculated to explain the membrane activities of nanocarriers. In addition, these telodendrimer subunits were synthesized and their membrane activities were tested directly, which validated the computational prediction and correlated with the observed hemolytic activity of nanocarriers. The glycerol substitution sustained the facial amphiphilicity of cholic acid, maintaining the superior drug loading capacity (paclitaxel and doxorubicin), stability, cell uptake, and anticancer efficacy of payloads. The in vivo optical imaging study indicated that the optimized nanocarriers can specifically deliver drug molecules to the tumor sites more efficiently than free drug administration, which is essential for the enhanced cancer treatment. PMID:24849780

  2. Why do we take drugs? From the drug-reinforcement theory to a novel concept of drug instrumentalization.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    The drug-reinforcement theory explains why humans get engaged in drug taking behavior. This theory posits that drugs of abuse serve as biological rewards by activating the reinforcement system. Although from a psychological and neurobiological perspective this theory is extremely helpful, it does not tell us about the drug-taking motives and motivation of an individual. The definition of drug instrumentalization goals will improve our understanding of individual drug-taking profiles. PMID:22074976

  3. Why do we take drugs? From the drug-reinforcement theory to a novel concept of drug instrumentalization.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer

    2011-12-01

    The drug-reinforcement theory explains why humans get engaged in drug taking behavior. This theory posits that drugs of abuse serve as biological rewards by activating the reinforcement system. Although from a psychological and neurobiological perspective this theory is extremely helpful, it does not tell us about the drug-taking motives and motivation of an individual. The definition of drug instrumentalization goals will improve our understanding of individual drug-taking profiles.

  4. Four cases of Japanese patients with psoriatic arthritis in whom effective treatments by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α drugs were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging together with improvement of skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Yonenaga, Takenori; Saeki, Hidehisa; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Fukuchi, Osamu; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Mitsuha; Ito, Toshihiro; Yanaba, Koichi; Tojyo, Shinjiro; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2015-01-01

    Because psoriatic skin lesions of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) usually precede the onset of joint symptom, dermatologists are in an ideal position to screen and find individuals with PsA early in the disease course. There have been no reports from the dermatology field evaluating the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α drugs on joint disorders using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in PsA patients. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effectiveness of MRI in the evaluation of anti-TNF-α drugs on joint disease of Japanese PsA patients. Data were collected from four adult Japanese male PsA patients. MRI of the affected hand was performed at baseline and 1-7 months after infliximab or adalimumab treatment. T1 -weighted gadolinium-enhanced images with fat suppression were acquired in the coronal, sagittal and/or axial planes. We determined the apparent improvement of synovitis, periarticular inflammation, tenosynovitis and/or bone marrow edema by MRI after anti-TNF-α treatments in all the patients together with the improvement of skin lesions. We also determined in one patient that these symptoms detected by MRI before treatment were alleviated within 1 month and had disappeared 6 months after treatment, suggesting the potentially early detection of the effect of anti-TNF-α drugs on joint disease. We present four cases of Japanese patients with PsA in whom effective treatments by anti-TNF-α drugs were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MRI. This imaging enables dermatologists and radiologists to assess and monitor early inflammatory changes, and to grant PsA patients earlier access to modern treatment such as biologics.

  5. Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tong Logan, Angela; Silverman, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    One of the most clinically significant complications related to the use of pharmacotherapy is the potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. The gastrointestinal system plays a large role in the pharmacokinetic profile of most medications, and many medications utilized in gastroenterology have clinically significant drug interactions. This review will discuss the impact of alterations of intestinal pH, interactions mediated by phase I hepatic metabolism enzymes and P-glycoprotein, the impact of liver disease on drug metabolism, and interactions seen with commonly utilized gastrointestinal medications. PMID:22933873

  6. Drug Interactions and Antiretroviral Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Matthew; Sperati, C. John; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the improved longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected individuals are developing several non-AIDS related comorbid conditions. Consequently, medical management of the HIV-infected population is increasingly complex, with a growing list of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This article reviews some of the most relevant and emerging potential interactions between antiretroviral medications and other agents. The most common DDIs are those involving protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors which alter the cytochrome P450 enzyme system and/or drug transporters such as p-glycoprotein. Of note are the new agents for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. These new classes of drugs and others drugs which are increasingly used in this patient population represent a significant challenge with regard to achieving the goals of effective HIV suppression and minimization of drug-related toxicities. Awareness of DDIs and a multidisciplinary approach are imperative in reaching these goals. PMID:24950731

  7. Progress in the study of drug nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Guo, Fei; Zheng, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jianxu

    2015-12-01

    The poor water solubility of many candidate drugs remains a major obstacle to their development and clinical use, especially for oral drug delivery. Nanocrystal technology can improve the solubility and dissolution rates of many poorly water-soluble drugs very effectively, significantly improving their oral bioavailability and decreasing the food effect. For this reason, this technology is becoming a key area of drug delivery research. This review presents much of the recent progress in nanocrystal drug pharmaceuticals, including the characteristics, composition, preparation technology, and clinical applications of these drugs. Finally, the effect of nanocrystal technology on insoluble drugs is quantified and described. PMID:26817271

  8. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  9. Advances in ophthalmic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Peter W J; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V

    2014-12-01

    Various strategies for ocular drug delivery are considered; from basic formulation techniques for improving availability of drugs; viscosity enhancers and mucoadhesives aid drug retention and penetration enhancers promote drug transport into the eye. The use of drug-loaded contact lenses and ocular inserts allows drugs to be better placed where they are needed for more direct delivery. Developments in ocular implants gives a means to overcome the physical barriers that traditionally prevented effective treatment. Implant technologies are under development allowing long-term drug delivery from a single procedure, these devices allow posterior chamber diseases to be effectively treated. Future developments could bring artificial corneas to eliminate the need for donor tissue and one-off implantable drug depots lasting the patient's lifetime.

  10. A (polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer)-dispersed sustained-release tablet for imperialine to simultaneously prolong the drug release and improve the oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing; Fu, Yu; Li, Jia; Qu, Mengke; Deng, Li; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-11-15

    Imperialine, extracted from Bulbus Fritillariae Cirrhosae, is an efficient antitussive and expectorant medicine. However, its short half-life and stomach degradation limited imperialine from further clinical use. The current study was conducted to develop a sustained-release tablet for imperialine both to prolong absorption time and to improve the oral bioavailability of the drug. The tablets were prepared by a direct compression method formulated on optimized solid dispersion (SD) for imperialine based on polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol graft copolymer (Soluplus(®)) with imperialine/Soluplus(®) ratio of 1:8 (w/w). In order to obtain the optimized formulation, factors that affected the drug release were investigated by in vitro dissolution studies in the media of pH1.2, 5.8, 7.0 and 7.4. Powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed that the imperialine in SD was amorphous instead of crystalline, and still stayed amorphous even after the direct compression. And besides, pharmacokinetic study in Beagle dogs was performed to inspect the in vivo sustained release. Plasma concentration-time curves and pharmacokinetic parameters were gained. As a result, the Cmax of imperialine was one-fold reduced and Tmax was two-fold prolonged, and the mean AUC0-24 was expressed as 89.581±21.243μgh/L, which showed that the oral bioavailability of imperialine was 2.46-fold improved. Moreover, the in vitro-in vivo correlation was recommended to carry out, demonstrating the percentages of drug release in vitro were well-correlated with the absorptive fraction in vivo with the correlation coefficients above 0.9900. By mathematically modeling and moment imaging of the drug release, Peppas equation was selected as the most fitted model for the sustained-release tablets with the diffusional coefficient in the range of 0.59-0.62, indicating the release of imperialine from the sustained-release tablets was an anomalous process involving

  11. Visits to primary care physicians among persons who inject drugs at high risk of hepatitis C virus infection: room for improvement.

    PubMed

    Artenie, A A; Jutras-Aswad, D; Roy, É; Zang, G; Bamvita, J-M; Lévesque, A; Bruneau, J

    2015-10-01

    The role of primary care physicians (PCP) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevention is increasingly emphasized. Yet, little is known about the patterns of contacts with PCP among persons who inject drugs (PWID). We sought to assess the 6-month prevalence of PCP visiting among PWID at risk of HCV infection and to explore the associated factors. Baseline data were collected from HCV-seronegative PWID recruited in HEPCO, an observational Hepatitis Cohort study (2004-2011) in Montreal, Canada. An interviewer-administered questionnaire elicited information on socio-demographic factors, drug use patterns and healthcare services utilization. Blood samples were tested for HCV antibodies. Using the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model, hierarchical logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predisposing, need and enabling factors associated with PCP visiting. Of the 349 participants (mean age = 34; 80.8% male), 32.1% reported visiting a PCP. In the multivariate model, among predisposing factors, male gender [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.45 (0.25-0.83)], chronic homelessness [AOR = 0.08 (0.01-0.67)], cocaine injection [AOR = 0.46 (0.28-0.76)] and reporting greater illegal or semi-legal income [AOR = 0.48 (0.27-0.85)] were negatively associated with PCP visits. Markers of need were not associated with the outcome. Among enabling factors, contact with street nurses [AOR = 3.86 (1.49-9.90)] and food banks [AOR = 2.01 (1.20-3.37)] was positively associated with PCP visiting. Only one third of participating PWID reported a recent visit to a PCP. While a host of predisposing factors seems to hamper timely contacts with PCP among high-risk PWID, community-based support services may play an important role in initiating dialogue with primary healthcare services in this population. PMID:25586516

  12. Drug Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    NBOD2, a program developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to solve equations of motion coupled N-body systems is used by E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Co. to model potential drugs as a series of elements. The program analyses the vibrational and static motions of independent components in drugs. Information generated from this process is used to design specific drugs to interact with enzymes in designated ways.

  13. How to improve communication for the safe use of medicines?: Discussions on social marketing and patient-tailored approaches at the annual meetings of the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bahri, Priya; Harrison-Woolrych, Mira

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decade, the annual meetings of national centres participating in the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring have increasingly included discussions on how to improve communication between national pharmacovigilance centres, patients, healthcare professionals, policy makers and the general public, with the aim of promoting the safe use of medicines. At the most recent meetings, working groups were dedicated to discuss possible applications and implementation of social marketing and patient-tailored approaches. This article provides the history and a summary of the recent discussions and recommendations to support progress in this respect at national and global level. Recommendations are made to investigate and pilot these approaches in small-scale projects at national pharmacovigilance centres. Applying elements from the social marketing and patient-tailored approaches to support behaviours of safe medicines use in patients and healthcare professionals should give the pharmacovigilance community new tools to achieve their goal to minimize risks with medicines and improve patient safety.

  14. The use of a dual PEDOT and RGD-functionalized alginate hydrogel coating to provide sustained drug delivery and improved cochlear implant function

    PubMed Central

    Chikar, JA; Hendricks, JL; Richardson-Burns, SM; Raphael, Y; Pfingst, BE; Martin, DC

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants provide hearing by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. Implant function can be hindered by device design variables, including electrode size and electrode-to-nerve distance, and cochlear environment variables, including the degeneration of the auditory nerve following hair cell loss. We have developed a dual component cochlear implant coating to improve both the electrical function of the implant and the biological stability of the inner ear, thereby facilitating the long-term perception of sound through a cochlear implant. This coating is a combination of an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-functionalized alginate hydrogel and the conducting polymer poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). Both in vitro and in vivo assays on the effects of these electrode coatings demonstrated improvements in device performance. We found that the coating reduced electrode impedance, improved charge delivery, and locally released significant levels of a trophic factor into cochlear fluids. This coating is non-cytotoxic, clinically relevant, and has the potential to significantly improve the cochlear implant user’s experience. PMID:22182748

  15. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  16. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize materials provide hopes, speculations and chances for an unprecedented change in drug delivery in near future. Nanotechnology is an emerging field to produce nanomaterials for drug delivery that can offer a new tool, opportunities and scope to provide more focused and fine-tuned treatment of diseases at a molecular level, enhancing the therapeutic potential of drugs so that they become less toxic and more effective. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems are of great scientific interest as they project their tremendous utility because of their capability of altering biodistribution of therapeutic agents so that they can concentrate more in the target tissues. Nanosize drug delivery systems generally focus on formulating bioactive molecules in biocompatible nanosystems such as nanocrystals, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructure lipid carriers, lipid drug conjugates, nanoliposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, emulsions, nanotubes, quantum dots etc. Extensively versatile molecules like synthetic chemicals to naturally occurring complex macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins could be dispensed in such formulations maintaining their stability and efficacy. Empty viral capsids are being tried to deliver drug as these uniformly sized bionanomaterials can be utilized to load drug to improve solubility, reduce toxicity and provide site specific targeting. Nanomedicines offer a wide scope for delivery of smart materials from tissue engineering to more recently artificial RBCs. Nanocomposites are the future hope for tailored and personalized medicines as well as for bone repairing and rectification of cartilage impairment. Nanosize drug delivery systems are addressing the challenges to overcome the delivery problems of wide ranges of drugs through their narrow submicron particle size range, easily manipulatable surface characteristics in achievement of versatile tissue targeting (includes active and passive drug targeting), controlled and sustained drug

  17. Supramolecular approaches for drug development.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Ebara, M; Izawa, H; Sanchez-Ballester, N M; Hill, J P; Ariga, K

    2012-01-01

    Various supramolecular systems can be used as drug carriers to alter physicochemical and pharmacokinetic characteristics of drugs. Representative supramolecular systems that can be used for this purpose include surfactant/polymer micelles, (micro)emulsions, liposomes, layer-by-layer assemblies, and various molecular conjugates. Notably, liposomes are established supramolecular drug carriers, which have already been marketed in formulations including AmBisome(®) (for treatment of fungal infection), Doxil(®) (for Kaposi's sarcoma), and Visudyne(®) (for age-related macular degeneration and choroidal neovascularization). Microemulsions have been used oral drug delivery of poorly soluble drugs due to improvements in bioavailability and predictable of absorption behavior. Neoral(®), an immunosuppressant used after transplant operations, is one of the most famous microemulsion-based drugs. Polymer micelles are being increasingly investigated as novel drug carriers and some formulations have already been tested in clinical trials. Supramolecular systems can be functionalized by designing the constituent molecules to achieve efficient delivery of drugs to desired sites in the body. In this review, representative supramolecular drug delivery systems, that may improve usability of candidate drugs or add value to existing drugs, are introduced. PMID:22455591

  18. Drug Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sardana, Raj K.

    This autoinstructional lesson deals with the study of such drugs as marijuana and LSD, with emphasis on drug abuse. It is suggested that it can be used in science classes at the middle level of school. No prerequisites are suggested. The teacher's guide lists the behavioral objectives, the equipment needed to complete the experience and suggests…

  19. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  20. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  1. Improving the drug delivery characteristics of graphene oxide based polymer nanocomposites through the "one-pot" synthetic approach of single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Meiying; Tian, Jianwen; Deng, Fengjie; Wang, Ke; Xu, Dazhuang; Liu, Liangji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based polymer nanocomposites have attracted extensive research interest recently for their outstanding physicochemical properties and potential applications. However, surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers has demonstrated to be trouble for most polymerization procedures are occurred under non-aqueous solution, which will in turn lead to the restacking of GO. In this work, a facile and efficient "one-pot" strategy has been developed for surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers through single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP). The GO based polymer nanocomposites were obtained via SET-LRP in aqueous solution using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as the monomer and 11-bromoundecanoic acid as the initiator, which could be effectively adsorbed on GO through hydrophobic interaction. The successful preparation of GO based polymer nanocomposites was confirmed by a series of characterization techniques such as 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The resultant products exhibit high water disperisibility, excellent biocompatibility and high efficient drug loading capability, making these PEGylated GO nanocomposites promising candidates for biomedical applications.

  2. 4-Aminopyridyl-Based CYP51 Inhibitors as Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Drug Leads with Improved Pharmacokinetic Profile and in Vivo Potency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CYP51 is a P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the sterol components of eukaryotic cell membranes. CYP51 inhibitors have been developed to treat infections caused by fungi, and more recently the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. To specifically optimize drug candidates for T. cruzi CYP51 (TcCYP51), we explored the structure–activity relationship (SAR) of a N-indolyl-oxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based scaffold originally identified in a target-based screen. This scaffold evolved via medicinal chemistry to yield orally bioavailable leads with potent anti-T. cruzi activity in vivo. Using an animal model of infection with a transgenic T. cruzi Y luc strain expressing firefly luciferase, we prioritized the biaryl and N-arylpiperazine analogues by oral bioavailability and potency. The drug–target complexes for both scaffold variants were characterized by X-ray structure analysis. Optimization of both binding mode and pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds led to potent inhibitors against experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25101801

  3. Murine delayed-type hypersensitivity granuloma: an improved model for the identification and evaluation of different classes of anti-arthritic drugs.

    PubMed

    Dunn, C J; Galinet, L A; Gibbons, A J; Shields, S K

    1990-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of five different classes of anti-inflammatory/immunoregulatory drugs using a mouse model of mBSA-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity granuloma (DTH GRA) to measure immune-mediated chronic inflammatory tissue formation. The compounds were administered orally daily following induction of DTH GRA (days 0 to 4); granulomata were quantitated gravimetrically on day 5. NSAIDs, with the exception of flurbiprofen, showed little activity in comparison with the steroids dexamethasone (1-3 mg/kg/day, orally) and prednisolone (3-10 mg/kg/day, orally), which caused significant suppression of DTH GRA tissue (65-76% and 26-68%, respectively). The "immunoregulatory" compounds levamisole and D(-)penicillamine were inactive, whereas cyclophosphamide (5-50 mg/kg/day, orally) reduced the response by 24-83%. The "interferon alpha-inducers" Tilorone, U-54,461, and U-56,499 were also potent inhibitors of the DTH GRA response; U-54,462, a weak interferon alpha-inducer, was inactive. Cyclosporin A (50-100 mg/kg/day, orally) suppressed DTH GRA most effectively when administered on days 3 and 4 (66% and 97%) of the five-day granuloma response (treatment was ineffective when given on days 1 and 2). We conclude that the DTH GRA response described above may be useful for evaluating different types of unique therapeutic agents that are effective in the treatment of chronic immuno-inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  5. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  6. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  7. Prescription Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... body, especially in brain areas involved in the perception of pain and pleasure. Prescription stimulants , such as ... of drug that causes changes in your mood, perceptions, and behavior can affect judgment and willingness to ...

  8. Antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one.

  9. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  10. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content En español Researchers Medical & Health Professionals Patients & ... Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs ...

  11. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... distance, and decrease coordination. Drivers who have used cocaine or methamphetamine can be aggressive and reckless when ...

  12. Drug Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... not be taken at the same time as antacids. WHAT CAUSES THE MOST INTERACTIONS WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? ... azole” Some antibiotics (names end in “mycin”) The antacid cimetidine (Tagamet) Some drugs that prevent convulsions, including ...

  13. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... also known as Ecstasy XTC, X, E, Adam, Molly, Hug Beans, and Love Drug Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), also known as G, Liquid Ecstasy, and Soap Ketamine, also known as Special K, K, Vitamin K, and Jet Rohypnol, also known ...

  14. Modification of physicochemical characteristics of active pharmaceutical ingredients and application of supersaturatable dosage forms for improving bioavailability of poorly absorbed drugs.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku

    2012-05-01

    New chemical entities are required to possess physicochemical characteristics that result in acceptable oral absorption. However, many promising candidates need physicochemical modification or application of special formulation technology. This review discusses strategies for overcoming physicochemical problems during the development at the preformulation and formulation stages with emphasis on overcoming the most typical problem, low solubility. Solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients can be improved by employing metastable states, salt forms, or cocrystals. Since the usefulness of salt forms is well recognized, it is the normal strategy to select the most suitable salt form through extensive screening in the current developmental study. Promising formulation technologies used to overcome the low solubility problem include liquid-filled capsules, self-emulsifying formulations, solid dispersions, and nanosuspensions. Current knowledge for each formulation is discussed from both theoretical and practical viewpoints, and their advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  15. Drug Control: Observations on Elements of the Federal Drug Control Strategy. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    Although the United States government invests vast sums of money in the war on drugs, the availability of drugs and the number of persons using illegal drugs are still serious problems. Information that Congress can use in improving drug control strategies is provided here. Some of the report's highlights include current research on promising…

  16. Evaluating the efficacy of memantine on improving cognitive functions in epileptic patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial (Phase IIIb pilot study)

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Priya; Varadarajan, Sathyanarayanan; Krishnan, Muthuraj; Shanmugam, Sundar; Kunjuraman, Gireesh; Ravinder, Jamuna Rani; Arumugam, Balasubramanian; Alex, Divya; Swaminathan, Porchelvan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: People with epilepsy have greater cognitive and behavioral dysfunction than the general population. There is no specific treatment available for cognitive impairment of these patients. We aimed to evaluate the effects of memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor noncompetitive antagonist, on improving cognition and memory functions in epileptic patients with cognitive and memory impairment, who received anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Methods: We did a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group trial, in SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India between April 2013 and September 2013. Fifty-nine epileptic patients taking AEDs with subjective memory complaints were recruited and randomized to either Group 1 to receive 16 weeks of once-daily memantine, (5 mg for first 8 weeks, followed by memantine 10 mg for next 8 weeks) or Group 2 to receive once daily placebo. This trial is registered with Clinical Trial Registry of India CTRI/2013/04/003573. Results: Of 59 randomized patients, 55 patients completed the study (26 memantine and 29 placebo). Memantine group showed statistically significant improvement in total mini mental state examination score from baseline (P = 0.765) to 16th week (P < 0.001) in comparison with the placebo. The Weshler's Memory Scale total score in memantine group improved significantly after 8 weeks (P = 0.002) compared with baseline (P = 0.873) and highly significant at the end of 16th week (P < 0.001). The self-rated quality of life and memory in memantine group also significantly improved at the study end. Conclusion: We conclude that once-daily memantine (10 mg) treatment significantly improved cognition, memory and quality of life in epileptic patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment and was found to have a favorable safety profile. PMID:27570386

  17. Drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Allergic drug reactions occur when a drug, usually a low molecular weight molecule, has the ability to stimulate an immune response. This can be done in one of two ways. The first is by binding covalently to a self-protein, to produce a haptenated molecule that can be processed and presented to the adaptive immune system to induce an immune response. Sometimes the drug itself cannot do this but a reactive breakdown product of the drug is able to bind covalently to the requisite self-protein or peptide. The second way in which drugs can stimulate an immune response is by binding non-covalently to antigen presenting or antigen recognition molecules such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or the T cell receptor. This is known as the p-I or pharmacological interaction hypothesis. The drug binding in this situation is reversible and stimulation of the response may occur on first exposure, not requiring previous sensitization. There is probably a dependence on the presence of certain MHC alleles and T cell receptor structures for this type of reaction to occur. PMID:22922763

  18. Drug abuse in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Claudia L; Creado, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. PMID:25187752

  19. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  20. Does Drug Testing Deter Drug Court Participants from Using Drugs or Alcohol?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinpeter, Christine B.; Brocato, Jo; Koob, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates 3 drug-testing strategies implemented in 5 different jurisdictions with drug courts in Orange County, California. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the sweat patch acts as a deterrent and under what conditions it can be used to improve outcomes. Results indicated that although the use of the sweat patch did not…

  1. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  2. Emerging Frontiers in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tibbitt, Mark W; Dahlman, James E; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Medicine relies on the use of pharmacologically active agents (drugs) to manage and treat disease. However, drugs are not inherently effective; the benefit of a drug is directly related to the manner by which it is administered or delivered. Drug delivery can affect drug pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism, duration of therapeutic effect, excretion, and toxicity. As new therapeutics (e.g., biologics) are being developed, there is an accompanying need for improved chemistries and materials to deliver them to the target site in the body, at a therapeutic concentration, and for the required period of time. In this Perspective, we provide an historical overview of drug delivery and controlled release followed by highlights of four emerging areas in the field of drug delivery: systemic RNA delivery, drug delivery for localized therapy, oral drug delivery systems, and biologic drug delivery systems. In each case, we present the barriers to effective drug delivery as well as chemical and materials advances that are enabling the field to overcome these hurdles for clinical impact.

  3. Quality assurance and quality improvement using supportive supervision in a large-scale STI intervention with sex workers, men who have sex with men/transgenders and injecting-drug users in India

    PubMed Central

    Wi, Teodora C; Das, Anjana; Kane, Sumit; Singh, Aman Kumar; George, Bitra; Steen, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background Documentation of the long-term impact of supportive supervision using a monitoring tool in STI intervention with sex workers, men who have sex with men and injection-drug users is limited. The authors report methods and results of continued quality monitoring in a large-scale STI services provided as a part of a broader HIV-prevention package in six Indian states under Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative. Methodology Guidelines and standards for STI services, and a supportive supervisory tool to monitor the quality were developed for providing technical support to STI component of large-scale HIV-prevention intervention through 372 project-supported STI clinics. The tool contained 80 questions to track the quality of STI services provided on a five-point scoring scale in five performance areas: coverage, quality of clinic and services, referral networks, community involvement and technical support. Results The tool was applied to different STI clinics during supportive supervision visits conducted once in every 3 months to assess quality, give immediate feedback and develop a quality score. A total of 292 clinics managed by seven lead implementing partners in six Indian states were covered in 15 quarters over 45 months. Overall quality indicators for the five performance areas showed a three- to sevenfold improvement over the period. Conclusion It was possible to improve quality over the long-term in STI interventions for sex workers, men who have sex with men and injection-drug users using an interactive and comprehensive supportive supervision tool which gives on-the-spot feedback. However, such an effort is time-consuming and resource-intensive, and needs a structured approach. PMID:20167739

  4. Acupoint-specific, frequency-dependent, and improved insulin sensitivity hypoglycemic effect of electroacupuncture applied to drug-combined therapy studied by a randomized control clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong-Tsung; Tzeng, Chung-Yuh; Lee, Yu-Chen; Chen, Ying-I; Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Shih-Liang

    2014-01-01

    The application of electroacupuncture (EA) to specific acupoints can induce a hypoglycemic effect in streptozotocin-induced rats, normal rats, and rats with steroid-induced insulin resistance. EA combined with the oral insulin sensitizer rosiglitazone improved insulin sensitivity in rats and humans with type II diabetes mellitus (DM). There are different hypoglycemic mechanisms between Zhongwan and Zusanli acupoints by EA stimulation. On low-frequency (2 Hz) stimulation at bilateral Zusanli acupoints, serotonin was involved in the hypoglycemic effect in normal rats. Moreover, after 15 Hz EA stimulation at the bilateral Zusanli acupoints, although enhanced insulin activity mainly acts on the insulin-sensitive target organs, the muscles must be considered. In addition, 15 Hz EA stimulation at the bilateral Zusanli acupoints has the combined effect of enhancing cholinergic nerve activity and increasing nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity to enhance insulin activity. Despite the well-documented effect of pain control by EA in many systemic diseases, there are few high-quality long-term clinical trials on the hypoglycemic effect of EA in DM. Combination treatment with EA and other medications seems to be an alternative treatment to achieve better therapeutic goals that merit future investigation. PMID:25024728

  5. Improved Cross Validation of a Static Ubiquitin Structure Derived from High Precision Residual Dipolar Couplings Measured in a Drug-Based Liquid Crystalline Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The antibiotic squalamine forms a lyotropic liquid crystal at very low concentrations in water (0.3-3.5% w/v), which remains stable over a wide range of temperature (1-40 °C) and pH (4-8). Squalamine is positively charged, and comparison of the alignment of ubiquitin relative to 36 previously reported alignment conditions shows that it differs substantially from most of these, but is closest to liquid crystalline cetyl pyridinium bromide. High precision residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured for the backbone 1H-15N, 15N-13C′, 1Hα-13Cα, and 13C′-13Cα one-bond interactions in the squalamine medium fit well to the static structural model previously derived from NMR data. Inclusion into the structure refinement procedure of these RDCs, together with 1H-15N and 1Hα-13Cα RDCs newly measured in Pf1, results in improved agreement between alignment-induced changes in 13C′ chemical shift, 3JHNHα values, and 13Cα-13Cβ RDCs and corresponding values predicted by the structure, thereby validating the high quality of the single-conformer structural model. This result indicates that fitting of a single model to experimental data provides a better description of the average conformation than does averaging over previously reported NMR-derived ensemble representations. The latter can capture dynamic aspects of a protein, thus making the two representations valuable complements to one another. PMID:24568736

  6. Drug misuse.

    PubMed Central

    Waller, T.

    1992-01-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  7. Monovalent cation and amiloride analog modulation of adrenergic ligand binding to the unglycosylated alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.L.; Seibert, K.; Brandon, S.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Limbird, L.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The unglycosylated alpha 2B subtype of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor found in NG-108-15 cells possesses allosteric regulation of adrenergic ligand binding by monovalent cations and 5-amino-substituted amiloride analogs. These findings demonstrate that allosteric modulation of adrenergic ligand binding is not a property unique to the alpha 2A subtype. The observation that amiloride analogs as well as monovalent cations can modulate adrenergic ligand binding to the nonglycosylated alpha 2B subtype indicates that charge shielding due to carbohydrate moieties does not play a role in this allosteric modulation but, rather, these regulatory effects result from interactions of cations and amiloride analogs with the protein moiety of the receptor. Furthermore, the observation that both alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptor subtypes are modulated by amiloride analogs suggests that structural domains that are conserved between the two are likely to be involved in this allosteric modulation.

  8. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    and sustain improvement long-term, representing a novel mechanism of action for disease-modifying Alzheimer's therapeutics. PMID:25390368

  9. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    and sustain improvement long-term, representing a novel mechanism of action for disease-modifying Alzheimer's therapeutics.

  10. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    models and sustain improvement long-term, representing a novel mechanism of action for disease-modifying Alzheimer's therapeutics. PMID:25390368

  11. Improved cross validation of a static ubiquitin structure derived from high precision residual dipolar couplings measured in a drug-based liquid crystalline phase.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Grishaev, Alexander; Roche, Julien; Zasloff, Michael; Bax, Ad

    2014-03-12

    The antibiotic squalamine forms a lyotropic liquid crystal at very low concentrations in water (0.3-3.5% w/v), which remains stable over a wide range of temperature (1-40 °C) and pH (4-8). Squalamine is positively charged, and comparison of the alignment of ubiquitin relative to 36 previously reported alignment conditions shows that it differs substantially from most of these, but is closest to liquid crystalline cetyl pyridinium bromide. High precision residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured for the backbone (1)H-(15)N, (15)N-(13)C', (1)H(α)-(13)C(α), and (13)C'-(13)C(α) one-bond interactions in the squalamine medium fit well to the static structural model previously derived from NMR data. Inclusion into the structure refinement procedure of these RDCs, together with (1)H-(15)N and (1)H(α)-(13)C(α) RDCs newly measured in Pf1, results in improved agreement between alignment-induced changes in (13)C' chemical shift, (3)JHNHα values, and (13)C(α)-(13)C(β) RDCs and corresponding values predicted by the structure, thereby validating the high quality of the single-conformer structural model. This result indicates that fitting of a single model to experimental data provides a better description of the average conformation than does averaging over previously reported NMR-derived ensemble representations. The latter can capture dynamic aspects of a protein, thus making the two representations valuable complements to one another. PMID:24568736

  12. National drug policy: implications of the 'tough on drugs' ideology.

    PubMed

    Norman, R

    2001-10-01

    Australia has emerged over the last decade as a world leader in drug policy. According to Single and Rohl (1997 pvii) Australia's National Drug Strategy 'has been characterised by a unique combination of features which have brought it international attention and acclaim'. The strength of Australia's policy has been its emphasis on both licit and illicit drugs, and also its clear articulation of harm minimisation as a guiding principle in all areas of action. The key policy goals recognised the harm associated with all substances and sought results in key areas of alcohol-related problems, tobacco-related problems, under-age consumption, prescription medication problems and illicit drug use. However, Australia has a new drug policy document for the new millennium, The National Drug Strategic Framework 1998 - 2002. As a result of a conservative influence in national politics, this framework has moved from the harm minimisation philosophy to a moralistic 'tough on drugs' philosophy that stresses zero tolerance, law enforcement and abstinence. There is a risk that Australia will experience an increase in adverse health, social and economic consequences as a result of this new policy direction. Nurses need to think critically about the 'tough on drugs' ideology. There is a risk that significant adverse affects may occur for their drug-using patients as a result of this policy change. In their practice, nurses need to challenge the validity of a punitive response, and to commit themselves to improving the health and safety of the illicit drug-using community.

  13. Diabetes Drugs and Cardiovascular Safety

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the beneficial effect of improved glycemic control on cardiovascular complications has been well established. However, the rosiglitazone experience aroused awareness of potential cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes drugs and prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to issue new guidelines about cardiovascular risk. Through postmarketing cardiovascular safety trials, some drugs demonstrated cardiovascular benefits, while some antidiabetic drugs raised concern about a possible increased cardiovascular risk associated with drug use. With the development of new classes of drugs, treatment options became wider and the complexity of glycemic management in type 2 diabetes has increased. When choosing the appropriate treatment strategy for patients with type 2 diabetes at high cardiovascular risk, not only the glucose-lowering effects, but also overall benefits and risks for cardiovascular disease should be taken into consideration. PMID:27302713

  14. Computer-aided drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Computational approaches are an integral part of interdisciplinary drug discovery research. Understanding the science behind computational tools, their opportunities, and limitations is essential to make a true impact on drug discovery at different levels. If applied in a scientifically meaningful way, computational methods improve the ability to identify and evaluate potential drug molecules, but there remain weaknesses in the methods that preclude naïve applications. Herein, current trends in computer-aided drug discovery are reviewed, and selected computational areas are discussed. Approaches are highlighted that aid in the identification and optimization of new drug candidates. Emphasis is put on the presentation and discussion of computational concepts and methods, rather than case studies or application examples. As such, this contribution aims to provide an overview of the current methodological spectrum of computational drug discovery for a broad audience. PMID:26949519

  15. Drug watch.

    PubMed

    Whitson, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments on new anti-HIV agents and drugs for opportunistic infections are highlighted. Information is provided on the infusion inhibitor T-20; DuPont's second generation non-nukes, DPC 961 and DPC 963; Papirine (PEN203) for the human papilloma virus; Sporanox for treating fungal infections; and the antiretroviral protein, lysozyme. In addition, information is given on a plant found in the Bolivian rainforest that may contain compounds to prevent HIV infection by blocking the enzyme, integrase. Other promising new drugs addressed at the 6th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections are listed in a table. Contact information for US clinical trials is provided.

  16. Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  17. Nanosizing of drugs: Effect on dissolution rate

    PubMed Central

    Dizaj, S. Maleki; Vazifehasl, Zh.; Salatin, S.; Adibkia, Kh.; Javadzadeh, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The solubility, bioavailability and dissolution rate of drugs are important parameters for achieving in vivo efficiency. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs depends on their ability to be absorbed via gastrointestinal tract. For drugs belonging to Class II of pharmaceutical classification, the absorption process is limited by drug dissolution rate in gastrointestinal media. Therefore, enhancement of the dissolution rate of these drugs will present improved bioavailability. So far several techniques such as physical and chemical modifications, changing in crystal habits, solid dispersion, complexation, solubilization and liquisolid method have been used to enhance the dissolution rate of