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Sample records for b-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

  1. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of expanded B-cell clones from multiclonal versus monoclonal B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana; Rodríguez-Caballero, Arancha; Criado, Ignacio; Langerak, Anton W.; Nieto, Wendy G.; Lécrevisse, Quentin; González, Marcos; Cortesão, Emília; Paiva, Artur; Almeida, Julia; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Chronic antigen-stimulation has been recurrently involved in the earlier stages of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The expansion of two or more B-cell clones has frequently been reported in individuals with these conditions; potentially, such coexisting clones have a greater probability of interaction with common immunological determinants. Here, we analyzed the B-cell receptor repertoire and molecular profile, as well as the phenotypic, cytogenetic and hematologic features, of 228 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like and non-chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like clones comparing multiclonal (n=85 clones from 41 cases) versus monoclonal (n=143 clones) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. The B-cell receptor of B-cell clones from multiclonal cases showed a slightly higher degree of HCDR3 homology than B-cell clones from mono clonal cases, in association with unique hematologic (e.g. lower B-lymphocyte counts) and cytogenetic (e.g. lower frequency of cytogenetically altered clones) features usually related to earlier stages of the disease. Moreover, a subgroup of coexisting B-cell clones from individual multiclonal cases which were found to be phylogenetically related showed unique molecular and cytogenetic features: they more frequently shared IGHV3 gene usage, shorter HCDR3 sequences with a greater proportion of IGHV mutations and del(13q14.3), than other unrelated B-cell clones. These results would support the antigen-driven nature of such multiclonal B-cell expansions, with potential involvement of multiple antigens/epitopes. PMID:24488564

  2. Hepatitis C virus upregulates B-cell receptor signaling: a novel mechanism for HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dai, B; Chen, A Y; Corkum, C P; Peroutka, R J; Landon, A; Houng, S; Muniandy, P A; Zhang, Y; Lehrmann, E; Mazan-Mamczarz, K; Steinhardt, J; Shlyak, M; Chen, Q C; Becker, K G; Livak, F; Michalak, T I; Talwani, R; Gartenhaus, R B

    2016-01-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for the development of B cells and has a critical role in B-cell neoplasia. Increasing evidence indicates an association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and B-cell lymphoma, however, the mechanisms by which HCV causes B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder are still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate the expression of HCV viral proteins in B cells of HCV-infected patients and show that HCV upregulates BCR signaling in human primary B cells. HCV nonstructural protein NS3/4A interacts with CHK2 and downregulates its activity, modulating HuR posttranscriptional regulation of a network of target mRNAs associated with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Interestingly, the BCR signaling pathway was found to have the largest number of transcripts with increased association with HuR and was upregulated by NS3/4A. Our study reveals a previously unidentified role of NS3/4A in regulation of host BCR signaling during HCV infection, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26434584

  3. Composite Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated B-Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Tubular Adenoma in a Rectal Polyp.

    PubMed

    Lo, Amy A; Gao, Juehua; Rao, M Sambasivia; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-02-01

    Composite tumors are formed when there is intermingling between two components of separate tumors seen histologically. Cases demonstrating composite tubular adenoma with other types of tumors in the colon are rare. Composite tubular adenomas with nonlymphoid tumors including carcinoids, microcarcinoids, and small cell undifferentiated carcinoma have been reported in the literature. The occurrence of composite lymphoma and tubular adenoma within the colorectal tract is extremely rare. Only three cases have been reported and include one case of mantle cell lymphoma and two cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising in composite tubular adenomas. We present the first case of composite Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and tubular adenoma in a rectal polyp with a benign endoscopic appearance.

  4. EBV-driven B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders: from biology, classification and differential diagnosis to clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Chi Young; Li, Ling; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus, affecting >90% of the adult population. EBV targets B-lymphocytes and achieves latent infection in a circular episomal form. Different latency patterns are recognized based on latent gene expression pattern. Latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) mimics CD40 and, when self-aggregated, provides a proliferation signal via activating the nuclear factor-kappa B, Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to promote cellular proliferation. LMP-1 also induces BCL-2 to escape from apoptosis and gives a signal for cell cycle progression by enhancing cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and by inhibiting p16 and p27. LMP-2A blocks the surface immunoglobulin-mediated lytic cycle reactivation. It also activates the Ras/PI3K/Akt pathway and induces Bcl-xL expression to promote B-cell survival. Recent studies have shown that ebv-microRNAs can provide extra signals for cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis. EBV is well known for association with various types of B-lymphocyte, T-lymphocyte, epithelial cell and mesenchymal cell neoplasms. B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders encompass a broad spectrum of diseases, from benign to malignant. Here we review our current understanding of EBV-induced lymphomagenesis and focus on biology, diagnosis and management of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:25613729

  5. EBV-negative monomorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are pathologically distinct from EBV-positive cases and frequently contain TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Courville, Elizabeth L; Yohe, Sophia; Chou, David; Nardi, Valentina; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Thakral, Beenu; Nelson, Andrew C; Ferry, Judith A; Sohani, Aliyah R

    2016-10-01

    Monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder commonly resembles diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma, and most are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive. We retrospectively identified 32 cases of monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder from two institutions and evaluated EBV in situ hybridization; TP53 mutation status; p53, CD30, myc, and BCL2 expression by immunohistochemistry; proliferation index by Ki67; and germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype by Hans criteria. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder arose after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in five and solid organ transplant in 27 patients, a median of 4 and 96 months after transplant, respectively (overall median latency 71 months, range 2-295). The most common morphology was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (28 cases), with three cases of Burkitt lymphoma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. Ten cases (31%) were EBV negative. Of those with the morphology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the EBV-negative cases were more frequently TP53-mutated (P<0.001), p53 positive by immunohistochemistry (P<0.001), CD30 negative (P<0.01), and of germinal center immunophenotype (P=0.01) compared with EBV-positive cases. No statistically significant difference in overall survival was identified based on EBV, TP53 mutation status, germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype, or other immunohistochemical parameters evaluated. Patients who died of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder were older with a longer latency from time of transplant to diagnosis (P<0.05). Our study demonstrates that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma-related immunohistochemical prognostic markers have limited relevance in the post-transplant setting and underscores differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in terms of immunophenotype and TP53 mutation frequency, supporting an alternative pathogenesis for EBV-negative post

  6. Methotrexate-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders presenting in the skin: A clinicopathologic and immunophenotypical study of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Koens, Lianne; Senff, Nancy J; Vermeer, Maarten H; Willemze, Rein; Jansen, Patty M

    2014-07-01

    Methotrexate (MTX)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (B-LPD) may first present in the skin, but their clinicopathologic features are still ill defined. Differentiation from primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma and primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCLBCL-LT) is important, as MTX-associated B-LPD may show spontaneous regression after withdrawal of MTX therapy. In the present study, the clinicopathologic and phenotypical features of 10 patients with MTX-associated B-LPD first presenting in the skin, including 5 EBV(+) and 5 EBV(-) cases, were investigated. Six patients had skin-limited disease. Clinically, abrogation of MTX therapy resulted in a complete response in 4 cases and a partial response in another 2. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 90%. MTX-associated B-LPD differed from primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma by the presence of ulcerating and/or generalized skin lesions, an infiltrate composed of centroblasts/immunoblasts rather than large centrocytes, reduced staining for CD79a, and expression of BCL2, IRF4, and FOXP1 in most cases. EBV(+) MTX-associated B-LPD differed from PCLBCL-LT by the presence ulcerative skin lesions, marked tumor cell polymorphism, reduced staining for CD79a, and expression of CD30 and EBV. EBV(-) cases showed morphologic and immunophenotypical similarities to PCLBCL-LT but differed by presentation with generalized skin lesions in 4 of 5 cases. The results of this study, showing a relatively good clinical outcome and spontaneous disease regression after only withdrawal of MTX in a considerable proportion of patients, underscores the importance of a careful wait-and-see policy before considering more aggressive therapies in patients with MTX-associated B-LPD of the skin.

  7. [EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder of the elderly successfully treated with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and locoregional radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Sugino, Noriko; Nakamura, Chishiho; Fujii, Sumie; Matsui, Yusuke; Kaneko, Hitomi; Watanabe, Mitsumasa; Miura, Yasuo; Wakasa, Tomoko; Tsudo, Mitsuru

    2011-03-01

    Age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder is a highly aggressive lymphoma, and a standard therapy for this disease has not yet been established. A 58-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of fever and lymphadenopathy across the whole body. Neck lymph node biopsy showed hemorrhagic and geographic necrosis with Hodgkin-like large cells against a background of small lymphocytes. The large cells were positive for CD30 and EBER. The patient was diagnosed as having age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Although there was no response to CHOP therapy, he obtained partial response after 3 courses of DeVIC therapy. Because his lymphoma was highly aggressive and chemotherapy-resistant, he underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with a conditioning regimen including ranimustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan. After stem cell transplantation and subsequent radiotherapy to the residual lesion, the patient achieved complete remission. This is the first report of successful autologous stem cell transplantation for a patient with age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:21471700

  8. CD8-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder associated with Epstein-Barr virus-infected B-cells in a rheumatoid arthritis patient under methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Koji, Hitoshi; Yazawa, Takuya; Nakabayashi, Kimimasa; Fujioka, Yasunori; Kamma, Hiroshi; Yamada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a 48-year-old female who developed lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) during treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with methotrexate (MTX). She presented with multiple tumors in the cervical lymph nodes (LNs), multiple lung shadows and round shadows in both kidneys with pancytopenia and a high CRP level. The LN showed CD8-positive T-cell LPD associated with Epstein-Barr (EB) virus-infected B-cells. Clonality assays for immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain and T-cell receptor gamma (TCRγ) were negative. The cessation of MTX without chemotherapy resulted in the complete disappearance of the tumors and abnormal clinical features. We compared this case with previously published ones and discuss the pathological findings, presuming that the proliferation of CD8 T-cells was a reactive manifestation to reactivated EB virus-infected B-cells.

  9. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  10. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging findings in central nervous system monomorphic B cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder before and after treatment and comparison with primary B cell central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Purakal, Alixandra; Pytel, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the MRI features of monomorphic central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (CNS PTLD), including diffusion-weighted and susceptibility-weighted sequences before and after treatment and to compare the imaging findings with those of primary central nervous system B cell lymphoma (PCNS BCL). Retrospective review of the brain MRI characteristics in patients with pathology proven monomorphic CNS PTLD and PCNS BCL was performed. In particular, the enhancement, diffusion-weighted, susceptibility-weighted MRI characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. In addition, the diffusion-weighted, susceptibility-weighted MRI features after treatment for CNS PTLD were evaluated. A total of 12 lesions in six patients with CNS PTLD and 12 lesions in nine patients with PCNS BCL were identified on MRI. Among the CNS PTLD lesions with post-contrast images, 80 % demonstrated peripheral enhancement. All of the CNS PTLD lesions contained foci of intratumoral susceptibility signal (ITSS) and the average mean ADC values and ratios were 0.892 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s (standard deviation: 0.082 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and 1.19 (standard deviation: 0.15), respectively. On the other hand, 75 % of the PCNS BCL displayed diffuse enhancement, two cases (16.7 %) contained ITSS, and the mean ADC values and ratios were 0.721 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s (standard deviation: 0.093 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s), and 0.99 (standard deviation: 0.17), respectively. Thus, the presence of heterogeneous lesions with ITSS that do not necessarily have as extensive restricted diffusion as PCNS BCL is suggestive of CNS PTLD in the appropriate clinical setting. The preliminary data in this series suggests that diffusion-weighted imaging may serve as a useful biomarker for monitoring treatment response, in which successful treatment of CNS PTLD may result in increased ADC values. In addition, foci of susceptibility effect in CNS PTLD tend to persist or increase over the course of

  11. Extra Y chromosome in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Xiao, H; Dadey, B; Block, A W; Han, T; Sandberg, A A

    1991-02-01

    Using separated lymphocytes from 95 male patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, we have established both Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and short-term cultures with polyclonal B-cell mitogens. Cytogenetic studies of these patients revealed an extra Y chromosome in 4 of 71 male cell lines examined. An extra Y chromosome appeared to be the sole karyotype change (47,XY, + Y) in 2 of these 4 patients. The extra Y chromosome was accompanied by extra copies of chromosomes 12 and 21 (48,XY, + Y, + 12 and 48,XY, + Y, + 21) in the other 2 patients, respectively. The possible oncological role of the extra Y chromosome in the initiation of leukemia is discussed. PMID:1847090

  12. Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma (MALT) – Like Presentations of Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A T-cell lymphoma masquerading as a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kaffenberger, Ben; Haverkos, Brad; Tyler, Kelly; Wong, Henry; Porcu, Pierluigi; Gru, Alejandro Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is the second most common type of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) worldwide, and in some countries the most common form. Clinically, AITL usually presents with systemic symptoms, diffuse lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and common laboratory abnormalities such as hypergammaglobulinemia. Skin rashes are seen in 50–80% of patients. AITL derives follicular T-helper cells (TFH), that express germinal center markes and produces hyperactivation of B-cell seen in AITL. Although the histologic features of AITL in the skin could be similar to pathologic findings present in lymph node biopsies, we present herein 2 cases of AITL with histologic and immunophenotypic features that were somewhat suggestive of extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT).Caution is urged to exclude the possibility of a systemic T-cell lymphoma such as AITL in cutaneous and lymph node B-cell proliferations. PMID:25839892

  13. A Phase I Dose-Finding Trial of Recombinant Interleukin-21 and Rituximab in Relapsed and Refractory Low Grade B-cell Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, John M.; Byrd, John C.; Andorsky, David J.; Yamada, Reiko E.; Kramer, Janet; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Hunder, Naomi; Pagel, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a phase I study to determine the safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and efficacy of weekly bolus recombinant human interleukin-21 (rIL-21) plus rituximab in patients with indolent B-cell malignancies. Experimental Design One week after a lead-in rituximab dose, cohorts of 3 patients were treated with 30, 100, or 150 μg/kg rIL-21 weekly for 4 weeks, concurrent with 4 weekly doses of rituximab. Patients with stable disease or better were eligible for a second course of therapy. Results Twenty-one patients with relapsed small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL, n=11), follicular lymphoma (n=9), or marginal zone lymphoma (n=1) were enrolled, with 19 completing at least 1 course of therapy. The MTD for rIL-21 was 100 μg/kg, based on observed toxicities including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hypotension, edema, and hypophosphatemia. Clinical responses were seen in 8 of 19 evaluable patients (42%; 3 CR/CRu, 5 PR), with 4 of longer duration than the patient’s previous response to rituximab-based treatment (median 9 versus 3 months). Conclusions Outpatient therapy of indolent B-cell malignancies with rituximab and weekly rIL-21 was well-tolerated and clinically-active, with durable complete remissions in a small subset of patients. Additional studies of rIL-21 and anti-CD20 antibodies in lymphoma and SLL/CLL are warranted. PMID:22893631

  14. Granulomatous Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Granulomatous Slack Skin and Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Gangar, Pamela; Venkatarajan, Sangeetha

    2015-07-01

    Granulomatous cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) and lymphomatoid granulomatosis are considered granulomatous lymphoproliferative disorders. The most common types of granulomatous CTCL are granulomatous mycosis fungoides and granulomatous slack skin. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis is a rare Epstein-Barr virus driven lymphoproliferative disorder. This article reviews the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, systemic associations, and management of both granulomatous slack skin syndrome and lymphomatoid granulomatosis. PMID:26143428

  15. Folliculotropic Mycosis Fungoides as a Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder.

    PubMed

    Spence-Shishido, Allyson; Streicher, Jenna L; George, Roshan P; Parker, Sareeta R; Lawley, Leslie P

    2015-09-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a known complication of solid organ transplantation. The majority are B cell in origin and related to Epstein-Barr virus infection. T-cell PTLD is much less common; most are Epstein-Barr virus negative and have a worse prognosis. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) as a presentation of PTLD is rare. CTCL has a less favorable prognosis in transplant patients compared with that in immune-competent patients. Herein, we report a case of a 13-year-old boy who developed folliculotropic mycosis fungoides, a rare subtype of CTCL, subsequent to renal transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this type of PTLD in a pediatric patient. PMID:26283779

  16. Plasmacytoma-like Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Proctor Short, Sara Rhodes; Cook, Steven L; Kim, Andrew S; Lamour, Jacqueline M; Lowe, Eric J; Petersen, William C

    2016-03-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a diversely manifesting group of lymphoid or plasmacytic proliferations found in solid organ and bone marrow transplant recipients. PTLD occurs as a result of immunosuppression and is often driven by the Epstein Barr virus. Although most commonly of B-cell origin, similar to B-cell lymphomas, PTLD can rarely present as a plasmacytic process, resembling multiple myeloma. Although more common in adults, 8 cases of plasmacytoma-like PTLD have been reported in pediatric renal and combined small bowel-liver transplant recipients. Here, we present a rare report of a plasmacytoma-like PTLD case in a pediatric heart transplant recipient.

  17. β-HHVs and HHV-8 in Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Quadrelli, C.; Barozzi, P.; Riva, G.; Vallerini, D.; Zanetti, E.; Potenza, L.; Forghieri, F.; Luppi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Similarly to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is a γ-herpesvirus, recently recognized to be associated with the occurrence of rare B cell lymphomas and atypical lymphoproliferations, especially in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected subjects. Moreover, the human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), a β-herpesvirus, has been shown to be implicated in some non-malignant lymph node proliferations, such as the Rosai Dorfman disease, and in a proportion of Hodgkin’s lymphoma cases. HHV-6 has a wide cellular tropism and it might play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of human diseases, but given its ubiquity, disease associations are difficult to prove and its role in hematological malignancies is still controversial. The involvement of another β-herpesvirus, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), has not yet been proven in human cancer, even though recent findings have suggested its potential role in the development of CD4+ large granular lymphocyte (LGL) lymphocytosis. Here, we review the current knowledge on the pathogenetic role of HHV-8 and human β-herpesviruses in human lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:22110893

  18. [THE COMBINATION OF EXPRESSION OF MARKERS CR1 AND CR2 (CD35/CD21) IN DIAGNOSTIC OF B-CELL LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Chibisova, O N; Burtsev, D V; Galstian, K M; Lugovskaia, G I

    2015-04-01

    The study was carried out to analyze rate of expression of antigens CD35 and CD21 in norm and under different forms of B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. The level of average intensity of fluorescence of antigens CD35, CD21 and CD200 is compared for different groups of patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. The established patterns of expression of antigens CD35 and CD21 under B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases permit considering expression of the given markers as a characteristic of differential diagnostic. PMID:26189291

  19. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Daan; Cardinaels, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for several patients with acute liver failure, end stage liver disease and primary hepatic malignancies. However, long term immunosuppressive therapy aiming to reduce the risk of transplant rejection increases the incidence of several complications including malignancies. This is illustrated by the observation of a high ratio between observed and expected cases of lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation. Despite a huge heterogeneity in morphological appearance of these disorders ranging from reactive-like lesions to real lymphomas, they are collectively termed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. In this review we will provide an overview of this rare but challenging disorder as a complication of liver transplantation. PMID:26494960

  20. [Primary Central Nervous System Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yoshiko; Nakaya, Aya; Fujita, Shinya; Hotta, Masaaki; Fujita, Yukie; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Nakanishi, Takahisa; Satake, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoki; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nomura, Shosaku

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with acute lymphocytic leukemia, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complained of nausea and blurred vision 288 days after the transplantation. Intracranial tumors were identified on brain MRI. She received whole brain radiation after open biopsy, but she died. The tumors had characteristics of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, and she was finally diagnosed with primary central nervous system post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This disease is rare and has a poor outcome. Therefore, accumulation of cases and establishment of treatments for this condition are urgently needed.

  1. Single-Fraction Radiotherapy for CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Michelle S.; Martinez-Escala, Maria Estela; Thomas, Tarita O.; Guitart, Joan; Rosen, Steven; Kuzel, Timothy; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder is a rare variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Sustained complete response following first-line treatments is rare. This retrospective review evaluates the response of refractory or recurrent lesions to palliative radiation therapy. Methods. The records of 6 patients with 12 lesions, treated with radiation therapy, were reviewed. All patients received previous first-line treatments. Patients with clinical and pathological evidence of symptomatic CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder, with no history of other cutaneous T-cell lymphoma variants, and with no prior radiation therapy to the index site were included. Results. The median age of patients was 50.5 years (range, 15–83 years). Median size of the treated lesions was 2.5 cm (range, 2–7 cm). Four sites were treated with a single fraction of 750–800 cGy (n = 3) and 8 sites were treated with 4000–4500 cGy in 200–250 cGy fractions (n = 3). Radiation therapy was administered with electrons and bolus. Median follow-up was 113 months (range, 16–147 months). For all sites, there was 100% complete response with acute grade 1-2 dermatitis. Conclusions. For recurrent and symptomatic radiation-naïve CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorder lesions, palliative radiation therapy shows excellent response. A single fraction of 750–800 cGy is as effective as a multifractionated course and more convenient. PMID:26504818

  2. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  3. Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child.

    PubMed

    Halula, Sarah E; Leino, Daniel G; Patel, Manish N; Racadio, John M; Lungren, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described. PMID:26167324

  4. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  5. Practical Management of CD30⁺ Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hughey, Lauren C

    2015-10-01

    Primary cutaneous CD30⁺ lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) account for approximately 25% of cutaneous lymphomas. Although these LPDs are clinically heterogeneous, they can be indistinguishable histologically. Lymphomatoid papulosis rarely requires systemic treatment; however, multifocal primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell cutaneous lymphoma and large cell transformation of mycosis fungoides are typically treated systemically. As CD30⁺ LPDs are rare, there is little published evidence to support a specific treatment algorithm. Most studies are case reports, small case series, or retrospective reviews. This article discusses various treatment choices for each of the CD30⁺ disorders and offers practical pearls to aid in choosing an appropriate regimen. PMID:26433852

  6. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Unagami, Kohei; Hirai, Toshihito; Toki, Daisuke; Omoto, Kazuya; Okumi, Masayoshi; Imai, Yoichi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation; however, few large studies have been performed in Asian institutions. We review our single-center experience with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients in Japan. We retrospectively evaluated patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation between January 1985 and December 2013. The patients were divided into early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (<1 year) and late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (≥1 year) groups. Thirteen patients had the disorder, an incidence rate of 0.75% (13/1730). Early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 3) had not occurred for the last two decades. In the late-onset group (N = 10), the median time of onset was 108.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year overall survival rates were 76.9% and 95.4% in patients with and without the disorder, respectively (P = 0.0001). Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder significantly affected transplant recipients' mortality. Late-onset occurred even > 10 years after transplantation; therefore, long-term monitoring of patients is needed.

  7. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Lones, M A; Kirov, I; Said, J W; Shintaku, I P; Neudorf, S

    2000-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Rare cases of PTLD after autologous BMT have been reported only in adults. This case report is the first to describe PTLD in a pediatric patient after autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (PSCT). This 2-year-old male with stage IV neuroblastoma underwent autologous PSCT. The post-PSCT course was complicated by fever with hematochezia and a lung mass. On day 94 post PSCT, colonoscopy revealed an ulcer due to a PTLD, monomorphic type, B cell phenotype, associated with Epstein-Barr virus. Fine needle aspiration identified the lung mass as neuroblastoma. PTLD can occur in pediatric autologous PSCT recipients, and may occur more frequently in autologous grafts manipulated by T cell depletion or CD34+ cell selection.

  8. Molecular etiology of an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder determined by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jeremy D.K.; Shen, Yaoqing; Pleasance, Erin; Li, Yvonne; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Wegrzyn-Woltosz, Joanna; Savage, Kerry J.; Weng, Andrew P.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Laskin, Janessa; Karsan, Aly

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to assess potential treatment options, whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing were performed on a patient with an unclassifiable small lymphoproliferative disorder. Variants from genome sequencing were prioritized using a combination of comparative variant distributions in a spectrum of lymphomas, and meta-analyses of gene expression profiling. In this patient, the molecular variants that we believe to be most relevant to the disease presentation most strongly resemble a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), whereas the gene expression data are most consistent with a low-grade chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The variant of greatest interest was a predicted NOTCH2-truncating mutation, which has been recently reported in various lymphomas. PMID:27148583

  9. EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer in organ transplant recipients: a localized indolent posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Hart, Melissa; Thakral, Beenu; Yohe, Sophia; Balfour, Henry H; Singh, Charanjeet; Spears, Michael; McKenna, Robert W

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive mucocutaneous ulcer (EBV MCU) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder occurring in elderly or iatrogenic immunocompromised patients. It has not been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. We observed 7 patients with EBV MCU in a cohort of 70 transplant recipients with EBV posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Transplants included: 5 renal, 1 heart, and 1 lung. Median patient age was 61; 5 were male. EBV MCU was observed in oral mucosa in 4 and gastrointestinal tract in 3. Duration of immunosuppressive therapy before EBV MCU was 0.6 to 13 years. Ulcers were undermined by inflammatory cells and polymorphic or monomorphic large cell lymphoproliferation. Reed-Sternberg-like cells were present in 5/7. Large B cells were CD20, CD30, and EBV-encoded RNA positive in all cases. Diagnosis in 3 recent patients was EBV MCU; 4 patients diagnosed before familiarity with EBV MCU were classified as monomorphic large cell (n=3) and polymorphic (n=1) PTLD. None of the patients had EBV DNA in their blood (<1000 copies/mL) at diagnosis or follow-up versus 35/44 transplant patients with systemic PTLD (P<0.001). All lesions resolved with reduced immunosuppression (7/7), change in immunosuppression (2/7), and rituximab (3/7). Five patients are living: 4 healthy, 1 awaiting second renal transplant. Two patients died 3 and 5 years after resolution of EBV MCU. No patient recurred with EBV MCU or other PTLDs. EBV MCU mimics more aggressive categories of PTLD but lacks EBV DNA in blood, which may be a useful distinguishing feature. Lesions are likely to resolve with conservative management. Awareness of EBV MCU in the posttransplant setting is necessary for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Vaccination strategies in lymphoproliferative disorders: Failures and successes.

    PubMed

    Allegra, A; Russo, S; Gerace, D; Calabrò, L; Maisano, V; Innao, V; Musolino, C

    2015-10-01

    Anti-tumor vaccines in lymphoproliferative disorders hold out the prospect of effective tumor therapies with minimal side effects. The addition of immunotherapy to old and new chemotherapy regimens has improved both response rates and disease-free survival, leading in many cases to an extended overall survival. Ideally, an antigen that is used for vaccination would be specifically expressed in the tumor; it must have an important, causal part in the multifactorial process that leads to cancer, and it must be expressed stably even after it is attacked by the immune system. Immunotherapies, which aim to activate the immune system to kill cancer cells, include strategies to increase the frequency or potency of antitumor T cells, to overcome suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment, and to reduce T-cell suppression systemically. In this review, we focus on the results of clinical trials of vaccination in lymphoma, and discuss potential strategies to enhance the efficacy of immunotherapy in the future.

  11. Cell sizing in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: an aid to differential diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, H D; Markey, G M; Nolan, R L; Morris, T C

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if leucocyte volume distribution analysis (LVDA), obtained using a Coulter Counter Model S Plus IV, can be used to aid differentiation of chronic lymphoproliferative disorder (CLPD) subtypes. METHODS: Mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width were measured on each patient (n = 90) using a hard copy of an amplified LVDA histogram. The mean lymphocyte volume was taken as the mean of the values on either side of the peak at half maximum height. The lymphocyte distribution width was taken as the range of cell values between the two values used to calibrate the mean lymphocyte volume. A template showing typical histograms from commonly occurring CLPD was also produced on an acetate sheet. This was used to examine the histogram from each new patient to evaluate its usefulness as an alternative to the calculation of mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width. RESULTS: Mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width were significantly higher in B cell lymphocytic leukaemia of mixed cell type (B CLL/PL), B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with peripheral blood spill, hairy cell leukaemia and T cell prolymphocytic leukaemia than in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B CLL). The mean lymphocyte volume, but not the lymphocyte distribution width, was also significantly higher in T cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia than in B CLL. The template gave an immediate preliminary indication of possible subtype(s) of disorder and could be used as an alternative to measurement of mean lymphocyte volume and lymphocyte distribution width. CONCLUSIONS: Electronic haematology analysers producing an LVDA provide a useful, cost effective cell sizing analysis which can aid the differentiation of subtypes of CLPD. Images PMID:1430257

  12. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  13. Recent insights in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Morscio, Julie; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-09-24

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an aggressive complication of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that arises in up to 20% of transplant recipients. Infection or reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, in combination with chronic immunosuppression are considered as the main predisposing factors, however insight in PTLD biology is fragmentary. The study of PTLD is complicated by its morphological heterogeneity and the lack of prospective trials, which also impede treatment optimization. Furthermore, the broad spectrum of underlying disorders and the graft type represent important confounding factors. PTLD encompasses different malignant subtypes that resemble histologically similar lymphomas in the general population. Post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PT-DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (PT-BL) and plasmablastic lymphoma (PT-PBL) occur most frequently. However, in many studies various EBV(+) and EBV(-) PTLD subtypes are pooled, complicating the interpretation of the results. In this review, studies of the gene expression pattern, the microenvironment and the genetic profile of PT-DLBCL, PT-BL and PT-PBL are summarized to better understand the mechanisms underlying post-transplantation lymphomagenesis. Based on the available findings we propose stratification of PTLD according to the histological subtype and the EBV status to facilitate the interpretation of future studies and the establishment of clinical trials. PMID:27683629

  14. Recent insights in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morscio, Julie; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an aggressive complication of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that arises in up to 20% of transplant recipients. Infection or reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, in combination with chronic immunosuppression are considered as the main predisposing factors, however insight in PTLD biology is fragmentary. The study of PTLD is complicated by its morphological heterogeneity and the lack of prospective trials, which also impede treatment optimization. Furthermore, the broad spectrum of underlying disorders and the graft type represent important confounding factors. PTLD encompasses different malignant subtypes that resemble histologically similar lymphomas in the general population. Post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PT-DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (PT-BL) and plasmablastic lymphoma (PT-PBL) occur most frequently. However, in many studies various EBV+ and EBV- PTLD subtypes are pooled, complicating the interpretation of the results. In this review, studies of the gene expression pattern, the microenvironment and the genetic profile of PT-DLBCL, PT-BL and PT-PBL are summarized to better understand the mechanisms underlying post-transplantation lymphomagenesis. Based on the available findings we propose stratification of PTLD according to the histological subtype and the EBV status to facilitate the interpretation of future studies and the establishment of clinical trials. PMID:27683629

  15. Recent insights in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morscio, Julie; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an aggressive complication of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that arises in up to 20% of transplant recipients. Infection or reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, in combination with chronic immunosuppression are considered as the main predisposing factors, however insight in PTLD biology is fragmentary. The study of PTLD is complicated by its morphological heterogeneity and the lack of prospective trials, which also impede treatment optimization. Furthermore, the broad spectrum of underlying disorders and the graft type represent important confounding factors. PTLD encompasses different malignant subtypes that resemble histologically similar lymphomas in the general population. Post-transplant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PT-DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (PT-BL) and plasmablastic lymphoma (PT-PBL) occur most frequently. However, in many studies various EBV+ and EBV- PTLD subtypes are pooled, complicating the interpretation of the results. In this review, studies of the gene expression pattern, the microenvironment and the genetic profile of PT-DLBCL, PT-BL and PT-PBL are summarized to better understand the mechanisms underlying post-transplantation lymphomagenesis. Based on the available findings we propose stratification of PTLD according to the histological subtype and the EBV status to facilitate the interpretation of future studies and the establishment of clinical trials.

  16. Trisomy 12 is seen within a specific subtype of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disease affecting the peripheral blood/bone marrow and co-segregates with elevated expression of CD11a.

    PubMed

    Su'ut, L; O'Connor, S J; Richards, S J; Jones, R A; Roberts, B E; Davies, F E; Fegan, C D; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1998-04-01

    In order to delineate the specific morphological and immunophenotypic features of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders associated with trisomy 12, 172 sequential unselected cases of CD19+CD5+ B-cell disorders, primarily affecting the peripheral blood and bone marrow, were studied. Trisomy 12 was found in 24 cases (13.9%), with all cases morphologically classified as either CLL-PL or CLL-mixed by FAB criteria. Trisomy 12 was not found in any cases of typical CLL. Trisomy 12 cases demonstrated a significant higher expression of CD11a (P<0.0001) and CD20 (P<0.0006) when compared to cases with the equivalent morphology and immunophenotype, but without the chromosomal abnormality. Trisomy 12 cases also demonstrated a higher frequency of FMC7, CD38 expression and moderate to strong surface immunoglobulin staining. However, no correlation was detected between the percentages of trisomy 12 cells and cells expressing CD11a, CD38, FMC7 or sIg mean fluorescent intensity. Cells from trisomy 12 positive cases were sorted according to their CD11a expression using fluorescent activated cell sorting. There was a significant increase in the percentage of trisomy 12 cells within the CD11a+ sorted fraction compared to the unsorted population (P < 0.05), implying that trisomy 12 is associated with increased expression of CD11a. With the highly specific morphological and immunophenotypic features demonstrated by trisomy 12 cases in this study, it is highly likely that these cases constitute a specific group of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

  17. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in children: incidence, prognosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Faye, Albert; Vilmer, Etienne

    2005-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children is a serious complication that has been responsible for high mortality rates over recent years. PTLDs are part of a clinically and histologically heterogeneous group of B-lymphocyte proliferations mostly induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in a context of immunosuppression. Major risk factors for PTLDs in solid organ transplantation are the EBV serostatus mismatch and the intensity, duration, and type of immunosuppression. T-cell depletion and the HLA-mismatched donor and recipient are the main risk factors following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For a long time, the only safe and effective therapeutic approach to PTLD was reduction of immunosuppression, with a risk of graft rejection. Based on a better knowledge of the pathophysiology and risk factors for PTLD, preventive and pre-emptive strategies have been recently proposed to control PTLD. New treatment modalities, such as anti-B-cell antibodies, cytokine inhibitor therapy, or anti-EBV cytotoxic T lymphocytes are promising and may improve the outcome of PTLD. These therapeutic approaches need to be further evaluated, especially in the context of pre-emptive strategies adapted to predictive markers of EBV-induced PTLD.

  18. Donor or recipient origin of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kinch, A; Cavelier, L; Bengtsson, M; Baecklund, E; Enblad, G; Backlin, C; Thunberg, U; Sundström, C; Pauksens, K

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies of donor or recipient origin of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) following solid organ transplantation (SOT) have either been small or with selected patient groups. We studied tumor origin in a population-based cohort of 93 patients with PTLD following SOT. Tumor origin of PTLD tissue was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization of the sex chromosomes in cases of sex mismatch between donor and recipient (n = 41), or HLA genotyping in cases of identical sex but different HLA type (n = 52). Tumor origin of PTLD could be determined in 67 of the 93 cases. All 67 PTLDs were of recipient origin. They were found in recipients of kidney (n = 38), liver (n = 12), heart (n = 10) and lung (n = 7). The most common recipient-derived lymphomas were monomorphic B-cell PTLDs (n = 45), monomorphic T cell PTLDs (n = 9), indolent lymphomas (n = 6), and polymorphic PTLD (n = 4). Half of the recipient-derived PTLDs were Epstein-Barr virus-positive. Twelve of the recipient-derived PTLDs were located in the grafts: in four cases exclusively and in eight cases in combination with disseminated disease outside the graft. Tumor origin was indeterminable in 26 cases, probably due to low DNA quality. We conclude that the vast majority of PTLDs after SOT was of recipient origin.

  19. Unusual gingival presentation of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Raut, A; Huryn, J; Pollack, A; Zlotolow, I

    2000-10-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is a well-documented complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Histologically, it is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of lymphocytes, which can range from benign B-cell hyperplasia to malignant lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is associated with several risk factors, such as congenital or acquired immunodeficiency states, autoimmune disorders, and infectious agents (eg, Epstein-Barr virus). Primary sites of presentation in the head and neck are Waldeyer's ring, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands, the oral cavity, and the larynx. Clinical appearance of gingival NHL varies but is usually found to be an asymptomatic gingival enlargement or mass resembling a pyogenic granuloma. We present a patient with a gingival ulceration that was subsequently diagnosed as Epstein-Barr virus malignant lymphoma resulting from the immunosuppression needed to prevent graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation.

  20. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  1. [Analyses of the rearrangement of T-cell receptor- and immunoglobulin genes in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disorders].

    PubMed

    Griesser, D H

    1995-01-01

    Rearrangements are developmentally regulated genetic recombinations in T and B cells which generate functional T cell receptor (TcR) and immunoglobulin genes, respectively. Different variable, sometimes diversity, and joining gene segments which are discontinuously spread out within their chromosomal location in germline configuration, are randomly assembled in individual lymphocytes. These rearrangements can be detected by Southern Blot analysis if more than 5% of a total lymphocyte population in a biopsy specimen carries the same clonal rearrangement. We analyzed DNA from 324 snap-frozen biopsy specimens from lympho-proliferative disorders. None of the 20 reactive lesions and four malignant myelomonocytic tumors had a clonal antigen receptor gene rearrangement. All 117 malignant B cell lymphomas of different subtypes and 95 of 97 malignant T cell lymphomas showed a clonal gene rearrangement. Only two angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy(AILD)-type T cell lymphomas did not have immune receptor gene rearrangements. They were morphologically indistinguishable from the other 47 T/AILD lymphomas with clonal rearrangement patterns. In most cases TcR beta and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene probes were sufficient for lineage assignment of the clonal T or B lymphocyte population. In 18% of B lymphomas, however, a cross-lineage rearrangement of TcR beta genes, and in 20% of the T cell lymphomas a clonal IgH gene rearrangement was detected. After exclusion of centrocytic, large cell anaplastic lymphomas (LCAL) of B-type, and T/AILD lymphomas which are overrepresented in our study, only 10% of the remaining 147 T and B cell lymphomas had aberrant rearrangements. TcR rearrangements other than those of the beta chain genes were extremely rare in B cell lymphomas, as were Ig kappa rearrangements in T lymphomas. Only two T/AILD lymphomas had IgH and Ig kappa rearrangement in addition to their clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements. Both samples likely contain a clonal B

  2. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Vilas-Boas, Andreia; Isenberg, David A

    2015-08-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  4. B-cell survival factors in autoimmune rheumatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Sandra A.; Vilas-Boas, Andreia

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic disorders have complex etiopathogenetic mechanisms in which B cells play a central role. The importance of factors stimulating B cells, notably the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) axis is now recognized. BAFF and APRIL are cytokines essential for B-cell proliferation and survival from the immature stages to the development of plasma cells. Their levels are increased in some subsets of patients with autoimmune disorders. Several recent biologic drugs have been developed to block this axis, namely belimumab [already licensed for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) treatment], tabalumab, atacicept and blisibimod. Many clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these drugs in several autoimmune disorders are ongoing, or have been completed recently. This review updates the information on the use of biologic agents blocking BAFF/APRIL for patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome and myositis. PMID:26288664

  5. Usefulness of IGH/TCR PCR studies in lymphoproliferative disorders with inconclusive clonality by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; Juncà, Jordi; Rodríguez, Inés; Marcé, Silvia; Cabezón, Marta; Millá, Fuensanta

    2014-01-01

    In up to 5-15% of studies of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD), flow cytometry (FCM) or immunomorphologic methods cannot discriminate malignant from reactive processes. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of PCR for solving these diagnostic uncertainties. We analyzed IGH and TCRγ genes by PCR in 106 samples with inconclusive FCM results. A clonal result was registered in 36/106 studies, with a LPD being confirmed in 27 (75%) of these cases. Specifically, 9/9 IGH clonal and 16/25 TCRγ clonal results were finally diagnosed with LPD. Additionally, two clonal TCRγ samples with suspicion of undefined LPD were finally diagnosed with T LPD. Although polyclonal results were obtained in 47 of the cases studied (38 IGH and nine TCRγ), hematologic neoplasms were diagnosed in 4/38 IGH polyclonal and in 1/9 TCRγ polyclonal studies. There were also 14 PCR polyclonal results (four IGH, 10 TCRγ), albeit nonconclusive. Of these, 2/4 were eventually diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma and 3/10 with T-cell LPD. In eight IGH samples, the results of PCR techniques were noninformative but in 3/8 cases a B lymphoma was finally confirmed. We concluded that PCR is a useful technique to identify LPD when FCM is inconclusive. A PCR clonal B result is indicative of malignancy but IGH polyclonal and nonconclusive results do not exclude lymphoid neoplasms. Interpretation of T-cell clonality should be based on all the available clinical and analytical data. PMID:23943305

  6. Usefullness of IGH/TCR PCR studies in lymphoproliferative disorders with inconclusive clonality by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; Juncà, Jordi; Rodríguez, Inés; Marcé, Silvia; Cabezón, Marta; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-07-25

    In up to 5-15% of studies of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) flow cytometry (FCM) or immunomorphologic methods cannot discriminate malignant from reactive processes. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of PCR for solving these diagnostic uncertainties. We analyzed IGH and TCRγ genes by PCR in 106 samples with inconclusive FCM results. A clonal result was registered in 36/106 studies, with a LPD being confirmed in 27 (75%) of these cases. Specifically, 9/9 IGH clonal and 16/25 TCRγ clonal results were finally diagnosed with LPD. Additionally, 2 clonal TCRγ samples with suspicion of undefined LPD were finally diagnosed with T LPD. Although polyclonal results were obtained in 47 of the cases studied (38 IGH and 9 TCRγ), hematologic neoplasms were diagnosed in 4/38 IGH polyclonal and in 1/9 TCRγ polyclonal studies. There were also 14 PCR polyclonal results (4 IGH, 10 TCRγ), albeit non-conclusive. Of these, 2/4 were eventually diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma and 3/10 with T-cell LPD. In 8 IGH samples the results of PCR techniques were non-informative but in 3/8 cases a B lymphoma was finally confirmed. We concluded that PCR is a useful technique to identify LPD when FCM is inconclusive. A PCR clonal B result is indicative of malignancy but IGH polyclonal and non-conclusive results do not exclude lymphoid neoplasms. Interpretation of T-cell clonality should be based on all the available clinical and analytical data. © 2013 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:23894019

  7. Comparison of Non-myeloablative Conditioning Regimens for Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sanghee; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Artz, Andrew; McCarthy, Philip L.; Logan, Brent R.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with non-myeloablative conditioning (NMA) for lymphoproliferative diseases (LD) includes fludarabine with and without low-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Transplant outcomes were compared among patients ≥40 years with LD who received a HCT with TBI (N=382) and no-TBI (N=515) NMA from 2001 to 2011. The groups were comparable except for donor, graft, prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), disease status and year of HCT. Cumulative incidences of grades II–IV GVHD at 100 days, were 29% and 20% (p=0.001), and chronic GVHD at 1 year were 54% and 44% (p=0.004) for TBI and no-TBI, respectively. Multivariate analysis of progression/relapse, treatment failure and mortality showed no outcome differences by conditioning. Full donor chimerism at day 100 was observed in 82% vs. 64% in the TBI and no-TBI groups, respectively (p=0.006). Subset of four most common conditioning/ GVHD prophylaxis combinations demonstrated higher rates of grades II–IV acute (p<0.001) and chronic GVHD (p<0.001) among recipients of TBI-mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) compared to other combinations. TBI-based NMA conditioning induces faster full donor chimerism but overall survival outcomes are comparable to no-TBI regimens. Combination of TBI and MMF are associated with higher rates of GVHD without impact on survival outcomes in patients with LD. PMID:25437248

  8. Intralymphatic Spread Is a Common Finding in Cutaneous CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Gerardo; Ena, Luca; Cota, Carlo; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    An intralymphatic variant of the cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders (cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma [ALCL] and lymphomatoid papulosis [LyP]) has been described recently. We retrieved 60 cases of ALCL of the skin (primary cutaneous: 37; cases with concomitant involvement of 1 regional lymph node: 4; skin involvement from systemic disease: 4; cases with staging results unknown: 15) and 16 cases of LyP, to evaluate the presence of lymphatic vessel involvement by neoplastic cells. A D2-40 immunohistochemical staining was used to highlight lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessel involvement was found in 36 cases (60%) of ALCL (primary cutaneous: 24; concomitant: 3; secondary cutaneous: 4; staging unknown: 5), and in 6 cases (37.5%) of LyP. Follow-up data, available in 28 patients with ALCL and 11 with LyP, suggested that lymphatic vessel involvement had no negative prognostic implication. Our study demonstrates that cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders are frequently characterized by involvement of the lymphatic vessels. The intralymphatic variant of ALCL and LyP may be explained, at least in part, by a particular lymphotropism of the neoplastic cells of cutaneous CD30 lymphoproliferative disorders.

  9. Age-related Epstein-Barr Virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorders of the orbit and maxillary sinus : a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takeki; Mawatari, Momoko; Koiso, Hiromi; Yokohama, Akihiko; Uchiumi, Hideki; Saitoh, Takayuki; Handa, Hiroshi; Hirato, Junko; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Tsukamoto, Norifumi

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of age-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (aEBVBLPD) primarily involving the orbit and maxillary sinus. Lesions in the left orbit and maxillary sinus were observed in a 59-year-old man presenting with pain in the left orbit and maxilla. Owing to the presence of Reed-Sternberg-like cells, the initial diagnosis was nodular sclerosis-type Hodgkin's lymphoma. Clinical stage was IIAE, and response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy was favorable. Further immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses of the Reed-Sternberg-like giant cells revealed CD30, CD15, CD20, Bob-1, Oct-2, EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) and latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) expression. The characteristics of the present case, which included immunohistochemical findings, sites of primary lesions, absence of other lymph node lesions and relatively old age, suggested aEBVBLPD. Owing to the similarity in morphology, higher frequency at extranodal sites and poor prognosis, aEBVBLPD represents a differential diagnostic issue from classical Hodgkin's lymphoma when Reed-Sternberg cells are positive for EBV.

  10. EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after umbilical cord blood transplantation in adults with hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J; Arango, M; Senent, L; Jarque, I; Montesinos, P; Sempere, A; Lorenzo, I; Martín, G; Moscardó, F; Mayordomo, E; Salavert, M; Cañigral, C; Boluda, B; Salazar, C; López-Hontangas, J L; Sanz, M A; Sanz, G F

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence, clinicopathological features, risk factors and prognosis of patients with EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV-PTLD) in 288 adults undergoing umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) at a single institution. Twelve patients developed proven EBV-PTLD at a median time of 73 days (range, 36-812). Three-year cumulative incidence (CI) of EBV-PTLD was 4.3% (95% CI: 1.9-6.7). All patients presented with extranodal involvement. Most frequently affected sites were the liver, spleen, central nervous system (CNS), Waldeyer's ring and BM in 7, 6, 4, 3 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had polymorphic and 11 had monomorphic EBV-PTLD (7 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified, 4 plasmablastic lymphomas). We confirmed donor origin and EBV infection in all histological samples. EBV-PTLD was the cause of death in 11 patients at a median time of 23 days (range, 1-84). The 3-year CI of EBV-PTLD was 12.9% (95% CI: 3.2-22.5) and 2.6% (95% CI: 0.5-4.7) for patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning, respectively (P<0.0001). In conclusion, adults with EBV-PTLD after UCBT showed frequent visceral and CNS involvement. The prognosis was poor despite routine viral monitoring and early intervention. An increased risk of EBV-PTLD was noted among recipients of RIC regimens.

  11. Croup as Unusual Presentation of Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Liver Transplantation in an 18-month-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkari, A.; Dehghani, S. M.; Haghighat, M.; Imanieh, M. H.; Nasimfard, A.; Yousefi, G.; Javaherizadeh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation that occurs due to immunosuppression and other risk factors. PTLD may present with involvement of other organs and with unusual presentation. The presentation is often extranodal (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, or the central nervous system). Herein, we report on a 1.5-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation almost 5 months prior to admission. She was on medications such as tacrolimus and prednisolone. Her presentation was started with symptoms of the upper respiratory infection followed by croupy cough and respiratory distress with no response to usual treatments. She had respiratory arrest during broncoscopy. Therefore, emergency tracheostomy was done. Biopsy from the paratracheal mass revealed large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTLD, monomorphic and high grade). This case presentation shows that persistent upper airway symptoms, particularly stridor and croupy cough, in children who underwent liver transplant should be further evaluated; the physician needs to have a high degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis of PTLD in this situation. PMID:26889375

  12. Croup as Unusual Presentation of Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Liver Transplantation in an 18-month-old Child.

    PubMed

    Keshtkari, A; Dehghani, S M; Haghighat, M; Imanieh, M H; Nasimfard, A; Yousefi, G; Javaherizadeh, H

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation that occurs due to immunosuppression and other risk factors. PTLD may present with involvement of other organs and with unusual presentation. The presentation is often extranodal (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, or the central nervous system). Herein, we report on a 1.5-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation almost 5 months prior to admission. She was on medications such as tacrolimus and prednisolone. Her presentation was started with symptoms of the upper respiratory infection followed by croupy cough and respiratory distress with no response to usual treatments. She had respiratory arrest during broncoscopy. Therefore, emergency tracheostomy was done. Biopsy from the paratracheal mass revealed large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTLD, monomorphic and high grade). This case presentation shows that persistent upper airway symptoms, particularly stridor and croupy cough, in children who underwent liver transplant should be further evaluated; the physician needs to have a high degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis of PTLD in this situation. PMID:26889375

  13. Unusual Indolent Course of a Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Natural Killer Cell Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Hadabbi, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorders are uncommon and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) plays an important aetiological role in their pathogenesis. We report a 20-year-old male with a chronic active EBV infection associated with a NK cell lymphoproliferative disorder which had an unusual indolent course. He presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in December 2011 with a history of intermittent fever and coughing. Examinations revealed generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, leukocytosis, transaminitis, diffuse bilateral lung infiltrates and bone marrow lymphocyte involvement. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test revealed a high EBV viral load in the peripheral blood cells. The patient received a course of piperacillin-tazobactam for Klebsiella pneumoniae, but no active treatment for the lymphoproliferative disorder. However, his lymphocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver enzymes dropped spontaneously. In addition, EBV PCR copies fluctuated and then decreased significantly. He remained clinically asymptomatic over the following four years. PMID:27226916

  14. [Four Cases of Other Iatrogenic Immunodeficiency-associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders in the Head and Neck Region].

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Masahiko; Akazawa, Yoshihiro; Kasugai, Shigeru; Mikami, Koshi; Saito, Yoshimitsu; Akutsu, Masatoshi; Akashi, Aibi; Ido, Kojiro; Maeda, Ichiro; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Koizuka, Izumi

    2016-05-01

    Other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (OIIA-LPD) comprise lymphoid proliferations or lymphomas that arise in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs for autoimmune diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate (MTX). MTX has been increasingly administered to patients with RA, resulting in methotrexate-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (MTX-LPD) in patients. We report herein on four cases of patients with RA, who diagnosed with head and neck region. In two cases (one case MTX and another case tacrolimus) drug therapy was discontinued, when the patients were diagnosed as having OIIA-LPD in only a few local findings. These patients have followed good clinical courses for 24 months. In the other two cases, consultations were performed for cervical lymphadenopathy by the Division of Rheumatology. In one case drug therapy was discontinued and a good clinical course was followed. In case of the other patient, however, who had undergone tacrolimus therapy after MTX therapy was discontinued, she relapsed and died. In the case of patients with an autoimmune disease such as RA who are taking MTX, tacrolimus, or anti TNF-α therapy, when cervical lymphadenopathy and extranodal disease are detected, OIIA-LPD should be suspected. We should cooperate with a hematologist-oncologist, a rheumatologist, and pathologist in such a case. PMID:27459820

  15. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD. PMID:26861102

  16. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD.

  17. Are T-LGL Leukemia and NK-Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disorder Really Two Distinct Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Zambello, Renato; Teramo, Antonella; Gattazzo, Cristina; Semenzato, Gianpietro

    2014-01-01

    Mature Large Granular lymphocytes (LGL) disorders include a spectrum of conditions, ranging from polyclonal to clonal indolent and/or overt leukemic LGL proliferations. Most cases are represented by clonal expansions of TCRα/β+ LGL displaying a CD8+ phenotype with expression of cytotoxic T-cell antigens (CD57, CD16, TIA-1, perforin and granzyme B). Proliferations of CD3-CD16+ NK cells with a restricted patter of NK receptors are less common, usually comprising 15% of the cases. Main features are cytopenias, splenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Morphology, immunophenotyping and molecular analyses are crucial to establish a correct diagnosis of disease. According to the 2008 WHO classification, two separate entities account for the majority of cases, T-LGL leukemia and Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disease of NK cell (this latter still provisional). Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cells types i.e. T and NK cells, with specific genetic features and abnormalities, compelling evidence supports the hypothesis that a common pathogenic mechanism would be involved in both disorders. As a matter of fact, a foreign antigen driven clonal selection is considered the initial step in the mechanism ultimately leading to generation of both conditions. In this chapter we will discuss recent advances on the pathogenesis of chronic T and NK disorders of granular lymphocytes, challenging the current WHO classification on the opportunity to separate T and NK disorders, which are likely to represent two sides of the same coin. PMID:24778993

  18. Chimaeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) in post-transplant B-lymphoproliferative disorder following stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Quartier, P; Reguerre, Y; Lutz, P; Carret, A S; Dehée, A; Rohrlich, P; Peuchmaur, M; Matthieu-Boué, A; Fischer, A; Vilmer, E

    2001-10-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after haemopoietic stem cell transplantation is a serious complication that occurs in 8-22% of patients with high-risk factors. We retrospectively investigated tolerance and efficacy of humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) as first-line treatment in 12 children with B-cell PTLD. At diagnosis, eight patients had tumoral involvement. The other four patients had fever, associated with raised Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viral load and monoclonal gammopathy. Rituximab was given at the dose of 375 mg/m2 once a week by intravenous infusion (1-9 infusions). Only 1/48 infusions was associated with a grade 2 clinical adverse event. Eight out of 12 (66%) patients responded to the treatment and were in complete remission. All patients without tumoral involvement responded to the treatment. A rapid decrease in fever within 1 week was observed in all responders. Non-responders did not show any clinical response during the first week. Tumoral involvement and immunodepression seemed to be more marked in non-responders. Rituximab was an effective and well-tolerated treatment of B-cell PTLD. Early treatment before tumoral involvement seemed to be the most effective approach. Lack of rapid response should lead to intensification of PTLD treatment. Pre-emptive treatment should be considered and evaluated in further longitudinal multicentre studies.

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder among solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Landgren, Ola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Castenson, David; Parsons, Ruth; Hoover, Robert N.; Engels, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been linked to increased risk of lymphoma among immunocompetent individuals. We therefore investigated the association between HCV infection and PTLD in a retrospective cohort study of all individuals in the United States who received their first solid organ transplant from 1994 to 2005 (N = 210 763) using Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data. During follow-up, 1630 patients with PTLD were diagnosed. HCV prevalence at transplantation was 11.3%. HCV infection did not increase PTLD risk in the total cohort (Cox regression model, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68-1.05), even after adjustment for type of organ transplanted, indication for transplantation, degree of HLA mismatch, donor type, or use of immunosuppression medications. Additional analyses also revealed no association by PTLD subtype (defined by site, pathology, cell type, and tumor Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] status). HCV infection did increase PTLD risk among the 2.8% of patients (N = 5959) who were not reported to have received immunosuppression maintenance medications prior to hospital discharge (HR = 3.09; 95% CI, 1.14-8.42; P interaction = .007). Our findings suggest that HCV is not a major risk factor for PTLD, which is consistent with the model in which an intact immune system is necessary for development of HCV-related lymphoproliferation. PMID:17855632

  20. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders: experimental and clinical developments

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingyun; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the first human virus related to oncogenesis, was initially identified in a Burkitt lymphoma cell line in 1964. EBV infects over 90% of the world’s population. Most infected people maintain an asymptomatic but persistent EBV infection lifelong. However, in some individuals, EBV infection has been involved in the development of cancer and autoimmune disease. Nowadays, oncogenic potential of EBV has been intensively studied in a wide range of human neoplasms, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), gastric carcinoma (GC), etc. EBV encodes a series of viral protein and miRNAs, promoting its persistent infection and the transformation of EBV-infected cells. Although the exact role of EBV in the oncogenesis remains to be clarified, novel diagnostic and targeted therapeutic approaches are encouraging for the management of EBV-related malignancies. This review mainly focuses on the experimental and clinical advances of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:26628948

  2. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found. PMID:26749337

  3. Virus and Autoantigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Are Key Effectors in a SCID Mouse Model of EBV-Associated Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Linnerbauer, Stefanie; Behrends, Uta; Adhikary, Dinesh; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Mautner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Polyclonal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B cell line (lymphoblastoid cell lines; LCL)-stimulated T-cell preparations have been successfully used to treat EBV-positive post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) in transplant recipients, but function and specificity of the CD4+ component are still poorly defined. Here, we assessed the tumor-protective potential of different CD4+ T-cell specificities in a PTLD-SCID mouse model. Injection of different virus-specific CD4+ T-cell clones showed that single specificities were capable of prolonging mouse survival and that the degree of tumor protection directly correlated with recognition of target cells in vitro. Surprisingly, some CD4+ T-cell clones promoted tumor development, suggesting that besides antigen recognition, still elusive functional differences exist among virus-specific T cells. Of several EBV-specific CD4+ T-cell clones tested, those directed against virion antigens proved most tumor-protective. However, enriching these specificities in LCL-stimulated preparations conferred no additional survival benefit. Instead, CD4+ T cells specific for unknown, probably self-antigens were identified as principal antitumoral effectors in LCL-stimulated T-cell lines. These results indicate that virion and still unidentified cellular antigens are crucial targets of the CD4+ T-cell response in this preclinical PTLD-model and that enriching the corresponding T-cell specificities in therapeutic preparations may enhance their clinical efficacy. Moreover, the expression in several EBV-negative B-cell lymphoma cell lines implies that these putative autoantigen(s) might also qualify as targets for T-cell-based immunotherapy of virus-negative B cell malignancies. PMID:24853673

  4. Detection of monoclonal T populations in patients with KIR-restricted chronic lymphoproliferative disorder of NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Cristina; Teramo, Antonella; Passeri, Francesca; De March, Elena; Carraro, Samuela; Trimarco, Valentina; Frezzato, Federica; Berno, Tamara; Barilà, Gregorio; Martini, Veronica; Piazza, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Facco, Monica; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Zambello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of chronic large granular lymphocyte proliferations is largely unknown. Although these disorders are characterized by the expansion of different cell types (T and natural killer) with specific genetic features and abnormalities, several lines of evidence suggest a common pathogenetic mechanism. According to this interpretation, we speculated that in patients with natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder, together with natural killer cells, also T lymphocytes undergo a persistent antigenic pressure, possibly resulting in an ultimate clonal T-cell selection. To strengthen this hypothesis, we evaluated whether clonal T-cell populations were detectable in 48 patients with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. At diagnosis, in half of the patients studied, we found a clearly defined clonal T-cell population, despite the fact that all cases presented with a well-characterized natural killer disorder. Follow-up analysis confirmed that the TCR gamma rearrangements were stable over the time period evaluated; furthermore, in 7 patients we demonstrated the appearance of a clonal T subset that progressively matures, leading to a switch between killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-restricted natural killer-type disorder to a monoclonal T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. Our results support the hypothesis that a common mechanism is involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:25193965

  5. B cells in the pathophysiology of autoimmune neurological disorders: a credible therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2006-10-01

    There is evidence that B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurological diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. Clonal expansion of B cells either in situ or intrathecally and circulating autoantibodies are critical elements in multiple sclerosis (MS), Devic's disease, paraneoplastic central nervous system disorders, stiff-person syndrome, myasthenia gravis, autoimmune demyelinating neuropathies and dermatomyositis. The pathogenic role of B cells and autoantibodies in central and peripheral nervous system disorders, as reviewed here, provides a rationale for investigating whether depletion of B cells with new agents can improve clinical symptomatology and, potentially, restore immune function. Preliminary results from several clinical studies and case reports suggest that B cell depletion may become a viable alternative approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  6. Three different histological subtypes of Epstein-Barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a patient with hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mikiko; Asano, Naoko; Fukushima, Mana; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case in which Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative polymorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and EBV-negative monomorphic T-cell PTLD [anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL)] were observed simultaneously in the same cervical lymph node, 34 months after liver transplantation for hepatitis C liver cirrhosis. Although hepatitis C recurred after 2 months, he had no other complications until PTLD occurred 34 months post-transplantation. The patient underwent reduction of the immunosuppressive drug and rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone therapy, and he was considered to have achieved complete remission. However, PTLD recurred, and he died 6 months after the initial diagnosis. Autopsy revealed only EBV-negative monomorphic T-cell PTLD (ALK-negative ALCL) that involved the liver, spleen, bilateral kidneys, stomach, bladder, heart, bone marrow, right ureter, and pons. Thus, recurrent PTLD may show a different histological type from the primary disorder, as PTLD has a multiclonal potentiality that causes various types of lymphomas. Therefore, it may be difficult to predict PTLD-related prognosis from the initial PTLD histological identification.

  7. T cell lymphoproliferative disorder following bone marrow transplantation for severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, L C; Lu, M Y; Yu, J; Jou, S T; Chiang, I P; Lin, K H; Lin, D T

    2000-10-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is uncommonly of T cell origin, especially following BMT. We describe a 13-year-old boy with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) and no evidence of Fanconi's anemia who underwent BMT at 11 years of age using CY 10 mg/kg once daily i.v. on days -5, -4, antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) 30 mg/kg once daily i.v. on days -5 approximately -3 and CsA from day -1 as conditioning. The BMT failed and he received a further peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) 240 days after BMT. Conditioning was with CY 50 mg/kg once daily i.v. on days -5 approximately -2, and ALG 15 mg/kg once daily i.v. on days -4 approximately -2. GVHD prophylaxis included CsA and MTX. Engraftment was later confirmed by cytogenetic studies. Desquamation and ulcers of the oral mucosa and mouth angle developed in the 13th month post PBSCT. A buccal mucosa biopsy on day +524 revealed only plasmacytosis. Immunosuppressants were discontinued at that point. Generalized lymphadenopathy, prolonged fever (waxing and waning) and facial swelling developed in the 18th month post PBSCT. A neck lymph node biopsy on day +601 showed T cell lymphoma of diffuse large cell type with monoclonal TCR gamma-chain gene rearrangement. A FISH study showed that the malignant T cells were of recipient origin. EBV in situ hybridization was negative. He did not receive further treatment apart from discontinuation of immunosuppressants. He was followed up in our out-patient clinic and showed good performance 1170 days post PBSCT. We speculate that a different mechanism was operating in the pathogenesis of T cell lymphoma in this case. Risk factors include SAA and two transplants, conditioned with CY and ALG, long term use of CsA and treatment with azathioprine. PMID:11081391

  8. HLA Associations and Risk of Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Danish Population-Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Bendix, Knud; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Andersen, Claus; Møller, Michael Boe; Sørensen, Søren Schwartz; Kampmann, Jan; Eiskjær, Hans; Iversen, Martin; Weinreich, Ilse Duus; Møller, Bjarne; Jespersen, Bente; d'Amore, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database. Having identified 93 PTLD patients in the cohort, we investigated the association of HLA types with PTLD, Epstein-Barr virus status and time to PTLD onset. The outcomes survival and PTLD were evaluated using Cox regression; mismatching, and the PTLD-specific mortality were evaluated in a competing risk analysis. Results Risk of PTLD was associated with male sex (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.71), and, in women, HLA-DR13 conferred an increased risk (odds ratio, 3.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.41-7.31). In multivariate analysis, HLA-B45 and HLA-DR13 remained independent predictive factors of PTLD. Mismatching in the B locus was associated with a reduced risk of PTLD (P < 0.001). Overall survival was poor after a PTLD diagnosis and was significantly worse than that in the remaining transplant cohort (P < 0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate risk-modifying HLA associations, which can be clinically useful after transplantation in personalized monitoring schemes. Given the strong linkage disequilibrium in the HLA region, the associations must be interpreted carefully. The large size, virtually complete ascertainment of cases and no loss to follow-up remain important strengths of the study. PMID:27500227

  9. Breast Implant–Associated ALCL: A Unique Entity in the Spectrum of CD30+ Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Story, Sara K.; Schowalter, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders represent a spectrum of diseases with distinct clinical phenotypes ranging from reactive conditions to aggressive systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)− anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). In January 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a possible association between breast implants and ALCL, which was likened to systemic ALCL and treated accordingly. We analyzed existing data to see if implant-associated ALCL (iALCL) may represent a distinct entity, different from aggressive ALCL. We conducted a systematic review of publications regarding ALCL and breast implantation for 1990–2012 and contacted corresponding authors to obtain long-term follow-up where available. We identified 44 unique cases of iALCL, the majority of which were associated with seroma, had an ALK− phenotype (97%), and had a good prognosis, different from the expected 40% 5-year survival rate of patients with ALK− nodal ALCL (one case remitted spontaneously following implant removal; only two deaths have been reported to the FDA or in the scientific literature since 1990). The majority of these patients received cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone with or without radiation, but radiation alone also resulted in complete clinical responses. It appears that iALCL demonstrates a strong association with breast implants, a waxing and waning course, and an overall good prognosis, with morphology, cytokine profile, and biological behavior similar to those of primary cutaneous ALCL. Taken together, these data are suggestive that iALCL may start as a reactive process with the potential to progress and acquire an aggressive phenotype typical of its systemic counterpart. A larger analysis and prospective evaluation and follow-up of iALCL patients are necessary to definitively resolve the issue of the natural course of the disease and best therapeutic approaches for these patients. PMID:23429741

  10. Chronic natural killer lymphoproliferative disorders: characteristics of an international cohort of 70 patients

    PubMed Central

    Poullot, E.; Zambello, R.; Leblanc, F.; Bareau, B.; De March, E.; Roussel, M.; Boulland, M. L.; Houot, R.; Renault, A.; Fest, T.; Semenzato, G.; Loughran, T.; Lamy, T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification distinguishes three entities among the large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL leukemia): T-cell LGL leukemia (T-LGL leukemia), aggressive natural killer (NK) cell leukemia, and chronic NK lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD), the later considered as a provisional entity. Only a few and small cohorts of chronic NK LPD have been published. Patients and methods We report here clinicobiological features collected retrospectively from 70 cases of chronic NK LPD, and compared with those of T-LGL leukemia. Results There were no statistical differences between chronic NK LPD and T-LGL leukemia concerning median age [61 years (range 23–82 years)], organomegaly (26%), associated autoimmune diseases (24%), and associated hematological malignancies (11%). Patients with chronic NK LPD were significantly less symptomatic (49% versus 18%, P < 0.001) and the association with rheumatoid arthritis was more rarely observed (7% versus 17%, P = 0.03). The neutropenia (<0.5 × 109/l) was less severe in chronic NK LPD (33% versus 61%, P < 0.001) without difference in the rate of recurrent infections. STAT3 mutation was detected in 12% of the cohort, which is lower than the frequency observed in T-LGL leukemia. Thirty-seven percent of the patients required specific therapy. Good results were obtained with cyclophosphamide. Overall and complete response rates were, respectively, 69% and 56%. Overall survival was 94% at 5 years. Conclusion This study suggests very high similarities between chronic NK LPD and T-LGL leukemias. Since chronic NK LPD is still a provisional entity, our findings should be helpful when considering further revisions of the WHO classification. PMID:25096606

  11. Translational Mini-Review Series on B Cell-Directed Therapies: Recent advances in B cell-directed biological therapies for autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, M C

    2009-01-01

    B cell-directed therapies are promising treatments for autoimmune disorders. Besides targeting CD20, newer B cell-directed therapies are in development that target other B cell surface molecules and differentiation factors. An increasing number of B cell-directed therapies are in development for the treatment of autoimmune disorders. Like rituximab, which is approved as a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), many of these newer agents deplete B cells or target pathways essential for B cell development and function; however, many questions remain about their optimal use in the clinic and about the role of B cells in disease pathogenesis. Other therapies besides rituximab that target CD20 are the furthest along in development. Besides targeting CD20, the newer B cell-directed therapies target CD22, CD19, CD40–CD40L, B cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) and A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). Rituximab is being tested in an ever-increasing number of autoimmune disorders and clinical studies of rituximab combined with other biological therapies are being pursued for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). B cell-directed therapies are being tested in clinical trials for a variety of autoimmune disorders including RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome, vasculitis, multiple sclerosis (MS), Graves' disease, idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), the inflammatory myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis) and the blistering skin diseases pemphigus and bullous pemphigoid. Despite the plethora of clinical studies related to B cell-directed therapies and wealth of new information from these trials, much still remains to be discovered about the pathophysiological role of B cells in autoimmune disorders. PMID:19604259

  12. Donor Monoclonal Gammopathy May Cause Lymphoproliferative Disorders in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Felldin, M; Ekberg, J; Polanska-Tamborek, D; Hansson, U; Sender, M; Rizell, M; Svanvik, J; Mölne, J

    2016-09-01

    Prior research on donor monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) has been inadequate regarding the risk for lymphoproliferative disease in solid organ transplantation recipients. Seven organ recipients from two different donors developed lymphoproliferative disease. The origin of the malignancy was determined by use of microsatellite analysis, and the plasma of the two donors was analyzed with the use of electrophoresis. The clinical courses of the seven recipients were followed for 36-60 months. One donor transmitted lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma to two kidney recipients and MGUS to a liver recipient, all IgMκ. A second donor caused IgGλ myeloma in two kidney and one liver recipient, and IgGλ gammopathy in a heart recipient. Transplant nephrectomy was performed in three kidney recipients and remission was achieved. The fourth kidney recipient has kept the graft and the disease has progressed. The liver recipient died from myeloma. There were no clinical signs of lymphoproliferative disease in the donors, but retrospective serum analyses showed M-components, IgMκ (37 g/L) and IgGλ (8 g/L). Donors with MGUS may cause donor-transmitted malignancies via passenger lymphocytes/plasma cells in solid organ recipients. The results call for a large register study of the incidence of donor MGUS and lymphoproliferative disease in their recipients. PMID:27575725

  13. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in diagnosis of post transplant lymphoproliferative disorders: Case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Singh, A.; Das, C. J.; Gupta, A. K.; Bagchi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder include a spectrum of conditions occurring in immunosuppressed post transplant recipients, lymphoma being the most ominous. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography CT) is the current imaging gold standard for lymphoma imaging as it allows both morphological and functional assessment. CT and/or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for morphological evaluation in transplant recipients. Integrating diffusion weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient analysis in MRI protocol enhances its sensitivity and may prove invaluable in response assessment in transplant recipients. PMID:27194838

  14. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia harbors a unique proteome where Ku70 is severely underexpressed as compared with other B-lymphoproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Perrot, A; Pionneau, C; Azar, N; Baillou, C; Lemoine, F M; Leblond, V; Merle-Béral, H; Béné, M-C; Herbrecht, R; Bahram, S; Vallat, L

    2012-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a clonal B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) of post-germinal center nature. Despite the fact that the precise molecular pathway(s) leading to WM remain(s) to be elucidated, a hallmark of the disease is the absence of the immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we compared proteomic profiles of WM cells with that of other LPDs. We were able to demonstrate that WM constitutes a unique proteomic entity as compared with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and marginal zone lymphoma. Statistical comparisons of protein expression levels revealed that a few proteins are distinctly expressed in WM in comparison with other LPDs. In particular we observed a major downregulation of the double strand repair protein Ku70 (XRCC6); confirmed at both the protein and RNA levels in an independent cohort of patients. Hence, we define a distinctive proteomic profile for WM where the downregulation of Ku70—a component of the non homologous end-joining pathway—might be relevant in disease pathophysiology. PMID:22961060

  15. Remission of late-onset post-heart transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following treatment with rituximab and modified mini-CHOP chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, QIANG; YANG, TIANXIN; JIN, XING; NI, XUMING; QI, HAIYAN; YAN, ZHIKUN

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is one of the most frequent secondary malignancies that can follow immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation, and may result in severe morbidities and even mortality. A middle-aged Han Chinese patient, prescribed with immunosuppressive cyclosporine and prednisone, developed PTLD that manifested as a painless cervical lymph node enlargement, 12 years following heart transplantation. Histology revealed monomorphic B-cell PTLD (diffuse large-cell lymphoma); as a result the immunosuppressive regimen of the patient was changed to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In addition, the patient was changed to 6-cycle rituximab with a modified mini-CHOP (R-mini-CHOP) regimen for induction, and 8-cycle quarterly rituximab treatment and maintenance therapy. R-mini-CHOP therapy was well tolerated, and no allograft rejection occurred. The patient exhibited clinical remission as demonstrated by the results of the positron emission tomography-computed tomography at the 5-year follow-up visit following R-mini-CHOP therapy. In conclusion, R-mini-CHOP therapy following reduced immunosuppression is effective and safe for the treatment of late-onset PTLD following heart transplantation. PMID:27347047

  16. Rearrangement of the rheumatoid factor-related germline gene Vg and bcl-2 expression in lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugai, S; Saito, I; Masaki, Y; Takeshita, S; Shimizu, S; Tachibana, J; Miyasaka, N

    1994-08-01

    Of 250 patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) (190 with 1 degree SS and 60 with 2 degrees SS), 60 patients demonstrated lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD): 41 patients had monoclonal gammopathy (MG), 4 had pseudolymphoma, 3 had in situ monoclonal lymphoproliferation, and 12 had malignant lymphoma. Rearrangement of the rheumatoid factor (RF)-related germline gene Vg (associated with the monoclonal RF SF18/2) was demonstrated in 24 of 50 genomic DNAs from the peripheral blood leukocytes of SS patients. It was found in none of 20 DNAs from normal subjects. This suggests an almost 50% incidence of a germline Ig gene rearrangement in SS patients without clinical MG. Lymphocytes composing the lymphoepithelial lesion (LEL) in the major salivary glands of SS patients expressed the oncogene bcl-2 protein in 4 out of 6 patients. The progression of SS from benign to malignant lymphoproliferation may be related to suppression of apoptotic death by bcl-2. These findings suggest that (i) RF clones are activated in SS with little or no somatic mutation resulting in monoclonal proliferation and (ii) the LEL in the salivary gland is one site for monoclonal B cell proliferation and emerging malignant lymphoma.

  17. IgG4-related disease: a novel lymphoproliferative disorder discovered and established in Japan in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yasufumi; Kurose, Nozomu; Umehara, Hisanori

    2011-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a novel lymphoproliferative disorder that shows hyper-IgG4-γ-globulinemia and IgG4-producing plasma cell expansion in affected organs with fibrotic or sclerotic changes. Patients show systemic inflammatory conditions and various symptoms depending on the affected organ. Since the first report of patients with elevated serum IgG4 in sclerosing pancreatitis in 2001, various systemic disorders described by many names have been reported. Despite similarities in the organs involved in IgG4-related Mikulicz's disease and Sjögren's syndrome, there are marked clinical and pathological differences between these conditions. Most patients diagnosed with autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan have IgG4-related pancreatitis [Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)], a disease distinct from some of the western type [Type 2 AIP, idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP), autoimmune pancreatitis with granulocytic epithelial lesions (GEL)]. Diagnosis of IgG4-related disease is characterized by both elevated serum IgG4 (>135 mg/dL) and histopathological features including lymphocyte and IgG4(+) plasma cell infiltration (IgG4(+) plasma cells/IgG(+) plasma cells>40%). Differential diagnosis from other distinct disorders, such as sarcoidosis, Castleman's disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, lymphoma, cancer, and other existing conditions associated with high serum IgG4 level or abundant IgG4-bearing plasma cells in tissues is necessary. We have begun a clinical prospective study to establish a treatment strategy (Phase II prospective treatment study for IgG4-multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome: UMIN R000002311). PMID:21628856

  18. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Cytogenetics in the management of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders in adults and children: an update by the Groupe francophone de cytogénétique hématologique (GFCH).

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Christine; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Chapiro, Elise; Nadal, Nathalie; Penther, Dominique; Poirel, Hélène-Antoine

    2016-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders include a high number of heterogeneous entities, described in the 2008 WHO classification. This classification reflects the crucial role of a multidisciplinary approach which integrates cytogenetic results both for the notion of clonality and for differential diagnosis between these entities. The prognostic impact of some cytogenetic abnormalities or genome complexity is also confirmed for many of these entities. Novel provisional entities have been described, such as BCLU (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma) for which karyotype is critical to distinguish BCLU from Burkitt's lymphoma. The karyotype can be established from any tumour or liquid infiltrated by lymphoma cells. Recent adaptations of technics for cellular cultures according to the subtype of known (or suspected) lymphoma have significantly improved the percentage of informative karyotypes. Conventional karyotypes remain the best technical approach recommended for most of these subtypes. Interphase and/or metaphase FISH also represents a solid and rapid approach, because of the significant number of recurrent (sometimes specific) rearrangements of these entities. Next generation sequencing technologies contribute to enrich genomic data and substantially improve the understanding of oncogenic mechanisms underlying these lymphoid malignancies. Some molecular biomarkers are already part of the diagnostic process (for example, somatic mutation of MYD88 in Waldenström disease) thus reinforcing the essential principle of a multidisciplinary approach for the diagnosis of all the mature lymphoid malignancies.

  20. Treatment options for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other Epstein-Barr virus-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davis, J E; Moss, D J

    2004-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies that largely arise from a defect in EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity and function. Much work has focused on the reconstitution of CTL immunity to EBV in transplant patients, in whom immunosuppression modalities render them susceptible to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Adoptive transfer of autologous CTLs is effective at both preventing and curing PTLD in solid organ transplant recipients and can produce a long-term memory response and protection against recurring disease. In this review, the benefits and restrictions of administering EBV-specific CTLs for the treatment of PTLD are discussed and compared with emerging therapies including the generation of allogeneic human leukocyte antigen-matched CTL banks and the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, MabThera. Furthermore, studies involving other EBV-associated disorders have described the potential benefit of adoptive transfer of EBV-specific CTLs for Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chronic active EBV infection, and Burkitt's lymphoma. The challenges of tailor-making therapies for individual diseases and EBV antigen expression latencies are highlighted, in addition to considering vaccination strategies for optimal treatment. PMID:15009802

  1. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

    PubMed

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2015-12-15

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56(low) NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56(low) NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94(hi)/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality.

  2. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  3. Three Rwandan Children With Massive Splenomegaly and Epstein-Barr Virus-associated Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Case Presentations and the Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Klabanoff, DeAnna; Ball, Allison; Rutare, Samuel; McCall, Natalie; Blackall, Douglas P

    2016-07-01

    This report describes 3 Rwandan children with massive splenomegaly and pancytopenia who underwent splenectomy. Each was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder (EBV LPD) based on lymphocyte morphology, lymphocyte immunophenotype, and the results of EBV in situ hybridization studies. The differential diagnosis of splenomegaly, with a special emphasis on the sub-Saharan African context, is discussed along with EBV and associated disorders. These cases serve as a call to consider EBV LPD in the differential diagnosis of splenomegaly in children in whom common causes have been ruled out. PMID:27352192

  4. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  5. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder of the Thorax: CT and FDG-PET Features in a Single Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ga Young; Kim, Mi Young; Huh, Joo Rryung; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Shim, Tae Sun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the chest computed tomography (CT) and F-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomographic (FDG-PET) findings of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in the thorax. From November 2004 to February 2013, the cases of 12 adult patients (3 female and 9 male, age range 34–68, and median age 46 years) with proven PTLD were retrospectively reviewed. The transplanted organs included the kidney (5/12), liver (4/12), heart (1/12), combined kidney and pancreas (1/12), and hematopoietic stem cell (1/12). We investigated the relationship of the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) to the patients’ long-term follow-up, and evaluated the characteristics of the lesions on the chest CT and FDG-PET. The lesions were classified into 2 patterns: that of lymph node and lung involvement. The interval between the transplantation and the onset of PTLD was 2 to 128 months (median, 49). Positive EBV-encoded RNA in the pathologic specimens was found in 10 patients (83.3%). Eight patients were positive for EBV PCR in their blood, and 3 patients showed seroconversion without antiviral therapy. The responses to treatment were complete in 7 cases (58.3%), partial remission in 4 cases (33.3%), and undetermined in 1 case (8.3%). The more common chest CT patterns showed lymph node involvement (10/12) rather than lung involvement (3/12). The median maximum-standardized uptake value on the FDG-PET scans was 7.7 (range, 2.7–25.5). In patients with PTLD involving the thorax, lymphadenopathy was the more common manifestation on the chest CT rather than lung involvement. The lesions showed hypermetabolism on FDG-PET. PMID:26252295

  6. Hepatitis C virus syndrome: A constellation of organ- and non-organ specific autoimmune disorders, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Fallahi, Poupak; Piluso, Alessia; Antonelli, Alessandro; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-03-27

    The clinical course of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by possible development of both liver and extrahepatic disorders. The tropism of HCV for the lymphoid tissue is responsible for several immune-mediated disorders; a poly-oligoclonal B-lymphocyte expansion, commonly observed in a high proportion of patients with HCV infection, are responsible for the production of different autoantibodies and immune-complexes, such as mixed cryoglobulins. These serological alterations may characterize a variety of autoimmune or neoplastic diseases. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis due to small-vessel deposition of circulating mixed cryoglobulins is the prototype of HCV-driven immune-mediated and lymphoproliferative disorders; interestingly, in some cases the disease may evolve to frank malignant lymphoma. In addition, HCV shows an oncogenic potential as suggested by several clinico-epidemiological and laboratory studies; in addition to hepatocellular carcinoma that represents the most frequent HCV-related malignancy, a causative role of HCV has been largely demonstrated in a significant percentage of patients with isolated B-cells non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The same virus may be also involved in the pathogenesis of papillary thyroid cancer, a rare neoplastic condition that may complicate HCV-related thyroid involvement. Patients with HCV infection are frequently asymptomatic or may develop only hepatic alteration, while a limited but clinically relevant number can develop one or more autoimmune and/or neoplastic disorders. Given the large variability of their prevalence among patients' populations from different countries, it is possible to hypothesize a potential role of other co-factors, i.e., genetic and/or environmental, in the pathogenesis of HCV-related extra-hepatic diseases.

  7. Hepatitis C virus syndrome: A constellation of organ- and non-organ specific autoimmune disorders, B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo; Sebastiani, Marco; Giuggioli, Dilia; Colaci, Michele; Fallahi, Poupak; Piluso, Alessia; Antonelli, Alessandro; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-01-01

    The clinical course of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by possible development of both liver and extrahepatic disorders. The tropism of HCV for the lymphoid tissue is responsible for several immune-mediated disorders; a poly-oligoclonal B-lymphocyte expansion, commonly observed in a high proportion of patients with HCV infection, are responsible for the production of different autoantibodies and immune-complexes, such as mixed cryoglobulins. These serological alterations may characterize a variety of autoimmune or neoplastic diseases. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis due to small-vessel deposition of circulating mixed cryoglobulins is the prototype of HCV-driven immune-mediated and lymphoproliferative disorders; interestingly, in some cases the disease may evolve to frank malignant lymphoma. In addition, HCV shows an oncogenic potential as suggested by several clinico-epidemiological and laboratory studies; in addition to hepatocellular carcinoma that represents the most frequent HCV-related malignancy, a causative role of HCV has been largely demonstrated in a significant percentage of patients with isolated B-cells non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The same virus may be also involved in the pathogenesis of papillary thyroid cancer, a rare neoplastic condition that may complicate HCV-related thyroid involvement. Patients with HCV infection are frequently asymptomatic or may develop only hepatic alteration, while a limited but clinically relevant number can develop one or more autoimmune and/or neoplastic disorders. Given the large variability of their prevalence among patients’ populations from different countries, it is possible to hypothesize a potential role of other co-factors, i.e., genetic and/or environmental, in the pathogenesis of HCV-related extra-hepatic diseases. PMID:25848462

  8. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes.

  9. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  10. No evidence of HTLV-I proviral integration in lymphoproliferative disorders associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Schaffer, J. M.; Boni, R.; Dummer, R.; Burg, G.; Takeshita, M.; Kikuchi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported detection of HTLV-I genetic sequences in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HTLV-I was detectable in lesional tissues of patients suffering from diseases known to be associated with CTCL. Thirty-five cases were obtained from diverse geographical locations including Ohio, California, Switzerland, and Japan. Six of them had concurrent CTCL. Cases were analyzed using a combination of genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ Southern blot, dot blot, and Southern blot analyses. All assays were specific for HTLV-I provirus. Sensitivity ranged from approximately 10(-6) for PCR-based studies to 10(-2) for unamplified genomic blotting. Lesional DNA from patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (fourteen cases), Hodgkin's disease (twelve cases), and CD30+ large-cell lymphoma (nine cases) was tested for the HTLV-I proviral pX region using a genomic PCR assay followed by confirmatory Southern blot analysis with a nested oligonucleotide pX probe. All cases were uniformly negative. All of the Hodgkin's disease cases, eight of the large-cell lymphoma cases, and six of the lymphomatoid papulosis cases were then subjected to dot blot analysis of genomic DNA using a full-length HTLV-I proviral DNA probe that spans all regions of the HTLV-I genome. Again, all cases were negative. Finally, eleven of the Hodgkin's disease cases were also subjected to Southern blot analysis of EcoRI-digested genomic DNA using the same full-length HTLV-I probe. Once again, all cases were negative. These findings indicated that, despite utilization of a variety of sensitive and specific molecular biological methods, HTLV-I genetic sequences were not detectable in patients with CTCL-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. These results strongly suggest that the HTLV-I retrovirus is not involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2

  11. Fc Receptor-Like Proteins in Pathophysiology of B-cell Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Mollie; Bryant, John Matthew; Sutkowski, Natalie; Haque, Azizul

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family of Fc receptor-like (FcRL) proteins, homologous to FcγRI, have been identified by multiple research groups. Consequently, they have been described using multiple nomenclatures including Fc receptor homologs (FcRH), immunoglobulin superfamily receptor translocation-associated genes (IRTA), immunoglobulin-Fc-gp42-related genes (IFGP), Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase anchor proteins (SPAP), and B cell cross-linked by anti-immunoglobulin M-activating sequences (BXMAS). They are now referred to under a unified nomenclature as FCRL. Eight different human FCRL genes have been identified, all of which appear to be related to the genes of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) of cellular adhesion molecules. These type 1 transmembrane glycoproteins are composed of different combinations of 5 types of immunoglobulin-like domains, with each protein consisting of 3 to 9 domains, and no individual domain type conserved throughout all of the FCRL proteins. Ligands for the majority of the FCRLs remain unknown. In general, FCRL expression is restricted to lymphocytes and is primarily expressed in B-lymphocytes, supporting FCRL’s involvement in a variety of immune disorders. Most FCRLs functionally repress B-cell activation; however, they might have dual roles in lymphocyte functions as these proteins often possess immunoreceptor tyrosine activation (ITAM) and inhibitory (ITIM) motif elements. The biological functions of these newly recognized FCRL proteins are just beginning to emerge, and might provide the insight necessary for understanding pathophysiology of lymphocyte disorders and treating different immune diseases. PMID:27446638

  12. Monocytes promote tumor cell survival in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and are impaired in their ability to differentiate into mature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Ryan A.; Wada, David A.; Ziesmer, Steven C.; Elsawa, Sherine F.; Comfere, Nneka I.; Dietz, Allan B.; Novak, Anne J.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Pittelkow, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of nonmalignant cells present in the tumor microenvironment promotes tumorigenesis by stimulating tumor cell growth and metastasis or suppressing host immunity. The role of such stromal cells in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is incompletely understood. Monocyte-derived cells (MDCs), including professional antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs), play a central role in T-cell biology. Here, we provide evidence that monocytes promote the survival of malignant T cells and demonstrate that MDCs are abundant within the tumor microenvironment of T cell–derived lymphomas. Malignant T cells were observed to remain viable during in vitro culture with autologous monocytes, but cell death was significantly increased after monocyte depletion. Furthermore, monocytes prevent the induction of cell death in T-cell lymphoma lines in response to either serum starvation or doxorubicin, and promote the engraftment of these cells in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. Monocytes are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment by CCL5 (RANTES), where their differentiation into mature DCs is impaired by tumor-derived interleukin-10. Collectively, the data presented demonstrate a previously undescribed role for monocytes in T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:19671921

  13. Extranodal large B cell lymphoma of the anterior maxilla. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Webber, Brian; Webber, Mariel; Keinan, David

    2015-01-01

    In the oral cavity, lymphoproliferative disorders can manifest in various ways, often as an extranodal externalization. In the case presented here, it was a B cell lymphoma originating in the periapical bone of the anterior maxilla. X-ray revealed a periapical radiolucency associated with an intact tooth with no decay, fillings or history of trauma. The tooth tested non-vital. After root canal treatment, an apicoectomy was performed with a biopsy. The most common diagnosis would be of dental etiology. The pathology report revealed a non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma. Most often, this disease appears as localized dental or oral pathology. Non-specific signs and symptoms present in association with lymphoproliferative disorders include lymphadenopathy, trismus, pain, swelling, sinusitis, fever, sepsis, prosthetic instability and paresthesia. Early detection results in decreased morbidity and a better prognosis for the patient. PMID:25707167

  14. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  15. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged.

  16. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  17. EORTC, ISCL, and USCLC consensus recommendations for the treatment of primary cutaneous CD30-positive lymphoproliferative disorders: lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltz, Katrin; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Cozzio, Antonio; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L.; Bagot, Martine; Olsen, Elise; Kim, Youn H.; Dummer, Reinhard; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Whittaker, Sean; Hodak, Emmilia; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Berti, Emilio; Horwitz, Steve; Prince, H. Miles; Guitart, Joan; Estrach, Teresa; Sanches, José A.; Duvic, Madeleine; Ranki, Annamari; Dreno, Brigitte; Ostheeren-Michaelis, Sonja; Knobler, Robert; Wood, Gary; Willemze, Rein

    2011-01-01

    Primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30+ LPDs) are the second most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and include lymphomatoid papulosis and primary cutaneous anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Despite the anaplastic cytomorphology of tumor cells that suggest an aggressive course, CD30+ LPDs are characterized by an excellent prognosis. Although a broad spectrum of therapeutic strategies has been reported, these have been limited mostly to small retrospective cohort series or case reports, and only very few prospective controlled or multicenter studies have been performed, which results in a low level of evidence for most therapies. The response rates to treatment, recurrence rates, and outcome have not been analyzed in a systematic review. Moreover, international guidelines for staging and treatment of CD30+ LPDs have not yet been presented. Based on a literature analysis and discussions, recommendations were elaborated by a multidisciplinary expert panel of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas, and the United States Cutaneous Lymphoma Consortium. The recommendations represent the state-of-the-art management of CD30+ LPDs and include definitions for clinical endpoints as well as response criteria for future clinical trials in CD30+ LPDs. PMID:21841159

  18. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD.

  19. SGN-35 in CD30-positive Lymphoproliferative Disorders (ALCL), Mycosis Fungoides (MF), and Extensive Lymphomatoid Papulosis (LyP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    CD-30 Positive Anaplastic Large T-cell Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell; Lymphomatoid Papulosis; Mycosis Fungoides; Skin Lymphoma; Cutaneous Lymphomas; Lymphoma; Hematologic Disorder

  20. Combined gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy for detection of cardiac lymphoproliferative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Rapoport, F.; Boucher, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    Two cases are reported in which combined radionuclide imaging using gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy aided in evaluating lymphomatous involvement of the heart and distinguishing tumor involvement from other cardiac disorders.

  1. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F; Maggadottir, S Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T; Nair, Rajan P; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Orange, Jordan S; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B-cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0 × 10(-9)) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P=4.8 × 10(-16)). Clec16a knockdown (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared with controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition. PMID:25891430

  2. Association of CLEC16A with human common variable immunodeficiency disorder and role in murine B cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Jørgensen, Silje F.; Maggadottir, S. Melkorka; Bakay, Marina; Warnatz, Klaus; Glessner, Joseph; Pandey, Rahul; Salzer, Ulrich; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Goldacker, Sigune; Buchta, Mary; Witte, Torsten; Padyukov, Leonid; Videm, Vibeke; Folseraas, Trine; Atschekzei, Faranaz; Elder, James T.; Nair, Rajan P.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Gieger, Christian; Nöthen, Markus M; Büning, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Orange, Jordan S.; Fevang, Børre; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Aukrust, Pål; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.; Grimbacher, Bodo; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hammarström, Lennart; Ellinghaus, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorder (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency in adults, characterized by B cell abnormalities and inadequate antibody response. CVID patients have considerable autoimmune comorbidity and we therefore hypothesized that genetic susceptibility to CVID may overlap with autoimmune disorders. Here, in the largest genetic study performed in CVID to date, we compare 778 CVID cases with 10,999 controls across 123,127 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Immunochip. We identify the first non-HLA genome-wide significant risk locus at CLEC16A (rs17806056, P=2.0×10−9) and confirm the previously reported human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations on chromosome 6p21 (rs1049225, P =4.8×10−16). Clec16a knock down (KD) mice showed reduced number of B cells and elevated IgM levels compared to controls, suggesting that CLEC16A may be involved in immune regulatory pathways of relevance to CVID. In conclusion, the CLEC16A associations in CVID represent the first robust evidence of non-HLA associations in this immunodeficiency condition. PMID:25891430

  3. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related lymphoproliferative disorder with subsequent EBV-negative T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tao, Q; Srivastava, G; Loke, S L; Liang, R H; Liu, Y T; Ho, F C

    1994-07-01

    A 58-year-old Chinese man presented initially with generalized lymphadenopathy, and lymph-node biopsy showed disturbed architecture with preponderance of large B-blasts mixed with numerous CD8+ T lymphocytes, consistent with an acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Immunohistological and gene rearrangement studies confirmed the absence of clonal T or B cells. Polyclonal EBV with lytic infection was detected by Southern blot hybridization (SoBH). Expression of EBV proteins (EBNA2, LMP and ZEBRA) was detected in a proportion of cells by immunostaining. EBV-lytic proteins EA-D, VCA, MA were also detected in rare scattered cells. Double immunostaining showed that the LMP-positive cells were of B and of T phenotype: 73% CD19+, 26% CD2+, 23% CD3+, 8% CD4+, 17% CD8+. After biopsy, there was spontaneous regression of lymph-node enlargement, but lymphadenopathy recurred 8 months later, and the second lymph-node biopsy showed T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by detection of clonally rearranged T-cell-receptor beta-chain gene. However, EBV genome could not be detected in the second biopsy by SoBH, in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded EBER RNA, and immunostaining for EBNA2, LMP and ZEBRA was also negative. This case is of special interest because an EBV-negative T-cell lymphoma developed shortly after an acute episode of EBV-related lymphoproliferation, even though many EBV-positive T cells were detected during the acute episode. EBV was apparently not a direct cause of the lymphoma, but the close temporal association of the 2 lesions supports the hypothesis that EBV can act as a co-factor in lymphomagenesis.

  4. Methotrexate-associated primary cutaneous CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case illustration and a brief review.

    PubMed

    Claudino, Wederson M; Gibson, Bradley; Tse, William; Krem, Maxwell; Grewal, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used anti-metabolite agent. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been documented with the prolonged use of immunosuppressive medications such as MTX. This is thought to be the result of immune dysregulation and/or chronic immune stimulation. Most cases of LPDs regress following withdrawal of the offending immunosuppressive agent. We present an interesting and rare case of CD30 and EBV positive CD8 primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) in a 66-year-old African American woman. Patient had been on MTX for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which was stopped after the patient was evaluated at our institution. Patient had an incredible response to stopping immunosuppression with spontaneous regression of skin lesions and disappearance of clonal malignant cell population as evidenced on serial biopsy specimens. Primary cutaneous CD30+ LPDs constitute about 30% of the primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTLs) and includes entities such as lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) and other CD30+ borderline LPDs. Histopathological criteria in addition to CD30 positivity is important for identification of these conditions. Treatment options include "wait and see", phototherapy, radiotherapy, topical agents, systemic therapy and surgical resection. Prognosis is excellent and most cases resolve spontaneously on withdrawal of immunosuppression. Refractory cases may require aggressive local treatment or systemic therapy. Brentuximab Vedontin, an anti-CD30 antibody drug conjugate (ADC), may provide additional therapeutic option in refractory cases. PMID:27335685

  5. Methotrexate-associated primary cutaneous CD30-positive cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: a case illustration and a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Wederson M; Gibson, Bradley; Tse, William; Krem, Maxwell; Grewal, Jaspreet

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a commonly used anti-metabolite agent. Increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been documented with the prolonged use of immunosuppressive medications such as MTX. This is thought to be the result of immune dysregulation and/or chronic immune stimulation. Most cases of LPDs regress following withdrawal of the offending immunosuppressive agent. We present an interesting and rare case of CD30 and EBV positive CD8 primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) in a 66-year-old African American woman. Patient had been on MTX for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which was stopped after the patient was evaluated at our institution. Patient had an incredible response to stopping immunosuppression with spontaneous regression of skin lesions and disappearance of clonal malignant cell population as evidenced on serial biopsy specimens. Primary cutaneous CD30+ LPDs constitute about 30% of the primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTLs) and includes entities such as lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP), primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (PC-ALCL) and other CD30+ borderline LPDs. Histopathological criteria in addition to CD30 positivity is important for identification of these conditions. Treatment options include “wait and see”, phototherapy, radiotherapy, topical agents, systemic therapy and surgical resection. Prognosis is excellent and most cases resolve spontaneously on withdrawal of immunosuppression. Refractory cases may require aggressive local treatment or systemic therapy. Brentuximab Vedontin, an anti-CD30 antibody drug conjugate (ADC), may provide additional therapeutic option in refractory cases. PMID:27335685

  6. Checking whether there is an increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other cancers with specific modern immunosuppression regimens in renal transplantation: Protocol for a network meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing renal transplant procedures require multi-agent immunosuppressive regimens both short term (induction phase) and long term (maintenance phase) to minimize the risk of organ rejection. There are several drug classes and agents for immunosuppression. Use of these agents may increase the risk of different harms including not only infections, but also malignancies including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. There is a need to identify which regimens minimize the risk of such outcomes. The objective of this systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies is to explore whether certain modern regimens of immunosuppression used to prevent organ rejection in renal transplant patients are associated with an increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other malignancies. Methods/design ‘Modern’ regimens were defined to be those evaluated in controlled studies beginning in 1990 or later. An electronic literature search of Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials has been designed by an experienced information specialist and peer reviewed by a second information specialist. Study selection and data collection will be performed by two reviewers. The outcomes of interest will include post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and other incident forms of malignancy occurring in adult renal transplant patients. Network meta-analyses of data from randomized and observational studies will be performed where judged appropriate based on a review of the clinical and methodological features of included studies. A sequential approach to meta-analysis will be used to combine data from different designs. Discussion Our systematic review will include both single-agent and multi-agent modern pharmacotherapy regimens in patients undergoing renal transplantation. It will synthesize malignancy outcomes. Our work will also add to the development of methods for

  7. CD3-CD4+ lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome: nodal and extranodal histopathological and immunophenotypic features of a peripheral indolent clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Guillaume; Copin, Marie-Christine; Roumier, Christophe; Aubert, Hélène; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Grardel, Nathalie; Poulain, Stéphanie; Staumont-Sallé, Delphine; Seneschal, Julien; Salles, Gilles; Ghomari, Kamel; Terriou, Louis; Leclech, Christian; Morati-Hafsaoui, Chafika; Morschhauser, Franck; Lambotte, Olivier; Ackerman, Félix; Trauet, Jacques; Geffroy, Sandrine; Dumezy, Florent; Capron, Monique; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Taieb, Alain; Hatron, Pierre-Yves; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Hachulla, Eric; Prin, Lionel; Labalette, Myriam; Launay, David; Preudhomme, Claude; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel

    2015-08-01

    The CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by hypereosinophilia and clonal circulating CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma has been described during this disease course, and we observed in our cohort of 23 patients 2 cases of angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. We focus here on histopathological (n=12 patients) and immunophenotypic (n=15) characteristics of CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome. Atypical CD4(+) T cells lymphoid infiltrates were found in 10 of 12 CD3(-)CD4(+) L-HES patients, in lymph nodes (n=4 of 4 patients), in skin (n=9 of 9) and other extra-nodal tissues (gut, lacrymal gland, synovium). Lymph nodes displayed infiltrates limited to the interfollicular areas or even an effacement of nodal architecture, associated with proliferation of arborizing high endothelial venules and increased follicular dendritic cell meshwork. Analysis of 2 fresh skin samples confirmed the presence of CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells. Clonal T cells were detected in at least one tissue in 8 patients, including lymph nodes (n=4 of 4): the same clonal T cells were detected in blood and in at least one biopsy, with a maximum delay of 23 years between samples. In the majority of cases, circulating CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells were CD2(hi) (n=9 of 14), CD5(hi) (n=12 of 14), and CD7(-)(n=4 of 14) or CD7(low) (n=10 of 14). Angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma can also present with CD3(-)CD4(+) T cells; despite other common histopathological and immunophenotypic features, CD10 expression and follicular helper T-cell markers were not detected in lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome patients, except in both patients who developed angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, and only at T-cell lymphoma diagnosis. Taken together, persistence of tissular clonal T cells and histopathological features define CD3(-)CD4(+) lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome as a peripheral indolent clonal T-cell lymphoproliferative

  8. Mycobacterium haemophilum as the Initial Presentation of a B-Cell Lymphoma in a Liver Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, T.; Lynn, M.; Cavazza, A.; Sames, E.; Hughes, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with pustular lesions of her face, trunk, and limbs and an acute arthritis of the knees and elbows. She had a complex medical background and had been on immunosuppressants for three years after a liver transplant. Tissue samples from her skin lesions and synovial fluid showed acid-fast bacilli. Mycobacterium haemophilum, an atypical mycobacteria, was later grown on culture. During her treatment with combination antibiotic therapy, she developed a pronounced generalised lymphadenopathy. Histology showed features of a diffuse B-cell lymphoma, a posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). PMID:24523979

  9. Functional analysis of the CD4(+) T-cell response to Epstein-Barr virus: T-cell-mediated activation of resting B cells and induction of viral BZLF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Fu, Z; Cannon, M J

    2000-07-01

    In contrast to the major role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cell responses in immunosurveillance, recent studies have offered the apparently paradoxical suggestion that development of EBV-driven human B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and tumors in SCID/hu mice is dependent on the presence of T cells, in particular CD4(+) T cells. This study presents a functional analysis of the CD4(+) T-cell response to EBV and shows that while CD4(+) T cells may be cytotoxic, they also express Th2 cytokines and CD40 ligand (gp39) and possess B-cell helper function. We show that EBV-specific CD4(+) T cells can provide non-HLA-restricted help for activation of resting B cells via a gp39-CD40-dependent pathway and are able to induce expression of BZLF1, a viral lytic cycle transactivator in latently infected resting B cells, ultimately resulting in rapid outgrowth of transformed B-cell colonies. These results support the proposal that CD4(+) T cells may play a key role in reactivation of latent EBV infection and may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders.

  10. Efficient Infection of a Human B Cell Line with Cell-Free Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Dollery, Stephen J.; Santiago-Crespo, Rey J.; Kardava, Lela; Moir, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is causatively linked to two B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, multicentric Castleman's disease and primary effusion lymphoma. Latently infected B cells are a major KSHV reservoir, and virus activation from tonsillar B cells can result in salivary shedding and virus transmission. Paradoxically, human B cells (primary and continuous) are notoriously refractory to infection, thus posing a major obstacle to the study of KSHV in this cell type. By performing a strategic search of human B cell lymphoma lines, we found that MC116 cells were efficiently infected by cell-free KSHV. Upon exposure to recombinant KSHV.219, enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter expression was detected in 17 to 20% of MC116 cells. Latent-phase transcription and protein synthesis were detected by reverse transcription-PCR and detection of latency-associated nuclear antigen expression, respectively, in cell lysates and individual cells. Selection based on the puromycin resistance gene in KSHV.219 yielded cultures with all cells infected. After repeated passaging of the selected KSHV-infected cells without puromycin, latent KSHV was maintained in a small fraction of cells. Infected MC116 cells could be induced into lytic phase with histone deacetylase inhibitors, as is known for latently infected non-B cell lines, and also selectively by the B cell-specific pathway involving B cell receptor cross-linking. Lytic-phase transition was documented by red fluorescent protein reporter expression, late structural glycoprotein (K8.1A, gH) detection, and infectious KSHV production. MC116 cells were CD27−/CD10+, characteristic of transitional B cells. These findings represent an important step in the establishment of an efficient continuous B cell line model to study the biologically relevant steps of KSHV infection. IMPORTANCE PMID:24257608

  11. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Issues in diagnosis of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms involving the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Report on the Bone Marrow Workshop of the XVIIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Fend, Falko; Kremer, Marcus; Orazi, Attilio; Safali, Mükerrem; van der Walt, Jon

    2016-09-01

    Small B cell lymphoid neoplasms are the most common lymphoproliferative disorders involving peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The Bone Marrow Workshop (BMW) organized by the European Bone Marrow Working Group (EBMWG) of the European Association for Haematopathology (EAHP) during the XVIIth EAHP Meeting in Istanbul, October 2014, was dedicated to discussion of cases illustrating how the recent advances in immunophenotyping, molecular techniques and cytogenetics provide better understanding and classification of these entities. Submitted cases were grouped into following categories: (i) cases illustrating diagnostic difficulties in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); (ii) cases of BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms other than CLL; (iii) transformation of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms in the BM; and (iv) multiclonality and composite lymphomas in the BM. This report summarizes presented cases and conclusions of the BMW and provides practical recommendations for classification of the BM manifestations of small B cell lymphoid neoplasms based on the current state of knowledge. PMID:27208429

  13. Frequency of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in relatives of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Franco Alzate, Catalina; Rendón Henao, Javier; Torres Hernández, José Domingo; Jaramillo Arbelaez, Patricia Elena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis is a symptom free condition characterized by the circulation of small clonal population of B lymphocytes in peripheral blood (less than 5x109/L) expressing an immunophenotype similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Different studies based on big hospital series have manifested a higher risk in subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis to progress to a chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The behavior of this hematologic entity is unknown therefore its frequency in sporadic chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient relatives was determined. Methods: Transversal descriptive study, 8 color flow cytometry was performed using two of the tubes of the Euro Flow recommended panel, with modifications, for the diagnose of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of B lymphocytes; besides, a fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed. univariate and bivariate analyses of the information were performed. Results: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis frequency found in 51 analyzed relatives was 2%, it was a female participant, 59 years old, with a total leukocyte count of 7.7x109/L and a B lymphocyte count of 0.124x109/L; from these, 0.04x109/L were clonal cells with restrictions of the kappa light chain. Rearrangements of the IGH gene (14q32) were found. Conclusion: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis was detected in one relative of a patient with sporadic chronic lymphocytic leukemia in a frequency similar to the one reported in general population. PMID:27546929

  14. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in patient after treatment of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Skugor, Nives Dzeko; Perić, Zinaida; Vrhovac, Radovan; Radić-Kristo, Delfa; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Jaksić, Branimir

    2010-03-01

    Relatively few cases of Epstein-Barr (EBV)-positive B-cell lymphomas arising in patients with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) have been reported. We report a case of AITL in which diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arose 13 months after the initial diagnosis of AITL. In a 36-year-old female patient, evaluated for moderate leukocytosis, peripheral and abdominal lymphadenopathy AITL was diagnosed in March 2008, based on results of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the enlarged cervical and supraclavicular lymph nodes. The diagnosis was also confirmed by immunophenotyping and histopathology of the cervical lymph nodes. The patient initially recieved FED chemotherapy (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone) followed by elective autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In April 2009 the patient was hospitalized because of fever, pancytopenia, hyperbilirubinemia and peripheral lymphadenopathy. The FNAC of the enlarged cervical lymph nodes was performed again, but this time the smears were composed of polymorphous population of lymphocytes with the predomination of large cells, CD20+ on immunocytochemical stains. The immunophenotyping confirmed a predomination of monoclonal mature B-cells. Patient had high number of EBV DNA copies in plasma and serologic testing revealed increased titers of EBV VCA IgG and EBV EBNA IgG. CHOP-R chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone and rituximab) was then administered, resulting in good partial response of the disease. Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation performed thereafter, resulted in complete remission of the disease. AITL is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder in which the neoplastic T-cells represent the minority of the lymph node cell population and almost all cases harbor EBV-infected B-cells. Various authors postulated that immunodeficiency in AITL patients together with immunosuppressive effects of cytotoxic drugs, may be responsible for EBV

  15. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  16. Disorders of B cells and helper T cells in the pathogenesis of the immunoglobulin deficiency of patients with ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, T A; Broder, S; Goldman, C K; Frost, K; Korsmeyer, S J; Medici, M A

    1983-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the immunoglobulin deficiency of 20 patients with ataxia telangiectasia was studied using an in vitro immunoglobulin biosynthesis system. 10 patients had no detectable IgA in their serum as assessed by radial diffusion in agar and 3 had a reduced serum IgA concentration. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 17 of the patients and 17 normal controls were cultured with pokeweed mitogen for 12 d and the immunoglobulin in the supernatants measured. The immunoglobulin synthesis was below the lower limit of the normal 95% confidence interval for IgM in 5 patients, for IgG in 8, and for IgA in 14. The mononuclear cells from 9 of the 10 patients with a serum IgA concentration less than 0.1 mg/ml failed to synthesize IgA in vitro. None of the patients manifested excessive suppressor cell activity. All patients had reduced but measurable helper T cell activity for immunoglobulin synthesis by co-cultured normal pokeweed mitogen-stimulated B cells (geometric mean 22% of normal). Furthermore, the addition of normal irradiated T cells to patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells led to an augmentation of IgM synthesis in 15 of 17 and to increased IgG synthesis in 9 of the 17 patients studied, including 9 of the 12 patients who had synthesized IgG before the addition of the irradiated T cells. In addition, IgA synthesis was increased in all eight patients examined that had serum IgA concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/ml. These studies suggest that a helper T cell defect contributes to the diminished immunoglobulin synthesis. However, a helper T cell defect does not appear to be the sole cause since there was no IgA synthesis by the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 9 of the 10 patients with a profoundly reduced serum IgA even when co-cultured with normal T cells. Furthermore, the cells of the nine patients with profoundly reduced IgA levels examined also failed to produce IgA when stimulated with the relatively helper T cell-independent polyclonal

  17. Role of EBNA-3 Family Proteins in EBV Associated B-cell Lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Shaoni; Ghosh Roy, Shatadru; Bose, Priyanka; Saha, Abhik

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly ubiquitous in human population and establishes a lifelong asymptomatic infection within the infected host unless the immune system is compromised. Following initial infection in the oropharyngeal epithelial cells, EBV primarily infects naive B-lymphocytes and develops a number of B-cell lymphomas particularly in immune-deficient individuals. In vitro, EBV can also infect and subsequently transform quiescent B-lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) resembling EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disorders in which a subset of latent transcripts are detected. Genetic studies revealed that EBNA-3 family comprising of three adjacent genes in the viral genome—EBNA-3A and -3C, but not -3B, are critical for B-cell transformation. Nevertheless, all three proteins appear to significantly contribute to maintain the overall proliferation and viability of transformed cells, suggesting a critical role in lymphoma development. Apart from functioning as important viral transcriptional regulators, EBNA-3 proteins associate with many cellular proteins in different signaling networks, providing a suitable platform for lifelong survival of the virus and concurrent lymphoma development in the infected host. The chapter describes the function of each these EBV nuclear antigen 3 proteins employed by the virus as a means to understand viral pathogenesis of several EBV-associated B-cell malignancies. PMID:27092119

  18. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia: diagnosis, natural history, and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) is defined as the presence of a clonal B-cell population in the peripheral blood with fewer than 5 × 109/L B-cells and no other signs of a lymphoproliferative disorder. The majority of cases of MBL have the immunophenotype of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). MBL can be categorized as either low count or high count based on whether the B-cell count is above or below 0.5 × 109/L. Low-count MBL can be detected in ∼5% of adults over the age of 40 years when assessed using standard-sensitivity flow cytometry assays. A number of biological and genetic characteristics distinguish low-count from high-count MBL. Whereas low-count MBL rarely progresses to CLL, high-count MBL progresses to CLL requiring therapy at a rate of 1% to 2% per year. High-count MBL is distinguished from Rai 0 CLL based on whether the B-cell count is above or below 5 × 109/L. Although individuals with both high-count MBL and CLL Rai stage 0 are at increased risk of infections and second cancers, the risk of progression requiring treatment and the potential to shorten life expectancy are greater for CLL. This review highlights challenging questions regarding the classification, risk stratification, management, and supportive care of patients with MBL and CLL. PMID:26065657

  19. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  20. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  1. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-07-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin's lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they seem to

  2. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  3. Updated Understanding of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Huang, Ping; Yang, Ye; Hao, Mu; Peng, Hongwei; Li, Fei

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a disorder characterized by immune dysregulation due to disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis, is mainly resulted from the mutations in FAS-mediated apoptotic pathway. In addition, other mutations of the genes such as Fas-ligand (FASLG), Caspase 10 (CASP10) and Caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have also been observed in a small number of patients with ALPS or ALPS-related disorders. However, approximately 20-30% of patients with ALPS have unidentified defect. Its clinical manifestations observed in multiple family members include unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias such as thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and anemia due to excessive production of antibodies by lymphocytes, elevated number of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. As a very rare disease, ALPS was first characterized in the early 1990s. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have been reported till now; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years. ALPS has historically considered as a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, however, recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previous thought because adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized and more adult ALPS patients are diagnosed. The new genetic and biological insights have improved the understanding of ALPS and a number of targeted therapeutic strategies such as mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus, and pentostatin have been successfully applied in ALPS patients with promising treatment efficacy. This article comprehensively reviews the clinical and laboratory manifestations, new research advances in the molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatments of this disorder.

  4. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  5. B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma linked to Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Million, Matthieu; Audoly, Gilles; Gorse, Audrey; Dutronc, Hervé; Roland, Gauthier; Dekel, Michal; Moreno, Asuncion; Cammilleri, Serge; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Protopopescu, Camelia; Ruminy, Philippe; Lepidi, Hubert; Nadel, Bertrand; Mege, Jean-Louis; Xerri, Luc; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can induce human lymphomas, whereas lymphoproliferative disorders have been described in patients with Q fever. We observed a lymphoma in a patient with Q fever that prompted us to investigate the association between the 2 diseases. We screened 1468 consecutive patients of the 2004 to 2014 French National Referral Center for Q fever database. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) were calculated comparatively to the 2012 Francim Registry. The presence of Coxiella burnetii was tested using immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization using a specific 16S ribosomal RNA probe and genomic DNA probe. Seven patients (0.48%) presented mature B-cell lymphoma consisting of 6 DLBCL and 1 FL. An excess risk of DLBCL and FL was found in Q fever patients compared with the general population (SIR [95% confidence interval], 25.4 [11.4-56.4] and 6.7 [0.9-47.9], respectively). C burnetii was detected in CD68(+) macrophages within both lymphoma and lymphadenitis tissues but localization in CD123(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) was found only in lymphoma tissues. Q fever patients with persistent focalized infection were found more at risk of lymphoma (hazard ratio, 9.35 [1.10-79.4]). Interleukin-10 (IL10) overproduction (P = .0003) was found in patients developing lymphoma. These results suggest that C burnetii should be added to the list of bacteria that promote human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, possibly by the infection of pDCs and IL10 overproduction. Screening for early lymphoma diagnosis should be considered in the management of patients with Q fever, especially those with persistent focalized infections. PMID:26463422

  6. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-09

    Immune Deficiency Disorders:; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorder:; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  7. EBV+ cutaneous B-cell lymphoproliferation of the leg in an elderly patient with mycosis fungoides and methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Thierry; Cairoli, Anne; Benhattar, Jean; Spring, Philipp; Hohl, Daniel; de Leval, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with a 5-year history of mycosis fungoides (MF) who had received several lines of therapy, including intravenous courses of Methotrexate (MTX) for the past 2 years, went on to develop several ulcerated cutaneous nodules on the left leg. Biopsy revealed diffuse sheets of EBV-positive large B cells (CD20+ CD30 ± IgM Lambda), with an angiocentric distribution and a monoclonal IGH gene rearrangement. Although the pathological features were diagnostic for an EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), several possibilities could be considered for assignment to a specific entity: EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly, methotrexate-induced lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD), lymphomatoid granulomatosis, or the more recently described EBV-positive mucocutaneous ulcer. The development of EBV+ lymphoproliferations has been reported in two other patients with MF under MTX, and occurred as skin lesions of the leg in one of these and in the current case, which may question the relatedness to primary cutaneous DLCBL, leg-type. PMID:23031074

  8. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  9. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients.

  10. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetskiy, Vadim; Klapper, Wolfram; Probatova, Natalya; Vasilyev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan) of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone), the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS. PMID:26998372

  11. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cells Requires IRF4 but Not XBP-1

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Caline G.; Rangaswamy, Udaya Shankari; Wakeman, Brian S.; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses display tropism for B cells and, like all known herpesviruses, exhibit distinct lytic and latent life cycles. One well-established observation among members of the gammaherpesvirus family is the link between viral reactivation from latently infected B cells and plasma cell differentiation. Importantly, a number of studies have identified a potential role for a CREB/ATF family member, X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), in trans-activating the immediate early BZLF-1 or BRLF1/gene 50 promoters of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), respectively. XBP-1 is required for the unfolded protein response and has been identified as a critical transcription factor in plasma cells. Here, we demonstrate that XBP-1 is capable of trans-activating the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) RTA promoter in vitro, consistent with previous observations for EBV and KSHV. However, we show that in vivo there does not appear to be a requirement for XBP-1 expression in B cells for virus reactivation. The MHV68 M2 gene product under some experimental conditions plays an important role in virus reactivation from B cells. M2 has been shown to drive B cell differentiation to plasma cells, as well as interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, both of which are dependent on M2 induction of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression. IRF4 is required for plasma cell differentiation, and consistent with a role for plasma cells in MHV68 reactivation from B cells, we show that IRF4 expression in B cells is required for efficient reactivation of MHV68 from splenocytes. Thus, the latter analyses are consistent with previous studies linking plasma cell differentiation to MHV68 reactivation from B cells. The apparent independence of MHV68 reactivation from XBP-1 expression in plasma cells may reflect redundancy among CREB/ATF family members or the involvement of other plasma cell-specific transcription factors. Regardless, these findings

  12. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    PubMed Central

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the development of specialized T cells called natural killer T cells. The SAP protein also helps control ... PubMed GeneReview: Lymphoproliferative Disease, X-Linked Latour S. Natural killer T cells and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. Curr ...

  14. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  15. Constitutive autophagy contributes to resistance to TP53-mediated apoptosis in Epstein-Barr virus-positive latency III B-cell lymphoproliferations.

    PubMed

    Pujals, Anaïs; Favre, Loëtitia; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Robert, Aude; Meurice, Guillaume; Le Gentil, Marion; Chelouah, Sonia; Martin-Garcia, Nadine; Le Cam, Eric; Guettier, Catherine; Raphaël, Martine; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Gaulard, Philippe; Codogno, Patrice; Lipinski, Marc; Wiels, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with various lymphoproliferative disorders and lymphomas. We have previously demonstrated that treating wild-type TP53-expressing B cell lines with the TP53 pathway activator nutlin-3 induced apoptosis in EBV-negative and EBV-positive latency I cells whereas EBV-positive latency III cells remained much more apoptosis-resistant. Here, we report a constitutively high level of autophagy in these resistant cells which express high levels of the proautophagic protein BECN1/Beclin 1 based, at least in part, on the activation of the NFKB signaling pathway by the viral protein LMP1. Following treatment with nutlin-3, several autophagy-stimulating genes were upregulated both in EBV-negative and EBV-positive latency III cells. However the process of autophagy was only triggered in the latter and was associated with an upregulation of SESN1/sestrin 1 and inhibition of MTOR more rapid than in EBV-negative cells. A treatment with chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, potentiated the apoptotic effect of nutlin-3, particularly in those EBV-positive cells which were resistant to apoptosis induced by nutlin-3 alone, thereby showing that autophagy participates in this resistant phenotype. Finally, using immunohistochemical staining, clinical samples from various B cell lymphoproliferations with the EBV-positive latency II or III phenotype were found to harbor a constitutively active autophagy.

  16. Lymphoproliferative disease after lung and heart-lung transplantation: first description in Spain.

    PubMed

    Morales, P; Torres, J; Pérez-Enguix, D; Solé, A; Pastor, A; Segura, A; Zurbano, F

    2005-11-01

    Lymphoproliferative syndromes are the most common tumors in transplant recipients. More than 90% of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative syndromes (PTLS) are considered to be associated with Epstein-Barr virus, and 86% are of the B-cell line. Histopathology ranges from polymorphic-reactive to monomorphic forms. Clonality should be studied using molecular biology techniques. Clinically, a differentiation is usually made between early PTLS (occurring within 1 year after transplantation) and late PTLS, which occur as localized or disseminated nodal lymphomas. In localized forms, immunosuppression should be discontinued or decreased, and the involved area should be subsequently resected or irradiated. In disseminated cases, immunosuppression should be decreased and administration of acyclovir/ganciclovir should be considered. If this is not effective, treatment should be started with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (rituximab). If no response occurs, use of chemotherapy, possibly with interferon, should be considered. Our aim was to report the incidence, clinical signs, and treatment in a series of patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx).

  17. Colonic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a liver transplant patient with historically very low tacrolimus levels.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher M; Lamzabi, Ihab; Bartels, Anne K; Jakate, Shriram; Van Thiel, David H

    2012-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) comprise a wide spectrum of hematologic malignancies that are found increasingly in orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) patients given the rising frequency of these surgeries and their long-term success. PTLDs are highly correlated with both the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and the degree of immunosuppression involved. Herein is reported a case of a 53-year-old male with successfully treated hepatitis C virus genotype 4 and hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent OLT and developed symptoms of weakness and poor appetite 4 years later while on tacrolimus 3 mg b.i.d. with historically very low plasma levels. He was found to be anemic and colonoscopy revealed a 4.5 cm cecal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Further workup revealed mesenteric lymph node enlargement consistent and nodal DLBCL dissemination. He was treated with cyclophosphamide-hydroxyldaunorubicin-oncovin-prednisone-rituximab (CHOP-R) chemotherapy and his tacrolimus dose was lowered. Additionally, he manifested PTLD-associated cryoglobulinemia leading to acute kidney injury. After a prolonged hospitalization he was discharged with close followup. PMID:23259146

  18. Lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys in southeast United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, retroviral neoplasms reported in wild upland game birds in the United States of America have typically been associated with reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) infection. The information presented herein described the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in ...

  19. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kumar, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  20. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y.; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  1. Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Vossenkämper, A; Lutalo, P M K; Spencer, J

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome are autoimmune disorders which are characterized by a disturbed B cell homeostasis which leads ultimately to dysfunction of various organs. One of the B cell subsets that appear in abnormal numbers is the population of transitional B cells, which is increased in the blood of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. Transitional B cells are newly formed B cells. In mice, transitional B cells undergo selection checks for unwanted specificity in the bone marrow and the spleen in order to eliminate autoreactive B cells from the circulating naive B cell population. In humans, the exact anatomical compartments and mechanisms of the specificity check-points for transitional B cells remain unclear, but appear to be defective in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. This review aims to highlight the current understanding of transitional B cells and their defects in the two disorders before and after B cell-targeted therapies.

  2. BAFF: a fundamental survival factor for B cells.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Fabienne; Browning, Jeffrey L

    2002-07-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the tumour-necrosis-factor family (BAFF) enhances B-cell survival--a function that is indispensable for B-cell maturation--and has a role in enhancing immune responses. Moreover, the overexpression of BAFF results in severe autoimmune disorders in mice, and elevated serum levels of BAFF occur in some patients who have autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of the role of BAFF has set the stage for a new approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease.

  3. Anti-B-Cell Therapies in Autoimmune Neurological Diseases: Rationale and Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Harry; Biba, Angie; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    B cells have an ever-increasing role in the etiopathology of a number of autoimmune neurological disorders, acting as antibody-producing cells and, most importantly, as sensors, coordinators, and regulators of the immune response. B cells, among other functions, regulate the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation and production of cytokines. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules or B-cell trophic factors bestows a rational approach for treating autoimmune neurological disorders, even when T cells are the main effector cells. This review summarizes basic aspects of B-cell biology, discusses the role(s) of B cells in neurological autoimmunity, and presents anti-B-cell drugs that are either currently on the market or are expected to be available in the near future for treating neurological autoimmune disorders.

  4. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Extensive Cutaneous Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Yayar, Okan; Demiroglu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we aimed to report a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) case that had extensive cutaneous relapse with no skin involvement previously. A 59-year-old man presented to hospital in April 2014 with fatigue, anorexia, fever, and anemia. Cervical lymph node biopsy revealed CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B lymphoproliferative neoplasm. After FISH investigation, he was diagnosed as DLBCL. He was given 7 cycles of R-CHOP and achieved remission. However, in November 2014, he had emerging skin lesions that cover nearly all of his body. A control PET-CT revealed diffuse cutaneous involvement. CD20+, BCL2+, MUM1+, BCL6+ high grade B cell lymphoma infiltration was detected with skin biopsy. He was diagnosed as relapse lymphoma, so 2 cycles of R-DHAP were given. There was no treatment response; therefore, R-ICE regimen was started. The patient had achieved second complete remission and his skin lesions were completely regressed. The involvement of skin with CD20+ cells after 7 cycles of rituximab therapy favors that there is a rituximab resistant disease which tends to involve the skin. To conclude, DLBCL may relapse extensively with cutaneous involvement and the best treatment option in these patients is salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:26457084

  5. B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Puri, Kamal D; Di Paolo, Julie A; Gold, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for normal B-cell development, selection, survival, proliferation, and differentiation into antibody-secreting cells. Similarly, this pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple B-cell malignancies. Genetic and pharmacological approaches have established an important role for the Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase isoform p110delta (PI3Kδ) in coupling the BCR and other BCRs to B-cell survival, migration, and activation. In the past few years, several small-molecule inhibitory drugs that target PI3Kδ, Btk, and Syk have been developed and shown to have efficacy in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of B-cell malignancies. Emerging preclinical data have also shown a critical role of BCR signaling in the activation and function of self-reactive B cells that contribute to autoimmune diseases. Because BCR signaling plays a major role in both B-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation and B-cell malignancies, inhibition of this pathway may represent a promising new strategy for treating these diseases. This review summarizes recent achievements in the mechanism of action, pharmacological properties, and clinical activity and toxicity of these BCR signaling inhibitors, with a focus on their emerging role in treating lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune disorders.

  6. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  7. B-cell monoclonality, Epstein Barr virus, and t(14;18) in myoepithelial sialadenitis and low-grade B-cell MALT lymphoma of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Diss, T C; Wotherspoon, A C; Speight, P; Pan, L; Isaacson, P G

    1995-05-01

    Low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type B-cell lymphomas of the salivary gland arise in a background of myoepithelial sialadenitis (MESA), usually in association with Sjögren's syndrome. The distinction between benign MESA and early lymphoma has proved difficult using histological criteria alone and the significance of B-cell monoclonality in this respect is controversial. We have used immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of immunoglobulin heavy-chain VDJ regions to assess clonality in biopsies from 45 patients with lymphoid infiltration of the parotid. Sequential biopsies spanning 3-18 years were available from seven patients, three of whom had developed disseminated nodal B-cell lymphoma. In light of previous studies, each biopsy was additionally analyzed for the presence of t(14;18) and Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) DNA using PCR. Monoclonality was detected in 34/45 cases. Comparison of histology with clonality confirmed earlier suggestions that the emergence of an identifiable population of centrocyte-like B cells around ducts or epithelial islands correlated with monoclonality. In six of seven patients with sequential biopsies PCR fragments of identical size were amplified from each biopsy, suggesting that demonstrable monoclonality in "lymphoepithelial" lymphoproliferative lesions of the salivary gland is indicative of lymphoma. No t(14;18) chromosome translocations were identified; EBV sequences were detected in three of 45 cases.

  8. Phase II Clinical Trial of Intratumoral Application of TG1042 (Adenovirus-interferon-γ) in Patients With Advanced Cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas and Multilesional Cutaneous B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Dummer, Reinhard; Eichmüller, Stefan; Gellrich, Sylke; Assaf, Chalid; Dreno, Brigitte; Schiller, Meinhard; Dereure, Olivier; Baudard, Marion; Bagot, Martine; Khammari, Amir; Bleuzen, Pascal; Bataille, Vincent; Derbij, Anna; Wiedemann, Nicole; Waterboer, Tim; Lusky, Monika; Acres, Bruce; Urosevic-Maiwald, Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders that are manageable by immunotherapy. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in a prospective open-label, dose-escalation multicenter study evaluating the effects of repeated TG1042 [adenovirus-interferon (IFN)-γ] intralesional injections in patients with primary CLs, of which 18 were of T-cell and 3 of B-cell type. Repeated intralesional therapy using TG1042 consistently results in local tumor regressions in about half of treated patients and one-third of patients also in regressions in noninjected distant lesions, likely reflecting the systemic immune activation after intralesional therapy. Treatment was well tolerated with few adverse events including injection site reactions, chills, lymphopenia, and fever. Immune monitoring in the peripheral blood demonstrated systemic immune activation and the induction of antibodies against tumor antigens in some patients without clear association with clinical responses. CLs, in particular B-cell lymphomas with high objective response rates, seem to be excellent targets for this type of immunotherapy. PMID:20372104

  9. Conditional TPM3-ALK and NPM-ALK transgenic mice develop reversible ALK-positive early B-cell lymphoma/leukemia.

    PubMed

    Giuriato, Sylvie; Foisseau, Marianne; Dejean, Emilie; Felsher, Dean W; Al Saati, Talal; Demur, Cécile; Ragab, Ashraf; Kruczynski, Anna; Schiff, Claudine; Delsol, Georges; Meggetto, Fabienne

    2010-05-20

    NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase) and TPM3-ALK (nonmuscular tropomyosin 3-anaplastic lymphoma kinase) are oncogenic tyrosine kinases implicated in the pathogenesis of human ALK-positive lymphoma. We report here the development of novel conditional mouse models for ALK-induced lymphomagenesis, with the use of the tetracycline regulatory system under the control of the EmuSRalpha enhancer/promoter. The expression of either oncogene resulted in the arrest of the differentiation of early B cells and lymphomagenesis. We also observed the development of skin keratoacanthoma lesions, probably because of aberrant ALK expression in keratinocytes. The inactivation of the ALK oncogene on doxycycline treatment was sufficient to induce sustained regression of both hematopoietic tumors and skin disease. Importantly, treatment with the specific ALK inhibitor (PF-2341066) also reversed the pathologic states, showing the value of these mouse models for the validation of ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Thus, our results show (1) that NPM-ALK and TPM3-ALK oncogenes are sufficient for lymphoma/leukemia development and required for tumor maintenance, hence validating ALK as potentially effective therapeutic target; and (2) for the first time, in vivo, the equal tumorigenic potential of the NPM-ALK and TPM3-ALK oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Our models offer a new tool to investigate in vivo the molecular mechanisms associated with ALK-induced lymphoproliferative disorders.

  10. JAK2 V617F detected in two B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without coexisting Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YI-NING; QIN, YOU-WEN; WANG, CHUN

    2014-01-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation has been observed in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-MPNs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis. This mutation has also been observed in a small number of other myeloid malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The JAK2 V617F allele has rarely been evaluated in lymphoproliferative disorders. In total, 28 JAK2 V617F-positive B-cell lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients have previously been reported and all presented with Ph-MPN concomitantly. However, following investigation of the JAK2 V617F mutation in 63 B-CLL patients at the Shanghai First People’s Hospital (Shanghai, China) between January 2008 and December 2012 via allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, two B-CLL patients without a history of Ph-MPN were identified to carry the JAK2 V617F allele. PMID:25013507

  11. Anti-CD79 Antibody Induces B cell Anergy That Protects Against Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Ian R.; Anceriz, Nadia; Rousseau, François; Seefeldt, Matt B.; Hatterer, Eric; Irla, Magali; Buatois, Vanessa; Chatel, Laurence E.; Getahun, Andrew; Fletcher, Ashley; Cons, Laura; Pontini, Guillemette; Hertzberg, Nicole A.; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Malinge, Pauline; Smith, Mia J.; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H.; Ferlin, Walter G.; Cambier, John C.

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus, as indicated by the efficacy of B cell-targeted therapies in these diseases. Therapeutic effects of the most commonly used B cell-targeted therapy, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, are contingent upon long-term depletion of peripheral B cells. Here, we describe an alternative approach involving the targeting of CD79, the transducer subunit of the B cell antigen receptor. Unlike anti-CD20 mAbs, the protective effects of CD79-targeted mAb are do not require cell depletion, but rather act by inducing an anergic-like state. Thus, we describe a novel B cell-targeted approach predicated on the induction of B cell anergy. PMID:24442438

  12. Epstein-barr virus-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases: three distinct cases from a single center.

    PubMed

    Bakanay, Sule Mine; Kaygusuz, Gülşah; Topçuoğlu, Pervin; Sengül, Sule; Tunçalı, Timur; Keven, Kenan; Kuzu, Işınsu; Uysal, Akın; Arat, Mutlu

    2014-03-01

    Three cases of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease that occurred 6 to 8 years after renal transplantation are reported. The patients respectively had gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and atypical Burkitt lymphoma. Absence of EBV in the tissue samples was demonstrated by both in situ hybridization for EBV early RNA and polymerase chain reaction for EBV DNA. Patients were treated with reduction in immunosuppression and combined chemotherapy plus an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab. Despite the reduction in immunosuppression, patients had stable renal functions without loss of graft functions. The patient with atypical Burkitt lymphoma had an abnormal karyotype, did not respond to treatment completely, and died due to disease progression. The other patients are still alive and in remission 5 and 3 years after diagnosis, respectively. EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases are usually late-onset and are reported to have poor prognosis. Thus, reduction in immunosuppression is usually not sufficient for treatment and more aggressive approaches like rituximab with combined chemotherapy are required.

  13. [Regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu

    2015-01-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in clinical research using human samples. PMID:26725860

  14. Antiviral Treatment of HCV-Infected Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: ANRS HC-13 Lympho-C Study

    PubMed Central

    Alric, Laurent; Besson, Caroline; Lapidus, Nathanael; Jeannel, Juliette; Michot, Jean-Marie; Cacoub, Patrice; Canioni, Danielle; Pol, Stanislas; Davi, Frédéric; Rabiega, Pascaline; Ysebaert, Loic; Bonnet, Delphine; Hermine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with lymphoproliferative disorders and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs). Evaluation of the efficacy and safety profiles of different antiviral therapies in HCV patients with B-NHL is warranted. Methods: First, we evaluated the sustained virologic response (SVR) and safety of Peg-interferon-alpha (Peg-IFN) + ribavirin +/- first protease inhibitors (PI1s) therapy in 61 HCV patients with B-NHL enrolled in a nationwide observational survey compared with 94 matched HCV-infected controls without B-NHL. In a second series, interferon-free regimens using a newly optimal combination therapy with direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs) were evaluated in 10 patients with HCV and B-NHL. Results: The main lymphoma type was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (38%) followed by marginal zone lymphoma (31%). In the multivariate analysis, patients with B-NHL treated by Peg-IFN-based therapy exhibited a greater SVR rate compared with controls, 50.8% vs 30.8%, respectively, p<0.01, odds ratio (OR) = 11.2 [2.3, 52.8]. B-NHL response was better (p = 0.02) in patients with SVR (69%) than in patients without SVR (31%). Premature discontinuation of Peg-IFN-based therapy was significantly more frequent in the B-NHL group (19.6%) compared with the control group (6.3%), p<0.02. Overall, survival was significantly enhanced in the controls than in the B-NHL group (hazard ratio = 34.4 [3.9, 304.2], p< 0.01). Using DAAs, SVR was achieved in 9/10 patients (90%). DAAs were both well tolerated and markedly efficient. Conclusions: The virologic response of HCV-associated B-NHL is high. Our study provides a comprehensive evaluation of different strategies for the antiviral treatment of B-NHL associated with HCV infection. PMID:27749916

  15. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions

    PubMed Central

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N.; Khaled, Hussein M.; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30–40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease. PMID:27698858

  16. Differential expression of viral agents in lymphoma tissues of patients with ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma from high and low endemic infectious disease regions

    PubMed Central

    Högfeldt, Therese; Jaing, Crystal; Loughlin, Kevin Mc; Thissen, James; Gardner, Shea; Bahnassy, Abeer A.; Gharizadeh, Baback; Lundahl, Joachim; Österborg, Anders; Porwit, Anna; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N.; Khaled, Hussein M.; Mellstedt, Håkan; Moshfegh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults, accounts for approximately 30–40% of newly diagnosed lymphomas worldwide. Environmental factors, such as viruses and bacteria, may contribute to cancer development through chronic inflammation and the integration of oncogenes, and have previously been indicated in cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer and lymphoproliferative disorders. In the present study, the presence of microbial agents was analyzed in the lymphoma tissue of patients with activated B-cell like (ABC) DLBCL. The present study compared two groups of patients from geographically varied regions that possess a difference in the prevalence of viral and other microbial agents. The patient populations were from Sweden (a low endemic infectious disease region) and Egypt (a high endemic infectious disease region). A differential expression of several viruses in lymphoma tissues was noted when comparing Swedish and Egyptian patients. JC polyomavirus (JCV) was detected in Swedish and Egyptian patients and, uniquely, the complete hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome was detected only in Egyptian lymphoma patients. None of these viruses were detected in control lymph tissues from Sweden or Egypt. In total, 38% of the Egyptian patients were found to have HBV surface antigens (HBsAgs) in their serum; however, HBsAgs were not found in any of the Swedish patients. The percentage of serum HBsAgs in Egyptian patients with ABC DLBCL was significantly increased compared with the general Egyptian population (P<0.05). The present study may support a notion that viral agents, including JCV and HBV, may be involved in the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in regions of high infectious disease.

  17. B-cell-specific conditional expression of Myd88p.L252P leads to the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Gero; Liedgens, Paul; Korovkina, Darya; Seeger, Jens M; Al-Baldawi, Yussor; Al-Maarri, Mona; Fritz, Christian; Vlantis, Katerina; Bezhanova, Svetlana; Scheel, Andreas H; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Reimann, Maurice; Möller, Peter; López, Cristina; Schlesner, Matthias; Lohneis, Philipp; Weber, Alexander N R; Trümper, Lorenz; Staudt, Louis M; Ortmann, Monika; Pasparakis, Manolis; Siebert, Reiner; Schmitt, Clemens A; Klatt, Andreas R; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schäfer, Stephan C; Persigehl, Thorsten; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Frenzel, Lukas P; Kashkar, Hamid; Reinhardt, H Christian

    2016-06-01

    The adaptor protein MYD88 is critical for relaying activation of Toll-like receptor signaling to NF-κB activation. MYD88 mutations, particularly the p.L265P mutation, have been described in numerous distinct B-cell malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Twenty-nine percent of activated B-cell-type DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL), which is characterized by constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, carry the p.L265P mutation. In addition, ABC-DLBCL frequently displays focal copy number gains affecting BCL2 Here, we generated a novel mouse model in which Cre-mediated recombination, specifically in B cells, leads to the conditional expression of Myd88(p.L252P) (the orthologous position of the human MYD88(p.L265P) mutation) from the endogenous locus. These mice develop a lymphoproliferative disease and occasional transformation into clonal lymphomas. The clonal disease displays the morphologic and immunophenotypical characteristics of ABC-DLBCL. Lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by crossing in a further novel allele, which mediates conditional overexpression of BCL2 Cross-validation experiments in human DLBCL samples revealed that both MYD88 and CD79B mutations are substantially enriched in ABC-DLBCL compared with germinal center B-cell DLBCL. Furthermore, analyses of human DLBCL genome sequencing data confirmed that BCL2 amplifications frequently co-occurred with MYD88 mutations, further validating our approach. Finally, in silico experiments revealed that MYD88-mutant ABC-DLBCL cells in particular display an actionable addiction to BCL2. Altogether, we generated a novel autochthonous mouse model of ABC-DLBCL that could be used as a preclinical platform for the development and validation of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL. PMID:27048211

  18. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors.

  19. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors. PMID:27653594

  20. Advances in the management and understanding of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS)

    PubMed Central

    Teachey, David T.; Seif, Alix E.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of T cell dysregulation caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. Patients with ALPS can develop a myriad of clinical manifestations including lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmunity and increased rates of malignancy. ALPS may be more common that originally thought, and testing for ALPS should be considered in patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or autoimmunity. As the pathophysiology of ALPS is better characterized, a number of targeted therapies are in preclinical development and clinical trials with promising early results. This review describes the clinical and laboratory manifestations found in ALPS patients, as well as the molecular basis for the disease and new advances in treatment. PMID:19930184

  1. Natural history of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome associated with FAS gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Price, Susan; Shaw, Pamela A.; Seitz, Amy; Joshi, Gyan; Davis, Joie; Niemela, Julie E.; Perkins, Katie; Hornung, Ronald L.; Folio, Les; Rosenberg, Philip S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Hsu, Amy P.; Lo, Bernice; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) presents in childhood with nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly associated with a characteristic expansion of mature CD4 and CD8 negative or double negative T-cell receptor αβ+ T lymphocytes. Patients often present with chronic multilineage cytopenias due to autoimmune peripheral destruction and/or splenic sequestration of blood cells and have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. Deleterious heterozygous mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of this condition, which is termed ALPS-FAS. We report the natural history and pathophysiology of 150 ALPS-FAS patients and 63 healthy mutation-positive relatives evaluated in our institution over the last 2 decades. Our principal findings are that FAS mutations have a clinical penetrance of <60%, elevated serum vitamin B12 is a reliable and accurate biomarker of ALPS-FAS, and the major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients are the overwhelming postsplenectomy sepsis and development of lymphoma. With longer follow-up, we observed a significantly greater relative risk of lymphoma than previously reported. Avoiding splenectomy while controlling hypersplenism by using corticosteroid-sparing treatments improves the outcome in ALPS-FAS patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:24398331

  2. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  3. Microbes and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Animals and many of their chronic microbial inhabitants form relationships of symbiotic mutualism, which occurs when coexisting life-forms derive mutual benefit from stable associations. While microorganisms receive a secure habitat and constant food source from vertebrate hosts, they are required for optimal immune system development and occupy niches otherwise abused by pathogens. Microbes have also been shown to provide vertebrate hosts with metabolic capabilities that enhance energy and nutrient uptake from the diet. The immune system plays a central role in the establishment and maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, and B lineage cells play a key role in this regulation. Here, I reviewed the structure and function of the microbiota and the known mechanisms of how nonpathogenic microbes influence B cell biology and immunoglobulin repertoire development early in life. I also discuss what is known about how B lineage cells contribute to the process of shaping the composition of commensal/mutualistic microbe membership.

  4. NFκB1 is essential to prevent the development of multiorgan autoimmunity by limiting IL-6 production in follicular B cells.

    PubMed

    de Valle, Elisha; Grigoriadis, George; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Willis, Simon N; Maxwell, Mhairi J; Corcoran, Lynn M; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Cornish, Jasper K S; Fairfax, Kirsten A; Vasanthakumar, Ajithkumar; Febbraio, Mark A; Hibbs, Margaret L; Pellegrini, Marc; Banerjee, Ashish; Hodgkin, Philip D; Kallies, Axel; Mackay, Fabienne; Strasser, Andreas; Gerondakis, Steve; Gugasyan, Raffi

    2016-04-01

    We examined the role of NFκB1 in the homeostasis and function of peripheral follicular (Fo) B cells. Aging mice lacking NFκB1 (Nfκb1(-/-)) develop lymphoproliferative and multiorgan autoimmune disease attributed in large part to the deregulated activity of Nfκb1(-/-)Fo B cells that produce excessive levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6). Despite enhanced germinal center (GC) B cell differentiation, the formation of GC structures was severely disrupted in the Nfκb1(-/-)mice. Bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that the Fo B cell-intrinsic loss of NFκB1 led to the spontaneous generation of GC B cells. This was primarily the result of an increase in IL-6 levels, which promotes the differentiation of Fo helper CD4(+)T cells and acts in an autocrine manner to reduce antigen receptor and toll-like receptor activation thresholds in a population of proliferating IgM(+)Nfκb1(-/-)Fo B cells. We demonstrate that p50-NFκB1 represses Il-6 transcription in Fo B cells, with the loss of NFκB1 also resulting in the uncontrolled RELA-driven transcription of Il-6.Collectively, our findings identify a previously unrecognized role for NFκB1 in preventing multiorgan autoimmunity through its negative regulation of Il-6 gene expression in Fo B cells. PMID:27022143

  5. Whole blood EBV-DNA predicts outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Maria Chiara; Cupelli, Elisa; Santangelo, Rosaria; Maiolo, Elena; Alma, Eleonora; Giachelia, Manuela; Martini, Maurizio; Bellesi, Silvia; D'Alò, Francesco; Voso, Maria Teresa; Pompili, Maurizio; Leone, Giuseppe; Larocca, Luigi Maria; Hohaus, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    An association between Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection and lymphoproliferative diseases has been reported with EBV + diffuse large B cell-lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly described as a distinct entity. In a cohort of 218 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, we detected EBV-DNA in 25% of whole blood (WB) samples at diagnosis. Presence and viral load in WB, mononuclear cells or plasma did not predict the presence of EBV in the tumor biopsy. Positive Hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology was associated with a higher frequency of EBV in WB. Patients with EBV-DNA in WB had a significantly shorter progression-free (p = 0.02) and overall survival (p = 0.05) after immunochemotherapy with R-CHOP (Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, Prednisolone). We conclude that detection of EBV in WB is not a surrogate marker for EBV-association in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, however it associates with worse outcome.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro can rescue germinal center B cells with inactivated immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Chaganti, Sridhar; Bell, Andrew I; Pastor, Noelia Begue; Milner, Anne E; Drayson, Mark; Gordon, John; Rickinson, Alan B

    2005-12-15

    Immunoglobulin genotyping of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease has suggested that such lesions often arise from atypical post-germinal center B cells, in some cases carrying functionally inactivated immunoglobulin genes. To investigate whether EBV can rescue cells that are failed products of the somatic hypermutation process occurring in germinal centers (GCs), we isolated GC cells from tonsillar cell suspensions and exposed them to EBV in vitro. Screening more than 100 EBV-transformed cell lines of GC origin identified 6 lines lacking surface immunoglobulin, a phenotype never seen among lines derived from circulating naive or memory B cells. Furthermore, 3 of the 6 surface immunoglobulin-negative GC lines carried inactivating mutations in the immunoglobulin H (IgH) variable gene sequence. The ability of EBV to rescue aberrant products of the germinal center reaction in vitro strengthens the probability that a parallel activity contributes to EBV's lymphomagenic potential in vivo.

  7. B cells from aged mice exhibit reduced apoptosis upon B-cell antigen receptor stimulation and differential ability to up-regulate survival signals.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Maletto, B A; Acosta Rodriguez, E V; Gruppi, A; Pistoresi-Palencia, M C

    2006-01-01

    During ageing, autoimmune disorders and the higher susceptibility to infectious have been associated with alterations in the humoral immune response. We report that splenic B lymphocytes from aged mice exhibit lower level of apoptosis induced by B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) ligation in vitro. Respect to B cells from young mice the anti-mu stimulated aged B cells show similar Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression but differential kinetic of A1 degradation and a higher level of cFLIP and FAIM. Even though B cells from aged mice show minor Fas expression they exhibit the same susceptibility to anti-Fas induced apoptosis. Aged B cells also present upon BCR stimulation, a higher proliferative response and similar level of activation markers expression than B cells from young mice. These data agree with the observation that aged mice exhibit an increment of T2 and mature B cell subset which rapidly enters cell cycle upon BCR engagement. The diminished apoptosis after activation in aged mice could compromise homeostatic mechanism allowing the persistence of self and non-self antigen specific B cells.

  8. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-15

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  9. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  10. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eight cases described herein represent the first reports of lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) infection in wild turkeys and the first identification of LPDV in North America. Systemic lymphoproliferative disease was presumably the cause of morbidity and mortality in five of the eight turk...

  11. The CD40 ligand expressed by human B cells costimulates B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Bergman, M C; Miura, Y; Fujita, K; Davis, L S; Lipsky, P E

    1995-05-15

    The possibility that activated B cells might express a ligand for CD40 that was of functional importance for B cell responses was examined by using highly purified human peripheral blood B cells, as well as a variety of B lymphoblastoid cell lines and hybridomas. Following stimulation with the combination of a calcium ionophore and a phorbol ester, human B cells bound a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular portion of CD40 and the Fc region of IgG1 (CD40.Ig). A variety of B cell lines and hybridomas also bound CD40.Ig, either constitutively or after activation. In addition, CD40.Ig specifically immunoprecipitated a 33-kDa glycoprotein from surface 125I-labeled activated B cells. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the CD40 ligand mRNA amplified by RT-PCR from activated T cells and B cell lines was identical. The CD40 ligand expressed on human B cells was important functionally because homotypic aggregation of CD40 ligand-expressing B cells was inhibited by the CD40.Ig construct. Additionally, RNA and DNA synthesis as well as Ig production by polyclonally activated, highly purified peripheral B cells and a variety of B cell lines were inhibited significantly by the CD40.Ig construct. Finally, B cell lines expressing the CD40 ligand induced Ig production from resting normal B cells in a CD40-dependent manner. These results indicate that human B cells express a ligand for CD40 that is identical with that expressed by activated T cells and that the B cell-expressed CD40 ligand plays an important role in facilitating responses of activated B cells.

  12. Molecular underpinning of B-cell anergy

    PubMed Central

    Yarkoni, Yuval; Getahun, Andrew; Cambier, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A byproduct of the largely stochastic generation of a diverse B-cell specificity repertoire is production of cells that recognize autoantigens. Indeed, recent studies indicate that more than half of the primary repertoire consists of autoreactive B cells that must be silenced to prevent autoimmunity. While this silencing can occur by multiple mechanisms, it appears that most autoreactive B cells are silenced by anergy, wherein they populate peripheral lymphoid organs and continue to express unoccupied antigen receptors yet are unresponsive to antigen stimulation. Here we review molecular mechanisms that appear operative in maintaining the antigen unresponsiveness of anergic B cells. In addition, we present new data indicating that the failure of anergic B cells to mobilize calcium in response to antigen stimulation is not mediated by inactivation of stromal interacting molecule 1, a critical intermediary in intracellular store depletion-induced calcium influx. PMID:20727040

  13. B-cell markers in malignant B-cell lymphoma with scleroderma-like manifestation.

    PubMed

    Van Joost, T; Stolz, E; Blog, F B; Van der Kwast, T H; Vuzevski, V D; Van Dongen, J M

    1984-12-01

    A case is described of malignant B-cell lymphoma with scleroderma-like manifestation. Using different monoclonals as B-cell markers the tumor appeared to be positive for surface immunoglobulins (SmIg) and for B2-antigen, but negative for intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin (CIg), BA2- and FMC7-antigens. Therefore, the tumor could be determined as a highly differentiated Sm-positive early B-cell type of B-cell lymphoma. In this clinically rare manifestation of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma aspects of the cell morphology and of cellular mediated immunity are briefly discussed.

  14. Innate immune control of EBV-infected B cells by invariant natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Brian K; Tsai, Kevin; Allan, Lenka L; Zheng, Dong Jun; Nie, Johnny C; Biggs, Catherine M; Hasan, Mohammad R; Kozak, Frederick K; van den Elzen, Peter; Priatel, John J; Tan, Rusung

    2013-10-10

    Individuals with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease lack invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and are exquisitely susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. To determine whether iNKT cells recognize or regulate EBV, resting B cells were infected with EBV in the presence or absence of iNKT cells. The depletion of iNKT cells increased both viral titers and the frequency of EBV-infected B cells. However, EBV-infected B cells rapidly lost expression of the iNKT cell receptor ligand CD1d, abrogating iNKT cell recognition. To determine whether induced CD1d expression could restore iNKT recognition in EBV-infected cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were treated with AM580, a synthetic retinoic acid receptor-α agonist that upregulates CD1d expression via the nuclear protein, lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF-1). AM580 significantly reduced LEF-1 association at the CD1d promoter region, induced CD1d expression on LCL, and restored iNKT recognition of LCL. CD1d-expressing LCL elicited interferon γ secretion and cytotoxicity by iNKT cells even in the absence of exogenous antigen, suggesting an endogenous iNKT antigen is expressed during EBV infection. These data indicate that iNKT cells may be important for early, innate control of B cell infection by EBV and that downregulation of CD1d may allow EBV to circumvent iNKT cell-mediated immune recognition.

  15. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  16. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Melissa A; Riddle, Christy C; Triana, Emily M; Jones, Dan; Duvic, Madeleine

    2005-09-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas include extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphoma, and, rarely, mantle cell lymphoma. Our purpose in conducting this review was to determine the clinical and behavioral characteristics of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, their relationship to infectious triggers, and therapeutic response. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 23 adult patients presenting to the dermatology clinic at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center with primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma between January 1999 and May 2003. Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas generally present on the head and neck, with the trunk and extremities afflicted to a lesser extent. Patients were found to have serologic evidence of prior infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (n = 10), Helicobacter pylori (n = 5), and Epstein-Barr virus (n = 6). Overall, treatment of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma should involve multiple modalities; however, specific treatment aimed at concurrent or suspected infection, particularly B burgdorferi, is a helpful adjunct and may achieve complete remission in a small subset of patients.

  17. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15-22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2-5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6-11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7-12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16-30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences.

  18. Distinct morphophenotypic features of chronic B-cell leukaemias identified with CD1c and CD23 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Orazi, A; Cattoretti, G; Polli, N; Delia, D; Rilke, F

    1991-07-01

    Morphological criteria usually applied to diagnose various subtypes of B-cell chronic lymphoid leukaemia are largely subjective. Immunophenotyping of 61 relevant cases using a selected panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb), showed that CD1c and CD23 mAb were able to separate B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) from other chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Lymphocytes of B-CLL were CD1c-, CD23+, whereas those of other types of chronic B-cell leukaemia were CD1c+/-, CD23-, and CD38/-. Non-B-CLL cases had a significantly higher amount of large peroxidase-negative (unstained) cells analyzed with an automated blood cell counter (Technicon H6000). This type of volumetric assessment allowed a separation between typical and "atypical" B-CLL, which otherwise were both CD1c-, and CD23+. These combinations of phenotypic markers corresponded to well-defined haematopathologic entities, conventionally diagnosed on peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow smears, and on histologic sections of lymph nodes and spleen.

  19. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells.

  20. A distinct plasmablast and naïve B-cell phenotype in primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Shaun M.; Gibson, Adele; Lucas, Geoff; Nandigam, Raghava; Taylor, Louise; Provan, Drew; Newland, Adrian C.; Savage, Caroline O.; Henderson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disorder in which platelet destruction is a consequence of both B- and T-cell dysregulation. Flow cytometry was used to further characterize the B- and T-cell compartments in a cross-sectional cohort of 26 immune thrombocytopenia patients including antiplatelet antibody positive (n=14) and negative (n=12) patients exposed to a range of therapies, and a cohort of matched healthy volunteers. Markers for B-cell activating factor and its receptors, relevant B-cell activation markers (CD95 and CD21) and markers for CD4+ T-cell subsets, including circulating T-follicular helper-like cells, were included. Our results indicate that an expanded population of CD95+ naïve B cells correlated with disease activity in immune thrombocytopenia patients regardless of treatment status. A population of CD21-naïve B cells was specifically expanded in autoantibody-positive immune thrombocytopenia patients. Furthermore, the B-cell maturation antigen, a receptor for B-cell activating factor, was consistently and strongly up-regulated on plasmablasts from immune thrombocytopenia patients. These observations have parallels in other autoantibody-mediated diseases and suggest that loss of peripheral tolerance in naïve B cells may be an important component of immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis. Moreover, the B-cell maturation antigen represents a potential target for plasma cell directed therapies in immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26969086

  1. A distinct plasmablast and naïve B-cell phenotype in primary immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Flint, Shaun M; Gibson, Adele; Lucas, Geoff; Nandigam, Raghava; Taylor, Louise; Provan, Drew; Newland, Adrian C; Savage, Caroline O; Henderson, Robert B

    2016-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disorder in which platelet destruction is a consequence of both B- and T-cell dysregulation. Flow cytometry was used to further characterize the B- and T-cell compartments in a cross-sectional cohort of 26 immune thrombocytopenia patients including antiplatelet antibody positive (n=14) and negative (n=12) patients exposed to a range of therapies, and a cohort of matched healthy volunteers. Markers for B-cell activating factor and its receptors, relevant B-cell activation markers (CD95 and CD21) and markers for CD4(+) T-cell subsets, including circulating T-follicular helper-like cells, were included. Our results indicate that an expanded population of CD95(+) naïve B cells correlated with disease activity in immune thrombocytopenia patients regardless of treatment status. A population of CD21-naïve B cells was specifically expanded in autoantibody-positive immune thrombocytopenia patients. Furthermore, the B-cell maturation antigen, a receptor for B-cell activating factor, was consistently and strongly up-regulated on plasmablasts from immune thrombocytopenia patients. These observations have parallels in other autoantibody-mediated diseases and suggest that loss of peripheral tolerance in naïve B cells may be an important component of immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis. Moreover, the B-cell maturation antigen represents a potential target for plasma cell directed therapies in immune thrombocytopenia.

  2. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  3. Minimal change nephrotic syndrome associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoid disorders: a retrospective study of 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Kofman, Tomek; Zhang, Shao-Yu; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Moktefi, Anissa; Raimbourg, Quentin; Francois, Hélène; Karras, Alexandre; Plaisier, Emmanuelle; Painchart, Bernard; Favre, Guillaume; Bertrand, Dominique; Gyan, Emmanuel; Souid, Marc; Roos-Weil, Damien; Desvaux, Dominique; Grimbert, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne; Lang, Philippe; Sahali, Djillali; Audard, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have examined the occurrence of minimal change nephrotic syndrome (MCNS) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We report here a series of 18 patients with MCNS occurring among 13,992 new cases of NHL. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic characteristics of this association, along with the response of patients to treatment, to determine if this association relies on a particular disorder. The most frequent NHLs associated with MCNS were Waldenström macroglobulinemia (33.3%), marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (27.8%), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (22.2%). Other lymphoproliferative disorders included multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma. In 4 patients MCNS occurred before NHL (mean delay, 15 mo), in 10 patients the disorders occurred simultaneously, and in 4 patients MCNS was diagnosed after NHL (mean delay, 25 mo). Circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins were present in 11 patients. A nontumoral interstitial infiltrate was present in renal biopsy specimens from 3 patients without significant renal impairment. Acute kidney injury resulting from tubular lesions or renal hypoperfusion was present in 6 patients. MCNS relapse occurred more frequently in patients treated exclusively by steroid therapy (77.8%) than in those receiving steroids associated with chemotherapy (25%). In conclusion, MCNS occurs preferentially in NHL originating from B cells and requires an aggressive therapeutic approach to reduce the risk of MCNS relapse.

  4. Proinflammatory GM-CSF-producing B cells in multiple sclerosis and B cell depletion therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Miyazaki, Yusei; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Touil, Hanane; Shen, Ping; Moore, Craig S; Michel, Laure; Althekair, Faisal; Rajasekharan, Sathy; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Fillatreau, Simon; Bar-Or, Amit

    2015-10-21

    B cells are not limited to producing protective antibodies; they also perform additional functions relevant to both health and disease. However, the relative contribution of functionally distinct B cell subsets in human disease, the signals that regulate the balance between such subsets, and which of these subsets underlie the benefits of B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) are only partially elucidated. We describe a proinflammatory, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-expressing human memory B cell subset that is increased in frequency and more readily induced in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared to healthy controls. In vitro, GM-CSF-expressing B cells efficiently activated myeloid cells in a GM-CSF-dependent manner, and in vivo, BCDT resulted in a GM-CSF-dependent decrease in proinflammatory myeloid responses of MS patients. A signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5)- and STAT6-dependent mechanism was required for B cell GM-CSF production and reciprocally regulated the generation of regulatory IL-10-expressing B cells. STAT5/6 signaling was enhanced in B cells of untreated MS patients compared with healthy controls, and B cells reemerging in patients after BCDT normalized their STAT5/6 signaling as well as their GM-CSF/IL-10 cytokine secretion ratios. The diminished proinflammatory myeloid cell responses observed after BCDT persisted even as new B cells reconstituted. These data implicate a proinflammatory B cell/myeloid cell axis in disease and underscore the rationale for selective targeting of distinct B cell populations in MS and other human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26491076

  5. The intestinal B-cell response in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mesin, Luka; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Niro, Roberto Di

    2012-01-01

    The function of intestinal immunity is to provide protection toward pathogens while preserving the composition of the microflora and tolerance to orally fed nutrients. This is achieved via a number of tightly regulated mechanisms including production of IgA antibodies by intestinal plasma cells. Celiac disease is a common gut disorder caused by a dysfunctional immune regulation as signified, among other features, by a massive intestinal IgA autoantibody response. Here we review the current knowledge of this B-cell response and how it is induced, and we discuss key questions to be addressed in future research. PMID:23060888

  6. Lack of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) deregulates B-cell survival and results in B-cell lymphocytosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruscoli, Stefano; Biagioli, Michele; Sorcini, Daniele; Frammartino, Tiziana; Cimino, Monica; Sportoletti, Paolo; Mazzon, Emanuela; Bereshchenko, Oxana

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are widely used as antiinflammatory/immunosuppressive drugs and antitumor agents in several types of lymphoma and leukemia. Therapeutic doses of GC induce growth-suppressive and cytotoxic effects on various leukocytes including B cells. Molecular mechanisms of GC action include induction of GC target genes. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) is a rapidly, potently, and invariably GC-induced gene. It mediates a number of GC effects, such as control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here we show that deletion of GILZ in mice leads to an accumulation of B lymphocytes in the bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissues. Gilz knockout (KO) mice develop a progressive nonlethal B lymphocytosis, with expansion of B220+ cells in the bone marrow and in the periphery, dependent on increased B-cell survival. Decreased B-cell apoptosis in mice lacking GILZ correlates with increased NF-κB transcriptional activity and Bcl-2 expression. B cell–specific gilz KO mice confirmed that the effect of GILZ deletion is B-cell self-intrinsic. These results establish GILZ as an important regulator of B-cell survival and suggest that the deregulation of GILZ expression could be implicated in the pathogenesis of B-cell disorders. PMID:26276664

  7. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS.

  8. Spectrum of Radiological Manifestations in Lymphoproliferative Malignancies with Unusual Extra Nodal Soft Tissue Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kahila; Upreti, Lalendra; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative malignancies constitute a wide spectrum of haematological malignancies and their prevalence is widely increasing. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and Hodgkin disease, frequently involve extranodal soft tissue structures in the head and neck, thorax and abdomen. These malignancies may involve virtually any type of soft tissues to any extent; hence many different imaging manifestations are possible which may mimic other disorders. The imaging characteristics of extranodal lymphomatous soft tissue involvement are described and classified here according to the site of involvement in 6 cases (primary diseases with orbital, muscle, extra testicular, scalp, sinonasal and pachymeningeal/dural involvement). In majority of these cases at presentation we found a predominantly homogeneous soft tissue mass with mildly high attenuation on CT and a T2 intermediate signal on MRI at these sites without any manifestation of disease elsewhere but on follow-up two out of these six cases developed systemic disease elsewhere. Few consistent patterns were noticed on CT and MRI which might help to include lymphomas as an important differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses. Though a definitive diagnosis requires a biopsy (bone marrow, lymph node, or mass), and other laboratory tests, imaging primarily aims at staging of the disease and identification of new or recurrent disease. PMID:27630925

  9. Treatment Response and Outcomes in Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease vs Lymphoma in Immunocompetent Patients.

    PubMed

    Trusson, R; Serre, J E; Szwarc, I; Brunot, V; Garrigue, V; Delmas, S; Kanouni, T; Cartron, G; Mourad, G

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after solid organ transplantation may carry a poorer prognosis than lymphoma in immunocompetent individuals, but comparative data are lacking. In a retrospective, single-center, case-control study, 21 cases of PTLD were identified in patients undergoing kidney transplantation since 2000, and compared to 42 nontransplanted controls cared for in the same institution and matched for age, prognostic index, and cerebral localization. Two-year and 5-year overall survival was 57% and 44%, respectively, in PTLD patients and 71% and 58% in controls (log-rank test P = .20). On multivariable analysis, overall survival was similar for PTLD and control patients (hazard ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 3.61, P = .16). Response rate to first-line chemotherapy was similar between the 2 groups. Death was due to progression of the disease in 46% vs 94% of PTLD and control patients, respectively (P < .01), or sepsis in 31% vs 0% (P = .03). Treatment-related mortality was significantly higher in PTLD (19%) than in controls (0%, P = .03). In conclusion, response to first-line chemotherapy and overall survival are similar in PTLD and control patients, whereas causes of death were significantly different. Better prevention and management of infectious complications could improve the results in PTLD patients. PMID:27569924

  10. Spectrum of Radiological Manifestations in Lymphoproliferative Malignancies with Unusual Extra Nodal Soft Tissue Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kahila; Upreti, Lalendra; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative malignancies constitute a wide spectrum of haematological malignancies and their prevalence is widely increasing. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and Hodgkin disease, frequently involve extranodal soft tissue structures in the head and neck, thorax and abdomen. These malignancies may involve virtually any type of soft tissues to any extent; hence many different imaging manifestations are possible which may mimic other disorders. The imaging characteristics of extranodal lymphomatous soft tissue involvement are described and classified here according to the site of involvement in 6 cases (primary diseases with orbital, muscle, extra testicular, scalp, sinonasal and pachymeningeal/dural involvement). In majority of these cases at presentation we found a predominantly homogeneous soft tissue mass with mildly high attenuation on CT and a T2 intermediate signal on MRI at these sites without any manifestation of disease elsewhere but on follow-up two out of these six cases developed systemic disease elsewhere. Few consistent patterns were noticed on CT and MRI which might help to include lymphomas as an important differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses. Though a definitive diagnosis requires a biopsy (bone marrow, lymph node, or mass), and other laboratory tests, imaging primarily aims at staging of the disease and identification of new or recurrent disease.

  11. Spectrum of Radiological Manifestations in Lymphoproliferative Malignancies with Unusual Extra Nodal Soft Tissue Involvement.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Prasad, Kahila; Upreti, Lalendra; Garga, Umesh Chandra

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoproliferative malignancies constitute a wide spectrum of haematological malignancies and their prevalence is widely increasing. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas and Hodgkin disease, frequently involve extranodal soft tissue structures in the head and neck, thorax and abdomen. These malignancies may involve virtually any type of soft tissues to any extent; hence many different imaging manifestations are possible which may mimic other disorders. The imaging characteristics of extranodal lymphomatous soft tissue involvement are described and classified here according to the site of involvement in 6 cases (primary diseases with orbital, muscle, extra testicular, scalp, sinonasal and pachymeningeal/dural involvement). In majority of these cases at presentation we found a predominantly homogeneous soft tissue mass with mildly high attenuation on CT and a T2 intermediate signal on MRI at these sites without any manifestation of disease elsewhere but on follow-up two out of these six cases developed systemic disease elsewhere. Few consistent patterns were noticed on CT and MRI which might help to include lymphomas as an important differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses. Though a definitive diagnosis requires a biopsy (bone marrow, lymph node, or mass), and other laboratory tests, imaging primarily aims at staging of the disease and identification of new or recurrent disease. PMID:27630925

  12. [EXPRESSION OF THE LIGHT CHAINS OF IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN NORMAL B-CELLS AND SOME B-CELL LYMPHOMAS].

    PubMed

    Khudoleeva, O A; Vorobjev, I A

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative method of determining the level of expression of immunoglobulin light chains on uncompensated data was suggested and used to examine disorders in light chain expression in various B-cell tumors. The average level of expression of the lambda isotype was 4 times higher than the level of expression of kappa isotype. The level of surface and cytoplasmic expression of LC IG varied within wide limits for different people, but there was a high degree of correlation between the levels of expression of kappa and lambda isotypes LC IG as well as between expression of the surface and cytoplasmic forms of each in isotype the same individual. In the majority of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas correlation between the expression of LC IG on the surface and in the cytoplasm of the cells was diminished. Expression of LC IG in CLL was significantly reduced on the surface of the cells and to a lesser extent--in the cytoplasm. In the case of marginal zone cell lymphoma, LC IG expression level was reduced on the surface of circulating cells and to a lesser extent--in the cytoplasm. In the case of mantle cell lymphoma and DLBCL, expression level of LC IG on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm was the same as in normal B-cells. However, in some cases DLBCL, no LC IG was expressed both on the surface and in the cytoplasm. PMID:26863766

  13. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h.

  14. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M; Schwartz, Marc A; Allenspach, Eric J; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K; Luning Prak, Eline T; Thrasher, Adrian J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R; Sanz, Ignacio; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-21

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)-deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell-intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  15. Effects of Lu-Do-Huang Extract (LDHE) on Apoptosis Induction in Human Hep3B Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Yu; Chen, Li-Han; Liu, Chen-Wei; Chien, Ting-Yi; Yu, Yu-Ping; Kao, Yu-Yu; Yang, Jo-Hsuan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2015-06-30

    Lu-Do-Huang (Pracparatum mungo) is a fermented mung bean [corrected] (Vigna radiata) and has long been used as a traditional and functional food in Traditional Chinese Medicine, especially for treating a variety of liver disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate the apoptotic effects of Lu-Do-Huang ethanol extract (LDHE) on Hep3B cells, a human hepatoma cell line. A variety of cellular assays, flow cytometry and immunoblotting were used. Our results showed that LDHE significantly inhibited Hep3B cells growth. Additionally, the cell cycle assay showed that LDHE prevented Hep3B cell entry into S phase and led to an arrest of Hep3B cells in the G₀/G₁ phase. LDHE induced Hep3B cells to undergo apoptosis as determined through Hep3B cell morphology changes, increase of apoptotic bodies, apoptotic cells, DNA fragmentations and caspase activity. We further examined the protein expression of TRADD, FADD, and Bax to verify the possible apoptotic pathways. The results indicated that LDHE-induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells might be mediated [corrected] by an extrinsic signaling pathway leading to an induction of apoptosis in Hep3B cells. In conclusion, LDHE induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in Hep3B cells. Our data provide the evidences regarding the anti-hepatoma potential of LDHE in Hep3B cells.

  16. Interleukin-5 Supports the Expansion of Fas Ligand-Expressing Killer B Cells that Induce Antigen-Specific Apoptosis of CD4+ T Cells and Secrete Interleukin-10

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, Matthew W.; Reed, Tamra J.; Fox, David A.; Lundy, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Beyond their critical role in humoral immunity, B lymphocytes can employ a variety of immunomodulatory mechanisms including expression of the apoptosis-inducing molecule Fas ligand (FasL; CD178). Here, we extensively characterized the surface phenotype of FasL+ killer B cells, showing they are enriched in the IgMhighCD5+CD1dhigh B cell subset previously reported to contain a higher frequency of B cells producing interleukin-10 (IL-10). A rare population of B cells expressing IL-10 was present among FasL+ B cells, but most FasL+ B cells did not produce IL-10. We also identify interleukin-5 (IL-5) as a novel inducer of killer B cell function. Constitutively FasL+ B cells expressed higher levels of the IL-5 receptor, and treating B cells with IL-5 and CD40L resulted in the expansion of a B cell population enriched for FasL+ cells. B cells stimulated with IL-5 and CD40L were potent inducers of apoptosis in activated primary CD4+ T cells, and this killing function was antigen-specific and dependent upon FasL. IL-5 also enhanced IL-10 secretion in B cells stimulated with CD40L. Taken together these findings elucidate the relationship of FasL+ B cells and IL-10-producing B cells and demonstrate that IL-5 can induce or enhance both killer B cell activity and IL-10 secretion in B cells. Finally, we found that the killer B cell activity induced by IL-5 was completely blocked by IL-4, suggesting the existence of a previously unknown antagonistic relationship between these type-2 cytokines in modulating the activity of killer B cells. Targeting this IL-5/IL-4 signaling axis may therefore represent a novel area of drug discovery in inflammatory disorders. PMID:23940537

  17. Characterization of EBV-related lymphoproliferative lesions arising in donor lymphocytes of transplanted human tumor tissues in the NOG mouse.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Etsuko; Kato, Atsuhiko; Chen, Yu Jau; Matsubara, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Human tumor tissue line models established in the severely immunodeficient NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Sug)/Jic (NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ(null) or NOG) mouse are important tools for oncology research. During the establishment process, a lymphoproliferative lesion (LPL) that replaces the original tumor cells in the site of transplantation occurs. In the present study, we studied the impact of the LPL on the establishment process and the characteristics of the lesion, investigated the systemic distribution of the lesion in the mouse, and evaluated the potential of a simple identification method. The incidence of the lesion varied among tumor types, and the lesion was found to be the leading cause of unsuccessful establishment with gastric and colorectal cancer. The lesion consisted of a varying population of proliferating lymphoid cells that expressed CD20. The cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related antigens, and EBV DNA was detected. There was systemic distribution of the lesion within the NOG mouse, and the most consistent gross finding was splenomegaly. Additionally, identification of LPL-affected cases was possible by detecting splenomegaly in the 1st and 2nd generation mice at necropsy. From our findings the lesion was judged to arise from EBV-infected B cells originating from the donor, and monitoring splenomegaly at necropsy was thought effective as a simple method for identifying the lesion at an early stage of the establishment process.

  18. Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase: From X-Linked Agammaglobulinemia Toward Targeted Therapy for B-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ponader, Sabine; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) mutations as the cause for X-linked agammaglobulinemia was a milestone in understanding the genetic basis of primary immunodeficiencies. Since then, studies have highlighted the critical role of this enzyme in B-cell development and function, and particularly in B-cell receptor signaling. Because its deletion affects mostly B cells, BTK has become an attractive therapeutic target in autoimmune disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) is the most advanced BTK inhibitor in clinical testing, with ongoing phase III clinical trials in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma. In this article, we discuss key discoveries related to BTK and clinically relevant aspects of BTK inhibitors, and we provide an outlook into clinical development and open questions regarding BTK inhibitor therapy. PMID:24778403

  19. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-01

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  20. Evidence that the malignant lymphoma of Sjögren's syndrome is a monoclonal B-cell neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Zulman, J; Jaffe, R; Talal, N

    1978-11-30

    We studied the malignant lymphomas that developed in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and the antecedent benign salivary-gland lesions to determine their cellular characteristics. We used an immunoperoxidase technic that identified intracellular gamma, alpha and mu heavy chains and kappa and lambda light chains. In six of nine patients, the lymphomas were composed of cells containing intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin that was exclusively IgMK. The benign lymphoepithelial salivary-gland lesions preceding these malignant tumors consisted of approximately equal numbers of lymphoid cells containing either kappa or lambda light chains. Thus, in some patients with Sjögren's syndrome, there may be a progression in the lympho-proliferative lesions from a polyclonal infiltrate to a monoclonal neoplasm. Intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin identifies six of the nine cases as being B-cell in origin.

  1. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Tyler K.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Freedman, Brett; Porter, Adeline R.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Otto, Michael; Schneewind, Olaf; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe’s success as a human pathogen. PMID:27711145

  2. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154–CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater. PMID:15180894

  3. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154-CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater.

  4. Indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Anamarija M.; Warnke, Roger A.; Hu, Qinglong; Gaulard, Philippe; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Alkan, Serhan; Wang, Huan-You; Cheng, Jason X.; Bacon, Chris M.; Delabie, Jan; Ranheim, Erik; Kucuk, Can; Hu, XiaoZhou; Weisenburger, Dennis D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal (GI) T-cell lymphoma is an infrequent and aggressive disease. However, rare indolent clonal T-cell proliferations in the GI tract have been described. We report 10 cases of GI involvement by an indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease, including 6 men and 4 women with a median age of 48 years (range, 15-77 years). Presenting symptoms included abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, food intolerance, and dyspepsia. The lesions involved oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon. The infiltrates were dense, but nondestructive, and composed of small, mature-appearing lymphoid cells. Eight cases were CD4−/CD8+, 1 was CD4+/CD8−, and another was CD4−/CD8−. T-cell receptor-γ chain gene rearrangement identified a clonal population in all 10 cases. There was no evidence of STAT3 SH2 domain mutation or activation. Six patients received chemotherapy because of an initial diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, with little or no response, whereas the other 4 were followed without therapy. After a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-175 months), 9 patients were alive with persistent disease and 1 was free of disease. We propose the name “indolent T-LPD of the GI tract” for these lesions that can easily be mistaken for intestinal peripheral T-cell lymphoma, and lead to aggressive therapy. PMID:24009234

  5. Altered BCR and TLR signals promote enhanced positive selection of autoreactive transitional B cells in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Nikita S.; Brahmandam, Archana; Thouvenel, Christopher D.; Becker-Herman, Shirly; Jacobs, Holly M.; Schwartz, Marc A.; Allenspach, Eric J.; Khim, Socheath; Panigrahi, Anil K.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Candotti, Fabio; Torgerson, Troy R.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency disorder frequently associated with systemic autoimmunity, including autoantibody-mediated cytopenias. WAS protein (WASp)–deficient B cells have increased B cell receptor (BCR) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, suggesting that these pathways might impact establishment of the mature, naive BCR repertoire. To directly investigate this possibility, we evaluated naive B cell specificity and composition in WASp-deficient mice and WAS subjects (n = 12). High-throughput sequencing and single-cell cloning analysis of the BCR repertoire revealed altered heavy chain usage and enrichment for low-affinity self-reactive specificities in murine marginal zone and human naive B cells. Although negative selection mechanisms including deletion, anergy, and receptor editing were relatively unperturbed, WASp-deficient transitional B cells showed enhanced proliferation in vivo mediated by antigen- and Myd88-dependent signals. Finally, using both BCR sequencing and cell surface analysis with a monoclonal antibody recognizing an intrinsically autoreactive heavy chain, we show enrichment in self-reactive cells specifically at the transitional to naive mature B cell stage in WAS subjects. Our combined data support a model wherein modest alterations in B cell–intrinsic, BCR, and TLR signals in WAS, and likely other autoimmune disorders, are sufficient to alter B cell tolerance via positive selection of self-reactive transitional B cells. PMID:26371186

  6. Systematic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease presenting as a persistent fever and cough: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is an extremely rare disorder and classically arises following primary acute or chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection. It is characterized by clonal proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus-infected T-cells with an activated cytotoxic phenotype. This disease has a rapid clinical course and is more frequent in Asia and South America, with relatively few cases being reported in Western countries. The clinical and pathological features of the disease overlap with other conditions including infectious mononucleosis, chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and natural killer cell malignancies. We describe the rare case of systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease in a 16-year-old Malay boy. Case presentation He presented with a six-month history of fever and cough, with pulmonary and mediastinal lymphadenopathy and severe pancytopenia. Medium- to large-sized, CD8+ and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA-positive atypical lymphoid cells were present in the bone marrow aspirate. He subsequently developed fatal virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome and died due to sepsis and multiorgan failure. Conclusions Although systemic Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative childhood disease is a disorder which is rarely encountered in clinical practice, our case report underlines the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic approach in the management of this disease. A high level of awareness of the disease throughout the diagnosis process for young patients who present with systemic illness and hemophagocytic syndrome may be of great help for the clinical diagnosis of this disease. PMID:25163591

  7. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C; Meffre, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti-B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti-B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti-B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti-B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  8. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  9. Pathological features of lymphoid proliferations of the salivary glands: lymphoepithelial sialadenitis versus low-grade B-cell lymphoma of the malt type.

    PubMed

    Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; Ferlito, A

    2000-12-01

    Lymphoid proliferations of the salivary glands can be either reactive or neoplastic. Reactive lesions include the lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (LESA; also known as myoepithelial sialadenitis [MESA]) of Sjogren's syndrome. Lymphomas of the salivary glands are predominantly B-cell type and include extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type. The spectrum of histopathologic features of LESA/MESA includes 1) "fully benign lymphoid infiltrate," with or without an associated lymphoid follicular structure, without immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain restriction in B-cells, and without any features of aggressive behavior, and 2) "lymphoproliferative lesions," with or without areas of Ig light chain restriction in B-cells, with the usual presence of centrocyte-like cells. A more or less pronounced lymphoepithelial aggressiveness may be present without definite evidence of malignancy. B-cell clones are detected in over 50% of cases of LESA/MESA by molecular genetic methods, but this does not correlate with morphological or clinical evidence of overt lymphoma. On the other hand, "marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the MALT type" of the salivary glands produces a dense lymphoid infiltrate diffusely involving the gland, with obliteration of acini. The centrocyte-like cells form broad "halos" around the epithelial cell nests and broad strands between lymphoepithelial lesions, often linking together several lymphoepithelial lesions. Further, lymphoma cells express monotypic surface Ig, and in the majority of the cases, the plasma cells are also monoclonal. In conclusion, the diagnosis of LESA/MESA versus marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of the MALT type still relies on the evaluation of morphological features. It seems that molecular genetic analysis has little or no practical role in the clinical diagnosis of salivary gland lymphoma in a setting of LESA/MESA and Sjögren's syndrome.

  10. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  11. My Treatment Approach to Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, James O.

    2012-01-01

    My favored treatment approach for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma continues to evolve. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can now be cured in more than 50% of patients. This is a result of improved definitions of the disease, improved diagnostic capabilities, better staging and restaging techniques, a useful prognostic index to guide therapeutic decisions, and the development of increasingly effective therapies. Positron emission tomographic scans have improved the accuracy of both staging and restaging. Findings on a positron emission tomographic scan at the end of therapy are the best predictors of a good treatment outcome. Numerous subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been identified that require specific treatment approaches. For example, plasmablastic lymphoma typically lacks CD20 and does not benefit from treatment with rituximab. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma originating in specific extranodal sites such as the central nervous system, testes, and skin presents special problems and requires specific treatment approaches. A subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a very high proliferative rate seems to have a poor outcome when treated with CHOP-R and does better with regimens used for patients with Burkitt lymphoma. New insights into the biology of these disorders are likely to further change treatment approaches. Recognition that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is not one disease, but a variety of clinicopathologic syndromes provides the opportunity to further improve our ability to benefit patients. PMID:22305028

  12. My treatment approach to patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James O

    2012-02-01

    My favored treatment approach for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma continues to evolve. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma can now be cured in more than 50% of patients. This is a result of improved definitions of the disease, improved diagnostic capabilities, better staging and restaging techniques, a useful prognostic index to guide therapeutic decisions, and the development of increasingly effective therapies. Positron emission tomographic scans have improved the accuracy of both staging and restaging. Findings on a positron emission tomographic scan at the end of therapy are the best predictors of a good treatment outcome. Numerous subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been identified that require specific treatment approaches. For example, plasmablastic lymphoma typically lacks CD20 and does not benefit from treatment with rituximab. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma originating in specific extranodal sites such as the central nervous system, testes, and skin presents special problems and requires specific treatment approaches. A subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with a very high proliferative rate seems to have a poor outcome when treated with CHOP-R and does better with regimens used for patients with Burkitt lymphoma. New insights into the biology of these disorders are likely to further change treatment approaches. Recognition that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is not one disease, but a variety of clinicopathologic syndromes provides the opportunity to further improve our ability to benefit patients. PMID:22305028

  13. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  14. New insights in the regulation of human B cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidlin, Heike; Diehl, Sean A.; Blom, Bianca

    2009-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide the cellular basis of the humoral immune response. All stages of this process, from B cell activation to formation of germinal centers and differentiation into memory B cells or plasma cells, are influenced by extrinsic signals and controlled by transcriptional regulation. Compared to naïve B cells, memory B cells display a distinct expression profile, which allows for their rapid secondary responses. Indisputably, many B cell malignancies result from aberrations in the circuitry controlling B cell function, particularly during the GC reaction. Here we review new insights into memory B cell subtypes, recent literature on transcription factors regulating human B cell differentiation, and further evidence for B cell lymphomagenesis emanating from errors during the GC cell reactions. PMID:19447676

  15. Germinal center B cells and mixed leukocyte reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Monfalcone, A.P.; Kosco, M.H.; Szakal, A.K.; Tew, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine if germinal center (GC) B cells are sufficiently activated to stimulate mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Percoll density fractionation and a panning technique with peanut agglutinin (PNA) were used to isolate GC B cells from the lymph nodes of immune mice. The GC B cells were treated with mitomycin C or irradiation and used to stimulate allogeneic or syngeneic splenic T cells in the MLR. Controls included high-density (HD) B cells prepared from spleens of the same mice and HD B cells activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate. GC B cells bound high amount sof PNA (i.e., PNAhi). Similarly, the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated B cells were PNAhi. Treatment with neuraminidase rendered the PNAlo HD B cells PNAhi. GC B cells and the LPS-dextran sulfate-activated HD B cells stimulated a potent MLR, while the untreated HD B cells did not. However, following neuraminidase treatment, the resulting PNAhi HD B cell population was able to induce an MLR. The PNA marker appeared to be an indicator of stimulatory activity, but incubating the cells with PNA to bind the cell surface ligand did not interfere with the MLR. GC B cells were also capable of stimulating a syngeneic MLR in most experiments although this was not consistently obtained. It appears that germinal centers represent a unique in vivo microenvironment that provides the necessary signals for B cells to become highly effective antigen-presenting cells.

  16. Epigenetics and B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shaknovich, Rita; Melnick, Ari

    2011-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Purpose of review It has only recently become apparent that mutations in epigenetic mechanisms and perturbation of epigenomic patterning are frequent events in B-cell lymphomas. The purpose of this review is to highlight these new findings and provide a conceptual framework for understanding how epigenetic modifications might contribute to lymphomagenesis. Recent findings Somatic mutations affecting histone methyltransferases such as EZH2 and MLL2, histone demethylases including UTX and JMJD2C and histone acetyltransferases including CBP and p300 are recurrent and common in lymphomas. These mutations result in disruption of chromatin structure and functions of other proteins, ultimately causing aberrant transcriptional programming affecting multiple gene networks. Widespread perturbation of cytosine methylation patterning now appears to be a hallmark of B-cell lymphomas and occurs in specific patterns that can distinguish disease subtypes. Therapeutic targeting strategies can overcome abnormal epigenetic mechanisms and potently kill lymphoma cells. Summary Newly discovered epigenetic lesions may provide critical insights into the genesis of B-cell lymphomas but further studies are required to understand how they affect biological mechanism. Epigenetic lesions offer tremendous opportunities for the development of improved biomarkers and treatments. PMID:21577103

  17. Class-switched B cells display response to therapeutic B-cell depletion in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Burkhard; Aeberli, Daniel; Eggli, Stefan; Fuhrer, Martin; Vajtai, Istvan; Vögelin, Esther; Ziswiler, Hans-Rudolf; Dahinden, Clemens A; Villiger, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Reconstitution of peripheral blood (PB) B cells after therapeutic depletion with the chimeric anti-CD20 antibody rituximab (RTX) mimics lymphatic ontogeny. In this situation, the repletion kinetics and migratory properties of distinct developmental B-cell stages and their correlation to disease activity might facilitate our understanding of innate and adaptive B-cell functions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Thirty-five 'RTX-naïve' RA patients with active arthritis were treated after failure of tumour necrosis factor blockade in an open-label study with two infusions of 1,000 mg RTX. Prednisone dose was tapered according to clinical improvement from a median of 10 mg at baseline to 5 mg at 9 and 12 months. Conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were kept stable. Subsets of CD19+ B cells were assessed by flow cytometry according to their IgD and CD27 surface expression. Their absolute number and relative frequency in PB were followed every 3 months and were determined in parallel in synovial tissue (n = 3) or synovial fluid (n = 3) in the case of florid arthritis. Results Six of 35 patients fulfilled the European League Against Rheumatism criteria for moderate clinical response, and 19 others for good clinical response. All PB B-cell fractions decreased significantly in number (P < 0.001) after the first infusion. Disease activity developed independently of the total B-cell number. B-cell repopulation was dominated in quantity by CD27-IgD+ 'naïve' B cells. The low number of CD27+IgD- class-switched memory B cells (MemB) in the blood, together with sustained reduction of rheumatoid factor serum concentrations, correlated with good clinical response. Class-switched MemB were found accumulated in flaring joints. Conclusions The present data support the hypothesis that control of adaptive immune processes involving germinal centre-derived, antigen, and T-cell-dependently matured B cells is essential for successful RTX treatment. PMID

  18. Expression of Human Herpesvirus-6 Antigens in Benign and Malignant Lymphoproliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Garber, Richard; Maiorana, Antonio; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Artusi, Tullio; Trovato, Raffaella; Marasca, Roberto; Torelli, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to look for the expression of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) antigens in a well characterized series of benign, atypical, and malignant lymphoid lesions, which tested positive for the presence of HHV-6 DNA. A panel of specific antibodies against HHV-6 antigens, characteristic either of the early (p41) or late (p101K, gp106, and gp116) phases of the viral cycle, was applied to the lymphoid tissues from 15 non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, 14 Hodgkin’s disease cases, 5 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathies with dysproteinemia, 14 reactive lymphadenopathies, and 2 cases of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease). In lymphomatous tissues, the expression of late antigens was documented only in reactive cells, and mainly in plasma cells. Of interest, the expression of the early p41 antigen was detected in the so-called “mummified” Reed-Sternberg cells, in two Hodgkin’s disease cases. In reactive lymphadenopathies, the HHV-6 late antigen-expressing cells were plasma cells, histiocytes, and rare granulocytes distributed in interfollicular areas. In both cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease, the p101K showed an intense staining in follicular dendritic cells of germinal centers, whereas the gp106 exhibited an intense cytoplasmic reaction in the abnormal histiocytes, which represent the histological hallmark of the disease. The expression of HHV-6 antigens is tightly controlled in lymphoid tissues. The lack of HHV-6 antigen expression in neoplastic cells and the limited expression in degenerating Reed-Sternberg cells argue against a major pathogenetic role of the virus in human lymphomagenesis. The detection of a rather unique pattern of viral late antigen expression in Rosai-Dorfman disease suggests a possible pathogenetic involvement of HHV-6 in some cases of this rare lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9736030

  19. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  20. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  1. Deregulation of Fas ligand expression as a novel cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Nabhani, Schafiq; Ginzel, Sebastian; Miskin, Hagit; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Harlev, Dan; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Hönscheid, Andrea; Oommen, Prasad T.; Kuhlen, Michaela; Thiele, Ralf; Laws, Hans-Jürgen; Borkhardt, Arndt; Stepensky, Polina; Fischer, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome is frequently caused by mutations in genes involved in the Fas death receptor pathway, but for 20–30% of patients the genetic defect is unknown. We observed that treatment of healthy T cells with interleukin-12 induces upregulation of Fas ligand and Fas ligand-dependent apoptosis. Consistently, interleukin-12 could not induce apoptosis in Fas ligand-deficient T cells from patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. We hypothesized that defects in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may cause a similar phenotype as that caused by mutations of the Fas ligand gene. To test this, we analyzed 20 patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome of unknown cause by whole-exome sequencing. We identified a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.698G>A, p.R212*) in the interleukin-12/interleukin-23 receptor-component IL12RB1 in one of these patients. The mutation led to IL12RB1 protein truncation and loss of cell surface expression. Interleukin-12 and -23 signaling was completely abrogated as demonstrated by deficient STAT4 phosphorylation and interferon γ production. Interleukin-12-mediated expression of membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligand was lacking and basal expression was much lower than in healthy controls. The patient presented with the classical symptoms of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: chronic non-malignant, non-infectious lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, elevated numbers of double-negative T cells, autoimmune cytopenias, and increased levels of vitamin B12 and interleukin-10. Sanger sequencing and whole-exome sequencing excluded the presence of germline or somatic mutations in genes known to be associated with the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome. Our data suggest that deficient regulation of Fas ligand expression by regulators such as the interleukin-12 signaling pathway may be an alternative cause of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease. PMID:26113417

  2. Treatment of ongoing autoimmune encephalomyelitis with activated B-cell progenitors maturing into regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Korniotis, Sarantis; Gras, Christophe; Letscher, Hélène; Montandon, Ruddy; Mégret, Jérôme; Siegert, Stefanie; Ezine, Sophie; Fallon, Padraic G.; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Fillatreau, Simon; Zavala, Flora

    2016-01-01

    The influence of signals perceived by immature B cells during their development in bone marrow on their subsequent functions as mature cells are poorly defined. Here, we show that bone marrow cells transiently stimulated in vivo or in vitro through the Toll-like receptor 9 generate proB cells (CpG-proBs) that interrupt experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) when transferred at the onset of clinical symptoms. Protection requires differentiation of CpG-proBs into mature B cells that home to reactive lymph nodes, where they trap T cells by releasing the CCR7 ligand, CCL19, and to inflamed central nervous system, where they locally limit immunopathogenesis through interleukin-10 production, thereby cooperatively inhibiting ongoing EAE. These data demonstrate that a transient inflammation at the environment, where proB cells develop, is sufficient to confer regulatory functions onto their mature B-cell progeny. In addition, these properties of CpG-proBs open interesting perspectives for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27396388

  3. Genetic errors of the human caspase recruitment domain-B-cell lymphoma 10-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma-translocation gene 1 (CBM) complex: Molecular, immunologic, and clinical heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Diego, Rebeca; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Ferreira Cerdán, Antonio; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Three members of the caspase recruitment domain (CARD) family of adaptors (CARD9, CARD10, and CARD11) are known to form heterotrimers with B-cell lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma-translocation gene 1 (MALT1). These 3 CARD-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complexes activate nuclear factor κB in both the innate and adaptive arms of immunity. Human inherited defects of the 3 components of the CBM complex, including the 2 adaptors CARD9 and CARD11 and the 2 core components BCL10 and MALT1, have recently been reported. Biallelic loss-of-function mutant alleles underlie several different immunologic and clinical phenotypes, which can be assigned to 2 distinct categories. Isolated invasive fungal infections of unclear cellular basis are associated with CARD9 deficiency, whereas a broad range of clinical manifestations, including those characteristic of T- and B-lymphocyte defects, are associated with CARD11, MALT1, and BCL10 deficiencies. Interestingly, human subjects with these mutations have some features in common with the corresponding knockout mice, but other features are different between human subjects and mice. Moreover, germline and somatic gain-of-function mutations of MALT1, BCL10, and CARD11 have also been found in patients with other lymphoproliferative disorders. This broad range of germline and somatic CBM lesions, including loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations, highlights the contribution of each of the components of the CBM complex to human immunity.

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation: Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Marieke L; Kersten, Marie José; Pals, Steven T; Bemelman, Frederike J; Ten Berge, Ineke J M

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a potentially fatal complication after (solid organ) transplantation, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The EBV-specific cytotoxic T cell response that is essential in controlling the virus in healthy individuals is suppressed in transplant recipients using immunosuppressive drugs. A primary EBV infection in EBV-seronegative patients receiving an EBV-seropositive donor organ or a reactivation in those who are already latently infected pretransplantation can lead to uninhibited growth of EBV-infected B cells and subsequently to PTLD. Effective preventive strategies, such as vaccines and antiviral agents, are lacking. Because not every transplant recipient with increasing EBV viral load develops PTLD, it is hard to decide how intensively these patients should be monitored and how and when a preemptive intervention should take place. There is a need for other tools to help predict the development of PTLD in patients at risk to make timing and strategy of preemptive intervention easier and more reliable. The cornerstone of the treatment of patients with PTLD is restoring the host's immunity by reduction of immunosuppressive drug therapy. American and British guidelines recommend to add rituximab monotherapy or rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, depending on histology and clinical characteristics. Although response to these therapies is good, toxicity is a problem, and PTLD still has a relatively high mortality rate. An evolving therapy, especially in PTLD occurring in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, is restoring the host's immune response with infusion of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. This may also play a role in the future in both prevention and treatment of PTLD in SOT. PMID:27500242

  5. Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yui, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Imadome, Ken-ichi; Arai, Ayako; Takahashi, Mikiko; Ohashi, Ryuji; Tamai, Hayato; Moriya, Keiichi; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Akira; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of the extremely rare condition Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) which occurred after umbilical cord blood transplantation. A 25-year-old Japanese man underwent cord blood transplantation from a male human leukocyte antigen 4/6-matched donor due to acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 8. Bone marrow examination on day 30 showed chimerism with at least 90% donor cells and complete hematological response. Chronic symptoms of graft-versus-host disease appeared only on the skin and were successfully treated with cyclosporine alone. Three years later, however, the patient experienced repeated cold-like symptoms and was hospitalized with liver dysfunction. A high fever developed and was followed by significant edema of the right side of the face. The EBV DNA copy number in whole peripheral blood was 2×10(4)/mL. Liver biopsy showed invasion of EBV-infected CD8-positive T cells. Southern blotting analysis of the whole peripheral blood showed that the T-cell receptor Cβ1 rearrangement was positive. On the basis of these results, EBV-positive T-cell LPD was diagnosed and treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine, and etoposide, followed by cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. However, the patient died of cardiac function failure, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage, all of unidentified cause. Most cases of EBV-related LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consist of EBV-positive B-cell LPD, and, to our knowledge, de novo EBV-positive T-cell LPD subsequent to transplantation has not been previously reported. PMID:26960588

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus–Positive Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disease After Solid Organ Transplantation: Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Nijland, Marieke L.; Kersten, Marie José; Pals, Steven T.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; ten Berge, Ineke J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a potentially fatal complication after (solid organ) transplantation, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The EBV-specific cytotoxic T cell response that is essential in controlling the virus in healthy individuals is suppressed in transplant recipients using immunosuppressive drugs. A primary EBV infection in EBV-seronegative patients receiving an EBV-seropositive donor organ or a reactivation in those who are already latently infected pretransplantation can lead to uninhibited growth of EBV-infected B cells and subsequently to PTLD. Effective preventive strategies, such as vaccines and antiviral agents, are lacking. Because not every transplant recipient with increasing EBV viral load develops PTLD, it is hard to decide how intensively these patients should be monitored and how and when a preemptive intervention should take place. There is a need for other tools to help predict the development of PTLD in patients at risk to make timing and strategy of preemptive intervention easier and more reliable. The cornerstone of the treatment of patients with PTLD is restoring the host's immunity by reduction of immunosuppressive drug therapy. American and British guidelines recommend to add rituximab monotherapy or rituximab in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, depending on histology and clinical characteristics. Although response to these therapies is good, toxicity is a problem, and PTLD still has a relatively high mortality rate. An evolving therapy, especially in PTLD occurring in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, is restoring the host's immune response with infusion of EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells. This may also play a role in the future in both prevention and treatment of PTLD in SOT. PMID:27500242

  7. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  8. Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pileri, Stefano A.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Pieri, Federica; Berra, Eva; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Piccioli, Milena; Johnson, Peter W. M.; Giardini, Roberto; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Novero, Domenico; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Marafioti, Teresa; Alonso, Miguel A.; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Although primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma has been primarily studied, its precise phenotype, molecular characteristics, and histogenesis are still a matter of debate. The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group collected 137 such cases for extensive pathological review. Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with fibrosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation. It consisted of large cells with varying degrees of nuclear polymorphism and clear to basophilic cytoplasm. On immunohistochemistry, the following phenotype was observed: CD45+, CD20+, CD79a+, PAX5/BSAP+, BOB.1+, Oct-2+, PU.1+, Bcl-2+, CD30+, HLA-DR+, MAL protein+/−, Bcl-6+/−, MUM1/IRF4+/−, CD10−/+, CD21−, CD15−, CD138−, CD68−, and CD3−. Immunoglobulins were negative both at immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Molecular analysis, performed in 45 cases, showed novel findings. More than half of the cases displayed BCL-6 gene mutations, which usually occurred along with functioning somatic IgVH gene mutations and Bcl-6 and/or MUM1/IRF4 expression. The present study supports the concept that a sizable fraction of cases of this lymphoma are from activated germinal center or postgerminal center cells. However, it differs from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas in that it shows defective immunoglobulin production despite the expression of OCT-2, BOB.1, and PU.1 transcription factors and the lack of IgVH gene crippling mutations. PMID:12507907

  9. B cell biology: implications for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Anolik, J H

    2013-04-01

    B cells are critical players in the orchestration of properly regulated immune responses, normally providing protective immunity without autoimmunity. Balance in the B cell compartment is achieved through the finely regulated participation of multiple B cell populations with different antibody-dependent and independent functions. Both types of functions allow B cells to modulate other components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Autoantibody-independent B cell functions include antigen presentation, T cell activation and polarization, and dendritic cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines and chemokines and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organization including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Additionally, the functional versatility of B cells enables them to play either protective or pathogenic roles in autoimmunity. In turn, B cell dysfunction has been critically implicated in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies and heterogeneous clinical involvement. Thus, the breakdown of B cell tolerance is a defining and early event in the disease process and may occur by multiple pathways, including alterations in factors that affect B cell activation thresholds, B cell longevity, and apoptotic cell processing. Once tolerance is broken, autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms including immune-complex mediated Type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines including IFNα, TNF and IL-1. The complexity of B cell functions has been highlighted by the variable success of B cell-targeted therapies in multiple autoimmune diseases, including those conventionally viewed as T cell-mediated conditions. Given the widespread

  10. Avian oncogenesis induced by lymphoproliferative disease virus: a neglected or emerging retroviral pathogen?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an exogenous oncogenic retrovirus that induces lymphoid tumors in some galliform species of birds. Historically, outbreaks of LPDV have been reported from Europe and Israel. Although the virus has previously never been detected in North America, herein we ...

  11. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy. PMID:23998255

  12. Circulating CD21low B cells in common variable immunodeficiency resemble tissue homing, innate-like B cells

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanov, Mirzokhid; Keller, Baerbel; Gutenberger, Sylvia; Foerster, Christian; Hoenig, Manfred; Driessen, Gertjan; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J.; Wiech, Elisabeth; Visentini, Marcella; Quinti, Isabella; Prasse, Antje; Voelxen, Nadine; Salzer, Ulrich; Goldacker, Sigune; Fisch, Paul; Eibel, Hermann; Schwarz, Klaus; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Warnatz, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The homeostasis of circulating B cell subsets in the peripheral blood of healthy adults is well regulated, but in disease it can be severely disturbed. Thus, a subgroup of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) presents with an extraordinary expansion of an unusual B cell population characterized by the low expression of CD21. CD21low B cells are polyclonal, unmutated IgM+IgD+ B cells but carry a highly distinct gene expression profile which differs from conventional naïve B cells. Interestingly, while clearly not representing a memory population, they do share several features with the recently defined memory-like tissue, Fc receptor-like 4 positive B cell population in the tonsils of healthy donors. CD21low B cells show signs of previous activation and proliferation in vivo, while exhibiting defective calcium signaling and poor proliferation in response to B cell receptor stimulation. CD21low B cells express decreased amounts of homeostatic but increased levels of inflammatory chemokine receptors. This might explain their preferential homing to peripheral tissues like the bronchoalveolar space of CVID or the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Therefore, as a result of the close resemblance to the gene expression profile, phenotype, function and preferential tissue homing of murine B1 B cells, we suggest that CD21low B cells represent a human innate-like B cell population. PMID:19666505

  13. The life and death of a B cell.

    PubMed

    Defrance, Thierry; Casamayor-Pallejà, Montserrat; Krammer, Peter H

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of apoptosis in the B cell lineage has implications for homeostasis, quality control of the antibody response, and tolerance. In this chapter we examine the different checkpoints that control life and death decisions of B cells during the antigen-independent and antigen-dependent phases of their development. We discuss the cell death mechanism involved in elimination of unwanted B cells at different stages of their development as well as the signals that trigger or repress the apoptotic process. At the steady state, before or after development of an immune response, B cell apoptosis ensures that the antigen receptor (BCR) on newly produced B cells is functional and does not recognize self-antigens with high avidity. It also ensures that the size of the peripheral B cell compartment remains constant in spite of the continuous input of B cells from the bone marrow. All these processes are controlled by the mitochondrial death pathway and are thus perturbed by overexpression of the antiapoptotic members of the bcl-2 gene family. By contrast, the death receptor pathway plays a prominent role during the antigen-dependent phase of B cell development. Three sets of membrane molecules stand as crucial regulators of B cell survival. First, the BCR which plays a central but ambiguous role. On the one hand, it triggers death of B cells that recognize self-antigens or have been exposed to repeated antigenic stimulations. On the other hand, it promotes survival of the peripheral mature B cell pool and protects activated B cells from CD95-induced killing. Second, the death receptor Fas/CD95 which is instrumental in censoring B cells activated in a bystander fashion at the initiation of the response to T-dependent antigens. It also drives elimination of low-affinity and self-reactive B cell clones that arise through the process of somatic mutations during the germinal center reaction. As such, it contributes to the affinity maturation of the antibody response. Finally

  14. A B cell explanation for autoimmune disease: the forbidden clone returns.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona

    2012-04-01

    More than 60 years ago, Burnet first proposed the 'forbidden clone' hypothesis postulating that autoimmune disease arises as a result of persistence of self-reactive clones of lymphocytes that should have been deleted via immune tolerance. These autoreactive clones could effect immune-mediated end-organ damage via peripheral self-antigen recognition. Recent evidence that stretches across the boundaries of many medical specialties supports this proposal, implicating a B cell precursor as the culprit. The success of B cell depleting therapy in rheumatoid arthritis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated vasculitis, polymyositis, lupus and autoimmune diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura supports this proposal. Clonality of B cells and plasma cells has been described in a number of autoimmune disorders and the presence of autoantibodies, which may arise years before the onset of clinical disease, supports the notion of autoreactivity within the B cell lineage. T cell activation within the end-organ would be predicted by cognate B-T cell interactions and resultant tissue inflammation and destruction could produce diverse clinical manifestations dictated by the original specificity of the autoimmune B cell.

  15. Congenital B cell lymphocytosis explained by novel germline CARD11 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenming; Stinson, Jeffrey R.; Lu, Wei; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Zheng, Lixin; Pittaluga, Stefania; Matthews, Helen F.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Kuchen, Stefan; Kardava, Lela; Wang, Wei; Lamborn, Ian T.; Jing, Huie; Raffeld, Mark; Moir, Susan; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Staudt, Louis M.; Su, Helen C.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) controls genes involved in normal lymphocyte functions, but constitutive NF-κB activation is often associated with B cell malignancy. Using high-throughput whole transcriptome sequencing, we investigated a unique family with hereditary polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis. We found a novel germline heterozygous missense mutation (E127G) in affected patients in the gene encoding CARD11, a scaffolding protein required for antigen receptor (AgR)–induced NF-κB activation in both B and T lymphocytes. We subsequently identified a second germline mutation (G116S) in an unrelated, phenotypically similar patient, confirming mutations in CARD11 drive disease. Like somatic, gain-of-function CARD11 mutations described in B cell lymphoma, these germline CARD11 mutants spontaneously aggregate and drive constitutive NF-κB activation. However, these CARD11 mutants rendered patient T cells less responsive to AgR-induced activation. By reexamining this rare genetic disorder first reported four decades ago, our findings provide new insight into why activating CARD11 mutations may induce B cell expansion and preferentially predispose to B cell malignancy without dramatically perturbing T cell homeostasis. PMID:23129749

  16. Congenital B cell lymphocytosis explained by novel germline CARD11 mutations.

    PubMed

    Snow, Andrew L; Xiao, Wenming; Stinson, Jeffrey R; Lu, Wei; Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Zheng, Lixin; Pittaluga, Stefania; Matthews, Helen F; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Kuchen, Stefan; Kardava, Lela; Wang, Wei; Lamborn, Ian T; Jing, Huie; Raffeld, Mark; Moir, Susan; Fleisher, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M; Su, Helen C; Lenardo, Michael J

    2012-11-19

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) controls genes involved in normal lymphocyte functions, but constitutive NF-κB activation is often associated with B cell malignancy. Using high-throughput whole transcriptome sequencing, we investigated a unique family with hereditary polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis. We found a novel germline heterozygous missense mutation (E127G) in affected patients in the gene encoding CARD11, a scaffolding protein required for antigen receptor (AgR)-induced NF-κB activation in both B and T lymphocytes. We subsequently identified a second germline mutation (G116S) in an unrelated, phenotypically similar patient, confirming mutations in CARD11 drive disease. Like somatic, gain-of-function CARD11 mutations described in B cell lymphoma, these germline CARD11 mutants spontaneously aggregate and drive constitutive NF-κB activation. However, these CARD11 mutants rendered patient T cells less responsive to AgR-induced activation. By reexamining this rare genetic disorder first reported four decades ago, our findings provide new insight into why activating CARD11 mutations may induce B cell expansion and preferentially predispose to B cell malignancy without dramatically perturbing T cell homeostasis.

  17. K+ channel expression during B cell differentiation: implications for immunomodulation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Heike; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Pennington, Michael; Chandy, K George

    2004-07-15

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we demonstrate a switch in potassium channel expression during differentiation of human B cells from naive to memory cells. Naive and IgD(+)CD27(+) memory B cells express small numbers of the voltage-gated Kv1.3 and the Ca(2+)-activated intermediate-conductance IKCa1 channel when quiescent, and increase IKCa1 expression 45-fold upon activation with no change in Kv1.3 levels. In contrast, quiescent class-switched memory B cells express high levels of Kv1.3 ( approximately 2000 channels/cell) and maintain their Kv1.3(high) expression after activation. Consistent with their channel phenotypes, proliferation of naive and IgD(+)CD27(+) memory B cells is suppressed by the specific IKCa1 inhibitor TRAM-34 but not by the potent Kv1.3 blocker Stichodactyla helianthus toxin, whereas the proliferation of class-switched memory B cells is suppressed by Stichodactyla helianthus toxin but not TRAM-34. These changes parallel those reported for T cells. Therefore, specific Kv1.3 and IKCa1 inhibitors may have use in therapeutic manipulation of selective lymphocyte subsets in immunological disorders. PMID:15240664

  18. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  19. The Contribution of B Cells to Renal Interstitial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Florian; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Cohen, Clemens D.; Brandt, Ulrike; Draganovici, Dan; Fischereder, Michael; Kretzler, Matthias; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Sitter, Thomas; Mosberger, Isabella; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Regele, Heinz; Schlöndorff, Detlef; Segerer, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Local B-cell infiltrates play a role in tissue fibrosis, neolymphangiogenesis, and renal allograft survival. We sought to characterize the B-cell infiltrates, factors involved in B-cell recruitment, and lymphangiogenesis in renal interstitial injury (ie, acute and chronic interstitial nephritis and chronic IgA nephropathy). CD20-positive B cells formed a prominent part of the interstitial infiltrating cells. Together with CD3-positive T cells, the CD20-positive B cells formed larger nodular structures. CD10-positive pre-B cells were rare, and the majority were mature CD27-positive B cells. Proliferating B cells were detected within nodular infiltrates. The level of mRNA expression of the chemokine CXCL13 was increased and correlated with CD20 mRNA in the tubulointerstitial space. CXCL13 protein was predominantly found at sites of nodular infiltrates, in association with CXCR5-positive B cells. Furthermore, sites of chronic interstitial inflammation were associated with a high number of lymphatic vessels. B-cell infiltrates form a prominent part of the interstitial infiltrates both in primary interstitial lesions and in IgA nephropathy. CXCR5-positive B cells might be recruited via the chemokine CXCL13 and seem to contribute to the formation of intrarenal lymphoid follicle-like structures. These might represent an intrarenal immune system. PMID:17255314

  20. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  1. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Difficult Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria S; McCubbin, Mark; Nand, Sucha

    2014-01-01

    Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT) 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH, and about 65% are

  2. [Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Coso, D; Rey, J; Bouabdallah, R

    2010-02-01

    Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a clinicopathological entity among the world health organization classification of lymphoid neoplasms. PMBL often concerns young adults, and the disease remains a localized disease in the majority of cases. The outcome of patients with PMBL is variable and unlike diffuse large cell lymphomas, the international prognostic index seems to be less applicable to such disease. The combination of rituximab and chemotherapy is the gold standard treatment of patients with good prognosis features and allows high cure rates. However, high-dose chemotherapy supported by peripheral blood stem cell support is often warranted in poor-prognosis patients. The use of positrons emission tomography examination is more and more used in such situations to select the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:20207294

  3. The human intestinal B-cell response.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J; Sollid, L M

    2016-09-01

    The intestinal immune system is chronically challenged by a huge plethora of antigens derived from the lumen. B-cell responses in organized gut-associated lymphoid tissues and regional lymph nodes that are driven chronically by gut antigens generate the largest population of antibody-producing cells in the body: the gut lamina propria plasma cells. Although animal studies have provided insights into mechanisms that underpin this dynamic process, some very fundamental differences in this system appear to exist between species. Importantly, this prevents extrapolation from mice to humans to inform translational research questions. Therefore, in this review we will describe the structures and mechanisms involved in the propagation, dissemination, and regulation of this immense plasma cell population in man. Uniquely, we will seek our evidence exclusively from studies of human cells and tissues. PMID:27461177

  4. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  5. Syk Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for the Positive Selection of Immature B Cells into the Recirculating B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Martin; Gulbranson-Judge, Adam; Quinn, Marian E.; Walters, Alice E.; MacLennan, Ian C.M.; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase Syk has been implicated as a key signal transducer from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We show here that mutation of the Syk gene completely blocks the maturation of immature B cells into recirculating cells and stops their entry into B cell follicles. Furthermore, using radiation chimeras we demonstrate that this developmental block is due to the absence of Syk in the B cells themselves. Syk-deficient B cells are shown to have the life span of normal immature B cells. If this is extended by over-expression of Bcl-2, they accumulate in the T zone and red pulp of the spleen in increased numbers, but still fail to mature to become recirculating follicular B cells. Despite this defect in maturation, Syk-deficient B cells were seen to give rise to switched as well as nonswitched splenic plasma cells. Normally only a proportion of immature B cells is recruited into the recirculating pool. Our results suggest that Syk transduces a BCR signal that is absolutely required for the positive selection of immature B cells into the recirculating B cell pool. PMID:9396770

  6. BIP induces mice CD19(hi) regulatory B cells producing IL-10 and highly expressing PD-L1, FasL.

    PubMed

    Tang, Youfa; Jiang, Qing; Ou, Yanghui; Zhang, Fan; Qing, Kai; Sun, Yuanli; Lu, Wenjie; Zhu, Huifen; Gong, Feili; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that B cells possess a regulatory function in mouse models of autoimmune diseases. Regulatory B cells can modulate immune response through many types of molecular mechanisms, including the production of IL-10 and the expression of PD-1 Ligand and Fas Ligand, but the microenvironmental factors and mechanisms that induce regulatory B cells have not been fully identified. BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein), a member of the heat shock protein 70 family, is a type of evolutionarily highly conserved protein. In this article, we have found that IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells are discrete cell populations, but enriched in CD19(hi) cells. BIP can induce IL-10-producing splenic B cells, IL-10 secretion and B cells highly expressing PD-L1 and FasL. CD40 signaling acts in synergy with BIP to induce regulatory B cells. BIP increased surface CD19 molecule expression intensity and IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells induced by BIP share the CD19(hi) phenotype. Furthermore, B cells treated with BIP and anti-CD40 can lead to suppression of T cell proliferation and the effect is partially IL-10-dependent and mainly BIP-induced. Taken together, our findings identify a novel function of BIP in the induction of regulatory B cells and add a new reason for the therapy of autoimmune disorders or other inflammatory conditions.

  7. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  8. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages.

  9. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish

    PubMed Central

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G.; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages. PMID:27003360

  10. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease.

  11. Dual immunoglobulin light chain B cells: Trojan horses of autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Pelanda, Roberta

    2014-04-01

    Receptor editing, a major mechanism of B cell tolerance, can also lead to allelic inclusion at the immunoglobulin light chain loci and the development of B cells that coexpress two different immunoglobulin light chains and, therefore, two antibody specificities. Most allelically included B cells express two κ chains, although rare dual-λ cells are also observed. Moreover, these cells typically coexpress an autoreactive and a nonautoreactive antibody. Thus, allelically included B cells could operate like 'Trojan horses': expression and function of the nonautoreactive antigen receptors might promote their maturation, activation, and terminal differentiation into effector cells that also express and secrete autoantibodies. Indeed, dual-κ B cells are greatly expanded into effector B cell subsets in some autoimmune mice, thus indicating they might play an important role in disease.

  12. Identification of bovine B cell reactive and B cell specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mukwedeya, D T; Takamatsu, H; Parkhouse, R M

    1993-11-01

    All monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the workshop panel were screened for reactivity with bovine surface immunoglobulin (sIg)+ cells (gated small dense lymphocytes from peripheral blood) by fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Eighteen temporary clusters--TCs 1-12, 15, 16, 18, 19, 25 and 26--contained mAbs reactive with sIg+ cells. mAb BAS21A (unclustered) and CC92 (TC25) were also reactive with sIg+ cells. Further FACS analysis with B cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and mesenteric lymph nodes, and B and T lymphoma cell lines, indicated that the majority of mAbs within TCs 2, 4, 15, 18 and 26 reacted specifically with bovine B cells. Bovine B cell specific mAbs within these clusters were TH14B, IL-A55, CACT101A, MUC76A from TC4, VPM30, GC65A, CACT65A from TC15, IL-A58, CC56, CC70, IL-A65 from TC18, and CC57 and 26A9 from TC26. Three mAbs--IL-A65, CC70, and BAQ15A--within TC18 defined WC3; mAbs TD9 and CC56 may also be related to WC3.

  13. Primary B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Tombolini, Flavia; Lacetera, Vito; Gini, Guido; Capelli, Debora; Leoni, Pietro; Montironi, Rodolfo; Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We present a rare case of primary lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma of the testis focusing on ultrasonographic and pathological features and clinical implications. Pathological examination revealed primary testicular lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma which was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, including rachicentesis with administration of chemotherapy and with radiotherapy of contralateral testis. Primary testicular lymphoblastic B cell lymphoma is an aggressive disease and it is necessary a multimodal therapy (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) to prevent metastasis. PMID:25641484

  14. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  15. [Acquired angioedema with C1-INH deficiency and accompanying chronic spontaneous urticaria in a patient with chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Klossowski, N; Braun, S A; von Gruben, V; Losem, C; Plewe, D; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2015-10-01

    Acquired angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-AAE) is characterized by recurrent edema of the subcutaneous and/or submucosal tissue without wheals and negative family history of angioedema. Here, we present the case of a patient with a chronic lymphatic B cell leukemia who suffered from both C1-INH-AAE and chronic spontaneous urticaria. Oral corticosteroids, antihistamines, and the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab were applied to treat the chronic urticaria in combination with the plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate Berinert® and the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant, but the symptoms did not improved significantly. Thus, polychemotherapy targeting the slow-growing lymphoproliferative disease including rituximab was initiated, which resulted in remission of both the urticaria and the angioedema.

  16. Depletion of B cells in murine lupus: efficacy and resistance.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Anupama; Shupe, Jonathan; Dunn, Robert; Kashgarian, Michael; Kehry, Marilyn R; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2007-09-01

    In mice, genetic deletion of B cells strongly suppresses systemic autoimmunity, providing a rationale for depleting B cells to treat autoimmunity. In fact, B cell depletion with rituximab is approved for rheumatoid arthritis patients, and clinical trials are underway for systemic lupus erythematosus. Yet, basic questions concerning mechanism, pathologic effect, and extent of B cell depletion cannot be easily studied in humans. To better understand how B cell depletion affects autoimmunity, we have generated a transgenic mouse expressing human CD20 on B cells in an autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr) (MRL/lpr) background. Using high doses of a murine anti-human CD20 mAb, we were able to achieve significant depletion of B cells, which in turn markedly ameliorated clinical and histologic disease as well as antinuclear Ab and serum autoantibody levels. However, we also found that B cells were quite refractory to depletion in autoimmune-prone strains compared with non-autoimmune-prone strains. This was true with multiple anti-CD20 Abs, including a new anti-mouse CD20 Ab, and in several different autoimmune-prone strains. Thus, whereas successful B cell depletion is a promising therapy for lupus, at least some patients might be resistant to the therapy as a byproduct of the autoimmune condition itself.

  17. The molecular biology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Frick, Mareike; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Georg

    2011-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most common type of malignant lymphoma. In the last few years, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this entity. Gene expression profiling has identified three molecular DLBCL subtypes, termed germinal-center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the biology of these DLBCL subtypes with a special emphasis on novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23556103

  18. B-cell targeted therapeutics in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are the source of humoral immunity and are thus a critical component of the adaptive immune system. However, B cells can also be pathogenic and the origin of disease. Deregulated B-cell function has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. B cells contribute to pathological immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, costimulation of T cells, antigen presentation, and the production of autoantibodies. DNA-and RNA-containing immune complexes can also induce the production of type I interferons, which further promotes the inflammatory response. B-cell depletion with the CD20 antibody rituximab has provided clinical proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response can result in significant benefit to patients. Consequently, the interest in B-cell targeted therapies has greatly increased in recent years and a number of new biologics exploiting various mechanisms are now in clinical development. This review provides an overview on current developments in the area of B-cell targeted therapies by describing molecules and subpopulations that currently offer themselves as therapeutic targets, the different strategies to target B cells currently under investigation as well as an update on the status of novel therapeutics in clinical development. Emerging data from clinical trials are providing critical insight regarding the role of B cells and autoantibodies in various autoimmune conditions and will guide the development of more efficacious therapeutics and better patient selection. PMID:23566679

  19. Involvement of B cells in non-infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Justine R; Stempel, Andrew J; Bharadwaj, Arpita; Appukuttan, Binoy

    2016-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis—or intraocular inflammatory disease—causes substantial visual morbidity and reduced quality of life amongst affected individuals. To date, research of pathogenic mechanisms has largely been focused on processes involving T lymphocyte and/or myeloid leukocyte populations. Involvement of B lymphocytes has received relatively little attention. In contrast, B-cell pathobiology is a major field within general immunological research, and large clinical trials have showed that treatments targeting B cells are highly effective for multiple systemic inflammatory diseases. B cells, including the terminally differentiated plasma cell that produces antibody, are found in the human eye in different forms of non-infectious uveitis; in some cases, these cells outnumber other leukocyte subsets. Recent case reports and small case series suggest that B-cell blockade may be therapeutic for patients with non-infectious uveitis. As well as secretion of antibody, B cells may promote intraocular inflammation by presentation of antigen to T cells, production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and support of T-cell survival. B cells may also perform various immunomodulatory activities within the eye. This translational review summarizes the evidence for B-cell involvement in non-infectious uveitis, and considers the potential contributions of B cells to the development and control of the disease. Manipulations of B cells and/or their products are promising new approaches to the treatment of non-infectious uveitis. PMID:26962453

  20. The B-Cell-Specific src-Family Kinase Blk Is Dispensable for B-Cell Development and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Texido, Gemma; Su, I-hsin; Mecklenbräuker, Ingrid; Saijo, Kaoru; Malek, Sami N.; Desiderio, Stephen; Rajewsky, Klaus; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    The B-cell lymphocyte kinase (Blk) is a src-family protein tyrosine kinase specifically expressed in B-lineage cells of mice. The early onset of Blk expression during B-cell development in the bone marrow and the high expression levels of Blk in mature B cells suggest a possible important role of Blk in B-cell physiology. To study the in vivo function of Blk, mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the blk gene were generated. In homozygous mutant mice, neither blk mRNA nor Blk protein is expressed. Despite the absence of Blk, the development, in vitro activation, and humoral immune responses of B cells to T-cell-dependent and -independent antigens are unaltered. These data are consistent with functional redundancy of Blk in B-cell development and immune responses. PMID:10648608

  1. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  2. Production of genetically modified Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T cells for adoptive transfer to patients at high risk of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, C A; Ng, C Y; Heslop, H E; Holladay, M S; Richardson, S; Turner, E V; Loftin, S K; Li, C; Brenner, M K; Rooney, C M

    1995-04-01

    EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a disorder most commonly associated with the immunocompromise that follows allogeneic organ transplantation. In patients receiving T cell-depleted bone marrow from HLA-mismatched or HLA-matched unrelated donors, the incidence of EBV-LPD is particularly high, ranging from 5 to 30%. Administration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes may be one means of preventing and treating this disease. We now describe a method that allows the routine and timely preparation of large numbers of such cells to allow their safe administration to bone marrow transplant recipients. We also describe how these cells may be genetically marked before infusion, to determine their fate and disposition in vivo.

  3. ABSENCE OF SCLEROSTIN ADVERSELY AFFECTS B CELL SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Corey J.; Rueda, Randell; McLelland, Bryce; Collette, Nicole M.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Manilay, Jennifer O.

    2012-01-01

    Increased osteoblast activity in sclerostin-knockout (Sost−/−) mice results in generalized hyperostosis and bones with small bone marrow cavities due to hyperactive mineralizing osteoblast populations. Hematopoietic cell fate decisions are dependent on their local microenvironment, which contains osteoblast and stromal cell populations that support both hematopoietic stem cell quiescence and facilitate B cell development. In this study, we investigated whether high bone mass environments affect B cell development via the utilization of Sost−/− mice, a model of sclerosteosis. We found the bone marrow of Sost−/− mice to be specifically depleted of B cells, due to elevated apoptosis at all B cell developmental stages. In contrast, B cell function in the spleen was normal. Sost expression analysis confirmed that Sost is primarily expressed in osteocytes and is not expressed in any hematopoietic lineage, which indicated that the B cell defects in Sost−/− mice are non-cell autonomous and this was confirmed by transplantation of wildtype (WT) bone marrow into lethally irradiated Sost−/− recipients. WT→Sost−/− chimeras displayed a reduction in B cells, whereas reciprocal Sost−/−→WT chimeras did not, supporting the idea that the Sost−/− bone environment cannot fully support normal B cell development. Expression of the pre-B cell growth stimulating factor, Cxcl12, was significantly lower in bone marrow stromal cells of Sost−/− mice while the Wnt target genes Lef-1 and Ccnd1 remained unchanged in B cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for Sost in the regulation of bone marrow environments that support B cells. PMID:22434688

  4. Tissue-Specific B-Cell Dysfunction and Generalized Memory B-Cell Loss during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peruchon, Sandrine; Chaoul, Nada; Burelout, Chantal; Delache, Benoit; Brochard, Patricia; Laurent, Pascale; Cognasse, Fabrice; Prévot, Sophie; Garraud, Olivier; Le Grand, Roger; Richard, Yolande

    2009-01-01

    Background Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. Methods and Findings Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.). We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD−CD27+) B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus–B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. Conclusions These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid organs

  5. BAFF enhances chemotaxis of primary human B cells: a particular synergy between BAFF and CXCL13 on memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Borhis, Gwenoline; Lefevre, Eric A; Chaoul, Nada; Deshayes, Frederique; Dessirier, Valérie; Lapree, Genevieve; Tsapis, Andreas; Richard, Yolande

    2008-03-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the TNF family, (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) regulate B-lymphocyte survival and activation. We report that BAFF, but not APRIL, increased the chemotactic response of primary human B cells to CCL21, CXCL12, and CXCL13. The BAFF-induced increase in B-cell chemotaxis was totally abolished by blockade of BAFF-R and was strongly dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, and p38MAPK pathways. BAFF had similar effects on the chemotaxis of naive and memory B cells in response to CCL21 but increased more strongly that of memory B cells to CXCL13 than that of naive B cells. Our findings indicate a previously unreported role for the BAFF/BAFF-R pair in mature B-cell chemotaxis. The synergy between CXCL13 and BAFF produced by stromal cells and follicular dendritic cells may have important implications for B-cell homeostasis, the development of normal B-cell areas, and for the formation of germinal center-like follicles that may be observed in various autoimmune diseases.

  6. Hybrid methods for B-cell epitope prediction.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2014-01-01

    Many computational approaches to B-cell epitope prediction have been published, including combinations of previously proposed methods, which complicates the tasks of further developing such computational approaches and of selecting those most appropriate for practical applications (e.g., the design of novel immunodiagnostics and vaccines). These tasks are considered together herein to clarify their close but often overlooked interrelationship, thereby providing a guide to their performance in mutual support of one another, with emphasis on key physicochemical and biological considerations that are relevant from an applications perspective. This aims to assist investigators in performing either or both tasks, with the overall goals of successfully applying computational tools towards practical ends and of generating informative new data towards iterative improvement of the tools, particularly as regards the design of peptide-based immunogens for eliciting the production of antipeptide antibodies that modulate biological activity of protein targets via functionally relevant cross-reactivity in relation to the phenomena of protein folding and protein disorder.

  7. Association of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) with probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-variant.

    PubMed

    Berio, A; Mangiante, G; Piazzi, A

    2014-01-01

    The paper reported on a case of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) associated with a probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome variant (Dianzani autoimmune lymphoproliferative disease) (DALD). A male patient with typical features of SMEI and a SCN1A gene variant presented in the first year of life with multiple lymph nodes, palpable liver at 2 cm from the costal margin, neutropenia, dysgammaglobulinemia, relative and sometimes absolute lymphocytosis. Subsequently the patient presented with constantly raised IgA in serum and positive antinuclear and thyroid antimicrosomal antibodies. The diagnosis of probable autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome was made; arthritis, skin and throat blisters, which appeared subsequently led to the diagnosis of linear IgA disease. On the basis of these unique associations, the Authors hypothesized that autoimmunity may be partly responsible of the severe epileptic symptomatology, perhaps mediated by autoantibodies against sodium channels or by accompanying cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Corticosteroid treatment ameliorated the epilepsy and laboratory tests. Future studies will be necessary to evaluate the relevance of autoimmunity in SMEI. PMID:25669891

  8. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of lymphoproliferative lesions involving the major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Chhieng, D C; Cangiarella, J F; Cohen, J M

    2000-04-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) is an accurate and cost-effective procedure for evaluating salivary gland lesions. Lymphoproliferative lesions may manifest as salivary gland enlargement. We report our experience with 43 cases of reactive and neoplastic lymphoproliferative lesions of the salivary glands evaluated by FNA, including 23 cases of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and 20 neoplastic lymphoproliferative processes. The latter included 2 multiple myelomas and 18 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 1; small cleaved cell lymphoma, 1; lympho-plasmacytoid lymphoma, 1; mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, 2; mixed cell lymphoma, 4; lymphoblastic lymphoma, 1; and large cell lymphoma, 8). There were no false-negative diagnoses. Aspiration smears from 3 patients with reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and 4 patients with malignant lymphoma initially were interpreted as atypical lymphoid proliferations or as suggestive of malignant lymphoma. Thus, FNA had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 87%. The majority of patients were treated medically without surgical intervention. Among the patients who underwent surgical resection of the salivary gland, 7 had an equivocal cytologic diagnosis and 2 had a benign cytologic diagnosis, but their parotid swelling failed to regress despite medical treatment. In most instances, FNA provides useful information for subsequent disease management and obviates surgical intervention.

  9. Role and regulation of CD1d in normal and pathological B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a non-polymorphic, MHC class I-like molecule, which presents phosphoand glycosphingo-lipid antigens to a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells called invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. This CD1d-iNKT cell axis regulates nearly all aspects of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Expression of CD1d on B cells is suggestive of the ability of these cells to present antigen to and form cognate interactions with iNKT cells. Herein we summarise key evidence regarding the role and regulation of CD1d in normal B cells and in humoral immunity. We then extend the discussion to B cell disorders, with emphasis on autoimmune disease, viral infection and neoplastic transformation of B lineage cells, where CD1d expression can be altered as a mechanism of immune evasion, and can have both diagnostic and prognostic importance. Finally we highlight current and future therapeutic strategies that aim to target the CD1d-iNKT axis in B cells. PMID:25381357

  10. B Cells: The Old New Players in Reproductive Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Franziska; Schumacher, Anne; Costa, Serban-Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive immunology research has long focused on T cell responses to paternal antigens and tolerance mechanisms supporting fetal well-being. The participation of B cells herein was not widely studied. Because of the fascinating immunological uniqueness of pregnancy, it is however to be expected that such pleiotropic cells play a considerable role. In fact, on the one hand B cells contribute toward pregnancy tolerance by secreting the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10 but on the other hand can seriously harm pregnancy because of their capacity of producing autoantibodies. As for protective B cells, new evidences in mouse models arise suggesting that IL-10 producing B cells, the so-called B10 cells, help in maintaining tolerance toward semi-allogenic fetal antigens. They may be also important to fight danger signals at the fetal-maternal interface as, e.g., in the case of infections with the aim to restore the disrupted fetal tolerance. In human pregnancies, IL-10 producing B cells increase with pregnancy onset but not in the case of spontaneous abortions. In vitro, they are able to suppress TNF-α production by T cells from pregnant individuals. Their generation and functionality will be discussed throughout this review article. B cells can be deleterious to pregnancy as well. Aberrant B cell compartment is associated with obstetric pathologies. In particular, the capacity of B2 cells to produce specific autoantibodies or of B-1a B cells to secrete natural autoantibodies that can turn autoreactive will be discussed herein. PMID:25002862

  11. Are autoantibodies the targets of B-cell-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S; Grammer, Amrie C; Ning, Tony C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2011-09-01

    B-cell-directed therapy-the use of agents that eliminate B cells or block cytokines important for B-cell function-is emerging as a promising approach to the treatment of rheumatic disease. Target diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), display diverse patterns of autoantibody production and aberrant activation of B cells. Despite the success of this general approach, the mechanisms by which B-cell-directed therapy ameliorates disease, and the role of autoantibodies as biomarkers of clinical response remain unclear. Importantly, although B-cell-directed therapy can reduce the production of some autoantibodies, the effects can be variable and heterogeneous, probably reflecting the critical (but ill-defined) roles of different B-cell and plasma cell populations in autoantibody production. Future studies during clinical trials of these agents are needed to define which B-cell and autoantibody populations are affected (or ought to be), and to discover informative biomarkers of clinical response that can be used to advance this therapeutic approach.

  12. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells.

  13. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  14. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. PMID:21703537

  15. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  16. B cells do not present antigen covalently linked to microspheres.

    PubMed Central

    Galelli, A; Charlot, B; Dériaud, E; Leclerc, C

    1993-01-01

    B cells have been shown to present antigen to T cells very efficiently through their capacity to capture antigens by their membrane immunoglobulin. This direct cognate interaction of T and B cells results in the proliferation and differentiation of B cells. This concept has been established using soluble proteins. However, most of the antigens to which the immune system is exposed are included in complex particulate structures such as bacteria or parasites. The capacity of B cells to present these large and complex antigens is still unclear. To address this question we have studied the presentation by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific B cells of the same antigen TNP-KLH (keyhole limpet haemocyanin), either in a soluble form or covalently linked to poly(acrolein) microspheres, from 0.25 to 1.5 microns in diameter. In the presence of irradiated splenocytes or purified macrophages as a source of antigen-presenting cells (APC), KLH-specific T cells proliferated in response to soluble TNP-KLH or to TNP-KLH coupled to beads. In contrast, TNP-specific memory B cells were totally ineffective in presenting the TNP-KLH beads to KLH-specific T cells whereas they presented very efficiently soluble TNP-KLH. Similar results were obtained with the A20 B lymphoma or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated TNP-specific B cells. These results therefore indicate that B cells are unable to present large size particulate antigens such as bacteria or parasites. PMID:8509143

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi cytosolic alkaline antigens (FI) induce polyclonal activation in murine normal B cells.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1996-08-01

    Several reports have described polyclonal activation in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to analyse the participation of one T. cruzi antigenic fraction in this immunological event. The antigen selected was FI, an antigenic fraction of pI 7-9 obtained from T. cruzi cytosol separated by isoelectricfocusing. FI is constituted by molecules with molecular weights of around 60 and 20 KDa. The authors assayed the ability of this antigenic fraction to induce polyclonal activation of spleen mononuclear cells from normal (NSMC) BALB/c mice. NSMC showed a marked lymphoproliferative response measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 3 days of culture in presence of FI. The values reached by FI-stimulated cells were 10 times higher than the controls (non-stimulated cells). This effect was dose-dependent. Furthermore, the authors observed that a purified T-cell population in the presence of adherent cells was unaffected by FI. Additionally, in a culture of NSMC, FI stimulated the proliferation of B cells as observed by the increase of the percentage of B220+ cells determined by FACS using FITC-conjugated anti-mouse B220. The authors noticed that the percentage of B220+Ly1+(CD5) populations in the presence of FI did not change with respect to the control (non-stimulated cells), indicating that FI expanded both conventional and CD5+ B cells. The isotypic pattern of the antibodies produced after 6 days of culture of NSMC in the presence of FI was predominantly IgM, which reacted with highly conserved antigens such as actin, myosin, myoglobin, thyroglobulin and carbonic anhydrase, but did not react with FI. A slight increase of IgG1 and IgG3 with respect to the control was observed but no changes on the levels of IgG2 was noticed. These results indicate that FI promotes activation, proliferation and differentiation in antibody-secreting cells of normal murine B lymphocytes.

  18. Gene expression profiling of the response to interferon beta in Epstein-Barr-transformed and primary B cells of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khsheibun, Rana; Paperna, Tamar; Volkowich, Anat; Lejbkowicz, Izabella; Avidan, Nili; Miller, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of interferon-beta (IFN-β), one of the key immunotherapies used in multiple sclerosis (MS), on peripheral blood leukocytes and T cells have been extensively studied. B cells are a less abundant leukocyte type, and accordingly less is known about the B cell-specific response to IFN-β. To identify gene expression changes and pathways induced by IFN-β in B cells, we studied the in vitro response of human Epstein Barr-transformed B cells (lymphoblast cell lines-LCLs), and validated our results in primary B cells. LCLs were derived from an MS patient repository. Whole genome expression analysis identified 115 genes that were more than two-fold differentially up-regulated following IFN-β exposure, with over 50 previously unrecognized as IFN-β response genes. Pathways analysis demonstrated that IFN-β affected LCLs in a similar manner to other cell types by activating known IFN-β canonical pathways. Additionally, IFN-β increased the expression of innate immune response genes, while down-regulating many B cell receptor pathway genes and genes involved in adaptive immune responses. Novel response genes identified herein, NEXN, DDX60L, IGFBP4, and HAPLN3, B cell receptor pathway genes, CD79B and SYK, and lymphocyte activation genes, LAG3 and IL27RA, were validated as IFN-β response genes in primary B cells. In this study new IFN-β response genes were identified in B cells, with possible implications to B cell-specific functions. The study's results emphasize the applicability of LCLs for studies of human B cell drug response. The usage of LCLs from patient-based repositories may facilitate future studies of drug response in MS and other immune-mediated disorders with a B cell component.

  19. DHA-enriched fish oil targets B cell lipid microdomains and enhances ex vivo and in vivo B cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gurzell, Eric A.; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Clinthorne, Jonathan; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fenton, Jenifer I.

    2013-01-01

    DHA is a n-3 LCPUFA in fish oil that generally suppresses T lymphocyte function. However, the effect of fish oil on B cell function remains relatively understudied. Given the important role of B cells in gut immunity and increasing human fish oil supplementation, we sought to determine whether DFO leads to enhanced B cell activation in the SMAD−/− colitis-prone mouse model, similar to that observed with C57BL/6 mice. This study tested the hypothesis that DHA from fish oil is incorporated into the B cell membrane to alter lipid microdomain clustering and enhance B cell function. Purified, splenic B cells from DFO-fed mice displayed increased DHA levels and diminished GM1 microdomain clustering. DFO enhanced LPS-induced B cell secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased CD40 expression ex vivo compared with CON. Despite increased MHCII expression in the unstimulated ex vivo B cells from DFO-fed mice, we observed no difference in ex vivo OVA-FITC uptake in B cells from DFO or CON mice. In vivo, DFO increased lymphoid tissue B cell populations and surface markers of activation compared with CON. Finally, we investigated whether these ex vivo and in vivo observations were consistent with systemic changes. Indeed, DFO-fed mice had significantly higher plasma IL-5, IL-13, and IL-9 (Th2-biasing cytokines) and cecal IgA compared with CON. These results support the hypothesis and an emerging concept that fish oil enhances B cell function in vivo. PMID:23180828

  20. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  1. NK cell depletion diminish tumour-specific B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Markus; Tawadros, Samir; Sedlacek, Hans-Harald; Schultze, Joachim L; Berthold, Frank

    2004-05-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells can exercise immediate cytotoxicity against malignant cells and thus far modulate the development of tumour directed T cell immunity. To investigate the impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell immunity mice were immunised with IMR5-75 human neuroblastoma cells with or without prior in vivo NK cell depletion. Flow cytometry analyses gave evidence for an impaired IgG response against the cells immunised with. Dissection of Th1 (IgG2a) and Th2 (IgG1) oriented B cell responses revealed Th1 responses as primarily affected, while Th2 oriented B cell responses as measured by flow cytometry and GD2 ganglioside-specific ELISA were enforced. The data reveal an unexpected impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell responses. Consequently, NK cell function has also to be taken into account when developing B cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Lipoxin A₄ modulates adaptive immunity by decreasing memory B-cell responses via an ALX/FPR2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Serhan, Charles N; Phipps, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Specialized proresolving mediators are endogenous bioactive lipid molecules that play a fundamental role in the regulation of inflammation and its resolution. Lipoxins and other specialized proresolving mediators have been identified in important immunological tissues including bone marrow, spleen, and blood. Lipoxins regulate functions of the innate immune system including the promotion of monocyte recruitment and increase macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A major knowledge gap is whether lipoxins influence adaptive immune cells. Here, we analyzed the actions of lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and its receptor ALX/FPR2 on human and mouse B cells. LXA₄ decreased IgM and IgG production on activated human B cells through ALX/FPR2-dependent signaling, which downregulated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. LXA₄ also inhibited human memory B-cell antibody production and proliferation, but not naïve B-cell function. Lastly, LXA₄ decreased antigen-specific antibody production in an OVA immunization mouse model. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the actions of lipoxins on human B cells, demonstrating a link between resolution signals and adaptive immunity. Regulating antibody production is crucial to prevent unwanted inflammation. Harnessing the ability of lipoxins to decrease memory B-cell antibody production can be beneficial to threat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.

  3. GNA13 loss in germinal center B cells leads to impaired apoptosis and promotes lymphoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Jane A.; Nugent, Adrienne; Rempel, Rachel E.; Moffitt, Andrea B.; Davis, Nicholas S.; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Shingleton, Jennifer R.; Zhang, Jenny; Love, Cassandra; Datta, Jyotishka; McKinney, Matthew E.; Tzeng, Tiffany J.; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan; Walzer, Katelyn A.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Rasheed, Suhail A. K.; Casey, Patrick J.; Lossos, Izidore S.

    2016-01-01

    GNA13 is the most frequently mutated gene in germinal center (GC)-derived B-cell lymphomas, including nearly a quarter of Burkitt lymphoma and GC-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. These mutations occur in a pattern consistent with loss of function. We have modeled the GNA13-deficient state exclusively in GC B cells by crossing the Gna13 conditional knockout mouse strain with the GC-specific AID-Cre transgenic strain. AID-Cre+ GNA13-deficient mice demonstrate disordered GC architecture and dark zone/light zone distribution in vivo, and demonstrate altered migration behavior, decreased levels of filamentous actin, and attenuated RhoA activity in vitro. We also found that GNA13-deficient mice have increased numbers of GC B cells that display impaired caspase-mediated cell death and increased frequency of somatic hypermutation in the immunoglobulin VH locus. Lastly, GNA13 deficiency, combined with conditional MYC transgene expression in mouse GC B cells, promotes lymphomagenesis. Thus, GNA13 loss is associated with GC B-cell persistence, in which impaired apoptosis and ongoing somatic hypermutation may lead to an increased risk of lymphoma development. PMID:26989201

  4. The regulation and activation of lupus-associated B cells.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michele L; Hondowicz, Brian D; Wharton, Gina N; Adair, Brigette S; Metzgar, Michele H; Alexander, Shawn T; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) B cells are regulated in non-autoimmune mice. While some are deleted or undergo receptor editing, a population of anti-dsDNA (VH3H9/V lambda 1) B cells that emigrate into the periphery has also been identified. These cells have an altered phenotype relative to normal B cells in that they have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B-cell interface in the spleen. This phenotype may be the consequence of immature B cells encountering antigen in the absence of T-cell help. When provided with T-cell help, the anti-dsDNA B cells differentiate into antibody-forming cells. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, the VH3H9/V lambda 1 anti-dsDNA B cells populate the B-cell follicle and by 12 weeks of age produce serum autoantibodies. The early event of anti-dsDNA B-cell follicular entry, in the absence of autoantibody production, is dependent upon CD4(+) T cells. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice may be regulated by the counterbalancing effect of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells. Consistent with this model, we have demonstrated that T(reg) cells are able to prevent autoantibody production induced by T-cell help. Additional studies are aimed at investigating the mechanisms of this suppression as well as probing the impact of distinct forms of T-cell-dependent and -independent activation on anti-dsDNA B cells.

  5. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  6. Immunopathology of B-cell lymphomas induced in C57BL/6 mice by dualtropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV).

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.; Twomey, P.; Hill, S.; Jonasson, J.; Beardsley, T.; Haas, M.

    1982-01-01

    Combined clinicopathologic and immunomorphologic evidence is presented that would indicate that a murine leukemia virus (MuLV) with the dualtropic host range is capable of producing a clinically malignant lesion composed of immunoblasts and associated plasma cells in C57BL/6 mice. This process, morphologically diagnosed as an immunoblastic lymphoma of B cells using standard histopathologic criteria, was found to be distinctly polyclonal with regard to immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype when analyzed for both surface and cytoplasmic Ig. Further studies demonstrated that this clinicopathologically malignant, dualtropic MuLV-induced, polyclonal immunoblastic lymphoma of B cells in C57BL/6 mice was normal diploid and unable to be successfully transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. Although all serum heavy and light chain components were found to be progressively elevated as the tumor load increased, the polyclonal increase in serum immunoglobulins was most pronounced for mu heavy and kappa light chains (ie, mu greater than gamma 2A greater than alpha greater than gamma 2B greater than gamma 1; kappa greater than lamba). The dissociation of clinicopathologic and biologic criteria for malignancy in the presently described dualtropic (RadLV) MuLV-induced B-cell lesion is sharply contrasted with the thymotropic (RadLV), MuLV-induced T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in C57BL/6 mice. This process is also a clinicopathologically malignant lesion but, when one uses biologic criteria, is found to be distinctly monoclonal, aneuploid, and easily transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. The close clinicopathologic and biologic similarities of the dualtropic MuLV-induced animal model to corresponding human B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases are stressed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:6282131

  7. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  8. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  9. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction. PMID:27167731

  10. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  11. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  12. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  13. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  14. Native kidney post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in a non-renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Araya, Carlos E; Mehta, Mansi B; González-Peralta, Regino P; Hunger, Stephen P; Dharnidharka, Vikas R

    2009-06-01

    PTLD is an important post-transplant complication. Although PTLD affects kidney allografts after renal transplantation, it has not been reported in native kidneys of other solid organ recipients. Herein, we report a child who underwent an orthotropic liver transplant for cryptogenic cholestatic hepatitis and developed fever, generalized lymphadenopathy, chronic EBV viremia, and lymphatic PTLD. Subsequently, she also developed gross hematuria and nephrotic range proteinuria. Kidney histology revealed EBV-positive mononuclear infiltrates within the renal parenchyma consistent with PTLD. Electron microscopy examination demonstrated subepithelial electron-dense deposits consistent with a membranous glomerulopathy pattern. The PTLD was successfully treated with reduced immunosuppression and cyclic cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and prednisone, but the renal disease progressed to end-stage renal failure within two yr. Repeat kidney histology showed chronic nephropathy and membranous glomerulopathy without PTLD infiltrates or detectable EBV staining, although chronic viremia persisted. To our knowledge, this is the first such child to be reported and highlights the importance of remaining vigilant for renal PTLD even in non-kidney organ recipients.

  15. B-cell memory and the persistence of antibody responses.

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, I C; García de Vinuesa, C; Casamayor-Palleja, M

    2000-01-01

    Antigens such as viral envelope proteins and bacterial exotoxins induce responses which result in the production of neutralizing antibody. These responses persist for years and provide highly efficient defence against reinfection. During these antibody responses a proportion of participating B cells mutate the genes that encode their immunoglobulin variable regions. This can increase the affinity of the antibody, but can also induce autoreactive B cells. Selection mechanisms operate which allow the cells with high affinity for the provoking antigen to persist, while other B cells recruited into the response die. PMID:10794052

  16. PI3 Kinase signals BCR dependent mature B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Zhang, Baochun; Paik, Ji Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Kearney, John F.; Otipoby, Kevin L.; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Previous work has shown that mature B cells depend upon survival signals delivered to the cells by their antigen receptor (BCR). To identify the molecular nature of this survival signal, we have developed a genetic approach in which ablation of the BCR is combined with the activation of specific, BCR dependent signaling cascades in mature B cells in vivo. Using this system, we provide evidence that the survival of BCR deficient mature B cells can be rescued by a single signaling pathway downstream of the BCR, namely PI3K signaling, with the FOXO1 transcription factor playing a central role. PMID:19879843

  17. Reprint of: B cell elimination in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clin. Immunol. 146(2) 90-103.

    PubMed

    Furtado, João; Isenberg, David A

    2013-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution, potentially life-threatening with considerable morbidity. The elimination of pathogenic B cells has emerged as a rational therapeutic option. Many open label studies have reported encouraging results in which clinical and serological remission have invariably been described, often enabling the reduction of steroid and immunosuppressive treatment. However, the results from randomized controlled studies have been disappointing and several questions remain to be answered. In this review we will focus on results of B cell direct depletion in the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  18. Reprint of: B cell elimination in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clin. Immunol. 146(2) 90-103.

    PubMed

    Furtado, João; Isenberg, David A

    2013-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with a worldwide distribution, potentially life-threatening with considerable morbidity. The elimination of pathogenic B cells has emerged as a rational therapeutic option. Many open label studies have reported encouraging results in which clinical and serological remission have invariably been described, often enabling the reduction of steroid and immunosuppressive treatment. However, the results from randomized controlled studies have been disappointing and several questions remain to be answered. In this review we will focus on results of B cell direct depletion in the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:23642318

  19. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K.; Kristensen, Anne B.; Lay, William N.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV− subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV− controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  20. ATM deficiency promotes development of murine B-cell lymphomas that resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hathcock, Karen S.; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Camps, Jordi; Shin, Dong-Mi; Triner, Daniel; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Maul, Robert W.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Staudt, Louis M.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ried, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity. In mice, ATM deficiency is exclusively associated with T-cell lymphoma development, whereas B-cell tumors predominate in human ataxia-telangiectasia patients. We demonstrate in this study that when T cells are removed as targets for lymphomagenesis and as mediators of immune surveillance, ATM-deficient mice exclusively develop early-onset immunoglobulin M+ B-cell lymphomas that do not transplant to immunocompetent mice and that histologically and genetically resemble the activated B cell–like (ABC) subset of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These B-cell lymphomas show considerable chromosomal instability and a recurrent genomic amplification of a 4.48-Mb region on chromosome 18 that contains Malt1 and is orthologous to a region similarly amplified in human ABC DLBCL. Of importance, amplification of Malt1 in these lymphomas correlates with their dependence on nuclear factor (NF)-κB, MALT1, and B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling for survival, paralleling human ABC DLBCL. Further, like some human ABC DLBCLs, these mouse B-cell lymphomas also exhibit constitutive BCR-dependent NF-κB activation. This study reveals that ATM protects against development of B-cell lymphomas that model human ABC DLBCL and identifies a potential role for T cells in preventing the emergence of these tumors. PMID:26400962

  1. B Cell Development in the Bone Marrow Is Regulated by Homeostatic Feedback Exerted by Mature B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Gitit; Zisman-Rozen, Simona; Benhamou, David; Melamed, Doron; Mehr, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment. PMID:27047488

  2. Transgelin-2 in B-Cells Controls T-Cell Activation by Stabilizing T Cell - B Cell Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Myoung-Won; Kim, Hye-Ran; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Jun, Chang-Duk; Park, Zee-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS), a dynamic and organized junction between T-cells and antigen presenting cells (APCs), is critical for initiating adaptive immunity. The actin cytoskeleton plays a major role in T-cell reorganization during IS formation, and we previously reported that transgelin-2, an actin-binding protein expressed in T-cells, stabilizes cortical F-actin, promoting T-cell activation in response to antigen stimulation. Transgelin-2 is also highly expressed in B-cells, although no specific function has been reported. In this study, we found that deficiency in transgelin-2 (TAGLN2-/-) in B-cells had little effect on B-cell development and activation, as measured by the expression of CD69, MHC class II molecules, and CD80/86. Nevertheless, in B-cells, transgelin-2 accumulated in the IS during the interaction with T-cells. These results led us to hypothesize that transgelin-2 may also be involved in IS stability in B-cells, thereby influencing T-cell function. Notably, we found that transgelin-2 deficiency in B-cells reduced T-cell activation, as determined by the release of IL-2 and interferon-γ and the expression of CD69. Furthermore, the reduced T-cell activation was correlated with reduced B-cell–T-cell conjugate formation. Collectively, these results suggest that actin stability in B-cells during IS formation is critical for the initiation of adaptive T-cell immunity. PMID:27232882

  3. An eruption of European B-cell biology.

    PubMed

    Cancro, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Volcanic ash clouds disrupted the 2010 ESF/EMBO meeting on B cells and protection. Nevertheless, the delegates who did make it to Catalonia put together their own programme of talks covering a range of themes from mutualism to epigenetics.

  4. BAFF suppresses IL-15 expression in B cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Xing, Chen; Xiao, He; He, Youdi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Marrero, Bernadette; Wang, Yujuan; Zhang, Shengquan; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxi

    2014-05-01

    Clinical trials have shown that BAFF inhibitors do not reduce memory B cell levels but can reduce the number of mature B cells. It remains uncertain whether BAFF affects memory-maintaining cytokines such as IL-15. We found that BAFF suppressed IL-15 expression in B cells from lupus-like or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. When BAFF was blocked with atacicept-IgG, IL-15 expression was upregulated in lupus-like or experimental allergic encephalomyelitis mice. Finally, we showed that BAFF suppressed IL-15 expression in transitional 2 B cells by reducing Foxo1 expression and inducing Foxo1 phosphorylation. This study suggests that BAFF suppresses IL-15 expression in autoimmune diseases, and this opens up the possible opportunity for the clinical application of BAFF- and IL-15-specific therapeutic agents.

  5. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  6. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Version 1.2016.

    PubMed

    Zelenetz, Andrew D; Gordon, Leo I; Wierda, William G; Abramson, Jeremy S; Advani, Ranjana H; Andreadis, C Babis; Bartlett, Nancy; Byrd, John C; Fayad, Luis E; Fisher, Richard I; Glenn, Martha J; Habermann, Thomas M; Lee Harris, Nancy; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Hoppe, Richard T; Horwitz, Steven M; Kaminski, Mark S; Kelsey, Christopher R; Kim, Youn H; Krivacic, Susan; LaCasce, Ann S; Lunning, Matthew; Nademanee, Auayporn; Porcu, Pierluigi; Press, Oliver; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Reddy, Nishitha; Reid, Erin; Roberts, Kenneth; Saad, Ayman A; Sokol, Lubomir; Swinnen, Lode J; Vose, Julie M; Yahalom, Joachim; Zafar, Nadeem; Dwyer, Mary; Sundar, Hema

    2016-02-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are now considered a heterogeneous group of distinct molecular subtypes (germinal center B-cell DLBCL, activated B-cell DLBCL, and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) with varied natural history and response to therapy. In addition, a subset of patients with DLBCL have concurrent MYC and/or BCL2 gene rearrangements (double-hit lymphomas; DHL) and others have a dual expression of both MYC and BCL2 proteins (double-expressing DLBCL; DEL). The standard of care for the treatment of patients with PMBL, DHL, or DEL has not been established. Adequate immunophenotyping and molecular testing (in selected circumstances) are necessary for the accurate diagnosis of different subtypes of DLBCL. The NCCN Guidelines included in this issue, part of the NCCN Guidelines for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, address the diagnosis and management of DLBCL and its subtypes. PMID:26850490

  7. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on B-cell leukemias and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... sufficient evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In 2003, VA recognized ...

  8. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  9. The RhoA-ROCK pathway in the regulation of T and B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, Edd; Chowdhury, Luvana; Yi, Woelsung; Pernis, Alessandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Effective immune responses require the precise regulation of dynamic interactions between hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. The Rho subfamily of GTPases, which includes RhoA, is rapidly activated downstream of a diverse array of biochemical and biomechanical signals, and is emerging as an important mediator of this cross-talk. Key downstream effectors of RhoA are the Rho kinases, or ROCKs. The ROCKs are two serine-threonine kinases that can act as global coordinators of a tissue’s response to stress and injury because of their ability to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Although the RhoA-ROCK pathway has been extensively investigated in the non-hematopoietic compartment, its role in the immune system is just now becoming appreciated. In this commentary, we provide a brief overview of recent findings that highlight the contribution of this pathway to lymphocyte development and activation, and the impact that dysregulation in the activation of RhoA and/or the ROCKs may exert on a growing list of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders.

  10. VISA is required for B cell expression of TLR7.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang-Guo; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Akerlund, Linda J; Shu, Hong-Bing; Cambier, John C

    2012-01-01

    B cells play a critical role in the initialization and development of the systemic lupus erythematosus that is dependent on the expression of the endosomal ssRNA receptor TLR7. Previous studies have established that B cell expression of TLR7 is controlled by the type I IFN secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In this article, we report that VISA, also known as MAVS, IPS-1, and CardIf, essential for RIG-I/MDA5-mediated signaling following sensing of cytosolic RNA, regulate B cell expression of TLR7 and CD23. We found that B cells from a VISA(-/-) mouse express reduced TLR7 but normal basal levels of type I IFN. We also show that although IFN-β and TLR7 agonists synergize to promote TLR7 expression in VISA(-/-) B cells, they do not fully complement the defect seen in VISA(-/-) cells. Cell transfer experiments revealed that the observed effects of VISA(-/-) are B cell intrinsic. The reduced TLR7 expression in B cells is correlated with impaired TLR7 agonist-induced upregulation of activation markers CD69 and CD86, cell proliferation, production of IFN-α, TNF, and IL-12, and NF-κB activation. Finally, studies indicate that genetic background may influence the observed phenotype of our VISA(-/-) mice, because VISA(-/-) B cells differ in CD23 and TLR7 expression when on C57BL/6 versus 129Sv-C57BL/6 background. Thus, our findings suggest an unexpected link between VISA-mediated cytosolic RLR signaling and autoimmunity.

  11. B CELL DEPLETION THERAPY EXACERBATES MURINE PRIMARY BILIARY CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dhirapong, Amy; Lleo, Ana; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn; Packard, Thomas A.; Cambier, John C.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Lindor, Keith; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is considered a model autoimmune disease due to the clinical homogeneity of patients and the classic hallmark of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAS). Indeed, the presence of AMAS is the most highly directed and specific autoantibody in autoimmune diseases. However, the contribution of B cells to the pathogenesis of PBC is unclear. Thus, although AMAs appear to interact with the biliary cell apotope and contribute to biliary pathology, there is no correlation of disease severity and titer of AMA. The recent development of well characterized mAbs specific for the B cell populations, anti-CD20 and anti-CD79, and the development of a well defined xenobiotic induced model of autoimmune cholangitis, prompted us to utilize these reagents and the model to address the contribution of B cells in the pathogenesis of murine PBC. Prior to the induction of autoimmune cholangitis, mice were treated with either anti-CD20, anti-CD79, or isotype matched control mAb and followed for B cell development, the appearance of AMAs, liver pathology and cytokine production. Results of the studies reported herein show that the in vivo depletion of B cells using either anti-CD20 or anti-CD79 led to the development of a more severe form of cholangitis than control mice which is in contrast with results from a number of other autoimmune models which have documented an important therapeutic role of B cell specific depletion. The anti-CD20/CD79 treated mice have increased liver T cell infiltrates and higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, our results reflect a novel disease protective role of B cells in PBC and suggest that B cell depletion therapy in humans with PBC should be approached with caution. PMID:21274873

  12. Rituximab induces Interleukin-6 production by human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D.; Hamilton, B. JoNell; Skopelja, Sladjana; Rigby, William F. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rituximab (RTX), an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, is highly effective in the treatment of several autoimmune diseases. The mechanism by which RTX treatment improves Rheumatoid Arthritis and ANCA-Associated Vasculitis is not easily related to B cell depletion. We have shown that RTX mediates a rapid stripping of CD20 and CD19 from the human B cell through a process known as trogocytosis. We hypothesized that changes in B cell phenotype resulting from trogocytosis would diminish the ability of B cells to promote autoimmune disease. Methods Human PBMC were cultured with RTX under conditions that permitted trogocytosis. Changes in B cell phenotype and cytokine production were measured under basal and activated (IL-4/anti-CD40) conditions. The effects of RTX were characterized for their requirements for FcγR and Fc-dependent interactions. Results Trogocytosis induced a marked loss of surface CD19, IgD, CD40 and BR3, but did not alter induction of CD86 expression on purified B cells by IL-4/anti-CD40 treatment. Unexpectedly, RTX-dependent trogocytosis of normal human B cells in vitro led to a rapid upregulation of IL-6 production, with no effect on TNFα, IL-1β, INFγ, or IL-10 production. This effect was Fc-dependent and required the presence of an FcγR bearing cell. This effect involved the release of pre-formed intracellular IL-6 protein as well as marked increases in IL-6 mRNA levels. Conclusion RTX mediated trogocytosis of B cells in vitro results in acute production and release of IL-6. The nature of this effect and its relationship to acute infusion reactions seen with RTX administration remain to be determined. PMID:25080282

  13. Autoimmunity, polyclonal B-cell activation and infection.

    PubMed

    Granholm, N A; Cavallo, T

    1992-02-01

    It is widely believed that autoimmunity is an integral part of the immune system, and that genetic, immunologic, hormonal, environmental and other factors contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Thus, autoimmune disease may represent an abnormal expression of immune functions instead of loss of tolerance to self, and it can be organ specific or systemic in its manifestations. We review the various factors that contribute to the development of autoimmune disease; we also review the mechanisms of polyclonal B-cell activation, with emphasis on the role of infectious agents. We consider systemic lupus erythematosus in humans and in experimental animals as prototypic autoimmune disease, and we summarize data to indicate that polyclonal B-cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune disease. The effect of polyclonal B-cell activation, brought about by injections of a B-cell activator-lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria-is sufficient to cause autoimmune disease in an immunologically normal host. In fact, autoimmune disease can be arrested if excessive polyclonal B-cell activation is suppressed; alternatively, autoimmune disease can be exacerbated if polyclonal B-cell activation is enhanced. We explore the mechanism of tissue injury when autoimmune disease is induced or exacerbated, and we consider the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies, immune complexes, complement, the blood cell carrier system, and the mononuclear phagocyte system. Although polyclonal B-cell activation may be the mechanism whereby various factors can cause or exacerbate systemic autoimmune disease, polyclonal B-cell activation may cause autoimmune disease on its own.

  14. Long Noncoding RNA Expression during Human B-Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Petri, Andreas; Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Hagedorn, Peter H; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of diverse cellular processes, but their roles in the developing immune system are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed lncRNA expression during human B-cell development by array-based expression profiling of eleven distinct flow-sorted B-cell subsets, comprising pre-B1, pre-B2, immature, naive, memory, and plasma cells from bone marrow biopsies (n = 7), and naive, centroblast, centrocyte, memory, and plasmablast cells from tonsil tissue samples (n = 6), respectively. A remapping strategy was used to assign the array probes to 37630 gene-level probe sets, reflecting recent updates in genomic and transcriptomic databases, which enabled expression profiling of 19579 long noncoding RNAs, comprising 3947 antisense RNAs, 5277 lincRNAs, 7625 pseudogenes, and 2730 additional lncRNAs. As a first step towards inferring the functions of the identified lncRNAs in developing B-cells, we analysed their co-expression with well-characterized protein-coding genes, a method known as "guilt by association". By using weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 272 lincRNAs, 471 antisense RNAs, 376 pseudogene RNAs, and 64 lncRNAs within seven sub-networks associated with distinct stages of B-cell development, such as early B-cell development, B-cell proliferation, affinity maturation of antibody, and terminal differentiation. These data provide an important resource for future studies on the functions of lncRNAs in development of the adaptive immune response, and the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies that originate from distinct B-cell subpopulations. PMID:26394393

  15. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  16. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  17. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  18. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  19. Identification of the human mature B cell miRNome

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Katia; Sumazin, Pavel; Morozov, Pavel; Schneider, Christof; Maute, Roy L.; Kitagawa, Yukiko; Mandelbaum, Jonathan; Haddad, Joseph; Chen, Chang-Zheng; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    The full set of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the human genome is not known. Because presently known miRNAs have been identified by virtue of their abundant expression in a few cell types, many tissue-specific miRNAs remain unrevealed. To understand the role of miRNAs in B-cell function and lymphomagenesis, we generated short-RNA libraries from normal human B cells at different stages of development (naïve, germinal-center, memory) and from a Burkitt lymphoma cell-line. A combination of cloning and computational analysis identified 178 miRNAs (miRNome) expressed in normal and/or transformed B-cell libraries. Most notably, the B-cell miRNome included 75 miRNAs which to our knowledge have not been previously reported and of which 66 have been validated by RNA blot and/or RT-PCR analyses. Numerous miRNAs were expressed in a stage- or transformation-specific fashion in B cells, suggesting specific functional or pathologic roles. These results provide a resource for studying the role of miRNAs in B-cell development, immune function, and lymphomagenesis. PMID:19446474

  20. Transcriptional analysis of the B cell germinal center reaction

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Ulf; Tu, Yuhai; Stolovitzky, Gustavo A.; Keller, Jeffrey L.; Haddad, Joseph; Miljkovic, Vladan; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Califano, Andrea; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2003-01-01

    The germinal center (GC) reaction is crucial for T cell-dependent immune responses and is targeted by B cell lymphomagenesis. Here we analyzed the transcriptional changes that occur in B cells during GC transit (naïve B cells → centroblasts → centrocytes → memory B cells) by gene expression profiling. Naïve B cells, characterized by the expression of cell cycle-inhibitory and antiapoptotic genes, become centroblasts by inducing an atypical proliferation program lacking c-Myc expression, switching to a proapoptotic program, and down-regulating cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion receptors. The transition from GC to memory cells is characterized by a return to a phenotype similar to that of naïve cells except for an apoptotic program primed for both death and survival and for changes in the expression of cell surface receptors including IL-2 receptor β. These results provide insights into the dynamics of the GC reaction and represent the basis for the analysis of B cell malignancies. PMID:12604779

  1. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis). By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation. PMID:27355450

  2. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  3. Receptor editing and genetic variability in human autoreactive B cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julie; Ota, Takayuki; Kelly, Margot; Strauch, Pamela; Freed, Brian M; Torres, Raul M; Nemazee, David; Pelanda, Roberta

    2016-01-11

    The mechanisms by which B cells undergo tolerance, such as receptor editing, clonal deletion, and anergy, have been established in mice. However, corroborating these mechanisms in humans remains challenging. To study how autoreactive human B cells undergo tolerance, we developed a novel humanized mouse model. Mice expressing an anti-human Igκ membrane protein to serve as a ubiquitous neo self-antigen (Ag) were transplanted with a human immune system. By following the fate of self-reactive human κ(+) B cells relative to nonautoreactive λ(+) cells, we show that tolerance of human B cells occurs at the first site of self-Ag encounter, the bone marrow, via a combination of receptor editing and clonal deletion. Moreover, the amount of available self-Ag and the genetics of the cord blood donor dictate the levels of central tolerance and autoreactive B cells in the periphery. Thus, this model can be useful for studying specific mechanisms of human B cell tolerance and to reveal differences in the extent of this process among human populations.

  4. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-05-08

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  5. Antibodies That Block or Activate Mouse B Cell Activating Factor of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Family (BAFF), Respectively, Induce B Cell Depletion or B Cell Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Schuepbach-Mallepell, Sonia; Vigolo, Michele; Willen, Laure; Tardivel, Aubry; Smulski, Cristian R; Zheng, Timothy S; Gommerman, Jennifer; Hess, Henry; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Mackay, Fabienne; Donzé, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal

    2016-09-16

    B cell activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF), also known as B lymphocyte stimulator, is a ligand required for the generation and maintenance of B lymphocytes. In this study, the ability of different monoclonal antibodies to recognize, inhibit, or activate mouse BAFF was investigated. One of them, a mouse IgG1 named Sandy-2, prevented the binding of BAFF to all of its receptors, BAFF receptor, transmembrane activator and calcium modulating ligand interactor, and B cell maturation antigen, at a stoichiometric ratio; blocked the activity of mouse BAFF on a variety of cell-based reporter assays; and antagonized the prosurvival action of BAFF on primary mouse B cells in vitro A single administration of Sandy-2 in mice induced B cell depletion within 2 weeks, down to levels close to those observed in BAFF-deficient mice. This depletion could then be maintained with a chronic treatment. Sandy-2 and a previously described rat IgG1 antibody, 5A8, also formed a pair suitable for the sensitive detection of endogenous circulating BAFF by ELISA or using a homogenous assay. Interestingly, 5A8 and Sandy-5 displayed activities opposite to that of Sandy-2 by stimulating recombinant BAFF in vitro and endogenous BAFF in vivo These tools will prove useful for the detection and functional manipulation of endogenous mouse BAFF and provide an alternative to the widely used BAFF receptor-Fc decoy receptor for the specific depletion of BAFF in mice. PMID:27451394

  6. Intrinsic differences in the initiation of B cell receptor signaling favor responses of human IgG(+) memory B cells over IgM(+) naive B cells.

    PubMed

    Davey, Angel M; Pierce, Susan K

    2012-04-01

    The acquisition of long-lived memory B cells (MBCs) is critical for the defense against many infectious diseases. Despite their importance, little is known about how Ags trigger human MBCs, even though our understanding of the molecular basis of Ag activation of B cells in model systems has advanced considerably. In this study, we use quantitative, high-resolution, live-cell imaging at the single-cell and single-molecule levels to describe the earliest Ag-driven events in human isotype-switched, IgG-expressing MBCs and compare them with those in IgM-expressing naive B cells. We show that human MBCs are more robust than naive B cells at each step in the initiation of BCR signaling, including interrogation of Ag-containing membranes, formation of submicroscopic BCR oligomers, and recruitment and activation of signaling-associated kinases. Despite their robust response to Ag, MBCs remain highly sensitive to FcγRIIB-mediated inhibition. We also demonstrate that in the absence of Ag, a portion of MBC receptors spontaneously oligomerized, and phosphorylated kinases accumulated at the membrane and speculate that heightened constitutive signaling may play a role in maintaining MBC longevity. Using high-resolution imaging, we have provided a description of the earliest events in the Ag activation of MBCs and evidence for acquired cell-intrinsic differences in the initiation of BCR signaling in human naive and MBCs.

  7. Clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes and progression to B cell lymphoma in cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wood, G S; Ngan, B Y; Tung, R; Hoffman, T E; Abel, E A; Hoppe, R T; Warnke, R A; Cleary, M L; Sklar, J

    1989-07-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH) is a disorder characterized by the development of one or more skin lesions containing dense lymphoid infiltrates that exhibit the histopathologic features of a benign, reactive process. Nevertheless, some cases have been associated with the subsequent development of clinically overt lymphomas. This suggests that monoclonal populations may exist in some cases of CLH and that these cases may represent a subset more likely to evolve into lymphoma. To determine if such a subset of CLH can be distinguished, Southern blot analysis of DNA was used to study the immunogenotypic features of lesions from 14 patients with clinical, histopathologic, and immunopathologic findings characteristic of CLH. Five cases exhibited detectable clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes. Furthermore, one of these five cases evolved into overt diffuse large cell lymphoma of B cell lineage during a 2-year follow-up of recurrent disease at the original cutaneous site. The immunoglobulin gene rearrangements of this lymphoma were identical to those of the prior CLH lesion. There was no evidence of detectable t(14;18) chromosomal translocations or clonal rearrangements of the beta gene of the T cell receptor in any case. It was concluded that CLH can be divided into two subsets based on the presence or absence of a clonal B cell population, and that overt lymphoma can arise from the former subset and contain the same B cell clone identified in the pre-existent CLH lesion.

  8. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  9. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  10. B-cell-targeted therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sabahi, Ramin; Anolik, Jennifer H

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease characterised by numerous autoantibodies and clinical involvement in multiple organ systems. The immunological events triggering the onset of clinical manifestations have not yet been fully defined, but a central role for B cells in the pathogenesis of this disease has more recently gained prominence as a result of research in both mice and humans. Both antibody-dependent and -independent mechanisms of B cells are important in SLE. Autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms, including immune complex-mediated type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines such as interferon-alpha, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-1. Suggested autoantibody-independent B-cell functions include antigen presentation, T-cell activation and polarisation, and dendritic-cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines, chemokines and lymphangiogenic growth factors, and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organisation, including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Given the large body of evidence implicating abnormalities in the B-cell compartment in SLE, a recent therapeutic focus has been to develop interventions that target the B-cell compartment by multiple mechanisms.Rituximab, a mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 that specifically depletes B cells, has been studied the most extensively. Although promising open-label data await confirmation in ongoing multicentre placebo-controlled trials, a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn. The adequacy of peripheral B-cell depletion depends on achieving high and sustained serum rituximab concentrations, pharmacokinetics that can be varied with treatment dose and factors that may affect drug clearance, such as human anti

  11. The Role of Latently Infected B Cells in CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana Citlali; Horwitz, Marc Steven

    2015-01-01

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the environmental factors, it is believed that previous infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) may contribute in the development of MS. EBV has been associated with other autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematous, and cancers like Burkitt’s lymphoma. EBV establishes a life-long latency in B cells with occasional reactivation of the virus throughout the individual’s life. The role played by B cells in MS pathology has been largely studied, yet is not clearly understood. In MS patients, Rituximab, a novel treatment that targets CD20+ B cells, has proven to have successful results in diminishing the number of relapses in remitting relapsing MS; however, the mechanism of how this drug acts has not been clearly established. In this review, we analyze the evidence of how B cells latently infected with EBV might be altering the immune system response and helping in the development of MS. We will also discuss how animal models, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (γHV-68), can be used as powerful tools in the study of the relationship between EBV, MS, and B cells. PMID:26579121

  12. TRAF3 deficiency promotes metabolic reprogramming in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W.; Wallis, Alicia M.; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte survival. B cell-specific TRAF3 deficiency results in enhanced viability and is associated with development of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We show that TRAF3 deficiency led to induction of two proteins important for glucose metabolism, Glut1 and Hexokinase 2 (HXK2). This was associated with increased glucose uptake. In the absence of TRAF3, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were increased in B cells without changes in mitochondrial mass or reactive oxygen species. Chemical inhibition of glucose metabolism or glucose deprivation substantially attenuated the enhanced survival of TRAF3-deficient B cells, with a decrease in the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. Changes in Glut1 and Mcl-1 levels, glucose uptake and B cell number in the absence of TRAF3 were all dependent upon NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK). These results indicate that TRAF3 deficiency suffices to metabolically reprogram B cells, a finding that improves our understanding of the role of TRAF3 as a tumor suppressor, and suggests potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27752131

  13. Long noncoding RNAs in B-cell development and activation

    PubMed Central

    Brazão, Tiago F.; Johnson, Jethro S.; Müller, Jennifer; Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are potentially important regulators of cell differentiation and development, but little is known about their roles in B lymphocytes. Using RNA-seq and de novo transcript assembly, we identified 4516 lncRNAs expressed in 11 stages of B-cell development and activation. Most of these lncRNAs have not been previously detected, even in the closely related T-cell lineage. Comparison with lncRNAs previously described in human B cells identified 185 mouse lncRNAs that have human orthologs. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-seq, we classified 20% of the lncRNAs as either enhancer-associated (eRNA) or promoter-associated RNAs. We identified 126 eRNAs whose expression closely correlated with the nearest coding gene, thereby indicating the likely location of numerous enhancers active in the B-cell lineage. Furthermore, using this catalog of newly discovered lncRNAs, we show that PAX5, a transcription factor required to specify the B-cell lineage, bound to and regulated the expression of 109 lncRNAs in pro-B and mature B cells and 184 lncRNAs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27381906

  14. Human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes home preferentially to and induce selective regressions of autologous EBV- induced B cell lymphoproliferations in xenografted C.B-17 scid/scid mice [published erratum appears in J Exp Med 1996 Sep 1;184(3):1199

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency [SCID]) mice inoculated with peripheral blood lymphocytes from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-seropositive donors, or with EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (EBV-LCL), develop lethal human EBV+ B cell lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV-LPD) with characteristics similar to those arising in immunodeficient patients. Using this model, we examined the capacity of human effector cells to control human EBV-LPD. SCID mice received rabbit anti-asialo GM1 antiserum to abrogate endogenous natural killer-cell function. Preliminary experiments showed that adoptive transfer of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), purified T cells, interleukin (IL) 2-activated PBMC or anti-CD3- activated T cells derived from EBV-seropositive donors did not result in improved survival of treated mice (in vivo effector/target ratio 2:1 to 1:1). In contrast, EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), derived from EBV-seropositive donors and expanded in vitro, exhibited strong EBV-specific and HLA-restricted activity both in vitro and in vivo. SCID mice inoculated intraperitoneally with autologous but not with HLA-mismatched EBV-LCL had significantly improved survival relative to untreated mice after inoculation of EBV-specific CTL either intraperitoneally (P<0.001) or intravenously (P<0.001) (in vivo effector/target ratio 1:1). SCID mice bearing large subcutaneous EBV+ tumors and treated intravenously with 10(7) EBV-specific CTL achieved complete tumor regression. Both CTL- and CTL-plus-IL-2-treated mice survived significantly longer than untreated animals or animals treated with IL-2 alone (P = 0.0004 and P<0.02, respectively). SCID mice bearing two subcutaneous EBV+ tumors, one autologous and the other HLA mismatched to the EBV-specific CTL donor, had regression of only the autologous tumor after intravenous infusion of 10(7) EBV-specific CTL. Moreover, we could demonstrate preferential homing of PKH26-labeled EBV- specific CTL to

  15. Hepatitis C virus-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders: Advances in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Salvatore; Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Gajofatto, Alberto; Sansonno, Domenico; Dammacco, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Since its identification in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a worldwide health problem with roughly 185 million chronic infections, representing individuals at high risk of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer. In addition to being a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality due to liver disease, HCV has emerged as an important trigger of lymphoproliferative disorders, owing to its lymphotropism, and of a wide spectrum of extra-hepatic manifestations (HCV-EHMs) affecting different organ systems. The most frequently observed HCV-EHMs include mixed cryoglobulinemia and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, nephropathies, thyreopathies, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and several neurological conditions. In addition, neuropsychiatric disorders and neurocognitive dysfunction are reported in nearly 50% of patients with chronic HCV infection, which are independent of the severity of liver disease or HCV replication rates. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and reduced quality of life are commonly associated with neurocognitive alterations in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic HCV infection, regardless of the stage of liver fibrosis and the infecting genotype. These manifestations, which are the topic of this review, typically occur in the absence of structural brain damage or signal abnormalities on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although metabolic and microstructural changes can be detected by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion tensor MRI, and neurophysiological tests of cognitive processing. Several lines of evidence, including comparative and longitudinal neuropsychological assessments in patients achieving spontaneous or treatment-induced viral clearance, support a major pathogenic role for HCV in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26576086

  16. Hepatitis C virus-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders: Advances in 2015.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Salvatore; Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Gajofatto, Alberto; Sansonno, Domenico; Dammacco, Franco

    2015-11-14

    Since its identification in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a worldwide health problem with roughly 185 million chronic infections, representing individuals at high risk of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer. In addition to being a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality due to liver disease, HCV has emerged as an important trigger of lymphoproliferative disorders, owing to its lymphotropism, and of a wide spectrum of extra-hepatic manifestations (HCV-EHMs) affecting different organ systems. The most frequently observed HCV-EHMs include mixed cryoglobulinemia and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, nephropathies, thyreopathies, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and several neurological conditions. In addition, neuropsychiatric disorders and neurocognitive dysfunction are reported in nearly 50% of patients with chronic HCV infection, which are independent of the severity of liver disease or HCV replication rates. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and reduced quality of life are commonly associated with neurocognitive alterations in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic HCV infection, regardless of the stage of liver fibrosis and the infecting genotype. These manifestations, which are the topic of this review, typically occur in the absence of structural brain damage or signal abnormalities on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although metabolic and microstructural changes can be detected by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion tensor MRI, and neurophysiological tests of cognitive processing. Several lines of evidence, including comparative and longitudinal neuropsychological assessments in patients achieving spontaneous or treatment-induced viral clearance, support a major pathogenic role for HCV in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders. PMID:26576086

  17. Hepatitis C virus-associated neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders: Advances in 2015.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Salvatore; Mariotto, Sara; Ferrari, Sergio; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Gajofatto, Alberto; Sansonno, Domenico; Dammacco, Franco

    2015-11-14

    Since its identification in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a worldwide health problem with roughly 185 million chronic infections, representing individuals at high risk of developing cirrhosis and liver cancer. In addition to being a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality due to liver disease, HCV has emerged as an important trigger of lymphoproliferative disorders, owing to its lymphotropism, and of a wide spectrum of extra-hepatic manifestations (HCV-EHMs) affecting different organ systems. The most frequently observed HCV-EHMs include mixed cryoglobulinemia and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, nephropathies, thyreopathies, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and several neurological conditions. In addition, neuropsychiatric disorders and neurocognitive dysfunction are reported in nearly 50% of patients with chronic HCV infection, which are independent of the severity of liver disease or HCV replication rates. Fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and reduced quality of life are commonly associated with neurocognitive alterations in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic HCV infection, regardless of the stage of liver fibrosis and the infecting genotype. These manifestations, which are the topic of this review, typically occur in the absence of structural brain damage or signal abnormalities on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), although metabolic and microstructural changes can be detected by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion-weighted and diffusion tensor MRI, and neurophysiological tests of cognitive processing. Several lines of evidence, including comparative and longitudinal neuropsychological assessments in patients achieving spontaneous or treatment-induced viral clearance, support a major pathogenic role for HCV in neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive disorders.

  18. An analysis of B cell selection mechanisms in germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E; Maini, Philip K; Iber, Dagmar

    2006-09-01

    Affinity maturation of antibodies during immune responses is achieved by multiple rounds of somatic hypermutation and subsequent preferential selection of those B cells that express B cell receptors with improved binding characteristics for the antigen. The mechanism underlying B cell selection has not yet been defined. By employing an agent-based model, we show that for physiologically reasonable parameter values affinity maturation can be driven by competition for neither binding sites nor antigen--even in the presence of competing secreted antibodies. Within the tested mechanisms, only clonal competition for T cell help or a refractory time for the interaction of centrocytes with follicular dendritic cells is found to enable affinity maturation while generating the experimentally observed germinal centre characteristics and tolerating large variations in the initial antigen density. PMID:16707510

  19. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  20. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators.

  1. High-efficiency Generation of Multiple Short Noncoding RNA in B-cells and B-cell-derived Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Almanza, Gonzalo; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Short noncoding (snc)RNAs are important new players in the landscape of biologics with therapeutic potential. Recently, we reported on a new method for the synthesis and delivery of snc RNA in B-cells transfected with plasmid DNA. Here using the same approach, we demonstrate that B-cells can be programmed for the enforced biogenesis and synchronous release of multiple sncRNAs. Our data show that this goal is feasible and that multiple sncRNA are released in the extracellular compartment in amounts comparable to those from B-cells programmed to express and secrete one scnRNA only. Furthermore, we found that the cargo of extracellular vescicles (EVs) isolated from programmed B-cells is remarkably enriched for multiple sncRNA. On average, we found that the content of multiple sncRNAs in EVs is 3.6 copynumber/EV. Collectively, we demonstrate that B-cells can be easily programmed toward the synthesis and release of multiple sncRNAs, including sncRNA-laden EVs, efficiently and specifically. PMID:26670278

  2. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  3. T-24.B-cell differentiation factor induces immunoglobulin secretion in human B cells without prior cell replication.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, G; Christie, J F; Stimson, W H; Guy, K; Dewar, A E

    1987-04-01

    Stimulation of B lymphocytes from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) has shown that these cells are capable of differentiation (Totterman, Nilsson & Sundstrom, 1980). Increases in the expression of different class II MHC antigens (Guy et al., 1983, 1986) and responsiveness to growth factors (Kabelitz et al., 1985; Suzuki, Butler & Cooper, 1985) have been studied. Supernatant from the human bladder carcinoma line T-24 contains a B-cell differentiation factor (BCDF) able to induce immunoglobulin secretion from CESS cells. We investigated the induction of proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in human B cells by studying the effects of this factor on B-CLL cells, in both the presence and absence of TPA. We report here that this material (termed T-24.BCDF) causes immunoglobulin secretion to be initiated in these cells, and that this is not accompanied by detectable DNA synthesis. These observations were extended to normal human B cells and demonstrate that human B cells can secrete immunoglobulin in the absence of clonal expansion. PMID:3495482

  4. Regulation of AID, the B-cell genome mutator.

    PubMed

    Keim, Celia; Kazadi, David; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which B cells somatically engineer their genomes to generate the vast diversity of antibodies required to challenge the nearly infinite number of antigens that immune systems encounter are of tremendous clinical and academic interest. The DNA cytidine deaminase activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyzes two of these mechanisms: class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Recent discoveries indicate a significant promiscuous targeting of this B-cell mutator enzyme genome-wide. Here we discuss the various regulatory elements that control AID activity and prevent AID from inducing genomic instability and thereby initiating oncogenesis.

  5. Surrogate light chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by marginal zone B cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Weicheng; Grimsholm, Ola; Bernardi, Angelina I; Höök, Nina; Stern, Anna; Cavallini, Nicola; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2015-04-01

    Selection of the primary antibody repertoire takes place in pro-/pre-B cells, and subsequently in immature and transitional B cells. At the first checkpoint, μ heavy (μH) chains assemble with surrogate light (SL) chain into a precursor B-cell receptor. In mice lacking SL chain, μH chain selection is impaired, and serum autoantibody levels are elevated. However, whether the development of autoantibody-producing cells is due to an inability of the resultant B-cell receptors to induce central and/or peripheral B-cell tolerance or other factors is unknown. Here, we show that receptor editing is defective, and that a higher proportion of BM immature B cells are prone to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, transitional B cells are also more prone to undergoing apoptosis, with a stronger selection pressure to enter the follicular B-cell pool. Those that enter the marginal zone (MZ) B-cell pool escape selection and survive, possibly due to the B-lymphopenia and elevated levels of B-cell activating factor. Moreover, the MZ B cells are responsible for the elevated IgM anti-dsDNA antibody levels detected in these mice. Thus, the SL chain is required for central and peripheral B-cell tolerance and inhibits anti-DNA antibody production by MZ B cells.

  6. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establishment and operation of a bank of EBV-specific CTLs derived from 25 blood donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types found at high frequency in European populations. Since licensure, there have been enquiries about 37 patients, who shared a median of three class I and two class II HLA types with these donors. Cells have been infused into ten patients with lymphoproliferative disease, eight of whom achieved complete remission. Neither patient with refractory disease was matched for HLA class II. Both cases of EBV-associated non-haematopoietic sarcoma receiving cells failed to achieve complete remission. Thirteen patients died before any cells could be issued, emphasizing that the bank should be contacted before patients become pre-terminal. Thus, this third party donor-derived EBV-specific CTL cell bank can supply most patients with appropriately matched cells and most recipients have good outcomes. PMID:25066775

  7. Establishment and operation of a Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant allogeneic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic cell bank for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Mark A; Wilkie, Gwen M; Robinson, Nicolas; Rivera, Nadja; Haque, Tanzina; Crawford, Dorothy H; Barry, Jacqueline; Fraser, Neil; Turner, David M; Robertson, Victoria; Dyer, Phil; Flanagan, Peter; Newlands, Helen R; Campbell, John; Turner, Marc L

    2014-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several malignancies, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conventional treatments for PTLD are often successful, but risk organ rejection and cause significant side effects. EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes provide an alternative treatment modality with few side effects, but autologous CTLs are difficult to use in clinical practice. Here we report the establishment and operation of a bank of EBV-specific CTLs derived from 25 blood donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types found at high frequency in European populations. Since licensure, there have been enquiries about 37 patients, who shared a median of three class I and two class II HLA types with these donors. Cells have been infused into ten patients with lymphoproliferative disease, eight of whom achieved complete remission. Neither patient with refractory disease was matched for HLA class II. Both cases of EBV-associated non-haematopoietic sarcoma receiving cells failed to achieve complete remission. Thirteen patients died before any cells could be issued, emphasizing that the bank should be contacted before patients become pre-terminal. Thus, this third party donor-derived EBV-specific CTL cell bank can supply most patients with appropriately matched cells and most recipients have good outcomes.

  8. Early B-cell Factor 1 Regulates the Expansion of B-cell Progenitors in a Dose-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Åhsberg, Josefine; Ungerbäck, Jonas; Strid, Tobias; Welinder, Eva; Stjernberg, Jenny; Larsson, Malin; Qian, Hong; Sigvardsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor doses are of importance for normal and malignant B-lymphocyte development; however, the understanding of underlying mechanisms and functional consequences of reduced transcription factor levels is limited. We have analyzed progenitor and B-lineage compartments in mice carrying heterozygote mutations in the E2a, Ebf1, or Pax5 gene. Although lymphoid progenitors from Ebf1 or Pax5 heterozygote mice were specified and lineage-restricted in a manner comparable with Wt progenitors, this process was severely impaired in E2a heterozygote mutant mice. This defect was not significantly enhanced upon combined deletion of E2a with Ebf1 or Pax5. Analysis of the pre-B-cell compartment in Ebf1 heterozygote mice revealed a reduction in cell numbers. These cells expressed Pax5 and other B-lineage-associated genes, and global gene expression analysis suggested that the reduction of the pre-B-cell compartment was a result of impaired pre-B-cell expansion. This idea was supported by a reduction in IL2Rα-expressing late pre-B-cells as well as by cell cycle analysis and by the finding that the complexity of the VDJ rearrangement patterns was comparable in Wt and Ebf1+/− pre-B-cells, although the number of progenitors was reduced. Heterozygote deletion of Ebf1 resulted in impaired response to IL7 in vitro and reduced expression levels of pre-BCR on the cell surface, providing possible explanations for the observed stage-specific reduction in cellular expansion. Thus, transcription factor doses are critical for specification as well as expansion of B-lymphoid progenitors, providing increased insight into the molecular regulation of B-cell development. PMID:24078629

  9. Two maturation-associated mouse erythrocyte receptors of human B cells. I. Identification of four human B-cell subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, I J; Zalewski, P D; Valente, L; Gee, D

    1982-01-01

    Using rosetting tests with untreated mouse erythrocytes (M) and pronase-treated M (pro M), four human B cell subsets can be identified. Three of these, possessing the phenotypes BM+ pro M+, BM- pro M+ or BM- pro M-, constitute 17%, 61% and 22% of normal blood B cells respectively. The fourth subset, BM+ pro M-, does not occur in normal tissues but was found in the pre-B-cell line of Raji cells, indicating that this phenotype may be a marker for early B cells. Some differences in the proportion of each subset were found in cord blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. Surface-immunoglobulin-positive (SIg+) and -negative (SIg-) non-T cells were present in each subset. M and pro-M rosetting tests were applied to cells from blood of 27 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and to cells from involved nodes, spleen or marrow in five cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In 15 cases of CLL, there was considerable increase in the BM+ pro M+ subset (BM+ pro M+ type CLL); in seven cases, there was a predominance of BM- pro M+ cells and in another four cases, BM- pro M- cells predominated. All five cases of NHL were greatly enriched in BM- pro M- cells. There was no obvious correlation between rosetting and other surface markers but BM- pro M- clones in CLL or NHL always stained brightly with FITC-anti-Ig. This was not found in BM+ pro M+ or BM- pro M+ clones. Rosette formation of neuraminidase-treated B cells with M identifies the same subset as B-pro-M rosetting in normals and CLL. Evidence is presented that two types of receptors are involved in M and pro-M rosetting, designated R1 and R2, binding to corresponding M ligands L1 and L2. M rosetting is due to R1-L1 binding while R2-L2 binding mediates B-pro-M rosetting. Shifts between subsets within the same clone in some cases of CLL suggest that the subsets are distinct maturational stage of B-cell development rather than families of B cells of different lineage. The following B-cell maturation sequence is proposed: R1+ R2

  10. Avian oncogenesis induced by lymphoproliferative disease virus: a neglected or emerging retroviral pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Keel, M. Kevin; Philips, Jamie E.; Cartoceti, Andrew N.; Munk, Brandon A.; Nemeth, Nicole M.; Welsh, Trista I.; Thomas, Jesse M.; Crum, James M.; Lichtenwalner, Anne B.; Fadly, Aly M.; Zavala, Guillermo; Holmes, Edward C.; Brown, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is an exogenous oncogenic retrovirus that induces lymphoid tumors in some galliform species of birds. Historically, outbreaks of LPDV have been reported from Europe and Israel. Although the virus has previously never been detected in North America, herein we describe the widespread distribution, genetic diversity, pathogenesis, and evolution of LPDV in the United States. Characterization of the provirus genome of the index LPDV case from North America demonstrated an 88% nucleotide identity to the Israeli prototype strain. Although phylogenetic analysis indicated that the majority of viruses fell into a single North American lineage, a small subset of viruses from South Carolina were most closely related to the Israeli prototype. These results suggest that LPDV was transferred between continents to initiate outbreaks of disease. However, the direction (New World to Old World or vice versa), mechanism, and time frame of the transcontinental spread currently remain unknown. PMID:24503062

  11. Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Involving the Colon in a Patient With Ulcerative Pancolitis and Polymyositis on Long-Term Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Michael D.; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Liu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    The link between immunosuppressive therapy and increased lymphoma risk is well established in patients with solid organ transplantation. Epstein-Barr virus-positive (EBV) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is known to be a complication in patients receiving methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis, and the risk of lymphoma in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has raised concerns regarding the lymphoproliferative potential of immunomodulatory therapy. In this report, we describe a case of EBV-positive DLBCL arising within the colon of a patient affected by ulcerative pancolitis. The patient is a 73-year-old man with a history of IBD and polymyositis on long-term methotrexate therapy. Increasing age and long-term methotrexate therapy may simulate post-transplantation immunosuppression and contribute to lymphoma tumorigenesis in a segment of chronically inflamed colon. PMID:27785332

  12. The Histological Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are aggressive B-cell neoplasms with considerable clinical, biologic and pathologic diversity, in part reflecting the functional diversity of the B-cell system and multiple pathways of transformation. In recent years, the advent of new high-throughput genomic technologies has provided new insights into the biology of DLBCL, leading to the identification of distinct molecular identities and novel pathogenetic pathways. This increasing complexity had led to an expanding number of entities in the WHO classification. Using a multi-modality approach, the updated 2008 classification delineated some new subgroups, including DLBCLs associated with particular age groups or specific anatomic sites, as well as two borderline categories: tumors at the interface between classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and DLBCL as well as between Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and DLBCL. This article reviews the histopathologic features of the various aggressive B-cell lymphoma subtypes included in the 2008 classification, with emphasis on some of the new entities as well as areas of diagnostic challenge. PMID:25805585

  13. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  14. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-06-10

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. This includes: (1) Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment. This activity is the restart of hotwork in B-Cell to size reduce the remainder of Tank 119 and other miscellaneous pieces of equipment into sizes that can be loaded into a grout container. This activity also includes the process of preparing the containers for shipment from the cell. The specific activities and procedures used are detailed in a table. (2) Load and Ship Low-Level Waste. This activity covers the process of taking a grouted LLW container from B-Cell and loading it into the cask in the REC airlock and Cask Handling Area (CHA) for shipment to the LLBG. The detailed activities and procedures for this part of cell cleanout are included in second table.

  15. Likelihood-Based Inference of B Cell Clonal Families

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Duncan K.

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system depends on a highly diverse collection of antibody-making B cells. B cell receptor sequence diversity is generated by a random recombination process called “rearrangement” forming progenitor B cells, then a Darwinian process of lineage diversification and selection called “affinity maturation.” The resulting receptors can be sequenced in high throughput for research and diagnostics. Such a collection of sequences contains a mixture of various lineages, each of which may be quite numerous, or may consist of only a single member. As a step to understanding the process and result of this diversification, one may wish to reconstruct lineage membership, i.e. to cluster sampled sequences according to which came from the same rearrangement events. We call this clustering problem “clonal family inference.” In this paper we describe and validate a likelihood-based framework for clonal family inference based on a multi-hidden Markov Model (multi-HMM) framework for B cell receptor sequences. We describe an agglomerative algorithm to find a maximum likelihood clustering, two approximate algorithms with various trade-offs of speed versus accuracy, and a third, fast algorithm for finding specific lineages. We show that under simulation these algorithms greatly improve upon existing clonal family inference methods, and that they also give significantly different clusters than previous methods when applied to two real data sets. PMID:27749910

  16. Regulatory roles of B cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-01-01

    B lymphocytes provide essential mechanisms of protection against infectious diseases. The secretion of specific antibodies by long-lived plasma cells is thought to account for the improved resistance afforded by most successful vaccines against pathogens. Accordingly, a goal in vaccine development is to induce potent B cell responses in order to drive the efficient formation of long-lived antibody-secreting cells. However, the roles of activated B cells are complex in infectious diseases. It was recently observed that activated B cells could also negatively regulate host defence mechanisms, both during primary infection and, after vaccination, upon secondary challenge, via mechanisms involving their production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-35. Remarkably, the B cells expressing IL-10 and IL-35 in vivo were distinct subsets of IgMhiCD19+CD138hi antibody-secreting cells. A better understanding of the diverse roles of these distinct antibody-secreting cell subsets in immunity and immunological memory, as well as of the signals controlling their generation, might help the rational development of better prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27586794

  17. Mucosal B cells: phenotypic characteristics, transcriptional regulation, and homing properties.

    PubMed

    Brandtzaeg, Per; Johansen, Finn-Eirik

    2005-08-01

    Mucosal antibody defense depends on a complex cooperation between local B cells and secretory epithelia. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue gives rise to B cells with striking J-chain expression that are seeded to secretory effector sites. Such preferential homing constitutes the biological basis for local production of polymeric immunoglobulin A (pIgA) and pentameric IgM with high affinity to the epithelial pIg receptor that readily can export these antibodies to the mucosal surface. This ultimate functional goal of mucosal B-cell differentiation appears to explain why the J chain is also expressed by IgG- and IgD-producing plasma cells (PCs) occurring at secretory tissue sites; these immunocytes may be considered as 'spin-offs' from early effector clones that through class switch are on their way to pIgA production. Abundant evidence supports the notion that intestinal PCs are largely derived from B cells initially activated in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Nevertheless, insufficient knowledge exists concerning the relative importance of M cells, major histocompatibility complex class II-expressing epithelial cells, and professional antigen-presenting cells for the uptake, processing, and presentation of luminal antigens in GALT to accomplish the extensive and sustained priming and expansion of mucosal B cells. Likewise, it is unclear how the germinal center reaction in GALT so strikingly can promote class switch to IgA and expression of J chain. Although B-cell migration from GALT to the intestinal lamina propria is guided by rather well-defined adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors, the cues directing preferential homing to different segments of the gut require better definition. This is even more so for the molecules involved in homing of mucosal B cells to secretory effector sites beyond the gut, and in this respect, the role of Waldever's ring (including the palatine tonsils and adenoids) as a regional inductive tissue needs further

  18. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  19. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  20. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells.

  1. Adhesive interactions regulate transcriptional diversity in malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Nadav-Dagan, Liat; Shay, Tal; Dezorella, Nili; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Domany, Eytan; Katz, Ben-Zion; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic profiling of B-cell malignancies is rapidly expanding, providing important information on the tumorigenic potential, response to treatment, and clinical outcome of these diseases. However, the relative contributions of inherent gene expression versus microenvironmental effects are poorly understood. The regulation of gene expression programs by means of adhesive interactions was studied here in ARH-77 human malignant B-cell variants, derived from the same cell line by selective adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. The populations included cells that adhere to fibronectin and are highly tumorigenic (designated "type A" cells) and cells that fail to adhere to fibronectin and fail to develop tumors in vivo ("type F" cells). To identify genes directly affected by cell adhesion to fibronectin, type A cells deprived of an adhesive substrate (designated "AF cells") were also examined. Bioinformatic analyses revealed a remarkable correlation between cell adhesion and both B-cell differentiation state and the expression of multiple myeloma (MM)-associated genes. The highly adherent type A cells expressed higher levels of NFkappaB-regulated genes, many of them associated with MM. Moreover, we found that the transcription of several MM-related proto-oncogenes is stimulated by adhesion to fibronectin. In contrast, type F cells, which display poor adhesive and tumorigenic properties, expressed genes associated with higher levels of B-cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that B-cell differentiation, as manifested by gene expression profiles, is attenuated by cell adhesion to fibronectin, leading to upregulation of specific genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of MM.

  2. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5f/f). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26120731

  3. Inducible resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in B cells.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, T L

    2000-12-01

    Apoptosis produced in B cells through Fas (APO-1, CD95) triggering is regulated by signals derived from other surface receptors: CD40 engagement produces upregulation of Fas expression and marked susceptibility to Fas-induced cell death, whereas antigen receptor engagement, or IL-4R engagement, inhibits Fas killing and in so doing induces a state of Fas-resistance, even in otherwise sensitive, CD40-stimulated targets. Surface immunoglobulin and IL-4R utilize at least partially distinct pathways to produce Fas-resistance that differentially depend on PKC and STAT6, respectively. Further, surface immunoglobulin signaling for inducible Fas-resistance bypasses Btk, requires NF-kappaB, and entails new macromolecular synthesis. Terminal effectors of B cell Fas-resistance include the known anti-apoptotic gene products, Bcl-xL and FLIP, and a novel anti-apoptotic gene that encodes FAIM (Fas Apoptosis Inhibitory Molecule). faim was identified by differential display and exists in two alternatively spliced forms; faim-S is broadly expressed, but faim-L expression is tissue-specific. The FAIM sequence is highly evolu- tionarily conserved, suggesting an important role for this molecule throughout phylogeny. Inducible resistance to Fas killing is hypothesized to protect foreign antigen-specific B cells during potentially hazardous interactions with FasL-bearing T cells, whereas autoreactive B cells fail to become Fas-resistant and are deleted via Fas-dependent cytotoxicity. Inadvertent or aberrant acquisition of Fas-resistance may permit autoreactive B cells to escape Fas deletion, and malignant lymphocytes to impede anti-tumor immunity.

  4. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5(f/f)). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  5. In Vitro Evolution of Allergy Vaccine Candidates, with Maintained Structure, but Reduced B Cell and T Cell Activation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Adedoyin, Justus; Rhyner, Claudio; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Grundström, Jeanette; Berndt, Kurt D.; Crameri, Reto; Grönlund, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus) affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients. PMID:21931754

  6. In vitro evolution of allergy vaccine candidates, with maintained structure, but reduced B cell and T cell activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; Adedoyin, Justus; Rhyner, Claudio; Neimert-Andersson, Theresa; Grundström, Jeanette; Berndt, Kurt D; Crameri, Reto; Grönlund, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Allergy and asthma to cat (Felis domesticus) affects about 10% of the population in affluent countries. Immediate allergic symptoms are primarily mediated via IgE antibodies binding to B cell epitopes, whereas late phase inflammatory reactions are mediated via activated T cell recognition of allergen-specific T cell epitopes. Allergen-specific immunotherapy relieves symptoms and is the only treatment inducing a long-lasting protection by induction of protective immune responses. The aim of this study was to produce an allergy vaccine designed with the combined features of attenuated T cell activation, reduced anaphylactic properties, retained molecular integrity and induction of efficient IgE blocking IgG antibodies for safer and efficacious treatment of patients with allergy and asthma to cat. The template gene coding for rFel d 1 was used to introduce random mutations, which was subsequently expressed in large phage libraries. Despite accumulated mutations by up to 7 rounds of iterative error-prone PCR and biopanning, surface topology and structure was essentially maintained using IgE-antibodies from cat allergic patients for phage enrichment. Four candidates were isolated, displaying similar or lower IgE binding, reduced anaphylactic activity as measured by their capacity to induce basophil degranulation and, importantly, a significantly lower T cell reactivity in lymphoproliferative assays compared to the original rFel d 1. In addition, all mutants showed ability to induce blocking antibodies in immunized mice.The approach presented here provides a straightforward procedure to generate a novel type of allergy vaccines for safer and efficacious treatment of allergic patients.

  7. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07218.001 PMID:25955968

  8. Aberrant immunoglobulin class switch recombination and switch translocations in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Nagel, Inga; Siebert, Reiner; Roschke, Anna V; Sanger, Warren; Wright, George W; Dave, Sandeep S; Tan, Bruce; Zhao, Hong; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Kuehl, W Michael; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2007-03-19

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying chromosomal translocations in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we investigated the nature and extent of immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) in these tumors. We used Southern blotting to detect legitimate and illegitimate CSR events in tumor samples of the activated B cell-like (ABC), germinal center B cell-like (GCB), and primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) subgroups of DLBCL. The frequency of legitimate CSR was lower in ABC DLBCL than in GCB DLBCL and PMBL. In contrast, ABC DLBCL had a higher frequency of internal deletions within the switch mu (Smu) region compared with GCB DLBCL and PMBL. ABC DLBCLs also had frequent deletions within Sgamma and other illegitimate switch recombinations. Sequence analysis revealed ongoing Smu deletions within ABC DLBCL tumor clones, which were accompanied by ongoing duplications and activation-induced cytidine deaminase-dependent somatic mutations. Unexpectedly, short fragments derived from multiple chromosomes were interspersed within Smu in one case. These findings suggest that ABC DLBCLs have abnormalities in the regulation of CSR that could predispose to chromosomal translocations. Accordingly, aberrant switch recombination was responsible for translocations in ABC DLBCLs involving BCL6, MYC, and a novel translocation partner, SPIB. PMID:17353367

  9. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-27

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  10. The relationship between typical and atypical B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A comparative genomic hybridization-based study.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, S J; Su'ut, L; Morgan, G J; Jack, A S

    2000-09-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be classified as typical or atypical based on morphologic and immunophenotypic features. The relationship between these 2 groups is uncertain, and there is some evidence they may be different entities. We used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to explore the cytogenetic relationship between typical and atypical B-cell CLL. Results showed a similar pattern of chromosome gains and losses detected in typical and atypical B-cell CLL, suggesting they are related disorders. Gain on chromosome 12 material occurred in cases that were apparently normal by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The common region mapped to chromosome 12q21. Gains on chromosome 4 were present in 74% (32) of cases analyzed and were confirmed by interphase FISH in 30% (13) of cases. We previously have shown the strong association between trisomy 12 as detected by FISH and CD11a expression in atypical B-cell CLL. In the present study, CGH demonstrated additional gains on 12p and 12q outside the common amplified region of 12q21 in these patients. PMID:10989646

  11. Expansion of Activated Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Impact of B Cell Depletion Therapy, and Biomarkers of Response

    PubMed Central

    Adlowitz, Diana G.; Barnard, Jennifer; Biear, Jamie N.; Cistrone, Christopher; Owen, Teresa; Wang, Wensheng; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Ezealah, Ezinma; Campbell, Debbie; Wei, Chungwen; Looney, R. John; Sanz, Inaki; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Although B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is effective in a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, both mechanisms and biomarkers of response are poorly defined. Here we characterized abnormalities in B cell populations in RA and the impact of BCDT in order to elucidate B cell roles in the disease and response biomarkers. In active RA patients both CD27+IgD- switched memory (SM) and CD27-IgD- double negative memory (DN) peripheral blood B cells contained significantly higher fractions of CD95+ and CD21- activated cells compared to healthy controls. After BCD the predominant B cell populations were memory, and residual memory B cells displayed a high fraction of CD21- and CD95+ compared to pre-depletion indicating some resistance of these activated populations to anti-CD20. The residual memory populations also expressed more Ki-67 compared to pre-treatment, suggesting homeostatic proliferation in the B cell depleted state. Biomarkers of clinical response included lower CD95+ activated memory B cells at depletion time points and a higher ratio of transitional B cells to memory at reconstitution. B cell function in terms of cytokine secretion was dependent on B cell subset and changed with BCD. Thus, SM B cells produced pro-inflammatory (TNF) over regulatory (IL10) cytokines as compared to naïve/transitional. Notably, B cell TNF production decreased after BCDT and reconstitution compared to untreated RA. Our results support the hypothesis that the clinical and immunological outcome of BCDT depends on the relative balance of protective and pathogenic B cell subsets established after B cell depletion and repopulation. PMID:26047509

  12. Deletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products exacerbates lymphoproliferative syndrome and lupus nephritis in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice.

    PubMed

    Goury, Antoine; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Belmokhtar, Karim; Vuiblet, Vincent; Ortillon, Jeremy; Jaisson, Stéphane; Devy, Jerôme; Le Naour, Richard; Tabary, Thierry; Cohen, Jacques H M; Schmidt, Ann-Marie; Rieu, Philippe; Touré, Fatouma

    2015-04-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that interacts with advanced glycation end products, but also with C3a, CpG DNA oligonucleotides, and alarmin molecules such as HMGB1 to initiate a proinflammatory reaction. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder associated with the accumulation of RAGE ligands. We generated mice invalidated for RAGE in the lupus-prone B6-MRL Fas lpr/j background to determine the role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. We compared the phenotype of these mice with that of their wild-type and B6-MRL Fas lpr/j littermates. Lymphoproliferative syndrome, production of anti-dsDNA Abs, lupus nephritis, and accumulation of CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) autoreactive T cells (in the peripheral blood and the spleen) were significantly increased in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j RAGE(-/-) mice compared with B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (respectively p < 0.005, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). A large proportion of autoreactive T cells from B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice expressed RAGE at their surface. Time course studies of annexin V expression revealed that autoreactive T cells in the spleen of B6-MRL Fas lpr/j-RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited a delay in apoptosis and expressed significantly less activated caspase 3 (39.5 ± 4.3%) than T cells in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (65.5 ± 5.2%) or wild-type mice (75.3 ± 2.64%) (p = 0.02). We conclude that the deletion of RAGE in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice promotes the accumulation of autoreactive CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, therefore exacerbating lymphoproliferative syndrome, autoimmunity, and organ injury. This suggests that RAGE rescues the apoptosis of T lymphocytes when the death receptor Fas/CD95 is dysfunctional.

  13. Deletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products exacerbates lymphoproliferative syndrome and lupus nephritis in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice.

    PubMed

    Goury, Antoine; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Belmokhtar, Karim; Vuiblet, Vincent; Ortillon, Jeremy; Jaisson, Stéphane; Devy, Jerôme; Le Naour, Richard; Tabary, Thierry; Cohen, Jacques H M; Schmidt, Ann-Marie; Rieu, Philippe; Touré, Fatouma

    2015-04-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor that interacts with advanced glycation end products, but also with C3a, CpG DNA oligonucleotides, and alarmin molecules such as HMGB1 to initiate a proinflammatory reaction. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder associated with the accumulation of RAGE ligands. We generated mice invalidated for RAGE in the lupus-prone B6-MRL Fas lpr/j background to determine the role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. We compared the phenotype of these mice with that of their wild-type and B6-MRL Fas lpr/j littermates. Lymphoproliferative syndrome, production of anti-dsDNA Abs, lupus nephritis, and accumulation of CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) autoreactive T cells (in the peripheral blood and the spleen) were significantly increased in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j RAGE(-/-) mice compared with B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (respectively p < 0.005, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). A large proportion of autoreactive T cells from B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice expressed RAGE at their surface. Time course studies of annexin V expression revealed that autoreactive T cells in the spleen of B6-MRL Fas lpr/j-RAGE(-/-) mice exhibited a delay in apoptosis and expressed significantly less activated caspase 3 (39.5 ± 4.3%) than T cells in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice (65.5 ± 5.2%) or wild-type mice (75.3 ± 2.64%) (p = 0.02). We conclude that the deletion of RAGE in B6-MRL Fas lpr/j mice promotes the accumulation of autoreactive CD3(+)B220(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, therefore exacerbating lymphoproliferative syndrome, autoimmunity, and organ injury. This suggests that RAGE rescues the apoptosis of T lymphocytes when the death receptor Fas/CD95 is dysfunctional. PMID:25762779

  14. Deletion of genes encoding PU.1 and Spi-B in B cells impairs differentiation and induces pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sokalski, Kristen M; Li, Stephen K H; Welch, Ian; Cadieux-Pitre, Heather-Anne T; Gruca, Marek R; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2011-09-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (Ets) transcription factor PU.1 is required to generate lymphoid progenitor cells from hematopoietic stem cells, but it is not required to generate B cells from committed B-cell lineage progenitors. We hypothesized that PU.1 function in B-cell differentiation is complemented by the related Ets transcription factor Spi-B. To test this hypothesis, mice were generated lacking both PU.1 and Spi-B in the B-cell lineage. Unlike mice lacking PU.1 or Spi-B, mice deficient in both PU.1 and Spi-B in the B-cell lineage had reduced frequencies of B cells as well as impaired B-cell differentiation. Strikingly, all PU.1 and Spi-B-deficient mice developed pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia before 30 weeks of age. Pre-B cells accumulated in the thymus resulting in massive thymic enlargement and dyspnea. These findings demonstrate that PU.1 and Spi-B are essential transcriptional regulators of B-cell differentiation as well as novel tumor suppressors in the B-cell lineage.

  15. Significance of p27 Immunostaining in B-Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    El-Kerdany, Tahany A; Shams Eldin El Telbany, Manal A; Esmaeel, Manal M; Mahmoud, Hanan M

    2016-08-01

    P27 is an important cell cycle regulatory protein. Many reports have validated the utility of p27 as a prognostic marker in different human cancers and to prove its prognostic role in B-cell neoplasm; 80 newly diagnosed B-cell neoplasm patients with mean age of 46.6 years recruited from Hematology/Oncology Unit of Ain Shams University Hospitals during the period from January 2008 till June 2010 were studied for their p27 immunostaining results which showed that all cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were positive for p27, whereas all mantly cell lymphoma cases were negative for it. There was significantly higher p27 positivity in CLL cases compared with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and that indolent cases showed significantly higher rate of positivity when compared with aggressive and highly aggressive cases. So, we can use this marker to differentiate CLL and mantly cell lymphoma in cases of confusion.

  16. 324 Facility B-cell quality process plan

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-07-29

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. These include: Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment; Load and Ship Low-Level Waste; Remove and Size Reduce the 1B Rack; Collect Dispersible Material from Cell Floor; Remove and Size Reduce the 2A Rack; Size Reduce the 1A Rack; Load and Ship Mixed Waste to PUREX Tunnels; and Move Spent Fuel to A-Cell;

  17. Lipoxin A4 decreases human memory B cell antibody production via an ALX/FPR2-dependent mechanism: A link between resolution signals and adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Serhan, Charles N.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) are endogenous bioactive lipid molecules that play a fundamental role in the regulation of inflammation and its resolution. SPMs are classified into lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. Lipoxins and other SPMs have been identified in important immunological tissues including bone marrow, spleen and blood. Lipoxins regulate functions of the innate immune system including the promotion of monocyte recruitment and increase macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A major knowledge gap is whether lipoxins influence adaptive immune cells. Here, we analyzed the actions of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and its receptor ALX/FPR2 on human B cells. LXA4 decreased IgM and IgG production on activated B cells through ALX/FPR2-dependent signaling, which downregulated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. LXA4 also inhibited human memory B cell antibody production and proliferation, but not naïve B cell function. Lastly, LXA4 decreased antigen-specific antibody production in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the actions of lipoxins on human B cells, which shows a link between resolution signals and adaptive immunity. Regulating antibody production is crucial to prevent unwanted inflammation. Harnessing the ability of lipoxins to decrease memory B cell antibody production can be beneficial to threat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. PMID:24166736

  18. Are T cells at the origin of B cell lymphomas?

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael E

    2007-02-21

    Lymphoma pathogenesis is at least in some cases related to transformed B cells (BCs) arising from germinal centre reactions (GCRs). In this article possible deregulations of GCRs are investigated using in silico simulations. It is found that the final differentiation of BCs as regulated by helper T cells (TCs) is the best candidate mechanism for such a deregulation. This shifts the paradigm of BC lymphoma pathogenesis from BC transformations to an emphasized role of TC-BC interactions. PMID:17070849

  19. Early alterations of B cells in patients with septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It has recently been proposed that B lymphocytes are involved in sepsis pathogenesis. The goal of this study is to investigate potential abnormalities in a subset distribution and activation of circulating B lymphocytes in patients with septic shock. Methods This observational prospective study was conducted in a medical-surgical ICU. All patients with septic shock were eligible for inclusion. B-cell phenotypes (CD19+CD69+, CD19+CD23+, CD19+CD5+, CD19+CD80, CD19+CD86+, CD19+CD40 and CD19+CD95+) were assessed by quantitative flow cytometry upon admission to the ICU and 3, 7, 14 and 28 d later. Results Fifty-two patients were included. Thirty-six healthy volunteers matched for age and sex were used as controls. The patients had lymphopenia that was maintained during 28 d of follow-up. In patients with septic shock who died, the percentage of CD19+CD23+ was lower during the 7 d of follow-up than it was in survival patients. Moreover, the percentage of CD80+ and CD95+ expression on B cells was higher in patients who died than in survivors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a CD19+CD23+ value of 64.6% at ICU admission enabled discrimination between survivors and nonsurvivors with a sensitivity of 90.9% and a specificity of 80.0% (P = 0.0001). Conclusions Patients with septic shock who survive and those who don't have different patterns of abnormalities in circulating B lymphocytes. At ICU admission, a low percentage of CD23+ and a high of CD80+ and CD95+ on B cells were associated with increased mortality of patients with septic shock. Moreover, a drop in circulating B cells persisted during 28 d of ICU follow-up. PMID:23721745

  20. Molecular characterization of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, P; Cesarman, E; Chadburn, A; Liu, Y F; Knowles, D M

    1996-06-01

    Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) postulated to arise from noncirculating thymic B lymphocytes. Because of its distinctive clinical and morphological features and putative unique cellular origin, PMBL is generally considered a distinct clinicopathological entity. Little is known, however, about the molecular characteristics of PMBL. Therefore, we analyzed 16 PMBLs for molecular alterations involving the bcl-1, bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, H-ras, K-ras, N-ras, and p53 genes and for Epstein-Barr virus infection, which are commonly involved in lymphoid neoplasia. Employing a combination of Southern blotting and/or polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism assays, we detected genetic alterations in 7 of the 16 (44%) PMBLs. Whereas the bcl-6 gene is rearranged in up to 45% of DLCLs, rearrangement of the bcl-6 gene was detected in only 1 of these 16 (6%) PMBLS. Point mutations of the 5' noncoding region of the c-myc gene were demonstrated in 3 other cases (19%), although c-myc gene rearrangements were not seen by Southern blotting. Missense point mutations of the p53 gene were identified in 3 additional PMBLs (19%). Alterations of the bcl-1, bcl-2, or ras genes and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection were not observed. In conclusion, a variety of molecular lesions occur in PMBLs and may be involved in their pathogenesis. This molecular genetic pattern bears little resemblance to that known for other B cell malignancies, including DLCL. In particular, the infrequent occurrence of bcl-6 gene rearrangement in PMBLs distinguishes them from other DLCLs of B cell origin, suggesting that PMBLs do not represent a distinct subtype of DLCL. PMID:8669486

  1. Molecular characterization of primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, P.; Cesarman, E.; Chadburn, A.; Liu, Y. F.; Knowles, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    Primary mediastinal B cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLCL) postulated to arise from noncirculating thymic B lymphocytes. Because of its distinctive clinical and morphological features and putative unique cellular origin, PMBL is generally considered a distinct clinicopathological entity. Little is known, however, about the molecular characteristics of PMBL. Therefore, we analyzed 16 PMBLs for molecular alterations involving the bcl-1, bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, H-ras, K-ras, N-ras, and p53 genes and for Epstein-Barr virus infection, which are commonly involved in lymphoid neoplasia. Employing a combination of Southern blotting and/or polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism assays, we detected genetic alterations in 7 of the 16 (44%) PMBLs. Whereas the bcl-6 gene is rearranged in up to 45% of DLCLs, rearrangement of the bcl-6 gene was detected in only 1 of these 16 (6%) PMBLS. Point mutations of the 5' noncoding region of the c-myc gene were demonstrated in 3 other cases (19%), although c-myc gene rearrangements were not seen by Southern blotting. Missense point mutations of the p53 gene were identified in 3 additional PMBLs (19%). Alterations of the bcl-1, bcl-2, or ras genes and evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection were not observed. In conclusion, a variety of molecular lesions occur in PMBLs and may be involved in their pathogenesis. This molecular genetic pattern bears little resemblance to that known for other B cell malignancies, including DLCL. In particular, the infrequent occurrence of bcl-6 gene rearrangement in PMBLs distinguishes them from other DLCLs of B cell origin, suggesting that PMBLs do not represent a distinct subtype of DLCL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8669486

  2. [Significance of regulatory B cells in nosogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wang, Fang; Ding, Kai Yang; Dai, Lan

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role of regulatory B cells (Breg) in pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and its clinical significance. A total of 35 ITP patients and 20 normal controls were enrolled in this study. The expression of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells was detected by flow cytometry and the expression of IL-10 mRNA and TGF-β1 mRNA was assayed by RT-PCR. The results indicated that the expression level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed ITP patients was obviously lower than that in normal controls (P < 0.05); the expression level of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells in ITP patients with increased platelet count after treatment was higher than that before treatment (P < 0.05); the expression level of IL-10 mRNA in newly diagnosed ITP patients was significantly lower than that the in normal controls (P < 0.05), the expression level of TGF-β1 mRNA in newly diagnosed ITP patients increases as compared with normal controls (P < 0.05), after treatment with DXM the expression of IL-10 mRNA was enhanced, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA was reduced as compared with expression level before treatment (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the Breg cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP via humoral immunity and its regulation of T lymphocytes.

  3. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  4. Large anaplastic spinal B-cell lymphoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Flatland, Bente; Fry, Michael M; Newman, Shelley J; Moore, Peter F; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B; Casimir, Roslyn H

    2008-12-01

    A 5-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of tetraparesis. The neurologic lesion was localized to the cervical spinal segment (C1-C6). A left axillary mass was identified, and the results of fine needle aspiration cytology indicated malignant round cell neoplasia of possible histiocytic origin. The cells were large, had marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis, occasional bi- and multinucleation, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Euthanasia was performed due to the poor prognosis associated with severe, progressive neurologic signs and a malignant neoplasm. Postmortem examination revealed spinal cord compression and an extradural mass at the C1-C2 spinal segment, with neoplastic cells in the adjacent vertebral bodies, surrounding skeletal muscle, left axillary lymph node, and bone marrow from the right femur. The initial histologic diagnosis was anaplastic sarcoma, but immunohistochemical results indicated the cells were CD20+ and CD45R+ and CD3-, compatible with a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. CD79a staining was nonspecific and uninterpretable. Weak to moderate CD18 positivity and E-cadherin positivity were also observed. Clonality of the B-cell population could not be demonstrated using PCR testing for antigen receptor gene rearrangement. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a feline spinal anaplastic B-cell lymphoma exhibiting bi- and multinucleated cells. The prognostic significance of this cell morphology and immunophenotype is unknown.

  5. APOBEC3 enzymes restrict marginal zone B cells

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Engeser, Gabriele B.; Winkelmann, Rebecca; Wheeler, Matthew L.; Shansab, Maryam; Yu, Philipp; Wünsche, Sarah; Walchhütter, Anja; Metzner, Mirjam; Vettermann, Christian; Eilat, Dan; DeFranco, Anthony; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In general, a long-lasting immune response to viruses is achieved when they are infectious and replication-competent. In the mouse, the neutralizing antibody response to Friend murine leukemia virus is contributed by an allelic form of the enzyme Apobec3 (abbreviated A3). This is counterintuitive, because A3 directly controls viremia before the onset of adaptive anti-viral immune responses. It suggests that A3 also affects the antibody response directly. Here we studied the relative size of cell populations of the adaptive immune system as a function of A3 activity. We created a transgenic mouse that expresses all seven human A3 enzymes (hA3) and compared it to wild-type and mouse A3 (mA3)-deficient mice. A3 enzymes decreased the number of marginal zone (MZ) B cells, but not the number of follicular B or T cells. When mA3 was knocked out, the retroelement hitchhiker-1 and sialyl transferases encoded by genes close to it were overexpressed three and two orders of magnitude, respectively. We suggest that A3 shifts the balance, from the fast antibody response mediated by MZ B cells with little affinity maturation, to a more sustained germinal center B-cell response, which drives affinity maturation and, thereby, a better neutralizing response. PMID:25501566

  6. Adaptive Response of T and B Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is initiated by the retention and accumulation of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, particularly low-density lipoprotein, in the artery wall. In the arterial intima, lipoprotein components that are generated through oxidative, lipolytic, and proteolytic activities lead to the formation of several danger-associated molecular patterns, which can activate innate immune cells as well as vascular cells. Moreover, self- and non-self-antigens, such as apolipoprotein B-100 and heat shock proteins, can contribute to vascular inflammation by triggering the response of T and B cells locally. This process can influence the initiation, progression, and stability of plaques. Substantial clinical and experimental data support that the modulation of adaptive immune system may be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. This may lead to the development of more selective and less harmful interventions, while keeping host defense mechanisms against infections and tumors intact. Approaches such as vaccination might become a realistic option for cardiovascular disease, especially if they can elicit regulatory T and B cells and the secretion of atheroprotective antibodies. Nevertheless, difficulties in translating certain experimental data into new clinical therapies remain a challenge. In this review, we discuss important studies on the function of T- and B-cell immunity in atherosclerosis and their manipulation to develop novel therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease.

  7. How B cells Shape the Immune Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Paul J.; Chan, John

    2009-01-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against nonviral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against nonviral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought. PMID:19283721

  8. Large anaplastic spinal B-cell lymphoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Flatland, Bente; Fry, Michael M; Newman, Shelley J; Moore, Peter F; Smith, Joanne R; Thomas, William B; Casimir, Roslyn H

    2008-12-01

    A 5-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was presented for evaluation of tetraparesis. The neurologic lesion was localized to the cervical spinal segment (C1-C6). A left axillary mass was identified, and the results of fine needle aspiration cytology indicated malignant round cell neoplasia of possible histiocytic origin. The cells were large, had marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis, occasional bi- and multinucleation, and cytoplasmic vacuolation. Euthanasia was performed due to the poor prognosis associated with severe, progressive neurologic signs and a malignant neoplasm. Postmortem examination revealed spinal cord compression and an extradural mass at the C1-C2 spinal segment, with neoplastic cells in the adjacent vertebral bodies, surrounding skeletal muscle, left axillary lymph node, and bone marrow from the right femur. The initial histologic diagnosis was anaplastic sarcoma, but immunohistochemical results indicated the cells were CD20+ and CD45R+ and CD3-, compatible with a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. CD79a staining was nonspecific and uninterpretable. Weak to moderate CD18 positivity and E-cadherin positivity were also observed. Clonality of the B-cell population could not be demonstrated using PCR testing for antigen receptor gene rearrangement. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a feline spinal anaplastic B-cell lymphoma exhibiting bi- and multinucleated cells. The prognostic significance of this cell morphology and immunophenotype is unknown. PMID:19055573

  9. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma with chronic granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nyunt, W W T; Wong, Y P; Wan Jamaludin, W F; Abdul Wahid, S F S

    2016-04-01

    Non-necrotic epithelioid granulomas have been reported in association with neoplasms including Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We report a case of diffuse large B cell lymphoma with chronic granulomatous inflammation to highlight awareness of obscure tumour cells within the granuloma, to avoid delay in diagnosis and management of lymphoma. A 39-year-old Malay lady with no past medical history, presented with a 2-month history of progressive worsening of difficulty in breathing, cough, low-grade fever, loss of weight and loss of appetite. Chest X-ray showed an anterior mediastinal mass and computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy was reported as chronic granulomatous inflammation suggestive of tuberculosis. After 2 months of anti-TB treatment, her symptoms were not relieved. The patient underwent another CT-guided biopsy of the anterior mediastinal mass in another hospital and the histopathology revealed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The patient was referred for treatment. On histopathological review, the first sample showed noncaseating granulomas engulfing tumour cells and large abnormal lymphoid cells which were CD20 positive and with high Ki-67 proliferative index. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma stage IV B IPSS score 3. She underwent chemotherapy (R-EPOCH) and responded well to treatment. PMID:27126666

  10. An age-related numerical and functional deficit in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells is associated with an increase in systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Niharika A; Upton, Jane; Phillips, Anna C; Sapey, Elizabeth; Lord, Janet M

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmunity increases with aging indicative of reduced immune tolerance, but the mechanisms involved are poorly defined. In recent years, subsets of B cells with immunoregulatory properties have been identified in murine models of autoimmune disorders, and these cells downregulate immune responses via secretion of IL10. In humans, immature transitional B cells with a CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) phenotype have been reported to regulate immune responses via IL10 production. We found the frequency and numbers of CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) cells were reduced in the PBMC pool with age. IL10 expression and secretion following activation via either CD40, or Toll-like receptors was also impaired in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells from healthy older donors. When investigating the mechanisms involved, we found that CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B-cell function was compromised by age-related effects on both T cells and B cells: specifically, CD40 ligand expression was lower in CD4 T cells from older donors following CD3 stimulation, and signalling through CD40 was impaired in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells from elders as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation (Y705) and activation of STAT3. However, there was no age-associated change in expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) cells, suggesting IL10-dependent immune suppression is impaired, but contact-dependent suppressive capacity is intact with age. Finally, we found a negative correlation between CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B-cell IL10 production and autoantibody (Rheumatoid factor) levels in older adults. We therefore propose that an age-related decline in CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cell number and function may contribute towards the increased autoimmunity and reduced immune tolerance seen with aging.

  11. Toll-Like Receptor-Dependent Immune Complex Activation of B Cells and Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Moody, Krishna L; Uccellini, Melissa B; Avalos, Ana M; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Viglianti, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    High titers of autoantibodies reactive with DNA/RNA molecular complexes are characteristic of autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In vitro and in vivo studies have implicated the endosomal Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) in the activation of the corresponding autoantibody producing B cells. Importantly, TLR9/TLR7-deficiency results in the inability of autoreactive B cells to proliferate in response to DNA/RNA-associated autoantigens in vitro, and in marked changes in the autoantibody repertoire of autoimmune-prone mice. Uptake of DNA/RNA-associated autoantigen immune complexes (ICs) also leads to activation of dendritic cells (DCs) through TLR9 and TLR7. The initial studies from our lab involved ICs formed by a mixture of autoantibodies and cell debris released from dying cells in culture. To better understand the nature of the mammalian ligands that can effectively activate TLR7 and TLR9, we have developed a methodology for preparing ICs containing defined DNA fragments that recapitulate the immunostimulatory activity of the previous "black box" ICs. As the endosomal TLR7 and TLR9 function optimally from intracellular acidic compartments, we developed a facile methodology to monitor the trafficking of defined DNA ICs by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. These reagents reveal an important role for nucleic acid sequence, even when the ligand is mammalian DNA and will help illuminate the role of IC trafficking in the response.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Emerging immunotherapy and strategies directly targeting B cells for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Magdalena; Smolewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, significant prolonged survival in diffusive large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been observed. The efficacy of initial treatment improved mostly due to addition of a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) to standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Moreover, accurate understanding of DLBCL pathogenesis and remarkable progress in gene expression profiling have led to the development of a variety of tumor-specific regimens. Novel agents target directly the pathways involved in signal transduction, lead to apoptosis and cancer cells differentiation. In this article, we mainly focus on new treatment options, such as monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, currently investigated in aggressive B-cell lymphoma with particular attention to DLBCL type.

  14. Pathogen manipulation of B cells: the best defence is a good offence.

    PubMed

    Nothelfer, Katharina; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Phalipon, Armelle

    2015-03-01

    B cells have long been regarded as simple antibody production units, but are now becoming known as key players in both adaptive and innate immune responses. However, several bacteria, viruses and parasites have evolved the ability to manipulate B cell functions to modulate immune responses. Pathogens can affect B cells indirectly, by attacking innate immune cells and altering the cytokine environment, and can also target B cells directly, impairing B cell-mediated immune responses. In this Review, we provide a summary of recent advances in elucidating direct B cell-pathogen interactions and highlight how targeting this specific cell population benefits different pathogens.

  15. Clonal B cells in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia exhibit functional features of chronic active B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, K V; Vogel, R; Ziegler, C; Altan-Bonnet, G; Velardi, E; Calafiore, M; Dogan, A; Arcila, M; Patel, M; Knapp, K; Mallek, C; Hunter, Z R; Treon, S P; van den Brink, M R M; Palomba, M L

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) characterized by immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy and the medullary expansion of clonal lymphoplasmacytic cells. Neoplastic transformation has been partially attributed to hyperactive MYD88 signaling, secondary to the MYD88 L265P mutation, occurring in the majority of WM patients. Nevertheless, the presence of chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, a feature of multiple IgM+ B-NHL, remains a subject of speculation in WM. Here, we interrogated the BCR signaling capacity of primary WM cells by utilizing multiparametric phosphoflow cytometry and found heightened basal phosphorylation of BCR-related signaling proteins, and augmented phosphoresponses on surface IgM (sIgM) crosslinking, compared with normal B cells. In support of those findings we observed high sIgM expression and loss of phosphatase activity in WM cells, which could both lead to signaling potentiation in clonal cells. Finally, led by the high-signaling heterogeneity among WM samples, we generated patient-specific phosphosignatures, which subclassified patients into a ‘high' and a ‘healthy-like' signaling group, with the second corresponding to patients with a more indolent clinical phenotype. These findings support the presence of chronic active BCR signaling in WM while providing a link between differential BCR signaling utilization and distinct clinical WM subgroups. PMID:26867669

  16. Epstein-Barr virus LMP2A suppresses MHC class II expression by regulating the B-cell transcription factors E47 and PU.1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Han; Lin, Ju-Yin; Chou, Ya-Ching; Chen, Mei-Ru; Yeh, Te-Huei; Lin, Chung-Wu; Lin, Sue-Jane; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2015-04-01

    Oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) uses various approaches to escape host immune responses and persist in B cells. Such persistent infections may provide the opportunity for this virus to initiate tumor formation. Using EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as a model, we found that the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and CD74 in B cells is repressed after EBV infection. Class II transactivator (CIITA) is the master regulator of MHC class II-related genes. As expected, CIITA was downregulated in LCLs. We showed that downregulation of CIITA is caused by EBV latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) and driven by the CIITA-PIII promoter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that LMP2A-mediated E47 and PU.1 reduction resulted in CIITA suppression. Mechanistically, the LMP2A immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif was critical for the repression of E47 and PU.1 promoter activity via Syk, Src, and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Elimination of LMP2A in LCLs using a shLMP2A approach showed that the expression levels of E47, PU.1, CIITA, MHC class II, and CD74 are reversed. These data indicated that the LMP2A may reduce MHC class II expression through interference with the E47/PU.1-CIITA pathway. Finally, we demonstrated that MHC class II may be detected in tonsils and EBV-negative Hodgkin disease but not in EBV-associated posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease and Hodgkin disease.

  17. RAG1 and RAG2 expression by B cell subsets from human tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Girschick, H J; Grammer, A C; Nanki, T; Mayo, M; Lipsky, P E

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that B cells acquire the capacity for secondary V(D)J recombination during germinal center (GC) reactions. The nature of these B cells remains controversial. Subsets of tonsil and blood B cells and also individual B cells were examined for the expression of recombination-activating gene (RAG) mRNA. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that RAG1 mRNA was present in all tonsil B cell subsets, with the largest amount found in naive B cells. RAG2 mRNA was only found in tonsil naive B cells, centrocytes, and to a lesser extent in centroblasts. Neither RAG1 nor RAG2 mRNA was routinely found in normal peripheral blood B cells. In individual tonsil B cells, RAG1 and RAG2 mRNAs were found in 18% of naive B cells, 22% of GC founder cells, 0% of centroblasts, 13% of centrocytes, and 9% of memory B cells. Individual naive tonsil B cells containing both RAG1 and RAG2 mRNA were activated (CD69(+)). In normal peripheral blood approximately 5% of B cells expressed both RAG1 and RAG2. These cells were uniformly postswitch memory B cells as documented by the coexpression of IgG mRNA. These results indicate that coordinate RAG expression is not found in normal peripheral naive B cells but is up-regulated in naive B cells which are activated in the tonsil. With the exception of centroblasts, RAG1 and RAG2 expression can be found in all components of the GC, including postswitch memory B cells, some of which may circulate in the blood of normal subjects.

  18. Chemokine-mediated B cell trafficking during early rabbit GALT development

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shi-Kang; Volgina, Veronica V.; Sethupathi, Periannan; Knight, Katherine L.; Lanning, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial and host cell interactions stimulate rabbit B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). B cells at the base of appendix follicles begin proliferating and diversifying their V-(D)-J genes around 1 week of age, ∼5 days after B cells first begin entering appendix follicles, To gain insight into the microbial and host cell interactions that stimulate B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire, we analyzed B cell trafficking within follicles during the first week of life. We visualized B cells, as well as chemokines that mediate B cell homing in lymphoid tissues, by in situ hybridization, and examined B cell chemokine receptor expression by flow cytometry. We found that B cells were activated, and began downregulating their BCRs, well before a detectable B cell proliferative region appeared at the follicle base. The proliferative region was similar to germinal center dark zones, in that it exhibited elevated CXCL12 mRNA expression, and B cells that upregulated CXCR4 mRNA in response to signals acquired from select intestinal commensals localized in this region. Our results suggest that, after entering appendix follicles, B cells home sequentially to the FAE, the FDC network, the B cell:T cell boundary and, ultimately, the base of the follicle, where they enter a proliferative program and diversify the primary antibody repertoire. PMID:25385821

  19. DIAGNOSING LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE VIRUS IN LIVE WILD TURKEYS (MELEAGRIS GALLOPAVO) USING WHOLE BLOOD.

    PubMed

    Alger, Katrina; Bunting, Elizabeth; Schuler, Krysten; Jagne, Jarra; Whipps, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a retrovirus that infects wild and domestic turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo ). The first cases of LPDV in the United States were diagnosed in 2009, and subsequent surveillance has revealed the virus to be widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern half of the country. More research is needed to determine whether LPDV is having a negative effect on turkey populations, but progress has been impeded by the lack of a simple method for diagnosing the virus in living birds. Infected animals may appear asymptomatic, and diagnostics currently rely on tissue or bone marrow, which can be difficult to obtain. This study investigated the reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect LPDV in whole blood, compared with previous methods using buffy coat (concentrated white blood cells) and bone marrow. Paired samples of whole blood and buffy coat were collected from 137 live turkeys and paired samples of whole blood and bone marrow were collected from 32 turkeys postmortem. Compared with buffy coat, whole blood had 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity. When compared with bone marrow, whole blood had 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Both comparisons had a high degree of agreement using Cohen's kappa statistic. Based on these results, PCR of whole blood provides detection of LPDV in living birds that is on par with both buffy coat and bone marrow.

  20. Risk factors for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, Maurício G; Boussaud, Veronique; Amrein, Catherine; Guillemain, Romain; Souilamas, Jihane; Souilamas, Redha

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze risk factors associated with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in a cohort of 112 lung transplant recipients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Prior to transplantation, patients were tested for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus (HHV types 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8), herpes zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) serologies. PTLD diagnosis was established based on increased EBV viral charge plus clinical/radiographic findings and confirmed by biopsy. Negative EBV and HHV serologies at the time of lung transplantation (LTx) were significant risk factors associated with development of PTLD in patients with CF in the univariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.05) and also in the multivariate analysis (odds ratio of 77.5 and 12.5, respectively). CMV serology, CMV mismatch, acute rejection in the first three months following LTx, HLA-A3 antigen expression, and female gender did not affect PTLD. Our study confirmed the presence of a strong association between negative EBV serology at the time of LTx and PTLD and suggested an independent effect of negative HHV serology on PTLD.

  1. LYMPHO-PROLIFERATIVE RESPONSES TO VARIOUS FASCIOLA HEPATICA WORM'S ANTIGENS: AN IN VITRO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Osama F; Amir, Elamir M; Hawash, Yousry A

    2016-04-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonotic disease with approximately 2-4 million people infected worldwide and a further 180 million at risk of infection. F. hepatica can survive within the bile ducts for many years through its ability to suppress the host immunity with Fasciola cathepsin L1 cysteine protease and Glutathione S transferase playing an important role. The aim of the present study is to investigate the in vitro lympho-proliferative responses of hepatic hilar lymphocytes (HLN) of infected sheep in response to different F. hepatica antigens. The suppressive effects of Fasciola excretory/secretory (ES) and tegument (TEG) and their fractions were also investigated. Our results showed that both ES and TEG had significant suppressive effects on lympho-proliferation, up to 74% and 92%, respectively. When these antigens were fractionated, fraction 3 (MW of >10000-30000) of both ES (64%) and TEG (59%) in addition to fraction 4 (MW of ≤ 10000) of TEG (38%) inherited the suppressive effects. Identification of the potential molecule(s) with such suppressive effects on lymphocytes in TEG fraction 4 could reveal vaccine candidates. PMID:27363058

  2. Lymphoproliferative response and its relationship with histological lesions in experimental ovine paratuberculosis and its diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Kurade, N P; Tripathi, B N

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative response (LPR) was studied in 19 lambs orally infected (Group I) with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) with in vitro lymphocyte stimulation test using MTT dye reduction assay. The non-specific LPR against Con A and specific LPR against sonicated antigen and johnin PPD (purified protein derivatives) were estimated on preinfection (0 day) and various days postinfection period (15 to 330 dpi) in the animals, which were classified according to histological and bacteriological evidence of paratuberculosis infection. Of the two antigens used, johnin PPD was found to be superior in terms of consistency and uniformity of response over an observation period of about a year. Significantly (P<0.05) higher LPR were observed in the infected sheep during postinfection period, as compared with preinfection values and values from uninfected control sheep. It was evident from the present study that the LPR in histologically infected animals fluctuated during the long course of infection and had a definite relationship with the gut pathology and the mycobacterial load. The LPR were stronger but variable in sheep with grades 1, 2 and 3 lesions (paucibacillary) and increased progressively from 30 dpi onwards. The sheep with the advanced lesions (grade 4, multibacillary) showed progressive decline in LPR till 120 dpi after initial stronger response at 30 dpi. Most of the animals were detected by LPR before initiation of faecal shedding of MAP. The results suggested that repeated testing was required while screening an infected flock for detecting most of the positive animals. PMID:17619156

  3. LYMPHO-PROLIFERATIVE RESPONSES TO VARIOUS FASCIOLA HEPATICA WORM'S ANTIGENS: AN IN VITRO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Osama F; Amir, Elamir M; Hawash, Yousry A

    2016-04-01

    Fascioliasis is an important zoonotic disease with approximately 2-4 million people infected worldwide and a further 180 million at risk of infection. F. hepatica can survive within the bile ducts for many years through its ability to suppress the host immunity with Fasciola cathepsin L1 cysteine protease and Glutathione S transferase playing an important role. The aim of the present study is to investigate the in vitro lympho-proliferative responses of hepatic hilar lymphocytes (HLN) of infected sheep in response to different F. hepatica antigens. The suppressive effects of Fasciola excretory/secretory (ES) and tegument (TEG) and their fractions were also investigated. Our results showed that both ES and TEG had significant suppressive effects on lympho-proliferation, up to 74% and 92%, respectively. When these antigens were fractionated, fraction 3 (MW of >10000-30000) of both ES (64%) and TEG (59%) in addition to fraction 4 (MW of ≤ 10000) of TEG (38%) inherited the suppressive effects. Identification of the potential molecule(s) with such suppressive effects on lymphocytes in TEG fraction 4 could reveal vaccine candidates.

  4. HIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses in asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Pontesilli, O; Carlesimo, M; Varani, A R; Ferrara, R; Guerra, E C; Bernardi, M L; Ricci, G; Mazzone, A M; D'Offizi, G; Aiuti, F

    1995-01-01

    In vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HIV-1 recombinant antigens (gp160, p24, and Rev protein) were studied in 83 patients with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection (CDC groups II and III) and circulating CD4 lymphocyte numbers > 400/mm3. Significant response to at least one of the three antigens was detected in 52.4% of the subjects, but the responses were weak, and concordance of the response to the three antigens was rare, the frequency of individuals responding to each antigen not exceeding 22.4%. Increasing frequencies of response were observed when recall antigens (tetanus toxoid and Candida albicans glycomannoprotein) (65.5%) and anti-CD3 MoAb (76.6%) were used as stimuli. Although a significant association between lymphocyte response to p24, but not gp160, and steadiness of CD4 lymphocyte numbers before the assay was observed, no predictive value for lack of CD4 cell decrease was confirmed for either antigen, and fluctuation of the responses to HIV antigens was seen during subsequent follow up. The panel of T cell assays used could be regarded as appropriate for monitoring both HIV-specific responses and T lymphocyte function during immunotherapy with soluble HIV antigens. PMID:7774051

  5. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jesse M; Allison, Andrew B; Holmes, Edward C; Phillips, Jamie E; Bunting, Elizabeth M; Yabsley, Michael J; Brown, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease.

  6. Molecular Surveillance for Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus in Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) from the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jesse M.; Allison, Andrew B.; Holmes, Edward C.; Phillips, Jamie E.; Bunting, Elizabeth M.; Yabsley, Michael J.; Brown, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV) is a poorly understood, oncogenic avian retrovirus of domestic turkeys that has historically been restricted to Europe and Israel. However, a recent study reported LPDV in multiple wild turkey diagnostic cases from throughout the eastern United States of America (USA). To better understand the distribution of LPDV in the eastern USA, we surveyed 1,164 reportedly asymptomatic hunter-harvested wild turkeys from 17 states for the presence of LPDV proviral DNA by PCR. In total, 564/1,164 (47%) turkeys were positive for LPDV. Wild turkeys from each state had a relatively high prevalence of LPDV, although statewide prevalence varied from 26 to 83%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two major clades of LPDV in the USA, although one was at a low frequency suggesting restricted transmission, as well as significant clustering by state of isolation. To determine the best tissue to target for diagnostic purposes, liver, spleen, and bone marrow were tested from a subset of 15 hunter-harvested wild turkeys and 20 wild turkey diagnostic cases. Overall, bone marrow provided the highest level of detection for both hunter-harvested turkeys and diagnostic cases. The sensitivity of LPDV detection between tissues was not significantly different for diagnostic cases, but was for hunter-harvested birds. These results indicate that LPDV infection is common and widespread in wild turkey populations throughout the eastern USA, even without overt signs of disease. PMID:25897755

  7. Risk factors for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saueressig, Maurício G; Boussaud, Veronique; Amrein, Catherine; Guillemain, Romain; Souilamas, Jihane; Souilamas, Redha

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze risk factors associated with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in a cohort of 112 lung transplant recipients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Prior to transplantation, patients were tested for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus (HHV types 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8), herpes zoster virus, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) serologies. PTLD diagnosis was established based on increased EBV viral charge plus clinical/radiographic findings and confirmed by biopsy. Negative EBV and HHV serologies at the time of lung transplantation (LTx) were significant risk factors associated with development of PTLD in patients with CF in the univariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.05) and also in the multivariate analysis (odds ratio of 77.5 and 12.5, respectively). CMV serology, CMV mismatch, acute rejection in the first three months following LTx, HLA-A3 antigen expression, and female gender did not affect PTLD. Our study confirmed the presence of a strong association between negative EBV serology at the time of LTx and PTLD and suggested an independent effect of negative HHV serology on PTLD. PMID:21518001

  8. FAS Haploinsufficiency Caused by Extracellular Missense Mutations Underlying Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bielke, María Gabriela Simesen; Perez, Laura; Yancoski, Judith; Oliveira, João Bosco; Danielian, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS), and the majority of them affect the intracellular domain of FAS protein, particularly the region termed death domain. However, approximately one third of these mutations affect the extracellular region of FAS and most are stop codons, with very few missense changes having been described to date. We previously described 7 patients with a FAS missense extracellular mutation, C107Y, two in homozygozity and 5 in heterozygosity. We investigated here the mechanistic effects of this mutation and observed that the homozygous patients did not show any FAS surface expression, while the heterozygous patients had diminished receptor expression. Aiming to understand why a missense mutation was abolishing receptor expression, we analyzed intracellular FAS protein trafficking using fluorescent fusion proteins of wild type FAS, two missense extracellular mutants (FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y) and one missense change localized in the intracellular region, FAS-D260E. The FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y mutants failed to reach the cell surface, being retained at the endoplasmic reticulum, unlike the WT or the FAS-D260E which were clearly expressed at the plasma membrane. These results support haploinsufficiency as the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of ALPS caused by extracellular FAS missense mutations. PMID:26563159

  9. Immunomodulatory nonablative conditioning regimen for B-cell lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chinratanalab, Wichai; Reddy, Nishitha; Greer, John P.; Morgan, David; Engelhardt, Brian; Kassim, Adetola; Brandt, Stephen J.; Jagasia, Madan; Goodman, Stacey; Savani, Bipin N.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with recurrent CD20+ B-cell lymphoid malignancies received fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab–based nonablative conditioning followed by either matched related (n = 18) or unrelated (n = 8) donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) between March 2008 and May 2011. Median age of patients at transplantation was 59 years (range, 41–64 years). At diagnosis, 20 (77%) had stage IV disease; 23 (88%) received ≥3 regimens, 14 (54%) received ≥4 regimens, and 4 (15%) had earlier autologous-SCT. All patients had either chemosensitive or stable disease and nine (35%) were in complete remission before transplantation. At the time of analysis, 17 patients were alive with an estimated 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rate of 63% and nonrelapse mortality of 25%. Grade II to IV acute graft-vs-host-disease occurred in 8 (31%) and chronic graft-vs-host-disease in 6 (23%) patients (extensive, n = 3). Causes of death include progressive disease in four, acute graft-vs-host-disease in two (both after receiving donor lymphocyte infusion for mixed chimerism with residual disease), infection in one, and other (e.g., substance abuse, leukoencephalopathy) in two. Six patients required rehospitalization within 100 days of SCT (mean = 10 days; range, 3–18 days). Our data support fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab–based nonablative conditioning allo-SCT in CD20+ B-cell lymphoid malignancies and it is time to compare this regimen with an alternative reduced-intensity conditioning regimen in B-cell malignancies. PMID:22269114

  10. Clonal relationships in recurrent B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kang, So Young; Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2016-03-15

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements remain largely unmodified during the clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. We investigated the clonal relationships between lymphoma components at diagnosis and at relapse by analyzing Ig gene rearrangements. A BIOMED-2 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed in 27 patients using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues, with subsequent cloning and sequencing of the amplified Ig genes in 17 patients. All 27 cases of primary and corresponding relapsed tumors showed monoclonal rearrangements of the Ig genes by BIOMED-2 PCR. Whereas IgVH or IgVK fragment lengths were identical in 8/27 pairs (30%), fragment lengths differed in 19/27 pairs (70%). In 17 cases analyzed by sequencing, an identical VDJ gene rearrangement was confirmed in 4/4 pairs (100%) with the same fragment lengths and in 10/13 pairs (77%) with different fragment lengths. Four of 17 primary lymphomas had multiple VDJ rearrangements, and three of them showed an unrelated relapse. Unrelated relapse was observed in 1/8 mantle cell lymphomas, 1/5 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and a large B cell lymphoma developed in a patient with a small lymphocytic lymphoma. Unrelated relapses developed after a longer disease-free interval and tended to show poorer outcome compared with related relapse. In summary, relapse of a lymphoma from an unrelated clone is uncommon, but can occur in B-cell lymphomas. Clonal relationships should be determined by sequencing of the Ig genes, and not just by comparing the PCR product size. PMID:26848863

  11. Mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Irene; Zhang, Yong-An; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2012-01-01

    As physical barriers that separate teleost fish from the external environment, mucosae are also active immunological sites that protect them against exposure to microbes and stressors. In mammals, the sites where antigens are sampled from mucosal surfaces and where stimulation of naive T and B lymphocytes occurs are known as inductive sites and are constituted by mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). According to anatomical location, the MALT in teleost fish is subdivided into gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), skin-associated lymphoid tissue (SALT), and gill-associated lymphoid tissue (GIALT). All MALT contain a variety of leukocytes, including, but not limited to, T cells, B cells, plasma cells, macrophages and granulocytes. Secretory immunoglobulins are produced mainly by plasmablasts and plasma cells, and play key roles in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis. Until recently, teleost fish B cells were thought to express only two classes of immunoglobulins, IgM and IgD, in which IgM was thought to be the only one responding to pathogens both in systemic and mucosal compartments. However, a third teleost immunoglobulin class, IgT/IgZ, was discovered in 2005, and it has recently been shown to behave as the prevalent immunoglobulin in gut mucosal immune responses. The purpose of this review is to summarise the current knowledge of mucosal immunoglobulins and B cells of fish MALT. Moreover, we attempt to integrate the existing knowledge on both basic and applied research findings on fish mucosal immune responses, with the goal to provide new directions that may facilitate the development of novel vaccination strategies that stimulate not only systemic, but also mucosal immunity. PMID:22133710

  12. Impairment of Mature B Cell Maintenance upon Combined Deletion of the Alternative NF-κB Transcription Factors RELB and NF-κB2 in B Cells.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Silva, Kathryn; Anderson, Michael M; Bhagat, Govind; Klein, Ulf

    2016-03-15

    BAFF is critical for the survival and maturation of mature B cells. BAFF, via BAFFR, activates multiple signaling pathways in B cells, including the alternative NF-κB pathway. The transcription factors RELB and NF-κB2 (p100/p52) are the downstream mediators of the alternative pathway; however, the B cell-intrinsic functions of these NF-κB subunits have not been studied in vivo using conditional alleles, either individually or in combination. We in this study report that B cell-specific deletion of relb led to only a slight decrease in the fraction of mature splenic B cells, whereas deletion of nfkb2 caused a marked reduction. This phenotype was further exacerbated upon combined deletion of relb and nfkb2 and most dramatically affected the maintenance of marginal zone B cells. BAFF stimulation, in contrast to CD40 activation, was unable to rescue relb/nfkb2-deleted B cells in vitro. RNA-sequencing analysis of BAFF-stimulated nfkb2-deleted versus normal B cells suggests that the alternative NF-κB pathway, in addition to its critical role in BAFF-mediated cell survival, may control the expression of genes involved in the positioning of B cells within the lymphoid microenvironment and in the establishment of T cell-B cell interactions. Thus, by ablating the downstream transcription factors of the alternative NF-κB pathway specifically in B cells, we identify in this study a critical role for the combined activity of the RELB and NF-κB2 subunits in B cell homeostasis that cannot be compensated for by the canonical NF-κB pathway under physiological conditions.

  13. Genetic lesions in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, M.; Zucca, E.; Young, K. H.; Bertoni, F.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma in adults, accounting for 35%–40% of all cases. The combination of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab with anthracycline-based combination chemotherapy (R-CHOP, rituximab with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) lead to complete remission in most and can cure more than half of patients with DLBCL. The diversity in clinical presentation, as well as the pathologic and biologic heterogeneity, suggests that DLBCL comprises several disease entities that might ultimately benefit from different therapeutic approaches. In this review, we summarize the current literature focusing on the genetic lesions identified in DLBCL. PMID:25605746

  14. Primary Malignant B-cell Lymphoma of the Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jungyo; Jeong, Hyeon; Kim, Young A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary epididymal lymphomas are very rare condition, only 6 case report was published. In 4 of them, initial presentation was non-tender, continuous growth of testis. It can be misdiagnosed with epididymitis, 5 of them was treated by antibiotics before surgery. One patients treated by surgery another 5 makes neoadjuvant therapy, 2 of radiotherapy 3 of chemotherapy. Only one man died after treatment. This case is about 54-year male patients, diagnosed by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, who treated by surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26793572

  15. Bilateral conjunctival extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kram, David E; Brathwaite, Carole D; Khatib, Ziad A

    2010-12-15

    Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas (EMZLs), while relatively common in adults, are rare entities in the pediatric population. A subclass of the typically aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, the few reported pediatric cases indicate that, as in adults, these tumors tend to be indolent. We present a case of EMZL arising in the conjunctivae in a 9-year-old male with bilateral disease. The patient was treated with surgical excision alone and has remained disease-free 6 years after the operation. PMID:20981695

  16. JCAR014 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma

  17. R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With First-Relapse/Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Downregulation of FOXP1 is required during germinal center B-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sagardoy, Ainara; Martinez-Ferrandis, Jose I.; Roa, Sergio; Bunting, Karen L.; Aznar, María Angela; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita; Fontán, Lorena; Fresquet, Vicente; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; Robles, Eloy F.; De Smedt, Linde; Sagaert, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    B-cell maturation and germinal center (GC) formation are dependent on the interplay between BCL6 and other transcriptional regulators. FOXP1 is a transcription factor that regulates early B-cell development, but whether it plays a role in mature B cells is unknown. Analysis of human tonsillar B-cell subpopulations revealed that FOXP1 shows the opposite expression pattern to BCL6, suggesting that FOXP1 regulates the transition from resting follicular B cell to activated GC B cell. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and gene expression assays on B cells indicated that FOXP1 acts as a transcriptional activator and repressor of genes involved in the GC reaction, half of which are also BCL6 targets. To study FOXP1 function in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing human FOXP1 in lymphoid cells. These mice exhibited irregular formation of splenic GCs, showing a modest increase in naïve and marginal-zone B cells and a significant decrease in GC B cells. Furthermore, aberrant expression of FOXP1 impaired transcription of noncoding γ1 germline transcripts and inhibited efficient class switching to the immunoglobulin G1 isotype. These studies show that FOXP1 is physiologically downregulated in GC B cells and that aberrant expression of FOXP1 impairs mechanisms triggered by B-cell activation, potentially contributing to B-cell lymphomagenesis. PMID:23580662

  19. Lentiviral-mediated gene therapy restores B cell tolerance in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Pala, Francesca; Morbach, Henner; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cassani, Barbara; Glauzy, Salome; Romberg, Neil; Candotti, Fabio; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bosticardo, Marita; Villa, Anna; Meffre, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, and high susceptibility to developing tumors and autoimmunity. Recent evidence suggests that B cells may be key players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity in WAS. Here, we assessed whether WAS protein deficiency (WASp deficiency) affects the establishment of B cell tolerance by testing the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells from 4 WAS patients before and after gene therapy (GT). We found that pre-GT WASp-deficient B cells were hyperreactive to B cell receptor stimulation (BCR stimulation). This hyperreactivity correlated with decreased frequency of autoreactive new emigrant/transitional B cells exiting the BM, indicating that the BCR signaling threshold plays a major role in the regulation of central B cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from WAS patients were enriched in self-reactive clones, revealing that peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoint dysfunction is associated with impaired suppressive function of WAS regulatory T cells. The introduction of functional WASp by GT corrected the alterations of both central and peripheral B cell tolerance checkpoints. We conclude that WASp plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of B cell tolerance in humans and that restoration of WASp by GT is able to restore B cell tolerance in WAS patients. PMID:26368308

  20. B cell homeostasis and plasma cell homing controlled by Krüppel-like factor 2.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Rebecca; Sandrock, Lena; Porstner, Martina; Roth, Edith; Mathews, Martina; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Kahn, Mark L; Schuh, Wolfgang; Jäck, Hans-Martin

    2011-01-11

    Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) controls T lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs by regulating sphingosin-1 phosphate receptor 1 (S1Pr1). Here we show that this is not the case for B cells. Instead, KLF2 controls homeostasis of B cells in peripheral lymphatic organs and homing of plasma cells to the bone marrow, presumably by controlling the expression of β(7)-integrin. In mice with a B cell-specific deletion of KLF2, S1Pr1 expression on B cells was only slightly affected. Accordingly, all splenic B cell subsets including B1 cells were present, but their numbers were increased with a clear bias for marginal zone (MZ) B cells. In contrast, fewer peyers patches harboring fewer B cells were found, and fewer B1 cells in the peritoneal cavity as well as recirculating B cells in the bone marrow were detected. Upon thymus-dependent immunization, IgG titers were diminished, and antigen-specific plasma cells were absent in the bone marrow, although numbers of antigen-specific splenic plasmablasts were normal. KLF2 plays also a role in determining the identity of follicular B cells, as KLF2-deficient follicular B cells showed calcium responses similar to those of MZ B cells and failed to down-regulate MZ B cell signature genes, such as CD21 and CXCR7. PMID:21187409

  1. B cells have distinct roles in host protection against different nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B cells may mediate protective responses against nematode parasites by supporting Th2 cell development and/or by producing antibodies. To examine this, B cell-deficient mice were inoculated with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) or Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp). B cell-deficient and wild type (WT...

  2. Autoantigen-specific B-cell depletion overcomes failed immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L; Thomas, James W

    2012-08-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid B cells from Multiple Sclerosis patients are subject to normal germinal center selection

    PubMed Central

    Harp, Christopher; Lee, Jane; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Cameron, Elizabeth; Olsen, Gregory; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael; Monson, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that some clonally expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cells from MS patients exhibit diminished mutation targeting patterns in comparison to typical B cells selected in the context of germinal centers (GCs). In order to determine whether the overall CSF B cell repertoires adhered to mutation patterns typical of GC-selected B cells, we analyzed the immunoglobulin repertoires from CSF B cells of 8 MS patients for mutation characteristics typical of GC-derived B cells. Mutation targeting was preserved. Thus, clonal expansion of some CSF B cells may occur independently of GC, but the CSF B cell pool is governed by typical GC selection. Interestingly, the heavy chain CDR3’s of CSF B cells from MS patients had a net acidic charge, similar to GC-derived B cells, but a tendency towards longer CDR3’s, consistent with autoreactive B cells. How these findings may support current hypotheses regarding the origin of CSF B cells is discussed. PMID:17169437

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid B cells from multiple sclerosis patients are subject to normal germinal center selection.

    PubMed

    Harp, Christopher; Lee, Jane; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Cameron, Elizabeth; Olsen, Gregory; Frohman, Elliot; Racke, Michael; Monson, Nancy

    2007-02-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory demonstrated that some clonally expanded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cells from MS patients exhibit diminished mutation targeting patterns in comparison to typical B cells selected in the context of germinal centers (GCs). In order to determine whether the overall CSF B cell repertoires adhered to mutation patterns typical of GC-selected B cells, we analyzed the immunoglobulin repertoires from CSF B cells of 8 MS patients for mutation characteristics typical of GC-derived B cells. Mutation targeting was preserved. Thus, clonal expansion of some CSF B cells may occur independently of GC, but the CSF B cell pool is governed by typical GC selection. Interestingly, the heavy chain CDR3's of CSF B cells from MS patients had a net acidic charge, similar to GC-derived B cells, but a tendency towards longer CDR3's, consistent with autoreactive B cells. How these findings may support current hypotheses regarding the origin of CSF B cells is discussed. PMID:17169437

  5. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Classification System That Associates Normal B-Cell Subset Phenotypes With Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybkær, Karen; Bøgsted, Martin; Falgreen, Steffen; Bødker, Julie S.; Kjeldsen, Malene K.; Schmitz, Alexander; Bilgrau, Anders E.; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y.; Li, Ling; Bergkvist, Kim S.; Laursen, Maria B.; Rodrigo-Domingo, Maria; Marques, Sara C.; Rasmussen, Sophie B.; Nyegaard, Mette; Gaihede, Michael; Møller, Michael B.; Samworth, Richard J.; Shah, Rajen D.; Johansen, Preben; El-Galaly, Tarec C.; Young, Ken H.; Johnsen, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Current diagnostic tests for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma use the updated WHO criteria based on biologic, morphologic, and clinical heterogeneity. We propose a refined classification system based on subset-specific B-cell–associated gene signatures (BAGS) in the normal B-cell hierarchy, hypothesizing that it can provide new biologic insight and diagnostic and prognostic value. Patients and Methods We combined fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression profiling, and statistical modeling to generate BAGS for naive, centrocyte, centroblast, memory, and plasmablast B cells from normal human tonsils. The impact of BAGS-assigned subtyping was analyzed using five clinical cohorts (treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [CHOP], n = 270; treated with rituximab plus CHOP [R-CHOP], n = 869) gathered across geographic regions, time eras, and sampling methods. The analysis estimated subtype frequencies and drug-specific resistance and included a prognostic meta-analysis of patients treated with first-line R-CHOP therapy. Results Similar BAGS subtype frequencies were assigned across 1,139 samples from five different cohorts. Among R-CHOP–treated patients, BAGS assignment was significantly associated with overall survival and progression-free survival within the germinal center B-cell–like subclass; the centrocyte subtype had a superior prognosis compared with the centroblast subtype. In agreement with the observed therapeutic outcome, centrocyte subtypes were estimated as being less resistant than the centroblast subtype to doxorubicin and vincristine. The centroblast subtype had a complex genotype, whereas the centrocyte subtype had high TP53 mutation and insertion/deletion frequencies and expressed LMO2, CD58, and stromal-1–signature and major histocompatibility complex class II–signature genes, which are known to have a positive impact on prognosis. Conclusion Further development of a diagnostic platform using

  6. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells. PMID:27458535

  7. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Franz J. J.; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J.; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  8. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  9. The Genetic Basis of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive disease featuring heterogeneous genetic, phenotypic and clinical characteristics. Understanding the basis for this heterogeneity represents a critical step toward further progress in the management of this disease, which remains a clinical challenge in approximately one third of patients. This review summarizes current knowledge about the molecular pathogenesis of DLBCL, and describes how recent advances in the genomic characterization of this cancer have provided new insights into its biology, revealing several potential targets for improved diagnosis and therapy. Recent findings In the past few years, the development of high-resolution technologies has provided significant help in identifying genetic lesions and/or disrupted signaling pathways that are required for DLBCL initiation and progression. These studies uncovered the involvement of cellular programs that had not been previously appreciated, including histone/chromatin remodeling and immune recognition. Alterations in these pathways could favor epigenetic reprogramming and escape from cellular immunity. Summary The identification of genetic alterations that contribute to the malignant transformation of a B cell into a DLBCL is helping to better understand the biology of this disease and to identify critical nodes driving tumor progression or resistance to therapy. The rapid pace at which these discoveries are taking place is poised to have significant impact for patients stratification based on molecular predictors and for the development of rational targeted therapies. PMID:23673341

  10. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-19

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations.

  11. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  12. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. PMID:26096744

  13. MicroRNA signatures in B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Lisio, L; Sánchez-Beato, M; Gómez-López, G; Rodríguez, M E; Montes-Moreno, S; Mollejo, M; Menárguez, J; Martínez, M A; Alves, F J; Pisano, D G; Piris, M A; Martínez, N

    2012-01-01

    Accurate lymphoma diagnosis, prognosis and therapy still require additional markers. We explore the potential relevance of microRNA (miRNA) expression in a large series that included all major B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) types. The data generated were also used to identify miRNAs differentially expressed in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) samples. A series of 147 NHL samples and 15 controls were hybridized on a human miRNA one-color platform containing probes for 470 human miRNAs. Each lymphoma type was compared against the entire set of NHLs. BL was also directly compared with DLBCL, and 43 preselected miRNAs were analyzed in a new series of routinely processed samples of 28 BLs and 43 DLBCLs using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A signature of 128 miRNAs enabled the characterization of lymphoma neoplasms, reflecting the lymphoma type, cell of origin and/or discrete oncogene alterations. Comparative analysis of BL and DLBCL yielded 19 differentially expressed miRNAs, which were confirmed in a second confirmation series of 71 paraffin-embedded samples. The set of differentially expressed miRNAs found here expands the range of potential diagnostic markers for lymphoma diagnosis, especially when differential diagnosis of BL and DLBCL is required. PMID:22829247

  14. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-08-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  15. Dominant neurologic symptomatology in intravascular large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kubisova, K; Martanovic, P; Sisovsky, V; Tomleinova, Z; Steno, A; Janega, P; Rychly, B; Babal, P

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare variant of extranodal large B-cell lymphoma and it is characterized by selective intravascular proliferation of malignant cells. Typical features of the disease include aggressive behavior, rapid and frequently fatal course. Clinical picture is non-specific and heterogeneous, depending on the affected organ. It is not uncommon that this unique type of lymphoma is diagnosed post mortem. Herein, we report two cases of IVLBCL with neurologic symptomatology. In our clinical study patient 1 was an 80-year-old male with mixed paraparesis of lower extremities and difficulties with sphincter control. Patient 2 (56-year-old male) had vision malfunction, mental status changes and defect in phatic and motor functions. In both cases definite diagnosis was established by histological examination of necroptic material. We propose to include IVLBCL in differential diagnostic considerations in patients presenting with gradually impairing neurological status and spinal cord damage of unknown etiology (Fig. 2, Ref. 9). PMID:27546361

  16. Quantifying evolutionary constraints on B-cell affinity maturation

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Connor O.; Bedford, Trevor; Minin, Vladimir N.; Bradley, Philip; Robins, Harlan; Matsen, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody repertoire of each individual is continuously updated by the evolutionary process of B-cell receptor (BCR) mutation and selection. It has recently become possible to gain detailed information concerning this process through high-throughput sequencing. Here, we develop modern statistical molecular evolution methods for the analysis of B-cell sequence data, and then apply them to a very deep short-read dataset of BCRs. We find that the substitution process is conserved across individuals but varies significantly across gene segments. We investigate selection on BCRs using a novel method that side-steps the difficulties encountered by previous work in differentiating between selection and motif-driven mutation; this is done through stochastic mapping and empirical Bayes estimators that compare the evolution of in-frame and out-of-frame rearrangements. We use this new method to derive a per-residue map of selection, which provides a more nuanced view of the constraints on framework and variable regions. PMID:26194758

  17. Nature and nurture: a case of transcending haematological pre-malignancies in a pair of monozygotic twins adding possible clues on the pathogenesis of B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marcus C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Roug, Anne S; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Villesen, Palle; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive molecular analysis of a pair of monozygotic twins, who came to our attention when one experienced amaurosis fugax and was diagnosed with JAK2+ polycythaemia vera. He (Twin A) was also found to have an asymptomatic B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Although JAK2-, Twin B was subsequently shown to have a benign monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Flow cytometric and molecular analyses of the B-cell compartments revealed different immunoglobulin light and heavy chain usage in each twin. We hypothesized that whole exome sequencing could help delineating the pattern of germline B-cell disorder susceptibility and reveal somatic mutations potentially contributing to the differential patterns of pre-malignancy. Comparing bone marrow cells and T cells and employing in-house engineered integrative analysis, we found aberrations in Twin A consistent with a myeloid neoplasm, i.e. in TET2, RUNX1, PLCB1 and ELF4. Employing the method for detecting high-ranking variants by extensive annotation and relevance scoring, we also identified shared germline variants in genes of proteins interacting with B-cell receptor signalling mediators and the WNT-pathway, including IRF8, PTPRO, BCL9L, SIT1 and SIRPB1, all with possible implications in B-cell proliferation. Similar patterns of IGHV-gene usage to those demonstrated here have been observed in inherited acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Collectively, these findings may help in facilitating identification of putative master gene(s) involved in B-cell proliferations in general and MBL and B-CLL in particular. PMID:25752595

  18. Nature and nurture: a case of transcending haematological pre-malignancies in a pair of monozygotic twins adding possible clues on the pathogenesis of B-cell proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Marcus C; Nyvold, Charlotte G; Roug, Anne S; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Villesen, Palle; Nederby, Line; Hokland, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We describe a comprehensive molecular analysis of a pair of monozygotic twins, who came to our attention when one experienced amaurosis fugax and was diagnosed with JAK2+ polycythaemia vera. He (Twin A) was also found to have an asymptomatic B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Although JAK2-, Twin B was subsequently shown to have a benign monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Flow cytometric and molecular analyses of the B-cell compartments revealed different immunoglobulin light and heavy chain usage in each twin. We hypothesized that whole exome sequencing could help delineating the pattern of germline B-cell disorder susceptibility and reveal somatic mutations potentially contributing to the differential patterns of pre-malignancy. Comparing bone marrow cells and T cells and employing in-house engineered integrative analysis, we found aberrations in Twin A consistent with a myeloid neoplasm, i.e. in TET2, RUNX1, PLCB1 and ELF4. Employing the method for detecting high-ranking variants by extensive annotation and relevance scoring, we also identified shared germline variants in genes of proteins interacting with B-cell receptor signalling mediators and the WNT-pathway, including IRF8, PTPRO, BCL9L, SIT1 and SIRPB1, all with possible implications in B-cell proliferation. Similar patterns of IGHV-gene usage to those demonstrated here have been observed in inherited acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Collectively, these findings may help in facilitating identification of putative master gene(s) involved in B-cell proliferations in general and MBL and B-CLL in particular.

  19. Dysfunctional B-cell activation in cirrhosis due to hepatitis C infection associated with disappearance of CD27+ B-cell population

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroyoshi; Iyer, Tara K.; Carpenter, Erica; Li, Hong; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Kaplan, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Both advanced solid tumors and hepatitis C have previously been associated with memory B-cell dysfunction. In this study we sought to dissect the impact of viral infection, cirrhosis and liver cancer on memory B-cell frequency and function in the spectrum of HCV disease. Methods Peripheral blood from healthy donors, HCV-infected patients with F1–F2 liver fibrosis, HCV-infected patients with cirrhosis, patients with HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma and non-HCV-infected cirrhotics were assessed for B-cell phenotype by flow cytometry. Isolated B-cells were stimulated with anti-CD40 antibodies and TLR9 agonist for assessment of costimulation marker expression, cytokine production, immunoglobulin production and CD4+ T-cell allostimulatory capacity. Results CD27+ memory B-cells, and more specifically CD27+IgM+ B-cells, were markedly less frequent in cirrhotic patients independent of HCV infection. Circulating B-cells in cirrhotics were hyporesponsive to CD40/TLR9 activation as characterized by CD70 upregulation, TNFβ secretion, IgG production and T-cell allostimulation. Lastly, blockade of TLR4 and TLR9 signaling abrogated the activation of normal donor B-cells by cirrhotic plasma suggesting a role for bacterial translocation in driving B-cell changes in cirrhosis. Conclusion Profound abnormalities in B-cell phenotype and function occur in cirrhosis independent of hepatitis C viral infection. These B-cell defects may explain in part the vaccine hyporesponsiveness and susceptibility to bacterial infection in this population. PMID:21932384

  20. Characterization of Regulatory B Cells in Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Birte; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Lundy, Steven K; Brimnes, Marie K; Smith, Terry J; Nielsen, Claus H

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of regulatory B cells is IL-10 production, hence their designation as IL-10+ B cells. Little is known about the ability of self-antigens to induce IL-10+ B cells in Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), or other autoimmune disease. Here we pulsed purified B cells from 12 HT patients, 12 GD patients, and 12 healthy donors with the thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin (TG) and added the B cells back to the remaining peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This procedure induced IL-10+ B-cell differentiation in GD. A similar tendency was observed in healthy donors, but not in cells from patients with HT. In GD, B cells primed with TG induced IL-10-producing CD4+ T cells. To assess the maximal frequency of inducible IL-10+ B cells in the three donor groups PBMCs were stimulated with PMA/ionomycin. The resulting IL-10+ B-cell frequency was similar in the three groups and correlated with free T3 levels in GD patients. IL-10+ B cells from both patient groups displayed CD25 or TIM-1 more frequently than did those from healthy donors. B-cell expression of two surface marker combinations previously associated with regulatory B-cell functions, CD24hiCD38hi and CD27+CD43+, did not differ between patients and healthy donors. In conclusion, our findings indicate that autoimmune thyroiditis is not associated with reduced frequency of IL-10+ B cells. These results do not rule out regulatory B-cell dysfunction, however. The observed phenotypic differences between IL-10+ B cells from patients and healthy donors are discussed.

  1. A role for TLR signaling during B cell activation in antiretroviral-treated HIV individuals.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART(+)). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART(+) and HIV(-) subjects. However, B cells of HIVART(+) subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART(+) individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV(-) subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV(-) subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART(+) individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV(-) subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART(+) subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART(+) subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  2. A Role for TLR Signaling During B Cell Activation in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzian, Ali; French, Audrey; Demarais, Patricia; Landay, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying B cell activation that persists during antiretroviral therapy (ART) are unknown. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is a critical mediator of innate cell activation and though B cells express TLRs, few studies have investigated a role for TLR signaling in B cell activation during HIV infection. We addressed this question by assessing the activated phenotype and TLR expression/responsiveness of B cells from ART-treated HIV-infected subjects (HIVART+). We evaluated activation markers implicated in B cell-mediated T cell trans infection during HIV pathogenesis. We found no significant difference in TLR expression between B cells of HIVART+ and HIV− subjects. However, B cells of HIVART+ subjects exhibited heightened endogenous expression levels of IL-6 (p=0.0051), T cell cognate ligands CD40 (p=0.0475), CD54 (p=0.0229), and phosphorylated p38 (p<0.0001), a marker of TLR signaling. In vitro, B cells of HIVART+ individuals were less responsive to TLR stimulation compared to B cells of HIV− subjects. The activated phenotype of in vitro TLR-stimulated B cells of HIV− subjects was similar to ex vivo B cells from HIVART+ individuals. TLR2 stimulation was a potent mediator of B cell activation, whereas B cells were least responsive to TLR4 stimulation. Compared to HIV− subjects, the serum level of lipoteichoic acid (TLR2 ligand) in HIVART+ subjects was significantly higher (p=0.0207), correlating positively with viral load (p=0.0127, r=0.6453). Our data suggest that during HIV infection TLR-activated B cells may exert a pathogenic role and B cells from HIVART+ subjects respond to in vitro TLR stimulation, yet exhibit a TLR tolerant phenotype suggesting prior in vivo TLR stimulation. PMID:23763346

  3. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  4. Gammaherpesvirus targets peritoneal B-1 B cells for long-term latency.

    PubMed

    Rekow, Michaela M; Darrah, Eric J; Mboko, Wadzanai P; Lange, Philip T; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2016-05-01

    Gammaherpesviruses establish life-long infection in most adults and are associated with the development of B cell lymphomas. While the interaction between gammaherpesviruses and splenic B cells has been explored, very little is known about gammaherpesvirus infection of B-1 B cells, innate-like B cells that primarily reside in body cavities. This study demonstrates that B-1 B cells harbor the highest frequency of latently infected cells in the peritoneum throughout chronic infection, highlighting a previously unappreciated feature of gammaherpesvirus biology.

  5. Factor VIII delivered by hematopoietic stem cell-derived B cells corrects the phenotype of hemophilia A mice

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali; Zweier-Renn, Lynnsey A.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The main impediments to clinical application of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for treatment of hemophilia A are the bone marrow transplant-related risks and the potential for insertional mutagenesis caused by retroviral vectors. To circumvent these limitations, we have adapted a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen and directed factor VIII (FVIII) protein synthesis to B lineage cells using an insulated lentiviral vector containing an immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer-promoter. Transplantation of lentiviral vector-modified HSCs resulted in therapeutic levels of FVIII in the circulation of all transplanted mice for the duration of the study (6 months). Immunostaining of spleen cells showed that the majority of FVIII was synthesized by B220+ B cells and CD138+ plasma cells. Subsequent challenge with recombinant FVIII elicited at most a minor anti-FVIII antibody response, demonstrating induction of immune hyporesponsiveness. All transplant recipients exhibited clot formation and survived tail clipping, indicating correction of their hemophilic phenotype. Therapeutic levels of FVIII could be transferred to secondary recipients by bone marrow transplantation, confirming gene transfer into long-term repopulating HSCs. Moreover, short-term therapeutic FVIII levels could also be achieved in secondary recipients by adoptive transfer of HSC-derived splenic B cells. Our findings support pursuit of B cell-directed protein delivery as a potential clinical approach to treat hemophilia A and other disorders correctable by systemically distributed proteins. PMID:21264447

  6. Essential role of MALT1 protease activity in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu; Posvitz-Fejfar, Anita; Rebeaud, Fabien; Guzzardi, Montserrat; Penas, Eva-Maria Murga; Dierlamm, Judith; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Thome, Margot

    2009-01-01

    A key element for the development of suitable anti-cancer drugs is the identification of cancer-specific enzymatic activities that can be therapeutically targeted. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue transformation protein 1 (MALT1) is a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, the least curable subtype of DLBCL. Recent data suggest that MALT1 has proteolytic activity, but it is unknown whether this activity is relevant for tumor growth. Here we report that MALT1 is constitutively active in DLBCL lines of the ABC but not the GCB subtype. Inhibition of the MALT1 proteolytic activity led to reduced expression of growth factors and apoptosis inhibitors, and specifically affected the growth and survival of ABC DLBCL lines. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in DLBCL of the ABC subtype, and provide a rationale for the development of pharmacological inhibitors of MALT1 in DLBCL therapy. PMID:19897720

  7. Increased BCR responsiveness in B cells from patients with chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Tata, Prasanthi V.; Fore, Matthew S.; Wooten, Jenna; Rudra, Sharmistha; Deal, Allison M.; Sharf, Andrew; Hoffert, Todd; Roehrs, Philip A.; Shea, Thomas C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Richards, Kristy L.; Jagasia, Madan; Lee, Stephanie J.; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chao, Nelson J.

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells have emerged as important contributors to chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) pathogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for their sustained activation remain unknown. We previously showed that patients with cGVHD have significantly increased B cell–activating factor (BAFF) levels and that their B cells are activated and resistant to apoptosis. Exogenous BAFF confers a state of immediate responsiveness to antigen stimulation in normal murine B cells. To address this in cGVHD, we studied B-cell receptor (BCR) responsiveness in 48 patients who were >1 year out from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that B cells from cGVHD patients had significantly increased proliferative responses to BCR stimulation along with elevated basal levels of the proximal BCR signaling components B cell linker protein (BLNK) and Syk. After initiation of BCR signaling, cGVHD B cells exhibited increased BLNK and Syk phosphorylation compared with B cells from patients without cGVHD. Blocking Syk kinase activity prevented relative post-HSCT BCR hyper-responsiveness of cGVHD B cells. These data suggest that a lowered BCR signaling threshold in cGVHD associates with increased B-cell proliferation and activation in response to antigen. We reveal a mechanism underpinning aberrant B-cell activation in cGVHD and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of the involved kinases may benefit these patients. PMID:24532806

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 2 positions and retains marginal zone B cells within the splenic marginal zone

    PubMed Central

    Muppidi, Jagan R.; Arnon, Tal I.; Bronevetsky, Yelena; Veerapen, Natacha; Tanaka, Masato; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Specialized B cells residing in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) continuously survey the blood for antigens and are important for immunity to systemic infections. However, the cues that uniquely attract cells to the MZ have not been defined. Previous work demonstrated that mice deficient in cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) have decreased numbers of MZ B cells but it has been unclear whether CB2 regulates MZ B cell development or positioning. We show that MZ B cells are highly responsive to the CB2 ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) and that CB2 antagonism rapidly displaces small numbers of MZ B cells to the blood. Antagonism for longer durations depletes MZ B cells from the spleen. In mice deficient in sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor function, CB2 antagonism causes MZ B cell displacement into follicles. Moreover, CB2 overexpression is sufficient to position B cells to the splenic MZ. These findings establish a role for CB2 in guiding B cells to the MZ and in preventing their loss to the blood. As a consequence of their MZ B cell deficiency, CB2-deficient mice have reduced numbers of CD1d-high B cells. We show that CB2 deficiency results in diminished humoral responses to a CD1d-restricted systemic antigen. PMID:21875957

  9. Nodal marginal zone B cells in mice: a novel subset with dormant self-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Friedrich, Heike C.; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells, representing a distinct subset of innate-like B cells, mount rapid T-independent responses to blood-borne antigens. They express low-affinity polyreactive antigen receptors that recognize both foreign and self-structures. The spleen is considered the exclusive site for murine MZ B cells. However, we have here identified B cells with a MZ B-cell phenotype in the subcapsular sinuses of mouse lymph nodes. The nodal MZ (nMZ) B cells display high levels of IgM, costimulators and TLRs, and are represented by naïve and memory cells. The frequency of nMZ B cells is about 1–6% of nodal B cells depending on mouse strain, with higher numbers in older mice and a trend of increased numbers in females. There is a significant expansion of nMZ B cells following immunization with an autoantigen, but not after likewise immunization with a control protein or with the adjuvant alone. The nMZ B cells secrete autoantibodies upon activation and can efficiently present autoantigen to cognate T cells in vitro, inducing T-cell proliferation. The existence of self-reactive MZ B cells in lymph nodes may be a source of autoantigen-presenting cells that in an unfortunate environment may activate T cells leading to autoimmunity. PMID:27277419

  10. A role for intrathymic B cells in the generation of natural regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Walters, Stacey N; Webster, Kylie E; Daley, Stephen; Grey, Shane T

    2014-07-01

    B cells inhabit the normal human thymus, suggesting a role in T cell selection. In this study, we report that B cells can modulate thymic production of CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]). Mice with transgenic expression of BAFF (BAFF-Tg) harbor increased numbers of Helios+ Foxp3+ thymic Tregs and, similar to some human autoimmune conditions, also exhibit increased numbers of B cells colonizing the thymus. Distinct intrathymic B cell subpopulations were identified, namely B220+, IgM+, CD23(hi), CD21(int) cells; B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(lo) cells; and a population of B220+, IgM+, CD23(lo), CD21(hi) cells. Anatomically, CD19+ B cells accumulated in the thymic medulla region juxtaposed to Foxp3+ T cells. These intrathymic B cells engender Tregs. Indeed, thymic Treg development was diminished in both B cell-deficient BAFF-Tg chimeras, but also B cell-deficient wild-type chimeras. B cell Ag capture and presentation are critical in vivo events for Treg development. In the absence of B cell surface MHC class II expression, thymic expansion of BAFF-Tg Tregs was lost. Further to this, expansion of Tregs did not occur in BAFF-Tg/Ig hen egg lysozyme BCR chimeras, demonstrating a requirement for Ag specificity. Thus, we present a mechanism whereby intrathymic B cells, through the provision of cognate help, contribute to the shaping of the Treg repertoire.

  11. Marginal Zone B Cells in Neonatal Rats Express Intermediate Levels of CD90 (Thy-1)

    PubMed Central

    Dammers, Peter M.; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Zandvoort, André; Kroese, Frans G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Here we show that marginal zone (MZ)-B cells in rats can already be detected in neonatal spleen from two days after birth. At this time point, morphologically distinct MZs are not present yet and the vast majority of B cells in spleen are located in a concentric area surrounding the T cell zones (PALS). Before MZs are obviously detectable in spleen (14 days after birth), MZ-B cells seem to be enriched at the outer zones of the concentric B cell areas. Similar to adult rats, neonatal MZ-B cells are intermediate-sized cells that express high levels of surface (s)IgM and HIS57 antigen, and low levels of sIgD and CD45R (HIS24). We show here, however, that in contrast to adult MZ-B cells, MZ-B cells (and also recirculating follicular (RF)-B cells) in neonatal rats express higher levels of CD90 (Thy-1). In adult rats, expression of CD90 on the B cell lineage is confined to immature B cells. We speculate that the expression of CD90 on neonatal MZ-B cells may have implications for their responsiveness to polysaccharide (T cell-independent type 2) antigens. PMID:15144015

  12. The actin-bundling protein L-plastin is essential for marginal zone B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Elizabeth M.; Deady, Lauren E.; Morley, Sharon Celeste

    2011-01-01

    B cell development is exquisitely sensitive to location within specialized niches in the bone marrow and spleen. Location within these niches is carefully orchestrated through chemotactic and adhesive cues. Here we demonstrate the requirement for the actin-bundling protein L-plastin (LPL) in B cell motility towards the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL13 and the lipid chemoattractant sphingosine-1-phosphate, which guide normal B cell development. Impaired motility of B cells in LPL−/− mice correlated with diminished splenic maturation of B cells, with a moderate (40%) loss of follicular B cells and a profound (>80%) loss of marginal zone B cells. Entry of LPL−/− B cells into the lymph nodes and bone marrow of mice was also impaired. Furthermore, LPL was required for the integrin-mediated enhancement of transwell migration but was dispensable for integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion. These results suggest that LPL may participate in signaling that enables lymphocyte transmigration. In support of this hypothesis, the phosphorylation of Pyk-2, a tyrosine kinase that integrates chemotactic and adhesive cues, is diminshed in LPL−/− B cells stimulated with chemokine. Finally, a well-characterized role of marginal zone B cells is the generation of a rapid humoral response to polysaccharide antigens. LPL−/− mice exhibited a defective antibody response to Streptococcus pneumoniae, indicating a functional consequence of defective MZ B cell development in LPL−/− mice. PMID:21832165

  13. Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Reconstitution after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation – revelation of B cell developmental pathways and lineage phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, M; Holmqvist, J; Abrahamsson, J; Mellgren, K

    2012-01-01

    OTHER ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON B CELL SUBSETS IN DISEASE B cells in multiple sclerosis: drivers of disease pathogenesis and Trojan horse for Epstein—Barr virus entry to the central nervous system? Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 1–6. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 7–14. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an immunological treatment that has been used for more than 40 years to cure a variety of diseases. The procedure is associated with serious side effects, due to the severe impairment of the immune system induced by the treatment. After a conditioning regimen with high-dose chemotherapy, sometimes in combination with total body irradiation, haematopoietic stem cells are transferred from a donor, allowing a donor-derived blood system to form. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of humoral problems and B cell development after HSCT, and relate these to the current understanding of human peripheral B cell development. We describe how these studies have aided the identification of subsets of transitional B cells and also a robust memory B cell phenotype. PMID:22132880

  14. Expression of sprouty2 inhibits B-cell proliferation and is epigenetically silenced in mouse and human B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Matthew J.; Dawson, David W.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Hong, Jason S.; Knosp, Wendy M.; Xu, Lizhong; Balatoni, Cynthia E.; Allen, Eric L.; Shen, Rhine R.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Martin, Gail R.

    2009-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma is the most common immune system malignancy. TCL1 transgenic mice (TCL1-tg), in which TCL1 is ectopically expressed in mature lymphocytes, develop multiple B- and T-cell leukemia and lymphoma subtypes, supporting an oncogenic role for TCL1 that probably involves AKT and MAPK-ERK signaling pathway augmentation. Additional, largely unknown genetic and epigenetic alterations cooperate with TCL1 during lymphoma progression. We examined DNA methylation patterns in TCL1-tg B-cell tumors to discover tumor-associated epigenetic changes, and identified hypermethylation of sprouty2 (Spry2). Sprouty proteins are context-dependent negative or positive regulators of MAPK-ERK pathway signaling, but their role(s) in B-cell physiology or pathology are unknown. Here we show that repression of Spry2 expression in TCL1-tg mouse and human B-cell lymphomas and cell lines is associated with dense DNA hypermethylation and was reversed by inhibition of DNA methylation. Spry2 expression was induced in normal splenic B cells by CD40/B-cell receptor costimulation and regulated a negative feedback loop that repressed MAPK-ERK signaling and decreased B-cell viability. Conversely, loss of Spry2 function hyperactivated MAPK-ERK signaling and caused increased B-cell proliferation. Combined, these results implicate epigenetic silencing of Spry2 expression in B lymphoma progression and suggest it as a companion lesion to ectopic TCL1 expression in enhancing MAPK-ERK pathway signaling. PMID:19147787

  15. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  16. Pathobiology of primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pileri, Stefano A; Zinzani, Pier L; Gaidano, Gianluca; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Rossi, Maura; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Controversy still exists over the response to therapy and prognosis of patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). Recent data from the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group (IELSG) suggest that a MACOP-B (methotrexate, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, bleomycin) chemotherapy regimen followed by radiotherapy may be a better induction strategy than other previously used treatments. Although the pathobiology of PMBL has been widely studied, its precise histology, phenotype, and molecular characteristics are still not clear. To date, phenotypic analysis has revealed the following phenotype: positivity for CD45 and CD20, but negativity for CD3, CD10, CD21, Class I/II major histocompatibility antigens, and a variety of other immunohistochemical markers. CD79a is generally detected, despite an absence of surface immunoglobulins (Igs). CD30 staining is observed in most cases, but is weaker and less homogeneous than in classic Hodgkin's lymphoma or anaplastic large cell lymphoma. BCL-2 protein is usually expressed but there are few data describing the expression of MUM1/IRF4, PAX5/BSAP, BCL-6, or the B-cell transcription factors BOB.1, Oct-2, and PU.1. Cytogenetic studies reveal gains in segments of chromosome 9p, including amplification of the REL proto-oncogene and the tyrosine kinase gene JAK2. Other molecular findings include: C-myc mutations or rearrangements, p53 mutations, IgV(H), gene mutations, and bcl-2 and mal over-expression. bcl-6 mutations and bcl-2 gene rearrangements are generally absent, suggesting that PMBL is of pre-germinal center (GC) origin. However, two recent reports show isotype-switched Ig genes with a high frequency of somatic hypermutations as well as variants in the 5' noncoding region of the bcl-6 gene. The IELSG collected 137 PMBL cases for extensive pathologic review. Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with sclerosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation. It

  17. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  18. Cutting Edge: Redox Signaling Hypersensitivity Distinguishes Human Germinal Center B Cells.

    PubMed

    Polikowsky, Hannah G; Wogsland, Cara E; Diggins, Kirsten E; Huse, Kanutte; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-08-15

    Differences in the quality of BCR signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. In this study, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naive B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane-proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage-specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells.

  19. Dissociation of two signals required for activation of resting B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Julius, M H; von Boehmer, H; Sidman, C L

    1982-01-01

    Cellular interactions involved in the T cell-dependent activation of B cells were analyzed by using lines and clones of helper T cells specific for determinants expressed on the B cell surface. Activation of male antigen-, M locus-, and H-2-specific T cells was shown to support polyclonal Ig production by a population of B cells that did not require T-cell-B-cell interaction for induction/amplification. However, these T cells alone did not activate gradient-purified small (resting) B cells. The activation of small B cells was shown to require not only a signal derived through an antigen-specific T-helper cell-B cell interaction but in addition a second signal that could be provided by anti-Ig antibodies. PMID:6979046

  20. B-Cell Dysregulation in Crohn's Disease Is Partially Restored with Infliximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Wilhelmina M. C.; van Laar, Jan A. M.; van der Houwen, Tim B.; Kamphuis, Lieke S. J.; Bartol, Sophinus J. W.; Lam, King H.; Ouwendijk, Rob J.; Sparrow, Miles P.; Gibson, Peter R.; van Hagen, P. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background B-cell depletion can improve a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, but does not appear beneficial for patients with Crohn’s disease. Objective To elucidate the involvement of B cells in Crohn’s disease, we here performed an ‘in depth’ analysis of intestinal and blood B-cells in this chronic inflammatory disease. Methods Patients with Crohn’s disease were recruited to study B-cell infiltrates in intestinal biopsies (n = 5), serum immunoglobulin levels and the phenotype and molecular characteristics of blood B-cell subsets (n = 21). The effects of infliximab treatment were studied in 9 patients. Results Granulomatous tissue showed infiltrates of B lymphocytes rather than Ig-secreting plasma cells. Circulating transitional B cells and CD21low B cells were elevated. IgM memory B cells were reduced and natural effector cells showed decreased replication histories and somatic hypermutation (SHM) levels. In contrast, IgG and IgA memory B cells were normally present and their Ig gene transcripts carried increased SHM levels. The numbers of transitional and natural effector cells were normal in patients who responded clinically well to infliximab. Conclusions B cells in patients with Crohn’s disease showed signs of chronic stimulation with localization to granulomatous tissue and increased molecular maturation of IgA and IgG. Therapy with TNFα-blockers restored the defect in IgM memory B-cell generation and normalized transitional B-cell levels, making these subsets candidate markers for treatment monitoring. Together, these results suggest a chronic, aberrant B-cell response in patients with Crohn’s disease, which could be targeted with new therapeutics that specifically regulate B-cell function. PMID:27468085