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Sample records for b-type cyclin over-expression

  1. Two fission yeast B-type cyclins, cig2 and Cdc13, have different functions in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, A; Russell, P

    1993-01-01

    Cyclin B interacts with Cdc2 kinase to induce cell cycle events, particularly those of mitosis. The existence of cyclin B subtypes in several species has been known for some time, leading to speculation that key events of mitosis may be carried out by distinct functional classes of Cdc2/cyclin B. We report the discovery of cig2, a third B-type cyclin gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Disruption of cig2 delays the onset of mitosis, to the degree that a cig2 null allele rescues mitotic catastrophe mutants, including those that are unable to carry out the inhibitory tyrosyl phosphorylation of Cdc2 kinase. Consistent with this, a cig2 null allele exhibits synthetic lethal interactions with cdc25ts and cdc2ts mutations. Mitotic phenotypes caused by disruption of cig2 are not reversed by increased production of Cdc13, the other fission yeast B-type cyclin that functions in mitosis. Likewise, a cdc13ts mutation is not rescued by increased gene dosage of cig2+. These data indicate that Cdc13 and Cig2 interact with Cdc2 to carry out different functions in mitosis. We suggest that some cyclin B subtypes found in other species, including humans, are also likely to have distinct, nonoverlapping functions in mitosis. Images PMID:8455610

  2. The A- and B-type cyclins of Drosophila are accumulated and destroyed in temporally distinct events that define separable phases of the G2-M transition.

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, W G; Gonzalez, C; Maldonado-Codina, G; Glover, D M

    1990-01-01

    We show that the sequence of Drosophila cyclin B has greater identity with B-type cyclins from other animal phyla than with Drosophila cyclin A, suggesting that the two cyclins have distinct roles that have been maintained in evolution. Cyclin A is not detectable in unfertilized eggs and is present at low levels prior to cellularization of the syncytial embryo. In contrast, the levels of cyclin B remain uniformly high throughout these developmental stages. In cells within cellularized embryos and the larval brain, cyclin A accumulates to peak levels in prophase and is degraded throughout the period in which chromosomes are becoming aligned on the metaphase plate. The degradation of cyclin B, on the other hand, does not occur until the metaphase-anaphase transition. In cells arrested at c-metaphase by treating with microtubule destabilizing drugs to prevent spindle formation, cyclin A has been degraded in the arrested cells, whereas cyclin B is maintained at high levels. These observations suggest that cyclin A has a role in the G2-M transition that is independent of spindle formation, and that entry into anaphase is a key requirement for the degradation of cyclin B. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2142452

  3. Identification of a mouse B-type cyclin which exhibits developmentally regulated expression in the germ line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. L.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    To begin to examine the function of cyclins in mammalian germ cells, we have screened an adult mouse testis cDNA library for the presence of B-type cyclins. We have isolated cDNAs that encode a murine B-type cyclin, which has been designated cycB1. cycB1 was shown to be expressed in several adult tissues and in the midgestation mouse embryo. In the adult tissues, the highest levels of cycB1 transcripts were seen in the testis and ovary, which contain germ cells at various stages of differentiation. The major transcripts corresponding to cycB1 are 1.7 and 2.5 kb, with the 1.7 kb species being the predominant testicular transcript and the 2.5 kb species more abundant in the ovary. Examination of cDNAs corresponding to the 2.5 kb and 1.7 kb mRNAs revealed that these transcripts encode identical proteins, differing only in the polyadenylation signal used and therefore in the length of their 3' untranslated regions. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the predominant sites of cycB1 expression in the testis and ovary were in the germinal compartment, particularly in early round spermatids in the testis and growing oocytes in the ovary. Thus cycB1 is expressed in both meiotic and postmeiotic cells. This pattern of cycB1 expression further suggests that cycB1 may have different functions in the two cell types, only one of which correlates with progression of the cell cycle.

  4. B-type cyclins regulate G1 progression in fission yeast in opposition to the p25rum1 cdk inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Castellanos, C; Labib, K; Moreno, S

    1996-01-01

    The onset of S phase in fission yeast is regulated at Start, the point of commitment to the mitotic cell cycle. The p34cdc2 kinase is essential for G1 progression past Start, but until now its regulation has been poorly understood. Here we show that the cig2/cyc17 B-type cyclin has an important role in G1 progression, and demonstrate that p34cdc2 kinase activity is periodically associated with cig2 in G1. Cells lacking cig2 are defective in G1 progression, and this is particularly clear in small cells that must regulate Start with respect to cell size. We also find that the cig1 B-type cyclin can promote G1 progression. Whilst p25rum1 can inhibit cig2/cdc2 activity in vitro, and may transiently inhibit this complex in vivo, cig1 is regulated independently of p25rum1. Since cig1/cdc2 kinase activity peaks in mitotic cells, and decreases after mitosis with similar kinetics to cdc13-associated kinase activity, we suggest that cig2 is likely to be the principal fission yeast G1 cyclin. cig2 protein levels accumulate in G1 cells, and we propose that p25rum1 may transiently inhibit cig2-associated p34cdc2 activity until the critical cell size required for Start is reached. Images PMID:8631305

  5. Inhibition of intimal hyperplasia after stenting by over-expression of p15: a member of the INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Segev, Amit; Nili, Nafiseh; Qiang, Beiping; Osherov, Azriel B; Giordano, Frank J; Jaffe, Ronen; Gauldie, Jack; Sparkes, John D; Fraser, Ashley R; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; Butany, Jagdish; Strauss, Bradley H

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated the role of p15(Ink4), a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation, cell cycle progression and intimal hyperplasia after stenting. Aortic VSMCs transduced with either adenovirus encoding for p15(Ink4) or β-galactosidase were assessed for DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and pRb phosphorylation. Rabbit carotid arteries were stented and treated with peri-adventitial delivery of saline or adenovirus encoding for p15(Ink4) or β-galactosidase. p15(Ink4) transgene and protein expression were evaluated at 24 h and 72 h, respectively. In-stent cell proliferation was evaluated by BrdU at day 7. Histomorphometric analysis of in-stent intimal hyperplasia was performed at 10 weeks. Human p15(Ink4) DNA was detected in transduced VSMCs at 24h. p15(Ink4) over-expression reduced VSMCs DNA synthesis by 60%. Cell cycle progression was inhibited, with a 30% increase in G1 population accompanied by inhibition of pRb phosphorylation. Human p15(Ink4) transgene was identified in transduced stented arteries but not in control arteries. p15(Ink4) immunostaining was increased and cell proliferation significantly reduced by 50% in p15(Ink4) transduced arteries. Intimal cross-sectional area (CSA) of p15(Ink4)-treated group was significantly lower than the β-gal treated and non-transduced groups (p=0.008). There were no differences in the intimal or medial inflammatory response between groups. p15(Ink4) over-expression blocks cell cycle progression leading to inhibition of VSMCs proliferation. Peri-adventitial delivery of p15(Ink4) significantly inhibits in-stent intimal hyperplasia.

  6. p63cdc13, a B-type cyclin, is associated with both the nucleolar and chromatin domains of the fission yeast nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, I M; Alfa, C E; Hyams, J S

    1993-11-01

    The cellular distribution of the fission yeast mitotic cyclin B, p63cdc13, was investigated by a combination of indirect immunofluorescence light microscopy, immunogold electron microscopy, and nuclear isolation and fractionation. Immunofluorescence microscopy of wild-type cells and the cold-sensitive mutant dis2.11 with a monospecific anti-p63cdc13 antiserum was consistent with the association of a major subpopulation of fission yeast M-phase protein kinase with the nucleolus. Immunogold electron microscopy of freeze-substituted wild-type cells identified two nuclear populations of p63cdc13, one associated with the nucleolus, the other with the chromatin domain. To investigate the cell cycle regulation of nuclear labeling, the mutant cdc25.22 was synchronized through mitosis by temperature arrest and release. Immunogold labeling of cells arrested at G2M revealed gold particles present abundantly over the nucleolus and less densely over the chromatin region of the nucleus. Small vesicles around the nucleus were also labeled by anti-p63cdc13, but few gold particles were detected over the cytoplasm. Labeling of all cell compartments declined to zero through mitosis. Cell fractionation confirmed that p63cdc13 was substantially enriched in both isolated nuclei and in a fraction containing small vesicles and organelles. p63cdc13 was not extracted from nuclei by treatment with RNase A, Nonidet P40 (NP-40), Triton X-100, and 0.1 M NaCl, although partial solubilization was observed with DNase I and 1 M NaCl. A known nucleolar protein NOP1, partitioned in a similar manner to p63cdc13, as did p34cdc2, the other subunit of the M-phase protein kinase. We conclude that a major subpopulation of the fission yeast mitotic cyclin B is targeted to structural elements of the nucleus and nucleolus.

  7. Candida albicans Cyclin Clb4 Carries S-Phase Cyclin Activity▿†

    PubMed Central

    Ofir, Ayala; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. The cyclin subunit activates the CDK and also imparts to the complex, at least in some cases, substrate specificity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an organism in which the roles of individual cyclins are best studied, contains nine cyclins (three G1 cyclins and six B-type cyclins) capable of activating the main cell cycle CDK, Cdc28. Analysis of the genome of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans revealed only two sequences corresponding to B-type cyclins, C. albicans Clb2 (CaClb2) and CaClb4. Notably, no homolog of the S. cerevisiae S-phase-specific cyclins, Clb5/Clb6, could be detected. Here, we performed an in vitro analysis of the activity of CaClb2 and CaClb4 and of three G1 cyclins, as well as an analysis of the phenotype of S. cerevisiae cells expressing CaClb2 or CaClb4 instead of Clb5. Remarkably, replacement of CLB5 by CaCLB4 caused rapid diploidization of S. cerevisiae. In addition, both in vivo and in vitro analyses indicate that, in spite of the higher sequence similarity of CaClb2 to Clb5/Clb6, CaClb4 is the functional homolog of Clb5/Clb6. The activity of a CaClb2/CaClb4 cyclin hybrid suggests that the cyclin box domain of CaClb4 carries the functional specificity of the protein. These results have implications for our understanding of the evolution of specificity of the cell cycle cyclins. PMID:20639412

  8. Role of Cyclin E as an Early Event in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    truncated cyclin E isoforms into our mouse model. OVCAR5 cells were transfected with 2 µg pRC- CMV -cyclin E, pcDNA3-cyclin E FL, pcDNA3-cyclin E...Imaging System (LI-COR Biotechnology, Lincoln, NB). The pRC- CMV -cyclin E construct was provided by B. Weinberg and the pcDNA3-cyclin E constructs...over-expressed in OVCAR5 cells by transfection. Whole cell lysates were collected and the protein analyzed by Western blot (Fig. 12). The pRC- CMV

  9. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  10. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle.

  11. Cyclin B2 and p53 control proper timing of centrosome separation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyun-Ja; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclins Bl and B2 are frequently elevated in human cancers and are associated with tumour aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome; however, whether and how B-type cyclins drive tumorigenesis is unknown. Here we show that cyclin Bl and B2 transgenic mice are highly prone to tumours, including tumour types where B-type cyclins serve as prognosticators. Cyclins Bl and B2 both induce aneuploidy when overexpressed but through distinct mechanisms, with cyclin Bl inhibiting separase activation, leading to anaphase bridges, and cyclin B2 triggering aurora-A-mediated Plkl hyperactivation, resulting in accelerated centrosome separation and lagging chromosomes. Complementary experiments revealed that cyclin B2 and p53 act antagonistically to control aurora-A-mediated centrosome splitting and accurate chromosome segregation in normal cells. These data demonstrate a causative link between B-type cyclin overexpression and tumour pathophysiology, and uncover previously unknown functions of cyclin B2 and p53 in centrosome separation that may be perturbed in many human cancers. PMID:24776885

  12. Upstream stimulatory factor regulates expression of the cell cycle-dependent cyclin B1 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cogswell, J P; Godlevski, M M; Bonham, M; Bisi, J; Babiss, L

    1995-01-01

    Progression through the somatic cell cycle requires the temporal regulation of cyclin gene expression and cyclin protein turnover. One of the best-characterized examples of this regulation is seen for the B-type cyclins. These cyclins and their catalytic component, cdc2, have been shown to mediate both the entry into and maintenance of mitosis. The cyclin B1 gene has been shown to be expressed between the late S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, while the protein is degraded specifically at interphase via ubiquitination. To understand the molecular basis for transcriptional regulation of the cyclin B1 gene, we cloned the human cyclin B1 gene promoter region. Using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system and both stable and transient assays, we have shown that the cyclin B1 gene promoter (extending to -3800 bp relative to the cap site) can confer G2-enhanced promoter activity. Further analysis revealed that an upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-binding site and its cognate transcription factor(s) are critical for expression from the cyclin B1 promoter in cycling HeLa cells. Interestingly, USF DNA-binding activity appears to be regulated in a G2-specific fashion, supporting the idea that USF may play some role in cyclin B1 gene activation. These studies suggest an important link between USF and the cyclin B1 gene, which in part explains how maturation promoting factor complex formation is regulated. PMID:7739559

  13. BRCA1-IRIS regulates cyclin D1 expression in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakuci, Enkeleda; Mahner, Sven; DiRenzo, James; ElShamy, Wael M. . E-mail: wael_elshamy@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-10-01

    The regulator of cell cycle progression, cyclin D1, is up-regulated in breast cancer cells; its expression is, in part, dependent on ER{alpha} signaling. However, many ER{alpha}-negative tumors and tumor cell lines (e.g., SKBR3) also show over-expression of cyclin D1. This suggests that, in addition to ER{alpha} signaling, cyclin D1 expression is under the control of other signaling pathways; these pathways may even be over-expressed in the ER{alpha}-negative cells. We previously noticed that both ER{alpha}-positive and -negative cell lines over-express BRCA1-IRIS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, the level of over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in ER{alpha}-negative cell lines even exceeded its over-expression level in ER{alpha}-positive cell lines. In this study, we show that: (1) BRCA1-IRIS forms complex with two of the nuclear receptor co-activators, namely, SRC1 and SRC3 (AIB1) in an ER{alpha}-independent manner. (2) BRCA1-IRIS alone, or in connection with co-activators, is recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter through its binding to c-Jun/AP1 complex; this binding activates the cyclin D1 expression. (3) Over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in breast cells over-activates JNK/c-Jun; this leads to the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cellular proliferation. (4) BRCA1-IRIS activation of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 appears to account for this, because in cells that were depleted from BRCA1-IRIS, JNK remained inactive. However, depletion of SRC1 or SRC3 instead reduced c-Jun expression. Our data suggest that this novel signaling pathway links BRCA1-IRIS to cellular proliferation through c-Jun/AP1 nuclear pathway; finally, this culminates in the increased expression of the cyclin D1 gene.

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  15. The proteolysis of mitotic cyclins in mammalian cells persists from the end of mitosis until the onset of S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Brandeis, M; Hunt, T

    1996-01-01

    We have studied how the cell cycle-specific oscillations of mitotic B-type cyclins are generated in mouse fibroblasts. A reporter enzyme comprising the N-terminus of a B-type cyclin fused to bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) was degraded at the end of mitosis like endogenous cyclins. Point mutations in the destruction box of this construct completely abolished its mitotic instability. When the destructible reporter was driven by the cyclin B2 promoter, CAT activity mimicked the oscillations in the level of the endogenous cyclin B2. These oscillations were largely conserved when the reporter was transcribed constitutively from the SV40 promoter. Pulse-chase experiments or addition of the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and ALLN showed that cyclin synthesis continued after the end of mitosis. The destruction box-specific degradation of cyclins normally ceases at the onset of S phase, and is active in fibroblasts arrested in G0 and in differentiated C2 myoblasts. We were able to reproduce this proteolysis in vitro in extracts of synchronized cells. Extracts of G1 cells degraded cyclin B1 whereas p27Kip1 was stable, in contrast, cyclin B1 remained stable and p27Kip1 was degraded in extracts of S phase cells. Images PMID:8895573

  16. Physical and spectral characterization of the human cyclin A gene and its interactions with anthracycline anticancer drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huixin; Wang, Xiaohui; Yu, Haijia; Fu, Manliang; Qu, Xiaogang; Zheng, Yongchen; Ren, Jinsong

    2007-02-01

    Over expression of cyclin A in human tumors has been linked to cancer by various experimental lines of evidence. However, physical and spectral characterization of the human cyclin A gene and its interactions with anticancer drugs have not been reported. Our gene sequence analysis, singular value decomposition method and melting studies in the presence of antitumor agents, daunomycin, doxorubicin and Hoechst 33258 showed that cyclin A gene had both AT-rich and GC-rich domains. For a ligand with unknown DNA binding specificity, this gene sequence can be used to differentiate its DNA binding preference.

  17. B-type stars in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Pigulski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    B-type stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique astrophysical tools to test several aspects of stellar evolution. Such objects can be used e.g. to determine the masses of Beta Cephei variable stars, as well as help to place tighter constraints on the value of the convective core overshooting parameter α. Both precise photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy with high SNR are required to achieve these goals, but since many of the targets are bright enough, the challenge is fair. Following this assumption, we shall explain how we plan to examine both the aforementioned aspects of stellar evolution using observations of B-type stars obtained with a wide range of spectrographs, as well as BRITE-Constellation satellites.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in developing maize endosperm: evidence for differential expression and functional specialization.

    PubMed

    Dante, Ricardo A; Sabelli, Paolo A; Nguyen, Hong N; Leiva-Neto, João T; Tao, Yumin; Lowe, Keith S; Hoerster, George J; Gordon-Kamm, William J; Jung, Rudolf; Larkins, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    Endosperm development in maize (Zea mays L.) and related cereals comprises a cell proliferation stage followed by a period of rapid growth coupled to endoreduplication. Regulation of the cell cycle in developing endosperm is poorly understood. We have characterized various subunits of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, master cell cycle regulators in all eukaryotes. A-, B-, and D-type cyclins as well as A- and B-type cyclin-dependent kinases were characterized with respect to their RNA and protein expression profiles. Two main patterns were identified: one showing expression throughout endosperm development, and another characterized by a sharp down-regulation with the onset of endoreduplication. Cyclin CYCB1;3 and CYCD2;1 proteins were distributed in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells throughout the endosperm, while cyclin CYCD5 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of peripheral cells. CDKB1;1 expression was strongly associated with cell proliferation. Expression and cyclin-binding patterns suggested that CDKA;1 and CDKA;3 are at least partially redundant. The kinase activity associated with the cyclin CYCA1 was highest during the mitotic stage of development, while that associated with CYCB1;3, CYCD2;1 and CYCD5 peaked at the mitosis-to-endoreduplication transition. A-, B- and D-type cyclins were more resistant to proteasome-dependent degradation in endoreduplicating than in mitotic endosperm extracts. These results indicated that endosperm development is characterized by differential expression and activity of specific cyclins and CDKs, and suggested that endoreduplication is associated with reduced cyclin proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  19. ERG deregulation induces PIM1 over-expression and aneuploidy in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Magistroni, Vera; Mologni, Luca; Sanselicio, Stefano; Reid, James Frances; Redaelli, Sara; Piazza, Rocco; Viltadi, Michela; Bovo, Giorgio; Strada, Guido; Grasso, Marco; Gariboldi, Manuela; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The ERG gene belongs to the ETS family of transcription factors and has been found to be involved in atypical chromosomal rearrangements in several cancers. To gain insight into the oncogenic activity of ERG, we compared the gene expression profile of NIH-3T3 cells stably expressing the coding regions of the three main ERG oncogenic fusions: TMPRSS2/ERG (tERG), EWS/ERG and FUS/ERG. We found that all three ERG fusions significantly up-regulate PIM1 expression in the NIH-3T3 cell line. PIM1 is a serine/threonine kinase frequently over-expressed in cancers of haematological and epithelial origin. We show here that tERG expression induces PIM1 in the non-malignant prostate cell line RWPE-1, strengthening the relation between tERG and PIM1 up-regulation in the initial stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Silencing of tERG reversed PIM1 induction. A significant association between ERG and PIM1 expression in clinical prostate carcinoma specimens was found, suggesting that such a mechanism may be relevant in vivo. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that tERG directly binds to PIM1 promoter in the RWPE-1 prostate cell line, suggesting that tERG could be a direct regulator of PIM1 expression. The up-regulation of PIM1 induced by tERG over-expression significantly modified Cyclin B1 levels and increased the percentage of aneuploid cells in the RWPE-1 cell line after taxane-based treatment. Here we provide the first evidence for an ERG-mediated PIM1 up-regulation in prostate cells in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a direct effect of ERG transcriptional activity in the alteration of genetic stability.

  20. Cell Cycle Independent Role of Cyclin D3 in Host Restriction of Influenza Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Mok, Chris Ka-Pun; Chan, Michael Chi Wai; Zhang, Yang; Nal-Rogier, Béatrice; Kien, François; Bruzzone, Roberto; Sanyal, Sumana

    2017-01-27

    To identify new host factors that modulate the replication of influenza A virus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the cytoplasmic tail of matrix protein 2 from the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain. The screen revealed a high-score interaction with cyclin D3, a key regulator of cell cycle early G1 phase. M2-cyclin D3 interaction was validated through GST pull-down and recapitulated in influenza A/WSN/33-infected cells. Knockdown of Ccnd3 by small interfering RNA significantly enhanced virus progeny titers in cell culture supernatants. Interestingly, the increase in virus production was due to cyclin D3 deficiency per se, and not merely a consequence of cell cycle deregulation. A combined knockdown of Ccnd3 and Rb1, which rescued cell cycle progression into the S phase, failed to normalize virus production. Infection by IAV triggered redistribution of cyclin D3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm followed by its proteasomal degradation. When over-expressed in HEK 293T cells cyclin D3 impaired binding of M2 with M1, which is essential for proper assembly of progeny virions, lending further support to its role as a putative restriction factor. Our study describes the identification and characterization of cyclin D3 as a novel interactor of influenza A virus M2 protein. We hypothesize that competitive inhibition of M1-M2 interaction by cyclin D3 impairs infectious virion formation and results in attenuated virus production. In addition, we provide mechanistic insights into the dynamic interplay of influenza virus with the host cell cycle machinery during infection.

  1. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  2. Cyclin activation of p34cdc2.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M J; Glotzer, M; Lee, T H; Philippe, M; Kirschner, M W

    1990-11-30

    The gradual accumulation of cyclin in the frog egg induces an abrupt and concerted activation of p34cdc2 that initiates mitosis. Activation is delayed even after the accumulation of cyclin to a critical threshold concentration. We have reproduced these unusual kinetic properties of p34cdc2 activation in vitro using bacterially expressed cyclin proteins and extracts derived from Xenopus eggs. Abrupt activation follows a lag period, the length of which is independent of the concentration of cyclin. The threshold concentration of cyclin and the length of the lag period are regulated by INH, an inhibitor of MPF activation in oocytes recently identified as a type 2A protein phosphatase. Binding to cyclin induces both tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation of the previously unphosphorylated p34cdc2, rendering it inactivated. The concerted transition into mitosis involves both a reduction in the rate of p34cdc2 phosphorylation on tyrosine and an increase in its rate of dephosphorylation.

  3. Over-Expression of Meteorin Drives Gliogenesis Following Striatal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jordan L.; Ermine, Charlotte M.; Jørgensen, Jesper R.; Parish, Clare L.; Thompson, Lachlan H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that damage to brain structures adjacent to neurogenic regions can result in migration of new neurons from neurogenic zones into the damaged tissue. The number of differentiated neurons that survive is low, however, and this has led to the idea that the introduction of extrinsic signaling factors, particularly neurotrophic proteins, may augment the neurogenic response to a level that would be therapeutically relevant. Here we report on the impact of the relatively newly described neurotrophic factor, Meteorin, when over-expressed in the striatum following excitotoxic injury. Birth-dating studies using bromo-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) showed that Meteorin did not enhance injury-induced striatal neurogenesis but significantly increased the proportion of new cells with astroglial and oligodendroglial features. As a basis for comparison we found under the same conditions, glial derived neurotrophic factor significantly enhanced neurogenesis but did not effect gliogenesis. The results highlight the specificity of action of different neurotrophic factors in modulating the proliferative response to injury. Meteorin may be an interesting candidate in pathological settings involving damage to white matter, for example after stroke or neonatal brain injury. PMID:27458346

  4. Novel alterations in CDK1/cyclin B1 kinase complex formation occur during the acquisition of a polyploid DNA content.

    PubMed Central

    Datta, N S; Williams, J L; Caldwell, J; Curry, A M; Ashcraft, E K; Long, M W

    1996-01-01

    The pathways that regulate the S-phase events associated with the control of DNA replication are poorly understood. The bone marrow megakaryocytes are unique in that they leave the diploid (2C) state to differentiate, synthesizing 4 to 64 times the normal DNA content within a single nucleus, a process known as endomitosis. Human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells model this process, becoming polyploid during phorbol diester-induced megakaryocyte differentiation. The mitotic arrest occurring in these polyploid cells involves novel alterations in the cdk1/cyclin B1 complex: a marked reduction in cdk1 protein levels, and an elevated and sustained expression of cyclin B1. Endomitotic cells thus lack cdk1/cyclin B1-associated H1-histone kinase activity. Constitutive over-expression of cdk1 in endomitotic cells failed to re-initiate normal mitotic events even though cdk1 was present in a 10-fold excess. This was due to an inability of cyclin-B1 to physically associate with cdk1. Nonetheless, endomitotic cyclin B1 possesses immunoprecipitable H1-histone kinase activity, and specifically translocates to the nucleus. We conclude that mitosis is abrogated during endomitosis due to the absence of cdk1 and the failure to form M-phase promoting factor, resulting in a disassociation of mitosis from the completion of S-phase. Further studies on cyclin and its interacting proteins should be informative in understanding endomitosis and cell cycle control. Images PMID:8688553

  5. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Ravinal, R C; Costa, R S; Lima, M S; Tucci, S; Muglia, V F; Reis, R B dos; Silva, G E B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  7. Cyclin A1 is expressed in mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongquan; Li, Yuanhong; Zhao, Chen; Jiang, Xuejun; Chen, Hongduo; Lang, Ming-Fei; Sun, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin A1 belongs to the type-A cyclins and participates in cell cycle regulation. Since its discovery, cyclin A1 has been shown mostly in testis. It plays important roles in spermatogenesis. However, there were also reports on ovary expression of cyclin A1. Therefore, we intended to revisit the expression of cyclin A1 in mouse ovary. Our study showed that cyclin A1 was expressed at the mRNA level and the protein level in mouse ovary. Tissue staining revealed that cyclin A1 was expressed in maturating oocytes. With the recent data on the functions of cyclins in somatic and stem cells, we also discussed the possibilities of further studies of cyclin A1 in mouse oocytes and perhaps in the oogonial stem cells. Our findings not only add to the supportive evidence of cyclin A1 expression in oocytes, but also may promote more interest in exploring cyclin A1 functions in ovary.

  8. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  9. Over expression of hRad9 protein correlates with reduced chemosensitivity in breast cancer with administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Haiqin; Shi, Ranran; Yang, Qingrui; Zhang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Xingchen; Mu, Kun

    2014-12-18

    Human Rad 9 (hRad9), part of the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 complex plays an important role in DNA damage repair as an up-stream regulator of checkpoint signaling, however little is known about its role in response to chemotherapy of breast cancer and whether hRad9 inhibition can potentiate the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy on breast cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Fifty cases of breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant therapy were collected. All these cases were revised and classified into chemotherapy sensitive (CS) or chemotherapy resistant (CR) group according to the Miller and Payne (MP) grading system. Immunohistochemically, hRad9 positive tumours showed nuclear and/or cytoplasmic staining. hRad9 over-expression was associated with an impaired neoadjuvant chemotherapy response. A significant correlation was found between expression of hRad9 and Cyclin D1. In vitro, hRad9 was knocked down using siRNA in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Deregulated expression of Rad9 accompanied by down expression of chk1 enhanced the sensitivity of human breast cancer cells to doxorubicin. Our work suggests that hRad9 might be a potential predictor for the response to chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer and its clinical value as a target for improving chemosensitivity needs further exploration.

  10. Over expression of hRad9 protein correlates with reduced chemosensitivity in breast cancer with administration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Haiqin; Shi, Ranran; Yang, Qingrui; Zhang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Xingchen; Mu, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Human Rad 9 (hRad9), part of the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 complex plays an important role in DNA damage repair as an up-stream regulator of checkpoint signaling, however little is known about its role in response to chemotherapy of breast cancer and whether hRad9 inhibition can potentiate the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy on breast cancer cells remains to be elucidated. Fifty cases of breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant therapy were collected. All these cases were revised and classified into chemotherapy sensitive (CS) or chemotherapy resistant (CR) group according to the Miller and Payne (MP) grading system. Immunohistochemically, hRad9 positive tumours showed nuclear and/or cytoplasmic staining. hRad9 over-expression was associated with an impaired neoadjuvant chemotherapy response. A significant correlation was found between expression of hRad9 and Cyclin D1. In vitro, hRad9 was knocked down using siRNA in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Deregulated expression of Rad9 accompanied by down expression of chk1 enhanced the sensitivity of human breast cancer cells to doxorubicin. Our work suggests that hRad9 might be a potential predictor for the response to chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer and its clinical value as a target for improving chemosensitivity needs further exploration. PMID:25520248

  11. Non-canonical functions of cell cycle cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hydbring, Per; Malumbres, Marcos; Sicinski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The role of cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), as core components of the machinery that drives cell cycle progression is well established. Increasing evidence indicates that mammalian cyclins and CDKs also carry out important roles in other cellular processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, the control of cell death, differentiation, the immune response and metabolism. Some of these non-canonical functions are performed by cyclins or by CDKs, independent of their respective cell cycle partners, suggesting a substantial divergence in the function of these proteins during evolution. PMID:27033256

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF MAGNETITE IN B-TYPE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Bin; Jewitt, David E-mail: jewitt@ucla.ed

    2010-09-15

    Spectrally blue (B-type) asteroids are rare, with the second discovered asteroid, Pallas, being the largest and most famous example. We conducted a focused, infrared spectroscopic survey of B-type asteroids to search for water-related features in these objects. Our results show that the negative optical spectral slope of some B-type asteroids is due to the presence of a broad absorption band centered near 1.0 {mu}m. The 1 {mu}m band can be matched in position and shape using magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), which is an important indicator of past aqueous alteration in the parent body. Furthermore, our observations of B-type asteroid (335) Roberta in the 3 {mu}m region reveal an absorption feature centered at 2.9 {mu}m, which is consistent with the absorption due to phyllosilicates (another hydration product) observed in CI chondrites. The new observations suggest that at least some B-type asteroids are likely to have incorporated significant amounts of water ice and to have experienced intensive aqueous alteration.

  13. Selective killing of transformed cells by cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase 2 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Nan P.; Sharma, Sushil K.; Ramsey, Timothy M.; Jiang, Li; Martin, Mary S.; Baker, Kayla; Adams, Peter D.; Bair, Kenneth W.; Kaelin, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies identified a short peptide motif that serves as a docking site for cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 2 complexes. Peptides containing this motif block the phosphorylation of substrates by cyclin A/cdk2 or cyclin E/cdk2. Here we report that cell membrane-permeable forms of such peptides preferentially induced transformed cells to undergo apoptosis relative to nontransformed cells. Deregulation of E2F family transcription factors is a common event during transformation and was sufficient to sensitize cells to the cyclin/cdk2 inhibitory peptides. These results suggest that deregulation of E2F and inhibition of cdk2 are synthetically lethal and provide a rationale for the development of cdk2 antagonists as antineoplastic agents. PMID:10200261

  14. Nuclear Import of Cdk/Cyclin Complexes: Identification of Distinct Mechanisms for Import of Cdk2/Cyclin E and Cdc2/Cyclin B1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jonathan D.; Yang, Jing; Truant, Ray; Kornbluth, Sally

    1999-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of nuclear proteins is required for both DNA replication and entry into mitosis. Consequently, most cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)/cyclin complexes are localized to the nucleus when active. Although our understanding of nuclear transport processes has been greatly enhanced by the recent identification of nuclear targeting sequences and soluble nuclear import factors with which they interact, the mechanisms used to target Cdk/cyclin complexes to the nucleus remain obscure; this is in part because these proteins lack obvious nuclear localization sequences. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for Cdk/cyclin transport, we examined nuclear import of fluorescent Cdk2/cyclin E and Cdc2/cyclin B1 complexes in digitonin-permeabilized mammalian cells and also examined potential physical interactions between these Cdks, cyclins, and soluble import factors. We found that the nuclear import machinery recognizes these Cdk/cyclin complexes through direct interactions with the cyclin component. Surprisingly, cyclins E and B1 are imported into nuclei via distinct mechanisms. Cyclin E behaves like a classical basic nuclear localization sequence–containing protein, binding to the α adaptor subunit of the importin-α/β heterodimer. In contrast, cyclin B1 is imported via a direct interaction with a site in the NH2 terminus of importin-β that is distinct from that used to bind importin-α. PMID:9922449

  15. Over-expression of Multi-heme C-type Cytochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Lin, Chiann Tso; Markillie, Lye Meng; Squier, Thomas C.; Hooker, Brian S.

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT-Because they contain covalently attached hemes, c-type cytochromes, especially those with multi-heme, are difficult to over-express. The gram negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been successfully used for over-expression of multi-heme c-type cytochromes...

  16. B1-type cyclin-dependent kinases are essential for the formation of stomatal complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boudolf, Véronique; Barrôco, Rosa; Engler, Janice de Almeida; Verkest, Aurine; Beeckman, Tom; Naudts, Mirande; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2004-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In yeasts, only one CDK is sufficient to drive cells through the cell cycle, whereas higher eukaryotes developed a family of related CDKs. Curiously, plants contain a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs), whose function is still unclear. We show that the CDKB1;1 gene of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is highly expressed in guard cells and stomatal precursor cells of cotyledons, suggesting a prominent role for B-type CDKs in stomatal development. In accordance, transgenic Arabidopsis plants with reduced B-type CDK activity had a decreased stomatal index because of an early block of meristemoid division and inhibition of satellite meristemoid formation. Many aberrant stomatal cells were observed, all of them blocked in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Although division of stomatal precursors was inhibited, cells still acquired stomatal identity, illustrating that stomatal cell differentiation is independent of cellular and nuclear division.

  17. Proper cyclin B3 dosage is important for precision of metaphase-to-anaphase onset timing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Chen, Nansheng

    2012-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and their compulsory cofactors, the cyclins, are the two key classes of regulatory molecules that determine the eukaryotic cell's progress through the cell cycle by substrate phosphorylation. Cdk1 forms complexes with B-type cyclins and phosphorylates a number of substrates as cells prepare to enter mitosis. CYB-3 (Cyclin B3) is a B-type cyclin that has been recently shown to be required for the timely metaphase-to-anaphase transition, presumably by alleviating a spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) block. Previously, we have shown that doubling the CYB-3 dosage suppresses sterility in the absence of the essential SAC component MDF-1/Mad1. Here we demonstrate the importance of the Mos1-mediated single-copy insertion method for understanding the effects of gene dosage by generating strains that have more (two or three) copies of the cyb-3 in wild-type and mdf-1(gk2) backgrounds to investigate dosage effect of CYB-3 on mitotic progression as well as development and fertility in the absence and the presence of the MDF-1 checkpoint component. We show that tripling the dosage of CYB-3 results in a significantly variable metaphase-to-anaphase transition, both in wild-type and mdf-1(gk2) mutant backgrounds. Although a majority of embryos initiate anaphase onset normally, a significant number of embryos initiate anaphase with a delay. We also show that tripling the dosage of CYB-3 has no effect on viability in the wild-type background; however, it does reduce the sterility caused by the absence of MDF-1. Together, these data reveal that proper dosage of CYB-3 is important for precision of timely execution of anaphase onset regardless of the presence of the MDF-1 checkpoint component.

  18. Novel plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors induced by biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Peres, Adrian; Churchman, Michelle L; Hariharan, Srivaidehirani; Himanen, Kristiina; Verkest, Aurine; Vandepoele, Klaas; Magyar, Zoltan; Hatzfeld, Yves; Van Der Schueren, Els; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Frankard, Valerie; Larkin, John C; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2007-08-31

    The EL2 gene of rice (Oryza sativa), previously classified as early response gene against the potent biotic elicitor N-acetylchitoheptaose and encoding a short polypeptide with unknown function, was identified as a novel cell cycle regulatory gene related to the recently reported SIAMESE (SIM) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana. Iterative two-hybrid screens, in vitro pull-down assays, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses showed that Orysa; EL2 binds the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) CDKA1;1 and D-type cyclins. No interaction was observed with the plant-specific B-type CDKs. The amino acid motif ELERFL was identified to be essential for cyclin, but not for CDK binding. Orysa;EL2 impaired the ability of Orysa; CYCD5;3 to complement a budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) triple CLN mutant, whereas recombinant protein inhibited CDK activity in vitro. Moreover, Orysa;EL2 was able to rescue the multicellular trichome phenotype of sim mutants of Arabidopsis, unequivocally demonstrating that Orysa;EL2 operates as a cell cycle inhibitor. Orysa;EL2 mRNA levels were induced by cold, drought, and propionic acid. Our data suggest that Orysa;EL2 encodes a new type of plant CDK inhibitor that links cell cycle progression with biotic and abiotic stress responses.

  19. The Requirement for Cyclin D Function in Tumor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Li, Xiaoyu; Hydbring, Per; Sanda, Takaomi; Stefano, Joanna; Christie, Amanda L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Look, A. Thomas; Kung, Andrew L.; von Boehmer, Harald; Sicinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY D-cyclins represent components of cell cycle machinery. To test the efficacy of targeting D-cyclins in cancer treatment, we engineered mouse strains which allow acute and global ablation of individual D-cyclins in a living animal. Ubiquitous shutdown of cyclin D1 or inhibition of cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mice bearing ErbB2-driven mammary carcinomas triggered tumor cell senescence, without compromising the animals’ health. Ablation of cyclin D3 in mice bearing Notch1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) triggered tumor cell apoptosis. Such selective killing of leukemic cells can also be achieved by inhibiting cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mouse and human T-ALL models. Inhibition of cyclin D-kinase activity represents a highly-selective anti-cancer strategy that specifically targets cancer cells without significantly affecting normal tissues. PMID:23079655

  20. B-Cyclin/CDKs Regulate Mitotic Spindle Assembly by Phosphorylating Kinesins-5 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Mark K.; Haase, Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that B-cyclin/CDK complexes regulate the assembly of the mitotic spindle and entry into mitosis, the full complement of relevant CDK targets has not been identified. It has previously been shown in a variety of model systems that B-type cyclin/CDK complexes, kinesin-5 motors, and the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase are required for the separation of spindle poles and assembly of a bipolar spindle. It has been suggested that, in budding yeast, B-type cyclin/CDK (Clb/Cdc28) complexes promote spindle pole separation by inhibiting the degradation of the kinesins-5 Kip1 and Cin8 by the anaphase-promoting complex (APCCdh1). We have determined, however, that the Kip1 and Cin8 proteins are present at wild-type levels in the absence of Clb/Cdc28 kinase activity. Here, we show that Kip1 and Cin8 are in vitro targets of Clb2/Cdc28 and that the mutation of conserved CDK phosphorylation sites on Kip1 inhibits spindle pole separation without affecting the protein's in vivo localization or abundance. Mass spectrometry analysis confirms that two CDK sites in the tail domain of Kip1 are phosphorylated in vivo. In addition, we have determined that Sic1, a Clb/Cdc28-specific inhibitor, is the SCFCdc4 target that inhibits spindle pole separation in cells lacking functional Cdc4. Based on these findings, we propose that Clb/Cdc28 drives spindle pole separation by direct phosphorylation of kinesin-5 motors. PMID:20463882

  1. The p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in proliferation of smooth muscle cells after exposure to cigarette smoke extract

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjia; Song, Ting; Ni, Leng; Yang, Genhuan; Song, Xitao; Wu, Lifei; Liu, Bao; Liu, Changwei

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Smooth muscle cells proliferated after exposure to cigarette smoke extract. • The p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expressions increased in the process. • The p-ERK inhibitor, U0126, can reverse these effects. • The p-ERK → p-c-Jun → cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the process. - Abstract: An epidemiological survey has shown that smoking is closely related to atherosclerosis, in which excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role. To investigate the mechanism underlying this unusual smoking-induced proliferation, cigarette smoke extract (CSE), prepared as smoke-bubbled phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), was used to induce effects mimicking those exerted by smoking on SMCs. As assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 detection (an improved MTT assay), SMC viability increased significantly after exposure to CSE. Western blot analysis demonstrated that p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expression increased. When p-ERK was inhibited using U0126 (inhibitor of p-ERK), cell viability decreased and the expression of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1 was reduced accordingly, suggesting that p-ERK functions upstream of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1. When a c-Jun over-expression plasmid was transfected into SMCs, the level of cyclinD1 in these cells increased. Moreover, when c-Jun was knocked down by siRNA, cyclinD1 levels decreased. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the excessive proliferation of SMCs exposed to CSE.

  2. Absence of effects of Sir2 over-expression on lifespan in C. elegans and Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Camilla; Valentini, Sara; Cabreiro, Filipe; Goss, Martin; Somogyvári, Milán; Piper, Matthew D.; Hoddinott, Matthew; Sutphin, George L.; Leko, Vid; McElwee, Joshua J.; Vazquez, Rafael; Orfila, Anne-Marie; Ackerman, Daniel; Au, Catherine; Vinti, Giovanna; Riesen, Michèle; Howard, Ken; Neri, Christian; Bedalov, Antonio; Kaeberlein, Matt; Söti, Csaba; Partridge, Linda; Gems, David

    2011-01-01

    Over-expression of sirtuins (NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases) has been reported to increase lifespan in budding yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster1-3. Studies of gene effects on ageing are vulnerable to confounding effects of genetic background4. We re-examined the reported effects of sirtuin over-expression on ageing and found that standardisation of genetic background and use of appropriate controls abolished the apparent effects in both C. elegans and Drosophila. In C. elegans, outcrossing of a line with high level sir-2.1 over-expression1 abrogated the longevity increase, but not sir-2.1 over-expression. Instead, longevity co-segregated with a second-site mutation affecting sensory neurons. Outcrossing of a line with low copy number sir-2.1 over-expression2 also abrogated longevity. A Drosophila strain with ubiquitous over-expression of dSir2 using the UAS-GAL4 system was long-lived relative to wild-type controls, as previously reported3, but not relative to the appropriate transgenic controls, and nor was a new line with stronger over-expression of dSir2. These findings underscore the importance of controlling for genetic background and the mutagenic effects of transgene insertions in studies of genetic effects on lifespan. The life extending effect of dietary restriction (DR) on ageing in Drosophila has also been reported to be dSir2 dependent3. We found that DR increased fly lifespan independently of dSir2. Our findings do not rule out a role for sirtuins in determination of metazoan lifespan, but they do cast doubt on the robustness of the previously reported effects on lifespan in C. elegans and Drosophila. PMID:21938067

  3. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events. PMID:21798004

  4. Investigations of the Magnetic a and B Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Gregg Allan

    In an effort to explore further the mechanisms responsible for magnetism and chemical peculiarity in the early-type stars, I have constructed models of the magnetic fields of individual A and B type stars, studied the evolutionary dependence of magnetism in the Ap/Bp stars, undertaken the first systematic study of linear polarisation in the spectral lines of magnetic A and B type stars, and searched for magnetic fields in the photospheres of canonically non-magnetic upper-main sequence stars. I present detailed studies of 8 magnetic Ap, Bp and He-strong stars. For 7 of these objects (84 UMa, iota Cas, HD 115708, HD 184927, HD 200311, HD 81009, and HD 192678) new models of the surface magnetic field structure have been developed using longitudinal field, field modulus, and broadband linear polarisation measurements. These models represent a substantial contribution to the accumulated data regarding the surface magnetic fields of upper-main sequence stars. One object (HD 59435) is in fact a spectroscopic binary (SB2), the secondary component of which is a magnetic Ap star. A detailed study of the evolutionary state of the components and the mean magnetic field modulus variation of the secondary is presented. The results of this analysis are consistent with the suggestion by Hubrig & Mathys (1994) that magnetism (and perhaps chemical peculiarity) arise late in the evolution of A and B type stars. In order to test further this possibility, a more extensive study of the evolutionary states and magnetic fields of 10 magnetic Ap stars was undertaken. This study indicates that the magnetic stars are distributed across the entire width of the main sequence, a result inconsistent with the hypothesis of Hubrig & Mathys. I furthermore present investigations of the Zeeman circular and linear polarisation measured within stellar spectral lines. The MuSiCoS spectropolarimeter was used to conduct the first systematic, high signal-to-noise ratio observations of Zeeman linear

  5. Synergistic effects of AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 in the development of rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Fengjie; Yuan, Yangyang; Zhi, Xuehong; Huang, Qian; Chen, Yuexin; Zhuang, Wenxin; Zhang, Dengcheng; Teng, Bogang; Kong, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yongxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of A-kinase anchor protein 95 (AKAP95), Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Connexin43 (Cx43) in rectal cancer tissues and assess the associations between each of the proteins and pathological parameters, as well as their inter-relationships. Methods: AKAP95, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cx43 protein expression rates were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 50 rectal cancer specimens and 16 pericarcinoma tissues. Results: The positive rates of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 proteins were 54.00 vs. 18.75%, 62.00 vs. 6.25%, and 72.00 vs. 31.25% in rectal cancer specimens and pericarcinoma tissues, respectively, representing statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). The positive rate of Cx43 protein expression in rectal cancer tissues was 44.00% and 62.50% in pericarcinoma tissues, and the difference between them was not significant (P > 0.05). No significant associations were found between protein expression of AKAP95, Cyclin E1, Cyclin D1, and Cx43, and the degree of differentiation, histological type, and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer (P > 0.05). However, significant correlations were obtained between the expression rates of AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AKAP95, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin D1 protein expression rates were significantly higher in rectal cancer tissues compared with pericarcinoma samples, suggesting an association between these proteins and the development and progression of rectal cancer. In addition, the significant correlations between the proteins (AKAP95 and Cyclin E1, Cyclin E1 and Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1 and Cx43 protein, and Cyclin D1 and Cx43) indicate the possible synergistic effects of these factors in the development and progression of rectal cancer. PMID:25973052

  6. Construction and high-throughput phenotypic screening of Zymoseptoria tritici over-expression strains

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, T.C.; Sidhu, Y.S.; Chaudhari, Y.K.; Talbot, N.J.; Studholme, D.J.; Haynes, K.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted gene deletion has been instrumental in elucidating many aspects of Zymoseptoria tritici pathogenicity. Gene over-expression is a complementary approach that is amenable to rapid strain construction and high-throughput screening, which has not been exploited to analyze Z. tritici, largely due to a lack of available techniques. Here we exploit the Gateway® cloning technology for rapid construction of over-expression vectors and improved homologous integration efficiency of a Z. tritici Δku70 strain to build a pilot over-expression library encompassing 32 genes encoding putative DNA binding proteins, GTPases or kinases. We developed a protocol using a Rotor-HDA robot for rapid and reproducible cell pinning for high-throughput in vitro screening. This screen identified an over-expression strain that demonstrated a marked reduction in hyphal production relative to the isogenic progenitor. This study provides a protocol for rapid generation of Z. tritici over-expression libraries and a technique for functional genomic screening in this important pathogen. PMID:26092797

  7. Construction and high-throughput phenotypic screening ofZymoseptoria tritici over-expression strains.

    PubMed

    Cairns, T C; Sidhu, Y S; Chaudhari, Y K; Talbot, N J; Studholme, D J; Haynes, K

    2015-06-01

    Targeted gene deletion has been instrumental in elucidating many aspects of Zymoseptoria tritici pathogenicity. Gene over-expression is a complementary approach that is amenable to rapid strain construction and high-throughput screening, which has not been exploited to analyze Z. tritici, largely due to a lack of available techniques. Here we exploit the Gateway® cloning technology for rapid construction of over-expression vectors and improved homologous integration efficiency of a Z. tritici Δku70 strain to build a pilot over-expression library encompassing 32 genes encoding putative DNA binding proteins, GTPases or kinases. We developed a protocol using a Rotor-HDA robot for rapid and reproducible cell pinning for high-throughput in vitro screening. This screen identified an over-expression strain that demonstrated a marked reduction in hyphal production relative to the isogenic progenitor. This study provides a protocol for rapid generation of Z. tritici over-expression libraries and a technique for functional genomic screening in this important pathogen.

  8. Over-expression of AGPase genes enhances seed weight and starch content in transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Shujuan; Zhao, Yajie; Li, Bei; Zhang, Juren

    2011-02-01

    Cereal crops accumulate starch in the seed endosperm as an energy reserve. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) plays a key role in regulating starch biosynthesis in cereal seeds. The AGPase in the maize endosperm is a heterotetramer of two small subunits, encoded by Brittle2 (Bt2) gene, and two large subunits, encoded by the Shrunken2 (Sh2) gene. The two genes (Bt2, Sh2) from maize were introduced into two elite maize inbred lines, solely and in tandem, and under the control of endosperm-specific promoters for over-expression. PCR, Southern blotting, and real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that the transgenes were integrated into the genome of transgenic plants and were over-expressed in their progeny. The over-expression of either gene enhanced AGPase activity, seed weight and starch content compared with the WT, but the amounts were lower than plants with over-expression of both Bt2 and Sh2. Developing seeds from co-expression transgenic maize plants had higher cytoplasmic AGPase activity: the 100-grain weight increased 15% over the wild type (WT), and the starch content increased to over 74% compared with the WT of 65%. These results indicate that over-expression of the genes in transgenic maize plants could improve kernel traits. This report provides a feasible approach for increasing starch content and seed weight in maize.

  9. Dlx2 over-expression: a possible mechanism for first branchial arch malformation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie-wen; Wang, Xu-dong; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Wen-hui; Lu, Jing-ting; Shen, Guo-fang

    2011-06-01

    The first branchial arch malformation (FBAM) is a rare congenital defect associated with anomalous development of the first and second branchial arches. Cause of FBAM still remains unknown, and is thought in most cases to be multifactorial, involving both genetic and enviromental factors. Dlx2 as a member of the Dlx homeobox gene family, plays a crucial role in the development of the first branchial arch. The tissues regulated mainly by Dlx2 are coincident with the tissues mainly involved in FBAM. Dlx2 over-expression generated by electroporation transfection can disturb the migration and differentiation of cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs), which migrate to the branchial arches and in turn give rise to much of the facial skeleton and connective tissues. Furthermore, Dlx2 over-expression can be found in the first branchial arch spontaneous mutant mice. So we hypothesize that Dlx2 over-expression mutation causes FBAM due to an increase in cell-cell adhesion and inhibiting the migration of CNCC to the first branchial arch in the early stage, or migrating to an incorrect position and can't differentiate into normal tissues. What an exact role of Dlx2 over-expression in FBAM remains to be investigated and Dlx2 over-expression transgenic mouse will be a nice model for further research in FBAM.

  10. Boron Abundances in A and B-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements - Li, Be, and B - are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362 A resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10 solar mass for which nitrogen abundances have been determined. The B II 1362 A line is blended throughout; the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362 A region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log e (B) = 2.88; a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep layers operating the CN-cycle. Further exploitation of the B II 1362 A line as an indicator of the evolutionary status of A- and B-type stars will require a larger stellar sample to be observed with higher signal-to-noise as attainable with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  11. Identification of cyclins A1, E1 and vimentin as downstream targets of heme oxygenase-1 in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrea; Mylroie, Hayley; Thornton, C. Clare; Calay, Damien; Birdsey, Graeme M.; Kiprianos, Allan P.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Soares, Miguel P.; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Randi, Anna M.; Mason, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological process and an important factor in disease pathogenesis. However, its exploitation as a clinical target has achieved limited success and novel molecular targets are required. Although heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) acts downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to modulate angiogenesis, knowledge of the mechanisms involved remains limited. We set out identify novel HO-1 targets involved in angiogenesis. HO-1 depletion attenuated VEGF-induced human endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and tube formation. The latter response suggested a role for HO-1 in EC migration, and indeed HO-1 siRNA negatively affected directional migration of EC towards VEGF; a phenotype reversed by HO-1 over-expression. EC from Hmox1−/− mice behaved similarly. Microarray analysis of HO-1-depleted and control EC exposed to VEGF identified cyclins A1 and E1 as HO-1 targets. Migrating HO-1-deficient EC showed increased p27, reduced cyclin A1 and attenuated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. In vivo, cyclin A1 siRNA inhibited VEGF-driven angiogenesis, a response reversed by Ad-HO-1. Proteomics identified structural protein vimentin as an additional VEGF-HO-1 target. HO-1 depletion inhibited VEGF-induced calpain activity and vimentin cleavage, while vimentin silencing attenuated HO-1-driven proliferation. Thus, vimentin and cyclins A1 and E1 represent VEGF-activated HO-1-dependent targets important for VEGF-driven angiogenesis. PMID:27388959

  12. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    PubMed Central

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  13. Over-expression of mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 suppresses programmed cell death in rice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yaocheng; Wang, Hongjuan; Zou, Yu; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yanqi; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-03

    In this study, we identified and functionally characterized the mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (mtHsp70). Over-expression of mtHsp70 suppressed heat- and H(2)O(2)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in rice protoplasts, as reflected by higher cell viability, decreased DNA laddering and chromatin condensation. Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) after heat shock was destroyed gradually in protoplasts, but mtHsp70 over-expression showed higher Δψ(m) relative to the vector control cells, and partially inhibited cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol. Heat treatment also significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a phenomenon not observed in protoplasts over-expressing mtHsp70. Together, these results suggest that mtHsp70 may suppress PCD in rice protoplasts by maintaining mitochondrial Δψ(m) and inhibiting the amplification of ROS.

  14. BAX gene over-expression via nucleofection to induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanwen; Mo, Xiaofen; Luo, Yi; Lu, Yi

    2012-09-01

    Despite significant advances in cataract surgery techniques, posterior capsule opacification (PCO) remains a common complication. In PCO, remaining epithelial cells cloud the lens capsule and impair postoperative vision. This in vitro study was designed to investigate the potential of a gene-based approach, specifically over-expression of the proapoptotic BAX gene, to prevent PCO. Human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) were transfected by nucleofection with a plasmid encoding a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein and human BAX. The expression levels of BAX and its antiapoptotic counterpart BCL2 were determined by realtime reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. BAX over-expression-induced cell death was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using the Annexin V antibody. Fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to assess changes in morphology and ultrastructure. Differential expression of the downstream apoptosis-related factor, caspase 3, was detected by Western blotting. Nucleofection efficiency was high (nearly 80%). BAX-transfected HLECs showed remarkably enhanced BAX gene expression and BAX:BCL2 ratio, but relatively little change in endogenous BCL2 expression. BAX over-expression also led to significant cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis-related characteristics and activation of caspase 3. In conclusion, our results indicate that BAX gene over-expression can trigger cell death in HLECs via an apoptotic pathway. Thus, BAX may be a promising candidate for human gene therapy to treat PCO.

  15. Over-expression of Topoisomerase II Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    John, Riffat; Ganeshan, Uma; Singh, Badri N.; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K.; Sopory, Sudhir K.; Rajam, Manchikatla V.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases are unique enzymes having an ability to remove or add DNA supercoils and untangle the snarled DNA. They can cut, shuffle, and religate DNA strands and remove the torsional stress during DNA replication, transcription or recombination events. In the present study, we over-expressed topoisomerase II (TopoII) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) and examined its role in growth and development as well as salt (NaCl) stress tolerance. Several putative transgenic plants were generated and the transgene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses, and RT-PCR analysis respectively. Percent seed germination, shoot growth, and chlorophyll content revealed that transgenic lines over-expressing the NtTopoIIα-1 gene exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt (150 and 200 mM NaCl) stress. Moreover, over-expression of TopoII lead to the elevation in proline and glycine betaine levels in response to both concentrations of NaCl as compared to wild-type. In response to NaCl stress, TopoII over-expressing lines showed reduced lipid peroxidation derived malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. These results suggest that TopoII plays a pivotal role in salt stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27630644

  16. Over-expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of two recombinant isoforms of human FAD synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Brizio, Carmen; Galluccio, Michele; Wait, Robin; Torchetti, Enza Maria; Bafunno, Valeria; Accardi, Rosita; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Indiveri, Cesare; Barile, Maria . E-mail: m.barile@biologia.uniba.it

    2006-06-09

    FAD synthetase (FADS) (EC 2.7.7.2) is a key enzyme in the metabolic pathway that converts riboflavin into the redox cofactor FAD. Two hypothetical human FADSs, which are the products of FLAD1 gene, were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and identified by ESI-MS/MS. Isoform 1 was over-expressed as a T7-tagged protein which had a molecular mass of 63 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Isoform 2 was over-expressed as a 6-His-tagged fusion protein, carrying an extra 84 amino acids at the N-terminal with an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa on SDS-PAGE. It was purified near to homogeneity from the soluble cell fraction by one-step affinity chromatography. Both isoforms possessed FADS activity and had a strict requirement for MgCl{sub 2}, as demonstrated using both spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. The purified recombinant isoform 2 showed a specific activity of 6.8 {+-} 1.3 nmol of FAD synthesized/min/mg protein and exhibited a K {sub M} value for FMN of 1.5 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M. This is First report on characterization of human FADS, and First cloning and over-expression of FADS from an organism higher than yeast.

  17. Rhomboid-7 over-expression results in Opa1-like processing and malfunctioning mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mokhlasur; Kylsten, Per

    2011-10-22

    Rhomboid-7 (rho-7) is a mitochondrial-specific intramembranous protease. The loss-of-function mutation rho-7 results in semi-lethality, while escapers have a reduced lifespan with several neurological disorders [1]. Here we show that general, or CNS-specific expression of rho-7 can rescue the lethality of rho-7. General, or CNS-specific over-expression of rho-7 in otherwise wild-type animals caused semi-lethality, with approximately 50% of the animals escaping this lethality, developing into adults displaying a shortened life span with larval locomotory problem. On a cellular level, over-expression resulted in severe depression of ATP levels and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II mRNA levels, a lowered number of mitochondria in neurons and aggregation of mitochondria in the brain indicating mitochondrial malfunction. Over-expression of rho-7 in developing eye discs resulted in an elevated apoptotic index. In the CNS, elevated levels of rho-7 were accompanied by both isoforms of Opa1-like, a dynamin-like GTPase, a mitochondrial component involved in regulating mitochondrial dynamics and function, including apoptosis. Most, but not all, of rho-7 over-expression phenotypes were suppressed by introducing a heterozygous mutation for Opa1-like. Our results suggest that rho-7 and Opa1-like function in a common molecular pathway affecting mitochondrial function and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

  18. p130Cas over-expression impairs mammary branching morphogenesis in response to estrogen and EGF.

    PubMed

    Camacho Leal, Maria del Pilar; Pincini, Alessandra; Tornillo, Giusy; Fiorito, Elisa; Bisaro, Brigitte; Di Luca, Elisa; Turco, Emilia; Defilippi, Paola; Cabodi, Sara

    2012-01-01

    p130Cas adaptor protein regulates basic processes such as cell cycle control, survival and migration. p130Cas over-expression has been related to mammary gland transformation, however the in vivo consequences of p130Cas over-expression during mammary gland morphogenesis are not known. In ex vivo mammary explants from MMTV-p130Cas transgenic mice, we show that p130Cas impairs the functional interplay between Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Estrogen Receptor (ER) during mammary gland development. Indeed, we demonstrate that p130Cas over-expression upon the concomitant stimulation with EGF and estrogen (E2) severely impairs mammary morphogenesis giving rise to enlarged multicellular spherical structures with altered architecture and absence of the central lumen. These filled acinar structures are characterized by increased cell survival and proliferation and by a strong activation of Erk1/2 MAPKs and Akt. Interestingly, antagonizing the ER activity is sufficient to re-establish branching morphogenesis and normal Erk1/2 MAPK activity. Overall, these results indicate that high levels of p130Cas expression profoundly affect mammary morphogenesis by altering epithelial architecture, survival and unbalancing Erk1/2 MAPKs activation in response to growth factors and hormones. These results suggest that alteration of morphogenetic pathways due to p130Cas over-expression might prime mammary epithelium to tumorigenesis.

  19. Orbital inclinations of late B-type spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, B. N. G.

    1986-05-01

    Information on the orbital inclinations j of late B-type spectroscopic binaries (SB's) with periods between 3 and 50 days is obtained from the masses M1 of their primary components, derived from uvby-beta photometry, and the values of M1 sin cubed j. The cumulative distribution of j for a fairly complete sample of double-lined binaries (SB2's) with Hg-Mn primaries is consistent with that expected for random orientations of the orbital planes. The period-eccentricity relations for Hg-Mn SB's and normal, sharp-lined SB's do not differ significantly. Subsynchronous rotators occur among the components of Hg-Mn SB's (e.g. HR266, Kappa-Cnc, HR 4072, Chi-Lup and 74 Aqr) and superficially normal SB's (e.g. 64Ori, HR 7338 and possibly HR 4892); the subsynchronous primary of HR 7338 is metal poor. The slow rotation of Hg-Mn stars is probably due to special initial conditions or to a substantial loss of angular momentum during contraction to the main sequence. The orbital periods of three of the SB2's with nonsynchronous Hg-Mn components (HR 266, AR Aur and 74 Aqr) are only about 4 days, and these systems may pose a difficulty for the hypothesis that the abundance anomalies are due to the separation of elements by diffusion in quiescent atmospheres.

  20. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  1. Cyclin D1 regulates hepatic estrogen and androgen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Hanse, Eric A; Romano, Andrea; Blomquist, Charles H; Mason, J Ian; Delvoux, Bert; Anttila, Chelsea; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2010-06-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle control protein that plays an important role in regenerating liver and many types of cancer. Previous reports have shown that cyclin D1 can directly enhance estrogen receptor activity and inhibit androgen receptor activity in a ligand-independent manner and thus may play an important role in hormone-responsive malignancies. In this study, we examine a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 regulates sex steroid signaling, via altered metabolism of these hormones at the tissue and cellular level. In male mouse liver, ectopic expression of cyclin D1 regulated genes involved in the synthesis and degradation of sex steroid hormones in a pattern that would predict increased estrogen and decreased androgen levels. Indeed, hepatic expression of cyclin D1 led to increased serum estradiol levels, increased estrogen-responsive gene expression, and decreased androgen-responsive gene expression. Cyclin D1 also regulated the activity of several key enzymatic reactions in the liver, including increased oxidation of testosterone to androstenedione and decreased conversion of estradiol to estrone. Similar findings were seen in the setting of physiological cyclin D1 expression in regenerating liver. Knockdown of cyclin D1 in HuH7 cells produced reciprocal changes in steroid metabolism genes compared with cyclin D1 overexpression in mouse liver. In conclusion, these studies establish a novel link between the cell cycle machinery and sex steroid metabolism and provide a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 may regulate hormone signaling. Furthermore, these results suggest that increased cyclin D1 expression, which occurs in liver regeneration and liver diseases, may contribute to the feminization seen in these settings.

  2. Endothelial actions of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    The cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is critically involved in the maintenance of arterial blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. Its cGMP-producing GC-A receptor is densely expressed in the microvascular endothelium of the lung and systemic circulation, but the functional relevance is controversial. Some studies reported that ANP stimulates endothelial cell permeability, whereas others described that the peptide attenuates endothelial barrier dysfunction provoked by inflammatory agents such as thrombin or histamine. Many studies in vitro addressed the effects of ANP on endothelial proliferation and migration. Again, both pro- and anti-angiogenic properties were described. To unravel the role of the endothelial actions of ANP in vivo, we inactivated the murine GC-A gene selectively in endothelial cells by homologous loxP/Cre-mediated recombination. Our studies in these mice indicate that ANP, via endothelial GC-A, increases endothelial albumin permeability in the microcirculation of the skin and skeletal muscle. This effect is critically involved in the endocrine hypovolaemic, hypotensive actions of the cardiac hormone. On the other hand the homologous GC-A-activating B-type NP (BNP), which is produced by cardiac myocytes and many other cell types in response to stressors such as hypoxia, possibly exerts more paracrine than endocrine actions. For instance, within the ischaemic skeletal muscle BNP released from activated satellite cells can improve the regeneration of neighbouring endothelia. This review will focus on recent advancements in our understanding of endothelial NP/GC-A signalling in the pulmonary versus systemic circulation. It will discuss possible mechanisms accounting for the discrepant observations made for the endothelial actions of this hormone-receptor system and distinguish between (patho)physiological and pharmacological actions. Lastly it will emphasize the potential therapeutical implications derived from the

  3. Endothelial actions of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2012-05-01

    The cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is critically involved in the maintenance of arterial blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. Its cGMP-producing GC-A receptor is densely expressed in the microvascular endothelium of the lung and systemic circulation, but the functional relevance is controversial. Some studies reported that ANP stimulates endothelial cell permeability, whereas others described that the peptide attenuates endothelial barrier dysfunction provoked by inflammatory agents such as thrombin or histamine. Many studies in vitro addressed the effects of ANP on endothelial proliferation and migration. Again, both pro- and anti-angiogenic properties were described. To unravel the role of the endothelial actions of ANP in vivo, we inactivated the murine GC-A gene selectively in endothelial cells by homologous loxP/Cre-mediated recombination. Our studies in these mice indicate that ANP, via endothelial GC-A, increases endothelial albumin permeability in the microcirculation of the skin and skeletal muscle. This effect is critically involved in the endocrine hypovolaemic, hypotensive actions of the cardiac hormone. On the other hand the homologous GC-A-activating B-type NP (BNP), which is produced by cardiac myocytes and many other cell types in response to stressors such as hypoxia, possibly exerts more paracrine than endocrine actions. For instance, within the ischaemic skeletal muscle BNP released from activated satellite cells can improve the regeneration of neighbouring endothelia. This review will focus on recent advancements in our understanding of endothelial NP/GC-A signalling in the pulmonary versus systemic circulation. It will discuss possible mechanisms accounting for the discrepant observations made for the endothelial actions of this hormone-receptor system and distinguish between (patho)physiological and pharmacological actions. Lastly it will emphasize the potential therapeutical implications derived from the

  4. Pleiotrophin over-expression provides trophic support to dopaminergic neurons in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pleiotrophin is known to promote the survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in vitro and is up-regulated in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. To establish whether pleiotrophin has a trophic effect on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing pleiotrophin in the substantia nigra of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Results The viral vector induced pleiotrophin over-expression by astrocytes in the substantia nigra pars compacta, without modifying endogenous neuronal expression. The percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells as well as the area of their projections in the lesioned striatum was higher in pleiotrophin-treated animals than in controls. Conclusions These results indicate that pleiotrophin over-expression partially rescues tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies and terminals of dopaminergic neurons undergoing 6-hydroxydopamine-induced degeneration. PMID:21649894

  5. Over-expression of phage HK022 Nun protein is toxic for Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Uc-Mass, Augusto; Khodursky, Arkady; Brown, Lewis; Gottesman, Max E.

    2008-01-01

    The Nun protein of coliphage HK022 excludes superinfecting λ phage. Nun recognizes and binds to the N utilization (nut) sites on phage λ nascent RNA and induces transcription termination. Over-expression of Nun from a high-copy plasmid is toxic for E.coli, despite the fact that nut sites are not encoded in the E.coli genome. Cells expressing Nun cannot exit stationary phase. Toxicity is related to transcription termination, since host and nun mutations that block termination also suppress cell killing. Nun inhibits expression of wild-type lacZ, but not lacZ expressed from the Crp/cAMP–independent lacUV5 promoter. Microarray and proteomics analyses show Nun down-regulates crp and tnaA. Crp over-expression and high indole concentrations partially reverse Nun-mediated toxicity and restore lacZ expression. PMID:18571198

  6. Transgenic over-expression of mammalian heparanase delays prion disease onset and progression

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk Ben-Zaken, O; Nissan, I; Tzaban, S; Taraboulos, A; Zcharia, E; Matzger, S; Shafat, I; Vlodavsky, I; Tal, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular heparan sulfate (HS) has a dual role in scrapie pathogenesis; it is required for PrPSc (scrapie prion protein) formation and facilitates infection of cells, mediating cellular uptake of prions. We examined the involvement of heparanase, a mammalian endoglycosidase degrading HS, in scrapie infection. In cultured cells, heparanase treatment or over-expression resulted in a profound decrease in PrPSc. Moreover, disease onset and progression were dramatically delayed in scrapie infected transgenic mice over-expressing heparanase. Together, our results provide direct in vivo evidence for the involvement of intact HS in the pathogenesis of prion disease and the protective role of heparanase both in terms of susceptibility to infection and disease progression. PMID:26168721

  7. Computational identification of gene over-expression targets for metabolic engineering of taxadiene production.

    PubMed

    Boghigian, Brett A; Armando, John; Salas, Daniel; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2012-03-01

    Taxadiene is the first dedicated intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of the anticancer compound Taxol. Recent studies have taken advantage of heterologous hosts to produce taxadiene and other isoprenoid compounds, and such ventures now offer research opportunities that take advantage of the engineering tools associated with the surrogate host. In this study, metabolic engineering was applied in the context of over-expression targets predicted to improve taxadiene production. Identified targets included genes both within and outside of the isoprenoid precursor pathway. These targets were then tested for experimental over-expression in a heterologous Escherichia coli host designed to support isoprenoid biosynthesis. Results confirmed the computationally predicted improvements and indicated a synergy between targets within the expected isoprenoid precursor pathway and those outside this pathway. The presented algorithm is broadly applicable to other host systems and/or product choices.

  8. Over-expression of microRNA169 confers enhanced drought tolerance to tomato.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Zou, Zhe; Gong, Pengjuan; Zhang, Junhong; Ziaf, Khurram; Li, Hanxia; Xiao, Fangming; Ye, Zhibiao

    2011-02-01

    Plant miRNA regulates multiple developmental and physiological processes, including drought responses. We found that the accumulation of Sly-miR169 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was induced by drought stress. Consequently, Sly-miR169 targets, namely, three nuclear factor Y subunit genes (SlNF-YA1/2/3) and one multidrug resistance-associated protein gene (SlMRP1), were significantly down-regulated by drought stress. Constitutive over-expression of a miR169 family member, Sly-miR169c, in tomato plant can efficiently down-regulate the transcripts of the target genes. Compared with non-transgenic plants, transgenic plants over-expressing Sly-miR169c displayed reduced stomatal opening, decreased transpiration rate, lowered leaf water loss, and enhanced drought tolerance. Our study is the first to provide evidence that the Sly-miR169c negatively regulates stomatal movement in tomato drought responses.

  9. CmMYB19 Over-Expression Improves Aphid Tolerance in Chrysanthemum by Promoting Lignin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinjie; Sheng, Liping; Zhang, Huanru; Du, Xinping; An, Cong; Xia, Xiaolong; Chen, Fadi; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei

    2017-01-01

    The gene encoding the MYB (v-myb avian myeloblastosis vira l oncogene homolog) transcription factor CmMYB19 was isolated from chrysanthemum. It encodes a 200 amino acid protein and belongs to the R2R3-MYB subfamily. CmMYB19 was not transcriptionally activated in yeast, while a transient expression experiment conducted in onion epidermal cells suggested that the CmMYB19 product localized to the nucleus. CmMYB19 transcription was induced by aphid (Macrosiphoniella sanborni) infestation, and the abundance of transcript was higher in the leaf and stem than in the root. The over-expression of CmMYB19 restricted the multiplication of the aphids. A comparison of transcript abundance of the major genes involved in lignin synthesis showed that CmPAL1 (phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1), CmC4H (cinnamate4 hydroxylase), Cm4CL1 (4-hydroxy cinnamoyl CoA ligase 1), CmHCT (hydroxycinnamoyl CoA-shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase), CmC3H1 (coumarate3 hydroxylase1), CmCCoAOMT1 (caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase 1) and CmCCR1 (cinnamyl CoA reductase1) were all upregulated, in agreement with an increase in lignin content in CmMYB19 over-expressing plants. Collectively, the over-expression of CmMYB19 restricted the multiplication of the aphids on the host, mediated by an enhanced accumulation of lignin. PMID:28287502

  10. Over-expression of catalase in myeloid cells confers acute protection following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Brown, Milton E; Che, Pao Lin; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chiang, Bryce; Taylor, W Robert; Davis, Michael E

    2014-05-21

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  11. Reduced seed germination in Arabidopsis over-expressing SWI/SNF2 ATPase genes.

    PubMed

    Leeggangers, Hendrika A C F; Folta, Adam; Muras, Aleksandra; Nap, Jan-Peter; Mlynarova, Ludmila

    2015-02-01

    In the life of flowering plants, seed germination is a critical step to ensure survival into the next generation. Generally the seed prior to germination has been in a dormant state with a low rate of metabolism. In the transition from a dormant seed to a germinating seed, various epigenetic mechanisms play a regulatory role. Here, we demonstrate that the over-expression of chromatin remodeling ATPase genes (AtCHR12 or AtCHR23) reduced the frequency of seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana up to 30% relative to the wild-type seeds. On the other hand, single loss-of-function mutations of the two genes did not affect seed germination. The reduction of germination in over-expressing mutants was more pronounced in stress conditions (salt or high temperature), showing the impact of the environment. Reduced germinations upon over-expression coincided with increased transcript levels of seed maturation genes and with reduced degradation of their mRNAs stored in dry seeds. Our results indicate that repression of AtCHR12/23 gene expression in germinating wild-type Arabidopsis seeds is required for full germination. This establishes a functional link between chromatin modifiers and regulatory networks towards seed maturation and germination.

  12. Over Expression of NANOS3 and DAZL in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Panula, Sarita; Reda, Ahmed; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Ramathal, Cyril; Sukhwani, Meena; Albalushi, Halima; Edsgärd, Daniel; Nakamura, Michiko; Söder, Olle; Orwig, Kyle E.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Reijo Pera, Renee A.; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying human germ cell development are largely unknown, partly due to the scarcity of primordial germ cells and the inaccessibility of the human germline to genetic analysis. Human embryonic stem cells can differentiate to germ cells in vitro and can be genetically modified to study the genetic requirements for germ cell development. Here, we studied NANOS3 and DAZL, which have critical roles in germ cell development in several species, via their over expression in human embryonic stem cells using global transcriptional analysis, in vitro germ cell differentiation, and in vivo germ cell formation assay by xenotransplantation. We found that NANOS3 over expression prolonged pluripotency and delayed differentiation. In addition, we observed a possible connection of NANOS3 with inhibition of apoptosis. For DAZL, our results suggest a post-transcriptional regulation mechanism in hES cells. In addition, we found that DAZL suppressed the translation of OCT4, and affected the transcription of several genes associated with germ cells, cell cycle arrest, and cell migration. Furthermore, DAZL over expressed cells formed spermatogonia-like colonies in a rare instance upon xenotransplantation. These data can be used to further elucidate the role of NANOS3 and DAZL in germ cell development both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27768780

  13. Over-expression of CXCR4 on mesenchymal stem cells augments myoangiogenesis in the infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongsheng; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Tiemin; Pasha, Zeeshan; Xu, Meifeng; Zhu, Yi; Ashraf, Muhammad; Wang, Yigang

    2008-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in myocardial repair following myocardial infarction. However, their in vivo reparative capability is limited due to lack of their survival in the infarcted myocardium. To overcome this limitation, we genetically engineered male rat MSCs overexpressing CXCR4 in order to maximize the effect of stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) for cell migration and regeneration. MSCs were isolated from adult male rats and cultured. Adenoviral transduction was carried out to over-express either CXCR4/green fluorescent protein (Ad-CXCR4/GFP) or Ad-null/GFP alone (control). Flow cytometry was used to identify and isolate GFP/CXCR4 over-expressing MSCs for transplantation. Female rats were assigned to one of four groups (n=8 each) to receive GFP-transduced male MSCs (2 x 10(6)) via tail vein injection 3 days after ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery: GFP-transduced MSCs (Ad-null/GFP-MSCs, group 1) or MSCs over-expressing CXCR4/GFP (Ad-CXCR4/GFP-MSCs, group 2), or Ad-CXCR4/GFP-MSCs plus SDF-1alpha (50 ng/microl) (Ad-CXCR4/GFP-MSCs/SDF-1alpha, group 3), or Ad-miRNA targeting CXCR4 plus SDF-1alpha (Ad-miRNA/GFP-MSCs+SDF-1alpha treatment, group 4). Cardiodynamic data were obtained 4 weeks after induction of regional myocardial infarction (MI) using echocardiography after which hearts were harvested for immunohistochemical studies. The migration of GFP and Y-chromosome positive cells increased significantly in the peri- and infarct areas of groups 2 and 3 compared to control group (p<0.05), or miRNA-CXCR4 group (p<0.01). The number of CXCR4 positive cells in groups 2, 3 was intimately associated with angiogenesis and myogenesis. MSCs engraftment was blocked by pretreatment with miRNA (group 4). Cardiac function was significantly improved in rats receiving MSCs over-expressing CXCR4 alone or with SDF-1alpha. The up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by CXCR4 overexpressing MSCs perhaps

  14. B-type natriuretic peptides and mortality after stroke

    PubMed Central

    García-Berrocoso, Teresa; Giralt, Dolors; Bustamante, Alejandro; Etgen, Thorleif; Jensen, Jesper K.; Sharma, Jagdish C.; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Saritas, Ayhan; Chen, Xingyong; Whiteley, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To measure the association of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal fragment of BNP (NT-proBNP) with all-cause mortality after stroke, and to evaluate the additional predictive value of BNP/NT-proBNP over clinical information. Methods: Suitable studies for meta-analysis were found by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases until October 26, 2012. Weighted mean differences measured effect size; meta-regression and publication bias were assessed. Individual participant data were used to estimate effects by logistic regression and to evaluate BNP/NT-proBNP additional predictive value by area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, and integrated discrimination improvement and categorical net reclassification improvement indexes. Results: Literature-based meta-analysis included 3,498 stroke patients from 16 studies and revealed that BNP/NT-proBNP levels were 255.78 pg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI] 105.10–406.47, p = 0.001) higher in patients who died; publication bias entailed the loss of this association. Individual participant data analysis comprised 2,258 stroke patients. After normalization of the data, patients in the highest quartile had double the risk of death after adjustment for clinical variables (NIH Stroke Scale score, age, sex) (odds ratio 2.30, 95% CI 1.32–4.01 for BNP; and odds ratio 2.63, 95% CI 1.75–3.94 for NT-proBNP). Only NT-proBNP showed a slight added value to clinical prognostic variables, increasing discrimination by 0.028 points (integrated discrimination improvement index; p < 0.001) and reclassifying 8.1% of patients into correct risk mortality categories (net reclassification improvement index; p = 0.003). Neither etiology nor time from onset to death affected the association of BNP/NT-proBNP with mortality. Conclusion: BNPs are associated with poststroke mortality independent of NIH Stroke Scale score, age, and sex. However, their translation to clinical practice seems difficult because BNP

  15. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinases 4/6 (Cdk4/6) to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (RB) family proteins, relieving E2F/DPs from the negative restraint of RB proteins and histone deacetylases. The cyclin D-Cdk4/6 complexes activate cyclin E/Cdk2 through titration of the Cdk inhibitors p21Cip1/p27Kip1. Cyclin E/Cdk2 further phosphorylates RBs, thereby activating E2F/DPs, and cells enter the S phase of the cell cycle. Cyclin D-Cdk4/6 also phosphorylates MEP50 subunit of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), which cooperates with cyclin D1 to drive lymphomagenesis in vivo. Activated PRMPT5 causes arginine methylation of p53 to suppress expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative target genes, explaining the molecular mechanism for tumorigenesis. Cyclin D1 physically interacts with transcription factors such as estrogen receptor, androgen receptor, and Myb family proteins to regulate gene expression in Cdk-independent fashion. Dmp1 is a Myb-like protein that quenches the oncogenic signals from activated Ras or HER2 by inducing Arf/p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Cyclin D1 binds to Dmp1α to activate both Arf and Ink4a promoters to induce cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in non-transformed cells to prevent them from neoplastic transformation. Dmp1-deficiency significantly accelerates mouse mammary tumorigenesis with reduced apoptosis and increased metastasis. Cyclin D1 interferes with ligand activation of PPARγ involved in cellular differentiation; it also physically interacts with histone deacetylases (HDACs) and p300 to repress gene expression. It has also been shown that cyclin D1 accelerates tumorigenesis through transcriptional activation of miR-17/20 and Dicer1 which, in turn, represses cyclin D1 expression. Identification of cyclin D1-binding proteins/promoters will be essential for further clarification of its biological activities. PMID:28090171

  16. Over-expression of HSP47 augments mouse embryonic stem cell smooth muscle differentiation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Mei Mei; Yin, Xiaoke; Potter, Claire; Yu, Baoqi; Cai, Hao; Di Bernardini, Elisabetta; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-01-01

    In the recent decade, embryonic stem cells (ESC) have emerged as an attractive cell source of smooth muscle cells (SMC) for vascular tissue engineering owing to their unlimited self-renewal and differentiation capacities. Despite their promise in therapy, their efficacy is still hampered by the lack of definitive SMC differentiation mechanisms and difficulties in successful trafficking of the ESC towards a site of injury or target tissue. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) is a 47-kDa molecular chaperone that is required for the maturation of various types of collagen and has been shown to be a critical modulator of different pathological and physiological processes. To date, the role of HSP47 on ESC to SMC differentiation or ESC chemotaxis is not known and may represent a potential molecular approach by which ESC can be manipulated to increase their efficacy in clinic. We provide evidence that HSP47 is highly expressed during ESC differentiation into the SMC lineage and that HSP47 reduction results in an attenuation of the differentiation. Our experiments using a HSP47 plasmid transfection system show that gene over-expression is sufficient to induce ESC-SMC differentiation, even in the absence of exogenous stimuli. Furthermore, HSP47 over-expression in ESC also increases their chemotaxis and migratory responses towards a panel of chemokines, likely via the upregulation of chemokine receptors. Our findings provide direct evidence of induced ESC migration and differentiation into SMC via the over-expression of HSP47, thus identifying a novel approach of molecular manipulation that can potentially be exploited to improve stem cell therapy for vascular repair and regeneration.

  17. GSL2 over-expression confers resistance to Pectobacterium atrosepticum in potato.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Sara; Meiyalaghan, Sathiyamoorthy; Latimer, Julie M; Gatehouse, Michelle L; Monaghan, Katrina S; Vanga, Bhanupratap R; Pitman, Andrew R; Jones, E Eirian; Conner, Anthony J; Jacobs, Jeanne M E

    2014-03-01

    Over-expression of the potato Gibberellin Stimulated-Like 2 ( GSL2 ) gene in transgenic potato confers resistance to blackleg disease incited by Pectobacterium atrosepticum and confirms a role for GSL2 in plant defence. The Gibberellin Stimulated-Like 2 (GSL2) gene (also known as Snakin 2) encodes a cysteine-rich, low-molecular weight antimicrobial peptide produced in potato plants. This protein is thought to play important roles in the innate defence against invading microbes. Over-expression of the GSL2 gene in potato (cultivar Iwa) was achieved using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer of a plant expression vector with the potato GSL2 gene under the regulatory control elements of the potato light-inducible Lhca3 gene. The resulting plants were confirmed as being transgenic by PCR, and subsequently analysed for transcriptional expression of the Lhca3-GSL2-Lhca3 chimeric potato gene. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the majority of the transgenic potato lines over-expressed the GSL2 gene at the mRNA level. Based on qRT-PCR results and evaluation of phenotypic appearance, eight lines were selected for further characterisation and evaluated in bioassays for resistance to Pectobacterium atrosepticum (formerly Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica), the causal agent of blackleg in potato. Three independent pathogenicity bioassays showed that transgenic lines with significantly increased transcriptional expression of the GSL2 gene exhibit resistance to blackleg disease. This establishes a functional role for GSL2 in plant defence against pathogens in potato.

  18. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Fibroblasts Over-Expressing Dominant Negative Ku70

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu Huang Yunhong; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response of cells over-expressing dominant negative (DN) Ku70 to single and multiple small radiation doses. Methods and Materials: Clones of fibroblasts over-expressing DNKu70, DNKu70-7, DNKu70-11, and parental Rat-1 cells were irradiated under oxic or hypoxic conditions with single or multiple doses. Cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after irradiation to determine surviving fraction (SF). Results: Oxic DNKu70-7 or -11 cells trypsinized 6 h after irradiation were 1.52 or 1.25 and 1.28 or 1.15 times more sensitive than oxic Rat-1 at SF of 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. Hypoxic DNKu70-7 or -11 cells trypsinized 6 h after irradiation were 1.44 or 1.70 and 1.33 or 1.51 times more sensitive than hypoxic Rat-1 at SF of 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. To the multiple doses, oxic and hypoxic DNKu70-7 or -11 cells were 1.35 or 1.37 and 2.23 or 4.61 times more sensitive than oxic and hypoxic Rat-1, respectively, resulting in very small oxygen enhancement ratios. Namely, enhancement caused by DNKu70 under hypoxia after multiple doses was greater than that under oxic conditions and greater than that after single dose. Conclusions: Over-expression of DNKu70 enhances cells' response to radiation given as a single dose and as multiple small doses. The enhancement after multiple doses was stronger under hypoxic than under oxic conditions. These results encourage the use of DNKu70 fragment in a gene-radiotherapy.

  19. Over-expression of ST3Gal-I promotes mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Picco, Gianfranco; Julien, Sylvain; Brockhausen, Inka; Beatson, Richard; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Haslam, Stuart; Mandel, Ulla; Dell, Anne; Pinder, Sarah; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy

    2010-10-01

    Changes in glycosylation are common in malignancy, and as almost all surface proteins are glycosylated, this can dramatically affect the behavior of tumor cells. In breast carcinomas, the O-linked glycans are frequently truncated, often as a result of premature sialylation. The sialyltransferase ST3Gal-I adds sialic acid to the galactose residue of core 1 (Galbeta1,3GalNAc) O-glycans and this enzyme is over-expressed in breast cancer resulting in the expression of sialylated core 1 glycans. In order to study the role of ST3Gal-I in mammary tumor development, we developed transgenic mice that over-express the sialyltransferase under the control of the human membrane-bound mucin 1 promoter. These mice were then crossed with PyMT mice that spontaneously develop mammary tumors. As expected, ST3Gal-I transgenic mice showed increased activity and expression of the enzyme in the pregnant and lactating mammary glands, the stomach, lungs and intestine. Although no obvious defects were observed in the fully developed mammary gland, when these mice were crossed with PyMT mice, a highly significant decrease in tumor latency was observed compared to the PyMT mice on an identical background. These results indicate that ST3Gal-I is acting as a tumor promoter in this model of breast cancer. This, we believe, is the first demonstration that over-expression of a glycosyltransferase involved in mucin-type O-linked glycosylation can promote tumorigenesis.

  20. Over-expression of TRESK K(+) channels reduces the excitability of trigeminal ganglion nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaohua; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2014-01-01

    TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) channel is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and is one of the major background K(+) channels in primary afferent neurons. Mutations in TRESK channels are associated with familial and sporadic migraine. In rats, both chronic nerve injury and inflammation alter the expression level of TRESK mRNA. Functional studies indicate that reduction of endogenous TRESK channel activity results in hyper-excitation of primary afferent neurons, suggesting that TRESK is a potential target for the development of new analgesics. However, whether and how enhancing TRESK channel activity would decrease the excitability of primary afferent neurons has not been directly tested. Here, we over-expressed TRESK subunits in cultured mouse TG neurons by lipofectamine-mediated transfection and investigated how this altered the membrane properties and the excitability of the small-diameter TG population. To account for the heterogeneity of neurons, we further divided small TG neurons into two groups, based on their ability to bind to fluorescently-labeled isolectin B (IB4). The transfected TG neurons showed a 2-fold increase in the level of TRESK proteins. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the fraction of lamotrigine-sensitive persistent K(+) currents as well as the size of total background K(+) currents. Consequently, both IB4-positive and IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits exhibited a lower input resistance and a 2-fold increase in the current threshold for action potential initiation. IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits also showed a significant reduction of the spike frequency in response to supra-threshold stimuli. Importantly, an increase in TRESK channel activity effectively inhibited capsaicin-evoked spikes in TG neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that potent and specific TRESK channel openers likely would reduce the excitability of

  1. A roller coaster ride with the mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tsz Kan; Poon, Randy Y C

    2005-06-01

    Cyclins are discovered as proteins that accumulate progressively through interphase and disappear abruptly at mitosis during each cell cycle. In mammalian cells, cyclin A accumulates from late G1 phase and is destroyed before metaphase, and cyclin B is destroyed slightly later at anaphase. The abundance of the mitotic cyclins is mainly regulated at the levels of transcription and proteolysis. Transcription is stimulated and repressed by several transcription factors, including B-MYB, E2F, FOXM1, and NF-Y. Elements in the promoter, including CCRE/CDE and CHR, are in part responsible for the cell cycle oscillation of transcription. Destruction of the mitotic cyclins is carried out by the ubiquitin ligases APC/C(CDC20) and APC/C(CDH1). Central to our knowledge is the understanding of how APC/C is turned on from anaphase to early G1 phase, and turned off from late G1 till the spindle-assembly checkpoint is deactivated in metaphase. Reciprocal actions of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on APC/C, as well as on the SCF complexes ensure that the mitotic cyclins are destroyed only at the proper time.

  2. Sequence analysis, cloning and over-expression of an endoxylanase from the alkaliphilic Bacillus halodurans.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M Alejandra; Delgado, Osvaldo D; Baigorí, Mario D; Siñeriz, Faustino

    2005-04-01

    The BhMIR32 xyn11A gene, encoding an extracellular endoxylanase of potential interest in bio-bleaching applications, was amplified from Bacillus halodurans MIR32 genomic DNA. The protein encoded is an endo-1,4-beta-xylanase belonging to family 11 of glycosyl hydrolases. Its nucleotide sequence was analysed and the mature peptide was subcloned into pET22b(+) expression vector. The enzyme was over-expressed in a high density Escherichia coli culture as a soluble and active protein, and purified in a single step by immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography with a specific activity of 3073 IU mg-1.

  3. A metagenomic alkaline protease from saline habitat: cloning, over-expression and functional attributes.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Megha K; Singh, Satya P

    2013-02-01

    Metagenomics has opened new horizon to unlock the biotechnological potential for novel enzymes. An alkaline protease gene was obtained from the total environmental DNA extracted from a saline habitat. After cloning and sequencing, it was identified that the protease gene related to uncultivable bacteria (HM219181). The protease was over expressed at 6h of induction with optimum induction at 1mM IPTG and 27°C. The purified enzyme was characterized with respect to various factors; temperature, pH, NaCl and chemical denaturant. The sequence analysis indicated a hydrophobic tendency of the protein, while the predicted 3D structure indicated the enzyme as a serine protease.

  4. Effects of BCL-2 over-expression on B cells in transgenic rats and rat hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Iscache, Anne-Laure; Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Pedros, Christophe; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Buelow, Roland; Anegon, Ignacio

    2011-10-01

    The rat is an important biomedical experimental model that benefited from the recent development of new transgenic and knockout techniques. With the goal to optimize rat mAb production and to analyze the impact of Bcl-2 on B-cell development, we generated bcl-2 transgenic rats. Transgenic rats showed Bcl-2 over-expression in B cells, increased B cell numbers in lymphoid organs, elevated production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and prolonged B-cell survival in vitro. Transgenic rats remained healthy, reproduced normally and did not develop autoimmunity. Fusions with bcl-2 transgenic splenocytes did not result in increased hybridoma generation. A comparison of on- and off-rates of 39 mAbs generated with bcl-2 transgenic and wild-type animals revealed no significant differences. Over-expression of Bcl-2 in hybridomas did not change cell proliferation but resulted in increased Ig production. Bcl-2 transgenic rats will be a useful tool for the generation of rat mAbs, the analysis of B cells in different pathophysiological models, such as autoimmunity, cancer or organ transplantation, and the study of rat B-cell biology.

  5. Over-expression of OsDREB genes lead to enhanced drought tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Qiang; Meng, Xiu-Ping; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Mian; Wang, Xi-Ping

    2008-12-01

    The DREB transcription factors, which specifically interact with C-repeat/DRE (A/GCCGAC), play an important role in plant abiotic stress tolerance by controlling the expression of many cold or/and drought-inducible genes in an ABA-independent pathway. We have isolated three novel rice DREB genes, OsDREB1E, OsDREB1G, and OsDREB2B, which are homologous to Arabidopsis DREB genes. The yeast one-hybrid assay indicated that OsDREB1E, OsDREB1G, and OsDREB2B can specifically bind to the C-repeat/DRE element. To elucidate the function of respective OsDREB genes, we have stably introduced these to rice by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Transgenic rice plants analysis revealed that over-expression of OsDREB1G and OsDREB2B in rice significantly improved their tolerance to water deficit stress, while over-expression of OsDREB1E could only slightly improved the tolerance to water deficit stress, suggesting that the OsDREBs might participate in the stress response pathway in different manners.

  6. The formation of brown adipose tissue induced by transgenic over-expression of PPARγ2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Yang, Jinzeng; Huang, Jinliang; Li, Ting; Xu, Dequan; Zuo, Bo; Hou, Liming; Wu, Wangjun; Zhang, Lin; Xia, Xiaoliang; Ma, Zhiyuan; Ren, Zhuqing; Xiong, Yuanzhu

    2014-04-18

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized to dissipate energy as heat, therefore reducing fat deposition and counteracting obesity. Brown adipocytes arise from myoblastic progenitors during embryonic development by the action of transcription regulator PRDM16 binding to PPARγ, which promotes BAT-like phenotype in white adipose tissue. To investigate the capability of converting white adipose tissue to BAT or browning by PPARγ in vivo, we generated transgenic mice with over-expressed PPARγ2. The transgenic mice showed strong brown fat features in subcutaneous fat in morphology and histology. To provide molecular evidences on browning characteristics of the adipose tissue, we employed quantitative real-time PCR to determine BAT-specific gene expressions. The transgenic mice had remarkably elevated mRNA level of UCP1, Elovl3, PGC1α and Cebpα in subcutaneous fat. Compared with wild-type mice, UCP1 protein levels were increased significantly in transgenic mice. ATP concentration was slightly decreased in the subcutaneous fat of transgenic mice. Western blotting analysis also confirmed that phosphorylated AMPK and ACC proteins were significantly (P<0.01) increased in the transgenic mice. Therefore, this study demonstrated that over-expression of PPARγ2 in skeletal muscle can promote conversion of subcutaneous fat to brown fat formation, which can have beneficial effects on increasing energy metabolisms and combating obesity.

  7. VCC-1 over-expression inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhitao; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Mu, Xia; Qu, Rongmei; Li, Ming

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levels of VCC-1 are increased significantly in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 could promotes cellular proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 inhibit the cisplatin-provoked apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 plays an important role in control the tumor growth and apoptosis. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor-correlated chemokine 1 (VCC-1), a recently described chemokine, is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which aberrant VCC-1 expression determines poor outcomes of cancers are unknown. In this study, we found that VCC-1 was highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue. It was also associated with proliferation of HepG2 cells, and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conversely, down-regulation of VCC-1 in HepG2 cells increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In summary, these results suggest that VCC-1 is involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells, and also provides some evidence for VCC-1 as a potential cellular target for chemotherapy.

  8. Over-expression of DMRT1 induces the male pathway in embryonic chicken gonads.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, Luke S; Raymond, Christopher S; Roeszler, Kelly N; Kuroiwa, Asato; Nakata, Tomohiro; Zarkower, David; Smith, Craig A

    2014-05-15

    DMRT1 encodes a conserved transcription factor with an essential role in gonadal function. In the chicken, DMRT1 in located on the Z sex chromosome and is currently the best candidate master regulator of avian gonadal sex differentiation. We previously showed that knockdown of DMRT1 expression during the period of sexual differentiation induces feminisation of male embryonic chicken gonads. This gene is therefore necessary for proper testis development in the chicken. However, whether it is sufficient to induce testicular differentiation has remained unresolved. We show here that over-expression of DMRT1 induces male pathway genes and antagonises the female pathway in embryonic chicken gonads. Ectopic DMRT1 expression in female gonads induces localised SOX9 and AMH expression. It also induces expression of the recently identified Z-linked male factor, Hemogen (HEMGN). Masculinised gonads show evidence of cord-like structures and retarded female-type cortical development. Furthermore, expression of the critical feminising enzyme, aromatase, is reduced in the presence of over-expressed DMRT1. These data indicate that DMRT1 is an essential sex-linked regulator of gonadal differentiation in avians, and that it likely acts via a dosage mechanism established through the lack of global Z dosage compensation in birds.

  9. B1-Type Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Are Essential for the Formation of Stomatal Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boudolf, Véronique; Barrôco, Rosa; Engler, Janice de Almeida; Verkest, Aurine; Beeckman, Tom; Naudts, Mirande; Inzé, Dirk; De Veylder, Lieven

    2004-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle. In yeasts, only one CDK is sufficient to drive cells through the cell cycle, whereas higher eukaryotes developed a family of related CDKs. Curiously, plants contain a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs), whose function is still unclear. We show that the CDKB1;1 gene of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is highly expressed in guard cells and stomatal precursor cells of cotyledons, suggesting a prominent role for B-type CDKs in stomatal development. In accordance, transgenic Arabidopsis plants with reduced B-type CDK activity had a decreased stomatal index because of an early block of meristemoid division and inhibition of satellite meristemoid formation. Many aberrant stomatal cells were observed, all of them blocked in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Although division of stomatal precursors was inhibited, cells still acquired stomatal identity, illustrating that stomatal cell differentiation is independent of cellular and nuclear division. PMID:15031414

  10. Rapamycin disrupts cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen complexes and cyclin D1 reverses rapamycin action by stabilizing these complexes.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary; Forrester, Elizabeth; Chytil, Anna; Corsino, Patrick; Green, Gail; Davis, Bradley; Rowe, Thomas; Law, Brian

    2006-01-15

    Rapamycin and its derivatives are promising anticancer agents, but the exact mechanisms by which these drugs induce cell cycle arrest and inhibit tumor growth are unknown. A biochemical analysis of human mammary tumor cell lines indicated that rapamycin-induced antiproliferative effects correlated with down-regulation of cellular p21 levels and the levels of p21 in cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and 4 complexes. Cyclin D1 overexpression reversed rapamycin action and this reversal correlated with increased levels of cellular p21, higher levels of p21 associated with Cdk2, and stabilization of cyclin D1/Cdk2/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complexes. Experiments using a novel cyclin D1-Cdk2 fusion protein or a kinase-dead mutant of the fusion protein indicated that reversal of rapamycin action required not only the formation of complexes with p21 and PCNA but also complex-associated kinase activity. Similar results were observed in vivo. The rapamycin derivative RAD001 (everolimus) inhibited the growth of mouse mammary tumors, which correlated with the disruption of cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. The potential implications of these results with respect to the use of rapamycin derivatives in breast cancer therapy are discussed.

  11. Over-expression of AtEXLA2 alters etiolated arabidopsis hypocotyl growth

    PubMed Central

    Boron, Agnieszka Karolina; Van Loock, Bram; Suslov, Dmitry; Markakis, Marios Nektarios; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant stature and shape are largely determined by cell elongation, a process that is strongly controlled at the level of the cell wall. This is associated with the presence of many cell wall proteins implicated in the elongation process. Several proteins and enzyme families have been suggested to be involved in the controlled weakening of the cell wall, and these include xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases (XTHs), yieldins, lipid transfer proteins and expansins. Although expansins have been the subject of much research, the role and involvement of expansin-like genes/proteins remain mostly unclear. This study investigates the expression and function of AtEXLA2 (At4g38400), a member of the expansin-like A (EXLA) family in arabidposis, and considers its possible role in cell wall metabolism and growth. Methods Transgenic plants of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown, and lines over-expressing AtEXLA2 were identified. Plants were grown in the dark, on media containing growth hormones or precursors, or were gravistimulated. Hypocotyls were studied using transmission electron microscopy and extensiometry. Histochemical GUS (β-glucuronidase) stainings were performed. Key Results AtEXLA2 is one of the three EXLA members in arabidopsis. The protein lacks the typical domain responsible for expansin activity, but contains a presumed cellulose-interacting domain. Using promoter::GUS lines, the expression of AtEXLA2 was seen in germinating seedlings, hypocotyls, lateral root cap cells, columella cells and the central cylinder basally to the elongation zone of the root, and during different stages of lateral root development. Furthermore, promoter activity was detected in petioles, veins of leaves and filaments, and also in the peduncle of the flowers and in a zone just beneath the papillae. Over-expression of AtEXLA2 resulted in an increase of >10 % in the length of dark-grown hypocotyls and in slightly thicker walls in non-rapidly elongating etiolated

  12. Over-Expression of TRESK K+ Channels Reduces the Excitability of Trigeminal Ganglion Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaohua; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2014-01-01

    TWIK-related spinal cord K+ (TRESK) channel is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and is one of the major background K+ channels in primary afferent neurons. Mutations in TRESK channels are associated with familial and sporadic migraine. In rats, both chronic nerve injury and inflammation alter the expression level of TRESK mRNA. Functional studies indicate that reduction of endogenous TRESK channel activity results in hyper-excitation of primary afferent neurons, suggesting that TRESK is a potential target for the development of new analgesics. However, whether and how enhancing TRESK channel activity would decrease the excitability of primary afferent neurons has not been directly tested. Here, we over-expressed TRESK subunits in cultured mouse TG neurons by lipofectamine-mediated transfection and investigated how this altered the membrane properties and the excitability of the small-diameter TG population. To account for the heterogeneity of neurons, we further divided small TG neurons into two groups, based on their ability to bind to fluorescently-labeled isolectin B (IB4). The transfected TG neurons showed a 2-fold increase in the level of TRESK proteins. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the fraction of lamotrigine-sensitive persistent K+ currents as well as the size of total background K+ currents. Consequently, both IB4-positive and IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits exhibited a lower input resistance and a 2-fold increase in the current threshold for action potential initiation. IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits also showed a significant reduction of the spike frequency in response to supra-threshold stimuli. Importantly, an increase in TRESK channel activity effectively inhibited capsaicin-evoked spikes in TG neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that potent and specific TRESK channel openers likely would reduce the excitability of primary

  13. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21Waf1, regulates vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kenichi; Kato, Seiya; Arima, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Teruhiko; Morimatsu, Minoru; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2004-04-01

    In the process of vascular diseases, smooth muscle cells (SMC) undergo not only hyperplasia but also hypertrophy, resulting in vascular remodeling. A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI), p21Waf1, has been shown to play an important role in SMC hyperplasia. Here we investigated a potential role of p21Waf1 in SMC hypertrophy. An exposure of cultured rat SMC to serum drove the cell cycle progression with up-regulation of various cell cycle markers and increased activities of cyclin-dependent kinases, but did not cause SMC hypertrophy. In contrast, incubation of SMC for 48 h with angiotensin II (AII, 100 nmol/l) resulted in a significant increase in the cell size measured by flowcytometric forward-angle light scatter assay, in association with an increase in the ratio of [3H]leucine/[3H]thymidine uptake, indicating SMC hypertrophy. At 48 h, p21Waf1 expression was up-regulated in SMC exposed to AII but not in those exposed to serum. These results suggest that p21Waf1 may be involved in hypertrophy. To further investigate this issue, two manipulations of the p21Waf1 gene were performed. Adenovirus-mediated over-expression of p21Waf1 not only reduced S-phasic cells but also caused hypertrophy, despite the exposure to serum. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide for p21Waf1 inhibited the hypertrophy of SMC exposed to AII. Our data suggest that p21Waf1 may play a role in SMC hypertrophy as well.

  15. Cyclin D2 Protein Stability Is Regulated in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Lu Mei; Sartori, Daniel J.; Teta, Monica; Opare-Addo, Lynn M.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Long, Simon Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Kushner, Jake A.

    2009-01-01

    The molecular determinants of β-cell mass expansion remain poorly understood. Cyclin D2 is the major D-type cyclin expressed in β-cells, essential for adult β-cell growth. We hypothesized that cyclin D2 could be actively regulated in β-cells, which could allow mitogenic stimuli to influence β-cell expansion. Cyclin D2 protein was sharply increased after partial pancreatectomy, but cyclin D2 mRNA was unchanged, suggesting posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms influence cyclin D2 expression in β-cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, cyclin D2 protein stability is powerfully regulated in fibroblasts. Threonine 280 of cyclin D2 is phosphorylated, and this residue critically limits D2 stability. We derived transgenic (tg) mice with threonine 280 of cyclin D2 mutated to alanine (T280A) or wild-type cyclin D2 under the control of the insulin promoter. Cyclin D2 T280A protein was expressed at much higher levels than wild-type cyclin D2 protein in β-cells, despite equivalent expression of tg mRNAs. Cyclin D2 T280A tg mice exhibited a constitutively nuclear cyclin D2 localization in β-cells, and increased cyclin D2 stability in islets. Interestingly, threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 tg mice had greatly reduced β-cell apoptosis, with suppressed expression of proapoptotic genes. Suppressed β-cell apoptosis in threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 tg mice resulted in greatly increased β-cell area in aged mice. Taken together, these data indicate that cyclin D2 is regulated by protein stability in pancreatic β-cells, that signals that act upon threonine 280 limit cyclin D2 stability in β-cells, and that threonine 280-mutant cyclin D2 overexpression prolongs β-cell survival and augments β-cell mass expansion. PMID:19628581

  16. Understanding and modulating cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor specificity: molecular modeling and biochemical evaluation of pyrazolopyrimidinones as CDK2/cyclin A and CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Karen A.; Markwalder, Jay A.; Seitz, Steven P.; Chang, Chong-Hwan; Cox, Sarah; Boisclair, Michael D.; Brizuela, Leonardo; Brenner, Stephen L.; Stouten, Pieter F. W.

    2005-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. The cyclins, their activating agents, and endogenous CDK inhibitors are frequently mutated in human cancers, making CDKs interesting targets for cancer chemotherapy. Our aim is the discovery of selective CDK4/cyclin D1 inhibitors. An ATP-competitive pyrazolopyrimidinone CDK inhibitor was identified by HTS and docked into a CDK4 homology model. The resulting binding model was consistent with available SAR and was validated by a subsequent CDK2/inhibitor crystal structure. An iterative cycle of chemistry and modeling led to a 70-fold improvement in potency. Small substituent changes resulted in large CDK4/CDK2 selectivity changes. The modeling revealed that selectivity is largely due to hydrogen-bonded interactions with only two kinase residues. This demonstrates that small differences between enzymes can efficiently be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors.

  17. Mechanisms and regulation of the degradation of cyclin B.

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, A

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of the cyclin B subunit of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B is required for inactivation of the kinase and exit from mitosis. Cyclin B is degraded by the ubiquitin pathway, a system involved in most selective protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. In this pathway, proteins are targeted for degradation by ligation to ubiquitin, a process carried out by the sequential action of three enzymes: the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a ubiquitin-carrier protein E2 and a ubiquitin-protein ligase E3. In the system responsible for cyclin B degradation, the E3-like function is carried out by a large complex called cyclosome or anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the early embryonic cell cycles, the cyclosome is inactive in the interphase, but becomes active at the end of mitosis. Activation requires phosphorylation of the cyclosome/APC by protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B. The lag kinetics of cyclosome activation may be explained by Suc1-assisted multiple phosphorylations of partly phosphorylated complex. The presence of a Fizzy/Cdc20-like protein is necessary for maximal activity of the mitotic form of cyclosome/APC in cyclin-ubiquitin ligation. PMID:10582242

  18. COX-2 over-expression correlates with VEGF and tumour angiogenesis in canine mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Felisbina L; Pires, Isabel; Parente, Margarida; Gregório, Hugo; Lopes, Carlos S

    2011-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible roles of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in canine mammary cancer angiogenesis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 70 tumours (28 benign and 42 malignant) in order to detect COX-2 and VEGF expression. Microvessel density (MVD) was determined by CD31 immunolabelling to assess tumour angiogenesis. There was a significantly higher expression of COX-2 (P<0.001), VEGF (P<0.001) and MVD (P<0.001) in malignant compared to benign tumours. In the malignant group, the MVD of COX-2 positive tumours was significantly higher than that of COX-2 negative tumours (P=0.026). A similar association was observed for VEGF (P<0.001) positive tumours. The results from this study suggested that over-expression of COX-2 and VEGF may contribute to increased angiogenesis and aggression in malignant tumours.

  19. Properties of astrocytes cultured from GFAP over-expressing and GFAP mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Woosung; Messing, Albee

    2009-04-15

    Alexander disease is a fatal leukoencephalopathy caused by dominantly-acting coding mutations in GFAP. Previous work has also implicated elevations in absolute levels of GFAP as central to the pathogenesis of the disease. However, identification of the critical astrocyte functions that are compromised by mis-expression of GFAP has not yet been possible. To provide new tools for investigating the nature of astrocyte dysfunction in Alexander disease, we have established primary astrocyte cultures from two mouse models of Alexander disease, a transgenic that over-expresses wild type human GFAP, and a knock-in at the endogenous mouse locus that mimics a common Alexander disease mutation. We find that mutant GFAP, as well as excess wild type GFAP, promotes formation of cytoplasmic inclusions, disrupts the cytoskeleton, decreases cell proliferation, increases cell death, reduces proteasomal function, and compromises astrocyte resistance to stress.

  20. Angiotensin converting enzyme over expression in myelocytes enhances the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Giani, Jorge F.; Shah, Kandarp; Bernstein, Ellen; Janjulia, Tea; Koronyo, Yosef; Shi, Peng D.; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya; Fuchs, Sebastien; Shen, Xiao Z.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure control. ACE also has effects on renal function, reproduction, hematopoiesis and several aspects of the immune response. ACE 10/10 mice over express ACE in monocytic cells; macrophages from ACE 10/10 mice demonstrate increased polarization towards a proinflammatory phenotype. As a result, ACE 10/10 mice have a highly effective immune response following challenge with either melanoma, bacterial infection or Alzheimer’s disease. The ACE 10/10 mice suggest that enhanced monocytic function greatly contributes to the ability of the immune response to defend against a wide variety of antigenic and non-antigenic challenges. PMID:24633750

  1. Over-expression of ThpI from Choristoneura fumiferana enhances tolerance to cold in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Xu, Jing; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Meng, Xiu-Rong; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2010-02-01

    Thermal hysteresis proteins (Thps) known as antifreeze proteins for their antifreeze activity, depress the freezing point of water below the melting point in many polar marine fishes, terrestrial arthropods and plants. For the purpose of breeding cold-resistant plants, we designed to introduce the Thp gene into the plants. The physiological and biochemical effect of high-lever expression of the modified Choristoneura fumiferana Thp (ThpI) in Arabidopsis thaliana plants was analyzed. Under low temperature stress, the ThpI transgenic plants exhibited stronger growth than wild-type plants. The elevated cold tolerance of the ThpI over-expressing plants was confirmed by the changes of electrolyte leakage activity, malonyldialdehyde and proline contents. These results preliminarily showed that the Thp possibly be used to enhance the low temperature-tolerant ability of plants.

  2. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  3. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-08-06

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed.

  4. Over-expression of Dof-type transcription factor increases lipid production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Salazar, Alejandro; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Rocha-Uribe, Alejandro; Ramírez-Alonso, Jocelín Itzel; Lara-Hernández, Ignacio; Hernández-Torres, Araceli; Paz-Maldonado, Luz María Teresita; Silva-Ramírez, Ana Sonia; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo; Martínez-Salgado, José Luis; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena

    2014-08-20

    The high demand for less polluting, newer, and cheaper fuel resources has increased the search of the most innovative options for the production of the so-called biofuels. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photosynthetic unicellular algae with multiple biotechnological advantages such as easy handling in the laboratory, a simple scale-up to industrial levels, as well as a feasible genetic modification at nuclear and chloroplast levels. Besides, its fatty acids can be used to produce biofuels. Previous studies in plants have found that the over expression of DOF-type transcription factor genes increases the synthesis and the accumulation of total lipids in seeds. In this context, the over-expression of a DOF-type transcription factor in C. reinhardtii was applied as approach to increase the amount of lipids. The results indicate higher amounts (around 2-fold) of total lipids, which are mainly fatty acids, in the genetically C. reinhardtii modified strains when compared with the non-genetically modified strain. In order to elucidate the possible function of the introduced Dof-type transcription factor, we performed a transcription profile of 8 genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and 6 genes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis, by quantitative real time (qRT-PCR). Differential expression profile was observed, which can explain the increase in lipid accumulation. However, these strains did not show notable changes in the fatty acid profile. This work represents an early effort in generating a strategy to increase fatty acids production in C. reinhardtii and their use in biofuel synthesis.

  5. Neuronal Over-expression of ACE2 Protects Brain from Ischemia-induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yuhui; Chen, Shuzhen; Wang, Jinju; Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiaotang; Penchikala, Madhuri; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II exaggerates cerebral injury in ischemic damage. Angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2 (ACE2) converts Ang II into Ang (1–7) and thus, may protect against the effects of Ang II. We hypothesized that neuronal ACE2 over-expression decreases ischemic stroke in mice with Ang II overproduction. Human renin and angiotensinogen double transgenic (RA) mice and RA mice with neuronal over-expression of ACE2 (SARA) were used for the study. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated from telemetry-recorded blood pressure (BP). SARA mice were infused peripherally with Norepinephrine to “clamp” the BP, or intracerebroventricularly-infused with a Mas receptor antagonist (A-779). Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery was performed to induce permanent focal ischemic stroke. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurological function were determined. Two days after surgery, brain samples were collected for various analyses. Results showed: 1) When compared to chronically hypertensive RA mice, SARA mice had lower basal MAP, less MCAO-induced infarct volume, and increased CBF, neurological function and cerebral microvascular density in the peri-infarct area; 2) These changes in SARA mice were not altered after MAP “clamping”, but partially reversed by brain infusion of A-779; 3) Ang (1–7)/Ang II ratio, angiogenic factors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide production were increased, whereas, NADPH oxidase subunits and reactive oxygen species were decreased in the brain of SARA mice. ACE2 protects brain from ischemic injury via the regulation of NADPH oxidase/eNOS pathways by changing Ang (1–7)/Ang II ratio, independently of MAP changes. PMID:24440367

  6. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  7. Cardiac α-actin over-expression therapy in dominant ACTA1 disease.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; McNamara, Elyshia; Griffiths, Lisa M; Papadimitriou, John M; Hardeman, Edna C; Bakker, Anthony J; Davies, Kay E; Laing, Nigel G; Nowak, Kristen J

    2013-10-01

    More than 200 mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) cause either dominant or recessive skeletal muscle disease. Currently, there are no specific therapies. Cardiac α-actin is 99% identical to skeletal muscle α-actin and the predominant actin isoform in fetal muscle. We previously showed cardiac α-actin can substitute for skeletal muscle α-actin, preventing the early postnatal death of Acta1 knock-out mice, which model recessive ACTA1 disease. Dominant ACTA1 disease is caused by the presence of 'poison' mutant actin protein. Experimental and anecdotal evidence nevertheless indicates that the severity of dominant ACTA1 disease is modulated by the relative amount of mutant skeletal muscle α-actin protein present. Thus, we investigated whether transgenic over-expression of cardiac α-actin in postnatal skeletal muscle could ameliorate the phenotype of mouse models of severe dominant ACTA1 disease. In one model, lethality of ACTA1(D286G). Acta1(+/-) mice was reduced from ∼59% before 30 days of age to ∼12%. In the other model, Acta1(H40Y), in which ∼80% of male mice die by 5 months of age, the cardiac α-actin transgene did not significantly improve survival. Hence cardiac α-actin over-expression is likely to be therapeutic for at least some dominant ACTA1 mutations. The reason cardiac α-actin was not effective in the Acta1(H40Y) mice is uncertain. We showed that the Acta1(H40Y) mice had endogenously elevated levels of cardiac α-actin in skeletal muscles, a finding not reported in dominant ACTA1 patients.

  8. Dopamine D2 receptor over-expression alters behavior and physiology in Drd2-EGFP mice

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Paul F.; Christensen, Christine H.; Hazelwood, Lisa A.; Dobi, Alice; Bock, Roland; Sibley, David R.; Mateo, Yolanda; Alvarez, Veronica A.

    2011-01-01

    BAC transgenic mice expressing the fluorescent reporter protein EGFP under the control of the D1 and D2 dopamine receptor promoters (Drd1-EGFP and Drd2-EGFP) have been widely used to study striatal function and have contributed to our understanding of the physiological and pathological function of the basal ganglia. These tools were produced and promptly made available to address questions in a cell-specific manner that has transformed the way we frame hypotheses in neuroscience. However, these mice have not been fully characterized until now. We found that Drd2-EGFP mice display a ~40% increase in membrane expression of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and a two-fold increase in D2R mRNA levels in the striatum when compared to wild-type and Drd1-EGFP mice D2R over-expression was accompanied by behavioral hypersensitivity to D2R-like agonists, as well as enhanced electrophysiological responses to D2R activation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. DA transients evoked by stimulation in the nucleus accumbens showed slower clearance in Drd2-EGFP mice and cocaine actions on DA clearance were impaired in these mice. Thus, it was not surprising to find that Drd2-EGFP mice were hyperactive when exposed to a novel environment and locomotion was suppressed by acute cocaine administration. All together, this study demonstrates that Drd2-EGFP mice over-express D2R and have altered dopaminergic signaling that fundamentally differentiates them from wild-type and Drd1-EGFP mice. PMID:21209197

  9. Proteomic Landscape of Tissue-Specific Cyclin E Functions in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Odajima, Junko; Jung, Piotr; Ndassa-Colday, Yasmine; Ficaro, Scott; Geng, Yan; Marco, Eugenio; Michowski, Wojciech; Wang, Yaoyu E.; DeCaprio, James A.; Litovchick, Larisa; Marto, Jarrod; Sicinski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    E-type cyclins (cyclins E1 and E2) are components of the cell cycle machinery that has been conserved from yeast to humans. The major function of E-type cyclins is to drive cell division. It is unknown whether in addition to their ‘core’ cell cycle functions, E-type cyclins also perform unique tissue-specific roles. Here, we applied high-throughput mass spectrometric analyses of mouse organs to define the repertoire of cyclin E protein partners in vivo. We found that cyclin E interacts with distinct sets of proteins in different compartments. These cyclin E interactors are highly enriched for phosphorylation targets of cyclin E and its catalytic partner, the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2). Among cyclin E interactors we identified several novel tissue-specific substrates of cyclin E-Cdk2 kinase. In proliferating compartments, cyclin E-Cdk2 phosphorylates Lin proteins within the DREAM complex. In the testes, cyclin E-Cdk2 phosphorylates Mybl1 and Dmrtc2, two meiotic transcription factors that represent key regulators of spermatogenesis. In embryonic and adult brains cyclin E interacts with proteins involved in neurogenesis, while in adult brains also with proteins regulating microtubule-based processes and microtubule cytoskeleton. We also used quantitative proteomics to demonstrate re-wiring of the cyclin E interactome upon ablation of Cdk2. This approach can be used to study how protein interactome changes during development or in any pathological state such as aging or cancer. PMID:27828963

  10. p53 Dimers associate with a head-to-tail response element to repress cyclin B transcription.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Robert; Lippincott, Daniel J; Durden, Brittany C; Kaplan, Anne R; Keiser, Hilary E; Park, Jung-Ho; Levesque, Aime A

    2012-01-01

    DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor SN38 activates cell cycle checkpoints which promote cell cycle arrest. This arrest can be abrogated in p53-defective cells by the Chk1 inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01). Previously, we compared p53 wild-type MCF10A cells with derivatives whose p53 function was inhibited by over-expression of the tetramerization domain (MCF10A/OD) or expression of shRNA against p53 (MCF10A/Δp53). Treatment of SN38-arrested MCF10A/OD cells with UCN-01 abrogated S, but not G2 arrest, while the MCF10A/Δp53 cells abrogated both S and G2 arrest. The MCF10A/OD cells had reduced levels of cyclin B, suggesting that tetramerization of p53 is not required for repression of cyclin B gene expression. In the present study, we analyzed p53 oligomerization status using glutaraldehyde cross-linking. Following SN38 treatment, MCF10A cells contained oligomeric forms of p53 with molecular weights approximating monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers. However, MCF10A/OD cells possessed only monomers and dimers suggesting that these complexes may be involved in repression of cyclin B. While genes transcriptionally activated by p53 contain a consensus sequence with elements repeated in a head-to-head orientation, the cyclin B promoter contains similar elements oriented head-to-tail. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that p53 associates with this head-to-tail element in both MCF10A and MCF10A/OD. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) using a biotin-labeled probe containing the head-to-tail element showed a shift in mobility consistent with the molecular weight of tetramers and dimers in MCF10A nuclear extract, but only the dimer in MCF10A/OD nuclear extract. Taken together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby p53 dimers associate with the head-to-tail element to repress cyclin B transcription.

  11. Preparation, structure, and digestibility of crystalline A- and B-type aggregates from debranched waxy starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liming; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-05-25

    Highly crystalline A- and B-type aggregates were prepared from short linear α-1,4 glucans generated from completely debranched waxy maize and waxy potato starches by manipulating the chain length and crystallization conditions including starch solids concentration and crystallization temperature. The A-type crystalline products were more resistant to enzyme digestion than the B-type crystalline products, and the digestibility of the A- and B-type allomorphs was not correlated with the size of the aggregates formed. Annealing increased the peak melting temperature of the B-type crystallites, making it similar to that of the A-type crystallites, but did not improve the enzyme resistance of the B-type crystalline products. The possible reason for these results was due to the compact morphology as well as the denser packing pattern of double helices in A-type crystallites. Our observations counter the fact that most B-type native starches are more enzyme-resistant than A-type native starches. Crystalline type per se does not seem to be the key factor that controls the digestibility of native starch granules; the resistance of native starches with a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern is probably attributed to the other structural features in starch granules.

  12. PPAR{gamma} ligands suppress the feedback loop between E2F2 and cyclin-E1

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, Yoko; Ito, Ichiaki; Wayama, Mitsutoshi; Fujimura, Akiko; Akaogi, Kensuke; Machida, Hikaru; Nakajima, Yuka; Kuroda, Takao; Ohmori, Kazuji; Murayama, Akiko; Kimura, Keiji; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2008-05-23

    PPAR{gamma} is a nuclear hormone receptor that plays a key role in the induction of peroxisome proliferation. A number of studies showed that PPAR{gamma} ligands suppress cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism remains to be determined. Here, we showed that PPAR{gamma} ligand troglitazone inhibited G1/S transition in colon cancer cells, LS174T. Troglitazone did not affect on either expression of CDK inhibitor (p18) or Wnt signaling pathway, indicating that these pathways were not involved in the troglitazone-dependent cell cycle arrest. GeneChip and RT-PCR analyses revealed that troglitazone decreased mRNA levels of cell cycle regulatory factors E2F2 and cyclin-E1 whose expression is activated by E2F2. Down-regulation of E2F2 by troglitazone results in decrease of cyclin-E1 transcription, which could inhibit phosphorylation of Rb protein, and consequently evoke the suppression of E2F2 transcriptional activity. Thus, we propose that troglitazone suppresses the feedback loop containing E2F2, cyclin-E1, and Rb protein.

  13. Over-expression of COQ10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibits mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Zampol, Mariana A.; Busso, Cleverson; Gomes, Fernando; Ferreira-Junior, Jose Ribamar; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Barros, Mario H.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} COQ10 deletion elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}, a synthetic diffusible ubiquinone. {yields} The significance that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined by testing over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. {yields} Inhibition of CoQ function due to Coq10p excess strength our hypothesis of Coq10p function in CoQ delivery. {yields} Respiratory deficiency caused by more Coq10p was specific and restored by Q{sub 2} in mitochondria or by Coq8p in cells. {yields} Coq8p over-production on other coq mutants revealed a surprisingly higher stability of other Coq proteins. -- Abstract: COQ10 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}. Rescue of respiration by Q{sub 2} is a characteristic of mutants blocked in coenzyme Q{sub 6} synthesis. Unlike Q{sub 6} deficient mutants, mitochondria of the coq10 null mutant have wild-type concentrations of Q{sub 6}. The physiological significance of earlier observations that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined in the present study by testing the in vivo effect of over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. Mitochondria with elevated levels of Coq10p display reduced respiration in the bc1 span of the electron transport chain, which can be restored with exogenous Q{sub 2}. This suggests that in vivo binding of Q{sub 6} by excess Coq10p reduces the pool of this redox carrier available for its normal function in providing electrons to the bc1 complex. This is confirmed by observing that extra Coq8p relieves the inhibitory effect of excess Coq10p. Coq8p is a putative kinase, and a high-copy suppressor of the coq10 null mutant. As shown here, when over-produced in coq mutants, Coq8p counteracts turnover of Coq3p and Coq4p subunits of the Q-biosynthetic complex. This can account for the observed rescue by COQ8 of the respiratory defect in strains

  14. A Simple Method for Assessment of MDR Bacteria for Over-Expressed Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Viveiros, Miguel; Couto, Isabel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    It is known that bacteria showing a multi-drug resistance phenotype use several mechanisms to overcome the action of antibiotics. As a result, this phenotype can be a result of several mechanisms or a combination of thereof. The main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance are: mutations in target genes (such as DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV); over-expression of efflux pumps; changes in the cell envelope; down regulation of membrane porins, and modified lipopolysaccharide component of the outer cell membrane (in the case of Gram-negative bacteria). In addition, adaptation to the environment, such as quorum sensing and biofilm formation can also contribute to bacterial persistence. Due to the rapid emergence and spread of bacterial isolates showing resistance to several classes of antibiotics, methods that can rapidly and efficiently identify isolates whose resistance is due to active efflux have been developed. However, there is still a need for faster and more accurate methodologies. Conventional methods that evaluate bacterial efflux pump activity in liquid systems are available. However, these methods usually use common efflux pump substrates, such as ethidium bromide or radioactive antibiotics and therefore, require specialized instrumentation, which is not available in all laboratories. In this review, we will report the results obtained with the Ethidium Bromide-agar Cartwheel method. This is an easy, instrument-free, agar based method that has been modified to afford the simultaneous evaluation of as many as twelve bacterial strains. Due to its simplicity it can be applied to large collections of bacteria to rapidly screen for multi-drug resistant isolates that show an over-expression of their efflux systems. The principle of the method is simple and relies on the ability of the bacteria to expel a fluorescent molecule that is substrate for most efflux pumps, ethidium bromide. In this approach, the higher the concentration of ethidium bromide required to

  15. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hals, Ingrid K.; Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin; Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli; Skorpen, Frank; Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo; Grill, Valdemar

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the

  16. Importance of hydrophobic interaction between a SoxB-type cytochrome c oxidase with its natural substrate cytochrome c-551 and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Kagekawa, Sayaka; Mizukami, Makoto; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Junshi; Sone, Nobuhito

    2002-08-01

    Cytochrome c-551, the electron donor of SoxB-type cytochrome c oxidase in thermophilic bacilli, can be over-expressed in Bacillus thermodenitrificans cells by tranformation with pSTEc551. Several mutant cytochromes c-551 were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis to this expression plasmid. Among them, several Lys residues were changed to Ala/Ser, and we found that these mutant cytochromes retained their activity as substrates, although their K(m) values were 0.04-0.12 microM, depending on the site replaced. In contrast, the C19A mutant cytochrome, which was produced in Brevibacillus choshinensis as a secretion protein, lost its activity as a substrate, suggesting that the fatty acyl-glyceryl residue covalently bound to the cysteine residue of the wild-type c-551 plays a very important role in the activity. The importance of the hydrophobic fatty acid residue for the binding of cytochrome c-551 to the oxidase was also shown by the loss of substrate activity in deacylated cytochrome c-551. These results show the importance of the hydrophobic interaction between this cytochrome and SoxB-type oxidase, despite the fact that the importance of an electrostatic interaction between cytochrome c and mitochondrial cytochrome aa(3) oxidase has already been established.

  17. Relationship between branching density and crystalline structure of A- and B-type maize mutant starches.

    PubMed

    Gérard, C; Planchot, V; Colonna, P; Bertoft, E

    2000-06-02

    Amylopectin from two double maize mutant starches of A-crystalline (wxdu) and B-crystalline type (aewx) was subjected successively to hydrolysis involving alpha and beta amylases, which isolated clusters and all branching zones of clusters (BZC). Enzymatic analysis together with ionic and size-exclusion chromatography revealed the structural features of the clusters and BZC and their role in starch crystallization. A-type clusters were larger (dp(n) > 80) and contained more (but shorter) chains than B-type clusters. The BZC of A-type starch was also larger, but with a shorter distance between the branching points than in B-type BZC. A-type clusters had a densely packed structure and B-type a poorly branched structure. Models for the structure of A- and B-type clusters are presented, and a hypothesis for the influence of cluster geometry on crystallization is proposed.

  18. Differential regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 in hepatocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rickheim, David G; Nelsen, Christopher J; Fassett, John T; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Hansen, Linda K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2002-07-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that cyclin D1 plays a pivotal role in the control of the hepatocyte cell cycle in response to mitogenic stimuli, whereas the closely related protein cyclin D3 has not been extensively evaluated. In the current study, we examined the regulation of cyclins D1 and D3 during hepatocyte proliferation in vivo after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) and in culture. In contrast to cyclin D1, which was nearly undetectable in quiescent liver and substantially up-regulated after PH, cyclin D3 was constitutively expressed and induced only modestly. In the regenerating liver, the concentration of cyclin D3 was only about 10% of that of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 formed complexes primarily with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4), which were markedly activated in the regenerating liver and readily sequestered the cell cycle inhibitory proteins, p21 and p27. Cyclin D3 bound to both cdk4 and cdk6. Cyclin D3/cdk6 activity was readily detectable in quiescent liver and changed little after PH, and this complex appeared to play a minor role in sequestering p21 and p27. In cultured hepatocytes, epidermal growth factor or insulin had little effect, but the combination of these agents substantially induced cyclin D1 and cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Mek1 or phosphoinositide 3-kinase markedly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and replication. In contrast, cyclin D3 was expressed in the absence of mitogens and was only modestly affected by these manipulations. In addition, growth-inhibitory extracellular matrix conditions inhibited cyclin D1 but not cyclin D3 expression. In conclusion, these results support the concept that cyclin D1 is critically regulated by extracellular stimuli that control proliferation, whereas cyclin D3 is regulated through different pathways and plays a distinct role in the liver.

  19. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Ma, Huaxian; Khan, M Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  20. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  1. Predominant D1 Receptors Involvement in the Over-expression of CART Peptides after Repeated Cocaine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenzhen; Oh, Eun-Hye; Chung, Yeon Bok; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of dopaminergic receptors (DR) in behavioral sensitization, as measured by locomotor activity, and the over-expression of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides after repeated administration of cocaine in mice. Repeated administrations of cocaine induced behavioral sensitization and CART over-expression in mice. The levels of striatal CART mRNA were significantly increased on the 3rd day. CART peptides were over-expressed on the 5th day in the striata of behaviorally sensitized mice. A higher proportion of CART+ cells in the cocaine-treated mice were present in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell than in the dorsolateral (DL) part of caudate putamen (CP). The concomitant administration of both D1R and D2R antagonists, SCH 23390 (D1R selective) and raclopride (D2R selective), blocked cocaine induced-behavioral sensitization, CART over-expression, and cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) signal pathways. SCH 23390 more predominantly inhibited the locomotor activity, CART over-expression, pCREB and PKA activity than raclopride. Cocaine induced-behavioral sensitization was also attenuated in the both D1R and D2R knockout (KO) mice, respectively. CART over-expression and activated cAMP/PKA/pCREB signal pathways were inhibited in the D1R-KO mice, but not in the D2R-KO mice. It is suggested that behavioral sensitization, CART over-expression and activated cAMP/PKA/pCREB signal pathways induced by repeated administration of cocaine could be more predominantly mediated by D1R. PMID:25729269

  2. Induced over-expression of AtDREB2A CA improves drought tolerance in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rafaela Ribeiro; da Cunha, Bárbara Andrade Dias Brito; Martins, Polyana Kelly; Martins, Maria Thereza Bazzo; Alekcevetch, Jean Carlos; Chalfun, Antônio; Andrade, Alan Carvalho; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Qin, Feng; Mizoi, Junya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Nakashima, Kazuo; Carvalho, Josirley de Fátima Corrêa; de Sousa, Carlos Antônio Ferreira; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kobayashi, Adilson Kenji; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa

    2014-05-01

    Drought is one of the most challenging agricultural issues limiting sustainable sugarcane production and, in some cases, yield losses caused by drought are nearly 50%. DREB proteins play vital regulatory roles in abiotic stress responses in plants. The transcription factor DREB2A interacts with a cis-acting DRE sequence to activate the expression of downstream genes that are involved in drought-, salt- and heat-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of stress-inducible over-expression of AtDREB2A CA on gene expression, leaf water potential (ΨL), relative water content (RWC), sucrose content and gas exchanges of sugarcane plants submitted to a four-days water deficit treatment in a rhizotron-grown root system. The plants were also phenotyped by scanning the roots and measuring morphological parameters of the shoot. The stress-inducible expression of AtDREB2A CA in transgenic sugarcane led to the up-regulation of genes involved in plant response to drought stress. The transgenic plants maintained higher RWC and ΨL over 4 days after withholding water and had higher photosynthetic rates until the 3rd day of water-deficit. Induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane increased sucrose levels and improved bud sprouting of the transgenic plants. Our results indicate that induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane enhanced its drought tolerance without biomass penalty.

  3. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDole, Brittnee; Isgor, Ceylan; Pare, Christopher; Guthrie, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on granule cell spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while granule cell basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong granule cell neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb granule cell spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF produces a marked increase in granule cell spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on granule cells, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating granule cell functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry. PMID:26211445

  4. GPX4 and GPX7 Over-Expression in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, E.; Capone, F.; Accardo, M.; Sorice, A.; Costantini, M.; Colonna, G.; Castello, G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer and is still one of the most fatal cancers. Hence, it needs to identify always new putative markers to improve its diagnosis and prognosis. The selenium is an essential trace mineral implicated as a key factor in the early stage of cancer and exerts its biological function through the selenoproteins. In the last years our group has been studying the involvement of some selenoproteins in HCC. However, no many data are reported in literature about the correlation between HCC and the glutathione peroxidases (GPXs), both selenium and non selenium-containing GPXs. In this paper we have evaluated the GPX4 and GPX7 expression in some paraffin-embedded tissues from liver biopsy of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis and HCC by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR analysis. Our results evidenced that i) GPX4 and GPX7 had a statistically significant over-expression in HCC tissues compared to cirrhotic counterparts used as non tumor tissues, and ii) their expression was higher in grade III HCC tissues with respect to grade I-II samples. Therefore, we propose to use GPX4 and GPX7 as possible markers for improving HCC diagnosis/prognosis. PMID:26708178

  5. Apoptotic effect of tannic acid on fatty acid synthase over-expressed human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fangyuan; Liang, Yan; Jiang, Bing; Li, Xiabing; Xun, Hang; He, Wei; Lau, Hay Tong; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Novel therapies and chemo-therapeutic drugs are urgently needed to be developed for the treatment of breast cancer. Increasing evidence suggests that fatty acid synthase (FAS) plays an important role in breast cancer, for the expression of FAS is significantly higher in human breast cancer cells than in normal cells. Tannic acid (TA), a natural polyphenol, possesses significant biological functions, including bacteriostasis, hemostasis, and anti-oxidant. Our previous studies demonstrated that TA is a natural FAS inhibitor whose inhibitory activity is stronger than that of classical FAS inhibitors, such as C75 and cerulenin. This study further assessed the effect and therapeutic potential of TA on FAS over-expressed breast cancer cells, and as a result, TA had been proven to possess the functions of inhibiting intracellular FAS activity, down-regulating FAS expression in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Since high-expressed FAS is recognized as a molecular marker for breast cancer and plays an important role in cancer prognosis, these findings suggest that TA is a potential drug candidate for treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Improving xylitol production at elevated temperature with engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus through over-expressing transporters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Dongmei; Gao, Xiaolian; Hong, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Three transporter genes including Kluyveromyces marxianus aquaglyceroporin gene (KmFPS1), Candida intermedia glucose/xylose facilitator gene (CiGXF1) or glucose/xylose symporter gene (CiGXS1) were over-expressed in K. marxianus YZJ017 to improve xylitol production at elevated temperatures. The xylitol production of YZJ074 that harbored CiGXF1 was improved to 147.62g/L in Erlenmeyer flask at 42°C. In fermenter, 99.29 and 149.60g/L xylitol were produced from 99.55 and 151.91g/L xylose with productivity of 4.14 and 3.40g/L/h respectively at 42°C. Even at 45°C, YZJ074 could produce 101.30g/L xylitol from 101.41g/L xylose with productivity of 2.81g/L/h. Using fed-batch fermentation through repeatedly adding non-sterilized substrate directly, YZJ074 could produce 312.05g/L xylitol which is the highest yield reported to date. The engineered strains YZJ074 which can produce xylitol at elevated temperatures is an excellent foundation for xylitol bioconversion.

  7. BDNF over-expression increases olfactory bulb granule cell dendritic spine density in vivo.

    PubMed

    McDole, B; Isgor, C; Pare, C; Guthrie, K

    2015-09-24

    Olfactory bulb granule cells (GCs) are axon-less, inhibitory interneurons that regulate the activity of the excitatory output neurons, the mitral and tufted cells, through reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses located on GC spines. These contacts are established in the distal apical dendritic compartment, while GC basal dendrites and more proximal apical segments bear spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the olfactory cortices. This synaptic connectivity is vital to olfactory circuit function and is remodeled during development, and in response to changes in sensory activity and lifelong GC neurogenesis. Manipulations that alter levels of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in vivo have significant effects on dendritic spine morphology, maintenance and activity-dependent plasticity for a variety of CNS neurons, yet little is known regarding BDNF effects on bulb GC spine maturation or maintenance. Here we show that, in vivo, sustained bulbar over-expression of BDNF in transgenic mice produces a marked increase in GC spine density that includes an increase in mature spines on their apical dendrites. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that changes in spine density were most notable in the distal and proximal apical domains, indicating that multiple excitatory inputs are potentially modified by BDNF. Our results indicate that increased levels of endogenous BDNF can promote the maturation and/or maintenance of dendritic spines on GCs, suggesting a role for this factor in modulating GC functional connectivity within adult olfactory circuitry.

  8. Lysosomal acid lipase over-expression disrupts lamellar body genesis and alveolar structure in the lung.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Qin, Yulin; Li, Huimin; Wu, Renliang; Yan, Cong; Du, Hong

    2007-12-01

    The functional role of neutral lipids in the lung is poorly understood. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is a critical enzyme in hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides to generate free fatty acids and cholesterol in lysosomes. Human LAL was over-expressed in a doxycycline-controlled system in mouse respiratory epithelial cells to accelerate intracellular neutral lipid degradation and perturb the surfactant homeostasis in the lung. In this animal system, neutral lipid concentrations of pulmonary surfactant were reduced in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in association with decrease of surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene expression. The size and the number of lamellar bodies in alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT II cells) were significantly reduced accordingly. The number of macrophages required for surfactant recycling in BALF was also significantly reduced. As a result of these combinatory effects, emphysema of the alveolar structure was observed. Taken together, neutral lipid homeostasis is essential for maintenance of lamellar body genesis and the alveolar structure in the lung.

  9. Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 over-expression in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McFadyen, M C E; Cruickshank, M E; Miller, I D; McLeod, H L; Melvin, W T; Haites, N E; Parkin, D; Murray, G I

    2001-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies world wide. Little improvement has been made in the long-term outcome of this disease, with the 5-year survival of patients only 30%. This poor prognosis is due to the late presentation of the disease and to the unpredictable response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. The cytochrome P450 enzymes are a superfamily of haemoproteins, known to be involved in the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of a number of anti-cancer drugs. CYP1B1 is a tumour-related form of cytochrome P450 which is over expressed in a wide variety of primary tumours of different histological type. The presence of CYP1B1 may be of importance in the modulation of these tumours to anti-cancer drugs. We have conducted a comprehensive immunohistochemical investigation, into the presence of cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. The key findings of this study are the increased expression of CYP1B1 in the majority of ovarian cancers investigated (92%), with a strong correlation demonstrated between CYP1B1 expression in both primary and metastatic ovarian cancer (P= 0.005 Spearman's rank correlation test). In contrast no detectable CYP1B1 was found in normal ovary. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461084

  10. Effects of growth hormone over-expression on reproduction in the common carp Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mengxi; Chen, Ji; Peng, Wei; Wang, Yaping; Liao, Lanjie; Li, Yongming; Trudeau, Vance L; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To study the complex interaction between growth and reproduction we have established lines of transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio) carrying a grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) growth hormone (GH) transgene. The GH-transgenic fish showed delayed gonadal development compared with non-transgenic common carp. To gain a better understanding of the phenomenon, we studied body growth, gonad development, changes of reproduction related genes and hormones of GH-transgenic common carp for 2years. Over-expression of GH elevated peripheral gh transcription, serum GH levels, and inhibited endogenous GH expression in the pituitary. Hormone analyses indicated that GH-transgenic common carp had reduced pituitary and serum level of luteinizing hormone (LH). Among the tested genes, pituitary lhβ was inhibited in GH-transgenic fish. Further analyses in vitro showed that GH inhibited lhβ expression. Localization of ghr with LH indicates the possibility of direct regulation of GH on gonadotrophs. We also found that GH-transgenic common carp had reduced pituitary sensitivity to stimulation by co-treatments with a salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and a dopamine antagonist. Together these results suggest that the main cause of delayed reproductive development in GH transgenic common carp is reduced LH production and release.

  11. Enhancement of larval RNAi efficiency by over-expressing Argonaute2 in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqian; Zeng, Baosheng; Ling, Lin; Xu, Jun; You, Lang; Aslam, Abu F M; Tan, Anjiang; Huang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference has been described as a powerful genetic tool for gene functional analysis and a promising approach for pest management. However, RNAi efficiency varies significantly among insect species due to distinct RNAi machineries. Lepidopteran insects include a large number of pests as well as model insects, such as the silkworm, Bombyx mori. However, only limited success of in vivo RNAi has been reported in lepidoptera, particularly during the larval stages when the worms feed the most and do the most harm to the host plant. Enhancing the efficiency of larval RNAi in lepidoptera is urgently needed to develop RNAi-based pest management strategies. In the present study, we investigate the function of the conserved RNAi core factor, Argonaute2 (Ago2), in mediating B. mori RNAi efficiency. We demonstrate that introducing BmAgo2 dsRNA inhibits the RNAi response in both BmN cells and embryos. Furthermore, we establish several transgenic silkworm lines to assess the roles of BmAgo2 in larval RNAi. Over-expressing BmAgo2 significantly facilitated both dsRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting DsRed using dsRNA injection and shRNA-mediated larval RNAi when targeting BmBlos2 using transgenic shRNA expression. Our results show that BmAgo2 is involved in RNAi in B. mori and provides a promising approach for improving larval RNAi efficiency in B. mori and in lepidopteran insects in general.

  12. Crebbp loss cooperates with Bcl2 over-expression to promote lymphoma in mice.

    PubMed

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Tadros, Saber; González-Herrero, Inés; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Rodríguez-Hernández, Guillermo; Moore, Dalia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Blanco, Oscar; Alonso-López, Diego; De Las Rivas, Javier; Hartert, Keenan; Duval, Romain; Klinkebiel, David; Bast, Martin; Vose, Julie; Lunning, Matthew; Fu, Kai; Greiner, Timothy; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Jiménez, Rafael; García Criado, Francisco Javier; García Cenador, María Begoña; Brindle, Paul; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Alizadeh, Ash; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Green, Michael R

    2017-03-13

    CREBBP is targeted by inactivating mutations in follicular lymphoma (FL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here, we provide evidence from transgenic mouse models that Crebbp deletion results in deficits in B-cell development and can cooperate with Bcl2 over-expression to promote B-cell lymphoma. Through transcriptional and epigenetic profiling of these B-cells we found that Crebbp inactivation was associated with broad transcriptional alterations, but no changes in the patterns of histone acetylation at the proximal regulatory regions of these genes. However, B-cells with Crebbp inactivation showed high expression of Myc and patterns of altered histone acetylation that were localized to intragenic regions, enriched for Myc DNA binding motifs, and showed Myc binding. Through the analysis of CREBBP mutations from a large cohort of primary human FL and DLBCL, we show a significant difference in the spectrum of CREBBP mutations in these two diseases, with higher frequencies of nonsense/frameshift mutations in DLBCL compared to FL. Together our data therefore provide important links between Crebbp inactivation and Bcl2 dependence, and show a role for Crebbp inactivation in the induction of Myc expression. We suggest this may parallel the role of CREBBP frameshift/nonsense mutations in DLBCL that result in loss of the protein, but may contrast the role of missense mutations in the lysine acetyltransferase domain that are more frequently observed in FL and yield an inactive protein.

  13. Cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 over-expression in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    McFadyen, M C; Cruickshank, M E; Miller, I D; McLeod, H L; Melvin, W T; Haites, N E; Parkin, D; Murray, G I

    2001-07-20

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological malignancies world wide. Little improvement has been made in the long-term outcome of this disease, with the 5-year survival of patients only 30%. This poor prognosis is due to the late presentation of the disease and to the unpredictable response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy. The cytochrome P450 enzymes are a superfamily of haemoproteins, known to be involved in the metabolic activation and/or detoxification of a number of anti-cancer drugs. CYP1B1 is a tumour-related form of cytochrome P450 which is over expressed in a wide variety of primary tumours of different histological type. The presence of CYP1B1 may be of importance in the modulation of these tumours to anti-cancer drugs. We have conducted a comprehensive immunohistochemical investigation, into the presence of cytochrome P450 CYP1B1 in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. The key findings of this study are the increased expression of CYP1B1 in the majority of ovarian cancers investigated (92%), with a strong correlation demonstrated between CYP1B1 expression in both primary and metastatic ovarian cancer (P = 0.005 Spearman's rank correlation test). In contrast no detectable CYP1B1 was found in normal ovary.

  14. A viral over-expression system for the major malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Niu, Guodong; Hughes, Grant L.; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding pathogen/mosquito interactions is essential for developing novel strategies to control mosquito-borne diseases. Technical advances in reverse-genetics, such as RNA interference (RNAi), have facilitated elucidation of components of the mosquito immune system that are antagonistic to pathogen development, and host proteins essential for parasite development. Forward genetic approaches, however, are limited to generation of transgenic insects, and while powerful, mosquito transgenesis is a resource- and time-intensive technique that is not broadly available to most laboratories. The ability to easily “over-express” genes would enhance molecular studies in vector biology and expedite elucidation of pathogen-refractory genes without the need to make transgenic insects. We developed and characterized an efficient Anopheles gambiae densovirus (AgDNV) over-expression system for the major malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. High-levels of gene expression were detected at 3 days post-infection and increased over time, suggesting this is an effective system for gene induction. Strong expression was observed in the fat body and ovaries. We validated multiple short promoters for gene induction studies. Finally, we developed a polycistronic system to simultaneously express multiple genes of interest. This AgDNV-based toolset allows for consistent transduction of genes of interest and will be a powerful molecular tool for research in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. PMID:24875042

  15. Mitochondrial Fragmentation Due to Inhibition of Fusion Increases Cyclin B through Mitochondrial Superoxide Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Tejas M.

    2015-01-01

    During the cell cycle, mitochondria undergo regulated changes in morphology. Two particularly interesting events are first, mitochondrial hyperfusion during the G1-S transition and second, fragmentation during entry into mitosis. The mitochondria remain fragmented between late G2- and mitotic exit. This mitotic mitochondrial fragmentation constitutes a checkpoint in some cell types, of which little is known. We bypass the ‘mitotic mitochondrial fragmentation’ checkpoint by inducing fragmented mitochondrial morphology and then measure the effect on cell cycle progression. Using Drosophila larval hemocytes, Drosophila S2R+ cell and cells in the pouch region of wing imaginal disc of Drosophila larvae we show that inhibiting mitochondrial fusion, thereby increasing fragmentation, causes cellular hyperproliferation and an increase in mitotic index. However, mitochondrial fragmentation due to over-expression of the mitochondrial fission machinery does not cause these changes. Our experiments suggest that the inhibition of mitochondrial fusion increases superoxide radical content and leads to the upregulation of cyclin B that culminates in the observed changes in the cell cycle. We provide evidence for the importance of mitochondrial superoxide in this process. Our results provide an insight into the need for mitofusin-degradation during mitosis and also help in understanding the mechanism by which mitofusins may function as tumor suppressors. PMID:26000631

  16. Comprehensive phenotypic analysis of knockout mice deficient in cyclin G1 and cyclin G2

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shouichi; Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Naito, Yoko; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Sasakura, Towa; Fukushima, Kohshiro; Nishikawa, Yukihiro; Ota, Kaori; Kato, Yorika; Wang, Mian; Torigata, Kosuke; Kasama, Takashi; Uchihashi, Toshihiro; Miura, Daisaku; Yabuta, Norikazu; Morii, Eiichi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin G1 (CycG1) and Cyclin G2 (CycG2) play similar roles during the DNA damage response (DDR), but their detailed roles remain elusive. To investigate their distinct roles, we generated knockout mice deficient in CycG1 (G1KO) or CycG2 (G2KO), as well as double knockout mice (DKO) deficient in both proteins. All knockouts developed normally and were fertile. Generation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from these mice revealed that G2KO MEFs, but not G1KO or DKO MEFs, were resistant to DNA damage insults caused by camptothecin and ionizing radiation (IR) and underwent cell cycle arrest. CycG2, but not CycG1, co-localized with γH2AX foci in the nucleus after γ-IR, and γH2AX-mediated DNA repair and dephosphorylation of CHK2 were delayed in G2KO MEFs. H2AX associated with CycG1, CycG2, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), suggesting that γH2AX affects the function of PP2A via direct interaction with its B’γ subunit. Furthermore, expression of CycG2, but not CycG1, was abnormal in various cancer cell lines. Kaplan–Meier curves based on TCGA data disclosed that head and neck cancer patients with reduced CycG2 expression have poorer clinical prognoses. Taken together, our data suggest that reduced CycG2 expression could be useful as a novel prognostic marker of cancer. PMID:27982046

  17. Altered stomatal dynamics in ascorbate oxidase over-expressing tobacco plants suggest a role for dehydroascorbate signalling.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios; De Tullio, Mario C; Barnes, Jeremy; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2008-01-01

    Control of stomatal aperture is of paramount importance for plant adaptation to the surrounding environment. Here, we report on several parameters related to stomatal dynamics and performance in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. Xanthi) over-expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (AO), a cell wall-localized enzyme of uncertain biological function that oxidizes ascorbic acid (AA) to monodehydroascorbic acid which dismutates yielding AA and dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). In comparison to WT plants, leaves of AO over-expressing plants exhibited reduced stomatal conductance (due to partial stomatal closure), higher water content, and reduced rates of water loss on detachment. Transgenic plants also exhibited elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide and a decline in hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzyme activity. Leaf ABA content was also higher in AO over-expressing plants. Treatment of epidermal strips with either 1 mM DHA or 100 microM hydrogen peroxide resulted in rapid stomatal closure in WT plants, but not in AO-over-expressing plants. This suggests that signal perception and/or transduction associated with stomatal closure is altered by AO over-expression. These data support a specific role for cell wall-localized AA in the perception of environmental cues, and suggest that DHA acts as a regulator of stomatal dynamics.

  18. E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein required for the destruction of mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed Central

    Aristarkhov, A; Eytan, E; Moghe, A; Admon, A; Hershko, A; Ruderman, J V

    1996-01-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of the mitotic cyclins A and B is required for the completion of mitosis and entry into the next cell cycle. This process is catalyzed by the cyclosome, an approximately 22S particle that contains a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, E3-C, that requires a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein (UBC) E2-C. Here we report the purification and cloning of E2-C from clam oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequence of E2-C indicates that it is a new UBC family member. Bacterially expressed recombinant E2-C is active in in vitro cyclin ubiquitination assays, where it exhibits the same substrate specificities seen with native E2-C. These results demonstrate that E2-C is not a homolog of UBC4 or UBC9, proteins previously suggested to be involved in cyclin ubiquitination, but is a new UBC family member with unique properties. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8633058

  19. Dehydration breakdown of antigorite and the formation of B-type olivine CPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2014-02-01

    Peridotite formed by contact metamorphism and dehydration breakdown of an antigorite schist from the Happo area, central Japan shows a strong olivine crystallographic preferred orientation (Ol CPO). The lack of mesoscale deformation structures associated with the intrusion and the lack of microstructural evidence for plastic deformation of neoblastic grains suggest that olivine CPO in this area did not form as a result of solid-state deformation. Instead, the good correspondence between the original antigorite orientation and the orientation of the newly formed olivine implies the CPO formed by topotactic growth of the olivine after antigorite. Ol CPO is likely to develop by a similar process in subduction zone environments where foliated serpentinite is dragged down to depths where antigorite is no longer stable. The Happo Ol CPO has a strong a-axis concentration perpendicular to the lineation and within the foliation-commonly referred to as B-type Ol CPO. Seismic fast directions parallel to the ocean trench are observed in many convergent margins and are consistent with the presence of B-type Ol CPO in the mantle wedge of these regions. Experimental work has shown that B-type CPO can form by dislocation creep under hydrous conditions at relatively high stresses. There are, however, several discrepancies between the characteristics of natural and laboratory samples with B-type Ol CPO. (1) The formation conditions (stress and temperature) of some natural examples with B-type CPO fall outside those predicted by experiments. (2) In deformation experiments, slip in the crystallographic c-axis direction is important but has not been observed in natural examples of B-type CPO. (3) Experimental work suggests the presence of H2O and either high shear stress or relatively low temperatures are essential for the formation of B-type CPO. These conditions are most likely to be achieved close to subduction boundaries, but these regions are also associated with serpentinization

  20. Consequence of the tumor-associated conversion to cyclin D1b

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Michael A; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Carr, Richard; Yoshida, Akihiro; Dean, Jeffry L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Diehl, John Alan; Knudsen, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that cyclin D1b, a variant of cyclin D1, is associated with tumor progression and poor outcome. However, the underlying molecular basis was unknown. Here, novel models were created to generate a genetic switch from cyclin D1 to cyclin D1b. Extensive analyses uncovered overlapping but non-redundant functions of cyclin D1b compared to cyclin D1 on developmental phenotypes, and illustrated the importance of the transcriptional regulatory functions of cyclin D1b in vivo. Data obtained identify cyclin D1b as an oncogene, wherein cyclin D1b expression under the endogenous promoter induced cellular transformation and further cooperated with known oncogenes to promote tumor growth in vivo. Further molecular interrogation uncovered unexpected links between cyclin D1b and the DNA damage/PARP1 regulatory networks, which could be exploited to suppress cyclin D1b-driven tumors. Collectively, these data are the first to define the consequence of cyclin D1b expression on normal cellular function, present evidence for cyclin D1b as an oncogene, and provide pre-clinical evidence of effective methods to thwart growth of cells dependent upon this oncogenic variant. PMID:25787974

  1. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases by p21.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Keyomarsi, K; Dynlacht, B; Tsai, L H; Zhang, P; Dobrowolski, S; Bai, C; Connell-Crowley, L; Swindell, E

    1995-01-01

    p21Cip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor that is transcriptionally activated by p53 in response to DNA damage. We have explored the interaction of p21 with the currently known Cdks. p21 effectively inhibits Cdk2, Cdk3, Cdk4, and Cdk6 kinases (Ki 0.5-15 nM) but is much less effective toward Cdc2/cyclin B (Ki approximately 400 nM) and Cdk5/p35 (Ki > 2 microM), and does not associate with Cdk7/cyclin H. Overexpression of P21 arrests cells in G1. Thus, p21 is not a universal inhibitor of Cdks but displays selectivity for G1/S Cdk/cyclin complexes. Association of p21 with Cdks is greatly enhanced by cyclin binding. This property is shared by the structurally related inhibitor p27, suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for inhibition. With respect to Cdk2 and Cdk4 complexes, p27 shares the inhibitory potency of p21 but has slightly different kinase specificities. In normal diploid fibroblasts, the vast majority of active Cdk2 is associated with p21, but this active kinase can be fully inhibited by addition of exogenous p21. Reconstruction experiments using purified components indicate that multiple molecules of p21 can associate with Cdk/cyclin complexes and inactive complexes contain more than one molecule of p21. Together, these data suggest a model whereby p21 functions as an inhibitory buffer whose levels determine the threshold kinase activity required for cell cycle progression. Images PMID:7626805

  2. Role of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) over-expression and angiogenesis in ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lucas; Popov, Sergey; Jury, Alexa; Al Sarraj, Saffa; Jones, Chris; Zacharoulis, Stergios

    2013-01-01

    New molecularly targeted therapies are needed for childhood ependymoma. Angiogenesis and the PDGFR pathway could be potential therapeutic targets. This study aimed to screen ependymomas for the expression and clinicopathological correlates of angiogenic factors and potential therapeutic targets including VEGFR, endoglin (CD105), CD34, CD31, c-Kit, PDGFR-α and PDGFR-β. Immunohistochemistry for angiogenesis factors and PDGFR-α and β was performed in 24 archival tumor samples from children and adults treated for ependymoma at our institution. CD31 density, CD105 density and pericyte coverage index (PCI) were calculated. These findings were correlated with clinical outcome. VEGFR2 was overexpressed in tumor cells in only one out of 24 cases, but was found overexpressed in the vessels in 6 cases. PDGFR-α and β were found to be over-expressed in the ependymoma tumor cells in seven out of 24 cases (29.2 %). CD31 density, CD105 density and PCI did not correlate with expression of PDGFRs. Overexpression of PDGFR-α and β in tumor cells and overexpression of PDGFR-α in tumor endothelium had prognostic significance and this was maintained in multivariate analysis for overexpression of PDGFR-α in tumor cells (2 year progression free survival was 16.7 ± 15.2 for cases with overexpression of PDGFR-α in the tumor vs. 74.5 ± 15.2 for those with low/no expression, hazard ratio = 5.78, p = 0.04). A number of angiogenic factors are expressed in ependymoma tumor cells and tumor endothelium. Preliminary evidence suggests that the expression of PDGFRs could have a prognostic significance in ependymoma. This data suggests that PDGFRs should be further evaluated as targets using novel PDGFR inhibitors.

  3. Over-expression of microRNA-1 causes arrhythmia by disturbing intracellular trafficking system

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaomin; Liang, Haihai; Wang, He; Chen, Guizhi; Jiang, Hua; Wu, Qiuxia; Liu, Tianyi; Liu, Qiushuang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Yunyan; Yang, Baofeng; Shan, Hongli

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular trafficking system plays a fundamental role in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Up-regulation of miR-1 contributes to arrhythmia, we sought to elucidate whether intracellular trafficking contributes to miR-1-driven arrhythmia. By performing microarray analyses of the transcriptome in the cardiomyocytes-specific over-expression of microRNA-1 (miR-1 Tg) mice and the WT mice, we found that these differentially expressed genes in miR-1 Tg mice were significantly enrichment with the trafficking-related biological processes, such as regulation of calcium ion transport. Also, the qRT-PCR and western blot results validated that Stx6, Braf, Ube3a, Mapk8ip3, Ap1s1, Ccz1 and Gja1, which are the trafficking-related genes, were significantly down-regulated in the miR-1 Tg mice. Moreover, we found that Stx6 was decreased in the heart of mice after myocardial infarction and in the hypoxic cardiomyocytes, and further confirmed that Stx6 is a target of miR-1. Meanwhile, knockdown of Stx6 in cardiomyocytes resulted in the impairments of PLM and L-type calcium channel, which leads to the increased resting ([Ca2+]i). On the contrary, overexpression of Stx6 attenuated the impairments of miR-1 or hypoxia on PLM and L-type calcium channel. Thus, our studies reveals that trafficking-related gene Stx6 may regulate intracellular calcium and is involved in the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmia, which provides new insights in that miR-1 participates in arrhythmia by regulating the trafficking-related genes and pathway.

  4. PAR1 is selectively over expressed in high grade breast cancer patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Norma A; Correa, Elma; Avila, Esther P; Vela, Teresa A; Pérez, Víctor M

    2009-01-01

    Background The protease-activated receptor (PAR1) expression is correlated with the degree of invasiveness in cell lines. Nevertheless it has never been directed involved in breast cancer patients progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether PAR1 expression could be used as predictor of metastases and mortality. Methods In a cohort of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma studied longitudinally since 1996 and until 2007, PAR1 over-expression was assessed by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and flow citometry. Chi-square and log rank tests were used to determine whether there was a statistical association between PAR1 overexpression and metastases, mortality, and survival. Multivariate analysis was performed including HER1, stage, ER and nodes status to evaluate PAR1 as an independent prognostic factor. Results Follow up was 95 months (range: 2–130 months). We assayed PAR1 in a cohort of patients composed of 136 patients; we found PAR1 expression assayed by immunoblotting was selectively associated with high grade patients (50 cases of the study cohort; P = 0.001). Twenty-nine of 50 (58%) patients overexpressed PAR1, and 23 of these (46%) developed metastases. HER1, stage, ER and PAR1 overexpression were robustly correlated (Cox regression, P = 0.002, P = 0.024 and P = 0.002 respectively). Twenty-one of the 50 patients (42%) expressed both receptors (PAR1 and HER1 P = 0.0004). We also found a statistically significant correlation between PAR1 overexpression and increased mortality (P = 0.0001) and development of metastases (P = 0.0009). Conclusion Our data suggest PAR1 overexpression may be involved in the development of metastases in breast cancer patient and is associated with undifferentiated cellular progression of the tumor. Further studies are needed to understand PAR1 mechanism of action and in a near future assay its potential use as risk factor for metastasis development in high grade breast cancer patients. PMID:19538737

  5. Improving starch yield in cereals by over-expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase: expectations and unanticipated outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Aytug; Okita, Thomas W

    2013-10-01

    Significant improvements in crop productivity are required to meet the nutritional requirements of a growing world population. This challenge is magnified by an increased demand for bioenergy as a means to mitigate carbon inputs into the environment. Starch is a major component of the harvestable organs of many crop plants, and various endeavors have been taken to improve the yields of starchy organs through the manipulation of starch synthesis. Substantial efforts have centered on the starch regulatory enzyme ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) due to its pivotal role in starch biosynthesis. These efforts include over-expression of this enzyme in cereal plants such as maize, rice and wheat as well as potato and cassava, as they supply the bulk of the staple food worldwide. In this perspective, we describe efforts to increase starch yields in cereal grains by first providing an introduction about the importance of source-sink relationship and the motives behind the efforts to alter starch biosynthesis and turnover in leaves. We then discuss the catalytic and regulatory properties of AGPase and the molecular approaches used to enhance starch synthesis by manipulation of this process during grain filling using seed-specific promoters. Several studies have demonstrated increases in starch content per seed using endosperm-specific promoters, but other studies have demonstrated an increase in seed number with only marginal impact on seed weight. Potential mechanisms that may be responsible for this paradoxical increase in seed number will also be discussed. Finally, we describe current efforts and future prospects to improve starch yield in cereals. These efforts include further enhancement of starch yield in rice by augmenting the process of ADPglucose transport into amyloplast as well as other enzymes involved in photoassimilate partitioning in seeds.

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 over-expression inhibits liver apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Francés, Daniel E A; Ingaramo, Paola I; Mayoral, Rafael; Través, Paqui; Casado, Marta; Valverde, Ángela M; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Carnovale, Cristina E

    2013-03-01

    Increased expression of COX-2 has been linked to inflammation and carcinogenesis. Constitutive expression of COX-2 protects hepatocytes from several pro-apoptotic stimuli. Increased hepatic apoptosis has been observed in experimental models of diabetes. Our present aim was to analyze the role of COX-2 as a regulator of apoptosis in diabetic mouse liver. Mice of C57BL/6 strain wild type (Wt) and transgenic in COX-2 (hCOX-2 Tg) were separated into Control (vehicle) and SID (streptozotocin induced diabetes, 200 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). Seven days post-injection, Wt diabetic animals showed a decrease in PI3K activity and P-Akt levels, an increase of P-JNK, P-p38, pro-apoptotic Bad and Bax, release of cytochrome c and activities of caspases-3 and -9, leading to an increased apoptotic index. This situation was improved in diabetic COX-2 Tg. In addition, SID COX-2 Tg showed increased expression of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and XIAP. Pro-apoptotic state in the liver of diabetic animals was improved by over-expression of COX-2. We also analyzed the roles of high glucose-induced apoptosis and hCOX-2 in vitro. Non-transfected and hCOX-2-transfected cells were cultured at 5 and 25 mM of glucose by 72 h. At 25 mM there was an increase in apoptosis in non-transfected cells versus those exposed to 5 mM. This increase was partly prevented in transfected cells at 25 mM. Moreover, the protective effect observed in hCOX-2-transfected cells was suppressed by addition of DFU (COX-2 selective inhibitor), and mimicked by addition of PGE(2) in non-transfected cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hyperglycemia-induced hepatic apoptosis is protected by hCOX-2 expression.

  7. Cyclin B targets p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, L; Azzi, L; Wang, J Y

    1991-06-01

    A universal intracellular factor, the 'M phase-promoting factor' (MPF), triggers the G2/M transition of the cell cycle in all organisms. In late G2, it is present as an inactive complex of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and unphosphorylated cyclin Bcdc13. In M phase, its activation as an active MPF displaying histone H1 kinase (H1K) originates from the concomitant tyrosine dephosphorylation of the p34cdc2 subunit and the phosphorylation of the cylin Bcdc13 subunit. We have investigated the role of cyclin in the formation of this complex and the tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2, using highly synchronous mitotic sea urchin eggs as a model. As cells leave the S phase and enter the G2 phase, a massive tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 occurs. This large p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation burst does not arise from a massive increase in p34cdc2 concentration. It even appears to affect only a fraction (non-immunoprecipitable by anti-PSTAIR antibodies) of the total p34cdc2 present in the cell. Several observations point to an extremely close association between accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin and p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation: (i) both events coincide perfectly during the G2 phase; (ii) both tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2 and cyclin are not immunoprecipitated by anti-PSTAIR antibodies; (iii) accumulation of unphosphorylated cyclin by aphidicolin treatment of the cells, triggers a dramatic accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated p34cdc2; and (iv) inhibition of cyclin synthesis by emetine inhibits p34cdc2 tyrosine phosphorylation without affecting the p34cdc2 concentration. These results show that, as it is synthesized, cyclin B binds and recruits p34cdc2 for tyrosine phosphorylation; this inactive complex then requires the completion of DNA replication before it can be turned into fully active MPF. These results fully confirm recent data obtained in vitro with exogenous cyclin added to cycloheximide-treated Xenopus egg extracts.

  8. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CAP causes decreased cell expansion leading to organ size reduction in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Barrero, Roberto A; Umeda, Masaaki; Yamamura, Saburo; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2003-04-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAP) are multifunctional proteins involved in Ras-cAMP signalling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. It has recently been demonstrated that over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic arabidopsis plants causes severe morphological defects owing to loss of actin filaments. To test the generality of the function of AtCAP1 in plants, transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing an arabidopsis CAP (AtCAP1) under the regulation of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter were produced. Over-expression of AtCAP1 in transgenic tobacco plants led to growth abnormalities, in particular a reduction in the size of leaves. Morphological alterations in leaves were the result of reduced elongation of epidermal and mesophyll cells.

  9. [Effects of ggpS over-expression on glycosylglycerol and glycerol biosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803].

    PubMed

    Ma, Peizhen; Tan, Xiaoming; Lü, Xuefeng; Tian, Jiyuan

    2016-03-01

    To study the roles of glucosylglycerol phosphate synthase (Ggps) in glucosylglycerol (GG) and glycerol biosynthesis, we over-expressed Ggps from either Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 in a Synechocystis strain with a high GG titer, and determined the GG and glycerol accumulation in the resultant mutants grown under different NaCl-stress conditions. Ion chromatography results revealed that GG yield was not improved, but glycerol production was significantly enhanced by over-expression of Ggps from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (6803ggpS). In addition, increasing the NaCl concentration of medium from 600 to 900 mmol/L led to a further 75% increase of glycerol accumulation in the mutant strain with 6803ggpS over-expression. These findings show the role of ggpS in driving the carbon flux to the glycerol biosynthesis pathway, and will be helpful for further improvement of GG and glycerol production in Synechocystis.

  10. Cyclin A is required at two points in the human cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, M; Pepperkok, R; Verde, F; Ansorge, W; Draetta, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclins play a fundamental role in regulating cell cycle events in all eukaryotic cells. The human cyclin A gene was identified as the site of integration of hepatitis B virus in a hepatocarcinoma cell line; in addition, cyclin A is associated with the E2F transcription factor in a complex which is dissociated by the E1A oncogene product. Such findings suggest that cyclin A is a target for oncogenic signals. We have now found that DNA synthesis and entry into mitosis are inhibited in human cells microinjected with anti-cyclin A antibodies at distinct times. Cyclin A binds both cdk2 and cdc2, giving two distinct cyclin A kinase activities, one appearing in S phase, the other in G2. These results suggest that cyclin A defines novel control points of the human cell cycle. Images PMID:1312467

  11. Expression of δ-cyclins of Brassica rapa L. embryos by clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, O. A.

    Cyclins is one of the important regulators of cell cycle. There are several types of cyclins exists. They are responding for different phases of cycle and have high homology in plant's and mammalian's cells. δ -cyclins are specific for plants and controlling the presynthetic phase events. These cyclins likes to mammalian D-cyclins and have similar functions. This class consist three types of cyclins -- δ 1, δ 2 and δ 3. Cyclin δ 1 is responding for events in cell, which take place before exiting from stage of quiet (G0). Cyclin δ 1 is responding for entering and outputting from G0, and cyclin δ 3 -- for events, which happen in cell after stage of quiet, by entering to S-phase (phase of DNA's synthesis). In present research was used δ 1- and δ 3-cyclins. For determination of δ -cyclins gene's expression level was excreted RNA from embryos: 3-days (spherical stage), 6-days (heart-shaped stage) and 9-days (generated stage) seedlings of Brassica rapa L. in control and under clinorotation. For definition the cyclins gene's expression level applied Northern Blot Analysis. Obtained data testify about difference in level of gene's expression of cyclin δ 1 between control and clinorotation variants. After three days by pollination the expression of this gene in embryos was observed in control only. By clinorotation the gene's expression was detected on 6 days later, but it level was lower than in control variant. On 9 days it was gently expressed by clinorotation, where as by control it was not detected absolutely. Cyclin δ 3 gene's expression was observed during all time of the experiment. These data also confirm known one about expression δ 1- cyclin, which expressed on beginning of cell cycle only. And δ 3 --cyclin that express during whole presinthetic phase of cell cycle (Sony et al., 1995, Murray, 1994, Inze et al, 1999, Umeda, 2000).

  12. Cyclin E Uses Cdc6 as a Chromatin-Associated Receptor Required for DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Furstenthal, Laura; Kaiser, Brett K.; Swanson, Craig; Jackson, Peter K.

    2001-01-01

    Using an in vitro chromatin assembly assay in Xenopus egg extract, we show that cyclin E binds specifically and saturably to chromatin in three phases. In the first phase, the origin recognition complex and Cdc6 prereplication proteins, but not the minichromosome maintenance complex, are necessary and biochemically sufficient for ATP-dependent binding of cyclin E–Cdk2 to DNA. We find that cyclin E binds the NH2-terminal region of Cdc6 containing Cy–Arg-X-Leu (RXL) motifs. Cyclin E proteins with mutated substrate selection (Met-Arg-Ala-Ile-Leu; MRAIL) motifs fail to bind Cdc6, fail to compete with endogenous cyclin E–Cdk2 for chromatin binding, and fail to rescue replication in cyclin E–depleted extracts. Cdc6 proteins with mutations in the three consensus RXL motifs are quantitatively deficient for cyclin E binding and for rescuing replication in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Thus, the cyclin E–Cdc6 interaction that localizes the Cdk2 complex to chromatin is important for DNA replication. During the second phase, cyclin E–Cdk2 accumulates on chromatin, dependent on polymerase activity. In the third phase, cyclin E is phosphorylated, and the cyclin E–Cdk2 complex is displaced from chromatin in mitosis. In vitro, mitogen-activated protein kinase and especially cyclin B–Cdc2, but not the polo-like kinase 1, remove cyclin E–Cdk2 from chromatin. Rebinding of hyperphosphorylated cyclin E–Cdk2 to interphase chromatin requires dephosphorylation, and the Cdk kinase–directed Cdc14 phosphatase is sufficient for this dephosphorylation in vitro. These three phases of cyclin E association with chromatin may facilitate the diverse activities of cyclin E–Cdk2 in initiating replication, blocking rereplication, and allowing resetting of origins after mitosis. PMID:11257126

  13. Cigarette smoke extract alters the cell cycle via the phospholipid transfer protein/transforming growth factor-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xue-Min; Li, You-Lun; Chen, Hong; Guo, Shu-Liang; Shui, Li-Li; Chen, Ya-Juan

    2016-09-05

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced alteration of the cell cycle and the possible mechanism. Male Wistar rats and the rat alveolar epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) were exposed to normal air or different concentrations of CSE. Then PLTP siRNA was transfected into cells and an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was administered prior to CSE exposure. Histological changes and cell cycle stage were recorded, as were the expression levels of PLTP, TGF-β1, CyclinD1 and CDK4. Resulting morphological changes included diffuse interstitial substance incrassation and elevated alveolar rupturing. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells in the G1 phase in a time- and dose-related manner. Both PLTP and TGF-β1 were up-regulated at protein and mRNA levels, whereas CyclinD1 and CDK4 expression was down-regulated after CSE exposure. Furthermore, PLTP siRNA significantly suppressed CSE-induced TGF-β1 expression, resulting in up-regulation of CyclinD1 and CDK4, but the TGF-β1 inhibitor was not able to abrogate CSE-induced PLTP over-expression. In conclusion, PLTP may operate upstream of the TGF-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway and may mediate the CSE-induced G1 arrest in RLE-6TN cells. Our work provides some new insight into the relation between PLTP and cell cycle progression.

  14. Distinct and Overlapping Requirements for Cyclins A, B, and B3 in Drosophila Female Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bourouh, Mohammed; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep; Rana, Ketki; Sinha, Sucheta; Guo, Zhihao; Swan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, like mitosis, depends on the activity of the cyclin dependent kinase Cdk1 and its cyclin partners. Here, we examine the specific requirements for the three mitotic cyclins, A, B, and B3 in meiosis of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that all three cyclins contribute redundantly to nuclear envelope breakdown, though cyclin A appears to make the most important individual contribution. Cyclin A is also required for biorientation of homologs in meiosis I. Cyclin B3, as previously reported, is required for anaphase progression in meiosis I and in meiosis II. We find that it also plays a redundant role, with cyclin A, in preventing DNA replication during meiosis. Cyclin B is required for maintenance of the metaphase I arrest in mature oocytes, for spindle organization, and for timely progression through the second meiotic division. It is also essential for polar body formation at the completion of meiosis. With the exception of its redundant role in meiotic maturation, cyclin B appears to function independently of cyclins A and B3 through most of meiosis. We conclude that the three mitotic cyclin-Cdk complexes have distinct and overlapping functions in Drosophila female meiosis. PMID:27652889

  15. ATM is required for rapid degradation of cyclin D1 in response to {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Dong Wan; Baek, Hye Jung; Motoyama, Noboru; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-01-23

    The cellular response to DNA damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation activates cell-cycle arrest to permit DNA repair and to prevent replication. Cyclin D1 is the key molecule for transition between the G1 and S phases of the cell-cycle, and amplification or overexpression of cyclin D1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers. To study the regulation of cyclin D1 in the DNA-damaged condition, we analyzed the proteolytic regulation of cyclin D1 expression upon {gamma}-irradiation. Upon {gamma}-irradiation, a rapid reduction in cyclin D1 levels was observed prior to p53 stabilization, indicating that the stability of cyclin D1 is controlled in a p53-independent manner. Further analysis revealed that irradiation facilitated ubiquitination of cyclin D1 and that a proteasome inhibitor blocked cyclin D1 degradation under the same conditions. Interestingly, after mutation of threonine residue 286 of cyclin D1, which is reported to be the GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation site, the mutant protein showed resistance to irradiation-induced proteolysis although inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} failed to prevent cyclin D1 degradation. Rather, ATM inhibition markedly prevented cyclin D1 degradation induced by {gamma}-irradiation. Our data indicate that communication between ATM and cyclin D1 may be required for maintenance of genomic integrity achieved by rapid arrest of the cell-cycle, and that disruption of this crosstalk may increase susceptibility to cancer.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution and diversification of cyclins in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaowu; Wu, Yuliang; Jin, Jialu; Yan, Jun; Kuang, Shuzhen; Zhou, Mi; Zhang, Yuexuan; Guo, An-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Cyclins are a family of diverse proteins that play fundamental roles in regulating cell cycle progression in Eukaryotes. Cyclins have been identified from protists to higher Eukaryotes, while its evolution remains vague and the findings turn out controversial. Current classification of cyclins is mainly based on their functions, which may not be appropriate for the systematic evolutionary analysis. In this work, we performed comparative and phylogenetic analysis of cyclins to investigate their classification, origin and evolution. Cyclins originated in early Eukaryotes and evolved from protists to plants, fungi and animals. Based on the phylogenetic tree, cyclins can be divided into three major groups designated as the group I, II and III with different functions and features. Group I plays key roles in cell cycle, group II varied in actions are kingdom (plant, fungi and animal) specific, and group III functions in transcription regulation. Our results showed that the dominating cyclins (group I) diverged from protists to plants, fungi and animals, while divergence of the other cyclins (groups II and III) has occurred in protists. We also discussed the evolutionary relationships between cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and found that the cyclins have undergone divergence in protists before the divergence of animal CDKs. This reclassification and evolutionary analysis of cyclins might facilitate understanding eukaryotic cell cycle control.

  17. Structure of a cyclin-dependent kinase from Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Leibly, David J; Newling, Paul A; Abendroth, Jan; Guo, Wenjin; Kelley, Angela; Stewart, Lance J; Van Voorhis, Wesley

    2011-09-01

    Giardia lamblia is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a water-borne infection that is prevalent throughout the world. The need for new therapeutics for the treatment of giardiasis is of paramount importance. Owing to the ubiquitous nature of kinases and their vital importance in organisms, they are potential drug targets. In this paper, the first structure of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) from G. lamblia (GlCDK; UniProt A8BZ95) is presented. CDKs are cell-cycle-associated kinases that are actively being pursued as targets for anticancer drugs as well as for antiparasitic chemotherapy. Generally, a CDK forms a complex with its associated cyclin. This CDK-cyclin complex is active and acts as a serine/threonine protein kinase. Typically, CDKs are responsible for the transition to the next phase of the cell cycle. Although the structure of GlCDK with its associated cyclin was not solved, the 1.85 Å resolution structure of apo GlCDK and a 2.0 Å resolution structure of GlCDK in complex with adenosine monophosphate are presented and the structural differences from the orthologous human CDK2 and CDK3 are discussed.

  18. Dissection of Cdk1–cyclin complexes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ear, Po Hien; Booth, Michael J.; Abd-Rabbo, Diala; Kowarzyk Moreno, Jacqueline; Hall, Conrad; Chen, Daici; Vogel, Jackie; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are regulatory enzymes with temporal and spatial selectivity for their protein substrates that are governed by cell cycle-regulated cyclin subunits. Specific cyclin–Cdk complexes bind to and phosphorylate target proteins, coupling their activity to cell cycle states. The identification of specific cyclin–Cdk substrates is challenging and so far, has largely been achieved through indirect correlation or use of in vitro techniques. Here, we use a protein-fragment complementation assay based on the optimized yeast cytosine deaminase to systematically identify candidate substrates of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdk1 and show dependency on one or more regulatory cyclins. We identified known and candidate cyclin dependencies for many predicted protein kinase Cdk1 targets and showed elusory Clb3–Cdk1-specific phosphorylation of γ-tubulin, thus establishing the timing of this event in controlling assembly of the mitotic spindle. Our strategy can be generally applied to identify substrates and accessory subunits of multisubunit protein complexes. PMID:24019491

  19. PROFILES OF GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH TETRACYCLINE OVER EXPRESSION OF HSP70 IN MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Profiles of gene expression associated with tetracycline over expression of HSP70 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) protect cells from damage through their function as molecular chaperones. Some cancers reveal high levels of HSP70 expression in asso...

  20. Lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of Sox9 protected chondrocytes from IL-1β induced degeneration and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Chen, Mingwei; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    To explore whether the over-expression of Sry-related HMG box (Sox9) in degenerative chondrocytes is able to improve cell regeneration and protects cells from inflammation induced apoptosis, we generated a Sox9 over-expressing vector delivery system in which the Sox9 gene was inserted into a lentiviral vector. After infecting mouse chondrocytes with the Sox9-encoding vector, we observed a high level of gene transduction efficiency and achieved a high level of Sox9 expression in the infected chondrocytes. To explore whether over-expression of Sox9 is able to induce cell regeneration and improve cell survival, we induced Sox9 over-expression by lentiviral vector infection 48 hours before IL-1β treatment. The cells were infected with the reporter gene GFP-encoded lentiviral vector as a negative control or left uninfected. 48-hours after IL-1β treatment, the chrondrocytes treated with IL-1β alone, underwent a degenerative process, with elevated expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and ALP, but the cell specific anabolic proteins collagen II and aggrecan were significantly suppressed. The cells infected with the GFP reporter vector had no increased regeneration after IL-1β treatment. The results indicated that Sox9 is an important chondrocyte transcription factor, promoting chondrocyte regeneration and cell survival, which were mediated through affecting multiple cell differentiation as well as anti-apoptotic signaling pathways.

  1. Tissue transglutaminase mediates the pro-malignant effects of oncostatin M receptor over-expression in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caffarel, Maria M; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Araujo, Angela M; Bauer, Julien; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Oncostatin M receptor (OSMR) is commonly over-expressed in advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), producing a significantly worse clinical outcome. Cervical SCC cells that over-express OSMR show enhanced responsiveness to the major ligand OSM, which induces multiple pro-malignant effects, including increased cell migration and invasiveness. Here, we show that tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) is an important mediator of the ligand-dependent phenotypic effects of OSMR over-expression in SCC cells. TGM2 expression correlated with disease progression and with OSMR levels in clinical samples of cervical and oral SCC. TGM2 depletion in cervical SCC cells abrogated OSM-induced migration on fibronectin-coated surfaces and invasiveness through extracellular matrix, while ectopic expression of TGM2 increased cell motility and invasiveness. Confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that TGM2 interacted with integrin–α5β1 in the presence of fibronectin in cervical SCC cells, with OSM treatment strengthening the interaction. Importantly, integrin–α5β1 and fibronectin were also over-expressed in cervical and oral SCC, where levels correlated with those of OSMR and TGM2. This combined tissue and in vitro study demonstrates for the first time that stimulation of over-expressed OSMR in cervical SCC cells activates TGM2/integrin-α5β1 interactions and induces pro-malignant changes. We conclude that an OSMR/TGM2/integrin-α5β1/fibronectin pathway is of biological significance in cervical SCC and a candidate for therapeutic targeting. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:23765377

  2. Both cyclin I and p35 are required for maximal survival benefit of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in kidney podocytes.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Hagmann, Henning; Krofft, Ronald D; Chang, Alice M; Zhang, Jiong; Terada, Yoshio; Brinkkoetter, Paul; Shankland, Stuart J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-5 is activated by both cyclin I and the noncyclin activator p35 in terminally differentiated cells such as kidney podocytes and neurons. Cyclin I and p35 are restricted to podocytes in the kidney, and each limit podocyte apoptosis by activating Cdk5. To determine whether both activators are necessary, or whether they serve backup roles, a double cyclin I-p35 null mouse was generated. Experimental glomerular disease characterized by podocyte apoptosis was then induced by administering an anti-podocyte antibody. The results showed that under nonstressed conditions double mutants had normal kidney structure and function and were indistinguishable from wild-type, cyclin I(-/-), or p35(-/-) mice. In contrast, when stressed with disease, podocyte apoptosis increased fourfold compared with diseased cyclin I(-/-) or p35(-/-) mice. This resulted in a more pronounced decrease in podocyte number, proteinuria, and glomerulosclerosis. Under normal states and nephritic states, levels for the prosurvival protein Bcl-2 were lower in double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice than the other mice. Similarly, levels of Bcl-xL, another prosurvival member, were lower in normal and nephritic double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice but similar to single-cyclin I(-/-) mice. Moreover, levels of ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 activation were lower in nephritic double cyclin I(-/-) p35(-/-) mice but similar to single-cyclin I(-/-) mice. The results demonstrate that the activators of Cdk5, p35, and cyclin I are not required for normal kidney function. However, they play pivotal coordinated roles in maintaining podocyte survival during stress states in disease.

  3. The cyclosome, a large complex containing cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, targets cyclins for destruction at the end of mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sudakin, V; Ganoth, D; Dahan, A; Heller, H; Hershko, J; Luca, F C; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    The ubiquitin-mediated degradation of mitotic cyclins is required for cells to exit from mitosis. Previous work with cell-free systems has revealed four components required for cyclin-ubiquitin ligation and proteolysis: a nonspecific ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, a soluble fraction containing a ubiquitin carrier protein activity called E2-C, a crude particulate fraction containing a ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity that is activated during M-phase, and a constitutively active 26S proteasome that degrades ubiquitinated proteins. Here, we identify a novel approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, which contains a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase activity, E3-C. E3-C is present but inactive during interphase; it can be activated in vitro by the addition of cdc2, enabling the transfer of ubiquitin from E2-C to cyclin. The kinetics of E3-C activation suggest the existence of one or more intermediates between cdc2 and E3-C. Cyclosome-associated E3-C acts on both cyclin A and B, and requires the presence of wild-type N-terminal destruction box motifs in each cyclin. Ubiquitinated cyclins are then rapidly recognized and degraded by the proteasome. These results identify the cyclosome-associated E3-C as the component of the cyclin destruction machinery whose activity is ultimately regulated by cdc2 and, as such, the element directly responsible for setting mitotic cyclin levels during early embryonic cell cycles. Images PMID:7787245

  4. Action of the p53 Effector, p21, on its Targets: Cyclin-cdk and PCNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    Lineweaver - Burke analysis of the inhibition of cyclin E-cdk2 by intact p21 and by p21 without the cyclin binding site. Task 2: Months 24-36: Determination...the peptide sequence was the critical feature of a Cy motif. Task 1: Months 1-24: Lineweaver - Burke analysis of the inhibition of cyclin E-cdk2 by...intact p21 and by p21 without the cyclin binding site. p21 without a Cy motif was ineffective in inhibiting cyclin E-cdk2 [2]. Lineweaver - Burke analysis

  5. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  10. Cyclin B1–Cdk1 Activation Continues after Centrosome Separation to Control Mitotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Arne; van Zon, Wouter; Karlsson Rosenthal, Christina; Wolthuis, Rob M. F

    2007-01-01

    Activation of cyclin B1–cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), triggered by a positive feedback loop at the end of G2, is the key event that initiates mitotic entry. In metaphase, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome–dependent destruction of cyclin B1 inactivates Cdk1 again, allowing mitotic exit and cell division. Several models describe Cdk1 activation kinetics in mitosis, but experimental data on how the activation proceeds in mitotic cells have largely been lacking. We use a novel approach to determine the temporal development of cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity in single cells. By quantifying both dephosphorylation of Cdk1 and phosphorylation of the Cdk1 target anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome 3, we disclose how cyclin B1–Cdk1 continues to be activated after centrosome separation. Importantly, we discovered that cytoplasmic cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity can be maintained even when cyclin B1 translocates to the nucleus in prophase. These experimental data are fitted into a model describing cyclin B1–Cdk1 activation in human cells, revealing a striking resemblance to a bistable circuit. In line with the observed kinetics, cyclin B1–Cdk1 levels required to enter mitosis are lower than the amount of cyclin B1–Cdk1 needed for mitotic progression. We propose that gradually increasing cyclin B1–Cdk1 activity after centrosome separation is critical to coordinate mitotic progression. PMID:17472438

  11. Regulation of Exit from Quiescence by p27 and Cyclin D1-CDK4

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Mohamed H.; Lee, Kwang Y.; Upton, Todd M.; Reed, Michael F.; Ewen, Mark E.

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis of cyclin D1 and its assembly with cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) to form an active complex is a rate-limiting step in progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Using an activated allele of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), we show that this kinase plays a significant role in positively regulating the expression of cyclin D1. This was found both in quiescent serum-starved cells and in cells expressing dominant-negative Ras. Despite the observation that cyclin D1 is a target of MEK1, in cycling cells, activated MEK1, but not cyclin D1, is capable of overcoming a G1 arrest induced by Ras inactivation. Either wild-type or catalytically inactive CDK4 cooperates with cyclin D1 in reversing the G1 arrest induced by inhibition of Ras activity. In quiescent NIH 3T3 cells expressing either ectopic cyclin D1 or activated MEK1, cyclin D1 is able to efficiently associate with CDK4; however, the complex is inactive. A significant percentage of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes are associated with p27 in serum-starved activated MEK1 or cyclin D1 cell lines. Reduction of p27 levels by expression of antisense p27 allows for S-phase entry from quiescence in NIH 3T3 cells expressing ectopic cyclin D1, but not in parental cells. PMID:9774675

  12. Over-expression of Trxo1 increases the viability of tobacco BY-2 cells under H2O2 treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Espín, Ana; Locato, Vittoria; Camejo, Daymi; Schiermeyer, Andreas; De Gara, Laura; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially hydrogen peroxide, play a critical role in the regulation of plant development and in the induction of plant defence responses during stress adaptation, as well as in plant cell death. The antioxidant system is responsible for controlling ROS levels in these processes but redox homeostasis is also a key factor in plant cell metabolism under normal and stress situations. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are ubiquitous small proteins found in different cell compartments, including mitochondria and nuclei (Trxo1), and are involved in the regulation of target proteins through reduction of disulphide bonds, although their role under oxidative stress has been less well studied. This study describes over-expression of a Trxo1 for the first time, using a cell-culture model subjected to an oxidative treatment provoked by H2O2. Methods Control and over-expressing PsTrxo1 tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells were treated with 35 mm H2O2 and the effects were analysed by studying the growth dynamics of the cultures together with oxidative stress parameters, as well as several components of the antioxidant systems involved in the metabolism of H2O2. Analysis of different hallmarks of programmed cell death was also carried out. Key Results Over-expression of PsTrxo1 caused significant differences in the response of TBY-2 cells to high concentrations of H2O2, namely higher and maintained viability in over-expressing cells, whilst the control line presented a severe decrease in viability and marked indications of oxidative stress, with generalized cell death after 3 d of treatment. In over-expressing cells, an increase in catalase activity, decreases in H2O2 and nitric oxide contents and maintenance of the glutathione redox state were observed. Conclusions A decreased content of endogenous H2O2 may be responsible in part for the delayed cell death found in over-expressing cells, in which changes in oxidative parameters and

  13. Strategies used for genetically modifying bacterial genome: ite-directed mutagenesis, gene inactivation, and gene over-expression*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-zhong; Zhang, Wei-guo

    2016-01-01

    With the availability of the whole genome sequence of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum, strategies for directed DNA manipulation have developed rapidly. DNA manipulation plays an important role in understanding the function of genes and in constructing novel engineering bacteria according to requirement. DNA manipulation involves modifying the autologous genes and expressing the heterogenous genes. Two alternative approaches, using electroporation linear DNA or recombinant suicide plasmid, allow a wide variety of DNA manipulation. However, the over-expression of the desired gene is generally executed via plasmid-mediation. The current review summarizes the common strategies used for genetically modifying E. coli and C. glutamicum genomes, and discusses the technical problem of multi-layered DNA manipulation. Strategies for gene over-expression via integrating into genome are proposed. This review is intended to be an accessible introduction to DNA manipulation within the bacterial genome for novices and a source of the latest experimental information for experienced investigators. PMID:26834010

  14. [A promoter responsible for over-expression of cholera toxin B subunit in cholera toxin A subunit structure gene].

    PubMed

    Cao, C; Shi, C; Li, P; Ma, Q

    1997-01-01

    A promoter sequence, which promotes the transcription of cholera toxin B subunit gene, was found in cholera toxin A subunit structure gene. The transcription starts at the adenine Located at +833, that is 456bp upstream to the A of the initiation codon ATG of cholera toxin B gene. Under the control of the promoter, cholera toxin B subunit was over-expressed as high as 200 mg/L at an optimized culture condition. The chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene and beta-galactosidase could also be efficiently expressed under the direction of the promoter. This promoter may be responsible for the 6 fold and 7 fold higher expression level of cholera toxin B subunit than cholera toxin A subunit in V. cholerae and Escheria coli respectively. The over-expression of CTB may be useful in preparing vaccine against cholera and facilitating the construction of peptide-bearing immunogenic hybrid proteins.

  15. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-02-21

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials.

  16. GroEL-GroES assisted folding of multiple recombinant proteins simultaneously over-expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Megha; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2015-07-01

    Folding of aggregation prone recombinant proteins through co-expression of chaperonin GroEL and GroES has been a popular practice in the effort to optimize preparation of functional protein in Escherichia coli. Considering the demand for functional recombinant protein products, it is desirable to apply the chaperone assisted protein folding strategy for enhancing the yield of properly folded protein. Toward the same direction, it is also worth attempting folding of multiple recombinant proteins simultaneously over-expressed in E. coli through the assistance of co-expressed GroEL-ES. The genesis of this thinking was originated from the fact that cellular GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of several endogenous proteins expressed in the bacterial cell. Here we present the experimental findings from our study on co-expressed GroEL-GroES assisted folding of simultaneously over-expressed proteins maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) and yeast mitochondrial aconitase (mAco). Both proteins mentioned here are relatively larger and aggregation prone, mostly form inclusion bodies, and undergo GroEL-ES assisted folding in E. coli cells during over-expression. It has been reported that the relative yield of properly folded functional forms of MalZ and mAco with the exogenous GroEL-ES assistance were comparable with the results when these proteins were overexpressed alone. This observation is quite promising and highlights the fact that GroEL and GroES can assist in the folding of multiple substrate proteins simultaneously when over-expressed in E. coli. This method might be a potential tool for enhanced production of multiple functional recombinant proteins simultaneously in E. coli.

  17. Regulation of cell growth and apoptosis through lactate dehydrogenase C over-expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tuo; Zhang, Cunchao; Jing, Yu; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Shengyu; Ma, Kai; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Dai, Jianxin; Kou, Geng; Wang, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Lactate has long been credited as a by-product, which jeopardizes cell growth and productivity when accumulated over a certain concentration during the manufacturing process of therapeutic recombinant proteins by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A number of efforts to decrease the lactate concentration have been developed; however, the accumulation of lactate is still a critical issue by the late stage of fed-batch culture. Therefore, a lactate-tolerant cell line was developed through over-expression of lactate dehydrogenase C (LDH-C). In fed-batch culture, sodium lactate or sodium pyruvate was supplemented into the culture medium to simulate the environment of lactate accumulation, and LDH-C over-expression increased the highest viable cell density by over 30 and 50 %, respectively, on day 5, meanwhile the viability was also improved significantly since day 5 compared with that of the control. The percentages of cells suffering early and late apoptosis decreased by 3.2 to 12.5 and 2.0 to 4.3 %, respectively, from day 6 onwards in the fed-batch culture when 40 mM sodium pyruvate was added compared to the control. The results were confirmed by mitochondrial membrane potential assay. In addition, the expression of cleaved caspases 3 and 7 decreased in cells over-expressing LDH-C, suggesting the mitochondrial pathway was involved in the LDH-C regulated anti-apoptosis. In conclusion, a novel cell line with higher lactate tolerance, lowered lactate production, and alleviated apoptosis response was developed by over-expression of LDH-C, which may potentially represent an efficient and labor-saving approach in generating recombinant proteins.

  18. Functional consequences of the over-expression of TRPC6 channels in HEK cells: impact on the homeostasis of zinc.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Jarvis, Louis; Harel, Amélie; Luche, Sylvie; Degot, Sébastien; Chapuis, Violaine; Boulay, Guylain; Rabilloud, Thierry; Bouron, Alexandre

    2014-07-01

    The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) protein is a non-selective cation channel able to transport essential trace elements like iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) through the plasma membrane. Its over-expression in HEK-293 cells causes an intracellular accumulation of Zn, indicating that it could be involved in Zn transport. This finding prompted us to better understand the role played by TRPC6 in Zn homeostasis. Experiments done using the fluorescent probe FluoZin-3 showed that HEK cells possess an intracellular pool of mobilisable Zn present in compartments sensitive to the vesicular proton pump inhibitor Baf-A, which affects endo/lysosomes. TRPC6 over-expression facilitates the basal uptake of Zn and enhances the size of the pool of Zn sensitive to Baf-A. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that TRPC6 over-expression does not affect the mRNA expression of Zn transporters (ZnT-1, ZnT-5, ZnT-6, ZnT-7, ZnT-9, Zip1, Zip6, Zip7, and Zip14); however it up-regulates the mRNA expression of metallothionein-I and -II. This alters the Zn buffering capacities of the cells as illustrated by the experiments done using the Zn ionophore Na pyrithione. In addition, HEK cells over-expressing TRPC6 grow slower than their parental HEK cells. This feature can be mimicked by growing HEK cells in a culture medium supplemented with 5 μM of Zn acetate. Finally, a proteomic analysis revealed that TRPC6 up-regulates the expression of the actin-associated proteins ezrin and cofilin-1, and changes the organisation of the actin cytoskeleton without changing the cellular actin content. Altogether, these data indicate that TRPC6 is participating in the transport of Zn and influences the Zn storage and buffering capacities of the cells.

  19. Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for epithelial to mesenchymal transition in CXCL12 over expressed breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shumei; Lv, Qiang; Zhao, Yiling; Liu, Chunfeng; Sun, Yingyan; Xi, Kemin; Xiao, Jiayi; Li, Caijuan

    2015-01-01

    CXCL12 is positively associated with the metastasis and prognosis of various human malignancies. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the main cells secreting CXCL12, are capable of inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of breast cancer cells. However, it has not been completely understood whether CXCL12 is involved in EMT of breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of CXCL12 on the EMT and cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotypes formation by transfecting pEGFP-N1-CXCL12 plasmid into MCF-7 cells. Real time-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the successful over expression of CXCL12 in MCF-7 cells. Cell counting kit-8 assay, wound healing assay and Transwell invasion analysis confirmed that over expression of CXCL12 significantly promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion in MCF-7 cells (P<0.05). In addition, ALDH activity was dramatically enhanced compared with parental (P<0.001), accompanied by the notably elevated mRNA and protein levels of OCT-4, Nanog, and SOX2 in CXCL12 overexpressed-MCF-7 cells (P<0.001). Furthermore, we observed the down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin, N-cadherin, and α-SMA in CXCL12 overexpressed-MCF-7 cells (P<0.01). Meanwhile, western blot and immunofluorescence assay showed that over expression of CXCL12 activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway to induce EMT of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by the increased expression of E-cadherin after silencing β-catenin by siRNA interference (P<0.001). Collectively, our findings suggested that over expression of CXCL12 could trigger EMT by activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway and induce CSC-like phenotypes formation to promote the proliferation and metastasis in MCF-7. Hence, CXCL12 may become a promising candidate for breast cancer therapy.

  20. Functional response to SDF1 alpha through over-expression of CXCR4 on adult subventricular zone progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian Shuang; Chopp, Michael; Santra, Manoranjan; Hozeska-Solgot, Ann; Zhang, Rui Lan; Wang, Lei; Teng, Hua; Lu, Mei; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2008-08-21

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor-1 alpha (SDF1 alpha) regulate neuroblast migration towards the ischemic boundary after stroke. Using loss- and gain-function, we investigated the biological effect of CXCR4/SDF1 alpha on neural progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells, from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult rat, were transfected with rat CXCR4-pLEGFP-C1 and pSIREN-RetroQ-CXCR4-siRNA retroviral vectors. Migration assay analysis showed that inhibition of CXCR4 by siRNA significantly reduced cell migration compared to the empty vector, indicating that CXCR4 mediated neural progenitor cell motility. When neural progenitor cells were cultured in growth medium containing bFGF (20 ng/ml), over-expression of CXCR4 significantly reduced the cell proliferation as measured by the number of bromodeoxyuridine+ (BrdU+) cells (26.4%) compared with the number in the control group (54.0%). Addition of a high concentration of SDF1 alpha (500 ng/ml) into the progenitor cells with over-expression of CXCR4 reversed the cell proliferation back to the control levels (57.6%). Immunostaining analysis showed that neither over-expression nor inhibition of CXCR4 altered the population of neurons and astrocytes, when neural progenitor cells were cultured in differentiation medium. These in vitro results suggest that CXCR4/SDF1 alpha primarily regulates adult neural progenitor cell motility but not differentiation, while over-expression of CXCR4 in the absence of SDF1 alpha decreases neural progenitor cell proliferation.

  1. The regulation of cyclin D1 degradation: roles in cancer development and the potential for therapeutic invention

    PubMed Central

    Alao, John P

    2007-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of cell cycle progression and can function as a transcriptionl co-regulator. The overexpression of cyclin D1 has been linked to the development and progression of cancer. Deregulated cyclin D1 degradation appears to be responsible for the increased levels of cyclin D1 in several cancers. Recent findings have identified novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of cyclin D1 stability. A number of therapeutic agents have been shown to induce cyclin D1 degradation. The therapeutic ablation of cyclin D1 may be useful for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In this review, current knowledge on the regulation of cyclin D1 degradation is discussed. Novel insights into cyclin D1 degradation are also discussed in the context of ablative therapy. A number of unresolved questions regarding the regulation of cellular cyclin D1 levels are also addressed. PMID:17407548

  2. Enhancing cytochrome P450-mediated conversions in P. pastoris through RAD52 over-expression and optimizing the cultivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Wriessnegger, Tamara; Moser, Sandra; Emmerstorfer-Augustin, Anita; Leitner, Erich; Müller, Monika; Kaluzna, Iwona; Schürmann, Martin; Mink, Daniel; Pichler, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) play an essential role in the biosynthesis of various natural compounds by catalyzing regio- and stereospecific hydroxylation reactions. Thus, CYP activities are of great interest in the production of fine chemicals, pharmaceutical compounds or flavors and fragrances. Industrial applicability of CYPs has driven extensive research efforts aimed at improving the performance of these enzymes to generate robust biocatalysts. Recently, our group has identified CYP-mediated hydroxylation of (+)-valencene as a major bottleneck in the biosynthesis of trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone in Pichia pastoris. In the current study, we aimed at enhancing CYP-mediated (+)-valencene hydroxylation by over-expressing target genes identified through transcriptome analysis in P. pastoris. Strikingly, over-expression of the DNA repair and recombination gene RAD52 had a distinctly positive effect on trans-nootkatol formation. Combining RAD52 over-expression with optimization of whole-cell biotransformation conditions, i.e. optimized media composition and cultivation at higher pH value, enhanced trans-nootkatol production 5-fold compared to the initial strain and condition. These engineering approaches appear to be generally applicable for enhanced hydroxylation of hydrophobic compounds in P. pastoris as confirmed here for two additional membrane-attached CYPs, namely the limonene-3-hydroxylase from Mentha piperita and the human CYP2D6.

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced p11 over-expression and chromatin remodeling: a novel molecular mechanism of traumatic stress?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, He; Hu, Xianzhang; Li, Xiao Xia; Smerin, Stanley; Ursano, Robert

    2011-06-01

    While the actions of glucocorticoids on brain function have been comprehensively studied, understanding of the underlying genomic mechanisms is advancing slowly. Recently, it was found that p11 is associated with traumatic stress and depression, and glucocorticoids regulate expression of the p11 gene. The ligand-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) interacts with two glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) in the p11 promoter region to up-regulate the p11 gene. RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, and mutation of GREs both block glucocorticoid-induced p11 over-expression, suggesting that glucocorticoid-induced p11 over-expression is mediated by GR and GREs. Thus, the p11 gene can be transcriptionally activated. There is evidence that this transcriptional activation is mediated by the remodeling of chromatin complexes in response to glucocorticoid receptor-regulated promotors. The regulation of eukaryotic gene expression by chromatin remodeling is complex and is essential for numerous cellular processes. The association of linker-histone, non-histone and heterochromatin-specific proteins plays a key role in the generation of higher-order chromatin structures. Understanding the chromatin remodeling involved in the glucocorticoid-mediated increase of p11 expression by stress may clarify stress-induced over-expression of p11 and also identify a new therapeutic target for post-traumatic disorder and depressive disorders, i.e., chromatin remodeling.

  4. Activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meikrantz, W; Gisselbrecht, S; Tam, S W; Schlegel, R

    1994-01-01

    Apoptosis was induced in S-phase-arrested HeLa cells by staurosporine, caffeine, 6-dimethylaminopurine, and okadaic acid, agents that activate M-phase-promoting factor and induce premature mitosis in similarly treated hamster cell lines. Addition of these agents to asynchronously growing HeLa cells or to cells arrested in early G1 phase with lovastatin had little or no effect. S-phase arrest also promoted tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis, eliminating the normal requirement for simultaneous cycloheximide treatment. For all of the apoptosis-inducing agents tested, the appearance of condensed chromatin was accompanied by 2- to 7-fold increases in cyclin A-associated histone H1 kinase activity, levels approximating the mitotic value. Where examined, both Cdc2 and Cdk2, the catalytic subunits known to associate with cyclin A, were activated. Stable overexpression of bcl-2 suppressed the apoptosis-inducing activity of all agents tested and reduced the amount of Cdc2 and Cdk2 in the nucleus, suggesting a possible mechanism by which bcl-2 inhibits the chromatin condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These findings suggest that at least one of the biochemical steps required for mitosis, activation of cyclin A-dependent protein kinases, is also an important event during apoptosis. Images PMID:8170983

  5. Cell cycle regulatory effects of retinoic Acid and forskolin are mediated by the cyclin C gene.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Katri M; Malinen, Marjo; Ropponen, Antti; Väisänen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2009-10-23

    As a partner of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 3, Cyclin C controls cellular proliferation and, together with CDK8, represses gene transcription. In this study, we showed that the highly expressed Cyclin C gene is a direct target of the nuclear hormone all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in HEK293 human embryonal kidney cells. The RA receptor (RAR) gamma associates with a Cyclin C promoter region containing two RAR binding sites. The Cyclin C gene also directly responds to the cAMP activator Forskolin via the transcription factor CREB1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1), for which we identified four binding sites within the first 2250 bp of its promoter. RARgamma and CREB1 show functional convergence via the corepressor NCoR1, which controls in particular the Forskolin response of Cyclin C. The histone deacetylases 1, 5, 6, 7 and 11 are involved in the basal expression of Cyclin C, but in HEK293 and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells the antiproliferative effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) are not mediated by Cyclin C. However, cell cycle progressing effects of all-trans RA and Forskolin are dependent on Cyclin C expression levels. This suggests that the primary regulation of Cyclin C by all-trans RA and Forskolin mediates some of the cell cycle control actions of these compounds.

  6. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A.; Mashek, Douglas G.; Mashek, Mara T.; Hendrickson, Anna M.; Mullany, Lisa K.; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:27351284

  7. Cyclin D1 represses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and inhibits fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kamarajugadda, Sushama; Becker, Jennifer R; Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Mashek, Mara T; Hendrickson, Anna M; Mullany, Lisa K; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-26

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle protein that promotes proliferation by mediating progression through key checkpoints in G1 phase. It is also a proto-oncogene that is commonly overexpressed in human cancers. In addition to its canonical role in controlling cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 affects other aspects of cell physiology, in part through transcriptional regulation. In this study, we find that cyclin D1 inhibits the activity of a key metabolic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of nuclear receptor family that induces fatty acid oxidation and may play an anti-neoplastic role. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 inhibits PPARα transcriptional activity and target gene expression in a cdk4-independent manner. In liver and breast cancer cells, knockdown of cyclin D1 leads to increased PPARα transcriptional activity, expression of PPARα target genes, and fatty acid oxidation. Similarly, cyclin D1 depletion enhances binding of PPARα to target sequences by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In proliferating hepatocytes and regenerating liver in vivo, induction of endogenous cyclin D1 is associated with diminished PPARα activity. Cyclin D1 expression is both necessary and sufficient for growth factor-mediated repression of fatty acid oxidation in proliferating hepatocytes. These studies indicate that in addition to playing a pivotal role in cell cycle progression, cyclin D1 represses PPARα activity and inhibits fatty acid oxidation. Our findings establish a new link between cyclin D1 and metabolism in both tumor cells and physiologic hepatocyte proliferation.

  8. Distinct proliferative and transcriptional effects of the D-type cyclins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; White, Peter; Hanse, Eric A; Nelsen, Christopher J; Goggin, Melissa M; Mullany, Joseph E; Anttila, Chelsea K; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2008-07-15

    The D-type cyclins (D1, D2 and D3) are components of the cell cycle machinery and govern progression through G(1) phase in response to extracellular signals. Although these proteins are highly homologous and conserved in evolution, they contain distinct structural motifs and are differentially regulated in various cell types. Cyclin D1 appears to play a role in many different types of cancer, whereas cyclins D2 and D3 are less frequently associated with malignancy. In this study, we transiently expressed cyclin D1, D2 or D3 in hepatocytes and analyzed transcriptional networks regulated by each. All three D-type cyclins promoted robust hepatocyte proliferation and marked liver growth, although cyclin D3 stimulated less DNA synthesis than D1 or D2. Accordingly, the three D-type cyclins similarly activated genes associated with cell division. Cyclin D1 regulated transcriptional pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and other substrates, whereas cyclin D2 did not regulate these pathways despite having an equivalent effect on proliferation. Comparison of transcriptional profiles following 70% partial hepatectomy and cyclin D1 transduction revealed a highly significant overlap, suggesting that cyclin D1 may regulate diverse cellular processes in the regenerating liver. In summary, these studies provide the first comparative analysis of the transcriptional networks regulated by the D-type cyclins and provide insight into novel functions of these key cell cycle proteins. Further study of the unique targets of cyclin D1 should provide further insight into its prominent role in proliferation, growth and cancer.

  9. Expression of cyclins E1 and E2 during mouse development and in neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yan; Yu, Qunyan; Whoriskey, Wendy; Dick, Fred; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Ford, Heide L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Pardee, Arthur B.; Amati, Bruno; Jacks, Tyler; Richardson, Andrea; Dyson, Nicholas; Sicinski, Piotr

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin E1 (formerly called cyclin E) and the recently described cyclin E2 belong to the family of E-type cyclins that operate during the G1/S phase progression in mammalian cells. The two E-cyclins share a catalytic partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and activate their associated kinase activities at similar times during cell cycle progression. Despite these similarities, it is unknown whether the two proteins perform distinct functions, or, alternatively, they control S-phase entry of different cell types in a tissue-specific fashion. To start addressing in vivo functions of E-cyclins, we determined the expression pattern of cyclins E1 and E2 during normal mouse development. We found that the two E-cyclins showed very similar patterns of expression; both were expressed within the proliferating compartment during embryo development. Analyses of cells and tissues lacking members of the retinoblastoma (pRB) family of proteins revealed that the expression of both cyclins is controlled in a pRB-dependent, but p107- and p130-independent fashion, likely through the pRB-dependent E2F transcription factors. We also found that cyclins E1 and E2 are expressed at high levels in mouse breast tumors driven by the Myc oncogene. Last, we found that cyclin E2 is overexpressed in ≈24% of analyzed human mammary carcinomas. Collectively these findings suggest that the expression of cyclins E1 and E2 is governed by similar molecular circuitry. PMID:11687642

  10. B-type natriuretic peptide rapid assay: a diagnostic test for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ancheta, Irma B

    2006-01-01

    Hospitals are constantly besieged with congestive heart failure admissions. Current studies show that the advent of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) rapid assay as a quick and easy blood test is beneficial to nurses in confirming the diagnosis of heart failure. B-type natriuretic peptide is a neurohormone produced by the failing heart in response to increased volume and cardiac overload. The BNP rapid assay measures the presence of BNP levels present in the circulating bloodstream to confirm the diagnosis of congestive heart failure. It is a simple blood test that can be done at the bedside or at the clinic so it is a valid point-of-care modality. Elevated levels suggest severity of heart failure and possibility of sudden death. This article focuses on the description of the diagnostic performance of the BNP rapid assay, its clinical dimensions, and its implications to nursing practice and collaborative practice models.

  11. Mouse B-Type Lamins Are Required for Proper Organogenesis But Not by Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngjo; Sharov, Alexei A.; McDole, Katie; Cheng, Melody; Hao, Haiping; Fan, Chen-Ming; Gaiano, Nicholas; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Zheng, Yixian

    2012-01-01

    B-type lamins, the major components of the nuclear lamina, are believed to be essential for cell proliferation and survival. We found that mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) do not need any lamins for self-renewal and pluripotency. Although genome-wide lamin-B binding profiles correlate with reduced gene expression, such binding is not directly required for gene silencing in ESCs or trophectoderm cells. However, B-type lamins are required for proper organogenesis. Defects in spindle orientation in neural progenitor cells and migration of neurons probably cause brain disorganizations found in lamin-B null mice. Thus, our studies not only disprove several prevailing views of lamin-Bs but also establish a foundation for redefining the function of the nuclear lamina in the context of tissue building and homeostasis. PMID:22116031

  12. PROJECTED ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES OF 136 EARLY B-TYPE STARS IN THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Garmany, C. D.; Glaspey, J. W.; Bragança, G. A.; Daflon, S.; Fernandes, M. Borges; Cunha, K.; Oey, M. S.; Bensby, T.

    2015-08-15

    We have determined projected rotational velocities, v sin i, from Magellan/MIKE echelle spectra for a sample of 136 early B-type stars having large Galactocentric distances. The target selection was done independently of their possible membership in clusters, associations or field stars. We subsequently examined the literature and assigned each star as Field, Association, or Cluster. Our v sin i results are consistent with a difference in aggregate v sin i with stellar density. We fit bimodal Maxwellian distributions to the Field, Association, and Cluster subsamples representing sharp-lined and broad-lined components. The first two distributions, in particular, for the Field and Association are consistent with strong bimodality in v sin i. Radial velocities are also presented, which are useful for further studies of binarity in B-type stars, and we also identify a sample of possible new double-lined spectroscopic binaries. In addition, we find 18 candidate Be stars showing emission at Hα.

  13. Arabidopsis PCNAs form complexes with selected D-type cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Strzalka, Wojciech K.; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Jakubowska, Agata; Sztatelman, Olga; Banas, Agnieszka K.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a key nuclear protein of eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to form complexes with cyclin dependent kinases, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors and the D-type cyclins which are involved in the cell cycle control. In Arabidopsis two genes coding for PCNA1 and PCNA2 proteins have been identified. In this study by analyzing Arabidopsis PCNA/CycD complexes we tested the possible functional differentiation of PCNA1/2 proteins in cell cycle control. Most out of the 10 cyclins investigated showed only nuclear localization except CycD2;1, CycD4;1, and CycD4;2 which were observed both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Using the Y2H, BiFC and FLIM-FRET techniques we identified D-type cyclins which formed complexes with either PCNA1 or PCNA2. Among the candidates tested only CycD1;1, CycD3;1, and CycD3;3 were not detected in a complex with the PCNA proteins. Moreover, our results indicate that the formation of CycD3;2/PCNA and CycD4;1/PCNA complexes can be regulated by other as yet unidentified factor(s). Additionally, FLIM-FRET analyses suggested that in planta the distance between PCNA1/CycD4;1, PCNA1/CycD6;1, PCNA1/CycD7;1, and PCNA2/CycD4;2 proteins was shorter than that between PCNA2/CycD4;1, PCNA2/CycD6;1, PCNA2/CycD7;1, and PCNA1/CycD4;2 pairs. These data indicate that the nine amino acid differences between PCNA1 and PCNA2 have an impact on the architecture of Arabidopsis CycD/PCNA complexes. PMID:26379676

  14. Ventricular aneurysms complicating coxsackievirus group B, types 1 and 4 murine myocarditis.

    PubMed

    El-Khatib, M R; Chason, J L; Lerner, A M

    1979-02-01

    Suckling Swiss Webster mice were inoculated with 10(4)TCD50 of coxsackieviruses, group B types 1 or 4. Virulent necrotizing myocarditis resulted in 185 infected mice. Of the latter group, three (14.3%) nurslings on the 17th and 23rd day after inoculations had left ventricular aneurysms postmortem. None of 61 concurrently matched control mice developed aneurysms. Ventricular aneurysm is a suggested but previously undocumented complication of murine, and possibly human necrotizing transmural coxsackievirus myocarditis.

  15. B-type natriuretic peptide level in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd; Hollman, Jay

    2006-12-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis who had a B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level of 129 pg/dl despite a left ventricular end diastolic pressure of 35 mmHg. We discuss a possible explanation for the relatively low BNP level given this patient's markedly elevated intracavitary pressures in the setting of constrictive pericarditis.

  16. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  17. An Einstein Observatory SAO-based catalog of B-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillo, F.; Sciortino, S.; Micela, G.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    About 4000 X-ray images obtained with the Einstein Observatory are used to measure the 0.16-4.0 keV emission from 1545 B-type SAO stars falling in the about 10 percent of the sky surveyed with the IPC. Seventy-four detected X-ray sources with B-type stars are identified, and it is estimated that no more than 15 can be misidentified. Upper limits to the X-ray emission of the remaining stars are presented. In addition to summarizing the X-ray measurements and giving other relevant optical data, the present extensive catalog discusses the reduction process and analyzes selection effects associated with both SAO catalog completeness and IPC target selection procedures. It is concluded that X-ray emission, at the level of Lx not less than 10 exp 30 ergs/s, is quite common in B stars of early spectral types (B0-B3), regardless of luminosity class, but that emission, at the same level, becomes less common, or nonexistent, in later B-type stars.

  18. Methylmalonic aciduria cblB type: characterization of two novel mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction studies.

    PubMed

    Brasil, S; Richard, E; Jorge-Finnigan, A; Leal, F; Merinero, B; Banerjee, R; Desviat, L R; Ugarte, M; Pérez, B

    2015-06-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene, which codes for the enzyme adenosine triphosphate (ATP): cobalamin adenosyltransferase (ATR). This study reports differences in the metabolic and disease outcomes of two pairs of siblings with MMA cblB type, respectively harbouring the novel changes p.His183Leu/p.Arg190dup (P1 and P2) and the previously described mutations p.Ile96Thr/p.Ser174fs (P3 and P4). Expression analysis showed p.His183Leu and p.Arg190dup to be destabilizing mutations. Both were associated with reduced ATR stability and a shorter half-life than wild-type ATR. Analysis of several parameters related to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function showed an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, a decrease in mitochondrial respiration and changes in mitochondria morphology and structure in patient-derived fibroblasts compared to control cells. The impairment in energy production and the presence of oxidative stress and fission of the mitochondrial reticulum suggested mitochondrial dysfunction in cblB patients' fibroblasts. The recovery of mitochondrial function should be a goal in efforts to improve the clinical outcome of MMA cblB type.

  19. Cell cycle-regulatory cyclins and their deregulation in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rajakishore

    2013-06-01

    Oral cancer is a growth-related disorder, and cyclins are the prime regulators of cell division. Cyclins are associated with the pathogenesis of oral cancer and are considered valuable biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis. These important molecules are regulated in many ways to achieve a gain in function and are involved in promoting neoplastic growth. While the causes of most cyclin overexpression are varied, these cyclins may be induced by buccal mucosal insult mainly with carcinogens that alter various pathways propelling oral cancer. Substantial experimental evidences support a link between oncogenic signaling pathways and the deregulation of cyclins in oral cancer. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which cyclins are regulated and promote oral oncogenesis.

  20. Foci of cyclin A2 interact with actin and RhoA in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Loukil, Abdelhalim; Izard, Fanny; Georgieva, Mariya; Mashayekhan, Shaereh; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Peter, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is a key player in the regulation of the cell cycle. Its degradation in mid-mitosis depends primarily on the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), while autophagy also contributes. However, a fraction of cyclin A2 persists beyond metaphase. In this work, we focus on cyclin A2-rich foci detected in mitosis by high resolution imaging and analyse their movements. We demonstrate that cyclin A2 interacts with actin and RhoA during mitosis, and that cyclin A2 depletion induces a dramatic decrease in active RhoA in mitosis. Our data suggest cyclin A2 participation in RhoA activation in late mitosis. PMID:27279564

  1. Early events in DNA replication require cyclin E and are blocked by p21CIP1

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Using immunodepletion of cyclin E and the inhibitor protein p21WAF/CIP1, we demonstrate that the cyclin E protein, in association with Cdk2, is required for the elongation phase of replication on single-stranded substrates. Although cyclin E/Cdk2 is likely to be the major target by which p21 inhibits the initiation of sperm DNA replication, p21 can inhibit single-stranded replication through a mechanism dependent on PCNA. While the cyclin E/Cdk2 complex appears to have a role in the initiation of DNA replication, another Cdk kinase, possibly cyclin A/Cdk, may be involved in a later step controlling the switch from initiation to elongation. The provision of a large maternal pool of cyclin E protein shows that regulators of replication are constitutively present, which explains the lack of a protein synthesis requirement for replication in the early embryonic cell cycle. PMID:7642695

  2. Transcriptional role of cyclin D1 in development revealed by a “genetic-proteomic” screen

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenu, Frédéric; Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Elias, Joshua E.; Meyer, Clifford A.; Mizeracka, Karolina; Marson, Alexander; Frampton, Garrett M.; Cole, Megan F.; Odom, Duncan T.; Odajima, Junko; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jecrois, Marie; Young, Richard A.; Liu, X. Shirley; Cepko, Constance L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Sicinski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cyclin D1 belongs to the core cell cycle machinery, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers1,2. The full repertoire of cyclin D1 functions in normal development and in oncogenesis is currently unclear. Here we developed FLAG- and HA-tagged cyclin D1 knock-in mouse strains that allowed high-throughput mass spectrometry approach to search for cyclin D1-binding proteins in different mouse organs. In addition to cell cycle partners, we observed several proteins involved in transcription. Genome-wide location (ChIP-chip) analyses revealed that during mouse development cyclin D1 occupies promoters of abundantly expressed genes. In particular, we found that in developing mouse retinas – an organ that critically requires cyclin D1 function3,4 – cyclin D1 binds the upstream regulatory region of the Notch1 gene where it serves to recruit CBP histone acetyltransferase. Genetic ablation of cyclin D1 resulted in decreased CBP recruitment, decreased histone acetylation of the Notch1 promoter region, and led to decreased levels of the Notch transcript and protein in cyclin D1-null retinas. Transduction of an activated allele of Notch1 into cyclin D1−/− retinas increased proliferation of retinal progenitor cells, indicating that upregulating Notch1 signaling alleviates the phenotype of cyclin D1-deficiency. These studies reveal that in addition to its well-established cell cycle roles, cyclin D1 plays an in vivo transcriptional function in mouse development. Our approach, which we term “genetic-proteomic” can be used to study the in vivo function of essentially any protein. PMID:20090754

  3. The Role of Cyclin D1 in Altering Stromal-Epithelial Interactions in Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    adenocarcinomas. One study of cyclin D1 expression in esophageal carcinomas indicated that cyclin D1 is strongly expressed in stromal fibroblasts. In this study...proliferate faster than controls in vivo in our tissue recombination model. Although cyclin D1 can increase BPH-1 cell motility and promote cell...Alarid ET, Turner T, Donjacour AA, Boutin EL, Foster BA. Normal and abnormal development of the male urogenital tract: role of androgens, mesenchymal

  4. Enhanced disease resistance in transgenic carrot (Daucus carota L.) plants over-expressing a rice cationic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wally, O; Punja, Z K

    2010-10-01

    Plant class III peroxidases are involved in numerous responses related to pathogen resistance including controlling hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels and lignin formation. Peroxidases catalyze the oxidation of organic compounds using H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. We examined the mechanisms of disease resistance in a transgenic carrot line (P23) which constitutively over-expresses the rice cationic peroxidase OsPrx114 (previously known as PO-C1) and which exhibits enhanced resistance to necrotrophic foliar pathogens. OsPrx114 over-expression led to a slight enhancement of constitutive transcript levels of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. These transcript levels were dramatically increased in line P23 compared to controls [GUS construct under the control of 35S promoter (35S::GUS)] when tissues were treated with cell wall fragments of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (SS-walls), and to a lesser extent with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid. There was no basal increase in basal H(2)O(2) levels in tissues of the line P23. However, during an oxidative burst response elicited by SS-walls, H(2)O(2) accumulation was reduced in line P23 despite, typical media alkalinization associated with oxidative burst responses was observed, suggesting that OsPrx114 was involved in rapid H(2)O(2) consumption during the oxidative burst response. Tap roots of line P23 had increased lignin formation in the outer periderm tissues, which was further increased during challenge inoculation with Alternaria radicina. Plant susceptibility to a biotrophic pathogen, Erysiphe heraclei, was not affected. Disease resistance to necrotrophic pathogens in carrot as a result of OsPrx114 over-expression is manifested through increased PR transcript accumulation, rapid removal of H(2)O(2) during oxidative burst response and enhanced lignin formation.

  5. Increased impulsive behavior and risk proneness following lentivirus-mediated dopamine transporter over-expression in rats' nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Adriani, W; Boyer, F; Gioiosa, L; Macrì, S; Dreyer, J-L; Laviola, G

    2009-03-03

    Multiple theories have been proposed for sensation seeking and vulnerability to impulse-control disorders [Zuckerman M, Kuhlman DM (2000) Personality and risk-taking: Common biosocial factors. J Pers 68:999-1029], and many of these rely on a dopamine system deficit. Available animal models reproduce only some behavioral symptoms and seem devoid of construct validity. We used lentivirus tools for over-expressing or silencing the dopamine transporter (DAT) and we evaluated the resulting behavioral profiles in terms of motivation and self-control. Wistar adult rats received stereotaxic inoculation of a lentivirus that allowed localized intra-accumbens delivery of a DAT gene enhancer/silencer, or the green fluorescent protein, GFP. These animals were studied for intolerance to delay, risk proneness and novelty seeking. As expected, controls shifted their demanding from a large reward toward a small one when the delivery of the former was increasingly delayed (or uncertain). Interestingly, in the absence of general locomotor effects, DAT over-expressing rats showed increased impulsivity (i.e. a more marked shift of demanding from the large/delayed toward the small/soon reward), and increased risk proneness (i.e. a less marked shift from the large/uncertain toward the small/sure reward), compared with controls. Rats with enhanced or silenced DAT expression did not show any significant preference for a novel environment. In summary, consistent with literature on comorbidity between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and pathological gambling, we demonstrate that DAT over-expression in rats' nucleus accumbens leads to impulsive and risk prone phenotype. Thus, a reduced dopaminergic tone following altered accumbal DAT function may subserve a sensation-seeker phenotype and the vulnerability to impulse-control disorders.

  6. Abnormalities of Endocytosis, Phagocytosis, and Development Process in Dictyostelium Cells That Over-Express Acanthamoeba castellanii Metacaspase Protein

    PubMed Central

    SAHEB, Entsar; TRZYNA, Wendy; MARINGER, Katherine; BUSH, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthamoeba castellanii forms a resistant cyst that protects the parasite against the host’s immune response. Acanthamoeba Type-I metacaspase (Acmcp) is a caspase-like protein that has been found to be expressed during the encystations. Dictyostelium discoideum is an organism closely related to Acanthamoeba useful for studying the molecular function of this protozoan caspase-like protein. Methods: The full length of Acmcp and a mutated version of the same gene, which lacks the proline rich N-terminal region (Acmcp-dpr), were cloned into the pDneo2a-GFP vector separately. The pDneo2a-GFP-Acmcp and pDneo2a-GFPAcmcp-dpr were electro-transfected into wild type D. discoideum cells to create cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp or Acmcp-dpr. Results: Both cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp and Acmcp-dpr showed a significant increase in the fluid phase internalization and phagocytosis rate compared to the control cells. Additionally, the cells expressing the Acmcp-dpr mutant were unable to initiate early development and failed to aggregate or form fruiting bodies under starvation conditions, whereas Acmcp over-expressing cells showed the opposite phenomena. Quantitative cell death analysis provided additional support for these findings. Conclusion: Acmcp is involved in the processes of endocytosis and phagocytosis. In addition, the proline rich region in Acmcp is important for cellular development in Dictyostelium. Given its important role in the development process, metacaspase protein is proposed as a candidate drug target against infections caused by A. castellanii. PMID:26246819

  7. Altered Fruit and Seed Development of Transgenic Rapeseed (Brassica napus) Over-Expressing MicroRNA394.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian Bo; Shu, Xia Xia; Shen, Qi; Li, Bo Wen; Song, Jun; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and seed development in plants is a complex biological process mainly involved in input and biosynthesis of many storage compounds such as proteins and oils. Although the basic biochemical pathways for production of the storage metabolites in plants are well characterized, their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we functionally identified rapeseed (Brassica napus) miR394 with its target gene Brassica napus leaf curling responsiveness (BnLCR) to dissect a role of miR394 during the fruit and seed development. Transgenic rapeseed plants over-expressing miR394 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were generated. miR394 over-expression plants exhibited a delayed flowering time and enlarged size of plants, leaf blade, pods and seed body, but developed seeds with higher contents of protein and glucosinolates (GLS) and lower levels of oil accumulation as compared to wild-type. Over-expression of miR394 altered the fatty acid (FA) composition by increasing several FA species such as C16:0 and C18:0 and unsaturated species of C20:1 and C22:1 but lowering C18:3. This change was accompanied by induction of genes coding for transcription factors of FA synthesis including leafy cotyledon1 (BnLEC1), BnLEC2, and FUSCA3 (FUS3). Because the phytohormone auxin plays a crucial role in fruit development and seed patterning, the DR5-GUS reporter was used for monitoring the auxin response in Arabidopsis siliques and demonstrated that the DR5 gene was strongly expressed. These results suggest that BnmiR394 is involved in rapeseed fruit and seed development.

  8. Over-expression of the apple spermidine synthase gene in pear confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance by altering polyamine titers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Peng; Pang, Xiao-Ming; Matsuda, Narumi; Kita, Masayuki; Inoue, Hiromichi; Hao, Yu-Jin; Honda, Chikako; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2008-04-01

    An apple spermidine synthase (SPDS) gene (MdSPDS1) was verified to encode a functional protein by the complementation of the spe3 yeast mutant, which lacks the SPDS gene. To justify our hypothesis that apple SPDS is involved in abiotic stress responses and to obtain transgenic fruit trees tolerant to abiotic stresses as well, MdSPDS1-over-expressing transgenic European pear (Pyrus communis L. 'Ballad') plants were created by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 21 transgenic lines showing various spermidine (Spd) titers and MdSPDS1 expression levels were obtained. Selected lines were exposed to salt (150 mM NaCl), osmosis (300 mM mannitol), and heavy metal (500 microM CuSO4) stresses for evaluating their stress tolerances. Transgenic line no. 32, which was revealed to have the highest Spd accumulation and expression level of MdSPDS1, showed the strongest tolerance to these stresses. When growth increments, electrolyte leakage (EL), and values of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were monitored, line no. 32 showed the lowest growth inhibition and the least increase in EL or TBARS under stress conditions. Spd titers in wild-type and transgenic lines showed diverse changes upon stresses, and these changes were not consistent with the changes in MdSPDS1 expressions. Moreover, there were no differences in the sodium concentration in the shoots between the wild type and line no. 32, whereas the copper concentration was higher in the wild type than in line no. 32. Although the mechanism(s) underlying the involvement of polyamines in stress responses is not known, these results suggest that the over-expression of the SPDS gene substantially increased the tolerance to multiple stresses by altering the polyamine titers in pear. Thus, MdSPDS1-over-expressing transgenic pear plants could be used to improve desert land and/or to repair polluted environments.

  9. Over-expression of Plk4 induces centrosome amplification, loss of primary cilia and associated tissue hyperplasia in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Paula A.; Bury, Leah; Shahbazi, Marta N.; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Tate, Peri H.; Wormald, Sam; Hindley, Christopher J.; Huch, Meritxell; Archer, Joy; Skarnes, William C.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Glover, David M.

    2015-01-01

    To address the long-known relationship between supernumerary centrosomes and cancer, we have generated a transgenic mouse that permits inducible expression of the master regulator of centriole duplication, Polo-like-kinase-4 (Plk4). Over-expression of Plk4 from this transgene advances the onset of tumour formation that occurs in the absence of the tumour suppressor p53. Plk4 over-expression also leads to hyperproliferation of cells in the pancreas and skin that is enhanced in a p53 null background. Pancreatic islets become enlarged following Plk4 over-expression as a result of equal expansion of α- and β-cells, which exhibit centrosome amplification. Mice overexpressing Plk4 develop grey hair due to a loss of differentiated melanocytes and bald patches of skin associated with a thickening of the epidermis. This reflects an increase in proliferating cells expressing keratin 5 in the basal epidermal layer and the expansion of these cells into suprabasal layers. Such cells also express keratin 6, a marker for hyperplasia. This is paralleled by a decreased expression of later differentiation markers, involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin. Proliferating cells showed an increase in centrosome number and a loss of primary cilia, events that were mirrored in primary cultures of keratinocytes established from these animals. We discuss how repeated duplication of centrioles appears to prevent the formation of basal bodies leading to loss of primary cilia, disruption of signalling and thereby aberrant differentiation of cells within the epidermis. The absence of p53 permits cells with increased centrosomes to continue dividing, thus setting up a neoplastic state of error prone mitoses, a prerequisite for cancer development. PMID:26701933

  10. Differential spatial expression of A- and B-type CDKs, and distribution of auxins and cytokinins in the open transverse root apical meristem of Cucurbita maxima

    PubMed Central

    Chiappetta, Adriana; Bruno, Leonardo; Salimonti, Amelia; Muto, Antonella; Jones, Jessica; Rogers, Hilary J.; Francis, Dennis; Bitonti, Maria Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Aside from those on Arabidopsis, very few studies have focused on spatial expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in root apical meristems (RAMs), and, indeed, none has been undertaken for open meristems. The extent of interfacing between cell cycle genes and plant growth regulators is also an increasingly important issue in plant cell cycle studies. Here spatial expression/localization of an A-type and B-type CDK, auxin and cytokinins are reported in relation to the hitherto unexplored anatomy of RAMs of Cucurbita maxima. Methods Median longitudinal sections were cut from 1-cm-long primary root tips of C. maxima. Full-length A-type CDKs and a B-type CDK were cloned from C. maxima using degenerate primers, probes of which were localized on sections of RAMs using in situ hybridization. Isopentenyladenine (iPA), trans-zeatin (t-Z) and indole-3yl-acetic acid (IAA) were identified on sections by immunolocalization. Key Results The C. cucurbita RAM conformed to an open transverse (OT) meristem typified by an absence of a clear boundary between the eumeristem and root cap columella, but with a distinctive longitudinally thickened epidermis. Cucma;CDKA;1 expression was detected strongly in the longitudinally thickened epidermis, a tissue with mitotic competence that contributes cells radially to the root cap of OT meristems. Cucma;CDKB2 was expressed mainly in proliferative regions of the RAM and in lateral root primordia. iPA and t-Z were mainly distributed in differentiated cells whilst IAA was distributed more uniformly in all tissues of the RAM. Conclusions Cucma;CDKA;1 was expressed most strongly in cells that have proliferative competence whereas Cucma;CDKB2 was confined mainly to mitotic cells. iPA and t-Z marked differentiated cells in the RAM, consistent with the known effect of cytokinins in promoting differentiation in root systems. iPA/t-Z were distributed in a converse pattern to Cucma;CDKB2 expression whereas IAA was detected in

  11. The PP2A-B56 phosphatase opposes cyclin E autocatalytic degradation via site-specific dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan J; Swanger, Jherek; Hughes, Bridget T; Clurman, Bruce E

    2017-01-30

    Cyclin E, in conjunction with its catalytic partner cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), regulates cell cycle progression as cells exit quiescence and enter S-phase. Multiple mechanisms control cyclin E periodicity during the cell cycle, including phosphorylation-dependent cyclin E ubiquitylation by the SCF(Fbw7) ubiquitin ligase. Serine 384 (S384) is the critical cyclin E phosphorylation site that stimulates Fbw7 binding and cyclin E ubiquitylation and degradation. Because S384 is autophosphorylated by bound CDK2, this presents a paradox as to how cyclin E can evade autocatalytically induced degradation in order to phosphorylate its other substrates. We found that S384 phosphorylation is dynamically regulated in cells, and that cyclin E is specifically dephosphorylated at S384 by the PP2A-B56 phosphatase, thereby uncoupling cyclin E degradation from cyclin E-CDK2 activity. Furthermore, the rate of S384 dephosphorylation is high in interphase but low in mitosis. This provides a mechanism whereby interphase cells can oppose autocatalytic cyclin E degradation and maintain cyclin E-CDK2 activity, while also enabling cyclin E destruction in mitosis, when inappropriate cyclin E expression is genotoxic.

  12. Induction of cyclin A gene expression by homocysteine in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, J C; Wang, H; Perrella, M A; Yoshizumi, M; Sibinga, N E; Tan, L C; Haber, E; Chang, T H; Schlegel, R; Lee, M E

    1996-01-01

    Homocysteine is an important and independent risk factor for arteriosclerosis. We showed previously that homocysteine stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, a hallmark of arteriosclerosis. We show here that homocysteine and serum increased DNA synthesis synergistically in both human and rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Treatment of quiescent RASMCs with 1 mM homocysteine or 2% calf serum for 36 h increased cyclin A mRNA levels by 8- and 14-fold, respectively, whereas homocysteine plus serum increased cyclin A mRNA levels by 40-fold, indicating a synergistic induction of cyclin A mRNA. Homocysteine did not increase the half-life of cyclin A mRNA (2.9 h), but it did increase the transcriptional rate of the cyclin A gene in nuclear run-on experiments. The positive effect of homocysteine on cyclin A gene transcription was confirmed by our finding that homocysteine increased cyclin A promoter activity and ATF-binding protein levels in RASMCs. Finally, 1 mM homocysteine increased cyclin A protein levels and cyclin A-associated kinase activity by threefold. This homocysteine-induced expression lesions by promoting proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:8550827

  13. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  14. Translokin (Cep57) interacts with cyclin D1 and prevents its nuclear accumulation in quiescent fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Miró, Maria; Colomina, Neus; Fernández, Rita M H; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 because of altered trafficking or degradation is thought to contribute directly to neoplastic transformation and growth. Mechanisms of cyclin D1 localization in S phase have been studied in detail, but its control during exit from the cell cycle and quiescence is poorly understood. Here we report that translokin (Tlk), a microtubule-associated protein also termed Cep57, interacts with cyclin D1 and controls its nucleocytoplasmic distribution in quiescent cells. Tlk binds to regions of cyclin D1 also involved in binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), and a fraction of cyclin D1 associates to the juxtanuclear Tlk network in the cell. Downregulation of Tlk levels results in undue nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 and increased Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB under quiescence conditions. In turn, overexpression of Tlk prevents proper cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus of proliferating cells in an interaction-dependent manner, inhibits Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB and hinders cell cycle progression to S phase. We propose that the Tlk acts as a key negative regulator in the pathway that drives nuclear import of cyclin D1, thus contributing to prevent pRB inactivation and to maintain cellular quiescence.

  15. Cyclin D2 is an FSH-responsive gene involved in gonadal cell proliferation and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sicinski, P; Donaher, J L; Geng, Y; Parker, S B; Gardner, H; Park, M Y; Robker, R L; Richards, J S; McGinnis, L K; Biggers, J D; Eppig, J J; Bronson, R T; Elledge, S J; Weinberg, R A

    1996-12-05

    THE D-type cyclins (D1, D2 and D3) are critical governors of the cell-cycle clock apparatus during the G1 phase of the mammalian cell cycle. These three D-type cyclins are expressed in overlapping, apparently redundant fashion in the proliferating tissues. To investigate why mammalian cells need three distinct D-type cyclins, we have generated mice bearing a disrupted cyclin D2 gene by using gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Cyclin D2-deficient females are sterile owing to the inability of ovarian granulosa cells to proliferate normally in response to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas mutant males display hypoplastic testes. In ovarian granulosa cells, cyclin D2 is specifically induced by FSH via a cyclic-AMP-dependent pathway, indicating that expression of the various D-type cyclins is under control of distinct intracellular signalling pathways. The hypoplasia seen in cyclin D2(-/-) ovaries and testes prompted us to examine human cancers deriving from corresponding tissues. We find that some human ovarian and testicular tumours contain high levels of cyclin D2 messenger RNA.

  16. The B-type lamin is required for somatic repression of testis-specific gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Shevelyov, Y. Y.; Lavrov, S. A.; Mikhaylova, L. M.; Nurminsky, I. D.; Kulathinal, R. J.; Egorova, K. S.; Rozovsky, Y. M.; Nurminsky, D. I.

    2009-01-01

    Large clusters of coexpressed tissue-specific genes are abundant on chromosomes of diverse species. The genes coordinately misexpressed in diverse diseases are also found in similar clusters, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate expression of large multigenic regions both in normal development and in its pathological disruptions. Studies on individual loci suggest that silent clusters of coregulated genes are embedded in repressed chromatin domains, often localized to the nuclear periphery. To test this model at the genome-wide scale, we studied transcriptional regulation of large testis-specific gene clusters in somatic tissues of Drosophila. These gene clusters showed a drastic paucity of known expressed transgene insertions, indicating that they indeed are embedded in repressed chromatin. Bioinformatics analysis suggested the major role for the B-type lamin, LamDmo, in repression of large testis-specific gene clusters, showing that in somatic cells as many as three-quarters of these clusters interact with LamDmo. Ablation of LamDmo by using mutants and RNAi led to detachment of testis-specific clusters from nuclear envelope and to their selective transcriptional up-regulation in somatic cells, thus providing the first direct evidence for involvement of the B-type lamin in tissue-specific gene repression. Finally, we found that transcriptional activation of the lamina-bound testis-specific gene cluster in male germ line is coupled with its translocation away from the nuclear envelope. Our studies, which directly link nuclear architecture with coordinated regulation of tissue-specific genes, advance understanding of the mechanisms underlying both normal cell differentiation and developmental disorders caused by lesions in the B-type lamins and interacting proteins. PMID:19218438

  17. α-Synuclein Over-Expression Induces Increased Iron Accumulation and Redistribution in Iron-Exposed Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Richard; Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; Perrin, Laura; Dučić, Tanja; Carboni, Eleonora; Bohic, Sylvain; Cloetens, Peter; Lingor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the most common α-synucleinopathy, and increased levels of iron are found in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients, but the potential interlink between both molecular changes has not been fully understood. Metal to protein binding assays have shown that α-synuclein can bind iron in vitro; therefore, we hypothesized that iron content and iron distribution could be modified in cellulo, in cells over-expressing α-synuclein. Owing to particle-induced X-ray emission and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence chemical nano-imaging, we were able to quantify and describe the iron distribution at the subcellular level. We show that, in neurons exposed to excess iron, the mere over-expression of human α-synuclein results in increased levels of intracellular iron and in iron redistribution from the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region within α-synuclein-rich inclusions. Reproducible results were obtained in two distinct recombinant expression systems, in primary rat midbrain neurons and in a rat neuroblastic cell line (PC12), both infected with viral vectors expressing human α-synuclein. Our results link two characteristic molecular features found in Parkinson's disease, the accumulation of α-synuclein and the increased levels of iron in the substantia nigra.

  18. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Crispens, Marta A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-08-28

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors.

  19. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB.

  20. Dissecting striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions. New clues from rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Sebastião, Ana Maria

    2016-03-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Chiodi et al. () showing that the effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation in the striatum are significantly reduced in rats with neuronal over-expression of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). Two hypotheses are derived from that study. Hypothesis A: two subpopulations of pre-synaptic CB1R in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals exist, one forming and another not forming heteromers with A2AR. Hypothesis B: CB1R are predominantly forming heteromers with A2AR. In the case of hypothesis A, the A2AR might be required for CB1R-A2AR heteromeric signaling, whereas non-heteromeric CB1R activity is inhibited by A2ARs. In the case of hypothesis B, up-regulation of A2ARs may perturb heteromeric stoichiometry, thus reducing CB1R functioning. In any case, pre-synaptic striatal A2AR-CB1R heteromers emerge as important targets of the effects of cannabinoids demonstrated at the neuronal and behavioral level. Read the highlighted article 'Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors' on page 907.

  1. Over-expression of inducible HSP70 chaperone suppresses neuropathology and improves motor function in SCA1 mice.

    PubMed

    Cummings, C J; Sun, Y; Opal, P; Antalffy, B; Mestril, R; Orr, H T; Dillmann, W H; Zoghbi, H Y

    2001-07-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are caused by gain-of-function mechanisms in which the disease-causing protein is altered, becomes toxic to the cell, and aggregates. Among these 'proteinopathies' are Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, prion disorders and polyglutamine diseases. Members of this latter group, also known as triplet repeat diseases, are caused by the expansion of unstable CAG repeats coding for glutamine within the respective proteins. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one such disease, characterized by loss of motor coordination due to the degeneration of cerebellar Purkinje cells and brain stem neurons. In SCA1 and several other polyglutamine diseases, the expanded protein aggregates into nuclear inclusions (NIs). Because these NIs accumulate molecular chaperones, ubiquitin and proteasomal subunits--all components of the cellular protein re-folding and degradation machinery--we hypothesized that protein misfolding and impaired protein clearance might underlie the pathogenesis of polyglutamine diseases. Over-expressing specific chaperones reduces protein aggregation in transfected cells and suppresses neurodegeneration in invertebrate animal models of polyglutamine disorders. To determine whether enhancing chaperone activity could mitigate the phenotype in a mammalian model, we crossbred SCA1 mice with mice over-expressing a molecular chaperone (inducible HSP70 or iHSP70). We found that high levels of HSP70 did indeed afford protection against neurodegeneration.

  2. Passive transfer of interferon-γ over-expressing macrophages enhances resistance of SCID mice to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pasula, Rajamouli; Martin, William J; Kesavalu, Banu Rekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2017-02-23

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is associated with increased deaths worldwide. Alveolar macrophages (AMs) play a critical role in host defense against infection with this pathogen. In this work we tested the hypothesis that passive transfer of normal AMs, IFN-γ activated AMs, or macrophages transduced to over-express IFN-γ into the lungs of immunosuppressed SCID mice, where resident macrophages are present but not functional, would enhance alveolar immunity and increase clearance of pulmonary M.tb infection. Accordingly, SCID mice were infected with M.tb intratracheally (I.T.), following which they received either control macrophages or macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ (J774A.1). The extent of M.tb infection was assessed at 30days post-M.tb infection. SCID mice administered macrophages over-expressing IFN-γ showed a significant decrease in M.tb burden and increased survival compared to J774A.1 control macrophages or untreated mice. This was further associated with a significant increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA and protein expression, as well as NF-κB (p65) mRNA, in the lungs. The increase in IFN-γ and TNF-α lung levels was inversely proportional to the number of M.tb organisms recovered. These results provide evidence that administration of macrophages overexpressing IFN-γ inhibit M.tb growth in vivo and may enhance host defense against M.tb infection.

  3. Over-expression of mango (Mangifera indica L.) MiARF2 inhibits root and hypocotyl growth of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bei; Li, Yun-He; Wu, Jian-Yong; Chen, Qi-Zhu; Huang, Xia; Chen, Yun-Feng; Huang, Xue-Lin

    2011-06-01

    An auxin response factor 2 gene, MiARF2, was cloned in our previous study [1] from the cotyledon section of mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zihua) during adventitious root formation, which shares an 84% amino acid sequence similarity to Arabidopsis ARF2. This study was to examine the effects of over-expression of the full-length MiARF2 open reading frame on the root and hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis. Phenotype analysis showed that the T(3) transgenic lines had about 20-30% reduction in the length of hypocotyls and roots of the seedlings in comparison with the wild-type. The transcription levels of ANT and ARGOS genes which play a role in controlling organ size and cell proliferation in the transgenic seedlings also decreased. Therefore, the inhibited root and hypocotyl growth in the transgenic seedlings may be associated with the down-regulated transcription of ANT and ARGOS by the over-expression of MiARF2. This study also suggests that although MiARF2 only has a single DNA-binding domain (DBD), it can function as other ARF-like proteins containing complete DBD, middle region (MR) and carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (CTD).

  4. Over expression of miR-200c suppresses invasion and restores methotrexate sensitivity in lung cancer A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Wulin; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Zhang, Jing

    2016-11-30

    MicroRNAs have become recognized as key players in the development of malignancy. MiR-200c can function as a tumor suppressor gene. However, the effect of miR-200c on methotrexate resistance remains unclear to date. This study aims to evaluate the function of miR-200c in lung cancer A549 cells. The data presented in our study demonstrated that the expression of miR-200c was down-regulated in methotrexate-resistant A549 cells. Over expression of miR-200c could significantly inhibit cell proliferation, induce G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induce cell apoptosis. RT-PCR and Western blot assays showed that the expression of P53 and P21 were significantly increased with miR-200c overexpression. These results indicated that over expression of miR-200c might enhance the sensitivity of A549 cells to methotrexate through the P53/P21 pathway. Furthermore, miR-200c overexpression significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion with increasing the expression of E-cad and decreasing the expression of EZH2. In consequence, we provide a mechanism of acquired resistance to methotrexate that is caused by the loss of miR-200c in lung cancer cells. Along with this, our study demonstrates the complex network of microRNA mediated chemoresistance.

  5. Over-expression of the cucumber expansin gene (Cs-EXPA1) in transgenic maize seed for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangwoong; Devaiah, Shivakumar P; Choi, Seo-eun; Bray, Jeff; Love, Robert; Lane, Jeffrey; Drees, Carol; Howard, John H; Hood, Elizabeth E

    2016-04-01

    Plant cell wall degradation into fermentable sugars by cellulases is one of the greatest barriers to biofuel production. Expansin protein loosens the plant cell wall by opening up the complex of cellulose microfibrils and polysaccharide matrix components thereby increasing its accessibility to cellulases. We over-expressed cucumber expansin in maize kernels to produce enough protein to assess its potential to serve as an industrial enzyme for applications particularly in biomass conversion. We used the globulin-1 embryo-preferred promoter to express the cucumber expansin gene in maize seed. Expansin protein was targeted to one of three sub-cellular locations: the cell wall, the vacuole, or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). To assess the level of expansin accumulation in seeds of transgenic kernels, a high throughput expansin assay was developed. The highest expressing plants were chosen and enriched crude expansin extract from those plants was tested for synergistic effects with cellulase on several lignocellulosic substrates. Activity of recombinant cucumber expansin from transgenic kernels was confirmed on these pretreated substrates. The best transgenic lines (ER-targeted) can now be used for breeding to increase expansin expression for use in the biomass conversion industry. Results of these experiments show the success of expansin over-expression and accumulation in transgenic maize seed without negative impact on growth and development and confirm its synergistic effect with cellulase on deconstruction of complex cell wall substrates.

  6. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Crispens, Marta A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors. PMID:25972361

  7. PGC-1α over-expression suppresses the skeletal muscle atrophy and myofiber-type composition during hindlimb unloading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hongju; He, Jian; Zhang, Chenyu; Fan, Ming; Chen, Xiaoping

    2017-03-01

    Disuse leads to severe muscle atrophy and a slow-to-fast myofiber-type transition. PGC-1α (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α) is documented to play an important role in muscle atrophy and slow-twitch myofiber determination. Transcription of atrophy-related Atrogin-1 by FoxO3 can be reduced by PGC-1α. While Smad3 augments FoxO3-induced Atrogin-1 and MuRF1 promoter activity. So PGC-1α, as a transcription co-activator, may regulate hindlimb unloading (HU)-induced myofiber-type transition and muscle atrophy through Smad3. Our results showed that transgenic PGC-1α mice resisted HU-induced muscle loss, atrophy-related genes expression, and slow-to-fast myofiber-type transition. Furthermore, over-expression of PGC-1α resisted the increase in pSmad3 during muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro. And, PGC-1α over-expression inhibited the expression of atrogenes via suppressing the phosphorylation of Smad3 in vitro. Thus, PGC-1α is effective in regulating myofiber-type transition during HU, and it alleviates skeletal muscle atrophy partially through suppressing the activation of Smad3.

  8. Investigation of TbfA in Riemerella anatipestifer using plasmid-based methods for gene over-expression and knockdown

    PubMed Central

    Liu, MaFeng; Wang, MengYi; Zhu, DeKang; Wang, MingShu; Jia, RenYong; Chen, Shun; Sun, KunFeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, XiaoYue; Biville, Francis; Cheng, AnChun

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is a duck pathogen that has caused serious economic losses to the duck industry worldwide. Despite this, there are few reported studies of the physiological and pathogenic mechanisms of Riemerella anatipestifer infection. In previous study, we have shown that TonB1 and TonB2 were involved in hemin uptake. TonB family protein (TbfA) was not investigated, since knockout of this gene was not successful at that time. Here, we used a plasmid based gene over-expression and knockdown to investigate its function. First, we constructed three Escherichia-Riemerella anatipestifer shuttle vectors containing three different native Riemerella anatipestifer promoters. The shuttle plasmids were introduced into Riemerella anatipestifer ATCC11845 by conjugation at an efficiency of 5 × 10−5 antibiotic-resistant transconjugants per recipient cell. Based on the high-expression shuttle vector pLMF03, a method for gene knockdown was established. Knockdown of TbfA in Riemerella anatipestifer ATCC11845 decreased the organism’s growth ability in TSB medium but did not affect its hemin utilization. In contrast, over-expression of TbfA in Riemerella anatipestifer ATCC11845ΔtonB1ΔtonB2. Significantly promoted the organism’s growth in TSB medium but significantly inhibited its hemin utilization. Collectively, these findings suggest that TbfA is not involved in hemin utilization by Riemerella anatipestifer. PMID:27845444

  9. Enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced anxiety in mice over-expressing human catalase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Reid H J; Johnson, Lance A; Zuloaga, Damian G; Limoli, Charles L; Raber, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a modulatory role in synaptic plasticity and signaling pathways. Mitochondria (MT), a major source of ROS because of their involvement in energy metabolism, are important for brain function. MT-generated ROS are proposed to be responsible for a significant proportion of OS and are associated with developmental abnormalities and aspects of cellular aging. The role of ROS and MT function in cognition of healthy individuals is relatively understudied. In this study, we characterized behavioral and cognitive performance of 5- to 6-month-old mice over-expressing mitochondrial catalase (MCAT). MCAT mice showed enhancements in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the water maze and contextual fear conditioning, and reduced measures of anxiety in the elevated zero maze. Catalase activity was elevated in MCAT mice in all brain regions examined. Measures of oxidative stress (glutathione, protein carbonyl content, lipid peroxidation, and 8-hydroxyguanine) did not significantly differ between the groups. The lack of differences in these markers of oxidative stress suggests that the differences observed in this study may be due to altered redox signaling. Catalase over-expression might be sufficient to enhance cognition and reduce measures of anxiety even in the absence of alteration in levels of OS.

  10. MASS AND DENSITY OF THE B-TYPE ASTEROID (702) ALAUDA

    SciTech Connect

    Rojo, P.; Margot, J. L. E-mail: jlm@astro.ucla.edu

    2011-02-01

    Observations with the adaptive optics system on the Very Large Telescope reveal that the outer main belt asteroid (702) Alauda has a small satellite with primary to secondary diameter ratio of {approx}56. The secondary revolves around the primary in 4.9143 {+-} 0.007 days at a distance of 1227 {+-} 24 km, yielding a total system mass of (6.057 {+-} 0.36) x 10{sup 18} kg. Combined with an IRAS size measurement, our data yield a bulk density of 1570 {+-} 500 kg m{sup -3} for this B-type asteroid.

  11. Co-expressed Cyclin D variants cooperate to regulate proliferation of germline nuclei in a syncytium.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Gunasekaran; Campsteijn, Coen; Thompson, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    The role of the G1-phase Cyclin D-CDK 4/6 regulatory module in linking germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation to nutrition is evolutionarily variable. In invertebrate Drosophila and C. elegans GSC models, G1 is nearly absent and Cyclin E is expressed throughout the cell cycle, whereas vertebrate spermatogonial stem cells have a distinct G1 and Cyclin D1 plays an important role in GSC renewal. In the invertebrate, chordate, Oikopleura, where germline nuclei proliferate asynchronously in a syncytium, we show a distinct G1-phase in which 2 Cyclin D variants are co-expressed. Cyclin Dd, present in both somatic endocycling cells and the germline, localized to germline nuclei during G1 before declining at G1/S. Cyclin Db, restricted to the germline, remained cytoplasmic, co-localizing in foci with the Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor, CKIa. These foci showed a preferential spatial distribution adjacent to syncytial germline nuclei at G1/S. During nutrient-restricted growth arrest, upregulated CKIa accumulated in arrested somatic endoreduplicative nuclei but did not do so in germline nuclei. In the latter context, Cyclin Dd levels gradually decreased. In contrast, the Cyclin Dbβ splice variant, lacking the Rb-interaction domain and phosphodegron, was specifically upregulated and the number of cytoplasmic foci containing this variant increased. This upregulation was dependent on stress response MAPK p38 signaling. We conclude that under favorable conditions, Cyclin Dbβ-CDK6 sequesters CKIa in the cytoplasm to cooperate with Cyclin Dd-CDK6 in promoting germline nuclear proliferation. Under nutrient-restriction, this sequestration function is enhanced to permit continued, though reduced, cycling of the germline during somatic growth arrest.

  12. Expression of cyclin E in postmitotic neurons during development and in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yayoi; Matsunaga, Yuko; Takiguchi, Masahito; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin E, a member of the G1 cyclins, is essential for the G1/S transition of the cell cycle in cultured cells, but its roles in vivo are not fully defined. The present study characterized the spatiotemporal expression profile of cyclin E in two representative brain regions in the mouse, the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Western blotting showed that the levels of cyclin E increased towards adulthood. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed the distributions of cyclin E mRNA and protein were comparable in the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum. Immunohistochemistry for the proliferating cell marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) revealed that cyclin E was expressed by both proliferating and non-proliferating cells in the cerebral cortex at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and in the cerebellum at postnatal day 1 (P1). Subcellular localization in neurons was examined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Cyclin E expression was nuclear in proliferating neuronal precursor cells but cytoplasmic in postmitotic neurons during embryonic development. Nuclear cyclin E expression in neurons remained faint in newborns, increased during postnatal development and was markedly decreased in adults. In various adult brain regions, cyclin E staining was more intense in the cytoplasm than in the nucleus in most neurons. These data suggest a role for cyclin E in the development and function of the mammalian central nervous system and that its subcellular localization in neurons is important. Our report presents the first detailed analysis of cyclin E expression in postmitotic neurons during development and in the adult mouse brain.

  13. Cyclins D, phytoregulators and cell cycle onset in germinating maize.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M; Lara-Nuñez, Aurora

    2008-08-01

    Several different D-type cyclins can be found in plants and in maize, four of these have been characterized: CycD2;1, CycD4;1, CycD5;1 and CycD5;2. These cyclins appear to form complexes with Cdks, with PCNA and also with KRP proteins and in these kinase activity can be measured. The expression of the corresponding genes during maize germination is highly stimulated by phytohormones like auxin and cytokinin, however this is not followed by an equivalent increase in the amount of the corresponding proteins; nonetheless, auxins do stimulate the associated kinase activity, particularly at early germination times. Thus, auxins appear to stimulate the cell cycle during germination at two levels, transcription and kinase activation. Both auxins and cytokinins appear to shorten the G1 phase during germination and stimulate DNA synthesis, but apparently they do it in different ways as the simultaneous addition of both to germinating maize axes eliminates DNA synthesis stimulation. Therefore, similar actions may be achieved by different paths.

  14. Cyclins D, phytoregulators and cell cycle onset in germinating maize

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Nuñez, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Several different D-type cyclins can be found in plants and in maize, four of these have been characterized: CycD2;1, CycD4;1, CycD5;1 and CycD5;2. These cyclins appear to form complexes with Cdks, with PCNA and also with KRP proteins and in these kinase activity can be measured. The expression of the corresponding genes during maize germination is highly stimulated by phytohormones like auxin and cytokinin, however this is not followed by an equivalent increase in the amount of the corresponding proteins; nonetheless, auxins do stimulate the associated kinase activity, particularly at early germination times. Thus, auxins appear to stimulate the cell cycle during germination at two levels, transcription and kinase activation. Both auxins and cytokinins appear to shorten the G1 phase during germination and stimulate DNA synthesis, but apparently they do it in different ways as the simultaneous addition of both to germinating maize axes eliminates DNA synthesis stimulation. Therefore, similar actions may be achieved by different paths. PMID:19704474

  15. The structure of cyclin E1/CDK2: implications for CDK2 activation and CDK2-independent roles.

    PubMed

    Honda, Reiko; Lowe, Edward D; Dubinina, Elena; Skamnaki, Vicky; Cook, Atlanta; Brown, Nick R; Johnson, Louise N

    2005-02-09

    Cyclin E, an activator of phospho-CDK2 (pCDK2), is important for cell cycle progression in metazoans and is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells. It is essential for entry to the cell cycle from G0 quiescent phase, for the assembly of prereplication complexes and for endoreduplication in megakaryotes and giant trophoblast cells. We report the crystal structure of pCDK2 in complex with a truncated cyclin E1 (residues 81-363) at 2.25 A resolution. The N-terminal cyclin box fold of cyclin E1 is similar to that of cyclin A and promotes identical changes in pCDK2 that lead to kinase activation. The C-terminal cyclin box fold shows significant differences from cyclin A. It makes additional interactions with pCDK2, especially in the region of the activation segment, and contributes to CDK2-independent binding sites of cyclin E. Kinetic analysis with model peptide substrates show a 1.6-fold increase in kcat for pCDK2/cyclin E1 (81-363) over kcat of pCDK2/cyclin E (full length) and pCDK2/cyclin A. The structural and kinetic results indicate no inherent substrate discrimination between pCDK2/cyclin E and pCDK2/cyclin A with model substrates.

  16. Identification of a major QTL controlling the content of B-type starch granules in Aegilops

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Griffiths, Simon; Leigh, Fiona; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Simmonds, James; Uauy, Cristobal; Trafford, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Starch within the endosperm of most species of the Triticeae has a unique bimodal granule morphology comprising large lenticular A-type granules and smaller near-spherical B-type granules. However, a few wild wheat species (Aegilops) are known to lack B-granules. Ae. peregrina and a synthetic tetraploid Aegilops with the same genome composition (SU) were found to differ in B-granule number. The synthetic tetraploid had normal A- and B-type starch granules whilst Ae. peregrina had only A-granules because the B-granules failed to initiate. A population segregating for B-granule number was generated by crossing these two accessions and was used to study the genetic basis of B-granule initiation. A combination of Bulked Segregant Analysis and QTL mapping identified a major QTL located on the short arm of chromosome 4S that accounted for 44.4% of the phenotypic variation. The lack of B-granules in polyploid Aegilops with diverse genomes suggests that the B-granule locus has been lost several times independently during the evolution of the Triticeae. It is proposed that the B-granule locus is susceptible to silencing during polyploidization and a model is presented to explain the observed data based on the assumption that the initiation of B-granules is controlled by a single major locus per haploid genome. PMID:21227932

  17. Comparison of physicochemical properties of B-type nontraditional starches from different sources.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Zhao, Lingxiao; Man, Jianmin; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Weidong; Huai, Huyin; Wei, Cunxu

    2015-01-01

    Starches were isolated from rhizomes of Curcuma longa, Canna edulis and Canna indica and bulbs of Lilium lancifolium, and showed a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern. Their physicochemical properties were investigated and compared. These starches showed significantly different granule morphologies and sizes, but all had eccentric hila. The C. longa starch had the lowest content of amylopectin short branch-chain and branching degree and the highest content of amylopectin long branch-chain, and the L. lancifolium starch the highest content of amylopectin short branch-chain and branching degree and the lowest content of amylopectin long branch-chain among the four starches. The L. lancifolium starch had the lowest resistance to gelatinization, and showed the lowest pasting peak, hot and final viscosities, and the C. longa starch had the highest resistance to gelatinization, and showed the highest pasting hot, final and setback viscosities and the lowest pasting breakdown viscosity. The C. longa and L. lancifolium starches possessed very high and low resistance to hydrolysis and digestion, respectively. The above physicochemical properties would be useful for the applications of B-type starches in food and nonfood industries.

  18. Statistical imprints of CMB B-type polarization leakage in an incomplete sky survey analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Larissa; Wang, Kai; Hu, Yangrui; Fang, Wenjuan; Zhao, Wen

    2017-01-01

    One of the main goals of modern cosmology is to search for primordial gravitational waves by looking on their imprints in the B-type polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation. However, this signal is contaminated by various sources, including cosmic weak lensing, foreground radiations, instrumental noises, as well as the E-to-B leakage caused by the partial sky surveys, which should be well understood to avoid the misinterpretation of the observed data. In this paper, we adopt the E/B decomposition method suggested by Smith in 2006, and study the imprints of E-to-B leakage residuals in the constructed B-type polarization maps, Script B(hat n), by employing various statistical tools. We find that the effects of E-to-B leakage are negligible for the Script B-mode power spectrum, as well as the skewness and kurtosis analyses of Script B-maps. However, if employing the morphological statistical tools, including Minkowski functionals and/or Betti numbers, we find the effect of leakage can be detected at very high confidence level, which shows that in the morphological analysis, the leakage can play a significant role as a contaminant for measuring the primordial B-mode signal and must be taken into account for a correct explanation of the data.

  19. Novel complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases and a cyclin-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana with a function unrelated to cell division.

    PubMed

    Barrôco, R M; De Veylder, L; Magyar, Z; Engler, G; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2003-02-01

    Although the majority of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in cell cycle progression, recent evidence has shown that CDKs are also implicated in transcription regulation. Here, we describe two Arabidopsis CDKs designated Arath;CDKC;1 and Arath; CDKC;2. These CDKs share a PITAIRE signature in the cyclin-binding domain and the structural characteristics of mammalian CDK9. Yeast two-hybrid screens and immunoprecipitation assays identified CDKC-interacting proteins with homology to the animal cyclin T/cyclin K group. We suggest that these Arabidopsis CDKCs may be part of a kinase complex similar to the animal positive transcription elongation factor b, whose activity is essential for transcription control. Expression studies showed that Arath; CDKC transcripts are mainly confined to epidermal tissues and are most abundant in flower tissues. No expression was detected in actively dividing Arabidopsis tissues, suggesting a role for the CDKC proteins in differentiated cells.

  20. Regulation of cyclin D2 gene expression by the Myc/Max/Mad network: Myc-dependent TRRAP recruitment and histone acetylation at the cyclin D2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Caroline; Dittrich, Oliver; Kiermaier, Astrid; Dohmann, Karen; Menkel, Annette; Eilers, Martin; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins promote cell cycle progression in part through the transcriptional up-regulation of the cyclin D2 gene. We now show that Myc is bound to the cyclin D2 promoter in vivo. Binding of Myc induces cyclin D2 expression and histone acetylation at a single nucleosome in a MycBoxII/TRRAP-dependent manner. Down-regulation of cyclin D2 mRNA expression in differentiating HL60 cells is preceded by a switch of promoter occupancy from Myc/Max to Mad/Max complexes, loss of TRRAP binding, increased HDAC1 binding, and histone deacetylation. Thus, recruitment of TRRAP and regulation of histone acetylation are critical for transcriptional activation by Myc. PMID:11511535

  1. Over-expression of human endosulfatase-1 exacerbates cadmium-induced injury to transformed human lung cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Huiying; Newman, Donna R.; Bonner, James C.; Sannes, Philip L.

    2012-11-15

    Environmental exposure to cadmium is known to cause damage to alveolar epithelial cells of the lung, impair their capacity to repair, and result in permanent structural alterations. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) can modulate cell responses to injury through their interactions with soluble effector molecules. These interactions are often sulfate specific, and the removal of sulfate groups from HS side chains could be expected to influence cellular injury, such as that caused by exposure to cadmium. The goal of this study was to define the role 6-O-sulfate plays in cellular responses to cadmium exposure in two pulmonary epithelial cancer cell lines (H292 and A549) and in normal human primary alveolar type II (hAT2) cells. Sulfate levels were modified by transduced transient over-expression of 6-O-endosulfatase (HSulf-1), a membrane-bound enzyme which specifically removes 6-O-sulfate groups from HSPG side chains. Results showed that cadmium decreased cell viability and activated apoptosis pathways at low concentrations in hAT2 cells but not in the cancer cells. HSulf-1 over-expression, on the contrary, decreased cell viability and activated apoptosis pathways in H292 and A549 cells but not in hAT2 cells. When combined with cadmium, HSulf-1 over-expression further decreased cell viability and exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways in the transformed cells but did not add to the toxicity in hAT2 cells. The finding that HSulf-1 sensitizes these cancer cells and intensifies the injury induced by cadmium suggests that 6-O-sulfate groups on HSPGs may play important roles in protection against certain environmental toxicants, such as heavy metals. -- Highlights: ► Primary human lung alveolar type 2 (hAT2) cells and H292 and A549 cells were used. ► Cadmium induced apoptosis in hAT2 cells but not in H292 or A549 cells. ► HSulf-1exacerbates apoptosis induced by cadmium in H292 and A549 but not hAT2 cells.

  2. The RNA-binding protein Spo5 promotes meiosis II by regulating cyclin Cdc13 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Arata, Mayumi; Sato, Masamitsu; Yamashita, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis comprises two consecutive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and II. Despite this unique progression through the cell cycle, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the sequential divisions. In this study, we carried out a genetic screen to identify factors that regulate the initiation of meiosis II in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified mutants deficient in meiosis II progression and repeatedly isolated mutants defective in spo5, which encodes an RNA-binding protein. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize YFP-tagged protein, we found that spo5 mutant cells precociously lost Cdc13, the major B-type cyclin in fission yeast, before meiosis II. Importantly, the defect in meiosis II was rescued by increasing CDK activity. In wild-type cells, cdc13 transcripts increased during meiosis II, but this increase in cdc13 expression was weaker in spo5 mutants. Thus, Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis II that controls the level of cdc13 expression and promotes de novo synthesis of Cdc13. We previously reported that inhibition of Cdc13 degradation is necessary to initiate meiosis II; together with the previous information, the current findings indicate that the dual control of Cdc13 by de novo synthesis and suppression of proteolysis ensures the progression of meiosis II.

  3. Altered expression of the cyclin D1 and retinoblastoma genes in human esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Zhang, Y.J.; Kahn, S.M.; Santella, R.M.; Weinstein, I.B. ); Hollstein, M.C.; Montesano, R. ); Harris, C.C. ); Lu, S.H. )

    1993-10-01

    The authors have examined DNA from four human esophageal carcinoma cell lines and 50 primary esophageal carcinomas obtained from China, Italy, and France for amplification of the cyclin D1 gene. They also examined 36 of these 50 carcinomas for expressions of the cyclin D1 and retinoblastoma (RB) proteins by immunohistochemistry. They found a 3- to 10-fold amplification of the cyclin D1 gene in 16 of the 50 (32%) tumors and in two of the four cell lines. Cyclin D1 protein was overexpressed in 12 of 13 tumors and the two cell lines that showed gene amplification when compared to normal controls. Studies on RB protein expression indicated that 6 of the 36 (17%) tumor samples examined and one cell line did not show detectable expression of this protein. The tumors and cell lines that had cyclin D1 gene amplification and overexpression exhibited normal levels of expression of RB protein. By contrast, the tumors and cell line that did not appear to express the RB protein did not show amplification of the cyclin D1 gene and expressed only low levels of the cyclin D1 protein (P = 0.03). These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of RB on cell cycle progression can be abrogated during tumor development either by loss of expression of the RB gene or by increased expression of the cyclin D1 gene. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The cyclin A centrosomal localization sequence recruits MCM5 and Orc1 to regulate centrosome reduplication.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Rebecca L; Pascreau, Gaetan; Maller, James L

    2010-08-15

    Centrosomes are the major microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells and regulate formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle. Aberrant centrosome number causes chromosome mis-segregation, and has been implicated in genomic instability and tumor development. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for the DNA replication factors MCM5 and Orc1 in preventing centrosome reduplication. Cyclin A-Cdk2 localizes on centrosomes by means of a modular centrosomal localization sequence (CLS) that is distinct from that of cyclin E. Here, we show that cyclin A interacts with both MCM5 and Orc1 in a CLS-dependent but Cdk-independent manner. Although the MRAIL hydrophobic patch is contained within the cyclin A CLS, binding of both MCM5 and Orc1 to cyclin A does not require a wild-type hydrophobic patch. The same domain in MCM5 that mediates interaction with cyclin E also binds cyclin A, resulting in centrosomal localization of MCM5. Finally, unlike its function in DNA synthesis, MCM5-mediated inhibition of centrosome reduplication in S-phase-arrested CHO cells does not require binding to other MCM family members. These results suggest that cyclins E and A sequentially prevent centrosome reduplication throughout interphase by recruitment of DNA replication factors such as MCM5 and Orc1.

  5. E-type cyclins modulate telomere integrity in mammalian male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Manterola, Marcia; Sicinski, Piotr; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2016-06-01

    We have shown that E-type cyclins are key regulators of mammalian male meiosis. Depletion of cyclin E2 reduced fertility in male mice due to meiotic defects, involving abnormal pairing and synapsis, unrepaired DNA, and loss of telomere structure. These defects were exacerbated by additional loss of cyclin E1, and complete absence of both E-type cyclins produces a meiotic catastrophe. Here, we investigated the involvement of E-type cyclins in maintaining telomere integrity in male meiosis. Spermatocytes lacking cyclin E2 and one E1 allele (E1+/-E2-/-) displayed a high rate of telomere abnormalities but can progress to pachytene and diplotene stages. We show that their telomeres exhibited an aberrant DNA damage repair response during pachynema and that the shelterin complex proteins TRF2 and RAP2 were significantly decreased in the proximal telomeres. Moreover, the insufficient level of these proteins correlated with an increase of γ-H2AX foci in the affected telomeres and resulted in telomere associations involving TRF1 and telomere detachment in later prophase-I stages. These results suggest that E-type cyclins are key modulators of telomere integrity during meiosis by, at least in part, maintaining the balance of shelterin complex proteins, and uncover a novel role of E-type cyclins in regulating chromosome structure during male meiosis.

  6. Study of possible changes in genes expression of mitotic cyclin under clinorotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    Cell cycle is regulated by cyclins, destruction and accumulation of which is the main process in cell cycle progress. In previous studies we have shown that slow horizontal clinorotation (2rpm) affects proliferative activity and cell cycle stages in inducted to grow 2-4 day old Pisum sativum seedlings. In the first cell cycle, delay in cell transition to S stage and delay in mitosis occur due to the prolongation of pre-synthetic stage. This observation is supported by accumulation of 2c DNA cells and transcripts of 3 cyclin in meristem cells. 3 cyclins are "plant" version of cyclin D, they regulate pre-synthetic stage of cell cycle. Cyclins A and B, regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases, control the beginning of S-stage and are necessary for prevention of certain delay in cell cycle progression. We suggest that delay in mitosis, observed under clinorotation, may take place not only due to prolongation of pre-synthetic stage but also due to change of cyclin genes expression under above condition. Further investigations will be aimed on establishing the level of cyclin genes expression under clinorotation.

  7. Defective in Mitotic Arrest 1 (Dma1) Ubiquitin Ligase Controls G1 Cyclin Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Bru, Samuel; Ricco, Natalia; Ramírez, Sara; Casals, Núria; Jiménez, Javier; Isasa, Marta; Crosas, Bernat; Clotet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is controlled by diverse cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that might be associated to numerous cyclin isoforms. Given such complexity, regulation of cyclin degradation should be crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SCF is the only E3 ligase known to date to be involved in G1 cyclin degradation. Here, we report the design of a genetic screening that uncovered Dma1 as another E3 ligase that targets G1 cyclins in yeast. We show that the cyclin Pcl1 is ubiquitinated in vitro and in vivo by Dma1, and accordingly, is stabilized in dma1 mutants. We demonstrate that Pcl1 must be phosphorylated by its own CDK to efficiently interact with Dma1 and undergo degradation. A nonphosphorylatable version of Pcl1 accumulates throughout the cell cycle, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the proposed mechanism. Finally, we present evidence that the levels of Pcl1 and Cln2 are independently controlled in response to nutrient availability. This new previously unknown mechanism for G1 cyclin degradation that we report here could help elucidate the specific roles of the redundant CDK-cyclin complexes in G1. PMID:23264631

  8. Cyclin F suppresses B-Myb activity to promote cell cycle checkpoint control.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard; Hoffmann, Saskia; Ahlskog, Johanna K; O'Hanlon, Karen; Quaas, Marianne; Larsen, Brian D; Rolland, Baptiste; Rösner, Heike I; Walter, David; Kousholt, Arne Nedergaard; Menzel, Tobias; Lees, Michael; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Rappsilber, Juri; Engeland, Kurt; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-05

    Cells respond to DNA damage by activating cell cycle checkpoints to delay proliferation and facilitate DNA repair. Here, to uncover new checkpoint regulators, we perform RNA interference screening targeting genes involved in ubiquitylation processes. We show that the F-box protein cyclin F plays an important role in checkpoint control following ionizing radiation. Cyclin F-depleted cells initiate checkpoint signalling after ionizing radiation, but fail to maintain G2 phase arrest and progress into mitosis prematurely. Importantly, cyclin F suppresses the B-Myb-driven transcriptional programme that promotes accumulation of crucial mitosis-promoting proteins. Cyclin F interacts with B-Myb via the cyclin box domain. This interaction is important to suppress cyclin A-mediated phosphorylation of B-Myb, a key step in B-Myb activation. In summary, we uncover a regulatory mechanism linking the F-box protein cyclin F with suppression of the B-Myb/cyclin A pathway to ensure a DNA damage-induced checkpoint response in G2.

  9. PKC iota promotes ovarian tumor progression through deregulation of cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Nanos-Webb, Angela; Bui, Tuyen; Karakas, Cansu; Zhang, Dong; Carey, Jason P.W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-01-01

    The high frequency of relapse of epithelial ovarian tumors treated with standard chemotherapy has highlighted the necessity to identify targeted therapies that can improve patient outcomes. The dynamic relationship between Cyclin E and PKCiota frequent overexpression in high-grade ovarian tumors poses a novel pathway for therapeutic investigation. We hypothesized that a PI3K dependent signaling pathway activating PKCiota perpetuates cyclin E deregulation during ovarian tumorigenesis. We observed a positive correlation between PKCiota and cyclin E in a panel of 19 ovarian cancer cell lines. Modulation of cyclin E had no effect on PKCiota knockdown/overexpression however PKCiota differentially regulated cyclin E expression. In the serous ovarian cancer cells (IGROV, OVCAR-3), shPKCiota decreased proliferation, caused a G1 arrest, and significantly prolonged overall survival in xenograft mouse models. In vitro shPKCiota decreased the ability of IGROV cells to grow under anchorage independent conditions and form aberrant acini, which was dependent upon Ad-cyclin E or Ad-LMW-E expression. RPPA analysis of PKCiota wild-type, catalytic active, dominant negative protein isoforms strengthened the association between phospho-PKCiota levels and PI3K pathway activation. Inhibitors of PI3K coordinately decreased phospho-PKCiota and Cyclin E protein levels. In conclusion, we have identified a PI3K/PKCiota/Cyclin E signaling pathway as a therapeutic target during ovarian tumorigenesis. PMID:26279297

  10. Gene structure, expression, and DNA methylation characteristics of sea cucumber cyclin B gene during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aijun; Chen, Muyan; Zhang, Xiumei; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-12-05

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, is a good model for studying environmentally-induced aestivation by a marine invertebrate. One of the central requirements of aestivation is the repression of energy-expensive cellular processes such as cell cycle progression. The present study identified the gene structure of the cell cycle regulator, cyclin B, and detected the expression levels of this gene over three stages of the annual aestivation-arousal cycle. Furthermore, the DNA methylation characteristics of cyclin B were analyzed in non-aestivation and deep-aestivation stages of sea cucumbers. We found that the cyclin B promoter contains a CpG island, three CCAAT-boxes and three cell cycle gene homology regions (CHRs). Application of qRT-PCR analysis showed significant downregulation of cyclin B transcript levels during deep-aestivation in comparison with non-aestivation in both intestine and longitudinal muscle, and these returned to basal levels after arousal from aestivation. Methylation analysis of the cyclin B core promoter revealed that its methylation level showed significant differences between non-aestivation and deep-aestivation stages (p<0.05) and interestingly, a positive correlation between Cyclin B transcripts expression and methylation levels of the core promoter was also observed. Our findings suggest that cell cycle progression may be reversibly arrested during aestivation as indicated by the changes in cyclin B expression levels and we propose that DNA methylation is one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in cyclin B transcriptional variation.

  11. Cyclin F/FBXO1 Interacts with HIV-1 Viral Infectivity Factor (Vif) and Restricts Progeny Virion Infectivity by Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of Vif Protein through SCF(cyclin F) E3 Ligase Machinery.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tracy; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Gupta, Kailash; Islam, Sehbanul; Ghosh, Payel; Santra, Manas Kumar; Mitra, Debashis

    2017-03-31

    Cyclin F protein, also known as FBXO1, is the largest among all cyclins and oscillates in the cell cycle like other cyclins. Apart from being a G2/M cyclin, cyclin F functions as the substrate-binding subunit of SCF(cyclin F) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In a gene expression analysis performed to identify novel gene modulations associated with cell cycle dysregulation during HIV-1 infection in CD4(+) T cells, we observed down-regulation of the cyclin F gene (CCNF). Later, using gene overexpression and knockdown studies, we identified cyclin F as negatively influencing HIV-1 viral infectivity without any significant impact on virus production. Subsequently, we found that cyclin F negatively regulates the expression of viral protein Vif (viral infectivity factor) at the protein level. We also identified a novel host-pathogen interaction between cyclin F and Vif protein in T cells during HIV-1 infection. Mutational analysis of a cyclin F-specific amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of Vif indicated rescue of the protein from cyclin F-mediated down-regulation. Subsequently, we showed that Vif is a novel substrate of the SCF(cyclin F) E3 ligase, where cyclin F mediates the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Vif through physical interaction. Finally, we showed that cyclin F augments APOBEC3G expression through degradation of Vif to regulate infectivity of progeny virions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that cyclin F is a novel F-box protein that functions as an intrinsic cellular regulator of HIV-1 Vif and has a negative regulatory effect on the maintenance of viral infectivity by restoring APOBEC3G expression.

  12. B-type natriuretic peptide and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuki, Shinichi; Wagner, Brandie D; Ivy, David Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the amino-terminal fragment (NTproBNP) correlate with clinical variables, but have not been simultaneously studied in a large number of pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The purpose of our investigation was to compare BNP and NTproBNP with clinical indicators of disease in a pediatric PAH population for which biomarkers are much needed. Design We retrospectively compared BNP and NTproBNP levels with exercise capacity, echocardiographic data, and hemodynamics in PAH patients under 21 years-old. Two hundred sixty three blood samples from 88 pediatric PAH patients were obtained, with BNP and NTproBNP drawn at the same time. Results There was a correlation between BNP and NTproBNP with mean pulmonary arterial pressure/mean arterial pressure (mPAP/mSAP) ratio (r=0.40 p<0.01, r=0.45 p<0.01, respectively), mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) (r=0.48 p<0.01, r=0.48 p<0.01), and tricuspid regurgitant (TR) velocity (r=0.36 p<0.01, r=0.41 p<0.01). BNP and NTproBNP are associated with 6 minute walking distance, mPAP, mPAP/mSAP ratio, mRAP, pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and TR velocity when investigated longitudinally. On the average, a 1 unit increase in log BNP or NTproBNP was associated with 4.5 unitsxm2 or 3.4 unitsxm2 increase in PVRI, respectively. There was a strong correlation between log BNP and log NTproBNP measurements (r= 0.87, p<0.01). Conclusion In pediatric PAH, BNP and NTProBNP are strongly correlated and predict changes in clinical variables and hemodynamics. In a cross-sectional analysis, NTproBNP correlated with echocardiographic and exercise data better than BNP; NTproBNP showed less within patient variability over time, therefore NTproBNP can add additional information towards predicting these clinical measurements. PMID:22325151

  13. Cyclin Y-mediated transcript profiling reveals several important functional pathways regulated by Cyclin Y in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanna; Hong, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Mirang; Park, Mikyoung

    2017-01-01

    Cyclin Y (CCNY), which is a cyclin protein known to play a role in cell division, is unexpectedly and thus interestingly expressed in non-proliferating neuronal cells. There have been only a few studies reporting the neuronal functions of CCNY in synapse remodeling and hippocampal long-term potentiation. Therefore, we here provide global and comprehensive information on the putative functions of CCNY in biological and functional pathways in neuronal systems. We adopted high-throughput RNA-sequencing technology for analyzing transcriptomes regulated by CCNY and utilized bioinformatics for identifying putative molecules, biological processes, and functional pathways that are possibly connected to CCNY functions in hippocampal neuronal cells of rats. We revealed that several enriched annotation terms and pathways associated with CCNY expression within neurons, including apoptosis, learning or memory, synaptic plasticity, actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway are targeted by CCNY. In addition, the mRNA levels of some genes enriched for those annotation terms and pathways or genes reported to be altered in Alzheimer’s disease mouse model were further validated by quantitative real-time PCR in hippocampal neuronal cells. The present study provides an excellent resource for future investigations of CCNY functions in neuronal systems. PMID:28241067

  14. The Rho GTPase effector ROCK regulates cyclin A, cyclin D1, and p27Kip1 levels by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Croft, Daniel R; Olson, Michael F

    2006-06-01

    The members of the Rho GTPase family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeletal structures. In addition, they influence progression through the cell cycle. The RhoA and RhoC proteins regulate numerous effector proteins, with a central and vital signaling role mediated by the ROCK I and ROCK II serine/threonine kinases. The requirement for ROCK function in the proliferation of numerous cell types has been revealed by studies utilizing ROCK-selective inhibitors such as Y-27632. However, the mechanisms by which ROCK signaling promotes cell cycle progression have not been thoroughly characterized. Using a conditionally activated ROCK-estrogen receptor fusion protein, we found that ROCK activation is sufficient to stimulate G1/S cell cycle progression in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Further analysis revealed that ROCK acts via independent pathways to alter the levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins: cyclin D1 and p21(Cip1) elevation via Ras and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, increased cyclin A via LIM kinase 2, and reduction of p27(Kip1) protein levels. Therefore, the influence of ROCK on cell cycle regulatory proteins occurs by multiple independent mechanisms.

  15. Hypothalamic over-expression of VGF in the Siberian hamster increases energy expenditure and reduces body weight gain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jo E; Brameld, John M; Hill, Phil; Cocco, Cristina; Noli, Barbara; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Barrett, Perry; Ebling, Francis J P; Jethwa, Preeti H

    2017-01-01

    VGF (non-acronymic) was first highlighted to have a role in energy homeostasis through experiments involving dietary manipulation in mice. Fasting increased VGF mRNA in the Arc and levels were subsequently reduced upon refeeding. This anabolic role for VGF was supported by observations in a VGF null (VGF-/-) mouse and in the diet-induced and gold-thioglucose obese mice. However, this anabolic role for VGF has not been supported by a number of subsequent studies investigating the physiological effects of VGF-derived peptides. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of TLQP-21 increased resting energy expenditure and rectal temperature in mice and protected against diet-induced obesity. Similarly, ICV infusion of TLQP-21 into Siberian hamsters significantly reduced body weight, but this was due to a decrease in food intake, with no effect on energy expenditure. Subsequently NERP-2 was shown to increase food intake in rats via the orexin system, suggesting opposing roles for these VGF-derived peptides. Thus to further elucidate the role of hypothalamic VGF in the regulation of energy homeostasis we utilised a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector to over-express VGF in adult male Siberian hamsters, thus avoiding any developmental effects or associated functional compensation. Initially, hypothalamic over-expression of VGF in adult Siberian hamsters produced no effect on metabolic parameters, but by 12 weeks post-infusion hamsters had increased oxygen consumption and a tendency to increased carbon dioxide production; this attenuated body weight gain, reduced interscapular white adipose tissue and resulted in a compensatory increase in food intake. These observed changes in energy expenditure and food intake were associated with an increase in the hypothalamic contents of the VGF-derived peptides AQEE, TLQP and NERP-2. The complex phenotype of the VGF-/- mice is a likely consequence of global ablation of the gene and its derived peptides during development, as well

  16. Over-expression of GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 feedback regulatory protein attenuates LPS and cytokine-stimulated nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Manasi; Kelly, Peter; Vallance, Patrick; Leiper, James

    2008-02-01

    GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GTP-CH1) catalyses the first and rate-limiting step for the de novo production of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The GTP-CH1-BH(4) pathway is emerging as an important regulator in a number of pathologies associated with over-production of nitric oxide (NO) and hence a more detailed understanding of this pathway may lead to novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of certain vascular diseases. GTP-CH1 activity can be inhibited by BH(4) through its protein-protein interactions with GTP-CH1 regulatory protein (GFRP), and transcriptional and post-translational modification of both GTP-CH1 and GFRP have been reported in response to proinflammatory stimuli. However, the functional significance of GFRP/GTP-CH1 interactions on NO pathways has not yet been demonstrated. We aimed to investigate whether over-expression of GFRP could affect NO production in living cells. Over-expression of N-terminally Myc-tagged recombinant human GFRP in the murine endothelial cell line sEnd 1 resulted in no significant effect on basal BH(4) nor NO levels but significantly attenuated the rise in BH(4) and NO observed following lipopolysaccharide and cytokine stimulation of cells. This study demonstrates that GFRP can play a direct regulatory role in iNOS-mediated NO synthesis and suggests that the allosteric regulation of GTP-CH1 activity by GFRP may be an important mechanism regulating BH(4) and NO levels in vivo.

  17. Ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in transgenic mice over-expressing erythropoietin: effect of acclimation to 3-week hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas-Alayza, Rosa; Macarlupú, José Luis; Monge-C, Carlos; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2007-09-30

    We used transgenic mice constitutively over-expressing erythropoietin ("tg6" mice) and wild-type (wt) mice to investigate whether the high hematocrit (hct), consequence of Epo over-expression affected: (1) the normoxic ventilation (V (E)) and the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and decline (HVD), (2) the increase in ventilation observed after chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (430mmHg for 21 days), (3) the respiratory "blunting", and (4) the erythrocythemic response induced by chronic hypoxia exposure. V (E) was found to be similar in tg6 and wt mice in normoxia (FIO2=0.21). Post-acclimation V (E) was significantly elevated in every time point in wt mice at FIO2=0.10 when compared to pre-acclimation values. In contrast, tg6 mice exhibited a non-significant increase in V (E) throughout acute hypoxia exposure. Changes in V (E) are associated with adjustments in tidal volume (V(T)). HVR and HVD were independent of EE in tg6 and wt mice before chornic hypoxia exposure. HVR was significantly greater in wt than in tg6 mice after chronic hypoxia. After acclimation, HVD decreased in tg6 mice. Chronic hypoxia exposure caused hct to increase significantly in wt mice, while only a marginal increase occurred in the tg6 group. Although pre-existent EE does not appear to have an effect on HVR, the observation of alterations on V(T) suggests that it may contribute to time-dependent changes in ventilation and in the acute HVR during exposure to chronic hypoxia. In addition, our results suggest that EE may lead to an early "blunting" of the ventilatory response.

  18. Hypothalamic over-expression of VGF in the Siberian hamster increases energy expenditure and reduces body weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Brameld, John M.; Hill, Phil; Cocco, Cristina; Noli, Barbara; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Barrett, Perry; Ebling, Francis J. P.; Jethwa, Preeti H.

    2017-01-01

    VGF (non-acronymic) was first highlighted to have a role in energy homeostasis through experiments involving dietary manipulation in mice. Fasting increased VGF mRNA in the Arc and levels were subsequently reduced upon refeeding. This anabolic role for VGF was supported by observations in a VGF null (VGF-/-) mouse and in the diet-induced and gold-thioglucose obese mice. However, this anabolic role for VGF has not been supported by a number of subsequent studies investigating the physiological effects of VGF-derived peptides. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of TLQP-21 increased resting energy expenditure and rectal temperature in mice and protected against diet-induced obesity. Similarly, ICV infusion of TLQP-21 into Siberian hamsters significantly reduced body weight, but this was due to a decrease in food intake, with no effect on energy expenditure. Subsequently NERP-2 was shown to increase food intake in rats via the orexin system, suggesting opposing roles for these VGF-derived peptides. Thus to further elucidate the role of hypothalamic VGF in the regulation of energy homeostasis we utilised a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector to over-express VGF in adult male Siberian hamsters, thus avoiding any developmental effects or associated functional compensation. Initially, hypothalamic over-expression of VGF in adult Siberian hamsters produced no effect on metabolic parameters, but by 12 weeks post-infusion hamsters had increased oxygen consumption and a tendency to increased carbon dioxide production; this attenuated body weight gain, reduced interscapular white adipose tissue and resulted in a compensatory increase in food intake. These observed changes in energy expenditure and food intake were associated with an increase in the hypothalamic contents of the VGF-derived peptides AQEE, TLQP and NERP-2. The complex phenotype of the VGF-/- mice is a likely consequence of global ablation of the gene and its derived peptides during development, as well

  19. Reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcement in mice over-expressing the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Line, Samantha J; Barkus, Chris; Rawlings, Nancy; Jennings, Katie; McHugh, Stephen; Sharp, Trevor; Bannerman, David M

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) is believed to play a key role in both normal and pathological psychological states. Much previous data suggest that the s allele of the polymorphic regulatory region of the 5-HTT gene promoter is associated with reduced 5-HTT expression and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression. In comparison, the l allele, which increases 5-HTT expression, is generally considered protective. However, recent data link this allele to both abnormal 5-HT signalling and psychopathic traits. Here, we studied the processing of aversive and rewarding cues in transgenic mice that over-express the 5-HTT (5-HTTOE mice). Compared with wild-type mice, 5-HTTOE mice froze less in response to both a tone that had previously been paired with footshock, and the conditioning context. In addition, on a decision-making T-maze task, 5-HTTOE mice displayed reduced preference for a larger, delayed reward and increased preference for a smaller, immediate reward, suggesting increased impulsiveness compared with wild-type mice. However, further inspection of the data revealed that 5-HTTOE mice displayed a relative insensitivity to reward magnitude, irrespective of delay. In contrast, 5-HTTOE mice appeared normal on tests of spatial working and reference memory, which required an absolute choice between options associated with either reward or no reward. Overall, the present findings suggest that 5-HTT over-expression results in a reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcers. Thus, these data show that increased 5-HTT expression has some maladaptive effects, supporting recent suggestions that l allele homozygosity may be a potential risk factor for disabling psychiatric traits.

  20. Over-expression of an FT-homologous gene of apple induces early flowering in annual and perennial plants.

    PubMed

    Tränkner, Conny; Lehmann, Sandra; Hoenicka, Hans; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Fladung, Matthias; Lenhardt, Denise; Dunemann, Frank; Gau, Achim; Schlangen, Karin; Malnoy, Mickael; Flachowsky, Henryk

    2010-11-01

    The protein encoded by the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana seems to be the long-searched florigen, and over-expression of FT orthologues resulted in accelerated flower development in annual and perennial plants. In the present study, we isolated two allelic mRNA sequences of an FT-homologous gene from apple, which was designated as MdFT1. Using a SSR motif this gene was mapped on LG 12 of apple. Over-expression of MdFT1 in Arabidopsis and the commercially important tree species poplar and apple itself using the CaMV 35S or the Arabidopsis Suc2 promoter resulted in significant accelerated flowering compared with wild-type plants. Transgenic T(0) plants of Arabidopsis flowered 4-6 days on average earlier than wild-type Arabidopsis under LD conditions. Under short-day conditions Suc2::MdFT1 plants of the T(1)-generation flowered after 66 ± 18 days, while wild-type plants flowered about 22 days later. All transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed a normal habit except for the early flowering phenotype. Early flowering was detected 6-10 months after transformation in transgenic polar clones containing MdFT1 driven by the CaMV 35S, whereas plants of the transgenic apple clone T780 set up its first flowers during in vitro cultivation. Based on our results we conclude that MdFT1 is responsible for inducing flowering and that the function of the apple FT1 gene is conserved in annual herbaceous species as well as perennial woody species. Furthermore, we discuss the role of MdFT1 in flower development with regard to the findings of genetic studies on apple.

  1. Angiopoietin-Like 4 Is Over-Expressed in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Association with Pathological Bone Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Swales, Catherine; Athanasou, Nicholas A.; Knowles, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Osteoclasts are responsible for the bone loss associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The secreted adipokine angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) specifically increases osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We have investigated expression of ANGPTL4 and its regulatory transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), in osteoclasts and other cells within rheumatoid synovium. We have also examined whether circulating levels of ANGPTL4 differ in RA patients compared with that in normal controls or patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that bone-apposing osteoclasts within the rheumatoid synovium express both ANGPTL4 and HIF-1α. ANGPTL4 was also strongly expressed in synovial lining cells, endothelial cells, stromal cells, CD68+ macrophages and plasma cells within RA synovium. Little ANGPTL4 was evident in normal synovial tissue. This reflected the over-expression of HIF-1α in rheumatoid versus normal synovial tissue. The concentration of ANGPTL4 was higher in both the serum and the synovial fluid of RA patients than in patients with OA or normal controls. High serum ANGPTL4 associated with elevated levels of the serum marker of bone resorption, receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Conclusions Over-expression of ANGPTL4 in multiple cell types within the rheumatoid synovium potentially provides a local pool of ANGPTL4 to stimulate osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in RA. Additionally, correlation of high serum ANGPTL4 with circulating RANKL suggests that ANGPTL4 may represent a novel marker for bone destruction in RA. PMID:25289668

  2. Biochemical mechanisms of imidacloprid resistance in Nilaparvata lugens: over-expression of cytochrome P450 CYP6AY1.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhiping; Wen, Yucong; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Zewen; Han, Zhaojun

    2013-11-01

    Imidacloprid is a key insecticide extensively used for control of Nilaparvata lugens, and its resistance had been reported both in the laboratory selected strains and field populations. A target site mutation Y151S in two nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits and enhanced oxidative detoxification have been identified in the laboratory resistant strain, contributing importantly to imidacloprid resistance in N. lugens. To date, however, imidacloprid resistance in field population is primarily attributable to enhanced oxidative detoxification by over-expressed P450 monooxygenases. A resistant strain (Res), originally collected from a field population and continuously selected in laboratory with imidacloprid for more than 40 generations, had 180.8-fold resistance to imidacloprid, compared to a susceptible strain (Sus). Expression of different putative P450 genes at mRNA levels was detected and compared between Res and Sus strains, and six genes were found expressed significantly higher in Res strain than in Sus strain. CYP6AY1 was found to be the most different expressed P450 gene and its mRNA level in Res strain was 17.9 times of that in Sus strain. By expressing in E. coli cells, CYP6AY1 was found to metabolize imidacloprid efficiently with initial velocity calculated of 0.851 ± 0.073 pmol/min/pmol P450. When CYP6AY1 mRNA levels in Res strain was reduced by RNA interference, imidacloprid susceptibility was recovered. In four field populations with different resistance levels, high levels of CYP6AY1 transcript were also found. In vitro and in vivo studies provided evidences that the over-expression of CYP6AY1 was one of the key factors contributing to imidacloprid resistance in the laboratory selected strain Res, which might also be the important mechanism for imidacloprid resistance in field populations, when the target site mutation was not prevalent at present.

  3. Cyclin A2 is an RNA binding protein that controls Mre11 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Limzerwala, Jazeel F.; Baker, Darren J.; Hamada, Masakazu; Nam, Hyun-Ja; van Deursen, Willemijn H.; Hamada, Naomi; Naylor, Ryan M.; Becker, Nicole A.; Davies, Brian A.; van Ree, Janine H.; Mer, Georges; Shapiro, Virginia S.; Maher, L. James; Katzmann, David J.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin A2 activates the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk1 and Cdk2 and is expressed at elevated levels from S phase until early mitosis. We found that mutant mice that cannot elevate cyclin A2 are chromosomally unstable and tumor-prone. Underlying the chromosomal instability is a failure to up-regulate the meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11) nuclease in S phase, which leads to impaired resolution of stalled replication forks, insufficient repair of double-stranded DNA breaks, and improper segregation of sister chromosomes. Unexpectedly, cyclin A2 controlled Mre11 abundance through a C-terminal RNA binding domain that selectively and directly binds Mre11 transcripts to mediate polysome loading and translation.These data reveal cyclin A2 as a mechanistically diverse regulator of DNA replication combining multifaceted kinase-dependent functions with a kinase-independent, RNA binding–dependent role that ensures adequate repair of common replication errors. PMID:27708105

  4. Identification of a novel cyclin required for the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Roig, M B; Roset, R; Ortet, L; Balsiger, N A; Anfosso, A; Cabellos, L; Garrido, M; Alameda, F; Brady, H J M; Gil-Gómez, G

    2009-02-01

    We have identified an early step common to pathways activated by different forms of intrinsic apoptosis stimuli. It requires de novo synthesis of a novel cyclin, cyclin O, that forms active complexes primarily with Cdk2 upon apoptosis induction in lymphoid cells. Cyclin O expression precedes glucocorticoid and gamma-radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo in mouse thymus and spleen, and its overexpression induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells. Knocking down the endogenous expression of cyclin O by shRNA leads to the inhibition of glucocorticoid and DNA damage-induced apoptosis due to a failure in the activation of apical caspases while leaving CD95 death receptor-mediated apoptosis intact. Our data demonstrate that apoptosis induction in lymphoid cells is one of the physiological roles of cyclin O and it does not act by perturbing a normal cellular process such as the cell cycle, the DNA damage checkpoints or transcriptional response to glucocorticoids.

  5. Spectropolarimetry of B-type and C-type asteroids: Phase Curves and Wavelength Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleszewski, C.; McMillan, R. S.; Smith, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present recent spectropolarimetric observations of eleven B- and C-type asteroids using SPOL (http://james.as.arizona.edu/~psmith/SPOL/) at the 2.3-m Bok and 1.6-m Kuiper telescopes. Our primary goal is to further constrain our understanding of the wavelength dependence of linear polarization. For each object, we produced polarimetric phase curves (linear polarization vs. phase angle) and measure the wavelength dependence in each observation by calculating the slope of each polarization spectrum. Previous analysis by Belskaya et al. (2009) shows that the slope of the polarization spectrum increases as the wavelength increases. No analysis of the wavelength dependence in B-types has occurred previously to our knowledge. For the five C-type (3 Ch- and 2 C-) objects observed, those of the Ch-type have larger minimum polarizations than of the C- subtype. This is consistent with polarimetric phase curves of similar asteroids by Gil-Hutton and Cañada-Assandri (2012). With respect to the wavelength dependence, our observed targets show an increase in polarization slope with wavelength, confirming the Belskaya (2009) result. After dividing the data by group, C- subtype objects have relatively flat polarization spectra, as opposed to the Ch- subtypes that have more rapidly changing slopes as phase angle increases. A mineralogical basis for the variety of wavelength dependences observed is most likely. Additional observations of the other C- subtypes will aid to distinguish how mineralogical variation affects polarization. It may also explain the wide range of polarization slopes measured near a phase angle of ten degrees in the Belskaya (2009) analysis. Six B-type asteroids were observed in a similar manner. As with the C-types, the polarimetric phase curves vary in shape, suggesting differences in albedo. Also, the wavelength dependence increases with wavelength, as shown for the C-types. On the other hand, all of the B-type objects have a similar wavelength dependence

  6. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  7. Rictor regulates FBXW7-dependent c-Myc and cyclin E degradation in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zheng; Zhou, Yuning; Evers, B. Mark; Wang, Qingding

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor decreases ubiquitination of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor increases protein levels of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. -- Abstract: Rictor (Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) forms a complex with mTOR and phosphorylates and activates Akt. Activation of Akt induces expression of c-Myc and cyclin E, which are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and play an important role in colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show that rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E degradation. The Rictor-FBXW7 complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Moreover, knocking down of rictor in serum-deprived colorectal cancer cells results in the decreased ubiquitination and increased protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin E while overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Genetic knockout of FBXW7 blunts the effects of rictor, suggesting that rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. Our findings identify rictor as an important component of FBXW7 E3 ligase complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E protein ubiquitination and degradation. Importantly, our results suggest that elevated growth factor signaling may contribute to decrease rictor/FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination of c-Myc and cyclin E, thus leading to accumulation of cyclin E and c-Myc in colorectal cancer cells.

  8. The dual role of cyclin C connects stress regulated gene expression to mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Cooper, Katrina F.

    2014-01-01

    Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, cellular damage is first recognized by a variety of sensor mechanisms. Thenceforth, the damage signal is transduced to the nucleus to install the correct gene expression program including the induction of genes whose products either detoxify destructive compounds or repair the damage they cause. Next, the stress signal is disseminated throughout the cell to effect the appropriate changes at organelles including the mitochondria. The mitochondria represent an important signaling platform for the stress response. An initial stress response of the mitochondria is extensive fragmentation. If the damage is prodigious, the mitochondria fragment (fission) and lose their outer membrane integrity leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors necessary for programmed cell death (PCD) execution. As this complex biological process contains many moving parts, it must be exquisitely coordinated as the ultimate decision is life or death. The conserved C-type cyclin plays an important role in executing this molecular Rubicon by coupling changes in gene expression to mitochondrial fission and PCD. Cyclin C, along with its cyclin dependent kinase partner Cdk8, associates with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to regulate transcription. In particular, cyclin C-Cdk8 repress many stress responsive genes. To relieve this repression, cyclin C is destroyed in cells exposed to pro-oxidants and other stressors. However, prior to its destruction, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is released from its nuclear anchor (Med13), translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it interacts with the fission machinery and is both necessary and sufficient to induce extensive mitochondria fragmentation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic cyclin C promotes PCD indicating that it mediates both mitochondrial fission and cell death pathways. This review will summarize the role cyclin C plays in regulating stress-responsive transcription. In addition, we will detail this new function

  9. Cyclin D1 in the Liver: Role of Noncanonical Signaling in Liver Steatosis and Hormone Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Kelley G.; Gonzalez-Rosario, Janet; Thevenot, Paul T.; Cohen, Ari J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 is an important protein for cell cycle progression; however, functions independent of the cell cycle have been described in the liver. Cyclin D1 is also involved in DNA repair, is overexpressed in many cancers, and functions as a proto-oncogene. The lesser-known roles of Cyclin D1, specifically in hepatocytes, impact liver steatosis and hormone regulation in the liver. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed was conducted using the keywords Cyclin D1, steatosis, lipogenesis, and liver transplantation. In this article, we review the results from this literature search, with a focus on the role of Cyclin D1 in hepatic lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis, as well as the impact and function of this protein in hepatic steatosis. Results: Cyclin D1 represses carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and results in a decrease in transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC). Cyclin D1 also inhibits peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) which is involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Cyclin D1 inhibits both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) and represses transcription of lipogenic genes FAS and liver-type pyruvate kinase (Pklr), along with the gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 represses multiple proteins involved in both lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Targeting Cyclin D1 to decrease hepatic steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or alcoholic fatty liver disease may help improve patient health and the quality of the donor liver pool. PMID:28331449

  10. Cellular immune mechanisms in Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 induced myocarditis in Balb/C mice

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, S.A.; Job, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Coxsackie B viruses are a common cause of viral myocarditis in humans. A murine model of the human disease has been developed using Coxsackievirus group B, type 3 and inbred Balb/c mice. Infection of T lymphocyte deficient mice does not result in significant myocarditis indicating the importance of T cells in this disease. The virus can be isolated from the hearts of T cell deficient and normal mice in equal concentrations. Virus elimination presumably is mediated by virus specific neutralizing antibody induced in both groups. T lymphocytes, natural killer cells and macrophage obtained from normal virus infected mice are all capable of lysing myofibers in vitro. Maximum lysis is obtained with the cytolytic T cells. When these cell populations or Coxsackievirus immune antibody were adoptively transferred into T lymphocyte deficient animals infected with the virus, only animals given T cells developed significant myocarditis.

  11. B-type natriuretic peptide and heart failure: what can we learn from clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Binoun-A-Egom, Christian; Andreas, Angelo; Klimas, Jan; Valentova, Vanda; Kruzliak, Peter; Egom, Emmanuel E

    2015-05-13

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), may favor natriuresis and diuresis, making it an ideal drug that may aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Several randomized clinical trials have tested the hypothesis that infusions of pharmacological doses of BNP to acute heart failure (HF) patients may enhance decongestion and preserve renal function in this clinical setting. Unfortunately, none of these has resulted in a better outcome. The current challenge for BNP research in acute HF lies in a failure of concept and reluctance to abandon a demonstrably ineffectual research model. Future success will necessitate a detailed understanding of the mechanism of action of BNP as well as a better integration of basic and clinical science. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Spectral classification with the International Ultraviolet Explorer: An atlas of B-type spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rountree, Janet; Sonneborn, George

    1993-01-01

    New criteria for the spectral classification of B stars in the ultraviolet show that photospheric absorption lines in the 1200-1900A wavelength region can be used to classify the spectra of B-type dwarfs, subgiants, and giants on a 2-D system consistent with the optical MK system. This atlas illustrates a large number of such spectra at the scale used for classification. These spectra provide a dense matrix of standard stars, and also show the effects of rapid stellar rotation and stellar winds on the spectra and their classification. The observational material consists of high-dispersion spectra from the International Ultraviolet Explorer archives, resampled to a resolution of 0.25 A, uniformly normalized, and plotted at 10 A/cm. The atlas should be useful for the classification of other IUE high-dispersion spectra, especially for stars that have not been observed in the optical.

  13. The Results of SED Simulations for a Young B-Type Star IRAS 22150+6109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhozhay, O. V.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Kuratov, K. S.; Zakhozhay, V. A.; Khokhlov, S. A.; Zharikov, S. V.; Manset, N.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic analysis and spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling for a young B-type star IRAS 22150+6109. The optical multicolor photometric data were obtained at the Tien-Shan Astronomical Observatory near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Infrared photometry was taken from various sky surveys, such as IRAS, WISE, and AKARI. High-resolution optical spectra were obtained at the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the 2.1 m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional San Pedro Martir (OAN SPM). Fundamental parameters of the star are estimated under an assumption that it has a zero-age main-sequence luminosity and a spectral type of B3. The best fit to the SED implies that a large disk is located very far from the star (136 AU) and extended to 850 AU.

  14. The use of B-type natriuretic peptide to diagnose congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jeffery R

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains the background and current use of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) assays to differentiate congestive heart failure (CHF) from other causes of dyspnea. With a large and growing elderly population, CHF is being diagnosed much more often in emergency rooms in the United States. Doctors need a way to quickly distinguish whether a patient with respiratory distress is suffering from cardiac insufficiency or another etiology. BNP is released from the ventricles in response cardiac overload from CHF or some other form of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Therefore, the detection and measurement of BNP is a fast and accurate method of determining if CHF is the cause of a patient's breathing difficulties.

  15. Pharmacological chaperones as a potential therapeutic option in methylmalonic aciduria cblB type

    PubMed Central

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Brasil, Sandra; Underhaug, Jarl; Ruíz-Sala, Pedro; Merinero, Begoña; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Martinez, Aurora; Pérez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) cblB type is caused by mutations in the MMAB gene. This encodes the enzyme ATP:cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR), which converts reduced cob(I)alamin to an active adenosylcobalamin cofactor. We recently reported the presence of destabilizing pathogenic mutations that retain some residual ATR activity. The aim of the present study was to seek pharmacological chaperones as a tailored therapy for stabilizing the ATR protein. High-throughput ligand screening of over 2000 compounds was performed; six were found to enhance the thermal stability of purified recombinant ATR. Further studies using a well-established bacterial system in which the recombinant ATR protein was expressed in the presence of these six compounds, showed them all to increase the stability of the wild-type ATR and the p.Ile96Thr mutant proteins. Compound V (N-{[(4-chlorophenyl)carbamothioyl]amino}-2-phenylacetamide) significantly increased this stability and did not act as an inhibitor of the purified protein. Importantly, compound V increased the activity of ATR in patient-derived fibroblasts harboring the destabilizing p.Ile96Thr mutation in a hemizygous state to within control range. When cobalamin was coadministrated with compound V, mutant ATR activity further improved. Oral administration of low doses of compound V to C57BL/6J mice for 12 days, led to increase in steady-state levels of ATR protein in liver and brain (disease-relevant organs). These results hold promise for the clinical use of pharmacological chaperones in MMA cblB type patients harboring chaperone-responsive mutations. PMID:23674520

  16. The Lyman-Continuum Fluxes and Stellar Parameters of O and Early B-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacca, William D.; Garmany, Catherine D.; Shull, J. Michael

    1996-01-01

    Using the results of the most recent stellar atmosphere models applied to a sample of hot stars, we construct calibrations of effective temperature (T(sub eff)), and gravity (log(sub g)) with a spectral type and luminosity class for Galactic 0-type and early B-type stars. From the model results we also derive an empirical relation between the bolometric correction and T(sub eff) and log g. Using a sample of stars with known distances located in OB associations in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud, we derive a new calibration of M(sub v) with spectral class. With these new calibrations and the stellar atmosphere models of Kurucz, we calculate the physical parameters and ionizing photon luminosities in the H(0) and He(0) continua for O and early B-type stars. We find substantial differences between our values of the Lyman- continuum luminosity and those reported in the literature. We also discuss the systematic discrepancy between O-type stellar masses derived from spectroscopic models and those derived from evolutionary tracks. Most likely, the cause of this 'mass discrepancy' lies primarily in the atmospheric models, which are plane parallel and hydrostatic and therefore do not account for an extended atmosphere and the velocity fields in a stellar wind. Finally, we present a new computation of the Lyman-continuum luminosity from 429 known O stars located within 2.5 kpc of the Sun. We find the total ionizing luminosity from this population ((Q(sub 0)(sup T(sub ot))) = 7.0 x 10(exp 51) photons/s) to be 47% larger than that determined using the Lyman continuum values tabulated by Panagia.

  17. CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS ORBITING THE RAPIDLY PULSATING SUBDWARF B-TYPE BINARY NY Vir

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Dai, Z.-B.; He, J.-J.; Xiang, F.-Y.

    2012-02-15

    We report here the tentative discovery of a Jovian planet in orbit around the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B-type (sdB-type) eclipsing binary NY Vir. By using newly determined eclipse times together with those collected from the literature, we detect that the observed-calculated (O - C) curve of NY Vir shows a small-amplitude cyclic variation with a period of 7.9 yr and a semiamplitude of 6.1 s, while it undergoes a downward parabolic change (revealing a period decrease at a rate of P-dot = -9.2 x 10{sup -12}). The periodic variation was analyzed for the light-travel-time effect via the presence of a third body. The mass of the tertiary companion was determined to be M{sub 3}sin i' = 2.3({+-} 0.3)M{sub Jupiter} when a total mass of 0.60 M{sub Sun} for NY Vir is adopted. This suggests that it is most probably a giant circumbinary planet orbiting NY Vir at a distance of about 3.3 astronomical units (AU). Since the rate of period decrease cannot be explained by true angular momentum loss caused by gravitational radiation or/and magnetic braking, the observed downward parabolic change in the O - C diagram may be only a part of a long-period (longer than 15 years) cyclic variation, which may reveal the presence of another Jovian planet ({approx}2.5 M{sub Jupiter}) in the system.

  18. Pleiotropic effect of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Tanaka, Kan; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-11-01

    Over-expression of sigE, a gene encoding an RNA polymerase sigma factor in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, is known to activate sugar catabolism and bioplastic production. In this study, we investigated the effects of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this cyanobacterium. Transmission electron and scanning probe microscopic analyses revealed that sigE over-expression increased the cell size, possibly as a result of aberrant cell division. Over-expression of sigE reduced respiration and photosynthesis activities via changes in gene expression and chlorophyll fluorescence. Hydrogen production under micro-oxic conditions is enhanced in sigE over-expressing cells. Despite these pleiotropic phenotypes, the sigE over-expressing strain showed normal cell viability under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. These results provide insights into the inter-relationship among metabolism, cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this unicellular cyanobacterium.

  19. Cyclin Dependent Kinase 9 Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Yogesh A; Taylor, Margaret A; Napoleon, John Victor; Rana, Sandeep; Contreras, Jacob I; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-10-13

    Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been the topic of intense research for nearly 2 decades due to their widely varied and critical functions within the cell. Recently CDK9 has emerged as a druggable target for the development of cancer therapeutics. CDK9 plays a crucial role in transcription regulation; specifically, CDK9 mediated transcriptional regulation of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins is critical for the survival of transformed cells. Focused chemical libraries based on a plethora of scaffolds have resulted in mixed success with regard to the development of selective CDK9 inhibitors. Here we review the regulation of CDK9, its cellular functions, and common core structures used to target CDK9, along with their selectivity profile and efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

  20. [Cytotoxicity of chimera peptides incorporating sequences of cyclin kinases inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, V P; Kulinich, V G; Lunin, V G; Filiasova, E I; Shishkin, A M; Sergeenko, O V; Riazanova, E M; Voronina, O L; Bozhenko, V K

    2007-01-01

    The study is concerned with proapoptotic properties of chimera peptides which incorporate sequences of inhibitors of cyclin kinases p161NK4a and p21CIP/WAF1 as well as internalized sequences (Antp and tat). Sequences of the p16 type appeared to be more cytotoxic than the p21 one. Cytotoxic effect proved dependent on orientation with respect to the C or N terminal point of a polypeptide chain rather than on chimera sequence extent. Although p16 endogenous synthesis did not influence chimera peptide levels, apoptosis did not take place in certain cellular lines. Due to the rather unsophisticated nature of such synthesis, it might be used in designing individually-tailored chemotherapeutic drugs.

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  2. Over-Expression of Leptin Receptors in Hypothalamic POMC Neurons Increases Susceptibility to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gamber, Kevin M.; Huo, Lihong; Ha, Sangdeuk; Hairston, Joyce E.; Greeley, Sarah; Bjørbæk, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) in rodents is characterized by impaired activation of signal-transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by leptin receptors (LepRb) within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. This signaling defect likely plays an important role in development of DIO. However, the neuro-chemical identity of the leptin-STAT3 resistant arcuate neurons has not been determined and the underlying mechanisms responsible for development of cellular leptin resistance remain unclear. To investigate this, we first measured arcuate gene expression of known key signaling components of the LepRb signaling pathway and tested whether specifically the critical arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are resistant to LepRb-STAT3 signaling in mice given a high-fat-diet (HFD) compared to mice provided a low-fat control diet (LFD). We found that leptin-dependent STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased within POMC neurons of HFD mice. In addition, Leprb mRNA and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3) mRNA were elevated in the arcuate of HFD mice. To investigate whether increased LepRb expression per se in POMC neurons can influence development of DIO and Socs3 expression, we created mice that over-express LepRb selectively in POMC neurons (POMC-LepRb). No differences in body weight, fat mass or food intake were found between LFD POMC-LepRb mice and LFD controls. Surprisingly, body weight, fat mass and caloric intake of HFD POMC-LepRb mice was markedly higher than HFD control mice. In addition, arcuate Socs3 mRNA was increased in HFD POMC-LepRb mice compared to HFD controls. These data show that specifically POMC neurons of DIO mice are resistant to STAT3 activation by leptin, indicating that those cells might play a role in development of DIO. Furthermore, over-expression of LepRb selectively in POMC neurons increases susceptibility to the development of DIO. We propose a model where over-reactivity of the leptin-LepRb signaling system in arcuate neurons may play

  3. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Xuanbin; Tan, Hor-Yue; Li, Sha; Tsang, Chi Man; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degradation. In addition, berberine recruits the Skp, Cullin, F-box containing complex-β-Transducin Repeat Containing Protein (SCFβ-TrCP) complex to facilitate Cyclin D1 ubiquitin-proteasome dependent proteolysis. Knockdown of β-TrCP blocks Cyclin D1 turnover induced by berberine; blocking the protein degradation induced by berberine in HepG2 cells increases tumor cell resistance to berberine. Our results shed light on berberine′s potential as an anti-tumor agent for clinical cancer therapy. PMID:27854312

  4. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    PubMed

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  5. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism. PMID:26962866

  6. The structural protein ODV-EC27 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a multifunctional viral cyclin.

    PubMed

    Belyavskyi, M; Braunagel, S C; Summers, M D

    1998-09-15

    Two major characteristics of baculovirus infection are arrest of the host cell at G2/M phase of the cell cycle with continuing viral DNA replication. We show that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) encodes for a multifunctional cyclin that may partially explain the molecular basis of these important characteristics of AcMNPV (baculovirus) infection. Amino acids 80-110 of the viral structural protein ODV-EC27 (-EC27) demonstrate 25-30% similarity with cellular cyclins within the cyclin box. Immunoprecipitation results using antibodies to -EC27 show that -EC27 can associate with either cdc2 or cdk6 resulting in active kinase complexes that can phosphorylate histone H1 and retinoblastoma protein in vitro. The cdk6-EC27 complex also associates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and we demonstrate that PCNA is a structural protein of both the budded virus and the occlusion-derived virus. These results suggest that -EC27 can function as a multifunctional cyclin: when associated with cdc2, it exhibits cyclin B-like activity; when associated with cdk6, the complex possesses cyclin D-like activity and binds PCNA. The possible roles of such a multifunctional cyclin during the life cycle of baculovirus are discussed, along with potential implications relative to the expression of functionally authentic recombinant proteins by using baculovirus-infected cells.

  7. Amygdalin Blocks Bladder Cancer Cell Growth In Vitro by Diminishing Cyclin A and cdk2

    PubMed Central

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25–10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug. PMID:25136960

  8. A comparative study of the degradation of yeast cyclins Cln1 and Cln2.

    PubMed

    Quilis, Inma; Igual, J Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The yeast cyclins Cln1 and Cln2 are very similar in both sequence and function, but some differences in their functionality and localization have been recently described. The control of Cln1 and Cln2 cellular levels is crucial for proper cell cycle initiation. In this work, we analyzed the degradation patterns of Cln1 and Cln2 in order to further investigate the possible differences between them. Both cyclins show the same half-life but, while Cln2 degradation depends on ubiquitin ligases SCF(G)(rr1) and SCF(C)(dc4), Cln1 is affected only by SCF(G)(rr1). Degradation analysis of chimeric cyclins, constructed by combining fragments from Cln1 and Cln2, identifies the N-terminal sequence of the proteins as responsible of the cyclin degradation pattern. In particular, the N-terminal region of Cln2 is required to mediate degradation by SCF(C)(dc4). This region is involved in nuclear import of Cln1 and Cln2, which suggests that differences in degradation may be due to differences in localization. Moreover, a comparison of the cyclins that differ only in the presence of the Cln2 nuclear export signal indicates a greater instability of exported cyclins, thus reinforcing the idea that cyclin stability is influenced by their localization.

  9. Cyclin B Translation Depends on mTOR Activity after Fertilization in Sea Urchin Embryos.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Héloïse; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Glippa, Virginie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin B/CDK1 complex is a key regulator of mitotic entry. Using PP242, a specific ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR kinase, we provide evidence that the mTOR signalling pathway controls cyclin B mRNA translation following fertilization in Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. We show that PP242 inhibits the degradation of the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-Binding Protein). PP242 inhibits global protein synthesis, delays cyclin B accumulation, cyclin B/CDK1 complex activation and consequently entry into the mitotic phase of the cell cycle triggered by fertilization. PP242 inhibits cyclin B mRNA recruitment into active polysomes triggered by fertilization. An amount of cyclin B mRNA present in active polysomes appears to be insensitive to PP242 treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that, following sea urchin egg fertilization, cyclin B mRNA translation is controlled by two independent mechanisms: a PP242-sensitive and an additional PP242-insentitive mechanism.

  10. Cyclin A2 promotes DNA repair in the brain during both development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Gygli, Patrick E.; Chang, Joshua C.; Gokozan, Hamza N.; Catacutan, Fay P.; Schmidt, Theresa A.; Kaya, Behiye; Goksel, Mustafa; Baig, Faisal S.; Chen, Shannon; Griveau, Amelie; Michowski, Wojciech; Wong, Michael; Palanichamy, Kamalakannan; Sicinski, Piotr; Nelson, Randy J.; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José J.

    2016-01-01

    Various stem cell niches of the brain have differential requirements for Cyclin A2. Cyclin A2 loss results in marked cerebellar dysmorphia, whereas forebrain growth is retarded during early embryonic development yet achieves normal size at birth. To understand the differential requirements of distinct brain regions for Cyclin A2, we utilized neuroanatomical, transgenic mouse, and mathematical modeling techniques to generate testable hypotheses that provide insight into how Cyclin A2 loss results in compensatory forebrain growth during late embryonic development. Using unbiased measurements of the forebrain stem cell niche, we parameterized a mathematical model whereby logistic growth instructs progenitor cells as to the cell-types of their progeny. Our data was consistent with prior findings that progenitors proliferate along an auto-inhibitory growth curve. The growth retardation in CCNA2-null brains corresponded to cell cycle lengthening, imposing a developmental delay. We hypothesized that Cyclin A2 regulates DNA repair and that CCNA2-null progenitors thus experienced lengthened cell cycle. We demonstrate that CCNA2-null progenitors suffer abnormal DNA repair, and implicate Cyclin A2 in double-strand break repair. Cyclin A2's DNA repair functions are conserved among cell lines, neural progenitors, and hippocampal neurons. We further demonstrate that neuronal CCNA2 ablation results in learning and memory deficits in aged mice. PMID:27425845

  11. SUMO2/3 modification of cyclin E contributes to the control of replication origin firing

    PubMed Central

    Bonne-Andrea, Catherine; Kahli, Malik; Mechali, Francisca; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Bossis, Guillaume; Coux, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) pathway is essential for the maintenance of genome stability. We investigated its possible involvement in the control of DNA replication during S phase by using the Xenopus cell-free system. Here we show that the SUMO pathway is critical to limit the number and, thus, the density of replication origins that are activated in early S phase. We identified cyclin E, which regulates cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) to trigger origin firing, as an S-phase substrate of this pathway. We show that cyclin E is dynamically and highly conjugated to SUMO2/3 on chromatin, independently of Cdk2 activity and origin activation. Moreover, cyclin E is the predominant SUMO2/3 target on chromatin in early S phase, as cyclin E depletion abolishes, while its readdition restores, the SUMO2/3 signal. Together, our data indicate that cyclin E SUMOylation is important for controlling origin firing once the cyclin E–Cdk2 complex is recruited onto replication origins. PMID:23673635

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of cyclin E and CDK2 from Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Fu, M J; Qiu, L H

    2016-09-16

    Reduced reproductive performance of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) has caused economic losses and hampered the fishing industry. Detailed investigation of the molecular mechanism by which the cell cycle is regulated in this organism is needed to understand the development and maturation of ovaries and oocytes, with a view to improving reproductive capacity. Cell cycle progression is mainly determined by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and cyclin complexes, the cyclin E/CDK2 complex playing a key role in G1/S transition. However, knowledge of the interplay between cyclin E and CDK2 in invertebrates remains limited. In this study, full-length P. monodon cyclin E (Pmcyclin E) and CDK2 (PmCDK2) sequences were cloned. The open reading frame of Pmcyclin E was 1263 bp in length and encoded a 47.9-kDa protein, while that of PmCDK2 was 921 bp, encoding a protein of 34.9 kDa. Recombinant cyclin E and CDK2 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. In addition, a pull-down assay was performed to identify any interaction between Pmcyclin E and PmCDK2. This research provides a basis for the study of the functional mechanisms of the cyclin E/CDK2 complex in shrimp, further enriching our knowledge of invertebrate cell cycle regulation.

  13. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Roques, Magali; Wall, Richard J; Douglass, Alexander P; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Ferguson, David J P; Kaindama, Mbinda L; Brusini, Lorenzo; Joshi, Nimitray; Rchiad, Zineb; Brady, Declan; Guttery, David S; Wheatley, Sally P; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Holder, Anthony A; Pain, Arnab; Wickstead, Bill; Tewari, Rita

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  14. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements mediate masking and unmasking of cyclin B1 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    de Moor, C H; Richter, J D

    1999-01-01

    During oocyte maturation, cyclin B1 mRNA is translationally activated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. This process is dependent on cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To determine whether a titratable factor might be involved in the initial translational repression (masking) of this mRNA, high levels of cyclin B1 3' UTR were injected into oocytes. While this treatment had no effect on the poly(A) tail length of endogenous cyclin B1 mRNA, it induced cyclin B1 synthesis. A mutational analysis revealed that the most efficient unmasking element in the cyclin 3' UTR was the CPE. However, other U-rich sequences that resemble the CPE in structure, but which do not bind the CPE-binding polyadenylation factor CPEB, failed to induce unmasking. When fused to the chloramphenical acetyl transferase (CAT) coding region, the cyclin B1 3' UTR inhibited CAT translation in injected oocytes. In addition, a synthetic 3' UTR containing multiple copies of the CPE also inhibited translation, and did so in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, efficient CPE-mediated masking required cap-dependent translation. During the normal course of progesterone-induced maturation, cytoplasmic polyadenylation was necessary for mRNA unmasking. A model to explain how cyclin B1 mRNA masking and unmasking could be regulated by the CPE is presented. PMID:10205182

  15. Cyclin D1 is an essential mediator of apoptotic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Kranenburg, O; van der Eb, A J; Zantema, A

    1996-01-01

    Many neurons in the developing nervous system undergo programmed cell death, or apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is largely unknown. In the present report, we present evidence that the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 is involved in the regulation of neuronal cell death. During neuronal apoptosis, cyclin D1-dependent kinase activity is stimulated, due to an increase in cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, artificial elevation of cyclin D1 levels is sufficient to induce apoptosis, even in non-neural cell types. Cyclin D1-induced apoptosis, like neuronal apoptosis, can be inhibited by 21 kDa E1B, Bcl2 and pRb, but not by 55 kDa E1B. Most importantly, however, overexpression of the cyclin D-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4 protects neurons from apoptotic cell death, demonstrating that activation of endogenous cyclin D1-dependent kinases is essential during neuronal apoptosis. These data support a model in which neuronal apoptosis results from an aborted attempt to activate the cell cycle in terminally differentiated neurons. Images PMID:8598205

  16. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  17. Mapping MRI/MRS Parameters with Genetic Over-expression Profiles In Human Prostate Cancer: Demonstrating the Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lenkinski, Robert E.; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Liu, Fangbing; Frangioni, John V.; Perner, Sven; Rubin, Mark A.; Genega, Elizabeth; Rofsky, Neil M.; Gaston, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy can probe a variety of physiological (e.g. blood vessel permeability) and metabolic characteristics of prostate cancer. However, little is known about the changes in gene expression that underlie the spectral and imaging features observed in prostate cancer. Tumor induced changes in vascular permeability and angiogenesis are thought to contribute to patterns of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI images of prostate cancer even though the genetic basis of tumor vasculogenesis is complex and the specific mechanisms underlying these DCEMRI features have not yet been determined. In order to identify the changes in gene expression that correspond to MRS and DCEMRI patterns in human prostate cancers, we have utilized tissue print micropeel techniques to generate “whole mount” molecular maps of radical prostatectomy specimens that correspond to pre-surgical MRI/MRS studies. These molecular maps include RNA expression profiles from both Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qrt-PCR) analysis, as well as immunohistochemical studies. Using these methods on patients with prostate cancer, we found robust over-expression of choline kinase a in the majority of primary tumors. We also observed overexpression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a newly identified angiogenic factor, in a subset of DCEMRI positive prostate cancers. These studies set the stage for establishing MRI/MRS parameters as validated biomarkers for human prostate cancer. PMID:18752015

  18. Transgenic over-expression of YY1 induces pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in a sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brian L.; Dockstader, Karen; Russell, Gloria; Hijmans, Jamie; Walker, Lisa; Cecil, Mackenzie; Demos-Davies, Kimberly; Medway, Allen; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Sucharov, Carmen C.

    2015-01-01

    YY1 can activate or repress transcription of various genes. In cardiac myocytes in culture YY1 has been shown to regulate expression of several genes involved in myocyte pathology. YY1 can also acutely protect the heart against detrimental changes in gene expression. In this study we show that cardiac over-expression of YY1 induces pathologic cardiac hypertrophy in male mice, measured by changes in gene expression and lower ejection fraction/fractional shortening. In contrast, female animals are protected against pathologic gene expression changes and cardiac dysfunction. Furthermore, we show that YY1 regulates, in a sex-specific manner, the expression of mammalian enable (Mena), a factor that regulates cytoskeletal actin dynamics and whose expression is increased in several models of cardiac pathology, and that Mena expression in humans with heart failure is sex-dependent. Finally, we show that sex differences in YY1 expression are also observed in human heart failure. In summary, this is the first work to show that YY1 has a sex-specific effect in the regulation of cardiac pathology. PMID:25935483

  19. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Deepak K.; Chandran, Predeesh; Timm, Alicia E.; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Smith, C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion. PMID:26815857

  20. Ectopic over-expression of oncogene Pim-2 induce malignant transformation of nontumorous human liver cell line L02.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ke; Duan, Wentao; Shi, Yujun; Li, Bo; Liu, Zuojin; Gong, Jiangping

    2010-07-01

    In order to prove that ectopic over-expression of Pim-2 could induce malignant transformation of human liver cell line L02, three groups of cells were set up including human liver cell line L02 (L02), L02 cells transfected with Pim-2 gene (L02/Pim-2) and L02 cells transfected with empty-vector (L02/Vector). Pim-2 expression levels were detected. The morphology, proliferation level, apoptosis rate and migration ability of the cells were detected respectively. Then the cells were subcutaneously inoculated into athymic mice and the microstructures of the neoplasm were observed. Compared with the controls, Pim-2 expression levels were significantly higher in L02/Pim-2 cells (P<0.05), and their morphology had obvious malignant changes. They also showed a significantly increased proliferation rate (P<0.05) and migration capacity (P<0.05), as well as a significantly decreased apoptosis rate (P<0.05). Only the athymic mice inoculated with L02/Pim-2 cells could generate neoplasm, and the morphology of the neoplasm coincided with that of the hepatoma. The results manifest that ectopic Pim-2 gene could be stably expressed in L02/Pim-2 cells. Both the morphological and biological changes of L02/Pim-2 cells demonstrate the trend of malignant transformation. L02/Pim-2 cells could generate hepatoma in athymic mice. In conclusion, Pim-2 could induce malignant transformation of human liver cell line L02.

  1. Over-expression of STP13, a hexose transporter, improves plant growth and nitrogen use in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Schofield, R A; Bi, Y-M; Kant, S; Rothstein, S J

    2009-03-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the regulation of hexose levels by the large monosaccharide transporter (MST) gene family influences many aspects of plant growth. The cloning and transgenic expression of one family member (STP13) enabled the manipulation of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism in Arabidopsis. Transgenic seedlings constitutively over-expressing STP13 (STP13OX) had increased rates of glucose uptake, higher endogenous sucrose levels and accumulated more total C and biomass per plant when grown on soil-less media supplemented with 55 mM glucose and sufficient N (9 mM nitrate). Furthermore, STP13OX seedlings acquired 90% more total N than the Col-0 seedlings, and had higher levels of expression of the nitrate transporter NRT2.2. In addition, STP13OX seedlings were larger and had higher biomass than Col-0 seedlings when grown under a limiting N condition (3 mM nitrate). Transgene analysis of STP13 reveals that its gene product is localized to the plasma membrane (PM) in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells, that it encodes a functional MST in planta, and that the STP13 promoter directs GUS expression to the vasculature and to leaf mesophyll cells. This work highlights the link between C and N metabolism, demonstrating that a plant's N use may be improved by increasing the availability of C.

  2. Enhanced neuronal plasticity and elevated endogenous sAPPα levels in mice over-expressing MMP9.

    PubMed

    Fragkouli, Apostolia; Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Georgopoulos, Spiros; Stamatakis, Antonios; Stylianopoulou, Fotini; Tsilibary, Effie C; Tzinia, Athina K

    2012-04-01

    Evidence accumulating during the past few years points to a significant role of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) enzymatic activity in synaptic plasticity and cognitive processes. We have previously demonstrated that MMP9 is involved in receptor-mediated α-secretase-like cleavage of APP in vitro, resulting in increased secretion of sAPPα, the soluble N-terminal product of the non-amyloidogenic pathway known to be involved in neuronal plasticity and memory formation. To study the in vivo role of MMP9, we have generated transgenic mice over-expressing MMP9 in the brain. Herein, we demonstrate that MMP9 transgenic animals display enhanced performance in the non-spatial novel object recognition and the spatial water-maze task and that their enhanced performance was accompanied by increased dendritic spine density in the hippocampus and cortex following behavioural testing. Consistent with the above observations, the electrophysiological analysis revealed prolonged maintenance of long-term synaptic potentiation in hippocampal slices from MMP9 transgenic mice. Moreover, elevated sAPPα levels in the hippocampus and cortex of MPP9 transgenic animals were also observed. Overall, our results extend previous findings on the physiological role of MMP9 in neuronal plasticity and furthermore reveal that, APP may be one of the physiological proteolytic targets of MMP9 in vivo.

  3. Characterization of cerebral microvasculature in transgenic mice with endothelium targeted over-expression of GTP-cyclohydrolase I

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R.; d’Uscio, Livius V.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a critical determinant of nitric oxide (NO) production by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the vascular endothelium and its biosynthesis is regulated by the enzymatic activity of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I). The present study was designed to determine the effects of endothelium-targeted overexpression of GTPCH I (eGCH-Tg) on murine cerebral vascular function. Endothelium targeted over-expression of GTPCH I was associated with a significant increase in levels of BH4, as well as its oxidized product, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2) in cerebral microvessels. Importantly, ratio of BH4 to 7,8-BH2, indicative of BH4 available for eNOS activation, was significantly increased in eGCH-Tg mice. However, expression of endothelial NOS, levels of nitrate/nitrite - indicative of NO production - remained unchanged between cerebral microvessels of wild-type and eGCH-Tg mice. Furthermore, increased BH4 biosynthesis neither affected production of superoxide anion nor expression of antioxidant proteins. Moreover, endothelium-specific GTPCH I overexpression did not alter intracellular levels of cGMP, reflective of NO signaling in cerebral microvessels. The obtained results suggest that, despite a significant increase in BH4 bioavailability, generation of endothelial NO in cerebral microvessels remained unchanged in eGCH-Tg mice. We conclude that under physiological conditions the levels of BH4 in the cerebral microvessels are optimal for activation of endothelial NOS and NO/cGMP signaling. PMID:26343845

  4. Lipocalin 2 over-expression facilitates progress of castration-resistant prostate cancer via improving androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Chenchen; Jiang, Haowen; Xu, Jianfeng; Ding, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the lethal phenotype of prostate cancer. Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is aberrantly expressed in many cancers including primary prostate cancer (PCa), but its role in CRPC has not been reported. Results LCN2 expression was upregulated in human primary PCa and CRPC tissues. Overexpression of LCN2 promoted C4-2B and 22RV1 cell proliferation while knockdown of LCN2 markedly inhibited C4-2B and 22RV1 cell growth. LCN2 overexpression led to increased AR downstream gene SLC45A3 without upregulating AR expression. In the xenograft model, overexpression of LCN2 significantly promoted tumor growth. Methods LCN2 expression was detected in primary PCa and CRPC tissues and cell lines C4-2B and 22RV1 using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, respectively. Serum LCN2 level was detected vi ELISA. Lentiviruses-mediated over-expression of LCN2 and LCN2 knockdown were performed in CRPC cell lines. Expressions of androgen receptor (AR) downstream genes was examined in cell lines, in CRPC tissues, and in animal models. Conclusion LCN2 could facilitate cell proliferation of CRPC via AR transcriptional activity. LCN2 could be a novel target in CRPC. PMID:27602760

  5. Largescale Transcriptomics Analysis Suggests Over-Expression of BGH3, MMP9 and PDIA3 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Shao, Fangyang; Pi, Weidong; Shi, Cong; Chen, Yujia; Gong, Diping; Wang, Bingjie; Cao, Zhiwei; Tang, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been reported as the most prevalent cancer of the head and neck region, while early diagnosis remains challenging. Here we took a comprehensive bioinformatics study on microarray data of 326 OSCC clinical samples with control of 165 normal tissues. The cell interaction pathways of ECM-receptor interaction and focal adhesion were found to be significantly regulated in OSCC samples. Further analysis of the topological properties and expression consistency identified that three hub genes in the gene interaction network, MMP9, PDIA3 and BGH3, were consistently up-expressed in OSCC samples. When being validated on additional microarray datasets of 41 OSCC samples, the validation rate of over-expressed BGH3, MMP9, and PDIA3 reached 90%, 90% and 84% respectively. At last, immuno-histochemical assays were done to test the protein expression of the three genes on newly collected clinical samples of 35 OSCC, 20 samples of pre-OSCC stage, and 12 normal oral mucosa specimens. Their protein expression levels were also found to progressively increase from normal mucosa to pre-OSCC stage and further to OSCC (ANOVA p = 0.000), suggesting their key roles in OSCC pathogenesis. Based on above solid validation, we propose BGH3, MMP9 and PDIA3 might be further explored as potential biomarkers to aid OSCC diagnosis. PMID:26745629

  6. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+).

  7. Over-expression of the cercosporin facilitator protein, CFP, in Cercospora kikuchii up-regulates production and secretion of cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, R G; Rose, M S; Eweida, M

    2001-10-16

    CFP (cercosporin facilitator protein), a light-regulated gene from the soybean fungal pathogen Cercospora kikuchii, encodes the putative major facilitator transporter of the fungal polyketide cercosporin. Gene disruption of CFP in C. kikuchii strain Gus-3 resulted in dramatically reduced cercosporin production and virulence, and increased sensitivity to the toxin. Two C. kikuchii transformant strains (10-1 and 10-11) that over-produce cercosporin were recovered from the complementation of CFP gene-disrupted strain Gus-3. Southern analysis revealed that these strains contained multiple genomic copies of CFP and over-expressed CFP transcript and protein. Although 10-1 and 10-11 produce and secrete significantly elevated levels of cercosporin, they exhibit wild-type resistance to cercosporin, and maintain a wild-type pattern of light-regulated toxin accumulation. Restoration of wild-type cercosporin resistance in 10-1 and 10-11 suggests that CFP does contribute substantially to cercosporin resistance via toxin secretion. The three-fold increase in toxin accumulation, predominantly associated with the mycelium fraction of these CFP multi-copy strains, suggests that CFP may also have a significant, but unknown, role in regulating toxin production.

  8. The DNA methylation inhibitor induces telomere dysfunction and apoptosis of leukemia cells that is attenuated by telomerase over-expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Li, Bingnan; de Jonge, Nick; Björkholm, Magnus; Xu, Dawei

    2015-03-10

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTIs) such as 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) have been used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignancies. Although inhibiting global/gene-specific DNA methylation is widely accepted as a key mechanism behind DNMTI anti-tumor activity, other mechanisms are likely involved in DNMTI's action. Because telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) plays key roles in cancer through telomere elongation and telomere lengthening-independent activities, and TERT has been shown to confer chemo- or radio-resistance to cancer cells, we determine whether DNMTIs affect telomere function and whether TERT/telomerase interferes with their anti-cancer efficacy. We showed that 5-AZA induced DNA damage and telomere dysfunction in AML cell lines by demonstrating the presence of 53-BP1 foci and the co-localization of 53-BP1 foci with telomere signals, respectively. Telomere dysfunction was coupled with diminished TERT expression, shorter telomere and apoptosis in 5-AZA-treated cells. However, 5-AZA treatment did not lead to changes in the methylation status of subtelomere regions. Down-regulation of TERT expression similarly occurred in primary leukemic cells derived from AML patients exposed to 5-AZA. TERT over-expression significantly attenuated 5-AZA-mediated DNA damage, telomere dysfunction and apoptosis of AML cells. Collectively, 5-AZA mediates the down-regulation of TERT expression, and induces telomere dysfunction, which consequently exerts an anti-tumor activity.

  9. Cloning and over-expression of a cDNA encoding a polyketide synthase from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Raharjo, Tri J; Chang, Wen-Te; Verberne, Marianne C; Peltenburg-Looman, Anja M G; Linthorst, Huub J M; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-04-01

    A polyketide synthase has been suggested to play an important role in cannabinoid biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa L. This enzyme catalyzes the biosynthesis of olivetolic acid, one of the precursors for cannabinoid biosynthesis. Using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based on the DNA homology of chalcone synthase (EC 2.3.1.156) and valerophenone synthase (EC 2.3.1.156) of hop (Humulus lupulus), a cDNA encoding a polyketide synthase in C. sativa was identified. The coding region of the gene is 1170 bp long encoding a 389 amino acid protein of a predicted 42.7 kDa molecular mass and with a pI of 6.04. The gene shares a high homology with a chalcone synthase gene of H. lupulus, 85% and 94% homology on the level of DNA and protein, respectively. Over-expression of the construct in Escherichia coli M15 resulted in a 45 kDa protein. The protein has chalcone synthase activity as well as valerophenone synthase activity, a chalcone synthase-like activity. Using n-hexanoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA as substrates did not give olivetol or olivetolic acid as a product.

  10. Rapid purification of the over-expressed membrane 3 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the presence of detergents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming; Breton, Rock; Azzi, Arezki; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    1996-10-01

    Three-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase / Δ 5-Δ 4 isomerase catalyses a key step in the transformation of all 5-prognen-3β-ol and 5-androsten-3β-ol steroids into the corresponding Δ 4-3-keto-steroids. Human type I 3β-HSD can be found in the subcellular fractions of mitochondria and microsome. A 1.5 kbp cDNA encoding human type I 3β-HSD was inserted into the transfer vector pBlueBac to form plasmid pBB / 3β-HSD. The recombinant baculovirus was obtained by co-transfection of wild type AcNPV genomic DNA and PBB / 3β-HSD in Sf9 cells, then used to infect Sf9 cells to over-express human 3β-HSD protein. The 3β-HSD sample was purified to homogeneity by a rapid procedure, consisting of an anion-exchange and an adsorbance chromatographies, based on FPLC and some detergents application. The whole process was successful with a purification rate of 90 fold and a high recovery (70%). The kinetic study showed a Vmax of 500 nmol/min · mg and a Km of 2.8 μM, being much more active than those reported.

  11. Alternative Sigma Factor Over-Expression Enables Heterologous Expression of a Type II Polyketide Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David Cole; Conway, Kyle R.; Pearce, Nelson; Villegas-Peñaranda, Luis Roberto; Garza, Anthony G.; Boddy, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterologous expression of bacterial biosynthetic gene clusters is currently an indispensable tool for characterizing biosynthetic pathways. Development of an effective, general heterologous expression system that can be applied to bioprospecting from metagenomic DNA will enable the discovery of a wealth of new natural products. Methodology We have developed a new Escherichia coli-based heterologous expression system for polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters. We have demonstrated the over-expression of the alternative sigma factor σ54 directly and positively regulates heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline biosynthetic gene cluster in E. coli. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that σ54 promoters are present in nearly 70% of polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthetic pathways. Conclusions We have demonstrated a new mechanism for heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline polyketide biosynthetic pathway, where high-level pleiotropic sigma factors from the heterologous host directly and positively regulate transcription of the non-native biosynthetic gene cluster. Our bioinformatics analysis is consistent with the hypothesis that heterologous expression mediated by the alternative sigma factor σ54 may be a viable method for the production of additional polyketide products. PMID:23724102

  12. Avermectin induced global DNA hypomethylation and over-expression of heat shock proteins in cardiac tissues of pigeon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ci; Cao, Ye; Zhou, Shuo; Khoso, Pervez Ahmed; Li, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Despite increasing evidences pointing to residues of avermectin (AVM) pose toxic effects on non-target organisms in environment, but the data in pigeon is insufficient. The alteration of global DNA methylation and response of heat shock proteins (Hsps) are important for assessing the AVM toxicity in cardiac tissues of pigeon (Columba livia). To investigate the effects of AVM exposure in cardiac tissues of pigeon, we detected the expression levels of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), methylated DNA-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2), and Hsp 60, 70 and 90. Pigeons were exposed to feed containing AVM (0, 20, 40 and 60mg/kg diet) for 30, 60, 90days respectively, and cardiac tissues were collected and analyzed. We found the transcriptional levels of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b mRNA were down-regulated, but the transcriptional levels of MBD2 mRNA were up-regulated by AVM exposure in cardiac tissues of pigeon. Necrocytosis, hemorrhage, infiltration of inflammatory cells and abundant vacuoles appeared in cardiac tissues after AVM exposure. Accompanying this phenotype, the mRNA transcriptional and/or protein levels of Hsp30, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 increased. In conclusion, these results underscored AVM exposure caused DNA methylation machinery malfunctions, and induced over-expression of Hsps to improve the protective function against cardiac injury.

  13. Over-expression of a novel JAZ family gene from Glycine soja, increases salt and alkali stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Cai, Hua; Luo, Xiao; Bai, Xi; Deyholos, Michael K; Chen, Qin; Chen, Chao; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2012-09-21

    Salt and alkali stress are two of the main environmental factors limiting crop production. Recent discoveries show that the JAZ family encodes plant-specific genes involved in jasmonate signaling. However, there is only limited information about this gene family in abiotic stress response, and in wild soybean (Glycine soja), which is a species noted for its tolerance to alkali and salinity. Here, we isolated and characterized a novel JAZ family gene, GsJAZ2, from G. soja. Transcript abundance of GsJAZ2 increased following exposure to salt, alkali, cold and drought. Over-expression of GsJAZ2 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to salt and alkali stress. The expression levels of some alkali stress response and stress-inducible marker genes were significantly higher in the GsJAZ2 overexpression lines as compared to wild-type plants. Subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein showed that GsJAZ2 was localized to the nucleus. These results suggest that the newly isolated wild soybean GsJAZ2 is a positive regulator of plant salt and alkali stress tolerance.

  14. Over-expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mesenchymal stem cells transfected with recombinant lentivirus BDNF gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhu, J; Zhang, K; Liu, T; Zhang, Z

    2016-12-30

    This study was aimed at investigating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene. Lentivirus vectors bearing BDNF gene were constructed. MSCs were isolated from rats and cultured. The lentiviral vectors containing BDNF gene were transfected into the MSCs, and BDNF gene and protein expressions were monitored with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). RT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure gene and protein expressions, respectibvely in MSCs, MSCs-EGFP and MSCs-EGFP-BDNF groups. Green fluorescence assay confirmed successful transfection of BDNF gene recombinant lentivirus into MSCs. RT-PCR and Western blot revealed that BDNF gene and protein expressions in the MSCs-EGFP-BDNF group were significantly higher than that in MSCs group and MSCs-EGFP group. There were no statistically significant differences in gene expression between MSCs and MSCs-EGFP groups. MSCs can over-express BDNF when transfected with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene.

  15. Platelet-derived growth factor over-expression in retinal progenitors results in abnormal retinal vessel formation.

    PubMed

    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Niklasson, Mia; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Hallböök, Finn; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) plays an important role in development of the central nervous system, including the retina. Excessive PDGF signaling is associated with proliferative retinal disorders. We reported previously that transgenic mice in which PDGF-B was over-expressed under control of the nestin enhancer, nes/tk-PdgfB-lacZ, exhibited enhanced apoptosis in the developing corpus striatum. These animals display enlarged lateral ventricles after birth as well as behavioral aberrations as adults. Here, we report that in contrast to the relatively mild central nervous system phenotype, development of the retina is severely disturbed in nes/tk-PdgfB-lacZ mice. In transgenic retinas all nuclear layers were disorganized and photoreceptor segments failed to develop properly. Since astrocyte precursor cells did not populate the retina, retinal vascular progenitors could not form a network of vessels. With time, randomly distributed vessels resembling capillaries formed, but there were no large trunk vessels and the intraocular pressure was reduced. In addition, we observed a delayed regression of the hyaloid vasculature. The prolonged presence of this structure may contribute to the other abnormalities observed in the retina, including the defective lamination.

  16. Ischemic preconditioning inhibits over-expression of arginyl-tRNA synthetase gene Rars in ischemia-injured neurons.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yin; Zhao, Hong-Yang; Wang, Hai-Jun; Wang, Wen-Liang; Zhang, Li-Zhi; Fu, Rong

    2016-08-01

    The expression changes of Rars gene in ischemia-injured neurons were investigated by detecting its translational product arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS), and the inhibitory effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on Rars gene were explored. Both IPC model and prolonged ischemia (PI) model were established by using the classic oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) method. The primary cultured neurons were assigned into the following groups: the experimental group (IPC+PI group), undergoing PI after a short period of IPC; the conditional control group (PI control group), subjected to PI without IPC; blank control group, the normally cultured neurons. The Rars transcriptional activities and ArgRS expression levels were measured at different time points after re-oxygenation (3 h/6 h/12 h/24 h). Data were collected and statistically analyzed. Compared to the blank control group, the Rars activities and ArgRS levels were significantly increased in PI control group, peaking at the time point of 6 h after re-oxygenation. Rars activities and ArgRS levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the PI control group at different time points after re-oxygenation. PI insult can induce an escalating activity of Rars and lead to ArgRS over-expression in primary cultured neurons. IPC can inhibit the increased Rars activity and down-regulate ArgRS expression of ischemia-insulted neurons. This mechanism may confer ischemic tolerance on neurons.

  17. Role of Cyclin E as an Early Event in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    of RCAS-cyclin E virus: The DF-1 chicken fibroblastic cell line was used for RCAS-cyclin E FL and RCAS-cyclin E trunc2 transfection and subsequent...DF-1 cells expressing RCAS viruses with different oncogenes were grown in 10-cm tissue culture dishes in DMEM with 10% FBS, and 1% antibiotics . Once...storing at - 80°C. Mouse Model: We have crossed transgenic mice that express Keratin5-TVA ( chicken retroviral keratin receptor that is expressed

  18. Modulating the interaction between CDK2 and cyclin A with a quinoline-based inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongqi; Shipps, Gerald W; Zhao, Lianyun; Siddiqui, M Arshad; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Curran, Patrick J; Duca, Jose S; Hruza, Alan W; Fischmann, Thierry O; Madison, Vincent S; Zhang, Rumin; McNemar, Charles W; Mayhood, Todd W; Syto, Rosalinda; Annis, Allen; Kirschmeier, Paul; Lees, Emma M; Parry, David A; Windsor, William T

    2014-01-01

    A new class of quinoline-based kinase inhibitors has been discovered that both disrupt cyclin dependent 2 (CDK2) interaction with its cyclin A subunit and act as ATP competitive inhibitors. The key strategy for discovering this class of protein-protein disrupter compounds was to screen the monomer CDK2 in an affinity-selection/mass spectrometry-based technique and to perform secondary assays that identified compounds that bound only to the inactive CDK2 monomer and not the active CDK2/cyclin A heterodimer. Through a series of chemical modifications the affinity (Kd) of the original hit improved from 1 to 0.005μM.

  19. The nature of the late B-type stars HD 67044 and HD 42035

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.

    2016-04-01

    While monitoring a sample of apparently slowly rotating superficially normal bright late B and early A stars in the northern hemisphere, we have discovered that HD 67044 and HD 42035, hitherto classified as normal late B-type stars, are actually respectively a new chemically peculiar star and a new spectroscopic binary containing a very slow rotator HD 42035 S with ultra-sharp lines (v_{{e}}sin i= 3.7 km s^{-1}) and a fast rotator HD 42035 B with broad lines. The lines of Ti ii, Cr ii, Mn ii, Sr ii, Y ii, Zr ii and Ba ii are conspicuous features in the high resolution SOPHIE spectrum (R=75000) of HD 67044. The Hg ii line at 3983.93 Å is also present as a weak feature. The composite spectrum of HD 42035 is characterised by very sharp lines formed in HD 42035 S superimposed onto the shallow and broad lines of HD 42035 B. These very sharp lines are mostly due to light elements from C to Ni, the only heavy species definitely present are strontium and barium. Selected lines of 21 chemical elements from He up to Hg have been synthesized using model atmospheres computed with ATLAS9 and the spectrum synthesis code SYNSPEC48 including hyperfine structure of various isotopes when relevant. These synthetic spectra have been adjusted to high resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of HD 67044 and HD 42035 S in order to derive abundances of these key elements. HD 67044 is found to have distinct enhancements of Ti, Cr, Mn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba and Hg and underabundances in He, C, O, Ca and Sc which shows that this star is not a superficially normal late B-type star, but actually is a new CP star most likely of the HgMn type. HD 42035 S has provisional underabundances of the light elements from C to Ti and overabundances of heavier elements (except for Fe and Sr which are also underabundant) up to barium. These values are lower limits to the actual abundances as we cannot currently place properly the continuum of HD 42035 S. More accurate fundamental parameters and abundances for HD

  20. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the human cyclin C (CCNC) and cyclin E (CCNE) genes: Deletion of the CCNC gene in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haimin; Lahti, J.M.; Kidd, V.J.

    1996-03-01

    The human G1-phase cyclins are important regulators of cell cycle progression that interact with various cyclin-dependent kinases and facilitate entry into S-phase. We have confirmed the localization of the human cyclin C (CCNC) gene to chromosome 6q21 and of human cyclin E (CCNE to 19q12). The CCNC gene structure was also determined, and we have shown that it is deleted in a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukemias, including a patient sample containing a t(2;6)(p21;q15), with no apparent cytogenetic deletion. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of the remaining CCNC allele from patients with a deletion of one allele established that there were no further mutations within the exons or the flanking intronic sequences. These results suggest either that haploinsufficiency of the cyclin C protein is sufficient to promote tumorigenesis or that the important tumor suppressor gene is linked to the CCNC locus. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Med13p prevents mitochondrial fission and programmed cell death in yeast through nuclear retention of cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Khakhina, Svetlana; Cooper, Katrina F; Strich, Randy

    2014-09-15

    The yeast cyclin C-Cdk8 kinase forms a complex with Med13p to repress the transcription of genes involved in the stress response and meiosis. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C displays nuclear to cytoplasmic relocalization that triggers mitochondrial fission and promotes programmed cell death. In this report, we demonstrate that Med13p mediates cyclin C nuclear retention in unstressed cells. Deleting MED13 allows aberrant cytoplasmic cyclin C localization and extensive mitochondrial fragmentation. Loss of Med13p function resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and hypersensitivity to oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death that were dependent on cyclin C. The regulatory system controlling cyclin C-Med13p interaction is complex. First, a previous study found that cyclin C phosphorylation by the stress-activated MAP kinase Slt2p is required for nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation. This study found that cyclin C-Med13p association is impaired when the Slt2p target residue is substituted with a phosphomimetic amino acid. The second step involves Med13p destruction mediated by the 26S proteasome and cyclin C-Cdk8p kinase activity. In conclusion, Med13p maintains mitochondrial structure, function, and normal oxidative stress sensitivity through cyclin C nuclear retention. Releasing cyclin C from the nucleus involves both its phosphorylation by Slt2p coupled with Med13p destruction.

  2. Cyclin E marks quiescent neural stem cells and caspase-3-positive newborn cells during adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yayoi; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2015-10-21

    Cyclin E is a key regulator of progression through the G1-phase of the cell cycle. Recently, a cell cycle-independent role for cyclin E in the adult mouse central nervous system has been suggested. In the present study, we examined expression of cyclin E in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a region of neurogenesis in adulthood, using immunofluorescence. In the adult DG, cyclin E-immunoreactive (cyclin E+) cells was limited to postmitotic cells. In the subgranular zone, cyclin E was detected in the vertical process of radial glia-like cells, which were marked by the neural stem cell markers nestin and GFAP. Cyclin E was also detected in the nucleus of cells, which were labeled with stage-specific neuronal cell markers, including Pax6, Sox2, NeuroD, doublecortin, and NeuN. The densities of cyclin E+ cells in the DG reduced and increased with age and running, respectively. Furthermore, the majority of cyclin E+ cells co-expressed active caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis. Together, the results indicate that cyclin E is expressed in the process of quiescent neural stem cells and in the nucleus of active caspase-3+ cells during neuronal cell differentiation, suggesting that cyclin E has a Cdk-independent function, which might be important for the mechanisms regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  3. Overexpression of Ki-67 and cyclins A and B1 in JC virus-infected cells of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ariza, A; Mate, J L; Isamat, M; Calatrava, A; Fernández-Vasalo, A; Navas-Palacios, J J

    1998-03-01

    Both SV40 and JC virus (JCV) appropriate the host cell replicative machinery to attend to their own reproductive needs. SV40 large T antigen is able to induce the expression of cyclins A, B1, and E (but not of cylin D1) in transfected diploid cells. Whether JCV infection influences cyclin expression in a similar fashion in the setting of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) remains unknown. Brain lesions from 7 PML cases (4 autopsies and 3 biopsies) were immunohistochemically investigated for the expression of Ki-67 and cyclins A, B1, and D1. All 7 cases showed strong positivity for Ki-67 and cyclins A and B1 in JCV-infected oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, the nuclear immunolocalization of cyclin A being in strong contrast to the cytoplasmic distribution of cyclin B1. No immunostaining for cyclin D1 was obtained in any of the 7 cases. These findings suggest that JCV infection is associated with overexpression of Ki-67 and cyclins A and B1 in PML host glial cells. Since cyclin changes in JCV-infected cells recapitulate SV40 T antigen-associated cyclin fluctuations, it appears reasonable to think that JCV T antigen shares some of the previously described capabilities of SV40 T antigen to alter cyclin expression for the sake of viral replication.

  4. Implications of caspase-dependent proteolytic cleavage of cyclin A1 in DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sang Hyeok; Seo, Sung-Keum; An, Sungkwan; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Caspase-1 mediates doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cyclin A1. • Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165. • Cyclin A1 expression is involved in DNA damage-induced cell death. - Abstract: Cyclin A1 is an A-type cyclin that directly binds to CDK2 to regulate cell-cycle progression. In the present study, we found that doxorubicin decreased the expression of cyclin A1 at the protein level in A549 lung cancer cells, while markedly downregulating its mRNA levels. Interestingly, doxorubicin upregulated caspase-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, and z-YAVD-fmk, a specific inhibitor of caspase-1, reversed the doxorubicin-induced decrease in cyclin A1 in A549 lung cancer and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165 into two fragments, which in vitro cleavage assays showed were further cleaved by caspase-3. Finally, we found that overexpression of cyclin A1 significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, and knockdown of cyclin A1 by RNA interference enhanced the sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation. Our data suggest a new mechanism for the downregulation of cyclin A1 by DNA-damaging stimuli that could be intimately involved in the cell death induced by DNA damage-inducing stimuli, including doxorubicin and ionizing radiation.

  5. Cyclin A2 is required for sister chromatid segregation, but not separase control, in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Touati, Sandra A; Cladière, Damien; Lister, Lisa M; Leontiou, Ioanna; Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Rattani, Ahmed; Böttger, Franziska; Stemmann, Olaf; Nasmyth, Kim; Herbert, Mary; Wassmann, Katja

    2012-11-29

    In meiosis, two specialized cell divisions allow the separation of paired chromosomes first, then of sister chromatids. Separase removes the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together in a stepwise manner from chromosome arms in meiosis I, then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Using mouse oocytes, our study reveals that cyclin A2 promotes entry into meiosis, as well as an additional unexpected role; namely, its requirement for separase-dependent sister chromatid separation in meiosis II. Untimely cyclin A2-associated kinase activity in meiosis I leads to precocious sister separation, whereas inhibition of cyclin A2 in meiosis II prevents it. Accordingly, endogenous cyclin A is localized to kinetochores throughout meiosis II, but not in anaphase I. Additionally, we found that cyclin B1, but not cyclin A2, inhibits separase in meiosis I. These findings indicate that separase-dependent cohesin removal is differentially regulated by cyclin B1 and A2 in mammalian meiosis.

  6. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  7. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  8. Interferon alpha bioactivity critically depends on Scavenger receptor class B type I function

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Marcos; Fioravanti, Jessica; Aranda, Fernando; Paredes, Vladimir; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Méndez, Miriam; Nistal-Villan, Estanislao; Larrea, Esther; Gao, Qinshan; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Prieto, Jesus; Berraondo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) binds pathogen-associated molecular patterns participating in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction but there is no information regarding potential interactions between SR-B1 and the interferon system. Herein, we report that SR-B1 ligands strongly regulate the transcriptional response to interferon α (IFNα) and enhance its antiviral and antitumor activity. This effect was mediated by the activation of TLR2 and TLR4 as it was annulled by the addition of anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies. In vivo, we maximized the antitumor activity of IFNα co-expressing in the liver a SR-B1 ligand and IFNα by adeno-associated viruses. This gene therapy strategy eradicated liver metastases from colon cancer with reduced toxicity. On the other hand, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of SR-B1 blocks the clathrin-dependent interferon receptor recycling pathway with a concomitant reduction in IFNα signaling and bioactivity. This effect can be applied to enhance cancer immunotherapy with oncolytic viruses. Indeed, SR-B1 antagonists facilitate replication of oncolytic viruses amplifying their tumoricidal potential. In conclusion, SR-B1 agonists behave as IFNα enhancers while SR-B1 inhibitors dampen IFNα activity. These results demonstrate that SR-B1 is a suitable pharmacology target to enhance cancer immunotherapy based on IFNα and oncolytic viruses. PMID:27622065

  9. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Predict Ventricular Arrhythmia Post Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Pickrell, Jeanette; Jani, Milena; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2015-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been shown to predict ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden death in patients with heart failure. We sought to determine whether BNP levels before left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can predict VA post LVAD implantation in advanced heart failure patients. We conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who underwent LVAD implantation in our institution during the period of May 2009-March 2013. The study was limited to patients receiving a HeartMate II or HeartWare LVAD. Acute myocardial infarction patients were excluded. We compared between the patients who developed VA within 15 days post LVAD implantation to the patients without VA. A total of 85 patients underwent LVAD implantation during the study period. Eleven patients were excluded (five acute MI, four without BNP measurements, and two discharged earlier than 13 days post LVAD implantation). The incidence of VA was 31%, with 91% ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 9% ventricular fibrillation. BNP remained the single most powerful predictor of VA even after adjustment for other borderline significant factors in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05). BNP levels are a strong predictor of VA post LVAD implantation, surpassing previously described risk factors such as age and VT in the past.

  10. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Romagnoli, Marcello; Hanuskova, Miriam; Fabbri, Elena; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2014-12-01

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20-60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5-2.5) and solid content (10-30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42-60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107-186 m2/g) and crystallinity (76-97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature.

  11. Emergent criticality in complex turing B-type atomic switch networks.

    PubMed

    Stieg, Adam Z; Avizienis, Audrius V; Sillin, Henry O; Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Aono, Masakazu; Gimzewski, James K

    2012-01-10

    Recent advances in the neuromorphic operation of atomic switches as individual synapse-like devices demonstrate the ability to process information with both short-term and long-term memorization in a single two terminal junction. Here it is shown that atomic switches can be self-assembled within a highly interconnected network of silver nanowires similar in structure to Turing’s “B-Type unorganized machine”, originally proposed as a randomly connected network of NAND logic gates. In these experimental embodiments,complex networks of coupled atomic switches exhibit emergent criticality similar in nature to previously reported electrical activity of biological brains and neuron assemblies. Rapid fluctuations in electrical conductance display metastability and power law scaling of temporal correlation lengths that are attributed to dynamic reorganization of the interconnected electro-ionic network resulting from induced non-equilibrium thermodynamic instabilities. These collective properties indicate a potential utility for realtime,multi-input processing of distributed sensory data through reservoir computation. We propose these highly coupled, nonlinear electronic networks as an implementable hardware-based platform toward the creation of physically intelligent machines.

  12. PULSATING B-TYPE STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 884: FREQUENCIES, MODE IDENTIFICATION, AND ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Saesen, S.; Briquet, M.; Aerts, C.; Carrier, F.; Miglio, A.

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physical description in the stellar structure and evolution model computations of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance, and chemical composition. We present an observational asteroseismology study based on the discovery of numerous multi-periodic and mono-periodic B stars in the open cluster NGC 884. We describe a thorough investigation of the pulsational properties of all B-type stars in the cluster. Overall, our detailed frequency analysis resulted in 115 detected frequencies in 65 stars. We found 36 mono-periodic, 16 bi-periodic, 10 tri-periodic, and 2 quadru-periodic stars and one star with nine independent frequencies. We also derived the amplitudes and phases of all detected frequencies in the U, B, V, and I filter, if available. We achieved unambiguous identifications of the mode degree for 12 of the detected frequencies in nine of the pulsators. Imposing the identified degrees and measured frequencies of the radial, dipole, and quadrupole modes of five pulsators led to a seismic cluster age estimate of log (age/yr) = 7.12-7.28 from a comparison with stellar models. Our study is a proof-of-concept for and illustrates the current status of ensemble asteroseismology of a young open cluster.

  13. WW Geminorum: An early B-type eclipsing binary evolving into the contact phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.-G.; Dai, H.-F.; Yin, X.-G.; Yang, Y. E-mail: yangyg@chnu.edu.cn

    2014-11-01

    WW Gem is a B-type eclipsing binary with a period of 1.2378 days. The CCD photometry of this binary was performed in 2013 December using the 85 cm telescope at the Xinglong Stations of the National Astronomical Observatories of China. Using the updated W-D program, the photometric model was deduced from the VRI light curves. The results imply that WW Gem is a near-contact eclipsing binary whose primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. The photometric mass ratio is q {sub ph} = 0.48(± 0.05). All collected times of minimum light, including two new ones, were used for the period studies. The orbital period changes of WW Gem could be described by an upward parabola, possibly overlaid by a light-time orbit with a period of P {sub mod} = 7.41(± 0.04) yr and a semi-amplitude of A = 0.0079 days(± 0.0005 days), respectively. This kind of cyclic oscillation may be attributed to the light-travel time effect via the third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +3.47(±0.04) × 10{sup –8} day yr{sup –1}, which may be explained by the conserved mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. With mass transfer, the massive binary WW Gem may be evolving into a contact binary.

  14. Cortical Brain Connectivity and B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Valeriani, Lavinia; Scarpellini, Maria Gabriella; Bramanti, Placido; Mecarelli, Oriano; Rossini, Paolo M

    2015-07-01

    The brain has a high level of complexity and needs continuous oxygen supply. So it is clear that any pathological condition, or physiological (aging) change, in the cardiovascular system affects functioning of the central nervous system. We evaluated linear aspects of the relationship between the slowness of cortical rhythms, as revealed by the modulation of a graph connectivity parameter, and congestive heart failure (CHF), as a reflection of neurodegenerative processes. Eyes-closed resting electroencephalographic (EEG) data of 10 patients with CHF were recorded by 19 electrodes positioned according the international 10-20 system. Graph theory function (normalized characteristic path length λ) was applied to the undirected and weighted networks obtained by lagged linear coherence evaluated by eLORETA software, therefore getting rid of volumetric propagation influences. The EEG frequency bands of interest were: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). The analysis between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) values and λ showed positive correlation in delta, associated with a negative correlation in alpha 2 band. Namely, the higher the severity of the disease (as revealed by the BNP vales), the higher the λ in delta, and lower in alpha 2 band. Results suggest that delta and alpha λ indices are good markers of the severity of CHF.

  15. B-type natriuretic peptide modulates ghrelin, hunger, and satiety in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Grimm, Gabriele; Resl, Michael; Heinisch, Birgit; Einwallner, Elisa; Esterbauer, Harald; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Clodi, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is accompanied by anorexia and increased release of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) from ventricular cardiomyocytes. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking heart failure and appetite regulation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of intravenous BNP administration on appetite-regulating hormones and subjective ratings of hunger and satiety in 10 healthy volunteers. Participants received in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, single-blinded study (subject) placebo once and 3.0 pmol/kg/min human BNP-32 once administered as a continuous infusion during 4 h. Circulating concentrations of appetite-regulating peptides were measured hourly. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. BNP inhibited the fasting-induced increase in total and acylated ghrelin concentrations over time (P = 0.043 and P = 0.038, respectively). In addition, BNP decreased the subjective rating of hunger (P = 0.009) and increased the feeling of satiety (P = 0.012) when compared with placebo. There were no significant changes in circulating peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide, leptin, and adiponectin concentrations. In summary, our results demonstrate that BNP exerts anorectic effects and reduces ghrelin concentrations in men. These data, taken together with the known cardiovascular properties of ghrelin, support the existence of a heart-gut-brain axis, which could be therapeutically targeted in patients with heart failure and obesity.

  16. An array of Escherichia coli clones over-expressing essential proteins: A new strategy of identifying cellular targets of potent antibacterial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H. Howard . E-mail: hxu3@calstatela.edu; Real, Lilian; Bailey, Melissa Wu

    2006-11-03

    With the advancement of high throughput screening, it has become easier and faster to discover hit compounds that inhibit proliferation of bacterial cells. However, development in technologies used to identify cellular targets of potent antibacterial inhibitors has lagged behind. Here, we describe a novel strategy of target identification for antibacterial inhibitors using an array of Escherichia coli clones each over-expressing one essential protein. In a proof-of-concept study, eight essential genes were cloned into pLex5BA vector under the control of an inducible promoter. Over-expression of target proteins was confirmed. For two clones, one over-expressing FabI and the other over-expressing MurA enzymes, the host cells became 17- and 139-fold more resistant to the specific inhibitors triclosan and phosphomycin, respectively, while the susceptibility of other clones towards these inhibitors remained unchanged after induction of gene expression. Target identification via target protein over-expression was demonstrated using both mixed clone and individual clone assay formats.

  17. Over-expression of a cytosolic isoform of the HbCuZnSOD gene in Hevea brasiliensis changes its response to a water deficit.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, J; Martin, F; Sanier, C; Clément-Vidal, A; Fabre, D; Oliver, G; Lardet, L; Ayar, A; Peyramard, M; Montoro, P

    2012-10-01

    Hevea brasiliensis is the main commercial source of natural rubber. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging systems are involved in various biotic and abiotic stresses. Genetic engineering was undertaken to study the strengthening of plant defences by antioxidants. To that end, Hevea transgenic plant lines over-expressing a Hevea brasiliensis cytosolic HbCuZnSOD gene were successfully established and regenerated. Over-expression of the HbCuZnSOD gene was not clearly related to an increase in SOD activity in plant leaves. The impact of HbCuZnSOD gene over-expression in somatic embryogenesis and in plant development are presented and discussed. The water deficit tolerance of two HbCuZnSOD over-expressing lines was evaluated. The physiological parameters of transgenic plantlets subjected to a water deficit suggested that plants from line TS4T8An displayed lower stomatal conductance and a higher proline content. Over-expression of the HbCuZnSOD gene and activation of all ROS-scavenging enzymes also suggested that protection against ROS was more efficient in the TS4T8An transgenic line.

  18. Over-expression of OsPTR6 in rice increased plant growth at different nitrogen supplies but decreased nitrogen use efficiency at high ammonium supply.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaorong; Xie, Dan; Chen, Jingguang; Lu, Haiyan; Xu, Yanling; Ma, Cui; Xu, Guohua

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) plays a critical role in plant growth and productivity and PTR/NRT1 transporters are critical for rice growth. In this study, OsPTR6, a PTR/NRT1 transporter, was over-expressed in the Nipponbare rice cultivar by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation using the ubiquitin (Ubi) promoter. Three single-copy T2 generation transgenic lines, named OE1, OE5 and OE6, were produced and subjected to hydroponic growth experiments in different nitrogen treatments. The results showed the plant height and biomass of the over-expression lines were increased, and plant N accumulation and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities were enhanced at 5.0mmol/L NH4(+) and 2.5mmol/L NH4NO3. The expression of OsATM1 genes in over-expression lines showed that the OsPTR6 over expression increased OsAMT1.1, OsATM1.2 and OsAMT1.3 expression at 0.2 and 5.0mmol/L NH4(+) and 2.5mmol/L NH4NO3. However, nitrogen utilisation efficiency (NUE) was decreased at 5.0mmol/LNH4(+). These data suggest that over-expression of the OsPTR6 gene could increase rice growth through increasing ammonium transporter expression and glutamine synthetase activity (GSA), but decreases nitrogen use efficiency under conditions of high ammonium supply.

  19. The δ-cyclin expression at early stages of embryogenesis of Brassica rapa L. under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, O. A.; Popova, A. F.

    We present some results of comparison studying of Brassica embryo development and the δ-cyclin genes expression under slow horizontal clinorotation and in the laboratory control. Some backlog of the δ1-cyclin genes expression at early stages of embryogenesis under clinorotation was revealed in comparison with the laboratory control. The similar level of the δ3-cyclin expression at all stages of embryo formation (from one to nine days) in both variants is shown. Some delays in the rate of Brassica rapa embryo development under clinorotation in comparison with the laboratory control can be a result of decrease of a level and some backlog of the δ1-cyclin expression at early stages of embryogenesis.

  20. Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Sameer, Aga Syed; Parray, Fazl Q; Dar, Manzoor Ahmad; Nissar, Saniya; Banday, Mujeeb Zafar; Rasool, Sabha; Gulzar, G M; Chowdri, Nissar A; Siddiqi, Mushtaq A

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to analyse the role of cyclin D1 A870G polymorphism in modulating the susceptibility to colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Kashmiri population. The genotype distribution of the cyclin D1 gene in 130 CRC cases in comparison with 160 healthy controls was investigated. No direct significant association between cyclin D1 genotypes and CRC was observed; however, the AG and AA genotypes were found to be associated with an increased risk of CRC compared to the GG genotype, with an almost 2-fold increase in OR. This study suggests that the cyclin D1 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CRC in the Kashmiri population.

  1. Growth dynamics and cyclin expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Edyta; Manfé, Valentina; Kamstrup, Maria R.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated cell growth dynamics and cyclins B1 and E expression in cell lines derived from mycosis fungoides (MyLa), Sézary syndrome (SeAx), and CD30+ lympho-proliferative diseases (Mac1, Mac2a, JK). Mac1 and Mac2a had the highest growth rate (doubling time 18–28 h, >90% cycling cells) whereas SeAx was proliferating slowly (doubling time 55 h, approximately 35% cycling cells). Expression of cyclin B1 correlated positively with doubling time whereas expression of cyclin E was unscheduled and constant across the investigated cell lines. All cell lines exhibited high expression of PCNA. Thus, we concluded that cyclin B1 could be used for rapid screening of cell proliferation in malignant lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. PMID:25386244

  2. MicroRNA 218 mediates the effects of Tbx5a over-expression on zebrafish heart development.

    PubMed

    Chiavacci, Elena; Dolfi, Luca; Verduci, Lorena; Meghini, Francesco; Gestri, Gaia; Evangelista, Alberto Mercatanti Monica; Wilson, Stephen W; Cremisi, Federico; Pitto, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    tbx5, a member of the T-box gene family, encodes one of the key transcription factors mediating vertebrate heart development. Tbx5 function in heart development appears to be exquisitely sensitive to gene dosage, since both haploinsufficiency and gene duplication generate the cardiac abnormalities associated with Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS), a highly penetrant autosomal dominant disease characterized by congenital heart defects of varying severity and upper limb malformation. It is suggested that tight integration of microRNAs and transcription factors into the cardiac genetic circuitry provides a rich and robust array of regulatory interactions to control cardiac gene expression. Based on these considerations, we performed an in silico screening to identify microRNAs embedded in genes highly sensitive to Tbx5 dosage. Among the identified microRNAs, we focused our attention on miR-218-1 that, together with its host gene, slit2, is involved in heart development. We found correlated expression of tbx5 and miR-218 during cardiomyocyte differentiation of mouse P19CL6 cells. In zebrafish embryos, we show that both Tbx5 and miR-218 dysregulation have a severe impact on heart development, affecting early heart morphogenesis. Interestingly, down-regulation of miR-218 is able to rescue the heart defects generated by tbx5 over-expression supporting the notion that miR-218 is a crucial mediator of Tbx5 in heart development and suggesting its possible involvement in the onset of heart malformations.

  3. Integrative genomics analysis of chromosome 5p gain in cervical cancer reveals target over-expressed genes, including Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Scotto, Luigi; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Nandula, Subhadra V; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Wright, Jason D; Pothuri, Bhavana; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Schneider, Achim; Arias-Pulido, Hugo; Murty, Vundavalli V

    2008-01-01

    Background Copy number gains and amplifications are characteristic feature of cervical cancer (CC) genomes for which the underlying mechanisms are unclear. These changes may possess oncogenic properties by deregulating tumor-related genes. Gain of short arm of chromosome 5 (5p) is the most frequent karyotypic change in CC. Methods To examine the role of 5p gain, we performed a combination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and gene expression analyses on invasive cancer and in various stages of CC progression. Results The SNP and FISH analyses revealed copy number increase (CNI) of 5p in 63% of invasive CC, which arises at later stages of precancerous lesions in CC development. We integrated chromosome 5 genomic copy number and gene expression data to identify key target over expressed genes as a consequence of 5p gain. One of the candidates identified was Drosha (RNASEN), a gene that is required in the first step of microRNA (miRNA) processing in the nucleus. Other 5p genes identified as targets of CNI play a role in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation (BASP1, TARS, PAIP1, BRD9, RAD1, SKP2, and POLS), signal transduction (OSMR), and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (NNT, SDHA, and NDUFS6), suggesting that disruption of pathways involving these genes may contribute to CC progression. Conclusion Taken together, we demonstrate the power of integrating genomics data with expression data in deciphering tumor-related targets of CNI. Identification of 5p gene targets in CC denotes an important step towards biomarker development and forms a framework for testing as molecular therapeutic targets. PMID:18559093

  4. Over-expression of Skp2 is associated with resistance to preoperative doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davidovich, Shirly; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Shapira, Ma'anit; Futerman, Boris; Hershko, Dan D

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Preoperative chemotherapy is often used in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. However, commonly used clinical and pathological parameters are poor predictors of response to this type of therapy. Recent studies have suggested that altered regulation of the cell cycle in cancer may be involved in resistance to chemotherapy. Over-expression of the ubiquitin ligase Skp2 results in loss of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 and is associated with poor prognosis in early breast cancer. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of these proteins as predictors of clinical outcome and response to chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer. Methods The expression levels of Skp2 and p27Kip1 were determined by immunohistochemistry both before and after preoperative chemotherapy in 40 patients with locally advanced breast cancer. All patients were treated with cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin (adriamycin)/5-fluorouracil (CAF) and some patients received additional treatment with docetaxel. Expression data were compared with patients' clinical and pathological features, clinical outcome, and response to chemotherapy. Results Skp2 expression before preoperative chemotherapy was inversely related to p27Kip1 levels, tumor grade, and expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Both Skp2 and p27Kip1 were found to be accurate prognostic markers for disease-free and overall survival. High preoperative expression of Skp2 was associated with resistance to CAF therapy in 94% of patients (P < 0.0001) but not with resistance to docetaxel. Conclusion Skp2 expression may be a useful marker for predicting response to doxorubicin-based preoperative chemotherapy and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. PMID:18644126

  5. HER2 over-expressing high grade endometrial cancer expresses high levels of p95HER2 variant

    PubMed Central

    Growdon, Whitfield B.; Groeneweg, Jolijn; Byron, Virginia; DiGloria, Celeste; Borger, Darrell R.; Tambouret, Rosemary; Foster, Rosemary; Chenna, Ahmed; Sperinde, Jeff; Winslow, John; Rueda, Bo R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subsets of high grade endometrial cancer (EnCa) over-express HER2 (ERBB2), yet clinical trials have failed to demonstrate any anti-tumor activity utilizing trastuzumab, an approved platform for HER2 positive breast cancer (BrCa). A truncated p95HER2 variant lacking the trastuzumab binding site may confer resistance. The objective of this investigation was to characterize the expression of the p95HER2 truncated variant in EnCa. Materials and Methods With institutional approval, 86 high grade EnCa tumors were identified with tumor specimens from surgeries performed between 2000-2011. Clinical data were collected and all specimens underwent tumor genotyping, HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC, HercepTest®), HER2 fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), along with total HER2 (H2T) and p95HER2 assessment with VeraTag® testing. Regression models were used to compare a cohort of 86 breast tumors selected for equivalent HER2 protein expression. Results We identified 44 high grade endometrioid and 42 uterine serous carcinomas (USC). IHC identified high HER2 expression (2+ or 3+) in 59% of the tumors. HER2 gene amplification was observed in 16 tumors (12 USC, 4 endometrioid). Both HER2 gene amplification and protein expression correlated with H2T values. High p95HER2 expression above 2.8 RF/mm2 was observed in 53% (n = 54) with significant correlation with H2T levels. When matched to a cohort of 107 breast tumors based on HercepTest HER2 expression, high grade EnCa presented with higher p95 levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that compared to BrCa, high grade EnCa expresses higher levels of p95HER2 possibly providing rationale for the trastuzumab resistance observed in EnCa. PMID:25602714

  6. Over-expression of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (NOR-1) exacerbates neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Calvo, Ricardo; Guadall, Anna; Calvayrac, Olivier; Navarro, María A; Alonso, Judith; Ferrán, Beatriz; de Diego, Alicia; Muniesa, Pedro; Osada, Jesús; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2013-05-15

    We have previously shown that NOR-1 (NR4A3) modulates the proliferation and survival of vascular cells in culture. However, in genetically modified animal models, somewhat conflicting results have been reported concerning the involvement of NOR-1 in neointimal formation after vascular injury. The aim of this study was to generate a transgenic mouse model over-expressing NOR-1 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and assess the consequence of a gain of function of this receptor on intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury. The transgene construct (SM22-NOR1) was prepared by ligating the full-length human NOR-1 cDNA (hNOR-1) and a mouse SM22α minimal promoter able to drive NOR-1 expression to SMC. Two founders were generated and two stable transgenic mouse lines (TgNOR-1) were established by backcrossing the transgene-carrying founders with C57BL/6J mice. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry confirmed that hNOR-1 was mainly targeted to vascular beds such as aorta and carotid arteries, and was similar in both transgenic lines. Vascular SMC from transgenic animals exhibit increased NOR-1 transcriptional activity (assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assays), increased mitogenic activity (determined by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation; 1.58-fold induction, P < 0.001) and increased expression of embryonic smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMemb) than wild-type cells from control littermates. Using the carotid artery ligation model, we show that neointima formation was increased in transgenic versus wild-type mice (2.36-fold induction, P < 0.01). Our in vivo data support a role for NOR-1 in VSMC proliferation and vascular remodelling. This NOR-1 transgenic mouse could be a useful model to study fibroproliferative vascular diseases.

  7. Reduced expression of pain mediators and pain sensitivity in amyloid precursor protein over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Shukla, M; Quirion, R; Ma, W

    2013-10-10

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides are derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). They are enriched in plaques present in Alzheimer's brains and thus play important roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. APP is also known to be expressed in the neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and contributes to neuronal survival and axonal growth during development. However, whether APP and Aβ peptides are involved in nociception and pathological pain states is mostly unknown. In the present study, we have used behavioral, biochemical and morphological approaches to address this issue in both adult rats and APP over-expressing CRND8 transgenic mice. We observed that the Aβ peptide (17-24) was predominantly expressed in small-sized DRG neurons of rats. Following intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of complete Freud's adjuvant (CFA), the levels of APP and Aβ peptides were significantly reduced in the ipsilateral lumbar 4-6 rat DRG. In 3-, 12- and 24-month-old CRND8 mice, pain sensitivity in response to heat and mechanical stimulation was significantly dampened compared to their age-matched wild-type littermates. In parallel with reduced pain sensitivity, the expression of pain mediators such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 was significantly reduced in L4-6 DRG of CRND8 mice. Although i.pl. injection of CFA induced a rather similar pattern of inflammatory pain in 3-month-old CRND8 mice and their wild-type littermates, recovery from inflammatory pain seemed faster in 12-month-old CRND8 mice than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that APP and Aβ peptides suppress both nociception and inflammatory pain and are likely involved in blunt pain perception of Alzheimer's patients in clinical settings.

  8. Over-expression of a novel JAZ family gene from Glycine soja, increases salt and alkali stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Dan; Cai, Hua; Luo, Xiao; Bai, Xi; Deyholos, Michael K.; Chen, Qin; Chen, Chao; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated and characterized a novel JAZ family gene, GsJAZ2, from Glycine soja. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of GsJAZ2 enhanced plant tolerance to salt and alkali stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The transcriptions of stress marker genes were higher in GsJAZ2 overexpression lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GsJAZ2 was localized to nucleus. -- Abstract: Salt and alkali stress are two of the main environmental factors limiting crop production. Recent discoveries show that the JAZ family encodes plant-specific genes involved in jasmonate signaling. However, there is only limited information about this gene family in abiotic stress response, and in wild soybean (Glycine soja), which is a species noted for its tolerance to alkali and salinity. Here, we isolated and characterized a novel JAZ family gene, GsJAZ2, from G. soja. Transcript abundance of GsJAZ2 increased following exposure to salt, alkali, cold and drought. Over-expression of GsJAZ2 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to salt and alkali stress. The expression levels of some alkali stress response and stress-inducible marker genes were significantly higher in the GsJAZ2 overexpression lines as compared to wild-type plants. Subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein showed that GsJAZ2 was localized to the nucleus. These results suggest that the newly isolated wild soybean GsJAZ2 is a positive regulator of plant salt and alkali stress tolerance.

  9. An over expression APP model for anti-Alzheimer disease drug screening created by zinc finger nuclease technology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Li, Hui; Mao, Yiqing; Li, Zhixin; Wang, Rong; Guo, Tingting; Jin, Ling; Song, Rongjing; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Na; Zhang, Yizhuang; Hu, Ruobi; Wang, Xi; Huang, Huakang; Lei, Zhen; Niu, Gang; Irwin, David M; Tan, Huanran

    2013-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), famous for their ability to precisely and efficiently modify specific genomic loci, have been employed in numerous transgenic model organism and cell constructions. Here we employ the ZFNs technology, with homologous recombination (HR), to construct sequence-specific Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) knock-in cells. With the use of ZFNs, we established APP knock in cell lines with gene-modification efficiencies of about 7%. We electroporated DNA fragment containing the promoter and the protein coding regions of the zinc finger nucleases into cells, instead of the plasmids, to avoid problems associated with off target homologous recombination, and adopted a pair of mutated FokI cleavage domains to reduce the toxic effects of the ZFNs on cell growth. Since over-expression of APP, or a subdomain of it, might lead to an immediately lethal effect, we used the Cre-LoxP System to regulate APP expression. Our genetically transformed cell lines, w5c1 and s12c8, showed detectable APP and Amyloid β (Aβ) production. The Swedish double mutation in the APP coding sequence enhanced APP and Aβ abundance. What is more, the activity of the three key secretases in Aβ formation could be modulated, indicating that these transgenic cells have potential for drug screening to modify amyloid metabolism in cells. Our transformed cells could readily be propagated in culture and should provide an excellent experimental medium for elucidating aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, especially those concerning the amyloidogenic pathways involving mutations in the APP coding sequence. The cellular models may also serve as a tool for deriving potentially useful therapeutic agents.

  10. Gain-of-function analysis of poplar CLE genes in Arabidopsis by exogenous application and over-expression assays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yisen; Yang, Shaohui; Song, Yingjin; Men, Shuzhen; Wang, Jiehua

    2016-04-01

    Among 50 CLE gene family members in the Populus trichocarpa genome, three and six PtCLE genes encode a CLE motif sequence highly homologous to Arabidopsis CLV3 and TDIF peptides, respectively, which potentially make them functional equivalents. To test and compare their biological activity, we first chemically synthesized each dodecapeptide and analysed itsi n vitro bioactivity on Arabidopsis seedlings. Similarly, but to a different extent, three types of poplar CLV3-related peptides caused root meristem consumption, phyllotaxis disorder, anthocyanin accumulation and failure to enter the bolting stage. In comparison, application of two poplar TDIF-related peptides led to root length promotion in a dose-dependent manner with an even stronger effect observed for poplar TDIF-like peptide than TDIF. Next, we constructed CaMV35S:PtCLE transgenic plants for each of the nine PtCLE genes. Phenotypic abnormalities exemplified by arrested shoot apical meristem and abnormal flower structure were found to be more dominant and severe in 35S:PtCLV3 and 35S:PtCLV3-like2 lines than in the 35S:PtCLV3-like line. Disordered vasculature was detected in both stem and hypocotyl cross-sections in Arabidopsis plants over-expressing poplar TDIF-related genes with the most defective vascular patterning observed for TDIF2 and two TDIF-like genes. Phenotypic difference consistently observed in peptide application assay and transgenic analysis indicated the functional diversity of nine poplar PtCLE genes under investigation. This work represents the first report on the functional analysis of CLE genes in a tree species and constitutes a basis for further study of the CLE peptide signalling pathway in tree development.

  11. Over-expression of miR-196b-5p is significantly associated with the progression of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Huang, Ying; Li, Hongying; Zhang, Xupai; Cheng, Peng; Deng, Donghong; Peng, Zhigang; Luo, Jun; Zhao, Weihua; Lai, Yongrong; Liu, Zhenfang

    2017-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with a high risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). miRNAs function as tumor suppressors and oncogenes in various cancers and regulate the differentiation potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). It has been suggested that miRNAs may play an important role in progression of MDS. We analyzed bone marrow samples collected from MDS patients according to different risk stratification indicated by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS). We demonstrated that miR-196b-5p was up-regulated in intermediate II and higher groups, and in secondary AML (s-AML) patients in particular (P < 0.01) compared with healthy controls, suggesting that the higher expression levels are associated with increased risk of the development of MDS. We observed changes in proliferation and apoptosis in MDS-L cells following transfection with miR-196-5p mimics or inhibitors. After up-regulating the expression of miR-196b-5p, proliferation of MDS-L cells was up-regulated, whereas apoptosis was down-regulated (P < 0.05). In contrast, down-regulation of miR-196b-5p expression decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis (P < 0.05). We concluded that over-expression of miR-196b-5p may be closely associated with the risk of transformation to leukemia in MDS patients.

  12. Enhanced polyamine accumulation alters carotenoid metabolism at the transcriptional level in tomato fruit over-expressing spermidine synthase.

    PubMed

    Neily, Mohamed Hichem; Matsukura, Chiaki; Maucourt, Mickaël; Bernillon, Stéphane; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Yin, Yong-Gen; Saito, Takeshi; Mori, Kentaro; Asamizu, Erika; Rolin, Dominique; Moriguchi, Takaya; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-02-15

    Polyamines are involved in crucial plant physiological events, but their roles in fruit development remain unclear. We generated transgenic tomato plants that show a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in polyamine content by over-expressing the spermidine synthase gene, which encodes a key enzyme for polyamine biosynthesis. Pericarp-columella and placental tissue from transgenic tomato fruits were subjected to (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for untargeted metabolic profiling and high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection for carotenoid profiling to determine the effects of high levels of polyamine accumulation on tomato fruit metabolism. A principal component analysis of the quantitative (1)H NMR data from immature green to red ripe fruit showed a clear discrimination between developmental stages, especially during ripening. Quantification of 37 metabolites in pericarp-columella and 41 metabolites in placenta tissues revealed distinct metabolic profiles between the wild type and transgenic lines, particularly at the late ripening stages. Notably, the transgenic tomato fruits also showed an increase in carotenoid accumulation, especially in lycopene (1.3- to 2.2-fold), and increased ethylene production (1.2- to 1.6-fold) compared to wild-type fruits. Genes responsible for lycopene biosynthesis, including phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, were significantly up-regulated in ripe transgenic fruits, whereas genes involved in lycopene degradation, including lycopene-epsilon cyclase and lycopene beta cyclase, were down-regulated in the transgenic fruits compared to the wild type. These results suggest that a high level of accumulation of polyamines in the tomato regulates the steady-state level of transcription of genes responsible for the lycopene metabolic pathway, which results in a higher accumulation of lycopene in the fruit.

  13. Circadian variation in expression of G1 phase cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 in human bowel mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Griniatsos, John; Michail, Othon P; Theocharis, Stamatios; Arvelakis, Antonios; Papaconstantinou, Ioannis; Felekouras, Evangelos; Pikoulis, Emmanouel; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Bakoyiannis, Chris; Marinos, George; Bramis, John; Michail, Panayiotis O

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the cellular proliferation rate in the large bowel epithelial cells is characterized by circadian rhythm. METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2004, twenty patients who were diagnosed as suffering from primary, resectable, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, infiltrating the sphincter mechanism, underwent abdominoperineal resection, total mesorectal excision and permanent left iliac colostomy. In formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained from the colostomy mucosa every six hours (00:00, 06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00), we studied the expression of G1 phase cyclins (D1 and E) as well as the expression of the G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p16 and p21 as indicators of cell cycle progression in colonic epithelial cells using immunohistochemical methods. RESULTS: The expression of both cyclins showed a similar circadian fashion obtaining their lowest and highest values at 00:00 and 18:00, respectively (P< 0.001). A circadian rhythm in the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p16 and p21 was also observed, with the lowest levels obtained at 12:00 and 18:00 (P< 0.001), respectively. When the complexes cyclins D1 - p21 and E - p21 were examined, the expression of the cyclins was adversely correlated to the p21 expression throughout the day. When the complexes the cyclins D1 - p16 and E - p16 were examined, high levels of p16 expression were correlated to low levels of cyclin expression at 00:00, 06:00 and 24:00. Meanwhile, the highest expression levels of both cyclins were correlated to high levels of p16 expression at 18:00. CONCLUSION: Colonic epithelial cells seem to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle during afternoon (between 12:00 and 18:00) with the highest rates obtained at 18:00. From a clinical point of view, the present results suggest that G1-phase specific anticancer therapies in afternoon might maximize their anti-tumor effect while minimizing toxicity

  14. Identification of New Substrates for Breast Tumor-Specific LMW Cyclin E/CDk2 Kinase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    cyclin EL or cyclin E-LMW and CDK2 (F80A) and CDK2 (F80G) from insect cells and carried out a similar     8   Rb kinase assay to test their...Multani, A. S., Wingate , H. F., Pathak, S., Zhang, N., Tucker, S. L., Chang, S., and Keyomarsi, K. (2004). Tumor-specific low molecular weight forms of

  15. Dexamethasone Induces Cardiomyocyte Terminal Differentiation via Epigenetic Repression of Cyclin D2 Gene.

    PubMed

    Gay, Maresha S; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Li, Yong; Kanna, Angela; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-08-01

    Dexamethasone treatment of newborn rats inhibited cardiomyocyte proliferation and stimulated premature terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart. Yet mechanisms remain undetermined. The present study tested the hypothesis that the direct effect of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated epigenetic repression of cyclin D2 gene in the cardiomyocyte plays a key role in the dexamethasone-mediated effects in the developing heart. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from 2-day-old rats. Cells were stained with a cardiomyocyte marker α-actinin and a proliferation marker Ki67. Cyclin D2 expression was evaluated by Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Promoter methylation of CcnD2 was determined by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). Overexpression of Cyclin D2 was conducted by transfection of FlexiCcnD2 (+CcnD2) construct. Treatment of cardiomyocytes isolated from newborn rats with dexamethasone for 48 hours significantly inhibited cardiomyocyte proliferation with increased binucleation and decreased cyclin D2 protein abundance. These effects were blocked with Ru486 (mifepristone). In addition, the dexamethasone treatment significantly increased cyclin D2 gene promoter methylation in newborn rat cardiomyocytes. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine inhibited dexamethasone-mediated promoter methylation, recovered dexamethasone-induced cyclin D2 gene repression, and blocked the dexamethasone-elicited effects on cardiomyocyte proliferation and binucleation. In addition, the overexpression of cyclin D2 restored the dexamethasone-mediated inhibition of proliferation and increase in binucleation in newborn rat cardiomyocytes. The results demonstrate that dexamethasone acting on glucocorticoid receptors has a direct effect and inhibits proliferation and stimulates premature terminal differentiation of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart via epigenetic repression of cyclin D2 gene.

  16. Expression of Cyclin D1 and P16 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dey, Biswajit; Raphael, Vandana; Khonglah, Yookarin; GiriLynrah, Kyrshanlang

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the lethal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Many genes including cyclin D1 and p16 play important role in its carcinogenesis. We aimed to analyze the expressions of cyclin D1 and p16 with the various clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC. METHODS We examined 30 biopsy samples of ESCC for cyclin D1 and p16 protein expressions using immunohistochemistry. Immunointensity was classified as no immunostaining (-), weakly immunostaining (+), weak immunostaining (++) and strongly positive immunostaining (+++). RESULTS Out of the 30 cases, positive expression of cyclin D1 was detected in 26 cases (86.7%). The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (88.2%), lymph node metastasis (87.5%), and tumors which were poorly differentiated (92.9%) were higher in cyclin D1 positive tumors than in the cyclin D1 negative tumors. However no significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression and the different clinicopathological parameters.There were 22 cases of ESCC (73.3 %) which showed negativity for p16. The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (82.4%) and poorly differentiated tumors (92.9%) were higher in the p16 negative tumors than in the p16 positive tumors. There was significant association between the histological grade and p16 expression (p=0.012). However, there were no significant association with regard to site, size and lymph node status of the tumors and p16 expression. CONCLUSION The study shows that alterations of cyclin D1 and p16 play an important role in ESCC. Loss of p16 expression was associated with poor differentiation.

  17. Real time detection of cell cycle regulator cyclin A on living tumor cells with europium emission.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguang; Chadbourne, Frances L; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Chan, Wai-Lun; Law, Ga-Lai; Lee, Chi-Sing; Cobb, Steven L; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2013-10-07

    Six water-soluble europium complexes (Eu-L1-P(n) and Eu-L2-P(n), n = 1, 2 and 3) with one antenna chromophore, two different linkers (L1 and L2) and three proposed cyclin A specific peptides (P1: -GAKRRLIF-NH2; P2: -GGAKRRLIF-NH2; P3: -Hex- GAKRRLIF-NH2) have been synthesized. With structural information available, comparisons of the cyclin grooves of cyclin A and the six europium complexes have been made, and insights have been gained into the determinants for peptide binding and the foundation of differential binding. Experiment-wise, the linear and two-photon induced photophysical properties of these conjugates were monitored in aqueous solution. Numerous in situ/in vitro biological assays have been carried out, such as responsive emission changes in situ/in vitro, Western blot and cellular uptake. As imaging agents, complexes with peptides P3: -Hex-GAKRRLIF-NH2 showed high selectivity to cyclin A in numerous cancer cells. When it comes to responsive optical signal changes, complex Eu-L2-P3 exhibited a threefold emission enhancement upon binding with cyclin A (100 nM cyclin A, ϕ = 8% to 21%, log KB = 5.83, detection limit = 5 nM), and this could be initiated by the shortened distance between the antenna and the lanthanide after they bind/get into cyclin A. It is promising that our compounds (especially compound Eu-L2-P3) could serve as the template for structure-guided efforts to develop potential imaging therapeutics on the basis of selective imaging of CDK2/cyclin A activity.

  18. Complexes of D-type cyclins with CDKs during maize germination.

    PubMed

    Godínez-Palma, Silvia K; García, Elpidio; Sánchez, María de la Paz; Rosas, Fernando; Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M

    2013-12-01

    The importance of cell proliferation in plant growth and development has been well documented. The majority of studies on basic cell cycle mechanisms in plants have been at the level of gene expression and much less knowledge has accumulated in terms of protein interactions and activation. Two key proteins, cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are fundamental for cell cycle regulation and advancement. Our aim has been to understand the role of D-type cyclins and type A and B CDKs in the cell cycle taking place during a developmental process such as maize seed germination. Results indicate that three maize D-type cyclins-D2;2, D4;2, and D5;3-(G1-S cyclins by definition) bind and activate two different types of CDK-A and B1;1-in a differential way during germination. Whereas CDKA-D-type cyclin complexes are more active at early germination times than at later times, it was surprising to observe that CDKB1;1, a supposedly G2-M kinase, bound in a differential way to all D-type cyclins tested during germination. Binding to cyclin D2;2 was detectable at all germination times, forming a complex with kinase activity, whereas binding to D4;2 and D5;3 was more variable; in particular, D5;3 was only detected at late germination times. Results are discussed in terms of cell cycle advancement and its importance for seed germination.

  19. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for probing the relative abundance of cyclin-dependent kinases in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kurzawa, Laetitia; Pellerano, Morgan; Coppolani, J B; Morris, May C

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependant kinases play a central role in coordinating cell growth and division, and in sustaining proliferation of cancer cells, thereby constituting attractive pharmacological targets. However, there are no direct means of assessing their relative abundance in living cells, current approaches being limited to antigenic and proteomic analysis of fixed cells. In order to probe the relative abundance of these kinases directly in living cells, we have developed a fluorescent peptide biosensor with biligand affinity for CDKs and cyclins in vitro, that retains endogenous CDK/cyclin complexes from cell extracts, and that bears an environmentally-sensitive probe, whose fluorescence increases in a sensitive fashion upon recognition of its targets. CDKSENS was introduced into living cells, through complexation with the cell-penetrating carrier CADY2 and applied to assess the relative abundance of CDK/Cyclins through fluorescence imaging and ratiometric quantification. This peptide biosensor technology affords direct and sensitive readout of CDK/cyclin complex levels, and reports on differences in complex formation when tampering with a single CDK or cyclin. CDKSENS further allows for detection of differences between different healthy and cancer cell lines, thereby enabling to distinguish cells that express high levels of these heterodimeric kinases, from cells that present decreased or defective assemblies. This fluorescent biosensor technology provides information on the overall status of CDK/Cyclin complexes which cannot be obtained through antigenic detection of individual subunits, in a non-invasive fashion which does not require cell fixation or extraction procedures. As such it provides promising perspectives for monitoring the response to therapeutics that affect CDK/Cyclin abundance, for cell-based drug discovery strategies and fluorescence-based cancer diagnostics.

  20. Over-expressed copper/zinc superoxide dismutase localizes to mitochondria in neurons inhibiting the angiotensin II-mediated increase in mitochondrial superoxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Case, Adam J; Yang, Rui-Fang; Schultz, Harold D; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease by exerting its effects on an array of different cell types, including central neurons. AngII intra-neuronal signaling is mediated, at least in part, by reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide (O2 (•-)). Recently, it has been discovered that mitochondria are a major subcellular source of AngII-induced O2 (•-). We have previously reported that over-expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a mitochondrial matrix-localized O2 (•-) scavenging enzyme, inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling. Interestingly, over-expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), which is believed to be primarily localized to the cytoplasm, similarly inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling and provides protection against AngII-mediated neurogenic hypertension. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that CuZnSOD over-expression in central neurons localizes to mitochondria and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling by scavenging mitochondrial O2 (•-). Using a neuronal cell culture model (CATH.a neurons), we demonstrate that both endogenous and adenovirus-mediated over-expressed CuZnSOD (AdCuZnSOD) are present in mitochondria. Furthermore, we show that over-expression of CuZnSOD attenuates the AngII-mediated increase in mitochondrial O2 (•-) levels and the AngII-induced inhibition of neuronal potassium current. Taken together, these data clearly show that over-expressed CuZnSOD in neurons localizes in mitochondria, scavenges AngII-induced mitochondrial O2 (•-), and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling.

  1. miR-155 Over-expression Promotes Genomic Instability by Reducing High-fidelity Polymerase Delta Expression and Activating Error-prone DSB Repair

    PubMed Central

    Czochor, Jennifer R.; Sulkowski, Parker; Glazer, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    miR-155 is an oncogenic microRNA (miR) that is often over-expressed in cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. miR-155 can target several DNA repair factors including RAD51, MLH1, and MSH6, and its over-expression results in an increased mutation frequency in vitro, although the mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that over-expression of miR-155 drives an increased mutation frequency both in vitro and in vivo, promoting genomic instability by affecting multiple DNA repair pathways. miR-155 over-expression causes a decrease in homologous recombination, but yields a concurrent increase in the error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Despite repressing established targets MLH1 and MSH6, the identified mutation pattern upon miR-155 over-expression does not resemble that of a mismatch repair-deficient background. Further investigation revealed that all four subunits of polymerase delta, a high-fidelity DNA replication and repair polymerase, are down-regulated at the mRNA level in the context of miR-155 over-expression. FOXO3a, a transcription factor and known target of miR-155, has one or more putative binding site(s) in the promoter of all four polymerase delta subunits. Finally, suppression of FOXO3a by miR-155 or by siRNA knockdown is sufficient to repress the expression of the catalytic subunit of polymerase delta, POLD1, at the protein level, indicating that FOXO3a contributes to the regulation of polymerase delta levels. PMID:26850462

  2. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 protects podocytes from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Saurus, Pauliina; Kuusela, Sara; Dumont, Vincent; Lehtonen, Eero; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku; Saleem, Moin A.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Loss of podocytes is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and predicts its progression. We found that treatment of podocytes with sera from normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes patients with high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity, known to predict progression of DN, downregulated CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2). LPS-treatment of mice also reduced CDK2 expression. LPS-induced downregulation of CDK2 was prevented in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using immunomodulatory agent GIT27. We also observed that CDK2 is downregulated in the glomeruli of obese Zucker rats before the onset of proteinuria. Knockdown of CDK2, or inhibiting its activity with roscovitine in podocytes increased apoptosis. CDK2 knockdown also reduced expression of PDK1, an activator of the cell survival kinase Akt, and reduced Akt phosphorylation. This suggests that CDK2 regulates the activity of the cell survival pathway via PDK1. Furthermore, PDK1 knockdown reduced the expression of CDK2 suggesting a regulatory loop between CDK2 and PDK1. Collectively, our data show that CDK2 protects podocytes from apoptosis and that reduced expression of CDK2 associates with the development of DN. Preventing downregulation of CDK2 by blocking the TLR pathway with GIT27 may provide a means to prevent podocyte apoptosis and progression of DN. PMID:26876672

  4. Emerging Drug Profile: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blachly, James S.; Byrd, John C.

    2013-01-01

    As the rational application of targeted therapies in cancer supplants traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, there is an ever-greater need for a thorough understanding of the complex machinery of the cell and an application of this knowledge to the development of novel therapeutics and combinations of agents. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of the class of targeted agents known as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, with a focus on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Flavopiridol (alvocidib) is the best studied of the CDK inhibitors, producing a dramatic cytotoxic effect in vitro and in vivo, with the principal limiting factor of acute tumor lysis. Unfortunately, flavopiridol has a narrow therapeutic window and is relatively non-selective with several off-target (i.e. non-CDK) effects, which prompted development of the second-generation CDK inhibitor dinaciclib. Dinaciclib appears to be both more potent and selective than flavopiridol, with at least an order of magnitude greater therapeutic index, and is currently in phase III clinical trials. In additional to flavopiridol and dinaciclib, we also review the current state of other members of this class, and provide commentary as to the future direction of combination therapy including CDK inhibitors. PMID:23488658

  5. Thermomagnetic treatment effects on microstructure in Nd-Fe-B type sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PaigeSmith, Catherine

    Optimizing the microstructure of sintered Nd-Fe-B type magnets has become increasingly important. Sintered magnets are key components to the growing industry of alternative energy, particularly wind turbines and electric car generators. With rising costs and limited supply of rare earth elements, special attention has been dedicated to improving magnetic properties of these magnets through processing rather than compositional modifications. The magnetic property needing the most improvement in Nd-Fe-B type sintered magnets is coercivity. Coercivity dictates the performance of magnets at temperatures still below the demagnetizing threshold temperature. It has been shown that annealing sintered magnets in a magnetic field can enhance coercivity when compared to conventional post-sinter annealing in the absence of a magnetic field. However, little is known about the microstructural changes that occur in sintered magnets as a result of these thermo-magnetic treatments. This work presents themicrostructural characterization of Dy-free and Dy-containing sintered magnets that have undergone annealing in a magnetic field of 9T. Microstructural characterization techniques were used to identify phases, analyze the texture of phases identified, and to study intergranular phases. Microstructural findings were then used to propose a solidification scheme during annealing and connect such findings to magnetic property results, as well as to make suggestions for optimizing the manufacturing process. In addition to the magnetic phase, phases identified in the Dy-free and Dy-containing Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets consisted of Nb-rich precipitates, Nd-rich phases, and phases from the Nd-Fe-Cu ternary system. Nd-Fe-Cu phases included alpha-Nd, NdCu, and the tau (Nd6Fe13Cu). The Nd-rich phases were specifically identified to be NdOx precipitates in an alpha-Nd matrix, and contained an orientation relationship described by (0001)alpha-Nd||(111)NdOx and [112¯0]alpha-Nd||[1¯10]NdO x. This

  6. Gcn5 determines the fate of Drosophila germline stem cells through degradation of Cyclin A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqi; Wang, Qi; Li, Wenqing; Mao, Feiyu; Yue, Shanshan; Liu, Sun; Liu, Xiaona; Xiao, Shan; Xia, Laixin

    2017-02-10

    The fluctuating CDK-CYCLIN complex plays a general role in cell-cycle control. Many types of stem cells use unique features of the cell cycle to facilitate asymmetric division. However, the manner in which these features are established remains poorly understood. The cell cycle of Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs) is characterized by short G1 and very long G2 phases, making it an excellent model for the study of cell cycle control in stem cell fate determination. Using a Drosophila female GSCs model, we found Gcn5, the first discovered histone acetyltransferase, to maintain germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries. Results showed that Gcn5 is dispensable for the transcriptional silencing of bam, but interacts with Cyclin A to facilitate proper turnover in GSCs. Results also showed that Gcn5 promotes Cyclin A ubiquitination, which is dependent on its acetylating activity. Finally, results showed that knockdown of Cyclin A rescued the GSC-loss phenotype caused by lack of Gcn5. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that Gcn5 acts through acetylation to facilitate Cyclin A ubiquitination and proper turnover, thereby determining the fate of GSCs.-Liu, T., Wang, Q., Li, W., Mao, F., Yue, S., Liu, S., Liu, X., Xiao, S., Xia, L. Gcn5 determines the fate of Drosophila germline stem cells through degradation of Cyclin A.

  7. Stress-induced nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of cyclin C promotes mitochondrial fission in yeast.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Katrina F; Khakhina, Svetlana; Kim, Stephen K; Strich, Randy

    2014-01-27

    Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by the opposing activities of dynamin-based fission and fusion machines. In response to stress, this balance is dramatically shifted toward fission. This study reveals that the yeast transcriptional repressor cyclin C is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced hyperfission. In response to oxidative stress, cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it is destroyed. Prior to its destruction, cyclin C both genetically and physically interacts with Mdv1p, an adaptor that links the GTPase Dnm1p to the mitochondrial receptor Fis1p. Cyclin C is required for stress-induced Mdv1p mitochondrial recruitment and the efficient formation of functional Dnm1p filaments. Finally, coimmunoprecipitation studies and fluorescence microscopy revealed an elevated association between Mdv1p and Dnm1p in stressed cells that is dependent on cyclin C. This study provides a mechanism by which stress-induced gene induction and mitochondrial fission are coordinated through translocation of cyclin C.

  8. Prefoldin 1 promotes EMT and lung cancer progression by suppressing cyclin A expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D; Shi, W; Tang, Y; Liu, Y; He, K; Hu, Y; Li, J; Yang, Y; Song, J

    2017-01-01

    Prefoldin (PFDN) is a co-chaperone protein that is primarily known for its classic cytoplasmic functions in the folding of actin and tubulin monomers during cytoskeletal assembly. Here, we report a marked increase in prefoldin subunit 1 (PFDN1) levels during the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and in human lung tumor tissues. Interestingly, the nuclear localization of PFDN1 was also detected. These observations suggest that PFDN1 may be essential for important novel functions. Overexpression of PFDN1 induced EMT and cell invasion. In sharp contrast, knockdown of PFDN1 generated the opposite effects. Overexpression of PFDN1 was also found to induce lung tumor growth and metastasis. Further experiments showed that PFDN1 overexpression inhibits the expression of cyclin A. PFDN1 suppressed cyclin A expression by directly interacting with the cyclin A promoter at the transcriptional start site. Strikingly, cyclin A overexpression abolished the above PFDN1-mediated effects on the behavior of lung cancer cells, whereas cyclin A knockdown alone induced EMT and increased cell migration and invasion ability. This study reveals that the TGF-β1/PFDN1/cyclin A axis is essential for EMT induction and metastasis of lung cancer cells. PMID:27694898

  9. Cyclin D2 induces proliferation of cardiac myocytes and represses hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Busk, Peter K. . E-mail: pkbu@novonordisk.com; Hinrichsen, Rebecca; Bartkova, Jirina; Hansen, Ane H.; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Bartek, Jiri; Haunso, Stig

    2005-03-10

    The myocytes of the adult mammalian heart are considered unable to divide. Instead, mitogens induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We have investigated the effect of adenoviral overexpression of cyclin D2 on myocyte proliferation and morphology. Cardiomyocytes in culture were identified by established markers. Cyclin D2 induced DNA synthesis and proliferation of cardiomyocytes and impaired hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II and serum. At the molecular level, cyclin D2 activated CDK4/6 and lead to pRB phosphorylation and downregulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}. Expression of the CDK4/6 inhibitor p16 inhibited proliferation and cyclin D2 overexpressing myocytes became hypertrophic under such conditions. Inhibition of hypertrophy by cyclin D2 correlated with downregulation of p27{sup Kip1}. These data show that hypertrophy and proliferation are highly related processes and suggest that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is due to low amounts of cell cycle activators unable to overcome the block imposed by cell cycle inhibitors. Cell cycle entry upon hypertrophy may be converted to cell division by increased expression of activators such as cyclin D2.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of the mRNA for cyclin from sea urchin eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Pines, J; Hunt, T

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding sea urchin cyclin and determined its sequence. It contains a single open reading frame of 409 amino acids which shows homology with clam cyclins. RNA transcribed in vitro from this sequence was efficiently translated in reticulocyte lysates, yielding full-length cyclin. Injection of nanogram amounts of this synthetic mRNA into Xenopus oocytes caused them to mature more rapidly than with progesterone treatment. The sea urchin cyclin underwent two posttranslational modifications in the Xenopus oocytes during maturation. The first occurred at about the time that maturation became cycloheximide-resistant, when a small apparent increase in the molecular weight of cyclin was observed. The second modification involved destruction of the cyclin at about the time of white spot appearance, just as would have occurred at the metaphase/anaphase transition in the natural environment of a cleaving sea urchin embryo. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. PMID:2826125

  11. Reversible phosphorylation controls the activity of cyclosome-associated cyclin-ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Lahav-Baratz, S; Sudakin, V; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin B/cdc2 is responsible both for driving cells into mitosis and for activating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of mitotic cyclins near the end of mitosis, an event required for the completion of mitosis and entry into interphase of the next cell cycle. Previous work with cell-free extracts of rapidly dividing clam embryos has identified two specific components required for the ubiquitination of mitotic cyclins: E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein that is constitutively active during the cell cycle, and E3-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase that purifies as part of a approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, and which is active only near the end of mitosis. Here, we have separated the cyclosome from its ultimate upstream activator, cdc2. The mitotic, active form of the cyclosome can be inactivated by incubation with a partially purified, endogenous okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase; addition of cdc2 restores activity to the cyclosome after a lag that reproduces that seen previously in intact cells and in crude extracts. These results demonstrate that activity of cyclin-ubiquitin ligase is controlled by reversible phosphorylation of the cyclosome complex. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568122

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin D1 expression in cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsoo; Lee, Myunghwa; Kim, Dae Woon; Hong, Seo Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a pluripotent protein kinase involved in the development of cancers through regulation of numerous oncogenic molecules. Cyclin D1, an important regulator of G1 to S phase transition in various cells, is one of target proteins that GSK3β regulate. Our objective was to assess the expression of GSK3β and cyclin D1 in cervical neoplasm of different histologic grades and to identify their correlation in cervical carcinogenesis. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of GSK3β and cyclin D1 was performed in a total of 137 patients with 12 normal, 62 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (31 CIN1 and 31 CIN3) and 63 invasive cancers including 56 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 adenocarcinomas. Results The expression of GSK3β increased in parallel with the lesion grade, while that of cyclin D1 decreased with severity of the lesion (P<0.001). There was a significant inverse correlation between GSK3β and cyclin D1 expression in overall cervical neoplasia (Φ=-0.413, P<0.001). GSK3β expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma (P=0.049). Conclusion These results suggest that the expressional increase in GSK3β plays a role in cervical carcinogenesis and has inverse correlation with cyclin D1 expression in this process. In addition, GSK3β expression appears to be associated with the histologic type of cervical cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27896249

  13. Cyclin A2 modulates EMT via β-catenin and phospholipase C pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Caroline T; Bendris, Nawal; Paul, Conception; Hamieh, Abdallah; Anouar, Youssef; Hahne, Michael; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Lemmers, Bénédicte

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Cyclin A2 is involved in cytoskeletal dynamics, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. This phenotype was potentiated by activated oncogenic H-Ras. However, the mechanisms governing EMT in these cells have not yet been elucidated. Here, we dissected the pathways that are responsible for EMT in cells deficient for Cyclin A2. In Cyclin A2-depleted normal murine mammary gland (NMuMG) cells expressing RasV12, we found that β-catenin was liberated from the cell membrane and cell-cell junctions and underwent nuclear translocation and activation. Components of the canonical wingless (WNT) pathway, including WNT8b, WNT10a, WNT10b, frizzled 1 and 2 and TCF4 were upregulated at the messenger RNA and protein levels following Cyclin A2 depletion. However, suppression of the WNT pathway using the acetyltransferase porcupine inhibitor C59 did not reverse EMT whereas a dominant negative form of TCF4 as well as inhibition of phospholipase C using U73122 were able to do so. This suggests that a WNT-independent mechanism of β-catenin activation via phospholipase C is involved in the EMT induced by Cyclin A2 depletion. Our findings will broaden our knowledge on how Cyclin A2 contributes to EMT and metastasis.

  14. Tight function zonula occludens-3 regulates cyclin D1-dependent cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capaldo, Christopher T; Koch, Stefan; Kwon, Michael; Laur, Oskar; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma

    2011-05-15

    Coordinated regulation of cell proliferation is vital for epithelial tissue homeostasis, and uncontrolled proliferation is a hallmark of carcinogenesis. A growing body of evidence indicates that epithelial tight junctions (TJs) play a role in these processes, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a novel plasma membrane pool of cyclin D1 with cell-cycle regulatory functions. We have determined that the zonula occludens (ZO) family of TJ plaque proteins sequesters cyclin D1 at TJs during mitosis, through an evolutionarily conserved class II PSD-95, Dlg, and ZO-1 (PDZ)-binding motif within cyclin D1. Disruption of the cyclin D1/ZO complex through mutagenesis or siRNA-mediated suppression of ZO-3 resulted in increased cyclin D1 proteolysis and G(0)/G(1) cell-cycle retention. This study highlights an important new role for ZO family TJ proteins in regulating epithelial cell proliferation through stabilization of cyclin D1 during mitosis.

  15. A role for cyclin D3 in the endomitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmet, J M; Ladd, D; Jackson, C W; Stenberg, P E; Ravid, K

    1997-01-01

    Platelets, essential for thrombosis and hemostasis, develop from polyploid megakaryocytes which undergo endomitosis. During this cell cycle, cells experience abrogated mitosis and reenter a phase of DNA synthesis, thus leading to endomitosis. In the search for regulators of the endomitotic cell cycle, we have identified cyclin D3 as an important regulatory factor. Of the D-type cyclins, cyclin D3 is present at high levels in megakaryocytes undergoing endomitosis and is markedly upregulated following exposure to the proliferation-, maturation-, and ploidy-promoting factor, Mpl ligand. Transgenic mice in which cyclin D3 is overexpressed in the platelet lineage display a striking increase in endomitosis, similar to changes seen following Mpl ligand administration to normal mice. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that unlike such treated mice, however, D3 transgenic mice show a poor development of demarcation membranes, from which platelets are believed to fragment, and no increase in platelets. Thus, while our model supports a key role for cyclin D3 in the endomitotic cell cycle, it also points to the unique role of Mpl ligand in priming megakaryocytes towards platelet fragmentation. The role of cyclin D3 in promoting endomitosis in other lineages programmed to abrogate mitosis will need further exploration. PMID:9372957

  16. State of the art of immunoassay methods for B-type natriuretic peptides: An update.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Franzini, Maria; Masotti, Silvia; Prontera, Concetta; Passino, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to give an update on the state of the art of the immunoassay methods for the measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its related peptides. Using chromatographic procedures, several studies reported an increasing number of circulating peptides related to BNP in human plasma of patients with heart failure. These peptides may have reduced or even no biological activity. Furthermore, other studies have suggested that, using immunoassays that are considered specific for BNP, the precursor of the peptide hormone, proBNP, constitutes a major portion of the peptide measured in plasma of patients with heart failure. Because BNP immunoassay methods show large (up to 50%) systematic differences in values, the use of identical decision values for all immunoassay methods, as suggested by the most recent international guidelines, seems unreasonable. Since proBNP significantly cross-reacts with all commercial immunoassay methods considered specific for BNP, manufacturers should test and clearly declare the degree of cross-reactivity of glycosylated and non-glycosylated proBNP in their BNP immunoassay methods. Clinicians should take into account that there are large systematic differences between methods when they compare results from different laboratories that use different BNP immunoassays. On the other hand, clinical laboratories should take part in external quality assessment (EQA) programs to evaluate the bias of their method in comparison to other BNP methods. Finally, the authors believe that the development of more specific methods for the active peptide, BNP1-32, should reduce the systematic differences between methods and result in better harmonization of results.

  17. Scavenger receptor class B, type I (Scarb1) deficiency promotes osteoblastogenesis but stunts terminal osteocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Corine; Kevorkova, Olha; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR‐BI), the Scarb1 gene product, is a high‐density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor which was shown to influence bone metabolism. Its absence in mice is associated with alterations of the glucocorticoid/adrenocorticotropic hormone axis, and translated in high bone mass and enhanced bone formation. Since the cellular alterations underlying the enhanced bone formation remain unknown, we investigated Scarb1‐deficient marrow stromal cells (MSC) behavior in vitro. No difference in HDL3, cholesteryl ester (CE) or estradiol (E) association/binding was measured between Scarb1‐null and wild‐type (WT) cells. Scarb1 genic expression was down‐regulated twofold following osteogenic treatment. Neither WT nor null cell proliferation was influenced by HDL3 exposure whereas this condition decreased genic expression of osteoblastic marker osterix (Sp7), and osteocyte markers sclerostin (Sost) and dentin matrix protein 1 (Dmp1) independently of genotype. Sost and Dmp1 basal expression in null cells was 40% and 50% that of WT cells; accordingly, osteocyte density was 20% lower in vertebrae from Scarb1‐null mice. Genic expression of co‐receptors for Wnt signaling, namely LDL‐related protein (Lrp) 5 and Lrp8, was increased, respectively, by two‐ and threefold, and of transcription target‐genes axis inhibition protein 2 (Axin2) and lymphoid enhancer‐binding factor 1 (Lef1) over threefold. Gene expression of Wnt signaling agonist Wnt5a and of the antagonist dickkopfs‐related protein 1 (Dkk1) were found to be increased 10‐ to 20‐fold in null MSC. These data suggest alterations of Wnt pathways in Scarb1‐deficient MSC potentially explaining their enhanced function, hence contributing to the high bone mass observed in these mice. PMID:25281615

  18. Facile synthesis of B-type carbonated nanoapatite with tailored microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Romagnoli, Marcello; Hanuskova, Miriam; Fabbri, Elena; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.

    2014-12-15

    Nanolime and a phosphate-based chelating agent were used to synthesize B-type carbonated apatite. Developed Rietveld refinement strategies allowed one to determine process yield, product crystallinity as well as structural (unit cell) and microstructural (size, strain) parameters. The effect of synthesis temperature (20–60 °C) as well as Ca/P ratio (1.5–2.5) and solid content (10–30 wt%) of the starting batch on these properties were investigated. FTIR, TEM and gas adsorption data provided supporting evidence. The process yield was 42–60 wt% and found to be governed by the Ca/P ratio. The purified products had high specific surface area (107–186 m{sup 2}/g) and crystallinity (76–97%). The unit cell parameters, correlated to the degree of structural carbonate, were sensitive to the Ca/P ratio. Instead, temperature governed the microstructural parameters. Less strained and larger crystals were obtained at higher temperatures. Long-term aging up to 6 months at 20 °C compensated for higher crystal growth kinetics at higher temperature. - Graphical abstract: Controlled synthesis of carbonated apatite at moderate temperatures using nanolime and sodiumhexametaphosphate as starting reagent. - Highlights: • Chemical synthesis of nano-sized apatite with tailored microstructure was performed. • Colloidal Ca(OH){sub 2} and a phosphorus-based chelating agents were used as reagents. • The method is simple and reproducible which facilitate industrial process scale-up. • Rietveld refinement strategies for product characterization were developed. • Rietveld analyses provided yield, microstructural and structure information.

  19. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate/B-type natriuretic peptide ratio and mortality in advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Patrícia; Araújo, José Paulo; Azevedo, Ana; Ferreira, António; Bettencourt, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Aims Attenuation of the effects of natriuretic peptides has been demonstrated in animal models but studies in humans are scarce, particularly concerning renal attenuation. We investigated the attenuation of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in chronic advanced heart failure (HF). Methods and results We included 62 outpatients with HF and severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Cases had at least one hospital admission or emergency department visit for acute HF in the previous year and were in NYHA class III/IV despite optimized therapy. The individual age- and sex-matched controls were symptomatically controlled (NYHA I and II). We collected 24 h urine and a blood sample from all patients. Plasma BNP and plasma (pcGMP) and urine cyclic guanosine monophosphate (ucGMP) were measured. Patients were followed for 3 months for hospital admission or all-cause death. ucGMP to plasma BNP (ucGMP/BNP) ratio was attenuated in cases vs. controls [median (IQR): 8354 (4293–16 456) vs. 12 693 (6896–22 851)]. There were no differences in pcGMP to BNP (pcGMP/BNP) ratio or urine cGMP excretion. Patients with worse outcome had lower pcGMP/BNP [260 (86–344) vs. 381 (244–728) in patients without adverse outcome events] and lower ucGMP/BNP [4146 (2207–9363) vs. 10 922 (7495–19 971)]. Conclusion Renal NP’s second messenger production is attenuated in advanced HF. Patients with worse outcome have lower ucGMP/BNP and pcGMP/BNP ratios. PMID:19168517

  20. Over-expression of pcvA involved in vesicle-vacuolar fusion affects the conidiation and penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinxin; Yang, Jing; An, Yang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Gang

    2012-03-01

    Rab GTPase is required for vesicle-vacuolar fusion during the vacuolar biogenesis in fungi. Rab GTPase-encoding gene, pcvA, was cloned from Penicillium chrysogenum: it contained five introns and its predicted protein contained the conserved Rab GTPase domain involved in GTP-binding and hydrolysis. Over-expression of pcvA significantly stimulated the vesicle-vacuolar fusion but repressed the conidiation and decreased conidial tolerance against thermal stress. Penicillin production was decreased in the pcvA over-expressed strain suggesting that pcvA is involved in vesicle-vacuolar fusion participates in the penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum.

  1. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  2. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  3. Superoxide dismutase induces G1-phase cell cycle arrest by down-regulated expression of Cdk-2 and cyclin-E in murine sarcoma S180 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyue; Liu, Anjun

    2013-06-01

    As an efficient reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) has been shown to inhibit tumor growth and interfere with motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. In this study, the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle arrest when S180 tumor cells were exposed to high levels of SOD were investigated. Here, both murine sarcoma S180 tumor cells and NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts were respectively treated with varying concentrations of Cu/Zn-SOD for 24, 48 and 72 h to determine optimal dose of SOD, which was a concentration of 800 U/ml SOD for 48 h. It is found that SOD induced S180 cell cycle arrest at G1-phase with decreasing level of superoxide production, whereas SOD had less effect on proliferation of NIH-3T3 cells. Moreover, the expression rate of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) in S180 tumor cells was suppressed after SOD treatment, which indicated the inhibition of DNA synthesis in S180 cells. Besides, there were significant down-regulations of cyclin-E and Cdk-2 in S180 cells after SOD treatment, which contributed to the blockage of G1/S transition in S180 cell cycle. Together, our data confirmed that SOD could notably inhibit proliferation of S180 tumor cell and induce cell cycle arrest at G1-phase by down-regulating expressions of cyclin-E and Cdk-2.

  4. Cyclin I-like (CCNI2) is a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhai, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yanfei; Xu, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to conventional cyclin-dependent kinases that are important for mitotic cell division, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is predominantly activated in post-mitotic cells and is involved in various cellular events. The kinase activity of CDK5 is tightly regulated by specific activators including p35, p39, and cyclin I (CCNI). Here we show that cyclin I-like (CCNI2), a homolog of CCNI, interacts with CDK5 and activates the kinase activity of CDK5. Different from CCNI, which colocalizes with CDK5 in the nuclei in transfected cells, CCNI2 mainly retains CDK5 in the cytoplasm as well as on the cell membrane. Furthermore, although the expression level of CCNI2 mRNA and CCNI2 protein do not change significantly during cell cycle, depletion of CCNI2 with siRNA affects cell cycle progression as well as cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that CCNI2 is a novel CDK5 activator and is involved in cell cycle regulation. PMID:28112194

  5. BAD induces apoptosis in cells over-expressing Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL without loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, A D; Hedley, D W; Pham, N A; Chow, S; Minden, M D

    2001-07-01

    Inhibitors of Bcl-2 may be useful therapeutic agents for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies including leukemia. A potential prototype of such a compound is the endogenous Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL binding protein BAD. Previous reports indicate that BAD can overcome the anti-apoptotic effect of Bcl-xL but not Bcl-2. If BAD cannot induce apoptosis in cells over-expressing Bcl-2, it would limit the application of molecules like BAD as novel anti-tumor agents. We report that transient transfection of BAD induced cell death in cells with and without over-expression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Forty-eight hours after transfection, BAD increased cell death in COS, COS Bcl-2, and COS Bcl-xL cells as demonstrated by decreased GFP expression, and an increase in the number of number of floating cells. In addition, BAD induced cell death in leukemic cell lines over-expressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as determined by changes in luciferase activity. BAD-induced apoptosis was not accompanied by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Therefore, we conclude that transient transfection of BAD directly induces apoptosis in cells over-expressing Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL and validates the pursuit of molecules like BAD as novel therapeutic agents.

  6. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppressed the over-expression of HSP 70 and MDR1 induced by heat shock in SGC 7901.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, You-Qing

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the expression of HSP 70 and MDR 1. SGC-7901 cells were cultured with RPMI 1640 medium. The single or combined effects of EGCG (0.1, 1, 10, 20, and 40 micromol/L) and heat shock were examined by MTT assay. The expression of HSP 70 and MDR 1 was semi-quantified by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry method (SP staining). EGCG suppressed cell proliferation at a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effects of combined treatment with EGCG and heat shock on the growth of SGC-7901 cells were stronger than single effects of EGCG. After using EGCG for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, the IC50s were 112.5 micromol/l, 21.41 micromol/l and 5.24 micromol/l, respectively. Heat shock stimulated the over-expression of HSP 70, especially after heat shock for 8 h, as well as MDR1 after heat shock for 24 h. But EGCG suppressed the over-expression induced by heat shock. The authors conclude that EGCG inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901, and EGCG combined with heat shock strengthened the effects. Heat shock weakened the over-expression of HSP 70 and MDR1; however, EGCG suppressed the over-expression of HSP 70 and MDR1 induced by heat shock. EGCG combined with heat shock may enhance the sensitivity of drugs to tumors.

  7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L.; Koss, Michael D.; Fillies, Marion; Gahl, Anja; Scheeder, Martin R.L.; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Monika . E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

    2005-12-16

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

  8. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  9. Modulation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll antenna size in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by TLA1 gene over-expression and RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Mautusi; Kirst, Henning; Dewez, David; Melis, Anastasios

    2012-12-19

    Truncated light-harvesting antenna 1 (TLA1) is a nuclear gene proposed to regulate the chlorophyll (Chl) antenna size in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chl antenna size of the photosystems and the chloroplast ultrastructure were manipulated upon TLA1 gene over-expression and RNAi downregulation. The TLA1 over-expressing lines possessed a larger chlorophyll antenna size for both photosystems and contained greater levels of Chl b per cell relative to the wild type. Conversely, TLA1 RNAi transformants had a smaller Chl antenna size for both photosystems and lower levels of Chl b per cell. Western blot analyses of the TLA1 over-expressing and RNAi transformants showed that modulation of TLA1 gene expression was paralleled by modulation in the expression of light-harvesting protein, reaction centre D1 and D2, and VIPP1 genes. Transmission electron microscopy showed that modulation of TLA1 gene expression impacts the organization of thylakoid membranes in the chloroplast. Over-expressing lines showed well-defined grana, whereas RNAi transformants possessed loosely held together and more stroma-exposed thylakoids. Cell fractionation suggested localization of the TLA1 protein in the inner chloroplast envelope and potentially in association with nascent thylakoid membranes, indicating a role in Chl antenna assembly and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. The results provide a mechanistic understanding of the Chl antenna size regulation by the TLA1 gene.

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates degranulation in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Ilarraza, Ramses; Davoine, Francis; Logan, Michael R; Shayeganpour, Anooshirvan; Wu, Yingqi; Majaesic, Carina; Adamko, Darryl J; Moqbel, Redwan; Lacy, Paige

    2015-04-01

    Degranulation from eosinophils in response to secretagogue stimulation is a regulated process that involves exocytosis of granule proteins through specific signalling pathways. One potential pathway is dependent on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its effector molecules, p35 and p39, which play a central role in neuronal cell exocytosis by phosphorylating Munc18, a regulator of SNARE binding. Emerging evidence suggests a role for Cdk5 in exocytosis in immune cells, although its role in eosinophils is not known. We sought to examine the expression of Cdk5 and its activators in human eosinophils, and to assess the role of Cdk5 in eosinophil degranulation. We used freshly isolated human eosinophils and analysed the expression of Cdk5, p35, p39 and Munc18c by Western blot, RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation. Cdk5 kinase activity was determined following eosinophil activation. Cdk5 inhibitors were used (roscovitine, AT7519 and small interfering RNA) to determine its role in eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) secretion. Cdk5 was expressed in association with Munc18c, p35 and p39, and phosphorylated following human eosinophil activation with eotaxin/CCL11, platelet-activating factor, and secretory IgA-Sepharose. Cdk5 inhibitors (roscovitine, AT7519) reduced EPX release when cells were stimulated by PMA or secretory IgA. In assays using small interfering RNA knock-down of Cdk5 expression in human eosinophils, we observed inhibition of EPX release. Our findings suggest that in activated eosinophils, Cdk5 is phosphorylated and binds to Munc18c, resulting in Munc18c release from syntaxin-4, allowing SNARE binding and vesicle fusion, with subsequent eosinophil degranulation. Our work identifies a novel role for Cdk5 in eosinophil mediator release by agonist-induced degranulation.

  11. Characteristics of Cyclin B and its potential role in regulating oogenesis in the red claw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, L M; Lv, W W; Zuo, D; Dong, Z J; Zhao, Y L

    2015-09-09

    Cyclin B is a regulatory subunit of maturation-promoting factor (MPF), which has a key role in the induction of meiotic maturation of oocytes. MPF has been studied in a wide variety of animal species; however, its expression in crustaceans is poorly characterized. In this study, the complete cDNA sequence of Cyclin B was cloned from the red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, and its spatiotemporal expression profiles were analyzed. Cyclin B cDNA (1779 bp) encoded a 401 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 45.1 kDa. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that Cyclin B mRNA was expressed mainly in the ovarian tissue and that the expression decreased as the ovaries developed. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the Cyclin B protein relocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus during oogenesis. These findings suggest that Cyclin B plays an important role in gametogenesis and gonad development in C. quadricarinatus.

  12. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi.

  13. Cyclin E in centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J; Marzluff, William F; Sluder, Greenfield

    2008-12-01

    When protein synthesis is completely blocked from before fertilization, the sea urchin zygote arrests in first S phase and the paternal centrosome reduplicates multiple times. However, when protein synthesis is blocked starting in prophase of first mitosis, the zygote divides and the blastomeres arrest in a G1-like state. The centrosome inherited from this mitosis duplicates only once in each blastomere for reasons that are not understood. The late G1 rise in cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity initiates centrosome duplication in mammalian cells and its activity is needed for centrosome duplication in Xenopus egg extracts. Since the half-time for cyclin E turnover is normally approximately 1 h in sea urchin zygotes, the different behaviors of centrosomes during G1 and S phase arrests could be due to differential losses of cyclin E and its associated kinase activities at these two arrest points. To better understand the mechanisms that limit centrosome duplication, we characterize the levels of cyclin E and its associated kinase activity at the S phase and G1 arrest points. We first demonstrate that cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity is required for centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes. Next we find that cyclin E levels and cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activities are both constitutively and equivalently elevated during both the S phase and G1 arrests. This indicates that centrosome duplication during the G1 arrest is limited by a block to reduplication under conditions permissive for duplication. The cytoplasmic conditions of S phase, however, abrogate this block to reduplication.

  14. Cell Cycle-independent Role of Cyclin D3 in Host Restriction of Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ying; Mok, Chris Ka-Pun; Chan, Michael Chi Wai; Zhang, Yang; Nal, Béatrice; Kien, François; Bruzzone, Roberto; Sanyal, Sumana

    2017-01-01

    To identify new host factors that modulate the replication of influenza A virus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the cytoplasmic tail of matrix protein 2 from the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain. The screen revealed a high-score interaction with cyclin D3, a key regulator of cell cycle early G1 phase. M2-cyclin D3 interaction was validated through GST pull-down and recapitulated in influenza A/WSN/33-infected cells. Knockdown of Ccnd3 by small interfering RNA significantly enhanced virus progeny titers in cell culture supernatants. Interestingly, the increase in virus production was due to cyclin D3 deficiency per se and not merely a consequence of cell cycle deregulation. A combined knockdown of Ccnd3 and Rb1, which rescued cell cycle progression into S phase, failed to normalize virus production. Infection by influenza A virus triggered redistribution of cyclin D3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, followed by its proteasomal degradation. When overexpressed in HEK 293T cells, cyclin D3 impaired binding of M2 with M1, which is essential for proper assembly of progeny virions, lending further support to its role as a putative restriction factor. Our study describes the identification and characterization of cyclin D3 as a novel interactor of influenza A virus M2 protein. We hypothesize that competitive inhibition of M1-M2 interaction by cyclin D3 impairs infectious virion formation and results in attenuated virus production. In addition, we provide mechanistic insights into the dynamic interplay of influenza virus with the host cell cycle machinery during infection. PMID:28130444

  15. Cyclin D1 unbalances the redox status controlling cell adhesion, migration, and drug resistance in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustany, Sophie; Bourgeais, Jérôme; Tchakarska, Guergana; Body, Simon; Hérault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Sola, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of multiple myeloma (MM) cells with their microenvironment are crucial for pathogenesis. MM cells could interact differentially with their microenvironment depending on the type of cyclin D they express. We established several clones that constitutively express cyclin D1 from the parental RPMI8226 MM cell line and analyzed the impact of cyclin D1 expression on cell behavior. We performed a gene expression profiling study on cyclin D1-expressing vs. control cells and validated the results by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of cyclin D1 altered the transcription of genes that control adhesion and migration. We confirmed that cyclin D1 increases cell adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin, stabilizes F-actin fibers, and enhances chemotaxis and inflammatory chemokine secretion. Both control and cyclin D1-expressing cells were more resistant to acute carfilzomib treatment when cultured on stromal cells than in suspension. However, this resistance was specifically reduced in cyclin D1-expressing cells after pomalidomide pre-treatment that modifies tumor cell/microenvironment interactions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that cyclin D1 expression was also associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling metabolism. We also found that cyclin D1 expression disrupted the redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species. The resulting oxidative stress activated the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (or ERK1/2) signaling pathway, increased cell adhesion to fibronectin or stromal cells, and controlled drug sensitivity. Our results have uncovered a new function for cyclin D1 in the control of redox metabolism and interactions of cyclin D1-expressing MM cells with their bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27286258

  16. A family of cyclin D homologs from plants differentially controlled by growth regulators and containing the conserved retinoblastoma protein interaction motif.

    PubMed Central

    Soni, R; Carmichael, J P; Shah, Z H; Murray, J A

    1995-01-01

    A new family of three related cyclins has been identified in Arabidopsis by complementation of a yeast strain deficient in G1 cyclins. Individual members show tissue-specific expression and are conserved in other plant species. They form a distinctive group of plant cyclins, which we named delta-type cyclins to indicate their similarities with mammalian D-type cyclins. The sequence relationships between delta and D cyclins include the N-terminal sequence LXCXE. This motif was originally identified in certain viral oncoproteins and is strongly implicated in binding to the retinoblastoma protein pRb. By analogy to mammalian cyclin D, these plant homologs may mediate growth and phytohormonal signals into the plant cell cycle. In support of this hypothesis, we show that, on restimulation of suspension-cultured cells, cyclin delta 3 is rapidly induced by the plant growth regulator cytokinin and cyclin delta 2 is induced by carbon source. PMID:7696881

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of the p53, mdm2, p21/Waf-1, Rb, p16, Ki67, cyclin D1, cyclin A and cyclin B1 proteins and apoptotic index in T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kanavaros, P; Bai, M; Stefanaki, K; Poussias, G; Rontogianni, D; Zioga, E; Gorgoulis, V; Agnantis, N J

    2001-04-01

    Fifty-seven cases of T-cell lymphomas (TCL) including 5 lymphoblastic (T-LBL) and 52 peripheral TCL (PTCL) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of p53, mdm2, p21, Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin A, cyclin B1, and Ki67/MIB1 proteins and 39/52 PTCL were also analyzed for the expression of p16 protein and for the presence of apoptotic cells by the TUNEL method. The aim was to search for abnormal immunoprofiles of p53 and Rb growth control pathways and to determine the proliferative activity and the apoptotic index of TCL. Abnormal overexpression of p53, p21 and mdm2, in comparison to normal lymph nodes, was found in 12/57, 10/57 and 2/57 cases of TCL, respectively. Abnormal loss of Rb and p16 expression was found in 1/57 and 2/39 cases, respectively, whereas abnormal overexpression of cyclin D1 was not detected in any of the 57 cases. Our data revealed entity-related p53/p21/mdm2 phenotypes. Indeed, most nodal and cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL) showed concomitant overexpression of p53 and p21 proteins (7/8 cases), and mdm2 was overexpressed in 2 p53-positive nodal ALCL. In contrast, overexpression of p53 was found in 3/17 cases of nodal peripheral TCL unspecified (PTCL-UC) and 2/7 non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Overexpression of p21 protein was detected in 2/3 p53-positive PTCL-UC and in 1/2 p53-positive non-ALCL cutaneous pleomorphic TCL. Finally, all the remaining 25 cases of TCL did not show p53 and p21 overexpression. Overall, the p53+/p21+ phenotype in 10/57 TCL suggests wild-type p53 capable of inducing p21 expression. The highest apoptotic index (AI) was found in ALCL and a positive correlation between apoptotic index and Ki67 index (p<0.001) was detected. Ki67, cyclin A and cyclin B1 expression was found in all 57 TCL and on the basis of the combined use of these 3 variables, 3 groups of proliferative activity could be determined: a) high in ALCL and T-LBL, b) low in mycosis fungoides (MF) and gammadelta hepatosplenic TCL

  18. Synthetic lethal mutations in the cyclin A interface of human cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Generally, the antagonism between host restriction factors and viral countermeasures decides on cellular permissiveness or resistance to virus infection. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved an additional level of self-imposed restriction by the viral tegument protein pp150. Depending on a cyclin A-binding motif, pp150 prevents the onset of viral gene expression in the S/G2 cell cycle phase of otherwise fully permissive cells. Here we address the physiological relevance of this restriction during productive HCMV infection by employing a cyclin A-binding deficient pp150 mutant virus. One consequence of unrestricted viral gene expression in S/G2 was the induction of a G2/M arrest. G2-arrested but not mitotic cells supported viral replication. Cyclin A destabilization by the viral gene product pUL21a was required to maintain the virus-permissive G2-arrest. An HCMV double-point mutant where both pp150 and pUL21a are disabled in cyclin A interaction forced mitotic entry of the majority of infected cells, with a severe negative impact on cell viability and virus growth. Thus, pp150 and pUL21a functionally cooperate, together building a cell cycle synchronization strategy of cyclin A targeting and avoidance that is essential for productive HCMV infection. PMID:28129404

  19. Cyclin D activates the Rb tumor suppressor by mono-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Anil M; Kaulich, Manuel; Shapiro, Gary S; Choi, Yoon J; Sicinski, Piotr; Dowdy, Steven F

    2014-06-04

    The widely accepted model of G1 cell cycle progression proposes that cyclin D:Cdk4/6 inactivates the Rb tumor suppressor during early G1 phase by progressive multi-phosphorylation, termed hypo-phosphorylation, to release E2F transcription factors. However, this model remains unproven biochemically and the biologically active form(s) of Rb remains unknown. In this study, we find that Rb is exclusively mono-phosphorylated in early G1 phase by cyclin D:Cdk4/6. Mono-phosphorylated Rb is composed of 14 independent isoforms that are all targeted by the E1a oncoprotein, but show preferential E2F binding patterns. At the late G1 Restriction Point, cyclin E:Cdk2 inactivates Rb by quantum hyper-phosphorylation. Cells undergoing a DNA damage response activate cyclin D:Cdk4/6 to generate mono-phosphorylated Rb that regulates global transcription, whereas cells undergoing differentiation utilize un-phosphorylated Rb. These observations fundamentally change our understanding of G1 cell cycle progression and show that mono-phosphorylated Rb, generated by cyclin D:Cdk4/6, is the only Rb isoform in early G1 phase.

  20. Cyclin A2 Mutagenesis Analysis: A New Insight into CDK Activation and Cellular Localization Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Bendris, Nawal; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Arsic, Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is essential at two critical points in the somatic cell cycle: during S phase, when it activates CDK2, and during the G2 to M transition when it activates CDK1. Based on the crystal structure of Cyclin A2 in association with CDKs, we generated a panel of mutants to characterize the specific amino acids required for partner binding, CDK activation and subcellular localization. We find that CDK1, CDK2, p21, p27 and p107 have overlapping but distinct requirements for association with this protein. Our data highlight the crucial importance of the N-terminal α helix, in conjunction with the α3 helix within the cyclin box, in activating CDK. Several Cyclin A2 mutants selectively bind to either CDK1 or CDK2. We demonstrate that association of Cyclin A2 to proteins such as CDK2 that was previously suggested as crucial is not a prerequisite for its nuclear localization, and we propose that the whole protein structure is involved. PMID:21829545

  1. Correlation between Cyclin Dependent Kinases and Artemisinin-Induced Dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Karen-Ann; Gresty, Karryn J.; Chen, Nanhua; Zhang, Veronica; Gutteridge, Clare E.; Peatey, Christopher L.; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C.; Cheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-induced dormancy provides a plausible explanation for recrudescence following artemisinin monotherapy. This phenomenon shares similarities with cell cycle arrest where cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins play an important role. Methods Transcription profiles of Plasmodium falciparum CDKs and cyclins before and after dihydroartemisinin (DHA) treatment in three parasite lines, and the effect of CDK inhibitors on parasite recovery from DHA-induced dormancy were investigated. Results After DHA treatment, parasites enter a dormancy phase followed by a recovery phase. During the dormancy phase parasites up-regulate pfcrk1, pfcrk4, pfcyc2 and pfcyc4, and down-regulate pfmrk, pfpk5, pfpk6, pfcrk3, pfcyc1 and pfcyc3. When entering the recovery phase parasites immediately up-regulate all CDK and cyclin genes. Three CDK inhibitors, olomoucine, WR636638 and roscovitine, produced distinct effects on different phases of DHA-induced dormancy, blocking parasites recovery. Conclusions The up-regulation of PfCRK1 and PfCRK4, and down regulation of other CDKs and cyclins correlate with parasite survival in the dormant state. Changes in CDK expression are likely to negatively regulate parasite progression from G1 to S phase. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of artemisinin-induced dormancy and cell cycle regulation of P. falciparum, opening new opportunities for preventing recrudescence following artemisinin treatment. PMID:27326764

  2. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  3. Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expression in normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Shevra, CR; Ghosh, A; Kumar, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proliferation and differentiation of cancer cells are regulated by various cell cycle promoting and inhibiting factors. Our knowledge about these proteins and mechanisms regulating cell cycle progression has increased dramatically in recent years. Aim: The present study was undertaken to examine the expression profile of cell cycle regulatory proteins in normal proliferative endometrium, hyperplasias (simple, complex and atypical) and endometrial carcinoma in a quantitative approach as also to assess correlations of Cyclin D1 expression with Ki-67 a proliferation marker. Settings and Design: A retrospective case control study in a tertiary referral centre. Materials and Methods: We evaluated and compared the expression profile of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expressions in 61 endometrial samples submitted as either endometrial curetting or hysterectomy specimens, which were diagnosed as simple hyperplasia (n =11), complex hyperplasia (n = 13), atypical hyperplasia (n = 7), and endometrial carcinoma (n = 20). Results: There was increased expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in patients with endometrial carcinoma relative to proliferative endometrium and simple hyperplasia, but there was no such difference between cases of atypical hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma. Cyclin D1 expression had a positive correlation with Ki-67 expression. Cyclin D1 together with Ki-67 may be a marker for endometrial carcinogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. PMID:25511212

  4. Binding Activity Prediction of Cyclin-Dependent Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saha, Indrajit; Rak, Benedykt; Bhowmick, Shib Sankar; Maulik, Ujjwal; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Koch, Uwe; Lazniewski, Michal; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2015-07-27

    The Cyclin-Dependent Kinases (CDKs) are the core components coordinating eukaryotic cell division cycle. Generally the crystal structure of CDKs provides information on possible molecular mechanisms of ligand binding. However, reliable and robust estimation of ligand binding activity has been a challenging task in drug design. In this regard, various machine learning techniques, such as Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayesian classifier, Decision Tree, and K-Nearest Neighbor classifier, have been used. The performance of these heterogeneous classification techniques depends on proper selection of features from the data set. This fact motivated us to propose an integrated classification technique using Genetic Algorithm (GA), Rotational Feature Selection (RFS) scheme, and Ensemble of Machine Learning methods, named as the Genetic Algorithm integrated Rotational Ensemble based classification technique, for the prediction of ligand binding activity of CDKs. This technique can automatically find the important features and the ensemble size. For this purpose, GA encodes the features and ensemble size in a chromosome as a binary string. Such encoded features are then used to create diverse sets of training points using RFS in order to train the machine learning method multiple times. The RFS scheme works on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to preserve the variability information of the rotational nonoverlapping subsets of original data. Thereafter, the testing points are fed to the different instances of trained machine learning method in order to produce the ensemble result. Here accuracy is computed as a final result after 10-fold cross validation, which also used as an objective function for GA to maximize. The effectiveness of the proposed classification technique has been demonstrated quantitatively and visually in comparison with different machine learning methods for 16 ligand binding CDK docking and rescoring data sets. In addition, the best possible features

  5. Bioimpedance analysis and plasma B-type natriuretic peptide assay may cooperate in diagnosing and managing heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tamagno, Gianluca; Guzzon, Samuele

    2006-06-01

    We describe the case of an obese patient presenting leg oedema, progressive oliguria, orthopnoea and mild increased B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) provided additional data for the interpretation of the plasma BNP values, contributing to the diagnosis of heart failure and the appropriate management of the patient. In our mind, BIA could represent a useful tool for integrating the plasma BNP assay in both diagnosis and management of heart failure.

  6. Cyclin D1 inhibits hepatic lipogenesis via repression of carbohydrate response element binding protein and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Hanse, Eric A; Mashek, Douglas G; Becker, Jennifer R; Solmonson, Ashley D; Mullany, Lisa K; Mashek, Mara T; Towle, Howard C; Chau, Anhtung T; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2012-07-15

    Following acute hepatic injury, the metabolic capacity of the liver is altered during the process of compensatory hepatocyte proliferation by undefined mechanisms. In this study, we examined the regulation of de novo lipogenesis by cyclin D1, a key mediator of hepatocyte cell cycle progression. In primary hepatocytes, cyclin D1 significantly impaired lipogenesis in response to glucose stimulation. Cyclin D1 inhibited the glucose-mediated induction of key lipogenic genes, and similar effects were seen using a mutant (D1-KE) that does not activate cdk4 or induce cell cycle progression. Cyclin D1 (but not D1-KE) inhibited the activity of the carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) by regulating the glucose-sensing motif of this transcription factor. Because changes in ChREBP activity could not fully explain the effect of cyclin D1, we examined hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), which regulates numerous differentiated functions in the liver including lipid metabolism. We found that both cyclins D1 and D1-KE bound to HNF4α and significantly inhibited its recruitment to the promoter region of lipogenic genes in hepatocytes. Conversely, knockdown of cyclin D1 in the AML12 hepatocyte cell line promoted HNF4α activity and lipogenesis. In mouse liver, HNF4α bound to a central domain of cyclin D1 involved in transcriptional repression. Cyclin D1 inhibited lipogenic gene expression in the liver following carbohydrate feeding. Similar findings were observed in the setting of physiologic cyclin D1 expression in the regenerating liver. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that cyclin D1 represses ChREBP and HNF4α function in hepatocytes via Cdk4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These findings provide a direct link between the cell cycle machinery and the transcriptional control of metabolic function of the liver.

  7. CDK10/cyclin M is a protein kinase that controls ETS2 degradation and is deficient in STAR syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guen, Vincent J.; Gamble, Carly; Flajolet, Marc; Unger, Sheila; Thollet, Aurélie; Ferandin, Yoan; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Cohen, Pascale A.; Meijer, Laurent; Colas, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate a variety of fundamental cellular processes. CDK10 stands out as one of the last orphan CDKs for which no activating cyclin has been identified and no kinase activity revealed. Previous work has shown that CDK10 silencing increases ETS2 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2)-driven activation of the MAPK pathway, which confers tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. The precise mechanisms by which CDK10 modulates ETS2 activity, and more generally the functions of CDK10, remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that CDK10 is a cyclin-dependent kinase by identifying cyclin M as an activating cyclin. Cyclin M, an orphan cyclin, is the product of FAM58A, whose mutations cause STAR syndrome, a human developmental anomaly whose features include toe syndactyly, telecanthus, and anogenital and renal malformations. We show that STAR syndrome-associated cyclin M mutants are unable to interact with CDK10. Cyclin M silencing phenocopies CDK10 silencing in increasing c-Raf and in conferring tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. CDK10/cyclin M phosphorylates ETS2 in vitro, and in cells it positively controls ETS2 degradation by the proteasome. ETS2 protein levels are increased in cells derived from a STAR patient, and this increase is attributable to decreased cyclin M levels. Altogether, our results reveal an additional regulatory mechanism for ETS2, which plays key roles in cancer and development. They also shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying STAR syndrome. PMID:24218572

  8. The O- and B-Type Stellar Population in W3: Beyond the High-Density Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Bagley, Micaela B.; Sherry, William H.; Rieke, George H.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results from our survey of the star-forming complex W3, combining VRI photometry with multiobject spectroscopy to identify and characterize the high-mass stellar population across the region. With 79 new spectral classifications, we bring the total number of spectroscopically confirmed O- and B-type stars in W3 to 105. We find that the high-mass slope of the mass function in W3 is consistent with a Salpeter IMF, and that the extinction toward the region is best characterized by an RV of approximately 3.6. B-type stars are found to be more widely dispersed across the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC) than previously realized: they are not confined to the high-density layer (HDL) created by the expansion of the neighboring W4 H ii region into the GMC. This broader B-type population suggests that star formation in W3 began spontaneously up to 8-10 Myr ago, although at a lower level than the more recent star formation episodes in the HDL. In addition, we describe a method of optimizing sky subtraction for fiber spectra in regions of strong and spatially variable nebular emission.

  9. THE O- AND B-TYPE STELLAR POPULATION IN W3: BEYOND THE HIGH-DENSITY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Bagley, Micaela B.; Rieke, George H.; Sherry, William H.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results from our survey of the star-forming complex W3, combining VRI photometry with multiobject spectroscopy to identify and characterize the high-mass stellar population across the region. With 79 new spectral classifications, we bring the total number of spectroscopically confirmed O- and B-type stars in W3 to 105. We find that the high-mass slope of the mass function in W3 is consistent with a Salpeter IMF, and that the extinction toward the region is best characterized by an R{sub V} of approximately 3.6. B-type stars are found to be more widely dispersed across the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC) than previously realized: they are not confined to the high-density layer (HDL) created by the expansion of the neighboring W4 H ii region into the GMC. This broader B-type population suggests that star formation in W3 began spontaneously up to 8–10 Myr ago, although at a lower level than the more recent star formation episodes in the HDL. In addition, we describe a method of optimizing sky subtraction for fiber spectra in regions of strong and spatially variable nebular emission.

  10. Recognition of subsets of the mammalian A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides by novel autoantibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Dangli, A; Plomaritoglou, A; Boutou, E; Vassiliadou, N; Moutsopoulos, H M; Guialis, A

    1996-01-01

    The structurally related A/B-type core heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) polypeptides of 34-39 kDa (A1, A2, B1 and B2) belong to a family of RNA-binding proteins that are major components of 40 S hnRNP complexes. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mapping analysis we compared each member of the A/B-type core proteins in the human and rat liver cells. This comparison revealed the unique presence in rat cells of major protein species, referred to as mBx polypeptides, that appeared as three charge isoforms at a position corresponding to the minor HeLa B1b protein spot. In addition, clear differences in the ratios of the A1 polypeptide to the A1b isoform were observed. The detection, in sera of patients with rheumatic autoimmune diseases, of two novel autoantibody specificities, one recognizing solely B2 protein and the second both the B2 and mBx polypeptides, helped to identify mBx proteins as new A/B-type hnRNP components, immunologically related to B2 protein. A common immunoreactive V8 protease peptide of approx. 17 kDa has been identified in B2 and mBx hnRNP polypeptides. mBx protein species are identified in cells of murine origin, and have a ubiquitous tissue distribution and developmental appearance. PMID:9003360

  11. Cyclin D1 expression in acral melanoma: a case control study in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Zainal Abidin; Narihan, M Zulkarnaen A; Ojep, Dk Norlida A; Soosay, Ashley Edward Roy; Pan, Kok Long

    2012-12-01

    Acral melanoma has been reported to have distinctive clinical presentation and ethnic distribution compared to other histological types of malignant melanoma. Acral melanoma also exhibits distinctive focused gene amplifications, including cyclin D1 overexpression. We reviewed archived histological material of malignant melanoma in the Sarawak General Hospital from year 2004 to 2010. 43 tumours, comprising 28 acral melanoma and 15 non-acral melanoma, had sufficient material to be included in the study. The majority (36%) of acral melanoma tumours occurred in the heel. The tumours were analyzed for cyclin D1 expression by immunohistochemistry. 68% of acral melanoma were cyclin D1 positive compared to a positivity of 33% in non-acral tumours. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). This finding may improve the histological diagnosis of acral melanoma and detection of positive resection margins.

  12. Soluble hyaluronan receptor RHAMM induces mitotic arrest by suppressing Cdc2 and cyclin B1 expression

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The hyaluronan (HA) receptor RHAMM is an important regulator of cell growth. Overexpression of RHAMM is transforming and is required for H- ras transformation. The molecular mechanism underlying growth control by RHAMM and other extracellular matrix receptors remains largely unknown. We report that soluble RHAMM induces G2/M arrest by suppressing the expression of Cdc2/Cyclin B1, a protein kinase complex essential for mitosis. Down-regulation of RHAMM by use of dominant negative mutants or antisense of mRNA also decreases Cdc2 protein levels. Suppression of Cdc2 occurs as a result of an increased rate of cdc2 mRNA degradation. Moreover, tumor cells treated with soluble RHAMM are unable to form lung metastases. Thus, we show that mitosis is directly linked to RHAMM through control of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1 expression. Failure to sustain levels of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1 proteins leads to cell cycle arrest. PMID:8666924

  13. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L10 Associates with Cyclin B1/Cdk1 Activity and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ruo-Xi; Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, En-dong; Tan, Jie-Qiong; Xu, Hui-Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins are important for mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. In addition to their roles in mitoribosome assembly, several mitochondrial ribosome proteins are also implicated in cellular processes like cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial homeostasis regulation. Here, we demonstrate that MRPL10 regulates cyclin B1/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) activity and mitochondrial protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In Drosophila, inactivation of mRpL10 (the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian MRPL10) in eyes results in abnormal eye development. Furthermore, expression of human cyclin B1 suppresses eye phenotypes and mitochondrial abnormality of mRpL10 knockdown Drosophila. This study identified that the physiological regulatory pathway of MRPL10 and providing new insights into the role of MRPL10 in growth control and mitochondrial function. PMID:27726420

  14. Metabolic engineering of morphinan alkaloids by over-expression of codeinone reductase in transgenic hairy roots of Papaver bracteatum, the Iranian poppy.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Ali; Sohi, Haleh Hashemi; Mousavi, Amir; Azadi, Pejman; Khalifani, Bahman Hosseini; Razavi, Khadijeh

    2013-03-01

    Papaver bracteatum has a high content of thebaine. It is used as an alternative to P. somniferum for the production of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid. Papaver bracteatum was genetically engineered to over-express codeinone reductase gene in hairy root cultures. Transcript level of the codeinone reductase gene in transgenic hairy root lines increased up to ten- and 24-fold in comparison with hairy roots without CodR over-expression and wild type roots, respectively. Codeine was produced at (0.04 % dry wt) and morphine was at (0.28 % dry wt) in the transgenic hairy root lines. Papaver bracteatum hairy roots expressing CodR gene thus have a high potential to produce morphinan alkaloids.

  15. A standardized method for quantifying proliferation by Ki-67 and cyclin A immunohistochemistry in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mu, Kun; Li, Li; Yang, Qingrui; Yun, Haiqin; Kharaziha, Pedram; Ye, Ding-Wei; Auer, Gert; Lagercrantz, Svetlana Bajalica; Zetterberg, Anders

    2015-08-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of proliferation markers such as Ki-67 and cyclin A is widely used in clinical evaluation as a prognostic factor in breast cancer. The proliferation status of tumors is guiding the decision of whether or not a patient should be treated with chemotherapy because low-proliferative tumors are less sensitive by such treatment. However, the lack of optimal cutoff points and selection of tumor areas hamper its use in clinical practice. This study was performed to compare the Ki-67 and cyclin A expression counted in hot-spot vs average counting based on 5 to 14 random tumor areas in 613 breast carcinomas. We correlated the findings with 10-year follow-up in order to standardize the evaluation of proliferation markers in clinical practice. A significant correlation was found between the percentage of positive cells estimated by Ki-67 and cyclin A both by hot-spot and by average counting. Both methods showed that high expression of Ki-67 and cyclin A is associated with more adverse tumor stage. The cutoff value for Ki-67 for distant metastases was set to 22% and to 15%, using hot-spot and average counting, respectively. For cyclin A, the values were set to 14% and 8% using the respective methods. Survival curves revealed that patients with a high hot-spot proliferation index had a significantly greater risk of shorter tumor-free survival. Our findings suggest that the determination of proliferation markers in breast cancer should be standardized to hot-spot counting and that specific cutoff values for proliferation could be useful as prognostic markers in clinical practice. Moreover, we suggest that expression levels of cyclin A could be used as a complementary marker to estimate the proliferation status in tumors, especially those with "borderline" expression levels of Ki-67, in order to more accurately estimate the proliferations status of the tumors.

  16. Placental estrogen suppresses cyclin D1 expression in the nonhuman primate fetal adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W; Pepe, Gerald J; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27(Kip1) and p57(Kip2) were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy.

  17. Model of the delayed translation of cyclin B maternal mRNA after sea urchin fertilization.

    PubMed

    Picard, Vincent; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Bourdon, Jérémie; Morales, Julia; Cormier, Patrick; Siegel, Anne; Bellé, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Sea urchin eggs exhibit a cap-dependent increase in protein synthesis within minutes after fertilization. This rise in protein synthesis occurs at a constant rate for a great number of proteins translated from the different available mRNAs. Surprisingly, we found that cyclin B, a major cell-cycle regulator, follows a synthesis pattern that is distinct from the global protein population, so we developed a mathematical model to analyze this dissimilarity in biosynthesis kinetic patterns. The model includes two pathways for cyclin B mRNA entry into the translational machinery: one from immediately available mRNA (mRNAcyclinB) and one from mRNA activated solely after fertilization (XXmRNAcyclinB). Two coefficients, α and β, were added to fit the measured scales of global protein and cyclin B synthesis, respectively. The model was simplified to identify the synthesis parameters and to allow its simulation. The calculated parameters for activation of the specific cyclin B synthesis pathway after fertilization included a kinetic constant (ka ) of 0.024 sec(-1) , for the activation of XXmRNAcyclinB, and a critical time interval (t2 ) of 42 min. The proportion of XXmRNAcyclinB form was also calculated to be largely dominant over the mRNAcyclinB form. Regulation of cyclin B biosynthesis is an example of a select protein whose translation is controlled by pathways that are distinct from housekeeping proteins, even though both involve the same cap-dependent initiation pathway. Therefore, this model should help provide insight to the signaling utilized for the biosynthesis of cyclin B and other select proteins. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 1070-1082, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Pesticide Roundup provokes cell division dysfunction at the level of CDK1/cyclin B activation.

    PubMed

    Marc, Julie; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Boulben, Sandrine; Hureau, Dorothée; Durand, Gaël; Bellé, Robert

    2002-03-01

    To assess human health risk from environmental chemicals, we have studied the effect on cell cycle regulation of the widely used glyphosate-containing pesticide Roundup. As a model system we have used sea urchin embryonic first divisions following fertilization, which are appropriate for the study of universal cell cycle regulation without interference with transcription. We show that 0.8% Roundup (containing 8 mM glyphosate) induces a delay in the kinetic of the first cell cleavage of sea urchin embryos. The delay is dependent on the concentration of Roundup. The delay in the cell cycle could be induced using increasing glyphosate concentrations (1-10 mM) in the presence of a subthreshold concentration of Roundup 0.2%, while glyphosate alone was ineffective, thus indicating synergy between glyphosate and Roundup formulation products. The effect of Roundup was not lethal and involved a delay in entry into M-phase of the cell cycle, as judged cytologically. Since CDK1/cyclin B regulates universally the M-phase of the cell cycle, we analyzed CDK1/cyclin B activation during the first division of early development. Roundup delayed the activation of CDK1/cyclin B in vivo. Roundup inhibited also the global protein synthetic rate without preventing the accumulation of cyclin B. In summary, Roundup affects cell cycle regulation by delaying activation of the CDK1/cyclin B complex, by synergic effect of glyphosate and formulation products. Considering the universality among species of the CDK1/cyclin B regulator, our results question the safety of glyphosate and Roundup on human health.

  19. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  20. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  1. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  2. Okadaic acid induced cyclin B1 expression and mitotic catastrophe in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Cheng, Min; Hong, Dao-Jun; Sun, Feng-Yan; Zhu, Cui-Qing

    2006-10-09

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the G2/M phase of cell cycle and the resulting mitotic catastrophe may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the cellular event that drives the differentiated neurons to abnormally enter G2/M phase remains elusive. Similarly, whether mitotic catastrophe is indeed one of the death pathways for differentiated neurons is not clear. Previous studies revealed that okadaic acid (OA), a phosphatase inhibitor that induces AD like pathological changes, evokes mitotic changes in neuroblastoma cells. In this study, we examined the in vivo effects of OA on cyclin B1 expression, the induction of mitosis, and subsequent mitotic catastrophe. We found that cyclin B1 expression in adult neurons was significantly increased after injecting OA into rat frontal cortex, which also increased tau protein phosphorylation. Interestingly, cyclin B1 and phosphorylated tau were well co-localized around the OA injection site, but were only partially co-localized in other brain regions. Staining with toluidine blue, Giemsa dye or propidium iodide revealed typical mitotic and mitotic catastrophe-like morphological changes with irregular arrangement of condensed chromatin and chromosome fibers in a few cells. Furthermore, the strong cyclin B1 staining in these cells suggests that cyclin B1 promoted G2 to M phase transition is required for the mitotic catastrophe. The detection of neuron-specific enolase in a portion of these cells demonstrated that at least part them are neuron. All together, our results suggest that the disturbance of the protein kinase-phosphatase system caused by OA is sufficient to induce neuronal cyclin B1 expression, force neurons into the mitotic phase of cell cycle, and cause mitotic catastrophe.

  3. Downregulation of cyclin D1 sensitizes cancer cells to MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuhui; Eilers, Grant; He, Quan; Liu, Lili; Wu, Yeqing; Wu, Yuehong; Yu, Wei; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Ou, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The MDM2-p53 pathway has a prominent oncogenic function in the pathogenesis of various cancers. Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of MDM2-p53 interaction, inhibits proliferation in cancer cells with wild-type p53. Herein, we evaluate the expression of MDM2, both the full length and a splicing variant MDM2-A, and the sensitivity of Nutlin-3 in different cancer cell lines. Included are seven cell lines with wild-type p53 (four mesothelioma, one breast cancer, one chondrosarcoma, and one leiomyosarcoma), two liposarcoma cell lines harboring MDM2 amplification and wild-type p53, and one mesothelioma cell line harboring a p53 point mutation. Nutlin-3 treatment increased expression of cyclin D1, MDM2, and p53 in cell lines with wild-type p53. Additive effects were observed in cells containing wild-type p53 through coordinated attack on MDM2-p53 binding and cyclin D1 by lentivirual shRNA knockdown or small molecule inhibition, as demonstrated by immunoblots and cell viability analyses. Further results demonstrate that MDM2 binds to cyclin D1, and that an increase in cyclin D1 expression after Nutlin-3 treatment is correlated with expression and ubiquitin E3-ligase activity of MDM2. MDM2 and p53 knockdown experiments demonstrated inhibition of cyclin D1 by MDM2 but not p53. These results indicate that combination inhibition of cyclin D1 and MDM2-p53 binding warrants clinical evaluation as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. PMID:27129163

  4. Evaluation of Cyclin D1 expression in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Vishal; Verma, Jyoti; Misra, Vatsala; Srivastav, Sapan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is an aggressive epithelial malignancy of the upper aero digestive tract and comprises 90% of all Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC). It is the sixth leading cancer worldwide with approximately 600,000 cases reported annually. It is one of the most common cancers in India. Tumour Lymph Node and Metastases (TNM) staging has been the most useful indicator to predict prognosis in HNSCC but recently various biomolecular markers have potentially offered new methods for early diagnosis and treatment alternatives for HNSCC patients; one amongst them being cyclin D1. Aim This study has been undertaken to evaluate expression of cyclin D1 in HNSCC cases and to find out its association with various pathological prognostic factors. Materials and Methods A 48 formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour sections, stained with Haematoxylin & Eosin were graded and staged. Immunohistochemistry for cyclin D1 was evaluated as Extent Score (ES), Intensity Score (IS) and Total Score (TS) was calculated. Statistical Analysis All the relevant data collected was transferred on to the excel sheet. Chi square test with and without Yate’s correction was used to compare various parameters. The p-value ≤ 0.05 was taken as critical level of significance. Results A significant association was seen between TS of Cyclin D1 expression with tumour stage and with lymph node metastasis but not with grade. Conclusion Higher Cyclin D1 expression is associated with higher tumour stage and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, there is value of analysing cyclin D1 amplification and expression, for prognostic evaluation. This may also be further used for targeted therapy in head and neck cancers. PMID:28384866

  5. Over-expression in Escherichia coli, purification and reconstitution in liposomes of the third member of the OCTN sub-family: The mouse carnitine transporter OCTN3

    SciTech Connect

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena; Indiveri, Cesare

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mOCTN3 transport protein has been cloned in pET-21a(+) and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expressed mOCTN3 has been purified to homogeneity by Ni-chelating chromatography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protein solubilised in Triton X-100 has been reconstituted in liposomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recombinant mOCTN3 catalyses transport of carnitine by a uniport mode. -- Abstract: pET-21a(+)-mOCTN3-6His was constructed and used for over-expression in Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)pLysS. After IPTG induction a protein with apparent molecular mass of 53 kDa was collected in the insoluble fraction of the cell lysate and purified by Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography with a yield of 2 mg/l of cell culture. The over-expressed protein was identified with mOCTN3 by anti-His antibody and reconstitution in liposomes. mOCTN3 required peculiar conditions for optimal expression and reconstitution in liposomes. The protein catalyzed a time dependent [{sup 3}H]carnitine uptake which was stimulated by intraliposomal ATP and nearly independent of the pH. The K{sub m} for carnitine was 36 {mu}M. [{sup 3}H]carnitine transport was inhibited by carnitine analogues and some Cys and NH{sub 2} reagents. This paper represents the first outcome in over-expressing, in active form, the third member of the OCTN sub-family, mOCTN3, in E. coli.

  6. Over-expression of ascorbate oxidase in the apoplast of transgenic tobacco results in altered ascorbate and glutathione redox states and increased sensitivity to ozone.

    PubMed

    Sanmartin, Maite; Drogoudi, Pavlina A M D; Lyons, Tom; Pateraki, Irene; Barnes, Jeremy; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2003-04-01

    Transgenic tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) plants expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (EC.1.10.3.3) were used to examine the role of extracellular ascorbic acid in mediating tolerance to the ubiquitous air pollutant, ozone (O(3)). Three homozygous transgenic lines, chosen on the basis of a preliminary screen of AO activity in the leaves of 29 lines, revealed up to a 380-fold increase in AO activity, with expression predominantly associated with leaf cell walls. Over-expression of AO resulted in no change in the total ascorbate content recovered in apoplast washing fluid, but the redox state of ascorbate was reduced from 30% in wild-type leaves to below the threshold for detection in transgenic plants. Levels of ascorbic acid and glutathione in the symplast were not affected by AO over-expression, but the redox state of ascorbate was reduced, while that of glutathione was increased. AO over-expressing plants exposed to 100 nmol mol(-1) ozone for 7 h day(-1) exhibited a substantial increase in foliar injury, and a greater pollutant-induced reduction in both the light-saturated rate of CO(2) assimilation and the maximum in vivo rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase carboxylation, compared with wild-type plants. Transgenic plants also exhibited a greater decline in CO(2) assimilation rate when exposed to a brief ozone episode (300 nmol mol(-1) for 8 h). Stomatal conductance, hence O(3) uptake, was unaffected by AO over-expression. Our findings illustrate the important role played by ascorbate redox state and sub-cellular compartmentation in mediating the tolerance of plants to ozone-induced oxidative stress.

  7. Sirtuin1 Over-Expression Does Not Impact Retinal Vascular and Neuronal Degeneration in a Mouse Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Michan, Shaday; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Cui, Zhenghao; Evans, Lucy P.; Hatton, Colman J.; Pei, Dorothy T.; Ju, Meihua; Sinclair, David A.; Smith, Lois E. H.; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness, including retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in children and diabetic retinopathy in adults. Retinopathy is characterized by an initial phase of vessel loss, leading to tissue ischemia and hypoxia, followed by sight threatening pathologic neovascularization in the second phase. Previously we found that Sirtuin1 (Sirt1), a metabolically dependent protein deacetylase, regulates vascular regeneration in a mouse model of oxygen-induced proliferative retinopathy (OIR), as neuronal depletion of Sirt1 in retina worsens retinopathy. In this study we assessed whether over-expression of Sirtuin1 in retinal neurons and vessels achieved by crossing Sirt1 over-expressing flox mice with Nestin-Cre mice or Tie2-Cre mice, respectively, may protect against retinopathy. We found that over-expression of Sirt1 in Nestin expressing retinal neurons does not impact vaso-obliteration or pathologic neovascularization in OIR, nor does it influence neuronal degeneration in OIR. Similarly, increased expression of Sirt1 in Tie2 expressing vascular endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages does not protect retinal vessels in OIR. In addition to the genetic approaches, dietary supplement with Sirt1 activators, resveratrol or SRT1720, were fed to wild type mice with OIR. Neither treatment showed significant vaso-protective effects in retinopathy. Together these results indicate that although endogenous Sirt1 is important as a stress-induced protector in retinopathy, over-expression of Sirt1 or treatment with small molecule activators at the examined doses do not provide additional protection against retinopathy in mice. Further studies are needed to examine in depth whether increasing levels of Sirt1 may serve as a potential therapeutic approach to treat or prevent retinopathy. PMID:24416337

  8. Diet-induced over-expression of flightless-I protein and its relation to flightlessness in Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Cho, Il Kyu; Chang, Chiou Ling; Li, Qing X

    2013-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata is among the most economically important pests worldwide. Understanding nutritional requirement helps rearing healthy medfly for biocontrol of its population in fields. Flight ability is a high priority criterion. Two groups of medfly larvae were reared with two identical component diets except one with fatty acids (diet A) and another without it (diet B). Adults from larvae reared on diet B demonstrated 20±8% of normal flight ability, whereas those from larvae reared on diet A displayed full flight ability of 97±1%. Proteomes were profiled to compare two groups of medfly pupae using shotgun proteomics to study dietary effects on flight ability. When proteins detected in pupae A were compared with those in pupae B, 233 and 239 proteins were, respectively, under- and over-expressed in pupae B, while 167 proteins were overlapped in both pupae A and B. Differential protein profiles indicate that nutritional deficiency induced over-expression of flightless-I protein (fli-I) in medfly. All proteins were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to create 13 biological networks and 17 pathways of interacting protein clusters in human ortholog. Fli-I, leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing G protein-coupled receptor 2, LRR protein soc-2 and protein wings apart-like were over-expressed in pupae B. Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, protocadherin-like wing polarity protein stan and several Wnt pathway proteins were under-expressed in pupae B. These results suggest down-regulation of the Wnt/wingless signaling pathway, which consequently may result in flightlessness in pupae B. The fli-I gene is known to be located within the Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) region on chromosome 17, and thus, we speculate that nutritional deficiency might induce over-expression of fli-I (or fli-I gene) and be associated with human SMS. However, more evidence would be needed to confirm our speculation.

  9. Coenzyme Q supplementation or over-expression of the yeast Coq8 putative kinase stabilizes multi-subunit Coq polypeptide complexes in yeast coq null mutants*

    PubMed Central

    He, Cuiwen H.; Xie, Letian X.; Allan, Christopher M.; Tran, UyenPhuong C.; Clarke, Catherine F.

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in yeast requires a multi-subunit Coq polypeptide complex. Deletion of any one of the COQ genes leads to respiratory deficiency and decreased levels of the Coq4, Coq6, Coq7, and Coq9 polypeptides, suggesting that their association in a high molecular mass complex is required for stability. Over-expression of the putative Coq8 kinase in certain coq null mutants restores steady-state levels of the sensitive Coq polypeptides and promotes the synthesis of late-stage Q-intermediates. Here we show that over-expression of Coq8 in yeast coq null mutants profoundly affects the association of several of the Coq polypeptides in high molecular mass complexes, as assayed by separation of digitonin extracts of mitochondria by two-dimensional blue-native/SDS PAGE. The Coq4 polypeptide persists at high molecular mass with over-expression of Coq8 in coq3, coq5, coq6, coq7, coq9, and coq10 mutants, indicating that Coq4 is a central organizer of the Coq complex. Supplementation with exogenous Q6 increased the steady-state levels of Coq4, Coq7, Coq9, and several other mitochondrial polypeptides in select coq null mutants, and also promoted the formation of late-stage Q-intermediates. Q supplementation may stabilize this complex by interacting with one or more of the Coq polypeptides. The stabilizing effects of exogenously added Q6 or over-expression of Coq8 depend on Coq1 and Coq2 production of a polyisoprenyl intermediate. Based on the observed interdependence of the Coq polypeptides, the effect of exogenous Q6, and the requirement for an endogenously produced polyisoprenyl intermediate, we propose a new model for the Q-biosynthetic complex, termed the CoQ-synthome. PMID:24406904

  10. Decreased cyclin A2 and increased cyclin G1 levels coincide with loss of proliferative capacity in rat Leydig cells during pubertal development.

    PubMed

    Ge, R S; Hardy, M P

    1997-09-01

    Postnatal development of Leydig cells can be divided into three distinct stages of differentiation: initially they exist as mesenchymal-like progenitors (PLC) by day 21; subsequently, as immature Leydig cells (ILC) by day 35, they acquire steroidogenic organelle structure and enzyme activities but metabolize most of the testosterone they produce; finally, as adult Leydig cells (ALC) by day 90 they actively produce testosterone. The aims of the present study were to determine whether changes in proliferative capacity are associated with progressive differentiation of Leydig cells, and if the proliferative capacity of Leydig cells is controlled by known hormonal regulators of testosterone biosynthesis: LH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), androgen, and estradiol (E2). Isolated PLC, ILC, and ALC were cultured in DMEM/F-12 for 24 h followed by an additional 24 h in the presence of LH (1 ng/ml), IGF-I (70 ng/ml), 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT, 50 nM), a synthetic androgen that is not metabolized by 5alpha-reductase, or E2 (50 nM). Proliferative capacity was measured by assaying [3H]thymidine incorporation and labeling index (LI). Messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels for cyclin A2 and G1, which are putative intracellular regulators of Leydig cell proliferation and differentiation, were measured by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Thymidine incorporation was highest in PLC (9.24 +/- 0.21 cpm/10(3) cell, mean +/- SE), intermediate in ILC (1.74 +/- 0.07) and lowest in ALC (0.24 +/- 0.03). Similarly, LI was highest in PLC (13.42 +/- 0.30%, mean +/- SE), intermediate in ILC (1.95 +/- 0.08%), and undetectable in ALC. Cyclin A2 mRNA levels, normalized to ribosomal protein S16 (RPS16), were highest in PLC (2.76 +/- 0.21, mean +/- SE), intermediate in ILC (1.79 +/- 0.14), and lowest in ALC (0.40 +/- 0.06). In contrast, cyclin G1 mRNA levels were highest in ALC (1.32 +/- 0.16), intermediate in ILC (0.47 +/- 0.07), and lowest in PLC (0.12 +/- 0.02). The

  11. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  12. Investigating the Role of Cyclin D1 in the Promotion of Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    20mM Tris, 40mM MgCl2, 2.5mM EGTA). Beads containing SCFFbx4 complexes 6 were then mixed with Sf9 -produced purified cyclin D1 substrate, ATP...ubiquitylation reactions with Sf9 -purified cyclin D1/CDK4 as substrate, in the presence of E1, E2, 1 ubiquitin, and ATP. 2 3 Figure 6. Fbx4 loss drives cell...kinase/methyltrans- ferase reactions with purified recombinant PRMT5/MEP50 pro- duced in Sf9 cells. PRMT5-dependent methyltransferase activity was

  13. Over-expression of the Sirt3 sirtuin Protects neuronally differentiated PC12 Cells from degeneration induced by oxidative stress and trophic withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Shulyakova, Natalya; Sidorova-Darmos, Elena; Fong, Jamie; Zhang, Guangming; Mills, Linda R; Eubanks, James H

    2014-10-31

    Sirt3 is a mitochondrial sirtuin whose deacetylase activity regulates facets of oxidative metabolic efficiency, anti-oxidative capacity, and intra-mitochondrial signaling. In this study, we tested whether the over-expression of a human Sirt3-myc transgene in differentiated PC12 cells, a model of sympathetic catecholaminergic neurons, would affect the sensitivity of these cells to oxidative stress or trophic withdrawal insults. Expression analysis revealed the Sirt3-myc product was expressed as a 45kDa pro-form, which localized primarily within the cytosol, and a 30kDa processed form that localized predominantly within mitochondria. When subjected to acute glucose deprivation or acute oxygen-glucose deprivation, differentiated PC12 cells over-expressing Sirt3-myc displayed significantly lower levels of cytotoxicity, both at the end of the insult, and at different times following media reperfusion, than cells transfected with a control plasmid. Further, Sirt3-myc over-expression also protected differentiated PC12 cells from apoptosis induced by trophic withdrawal. Collectively, these data indicate that an elevation of Sirt3 is sufficient to protect neuronal PC12 cells from cytotoxic insults, and add to the growing evidence that Sirt3 could be targeted for neuroprotective intervention.

  14. Enhanced morphinan alkaloid production in hairy root cultures of Papaver bracteatum by over-expression of salutaridinol 7-o-acetyltransferase gene via Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation.

    PubMed

    Sharafi, Ali; Hashemi Sohi, Haleh; Mousavi, Amir; Azadi, Pejman; Dehsara, Bahareh; Hosseini Khalifani, Bahman

    2013-11-01

    Papaver bracteatum is an important medicinal plant valued for its high content of thebaine and an alternative to P. somniferum for benzylisoquinoline alkaloid production. Salutaridinol 7-o-acetyltransferase (SalAT) is a key gene in morphinan alkaloids biosynthesis pathway. Over expression of SalAT gene was used for metabolic engineering in P. bracteatum hairy root cultures. Transcript level of the salutaridinol 7-o-acetyltransferase gene in transgenic hairy root lines increased up to 154 and 128 % in comparison with hairy roots without SalAT over expression and wild type roots, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that the transgenic hairy roots relatively improved levels of thebaine (1.28 % dry weight), codeine (0.02 % dry weight) and morphine (0.03 % dry weight) compared to those hairy roots without SalAT over expression. This suggests that P. bracteatum hairy roots expressing the SalAT gene could be potentially used for the production of valuable morphinan alkaloids.

  15. Enhancement of chlorogenic acid production in hairy roots of Platycodon grandiflorum by over-expression of an Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor AtPAP1.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Kwon, Do Yeon; Lee, Sanghyun; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Nam Il; Park, Sang Un

    2014-08-22

    To improve the production of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in hairy roots of Platycodon grandiflorum, we induced over-expression of Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor production of anthocyanin pigment (AtPAP1) using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation system. Twelve hairy root lines showing over-expression of AtPAP1 were generated. In order to investigate the regulation of AtPAP1 on the activities of CGA biosynthetic genes, the expression levels of seven P. grandiflorum CGA biosynthetic genes were analyzed in the hairy root line that had the greatest accumulation of AtPAP1 transcript, OxPAP1-1. The introduction of AtPAP1 increased the mRNA levels of all examined CGA biosynthetic genes and resulted in a 900% up-regulation of CGA accumulation in OxPAP1-1 hairy roots relative to controls. This suggests that P. grandiflorum hairy roots that over-express the AtPAP1 gene are a potential alternative source of roots for the production of CGA.

  16. Over-Expression of the Mycobacterial Trehalose-Phosphate Phosphatase OtsB2 Results in a Defect in Macrophage Phagocytosis Associated with Increased Mycobacterial-Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Wu, Mei; Shi, Yan; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2) is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage–mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host–pathogen interactions. Macrophage–mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study. PMID:27867377

  17. Over-expression of TSC-22 (TGF-beta stimulated clone-22) markedly enhances 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in a human salivary gland cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Uchida, D; Kawamata, H; Omotehara, F; Miwa, Y; Hino, S; Begum, N M; Yoshida, H; Sato, M

    2000-06-01

    We have recently isolated TSC-22 (transforming growth factor-beta-stimulated clone-22) cDNA as an anticancer, drug-inducible (with vesnarinone) gene in a human salivary gland cancer cell line, TYS. We have also reported that TSC-22 negatively regulates the growth of TYS cells and that down-regulation of TSC-22 in TYS cells plays a major role in salivary gland tumorigenesis (Nakashiro et al, 1998). In this study, we transfected TYS cells with an expression vector encoding the TSC-22-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein, and we established TSC-22-GFP-expressing TYS cell clones. Next, we examined (a) the subcellular localization of the fusion protein, (b) the sensitivity of the transfectants to several anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, cis-diaminedichloroplatinum, peplomycin), and (c) induction of apoptotic cell death in the transfectants by 5-fluorouracil treatment. The TSC-22-GFP fusion protein was clearly localized to the cytoplasm, but not to the nucleus. Over-expression of the TSC-22-GFP fusion protein did not affect cell growth, but significantly increased the sensitivity of the cells to the anticancer drugs (p < 0.01; one-way ANOVA). Furthermore, over-expression of the TSC-22-GFP fusion protein markedly enhanced 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that over-expression of TSC-22-GFP protein in TYS cells enhances the chemosensitivity of the cells via induction of apoptosis.

  18. Enhancement of Chlorogenic Acid Production in Hairy Roots of Platycodon grandiflorum by Over-Expression of An Arabidopsis thaliana Transcription Factor AtPAP1

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Kwon, Do Yeon; Lee, Sanghyun; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Nam Il; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    To improve the production of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in hairy roots of Platycodon grandiflorum, we induced over-expression of Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factor production of anthocyanin pigment (AtPAP1) using an Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation system. Twelve hairy root lines showing over-expression of AtPAP1 were generated. In order to investigate the regulation of AtPAP1 on the activities of CGA biosynthetic genes, the expression levels of seven P. grandiflorum CGA biosynthetic genes were analyzed in the hairy root line that had the greatest accumulation of AtPAP1 transcript, OxPAP1-1. The introduction of AtPAP1 increased the mRNA levels of all examined CGA biosynthetic genes and resulted in a 900% up-regulation of CGA accumulation in OxPAP1-1 hairy roots relative to controls. This suggests that P. grandiflorum hairy roots that over-express the AtPAP1 gene are a potential alternative source of roots for the production of CGA. PMID:25153629

  19. Enhancement in production of recombinant two-chain Insulin Glargine by over-expression of Kex2 protease in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Sreenivas, Suma; Krishnaiah, Sateesh M; Govindappa, Nagaraja; Basavaraju, Yogesh; Kanojia, Komal; Mallikarjun, Niveditha; Natarajan, Jayaprakash; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Sastry, Kedarnath N

    2015-01-01

    Glargine is an analog of Insulin currently being produced by recombinant DNA technology using two different hosts namely Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. Production from E. coli involves the steps of extraction of inclusion bodies by cell lysis, refolding, proteolytic cleavage and purification. In P. pastoris, a single-chain precursor with appropriate disulfide bonding is secreted to the medium. Downstream processing currently involves use of trypsin which converts the precursor into two-chain final product. The use of trypsin in the process generates additional impurities due to presence of Lys and Arg residues in the Glargine molecule. In this study, we describe an alternate approach involving over-expression of endogenous Kex2 proprotein convertase, taking advantage of dibasic amino acid sequence (Arg-Arg) at the end of B-chain of Glargine. KEX2 gene over-expression in Pichia was accomplished by using promoters of varying strengths to ensure production of greater levels of fully functional two-chain Glargine product, confirmed by HPLC and mass analysis. In conclusion, this new production process involving Kex2 protease over-expression improves the downstream process efficiency, reduces the levels of impurities generated and decreases the use of raw materials.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of Vero E6 cells over-expressing SARS-CoV S2 subunit: Insights on viral regulation of apoptosis and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Y.-S. Yip, C.-W. Hon, C.-C. Chow, Ken Y.C. Ma, Iris C.M. Zeng Fanya Leung, Frederick C.C.

    2008-02-05

    We have previously demonstrated that over-expression of spike protein (S) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or its C-terminal subunit (S2) is sufficient to induce apoptosis in vitro. To further investigate the possible roles of S2 in SARS-CoV-induced apoptosis and pathogenesis of SARS, we characterized the host expression profiles induced upon S2 over-expression in Vero E6 cells by oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Possible activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in S2 expressing cells was suggested, as evidenced by the up-regulation of cytochrome c and down-regulation of the Bcl-2 family anti-apoptotic members. Inhibition of Bcl-2-related anti-apoptotic pathway was further supported by the diminution of S2-induced apoptosis in Vero E6 cells over-expressing Bcl-xL. In addition, modulation of CCN E2 and CDKN 1A implied the possible control of cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase. This study is expected to extend our understanding on the pathogenesis of SARS at a molecular level.

  1. APN/CD13 Is Over-expressed by Psoriatic Fibroblasts and Is Modulated by CGRP and IL-4 But not by Retinoic Acid Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Guibourdenche, Jean; Jarray, Rafika; Conti, Marc; Palmic, Patricia; Leclerc-Mercier, Stéphanie; Bruneau, Julie; Hermine, Olivier; Lepelletier, Yves; Raynaud, Françoise

    2017-04-07

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common skin inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent flare episodes associated with scaly well-demarcated skin plaques. Skin biopsies from psoriatic patients with high PASI score (22.67 ± 8.67) and from HD were used to study APN/CD13. APN/CD13 is over-expressed in LP and nLP compare to HD skins and fibroblasts. This over-expression is positively correlated with specific enzymatic activity enhancement. However, discrepancies between APN/CD13 expression in LP and nLP prompt us to focus our study on APN/CD13 modulation. Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide, positively modulated expression and activity of APN/CD13. CGRP consistently induced IL4 secretion, which is also involved in the increase of APN/CD13 expression and activity, which is significantly reversed using IL-4 blocking antibody. Surprisingly, retinoic acid altered the APN/CD13 enzymatic activity only in nLP fibroblasts without modification of APN/CD13 expression. APN/CD13 is over-expressed on psoriatic fibroblasts and exerted high level of activity compare to HD fibroblasts. Taken together, several factors such as CGRP and IL-4 acted on positive regulation of APN/CD13 expression and activity. This study highlighted the interest of APN/CD13 as a new potential target, which should be investigated in psoriasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Strengthening Triterpene Saponins Biosynthesis by Over-Expression of Farnesyl Pyrophosphate Synthase Gene and RNA Interference of Cycloartenol Synthase Gene in Panax notoginseng Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Ge, Feng; Sun, Ying; Liu, Diqiu; Chen, Chaoyin

    2017-04-05

    To conform to the multiple regulations of triterpene biosynthesis, the gene encoding farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPS) was transformed into Panax notoginseng (P. notoginseng) cells in which RNA interference (RNAi) of the cycloartenol synthase (CAS) gene had been accomplished. Transgenic cell lines showed both higher expression levels of FPS and lower expression levels of CAS compared to the wild-type (WT) cells. In the triterpene and phytosterol analysis, transgenic cell lines provided a higher accumulation of total triterpene saponins, and a lower amount of phytosterols in comparison with the WT cells. Compared with the cells in which RNAi of the CAS gene was achieved, the cells with simultaneously over-expressed FPS and silenced CAS showed higher triterpene contents. These results demonstrate that over-expression of FPS can break the rate-limiting reaction catalyzed by FPS in the triterpene saponins biosynthetic pathway; and inhibition of CAS expression can decrease the synthesis metabolic flux of the phytosterol branch. Thus, more precursors flow in the direction of triterpene synthesis, and ultimately promote the accumulation of P. notoginseng saponins. Meanwhile, silencing and over-expressing key enzyme genes simultaneously is more effective than just manipulating one gene in the regulation of saponin biosynthesis.

  3. Tobacco seeds simultaneously over-expressing Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase display enhanced seed longevity and germination rates under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Pyo; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Bang, Jae-Woog; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2010-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during seed desiccation, germination, and ageing, leading to cellular damage and seed deterioration and, therefore, decreased seed longevity. The effects of simultaneous over-expression of two antioxidant enzymes on seed longevity and seed germination under stressful conditions were investigated. Transgenic tobacco simultaneously over-expressing the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes in plastids showed normal growth and seed development. Furthermore, the transgenic seeds displayed increased CuZnSOD and APX enzymatic activities during seed development and maintained antioxidant enzymatic activity after two years of dried storage at room temperature. The two-year stored non-transgenic seeds (aged NT seeds) had higher levels of ion leakage than the two-year stored transgenic seeds (aged CA seeds), indicating membrane damage caused by ROS was more severe in the aged NT seeds than the aged CA seeds. The aged CA seeds decreased germination rates as compared to newly harvested transgenic and non-transgenic seeds. The aged CA seeds, however, significantly increased germination rates under various abiotic stress conditions as compared to aged NT seeds. These data strongly suggest that simultaneous over-expression of the CuZnSOD and APX genes in plastids improves seed longevity and germination under various environmental stress conditions by attenuating the effects of oxidative stress produced by elongated storage conditions and harsh environmental stresses.

  4. Over-Expression of PDGFR-β Promotes PDGF-Induced Proliferation, Migration, and Angiogenesis of EPCs through PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Xiaohui; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Jinkun; Qin, Zhexue; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Kui; Lu, Wei; Liu, Jie; Huang, Lan

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play critical roles in postnatal neovascularization and re-endothelialization following vascular injury. Here we evaluated whether the over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) can enhance the PDGF-BB-stimulated biological functions of EPCs through the PDGFR-β/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. We first confirmed the expression of endogenous PDGFR-β and its plasma membrane localization in spleen-derived EPCs. We then demonstrated that the PDGFR-β over-expression in EPCs enhanced the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis of EPCs. Using AG1295 (a PDGFR kinase inhibitor), LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), and sc-221226 (an Akt inhibitor), we further showed that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway participates in the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis of EPCs. In addition, the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is required for PDGFR-β over-expression to enhance these PDGF-BB-induced phenotypes. PMID:22355314

  5. Inotodiol inhabits proliferation and induces apoptosis through modulating expression of cyclinE, p27, bcl-2, and bax in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Wei; Zhong, Xiu-Hong; Yang, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Zhong; Yang, Ning-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a medicinal mushroom that has been used as an effective agent to treat various diseases such as diabetes, tuberculosis and cancer. Inotodiol, an included triterpenoid shows significant anti-tumor effect. However, the mechanisms have not been well documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of inotodiol on proliferation and apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. HeLa cells were treated with different concentrations of inotodiol. The MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferating ability, flow cytometry (FCM) was employed for cell cycle analysis and cell apoptosis, while expression of cyclinE, p27, bcl-2 and bax was detected by immunocytochemistry. Proliferation of HeLa cells was inhibited by inotodiolin a dose-dependent manner at 24h (r=0.9999, p<0.01). A sub-G1 peak (apoptotic cells) of HeLa cells was detected after treatment and the apoptosis rate with the concentration and longer incubation time (r=1.0, p<0.01), while the percentage of cells in S phase and G2/M phase decreased significantly. Immunocytochemistry assay showed that the expression of cyclin E and bcl-2 in the treated cells significantly decreased, while the expression of p27 and bax obviously increased, compared with the control group (p<0.05). The results of our research indicate that inotodiol isolated from Inonotus obliquus inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells and induced apoptosis in vitro. The mechanisms may be related to promoting apoptosis through increasing the expression of bax and cutting bcl-2 and affecting the cell cycle by down-regulation the expression of cyclin E and up-regulation of p27. The results further indicate the potential value of inotodiol for treatment of human cervical cancer.

  6. Decreased cyclin B1 expression contributes to G2 delay in human brain tumor cells after treatment with camptothecin.

    PubMed Central

    Janss, A. J.; Maity, A.; Tang, C. B.; Muschel, R. J.; McKenna, W. G.; Sutton, L.; Phillips, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    DNA damage produces delayed mitosis (G2/M delay) in proliferating cells, and shortening the delay sensitizes human malignant glioma and medulloblastoma cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Although activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDC2 mediates G2/M transition in all tumor cells studied to date, regulation of CDC2 varies between tumor types. Persistent hyperphosphorylation of kinase and reduced cyclin expression have been implicated as mediators of treatment-induced G2 delay in different tumor models. To evaluate regulation of G2/M transition in human brain tumors, we studied the expression and/or activity of CDC2 kinase and cyclins A and B1 in U-251 MG and DAOY medulloblastoma cells after their treatment with camptothecin (CPT). Synchronized cells were treated during S phase, then harvested at predetermined intervals for evaluation of cell cycle kinetics, kinase activity mRNA, and protein expression. CPT produced G2 delay associated with decreased CDC2 kinase activity and cyclin B1 expression. Kinase activity was associated with CDC2 bound to cyclin B1, not cyclin A, in both cell lines. Cyclin A mRNA and protein expression were reduced after CPT treatment; however, decreased protein expression was short lived and moderate in the glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor/medulloblastoma cells, respectively. We conclude that G2 delay is a common response of brain tumor cells to chemotherapy with topoisomerase I inhibitors and that a mechanism of this delay may be reduced expression of cyclin B1. PMID:11305412

  7. D-cyclins Repress Apoptosis in Hematopoietic Cells by Controlling Death Receptor Fas and its Ligand FasL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Saez, Borja; Anders, Lars; Hydbring, Per; Stefano, Joanna; Bacon, Nickolas A.; Cook, Colleen; Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Signoretti, Sabina; Young, Richard A.; Scadden, David T.; Sicinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY D-type cyclins (D1, D2 and D3) are components of the mammalian core cell cycle machinery and function to drive cell proliferation. Here we report that D-cyclins perform a rate-limiting anti-apoptotic function in vivo. We found that acute shutdown of all three D-cyclins in bone marrow of adult mice resulted in massive apoptosis of all hematopoietic cell types. We demonstrate that adult hematopoietic stem cells are particularly dependent on D-cyclins for survival, and they are especially sensitive to cyclin D loss. Surprisingly, we found that the anti-apoptotic function of D-cyclins also operates in quiescent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our analyses revealed that D-cyclins repress the expression of the death receptor Fas and its ligand, FasL. Acute ablation of D-cyclins upregulated these pro-apoptotic genes, and led to Fas- and caspase 8-dependent apoptosis. These results reveal an unexpected function of cell cycle proteins in controlling apoptosis in normal cell homeostasis. PMID:25087893

  8. Destruction of Xenopus cyclins A and B2, but not B1, requires binding to p34cdc2.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, E; Kobayashi, H; Harrison, D; Hunt, T

    1994-01-01

    The specific and rapid destruction of cyclins A and B during mitosis is their most remarkable property. A short peptide motif of approximately 10 amino acids near the N-terminus, known as the destruction box, is absolutely required for programmed proteolysis. In this paper we show that although the destruction box is necessary for the degradation of cyclin A, it is not sufficient. Mutant versions of cyclin A that cannot form complexes with p34cdc2 are stable, which we interpret to mean that this cyclin must bind to p34cdc2 in order to undergo programmed proteolysis. Thus, N-terminal fragments of cyclin A containing little more than the destruction box and its surroundings are indestructible. p34cdc2 binding also appears to be required for the destruction of cyclin B2. In contrast, cyclin B1 does not require p34cdc2 binding for specific proteolysis. The systems for the proteolysis of cyclins A, B1 and B2 thus appear to show important differences in the way they recognize their substrates. Images PMID:8313903

  9. Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase 9 by dinaciclib suppresses cyclin B1 expression and tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Sandeep; Khera, Nimmish; Guo, Zhanfang; Hoog, Jeremy; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are potential cancer therapeutic targets because of their critical role in promoting cell growth. Dinaciclib is a novel CDK inhibitor currently under clinical evaluation for the treatment of advanced malignancies. In this study, we demonstrated the anti-tumor activity of dinaciclib in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patient derived xenograft (PDX) and cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with dinaciclib induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and marked apoptosis. These changes were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of CDK1 and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and decreased protein levels of cyclin B1, cMYC and survivin. We further demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of CDK9, the kinase subunit of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), instead of CDK1 or CDK2, reduced the levels of cyclin B1 and MYC in TNBC cell lines. These data support the importance of CDK9, in addition to CDK1, in mediating the growth inhibitory effect of dinaciclib in TNBC. Further investigation of CDK9 as a therapeutic target in TNBC is needed. PMID:27486754

  10. Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol affects the photosynthetic apparatus and improves the performance of transgenic poplars on heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies of transgenic poplars over-expressing the genes gsh1 and gsh2 encoding γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS) and glutathione synthetase, respectively, provided detailed information on regulation of GSH synthesis, enzymes activities and mRNA expression. In this experiment, we studied quantitative parameters of leaves, assimilating tissues, cells and chloroplasts, mesophyll resistance for CO(2) diffusion, chlorophyll and carbohydrate content in wild-type poplar and transgenic plants over-expressing gsh1 in the cytosol after 3 years of growth in relatively clean (control) or heavy metal-contaminated soil in the field. Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol led to a twofold increase of intrafoliar GSH concentration and influenced the photosynthetic apparatus at different levels of organisation, i.e., leaves, photosynthetic cells and chloroplasts. At the control site, transgenic poplars had a twofold smaller total leaf area per plant and a 1.6-fold leaf area per leaf compared to wild-type controls. Annual aboveground biomass gain was reduced by 50% in the transgenic plants. The reduction of leaf area of the transformants was accompanied by a significant decline in total cell number per leaf, indicating suppression of cell division. Over-expression of γ-ECS in the cytosol also caused changes in mesophyll structure, i.e., a 20% decrease in cell and chloroplast number per leaf area, but also an enhanced volume share of chloroplasts and intercellular airspaces in the leaves. Transgenic and wild poplars did not exhibit differences in chlorophyll and carotenoid content of leaves, but transformants had 1.3-fold fewer soluble carbohydrates. Cultivation on contaminated soil caused a reduction of palisade cell volume and chloroplast number, both per cell and leaf area, in wild-type plants but not in transformants. Biomass accumulation of wild-type poplars decreased in contaminated soil by more than 30-fold, whereas transformants showed a twofold decrease