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Sample records for b1 periprosthetic fractures

  1. Periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFFs) has been associated with a high frequency of complications and reoperations. The preferred treatment is internal fixation, a revision of the femoral stem, or a combination of both. An improved understanding of plate use during internal fixation, and the introduction of locking-plate osteosynthesis may lead to improved outcome. We evaluated the outcome of Vancouver type B1 and C PFFs treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis, by assessing rates of fracture union and reoperations and by analyzing failure cases. Patients and methods From 2002 through 2011, 58 consecutive patients (60 fractures) with low-energy PFF around or below a stable femoral stem, i.e. Vancouver type B1 and C fractures, underwent osteosynthesis with a locking plate. All patients had a total hip replacement (THR). They were followed up clinically and radiographically, with 6 weeks between visits, until fracture union or until death. Fracture union was evaluated 6 months postoperatively. Results At a median follow-up time of 23 (0–121) months after PFF, 8 patients (8 fractures) had been reoperated due either to infection (n = 4), failure of fixation (n = 3), or loosening of the femoral stem (n = 1). All the patients who had been followed up for at least 6 months—and who did not undergo reoperation or die—went on to fracture union (n = 43). Interpretation Locking-plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures gives good results regarding fracture union. It appears that spanning of the prosthesis to avoid stress-rising areas is important for successful treatment. Infection is the major cause of failure. PMID:23140109

  2. Double plating in Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic proximal femur fractures: A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, Dirk; Grüneweller, Niklas; Gehweiler, Dominic; Brunn, Benjamin; Raschke, Michael J; Stange, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Periprosthetic hip fractures are an increasing problem in modern orthopedic and trauma surgery. Many options for the operative treatment are available to the surgeon ranging from modern variable angular systems to standard plates, screws, and cerclages. However, there is no gold standard and therefore, the aim of this study, was to investigate the biomechanical characteristics of double plating versus a lateral standard plate in a Vancouver B1 fracture model. Ten 4th generation composite femora were used to implant cementless total hip prosthesis and create Vancouver B1 periprosthetic fractures. Afterwards, the osteotomies were fixed using the locking compression plate in combination with the locking attachment plate (LCP, LAP, DePuy Synthes, Solothurn, Switzerland)-group I. Group II additionally achieved a 5-hole 4.5/5.0 mm LCP anteriorly. Each construct was cyclically loaded to failure in axial compression. Axial construct stiffness was 50.87 N/mm (SD 1.61) for group I compared to 738.68 N/mm (SD 94.8) for group II, this difference was statistically significant (p = 0.016). The number of cycles to failure was also significant higher for group II (2,375 vs. 13,000 cycles; p = 0.016). Double plating can significantly increase construct stiffness and stability, and thus, is an option in the treatment of complex periprosthetic fractures, in revision surgery and for patients with the inability to partial weight bear. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:234-239, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Reversed Contralateral LISS Plate for Vancouver B1 Periprosthetic Femoral Shaft Fractures.

    PubMed

    Russo, Matthew; Malekzadeh, A Stephen; Hampton, Chadwick; Hymes, Robert; Schwartzbach, Cary; Schulman, Jeffrey

    2015-06-01

    The authors reviewed all patients treated for periprosthetic femur fractures between March 1, 2007, and January 31, 2010 at the senior author's institution. Demographic features, mechanism of injury, radiographs, and computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine the type and stability of the femoral implant at the time of injury. All Vancouver B1 fractures were treated with a novel technique that used a contoured distal femoral locking plate intended for the contralateral femur and reversed to accommodate the ipsilateral femoral bow and contour of the proximal femur. Fixation was achieved around the implant with percutaneously placed unicortical and/or bicortical screws. Radiographs were reviewed for fracture healing, malunion, implant failure, and prosthetic loosening. Fifteen patients were identified and underwent the procedure as described. One patient died soon after surgery of complications from a ruptured preexisting esophageal ulcer. Of the remaining 14 patients, the average duration of follow-up was 25 months (range, 6-31 months). Two patients did not achieve union; however, repeat interpretation of the presenting radiographs showed likely misdiagnosed Vancouver B2 fractures. The first patient had late aseptic loosening and underwent revision surgery 22 weeks postoperatively. The other had early loss of fixation that required revision with a long stem prosthesis. Other complications included 1 deep venous thrombosis and 2 superficial wound infections. The infections were successfully treated with a single formal irrigation and debridement, primary closure, and a short course of oral antibiotics. Ultimately, in 86% of patients (12/14), fracture healing occurred with this biologically friendly technique. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Tangential Bicortical Locked Fixation Improves Stability in Vancouver B1 Periprosthetic Femur Fractures: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gregory S; Caroom, Cyrus T; Wee, Hwabok; Jurgensmeier, Darin; Rothermel, Shane D; Bramer, Michelle A; Reid, John Spence

    2015-10-01

    The biomechanical difficulty in fixation of a Vancouver B1 periprosthetic fracture is purchase of the proximal femoral segment in the presence of the hip stem. Several newer technologies provide the ability to place bicortical locking screws tangential to the hip stem with much longer lengths of screw purchase compared with unicortical screws. This biomechanical study compares the stability of 2 of these newer constructs to previous methods. Thirty composite synthetic femurs were prepared with cemented hip stems. The distal femur segment was osteotomized, and plates were fixed proximally with either (1) cerclage cables, (2) locked unicortical screws, (3) a composite of locked screws and cables, or tangentially directed bicortical locking screws using either (4) a stainless steel locking compression plate system with a Locking Attachment Plate (Synthes) or (5) a titanium alloy Non-Contact Bridging system (Zimmer). Specimens were tested to failure in either axial or torsional quasistatic loading modes (n = 3) after 20 moderate load preconditioning cycles. Stiffness, maximum force, and failure mechanism were determined. Bicortical constructs resisted higher (by an average of at least 27%) maximum forces than the other 3 constructs in torsional loading (P < 0.05). Cables constructs exhibited lower maximum force than all other constructs, in both axial and torsional loading. The bicortical titanium construct was stiffer than the bicortical stainless steel construct in axial loading. Proximal fixation stability is likely improved with the use of bicortical locking screws as compared with traditional unicortical screws and cable techniques. In this study with a limited sample size, we found the addition of cerclage cables to unicortical screws may not offer much improvement in biomechanical stability of unstable B1 fractures.

  5. Cement-in-cement revision for selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Brew, Christopher J; Wilson, Lance J; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Hubble, Matthew J W; Crawford, Ross W

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of the cement-in-cement (c-in-c) technique for fixation of selected Vancouver Type B1 femoral periprosthetic fractures and to assess the degree of cement interposition at the fracture site. Six embalmed cadaveric femora were implanted with a cemented femoral stem. Vancouver Type B1 fractures were created by applying a combined axial and rotational load to failure. The femora were repaired using the c-in-c technique and reloaded to failure. The mean primary fracture torque was 117 Nm (SD 16.6, range 89-133). The mean revision fracture torque was 50 Nm (SD 16.6, range 29-74), which is above the torque previously observed for activities of daily living. Cement interposition at the fracture site was found to be minimal.

  6. Finite element analysis of different repair methods of Vancouver B1 periprosthetic fractures after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dave W; Lin, Chun-Li; Hu, Chih-Chien; Wu, Jhao-Wei; Lee, Mel S

    2012-07-01

    To use finite element analysis to study the stability of different fixation methods used to repair Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic fractures occurring after total hip arthroplasty (THA). An artificial femur was used as the basis for the solid model; U2 series femoral stem (United Orthopedic Corporation, Hsinchu, Taiwan) was used for modelling of the prosthesis; and the modelling of the cable plate, wires and screws was based on information given in the manufacturer's catalogue (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA). The analysis model was constructed using the ANSYS software, and all material settings were based on literature values. A six-orifice cable plate, unicortical screws (20mm long and 4.5mm in diameter) and bicortical screws (50mm long and 4.5mm in diameter) were constructed. Four analysis models were defined. The basic model had a plate and three cable wires above the fracture line and two bicortical screws below the fracture line. In the second model, two unicortical screws were added above the fracture line. In the third model, three wires were added below the fracture line. In the fourth model, both the proximal screws of the second model and the distal wires of the third model were added to the basic model. To ensure that the numerical values produced by analysis reached convergence, mesh convergence was tested. Adding two proximal unicortical screws to the basic Ogden construct (plate, proximal wires and distal screws) lessened displacement of the fracture and decreased the von Mises stress on the repair. Adding three distal wires to the basic construct had no noticeable effect. Better fixation power is achieved by using both proximal and distal screws (the locking-plate concept) in treating Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic fracture after THA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis: fracture union and reoperations in 60 consecutive fractures.

    PubMed

    Froberg, Lonnie; Troelsen, Anders; Brix, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Historically, the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFFs) has been associated with a high frequency of complications and reoperations. The preferred treatment is internal fixation, a revision of the femoral stem, or a combination of both. An improved understanding of plate use during internal fixation, and the introduction of locking-plate osteosynthesis may lead to improved outcome. We evaluated the outcome of Vancouver type B1 and C PFFs treated by locking-plate osteosynthesis, by assessing rates of fracture union and reoperations and by analyzing failure cases. From 2002 through 2011, 58 consecutive patients (60 fractures) with low-energy PFF around or below a stable femoral stem, i.e. Vancouver type B1 and C fractures, underwent osteosynthesis with a locking plate. All patients had a total hip replacement (THR). They were followed up clinically and radiographically, with 6 weeks between visits, until fracture union or until death. Fracture union was evaluated 6 months postoperatively. At a median follow-up time of 23 (0-121) months after PFF, 8 patients (8 fractures) had been reoperated due either to infection (n = 4), failure of fixation (n = 3), or loosening of the femoral stem (n = 1). All the patients who had been followed up for at least 6 months-and who did not undergo reoperation or die-went on to fracture union (n = 43). Locking-plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic Vancouver type B1 and C fractures gives good results regarding fracture union. It appears that spanning of the prosthesis to avoid stress-rising areas is important for successful treatment. Infection is the major cause of failure.

  8. [Periprosthetic Acetabulum Fractures].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, A J; Stuby, F; de Zwart, P M; Ochs, B G

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to periprosthetic fractures of the femur, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare complications - both primary fractures and fractures in revision surgery. This topic is largely under-reported in the literature; there are a few case reports and no long term results. Due to an increase in life expectancy, the level of patients' activity and the number of primary joint replacements, one has to expect a rise in periprosthetic complications in general and periprosthetic acetabular fractures in particular. This kind of fracture can be intra-, peri- or postoperative. Intraoperative fractures are especially associated with insertion of cementless press-fit acetabular components or revision surgery. Postoperative periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are usually related to osteolysis, for example, due to polyethylene wear. There are also traumatic fractures and fractures missed intraoperatively that lead to some kind of insufficiency fracture. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are treated conservatively if the implant is stable and the fracture is not dislocated. If surgery is needed, there are many possible different surgical techniques and challenging approaches. That is why periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum should be treated by experts in pelvic surgery as well as revision arthroplasty and the features specific to the patient, fracture and prosthetic must always be considered. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Periprosthetic acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Francesco; Formagnana, Mario; Bargagliotti, Marco; Perticarini, Loris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the acetabular periprosthetic fractures. This article explores the current literature on the epidemiology, causes and classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. Integrating data with the experience of the authors, it offers a guide to diagnosis and possible therapeutic strategies. Intra-operative fractures can occur during rasping, reaming or implant impaction, and they must be treated immediately if the component(s) is (are) unstable. Post-operative fractures can be due to major trauma (acute fractures) or minor forces in bone osteolysis; it is possible to plan reconstruction and fixation according to fracture characteristics. Treatment choice depends upon fracture site and implant stability. Periprosthetic acetabular fractures are uncommon complications that can occur intra-operatively or post-operatively, and a reconstructive surgeon must be able to manage the procedure. Accurate planning and reconstruction implant are necessary to achieve good cup stability.

  10. Infection in periprosthetic hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Fracture around the acetabulum and femur in total hip arthroplasty is a possible complication, sometimes with difficult surgical solution, namely when a sepsis is present. Periprosthetic hip fractures were classified according to a modified Vancouver classification. We treated 112 patients (67 men and 45 women) with periprosthetic hip fractures: 105 femoral fractures (94%) and seven acetabular fractures (6%). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years. For Type A (seven cases - 7%), B1 (10 cases - 10%) or C (13 cases - 12%) fractures around well fixed femoral stems we only fixed the fractures. For Type B2 (17 cases - 16%), B3 (46 cases - 44%) and D (12 cases - 11%, with associated fractures, not contemplated in the Vancouver classification) we used an uncemented long femoral stem, fixation with metallic cables and cancellous bone allografts to fill the femoral bone loss. We observed a deep infection in three patients (2.7%), three early hip dislocations treated by closed reductions, two cases with asymptomatic trochanteric non-union and one femoral refracture. In the three infection cases we performed two-stage revision with cementless hip prosthesis, using an antibiotic-loaded cement hip spacer (three to eight months), a six weeks period of parenteral antibiotics and we performed articular aspiration before revision surgery. Until now, we did not observe any re-infection. It is very important to make an early diagnosis, isolate micro-organisms and ensure their antibiotic susceptibility. The surgery solution depends on the well fixed implants and periprosthetic osteolysis and articular instability.

  11. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, J J; Kim, Y S; Pederson, D R; Brown, T D

    1999-04-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures during and after total hip replacement occur infrequently. Intraoperative fractures have risen with the use of press fit cementless fixation techniques and postoperative fractures are increasing because of the long-term problems associated with osteolysis. This article outlines the classification and management of these fractures.

  12. Periprosthetic fractures evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Masri, Bassam A; Meek, R M Dominic; Duncan, Clive P

    2004-03-01

    Periprosthetic fracture is a serious complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) that can be difficult to treat, and can be potentially fraught with complications. The incidence of such fractures is increasing, especially after the use of cementless revision arthroplasty. The prevention of these fractures is achieved by understanding the risk factors involved. If the risks are not understood, the best outcome is achieved when the surgeon has a thorough understanding of the principles of treatment of these fractures and has access to various fixation and prosthetic devices, and allograft bone when necessary. Acetabular fractures are rare and relatively little has been reported on their treatment. Periprosthetic femoral fracture treatment is based on the site of fracture, implant stability, and bone stock. The Vancouver classification offers a reproducible description of these factors with the subsequently easy formation of a treatment plan.

  13. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Helfet, David L; Ali, Arif

    2004-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty are uncommon, but are increasing in number and severity. These fractures may occur intraoperatively, during the perioperative period, or many years after the total hip arthroplasty. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum vary in severity and may involve stress fractures of the pubis or medial wall, significant bone loss secondary to osteolysis and subsequent loss of column integrity, or complete pelvic discontinuity. Treatment differs depending on the complexity of the fracture and the stability of the acetabular prosthesis. Surgical treatment for an unstable acetabulum should stabilize the bony columns of the acetabulum, provide bone grafting of defects, and should maintain adequate bone stock for replacement of a stable acetabular implant. Strict adherence to the principles of fracture surgery is required to achieve bony union of the acetabular columns and provide a stable environment for reimplantation of an acetabular component.

  14. Managing periprosthetic femoral stem fractures.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Aaron G

    2006-06-01

    Periprosthetic fractures can be difficult to manage. The classification system developed in Vancouver is simple and useful in determining appropriate treatment. It takes into account the site of the fracture, the stability of the implant, and the surrounding bone stock, which are the important elements of the fracture and hip that determines treatment. Understanding this classification system should allow the practitioner to choose the appropriate treatment. In addition to fracture management skills, understanding how to perform a host of hip revision technique may also be required.

  15. [Classification of periprosthetic shoulder fractures].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Kirchhoff, S; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The key targets in the treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are the preservation of bone, successful bony consolidation and provision of a stable anchoring of the prosthesis with the major goal of restoring the shoulder-arm function. A substantial problem of periprosthetic shoulder fractures is the fact that treatment is determined not only by the fracture itself but also by the implanted prosthesis and its function. Consequently, the exact preoperative shoulder function and, in the case of an implanted anatomical prosthesis, the status and function of the rotator cuff need to be assessed in order to clarify the possibility of a secondarily occurring malfunction. Of equal importance in this context is the type of implanted prosthesis. The existing classification systems of Wright and Cofield, Campbell et al., Groh et al. and Worland et al. have several drawbacks from a shoulder surgeon's point of view, such as a missing reference to the great variability of the available prostheses and the lack of an evaluation of rotator cuff function. The presented 6‑stage classification for the evaluation of periprosthetic fractures of the shoulder can be considered just as simple or complex to understand as the classification of the working group for osteosynthesis problems (AO, Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), depending on the viewpoint. From our point of view the classification presented here encompasses the essential points of the existing classification systems and also covers the otherwise missing points, which should be considered in the assessment of such periprosthetic fractures. The classification presented here should provide helpful assistance in the daily routine to find the most convenient form of therapy.

  16. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture associated with extensive osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Chatoo, M; Parfitt, J; Pearse, M F

    1998-10-01

    Periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum is an uncommon complication of total hip arthroplasty. The management is reported to be difficult, and complications such as nonunion and implant loosening are common. We described herein a case of nontraumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture associated with significant osteolysis, which was successfully managed by addressing the fracture and osteolysis independently.

  17. [Periprosthetic acetabular fractures in geriatric patients].

    PubMed

    Herath, S C; Rollmann, M F R; Histing, T; Holstein, J H; Pohlemann, T

    2017-02-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures in geriatric patients are rare injuries; however, the incidence is increasing because of the current demographic developments. For diagnosis of periprosthetic acetabular fractures, conventional X‑ray images are regularly complemented by computed tomography (CT). For exclusion of loosening of the prosthesis more advanced techniques, such as single photon emission CT (SPECT/CT) are applied. In addition to classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures by the traditional system of Letournel there are several other classification systems, which take into account the etiology of the fracture and the stability of the prosthesis. While, under certain circumstances conservative treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures is possible, operative treatment often requires extensive surgical procedures to restore the stability of the acetabulum as a support for the cup of the prosthesis. Besides the traditional techniques of acetabular osteosynthesis, special revision systems, augmentations and allografts are used for the reconstruction of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. To determine a therapeutic regimen patient-specific preconditions as well as fracture pattern and type of prosthesis need to be taken into account. In the literature there are several algorithms, which are aimed at supporting the attending physician in making the correct decision for the treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. In cases of periprosthetic acetabular fractures even experienced surgeons are faced with great challenges. Thus, treatment should be carried out in specialized centers.

  18. [Investigate progress of intraoperative periprosthetic fracture of total hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2011-02-01

    One of the complications of total hip arthroplasty is intraoperative periprosthetic fracture. Periprosthetic fracture is divided into acetabular fracture and femoral fracture. Risk factors for intraoperative periprosthetic fracture include use of minimally invasive techniques, press-fit cementless stems, revision operations and osteoporosis. It has been recognized that treatment of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures should be based on the classification of the Vancouver system for intraoperative fractures.

  19. Treatment algorithm of acetabular periprosthetic fractures.

    PubMed

    Simon, Paul; von Roth, Philipp; Perka, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum represent a rare incident in primary and revision total hip arthroplasty. The management of these fractures can be challenging. At present, there are no reliable guidelines for the treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. Periprosthetic acetabular fractures can occur intra-operatively, in particular during insertion of non-cemented cups or in the context of revision surgery. Post-operative causes for periprosthetic acetabular fractures are traumatic events or, more commonly, pelvic discontinuity due to severe bone loss related to osteolysis. Despite their aetiology, the main objective of surgery is to achieve a stable acetabular component and fracture. While stable fractures and implants could be treated non-operatively, unstable fractures require surgery to achieve component stability and allow appropriate biological fixation of the revision cup. Assessment of the stability plays a crucial role before determining the treatment strategy. There is a large variety of surgical techniques available for the management of these fractures. This review article outlines the epidemiology, aetiology and current classification systems, and provides a distinct diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures.

  20. Periprosthetic proximal femur fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Vegari, David N

    2011-06-01

    With the increase in demand for total hip and knee arthroplasty, the orthopaedic community has seen a dramatic increase in periprosthetic fractures. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with these fractures, the orthopaedic surgeon needs to be prepared to deal with this difficult problem. The purpose of this article is to provide the surgeon with an algorithmic approach that allows for easy classification and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur. Such an approach should prevent the mismanagement of these complications.

  1. Periprosthetic Femur Fracture Occuring after Contralateral Neglected Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Deniz; Toprak, Ali; IKilic, Enver; Bingol, Olgun; Tabak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are uncommon, but at times may lead to complications especially in elderly patients. As treatment of these fractures is difficult, prevention by identifying the risk factors is the best way to overcome these complex problems. Case Report: A periprosthetic right femur fracture associated with a neglected left femoral neck fracture in the contralateral femur in a 78-year-old elder woman patient is reported in the present article. We discuss the prevention of periprosthetic fractures after hip arthroplasty and address the risk factors associated with this complication. Conclusion: The present case emphasizes the importance of investigating and treating the cause of sudden onset of restriction on full weight-bearing in the contralateral limb, to prevent periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty in elderly patients. PMID:27299115

  2. Periprosthetic fractures around total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, SS; Patel, S; Reading, G; El-Husseiny, M; Douglas, S; Haddad, FS

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The number of total knee arthroplasties performed continues to rise annually and it would be expected that complications, which include periprosthetic fractures, will also therefore become more commonplace. This article reviews the current literature regarding this injury and identifies the treatment principles that enable patients to regain optimal function. METHODS A comprehensive search of the Pubmed and Embase™ databases was performed to identify relevant articles. Keywords and MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms included in the search strategy were ‘periprosthetic fracture(s)’, ‘femur’, ‘tibia’, ‘patella(r)’, ‘complication(s)’, ‘failure(s)’, ‘risk(s)’, ‘prevalence’, ‘incidence’, ‘epidemiology’ and ‘classification(s)’. The search was limited to all articles published in English and reference lists from the original articles were reviewed to identify pertinent articles to include in this review. A total number of 43 studies were identified. RESULTS Common treatment aims have been identified when managing patients with a periprosthetic fracture around total knee arthoplasty. The main criterion that determines which option to choose is the degree of remaining bone stock and the amount of fracture displacement. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of a periprosthetic fracture around total knee arthroplasty will either be non-operative, osteosynthesis or revision arthroplasty. It is imperative that a suitable option is chosen and based on the published literature, pathways are outlined to aid the surgeon. PMID:22943223

  3. [Principles of management of periprosthetic fractures].

    PubMed

    Röderer, G; Gebhard, F; Scola, A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing numbers of primary total hip and knee replacements have subsequently led to growing rates of periprosthetic fractures. In many cases geriatric patients with osteopenia or osteoporotic bone quality are affected. The goal of treatment is the retention or reconstruction of joint function using open reduction and internal fixation or a revision prosthesis. The aim of this article is a description of the basic principles of treatment of periprosthetic fractures of the lower extremities. An exact description of the fracture using current classification systems with imaging diagnostics is mandatory. This also includes an assessment of the stability of the prosthesis. In the case of a stable prosthesis and a good bone stock open reduction and internal fixation should be performed. In these cases locking plates are standard procedure. If fracture reduction is possible minimally invasive procedures can be performed which help to reduce the surgical trauma and accelerate rehabilitation. If the prosthesis is loose it has to be exchanged for a revision implant. If vast bony defects result they can be augmented using wedges. Conservative treatment plays only a subordinate role in selected cases. Periprosthetic fractures show an increasing incidence and occur more frequently in the geriatric patient population. Due to comorbidities and poor bone quality surgical treatment is a challenge. The fracture must be exactly classified using the appropriate classification system in order to clarify if the prosthesis can be retained or if it has to be exchanged.

  4. [Distal femoral periprosthetic fractures: classification and therapy].

    PubMed

    Tomás, T; Nachtnebl, L; Otiepka, P

    2010-06-01

    Periprosthetic fracture is one of the most serious complication of total knee arthroplasty. In our retrospective clinical study we designed our classification with rules for treatment of those fractures. During the last thirty years we treated 53 distal femoral periprosthetic fractures in our orthopaedic department. In our clinical study we reviewed our group of distal femoral periprosthetic fractures with on the basis of X-ray findings, the treatment method used and treatment outcomes. According to our findings we divided distal femoral periprosthetic fractures into six groups: Type I Nondisplaced fractures, 5.7%; treatment failure rate, 33%. Type II a Fractures with lateral comminution (the most often type of fractures), 37.7%; treatment failure rate, 20%. Type II b Fractures with medial comminution, 7.5%; treatment failure rate, 60%. Type II c Fractures above TKA (the second most often type), 34%; treatment failure rate, 18%. Type II d Comminuted fractures, 5.7%; treatment failure rate, 18%. Type IIIFractures with loosening of TKA, 9.4%; treatment failure rate, 20%. For the treatment of fractures we used various methods according to the type of fracture: Plate osteosynthesis in 32 cases, with failure in seven. Three failures in IIa group due to incorrect osteosynthesis with condylar plate, treated by reosteosteosynthesis with same implant. One in IIb group treated primarily with cement plomb, after second failure treated with revision total knee arthroplasty. Two failures in IIc group, treated by reosteosynthesis with spongioplasty using the same implant. One failure in III group solved with revision TKA. Intramedullary nail in nine cases , with failure in two. One failure in IIb group treated by reosteosynthesis with condylar plate and cement plombage. One in IIc group due to infection, solved with extraction of material and second stage revision TKA. Conservative treatment in three cases,with failure in two. One in I group treated with condylar plate. One in

  5. PERIPROSTHETIC FRACTURES IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; De Bortoli, Giovani; Ventura Vieira, Inácio Facó; Uliana, Christiano Saliba

    2015-01-01

    The increasing number of total knee arthroplasties, in combination with the population's longer life expectancy, has led to a greater number of long-term complications. These add to the poor bone quality of elderly patients and often culminate in periprosthetic fractures. This complex orthopedic problem has a great diversity of clinical presentation. It may affect any of the bones in the knee and, because of the difficulty in finding solutions, may lead to disastrous outcomes. Its treatment requires that orthopedists should have broad knowledge both of arthroplasty techniques and of osteosynthesis, as well as an elaborate therapeutic arsenal including, for example, access to a bone bank. PMID:27022546

  6. A Review of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Associated With Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Daniel; Mears, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur in association with total hip arthroplasty are increasingly common and often difficult to treat. Patients with periprosthetic fractures are typically elderly and frail and have osteoporosis. No clear consensus exists regarding the optimal management strategy because there is limited high-quality research. The Vancouver classification facilitates treatment decisions. In the presence of a stable prosthesis (type-B1 and -C fractures), most authors recommend surgical stabilization of the fracture with plates, strut grafts, or a combination thereof. In up to 20% of apparent Vancouver type-B1 fractures, the femoral stem is loose, which may explain the high failure rates associated with open reduction and internal fixation. Some authors recommend routine opening and dislocation of the hip to perform an intraoperative stem stability test to rule out a loose component. Advances in plating techniques and technology are improving the outcomes for these fractures. For fractures around a loose femoral prosthesis (types B2 and 3), revision using an extensively porous-coated uncemented long stem, with or without additional fracture fixation, appears to offer the most reliable outcome. Cement-in-cement revision using a long-stem prosthesis is feasible in elderly patients with a well-fixed cement mantle. It is essential to treat the osteoporosis to help fracture healing and to prevent further fractures. We provide an overview of the causes, classification, and management of periprosthetic femoral fractures around a total hip arthroplasty based on the current best available evidence. PMID:23569704

  7. Management and outcome of periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Schuster, Rupert; Aldrian, Silke; Prosquill, Stella; Krumboeck, Anna; Zehetgruber, Isabella; Kovar, Florian; Schwameis, Katrin; Vécsei, Vilmos

    2010-06-01

    The incidence of periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty is continuously rising because of an increasing number of knee joint replacements and an enhanced survivorship of the elderly population after knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to analyze the practicability and effectiveness of the various treatment methods for management of periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty, and to determine the clinical and radiographic long-term results of patients following surgical and nonoperative treatment of these injuries. We reviewed the clinical and radiographic records of 41 patients (31 women and 10 men; average age, 78.6 years) with periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty between 1992 and 2008. Thirty-seven patients showed a periprosthetic fracture of the distal femur, and four patients had a periprosthetic proximal tibial fracture. Thirty-six patients underwent operative stabilization by plate fixation (n = 18), intramedullary nailing (n = 15) or revision arthroplasty (n = 3), and five patients were treated nonoperatively by long-term cast immobilization. Twenty-eight patients returned to their preinjury activity level and were satisfied with their clinical outcome. In 10 patients, we saw a relevant decrease of knee function and severe limitations in gait and activities of daily living. Three patients died related to surgery. Successful fracture healing within 6 months was achieved in 33 (87%) of 38 patients. Failures of reduction or fixation occurred in 8 (21%) of 38 patients. Reoperation due to technical failures was necessary in three patients. Compared with current data in literature, we had a satisfactory outcome in following individualized treatment of periprosthetic fractures after knee joint replacement. Referring to the wide field of treatment options and high rates of complications, periprosthetic femoral fractures around the knee commonly constitute a challenging problem for the treating surgeons and

  8. Complications of total hip arthroplasty: periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Chitre, Amol; Wynn Jones, Henry; Shah, Nikhil; Clayson, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are a rare but potentially disastrous complication of total hip arthroplasty. Such fractures occur either as early perioperative complications or late complications when they are associated with either significant trauma or as a result of the loss of the structural integrity of the bone supporting the prosthesis, such as aseptic osteolysis. The incidence of such fractures appears to be increasing with the increased use of uncemented acetabular components. This article explores the current literature on the epidemiology, etiology, and classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures as well as offering potential treatment strategies.

  9. Atypical periprosthetic acetabular fracture in long-term alendronate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Giuseppe; Capone, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bisphosphonates have been commonly used in the treatment of osteoporosis, demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction. However, even if are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about atypical fractures related to its prolonged use. Although atypical femoral fracture are more common, case reports demonstrated that even other skeletal areas can be involved by unusual pattern of fracture. We report a atypical acetabular periprosthetic fracture in a 83-year-old female patient after prolonged alendronate treatment for osteoporosis and isolated acetabular revision surgery. The patient underwent to clinical, bioumoral and radiological evaluation and all the history cases were fully reported. We believe this periprosthetic fracture, according to the available data, may have similar underlying pathology to atypical femoral fractures. Awareness of symptoms, in addition to a regular radiographic survey may facilitate early diagnosis and possible prevention of spontaneous periprosthetic fractures, in patients receiving bisphosphonate therapy beyond 5 years. The treatment of this atypical periprosthetic fracture should include both surgical than pharmacological therapy to obtained bone healing. PMID:28228784

  10. Atypical periprosthetic acetabular fracture in long-term alendronate therapy.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Giuseppe; Capone, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have been commonly used in the treatment of osteoporosis, demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction. However, even if are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about atypical fractures related to its prolonged use. Although atypical femoral fracture are more common, case reports demonstrated that even other skeletal areas can be involved by unusual pattern of fracture. We report a atypical acetabular periprosthetic fracture in a 83-year-old female patient after prolonged alendronate treatment for osteoporosis and isolated acetabular revision surgery. The patient underwent to clinical, bioumoral and radiological evaluation and all the history cases were fully reported. We believe this periprosthetic fracture, according to the available data, may have similar underlying pathology to atypical femoral fractures. Awareness of symptoms, in addition to a regular radiographic survey may facilitate early diagnosis and possible prevention of spontaneous periprosthetic fractures, in patients receiving bisphosphonate therapy beyond 5 years. The treatment of this atypical periprosthetic fracture should include both surgical than pharmacological therapy to obtained bone healing.

  11. Acute periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Potty, Anish G; Corona, Jacqueline; Manning, Blaine T; Le, Amanda; Saleh, Khaled J

    2014-01-01

    Although periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are relatively uncommon after total hip arthroplasty, a variety of patient-, surgeon-, and implant-related risk factors can contribute to the occurrence of this serious complication. These risk factors, combined with the increased use of cementless acetabular cups, will likely result in an increased prevalence of these fractures in the future. By better understanding the risk factors, classification schemes, and treatment options for periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum, orthopaedic surgeons can achieve better outcomes for their patients.

  12. Periprosthetic femoral fractures after hemiarthroplasty. An analysis of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Huerta, M; Roces-Fernández, A; Mencía-Barrio, R; Alonso-Barrio, J A; Ramos-Pascua, L R

    2015-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures after hemiarthroplasty and analyze their treatment. An observational, longitudinal, retrospective study was conducted on a series of 17 patients with periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip hemiarthroplasty. Fourteen fractures were treated surgically. The characteristics of patients, fractures and treatment outcomes in terms of complications, mortality and functionality were analyzed. The large majority (82%) of patients were women, the mean age was 86 years and with an ASA index of 3 or 4 in 15 patients. Ten fractures were type B. There were 8 general complications, one deep infection, one mobilization of a non-exchanged hemiarthroplasty, and 2 non-unions. There were 85% consolidated fractures, and only 5 patients recovered the same function prior to the injury. At the time of the study 9 patients had died (53%). Periprosthetic femoral fractures after hemiarthroplasty will increase in the coming years and their treatment is difficult. Periprosthetic femoral fractures after hemiarthroplasty are more common in women around 90 years-old, and usually occur in patients with significant morbidity. Although the Vancouver classification is reliable, simple and reproducible, it is only a guide to decide on the best treatment in a patient often fragile. The preoperative planning is essential when deciding a surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Periprosthetic Fracture of the Ulna—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, David; Schweizer, Andreas; Nagy, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    After resection of the radial head, the load transmission through the forearm is changed dramatically. Most of the axial load is transmitted to the ulna. This can happen through the interosseous membrane, if intact, thus preventing proximal migration of theradius. However, radial head resection entails some slacking of the interosseous membrane, thereby reducing its ability to transmit load. In traumatic lesions of the interosseous membrane there is no limit to the proximal migration of the radius until the ulnar head abuts on the carpus. In both cases the load transmitted by the ulna increases dramatically and can promote fractures thereof. A 52-year-old, right-handed male patient presented with a periprosthetic fracture of the right ulna 6 weeks after implantation of an ulna head prosthesis. He had previously undergone radial head excision for malunion of the radial head and secondary humeroradial osteoarthritis. This operation had reduced pain and improved the range of motion at the elbow but entailed degenerative arthritis and related symptoms at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). From the spectrum of possible treatment options, ulnar head resurfacing/hemiprosthesis was elected and performed without intraoperative or postoperative irregularities. However, 6 weeks postoperatively, as he was lifting a heavy object, a periprosthetic fracture of the ulna occurred, which ultimately was treated successfully by open reduction and plate fixation. Plate fixation of periprosthetic fractures is an established treatment concept after excluding implant loosening. Periprosthetic fracture of the ulna seems to be a rare complication but can be treated similarly. PMID:25945299

  14. Plate failure following plate osteosynthesis in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Boesmueller, Sandra; Baumbach, Sebastian F; Hofbauer, Marcus; Wozasek, Gerald E

    2015-10-01

    Increasing numbers of total knee and hip arthroplasties result in a growing number of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PPFF). PPFF with a stable stem component are treated commonly with plate osteosynthesis. Therefore plate failure is seen as a major complication. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the patients' outcome after plate failure. The database of a Level 1 trauma center was searched for all patients treated for a PPFF with plate osteosynthesis. Patients with plate failure were investigated specifically. Standard demographic data, details on initial arthroplasty, trauma, and treatment were recorded for all patients. All fractures were classified and their outcome reviewed. Seven (8.8%) out of 80 patients treated with plate osteosynthesis following PPFF met our inclusion criterion being plate failure. All these patients were female, with an average age at primary surgery of 74 ± 13 years and a mean follow-up of 885 days (range, 264-2549). Four patients suffered a PPFF after total hip arthroplasty (THA) (2 Vancouver Type B1 and 2 Type C) and three after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (Lewis-Rorabeck Type II). Following plate failure, four patients healed uneventfully and three patients experienced complications such as pseudarthrosis, screw loosening, and further plate failure. In patients with poor bone quality, bone graft, bone cement, and bone biologics have to be considered in revision surgery. Furthermore, long-stem revision and tumor prosthesis are an additional solution.

  15. Navigated percutaneous screw fixation of a periprosthetic acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Gras, Florian; Marintschev, Ivan; Klos, Kajetan; Fujak, Albert; Mückley, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2010-10-01

    Periprosthetic fractures are severe complications of total hip arthroplasty with increasing incidence. Most fractures are localized around the femoral component of prosthesis, whereas periacetabular fractures are rare and their management is difficult. In most cases, an operative procedure with revision and exchange of the acetabular cup is necessary. The approaches are demanding and an increased risk of complications is reported. We present the case of a female patient with a cementless total hip arthroplasty due to severe arthritis, suffering of an infratectal transverse periprosthetic fracture. After an initial conservative treatment attempt, we performed a minimally invasive screw fixation using navigated 2-dimensional fluoroscopic guidance. In this report, the literature for treatment recommendations is reviewed and the chosen navigation technique discussed. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of fracture fixation constructs using a variable-angle locked periprosthetic femur plate system.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Martin F; Burgers, Travis A; Mason, James J; Williams, Bart O; Sietsema, Debra L; Jones, Clifford B

    2014-07-01

    In the United States there are more than 230,000 total hip replacements annually, and periprosthetic femoral fractures occur in 0.1-4.5% of those patients. The majority of these fractures occur at the tip of the stem (Vancouver type B1). The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanically stability and strength of three fixation constructs and identify the most desirable construct. Fifteen medium adult synthetic femurs were implanted with a hip prosthesis and were osteotomized in an oblique plane at the level of the implant tip to simulate a Vancouver type B1 periprosthetic fracture. Fractures were fixed with a non-contact bridging periprosthetic proximal femur plate (Zimmer Inc., Warsaw, IN). Three proximal fixation methods were used: Group 1, bicortical screws; Group 2, unicortical screws and one cerclage cable; and Group 3, three cerclage cables. Distally, all groups had bicortical screws. Biomechanical testing was performed using an axial-torsional testing machine in three different loading modalities (axial compression, lateral bending, and torsional/sagittal bending), next in axial cyclic loading to 10,000 cycles, again in the three loading modalities, and finally to failure in torsional/sagittal bending. Group 1 had significantly greater load to failure and was significantly stiffer in torsional/sagittal bending than Groups 2 and 3. After cyclic loading, Group 2 had significantly greater axial stiffness than Groups 1 and 3. There was no difference between the three groups in lateral bending stiffness. The average energy absorbed during cyclic loading was significantly lower in Group 2 than in Groups 1 and 3. Bicortical screw placement achieved the highest load to failure and the highest torsional/sagittal bending stiffness. Additional unicortical screws improved axial stiffness when using cable fixation. Lateral bending was not influenced by differences in proximal fixation. To treat periprosthetic fractures, bicortical screw placement should be

  17. Intraoperative Periprosthetic Femur Fracture: A Biomechanical Analysis of Cerclage Fixation.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Nicholas B; Charters, Michael A; Sikora-Klak, Jakub; Banglmaier, Richard F; Oravec, Daniel J; Silverton, Craig D

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative periprosthetic femur fracture is a known complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA) and a variety of cerclage systems are available to manage these fractures. The purpose of this study was to examine the in situ biomechanical response of cerclage systems for fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures that occur during cementless THA. We compared cobalt chrome (CoCr) cables, synthetic cables, monofilament wires and hose clamps under axial compressive and torsional loading. Metallic constructs with a positive locking system performed the best, supporting the highest loads with minimal implant subsidence (both axial and angular) after loading. Overall, the CoCr cable and hose clamp had the highest construct stiffness and least reduction in stiffness with increased loading. They were not demonstrably different from each other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures with modular stems.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Fernandez-Lombardia, Jesus; de los Rios, Jimena Llorens; Perez-Coto, Ivan; Iglesias-Fernandez, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the efficacy of modular femoral stems for the treatment of certain post-operative periprosthetic fractures in patients with hip arthroplasty. Of a total series of 61 modular revision stems, 17 were used to address periprosthetic femoral fractures and 12 of these are the object of this study. The average follow-up was 3.7 years (range 1-14 years). The evaluations were performed at three and six months, and then annually using the HHS score and radiographic studies for the assessment of loosening, subsidence and bone integration of the stem. Seven cases had type B2 fractures and five type B3 ones. All patients walked freely, eight of them using canes. HHS improved to a post-operative mean of 78 (range 72-83). Radiographically, fracture healing was observed at three months in nine cases. In six cases stem subsidence of a mean of 3.9 mm (range 2-12 mm) was observed, which stabilized a year following implantation and did not need revision surgery. In two cases a subsequent dislocation (at three and seven months after surgery) occurred, which were treated with constrained acetabular systems. In nine cases hypotrophy of the cortex in the diaphyseal area was noted, which did not alter the patients' clinical course. Modular femoral stems are an acceptable treatment in type B2 and B3 periprosthetic fractures.

  19. Patient factors Predict Periprosthetic Fractures Following Revision Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Jensen, Matthew; Lewallen, David

    2011-01-01

    We assessed important patient risk factors for postoperative periprosthetic fractures after revision total hip replacement (THR) using prospectively collected Institutional Joint Registry data. We used univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analyses. There were 330 postoperative periprosthetic fractures after 6,281 revision THRs. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, hazard [95% confidence interval] of periprosthetic fracture was higher for: women, 1.66 [1.32, 2.08], p<0.001; higher Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index of 2, 1.46 (1.03, 2.07) and index of 3+, 2.01 (1.48, 2.73), overall p<0.001; and operative diagnosis, especially previous non-union, 5.76 (2.55, 13.02), overall p<0.001. Hazard was lower in 61–70 year old, 0.64 (0.49, 0.84) and 71–80 year old 0.57 (0.43, 0.76), compared to <60 years (overall p<0.0001). Our study identified important modifiable and unmodifiable risk factors for fractures after revision THR. PMID:22342128

  20. Periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peterson, C A; Lewallen, D G

    1996-08-01

    Eleven patients who had sustained a periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum at a mean of 6.2 years (range, one month to thirteen years) after a total hip arthroplasty were managed at our institution between 1985 and 1991. Five patients had a fracture of the medial wall; three, a fracture of the posterior column; two, a transverse fracture; and one, a fracture of the anterior column. Six fractures were displaced by two millimeters or more. Eight fractures were caused by blunt trauma or a fall, and three occurred spontaneously. A fracture was classified as type 1 if the acetabular component was clinically and radiographically stable (eight patients) and as type 2 if the component was unstable (three patients). One patient, who had a displaced type-2 fracture of the posterior column, died of an associated intrapelvic vascular injury. The other two patients who had a type-2 fracture were managed with revision of the acetabular component without supplemental plate fixation, immediately after the diagnosis of the fracture. The eight patients who had a type-1 fracture initially were managed with limitation of weight-bearing or modification of activity; in six of these patients, the fracture united without additional treatment. The ten surviving patients were followed for a mean of sixty-two months after the fracture. Eight of these patients-including four in whom a type-1 fracture had united after non-operative treatment-had a revision of the acetabular component because of pain, loosening, or non-union by the time of the most recent follow-up. Two patients (one of whom had a type-1 fracture and the other, a type-2 fracture) had multiple revisions of the acetabular component; both had supplemental internal fixation with a plate. All ten patients ultimately had a stable, functioning prosthesis. We conclude that periprosthetic acetabular fractures are associated with a poor prognosis with regard to the survival of the acetabular component but that it is possible to

  1. Proximal femoral replacement for the treatment of periprosthetic fractures.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gregg R; Parvizi, Javad; Rapuri, Venkat; Wolf, Christopher F; Hozack, William J; Sharkey, Peter F; Purtill, James J

    2005-08-01

    A periprosthetic fracture around the femoral component is a rare but potentially problematic complication after total hip arthroplasty. Reconstruction can be challenging, especially when severe bone stock deficiency is encountered. Proximal femoral replacement is one method of treating the severely deficient proximal part of the femur. The present report describes the outcomes of revision total hip arthroplasty with use of a proximal femoral replacement in a cohort of patients who had a Vancouver type-B3 periprosthetic fracture. With use of a computerized institutional database, all patients in whom a Vancouver type-B3 fracture (characterized by severe proximal bone deficiency and a loose femoral stem) had been treated with a proximal femoral replacement were identified. A modular femoral replacement with proximal porous coating had been used in all cases. The twenty-one patients who were identified had had a mean age of 78.3 years (range, fifty-two to ninety years) at the time of the index operation. The clinical and radiographic records of these patients were reviewed. At the time of the latest follow-up (mean, 3.2 years), all but one of the patients were able to walk and had minimal to no pain. Complications included persistent wound drainage that was treated with incision and drainage (two hips), dislocation (two hips), refracture of the femur distal to the stem (one hip), and acetabular cage failure (one hip). Despite a relatively high complication rate, we believe that proximal femoral replacement is a viable option for the treatment of periprosthetic fractures in older patients with severe bone deficiency. If a proximal femoral replacement is used, the stability of the hip must be tested diligently intraoperatively and a constrained acetabular liner should be utilized if instability is encountered. In order to enhance the bone stock, the proximal part of the femur, however poor in quality, should be retained for reapproximation onto the implant.

  2. Impaction bone grafting and cemented stem revision in periprosthetic hip fractures: a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Dearden, Paul M; Bobak, Peter P; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2014-01-01

    With an ageing population, and increasing longevity of hip arthroplasty prostheses, the incidence of periprosthetic femoral fractures is rising. We present a simple and easily reproducible technique for reduction of any periprosthetic fracture that requires bone graft augmentation. This method facilitates impaction bone grafting to reconstitute lost bone stock and revision using a cemented implant.

  3. Systematic review of periprosthetic tibia fracture after total knee arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Ray, Joseph R; Wandtke, Meghan E; Buchanan, Grant S; Sanford, Chris G; Liu, Jiayong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the known incidences, treatment options, and related outcomes of periprosthetic tibia fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: A literature search was done to identify studies that fit the inclusion criteria. The database search yielded 185 results, which were further reduced by the exclusion criteria to 13 papers, totaling 157 patients that met these criteria. Incidence rates of the different types of periprosthetic tibia fractures were determined and their treatments were subsequently analyzed based on the fracture’s subclass, with patient outcomes being overall favorable. RESULTS: Of the 144 documented patients, 54 (37.5%) had a subclass C fracture, which are frequently seen in revision arthroplasties or when using cement intraoperatively. The fractures of subclasses A and B occur postoperatively. There were 90 subclass A and B fractures with incidences of 18.75% and 43.75% respectively. When broken down by type, 62 (55.36%) were type 1, 24 (21.4%) were type 2, 24 (21.4%) were type 3, and 2 (1.8%) were type 4. Furthermore, from the studies that included origin of injury, the types were further classified as having non-traumatic or traumatic origins. Type 1 had 78% (40/51) non-traumatic origin and 22% (11/51) traumatic origin. Fifteen fractures were type 2, but 5 were falls and 1 through a motor vehicle accident, giving a trauma causation of 40% (6/15). Of the 24 type 3 fractures, 12 were falls and 2 vehicular accidents, leading to a trauma causation of 58% (14/24). CONCLUSION: Type 1 fractures were the most common. Subclass A was treated with locking plates, B required a revision TKA, and C was treated intraoperatively or nonoperatively. PMID:26396942

  4. [Treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures after total hip arthroplasty with specially constructed retrograde hollow nails].

    PubMed

    Szalay, G; Meyer, C; Mika, J; Schnettler, R; Thormann, U

    2014-12-01

    Treatment of periprosthetic fractures by implantation of a specially constructed, retrograde hollow nail which fits over the tip of the prosthesis and becomes locked on it. Periprosthetic femoral fractures with firmly anchored prosthesis shaft after total hip arthroplasty of types B1 and C according to the Vancouver classification. Loosened prosthesis (type B2/B3) and trochanteric fractures (type A). Broken or damaged prosthesis, florid inflammation and soft tissue injuries in the operation field, contracted knee joint, advanced deformation in the knee joint and distal femur, enclosed prosthesis and general contraindications. In a supine position the periprosthetic fracture is exposed via a lateral access. For cemented prostheses the cement is removed around the tip of the prosthesis (at least 2-3 cm) and medullary cavity. Arthrotomy with flexion of the knee joint and marking of the nail entry point. Drill the medullary cavity, retrograde introduction of the nail, visually fit the nail over the tip of the prosthesis and lock the nail with the prosthesis. If necessary use additional spongiosaplasty or also placement of additional cerclages depending on fracture type and size of the defect zone. Lock the nail distally. Use intraoperative radiological imaging to control correct positioning and length of the nail. Close the wound layer by layer with placement of suction drainage devices and dressing. Partial loading for 6 weeks with a subsequent pain-adapted loading gradient until full loading is possible. If selective partial loading is not possible, a decision must be made in individual cases as to whether the intraoperative findings allow immediate full loading. From 2004 to 2011 a total of 25 periprosthetic femoral fractures in 25 patients were treated in 2 locations using specially constructed slotted hollow nails. Within the framework of a retrospective study 20 of these patients (16 female and 4 male; average age 77.2 [72-84] years) were clinically and

  5. Periprosthetic humeral fractures after reverse shoulder arthroplasty. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wajnsztejn, Andre; Foni, Noel Oizerovici; Oizerovici, Dan; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Ejnisman, Benno

    2017-09-21

    Periprosthetic fractures is a severe complication after joint replacement. The rapidly increase of reverse shoulder arthroplasty surgeries, periprosthetic humeral fractures, which are described as rare, may increase in the near future. We report the case of displaced humeral fracture bellow the stem of reverse shoulder prosthesis. The patient was an 85-year-old woman who had a total shoulder replacement 6 years previously. The surgical solution consisted of plate osteossynthesis and cerclage. This report describes an unprecedented case in Brazilian literature; and gives an overview of the existing literature including this injury classification. RESUMO As fraturas periprotéticas do ombro representam uma grave complicação após a substituição da articulação. Devido ao rápido aumento do número de cirurgias de artroplastia reversa no ombro, as fraturas periprótese do úmero, descritas como raras, podem aumentar no futuro próximo. Descrevemos um caso de fratura desviada do úmero abaixo do componente umeral de uma artroplastia reversa. A paciente era uma mulher de 85 anos de idade, que tinha uma artroplastia reversa do ombro há 6 anos. O tratamento cirúrgico consistiu em osteossíntese com placa, parafusos e cerclagem. Os objetivos do presente trabalho foram reportar um caso inédito na literatura brasileira, e revisar a literatura existente e as classificações da lesão.

  6. [Risk factors for failure of osteosynthesis. After periprosthetic fractures of the knee joint].

    PubMed

    Hanschen, M; Biberthaler, P

    2014-06-01

    The increasing number of implantations of total knee endoprostheses shows a correlation with an increase in revision operations and periprosthetic fractures. This article presents strategies for prevention of complications after open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of periprosthetic fractures in addition to the classification of periprosthetic fractures of the knee joint. Osteosynthetic treatment is only applicable in some of the cases. Although special periprosthetic, angle locking plates are available for osteosynthesis, treatment of periprosthetic fractures of the knee joint remains a challenge with a high complication rate. If the prosthesis becomes loosened, the prosthesis should be replaced and ORIF should not be performed. The risk factors for failure of osteosynthesis include the prosthesis model and the associated reduction of residual bone and the mostly osteoporotic bone structures.

  7. Enhancing fixation strength in periprosthetic femur fractures by orthogonal plating-A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Stoffel, Karl; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Klos, Kajetan; Kielstein, Heike; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2016-04-01

    Orthogonal plate osteosynthesis enhances fixation stability in periprosthetic femur fractures. Another option are locking attachment plates (LAP) allowing bicortical locking screw placement lateral to the prosthesis stem. Stability of lateral plate osteosynthesis with two LAP (2LAP) was compared to anterolateral orthogonal plate osteosynthesis (OP) with one LAP in a periprosthetic femur fracture model. In six pairs of fresh frozen human femora with cemented Charnley hip prosthesis, a transverse osteotomy was set distal to the tip of the prosthesis simulating a Vancouver type B1 fracture. Each pair was instrumented using a plate tensioner with either one lateral plate and two LAP, or two orthogonal anterolateral plates and one LAP. Stiffness was determined in a four-point-bending test prior to cyclic testing (2Hz) with physiologic profile and progressively increasing load up to catastrophic construct failure. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon-signed-rank test were used for statistical evaluation at a level of significance p = 0.05. The OP construct exhibited a significantly higher number of cycles and load to failure (39,627 cycles ± 4,056; 4,463 N ± 906) compared to the 2LAP construct (32,927 cycles ± 3,487; 3,793 N ± 849), p < 0.01. Mediolateral bending and torsional stiffness of the OP (1610 N/mm ± 249; 16.9 Nm/mm ± 6.3) were significantly higher compared to 2 LAP (1077 N/mm ± 189; 12.1 Nm/mm ± 3.9), p = 0.03 for both comparisons. Orthogonal plate osteosynthesis is a valuable option in periprosthetic fracture surgery, offering increased stability compared to a single lateral plate fixed with two LAP.

  8. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2011-01-28

    The purpose of this study is to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer or force response data from an instrument stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing will be conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem will be instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs will be compared: a monolithic impactor with an integrated load cell and accelerometer and a two piece impactor. Acceleration and force measurements will be taken in the direction of impaction. Signal processing techniques will be applied to the acceleration time histories to determine features that can be used to assess device seating and potential fracture. A consistent energy input will be applied using a drop tower. The effect of introducing compliance under the bone support vise will also be investigated. The ultimate goal of this study is to design an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental set-up, the signal processing techniques used and the subsequent results.

  9. The biomechanical effect of bone quality and fracture topography on locking plate fixation in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Leonidou, Andreas; Moazen, Mehran; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Graham, Simon M; Macheras, George A; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2015-02-01

    Optimal management of periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) around a well fixed prosthesis (Vancouver B1) remains controversial as adequate fixation needs to be achieved without compromising the stability of the prosthesis. The aim of this study was to highlight the effect of bone quality i.e. canal thickness ratio (CTR), and fracture topography i.e. fracture angle and its position in relation to the stem, on the biomechanics of a locking plate for a Vancouver B1 fracture. A previously corroborated simplified finite element model of a femur with a cemented total hip replacement stem was used in this study. Canal thickness ratio (CTR) and fracture topography were altered in several models and the effect of these variations on the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture displacement was studied. Increasing the CTR led to reduction of the von Mises stress on the locking plate as well as the fracture movement. In respect to the fracture angle with the medial cortex, it was shown that acute angles resulted in lower von Mises stress on the plate as opposed to obtuse angles. Furthermore, acute fracture angles resulted in lower fracture displacement compared to the other fractures considered here. Fractures around the tip of the stem had the same biomechanical effect on the locking plate. However, fractures more distal to the stem led to subsequent increase of stress, strain, and fracture displacement. Results highlight that in good bone quality and acute fracture angles, single locking plate fixation is perhaps an appropriate management method. On the contrary, for poor bone quality and obtuse fracture angles alternative management methods might be required as the fixation might be under higher risk of failure. Clinical studies for the management of PFF are required to further support our findings.

  10. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques for osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Brunner, U; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) is currently low and accounts for 0.6-2.4%. Due to an increase in the rate of primary implantations a quantitative increase of PHF is to be expected in the near future. The majority of PHF occur intraoperatively during implantation with an increased risk for cementless stems and when performing total arthroplasty. Additional risk factors are in particular female gender and the severity of comorbidities. In contrast, postoperative PHF mostly due to low-energy falls, have a prevalence between 0.6% and 0.9% and are significantly less common. The prognosis and functional outcome following revision by open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) essentially depend on a thorough assessment of the indications for revision surgery, the operative treatment and the pretraumatic functional condition of the affected shoulder. In the armamentarium of periprosthetic ORIF of the humerus cerclage systems and locking implants as well as a combination of both play a central role. In comminuted fractures with extensive defect zones, severely thinned cortex or extensive osteolysis a biological augmentation of the ORIF should be considered. In this context when the indications are correctly interpreted, especially in the case of a stable anchored stem, various groups have reported that a high bony union rate can be achieved. As the treatment of PHF is complex it should be performed in dedicated centers in order to adequately address potential comorbidities, especially in the elderly population.

  11. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cruce, Jesse R; Erwin, Jenny R; Remick, Kevin R; Cornwell, Phillip J; Menegini, R. Michael; Racanelli, Joe

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  12. Radiographic outcomes of cable-plate versus cable-grip fixation in periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Nodzo, Scott R; Oi, Kathryn; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2017-05-23

    Newer generation cable-plate designs are commonly used for periprosthetic proximal femur fractures; however, comparisons relative to cable-grips remain limited. The aim of this study was to compare radiographic healing rates of cable-plate versus cable-grip fixation for periprosthetic proximal femur fractures. Consecutive patients with an acute or chronic Vancouver A, B1, or B2 periprosthetic proximal femur fracture undergoing trochanteric fixation with a cable-plate (n = 46 cases) or cable-grip (n = 24 cases) system were identified retrospectively from a single-centre hospital database (mean follow-up 28 months [range 6-89 months]). Demographics, radiographic fracture healing, and complications were compared between the 2 groups. Radiographic union rates were not different between the cable-grip versus cable-plate group (67% vs. 76% respectively; p = 0.4). Healing rates of greater trochanteric fractures alone were not different between the cable-plate versus cable-grip groups (75% vs. 71% respectively; p = 0.38). The cable-plates were used for a more diverse range of fracture patterns relative to the cable-grips. An increased number of cables was associated with radiographic healing (odds ratio 14 [95% confidence interval 2-64]; p = 0.01), and body mass index had a negative correlation with radiographic healing (odds ratio -0.4 [95% confidence interval 0.5-0.9]. Similar rates of periprosthetic fracture healing were seen using a cable-grip versus cable-plate system; however, the cable-plate system could be used for a more diverse range of fracture patterns.

  13. [Periprosthetic humeral fractures: Strategies and techniques of revision arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, C; Beirer, M; Brunner, U

    2016-04-01

    The primary aims when performing revision arthroplasty of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are preservation of bone stock, achieving fracture healing and preserving a stable prosthesis with the focus on regaining the preoperative shoulder-arm function. The indications for revision arthroplasty are given in PHF in combination with loosening of the stem. In addition, further factors must be independently clarified in the case of an anatomical arthroplasty. In this context secondary glenoid erosion as well as rotator cuff insufficiency are potential factors for an extended revision procedure. For the performance of revision surgery modular revision sets including long stems, revision glenoid and metaglene components as well as plate and cerclage systems are obligatory besides the explantation instrumentation. Despite a loosened prosthesis, a transhumeral removal of the stem along with a subpectoral fenestration are often required. Length as well as bracing of revision stems need to bridge the fracture by at least twice the humeral diameter. Moreover, in many cases a combined procedure using an additional distal open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) plus cable cerclages as well as biological augmentation might be needed. Assuming an adequate preparation, the experienced surgeon is able to achieve a high fracture union rate along with an acceptable or even good shoulder function and to avoid further complications.

  14. Post-Traumatic Periprosthetic Tibial and Fibular Fracture After Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Brock, Amanda K; Tan, Eric W; Shafiq, Babar

    Periprosthetic fractures after total ankle arthroplasty are uncommon, with most cases occurring intraoperatively. We describe a post-traumatic periprosthetic fracture of the distal tibia and fibula after total ankle arthroplasty that was treated with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis. It is important for orthopedic surgeons not only to recognize the risk factors for postoperative periprosthetic total ankle arthroplasty fractures, but also to be familiar with the treatment options available to maximize function and minimize complications. The design of the tibial prosthesis and surgical techniques required to prepare the ankle joint for implantation are important areas of future research to limit the risk of periprosthetic fractures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures after Total Hip Replacement: Our Results and Treatment Complications].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, T; Salášek, M; Weisová, D

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The study consists of a retroactive evaluation of results of surgical treatment in patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after total hip replacement and a comparison with results reported in the literature. MATERIAL AND METHODS In the period from 2003 to 2013, a total of 83 patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after total hip replacement were treated at our clinic, namely 69 women and 14 men. The mean age in the cohort was 74 years (range 47-87). The Vancouver classification was used to grade the fractures. The cohort included 31 patients with type B1 fracture, 25 patients with type B2 fracture, 8 patients with type B3 fracture, and 19 patients with type C fracture. Altogether 80 patients underwent a surgery, 3 patients with non-displaced type B1 fracture were treated conservatively. The mechanism of injury was a simple fall in 75 % of primary endoprostheses and in 56% of revision endoprostheses. The average time to fracture was 7.6 years in primary implant and 3.6 years in revision endoprosthesis. In fractures with a well-fixed stem (type B1 and C) plate osteosynthesis was used. In case of a comminution zone, osteosynthesis was followed by spongioplasty. In patients with a loose stem (type B2 and B3), the fracture was treated with a revision uncemented stem. In two cases a combination of a revision stem and a massive corticocancellous bone graft was used. The evaluation was performed using the Harris Hip Score and the minimum follow-up from the surgery was 3 years. RESULTS In the group of patients with type B1 fracture, 28 patients were treated surgically. An excellent result was achieved in 22 patients (84%), in 4 patients (16%) the result was very good. The remaining 2 patients failed to meet the requirement of the minimum follow-up of 3 years. In the group of patients with type B2 fractures, composed of 25 patients, the femoral component was replaced with a revision uncemented stem with cerclage wires or titanium tapes or

  16. What is new in distal femur periprosthetic fracture fixation?

    PubMed

    Tosounidis, Theodoros H; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Distal femoral periprosthetic fractures are on the rise. Increased mortality of these injuries is also evident from recent data. Their incidence and risk factors have been extensively reported in the past but new data are being available that merit attention. The increased incidence and the even higher projected incidence should direct the focus of future strategies to the education of surgeons, relevant capacity of hospital and reconfiguration of health care resources. New and potentially modifiable risk factors should be taken into consideration to the informed consent process and new studies should be developed to clarify the causative relationship of the new risk factors such as the peptic ulcer disease and the COPD. The main internal fixation techniques remain the lateral locking plating and the retrograde intramedullary nailing. New techniques in plating are the supplementary medial plate in selected cases and the far cortical locking. Nailing is considered a valid option especially in fractures located well above the anterior flange of the femoral component of the arthroplasty. Results and outcomes from good quality studies are still sparse regarding the comparison between plating and nailing. Interprosthetic fractures constitute an entity that is lately gaining considerable attention. The best method of management of these injuries is still evolving with considerable amount of work being done in the clinical and biomechanical level.

  17. Simultaneous Periprosthetic Fractures of the Femur and the Acetabulum After Bipolar Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia-Paraskevi; Drosos, Georgios; Vogiatzaki, Theodosia; Tilkeridis, Konstantinos; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum and femur after bipolar hip arthroplasty Symptoms: Inability to walk Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Revision cup and internal fixation femur Specialty: Orhopedics and Traumatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Although periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a recognized complication of total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare. Simultaneous periprosthetic fractures of both the acetabulum and the femur have not been reported, to our knowledge. Case Report: We report a simultaneous fracture of the acetabulum and the femur in a 68-year-old female patient who had previously sustained a subcapital fracture of the femur, treated with a bipolar uncemented prosthesis. We discuss the possible mechanism of this combination of fractures. Conclusions: Simultaneous periprosthetic fractures of the femur and the acetabulum can occur if, in the presence of osteoporotic bone, the metallic femoral head has migrated medially in the acetabulum while the femoral stem is not loose. PMID:28003639

  18. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum during cup insertion: posterior column stability is crucial.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, G-Yves; Belzile, Etienne L; Fernandes, Julio C; Vendittoli, Pascal A; Hébert-Davies, Jonah

    2015-02-01

    Periprosthetic hip fractures around acetabular components are rare with little information available to guide surgical management of these complex injuries. A retrospective review of intraoperative isolated acetabular periprosthetic fractures from three tertiary surgical units was done. A total of 32 patients were identified with 9 initially missed. Acetabular components were stable (type 1) in 11 patients with no failures; unstable (type 2) in 12 patients and treated with supplemental fixation. Non-union and displacement were correlated with absent posterior column plating. Missed fractures (type 3) had the highest reoperation rate. Anterior patterns all healed, whereas fractures with posterior column instability had a 67% failure rate. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture can heal successfully with posterior column stability. Plating is mandatory for large posterior wall fragments to achieve osteointegration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes of post-operative periprosthetic acetabular fracture around total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Jauregui, Julio J; Elmallah, Randa D K; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Post-operative periprosthetic acetabular fractures are rare, but serious complication following total hip arthroplasty (THA). As the number of THA performed each year increases so will the expected number of periprosthetic fractures, thus making the treatment of these fractures an important topic for discussion. The purpose of this review is to analyze the recent evidence on risk factors, fracture classification schemes and treatment strategies that have been used for periprosthetic acetabular fractures around THA. The modified Paprosky classification is the most widely used and is a useful guide for management strategies. This classification system provides the guidelines for developing multiple treatment algorithms for decision making. Treatment options for surgical management include open reduction and internal fixation with plating, use of reconstruction cages, trabecular metal augments and bone grafting as needed. Treatment decisions are still an area of controversy and current research.

  20. Periprosthetic humeral fractures associated with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: incidence and management.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Carlos; Lópiz-Morales, Yaiza; Rodríguez, Alberto; López-Durán, Luis; Martínez, Fernando Marco

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to record the incidence and management of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) using reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) in our institution. We performed a retrospective study of 203 RTSA implanted in 200 patients between 2003 and 2014. The mean follow-up was 78.82 months (range, 12-141). Mean age of the study cohort was 75.87 years (range, 44-88). There were only 25 male patients (12.5 %). We assessed the presence of periprosthetic humeral fractures studying the medical files and X-rays of all patients. We identified seven periprosthetic humeral fractures in 203 RTSA (3.4 %): three intra-operative (1.47 %) and four post-operative (1.97 %). The average age at the time of the fracture was 75.14 years (59-83). All patients were women (100 %). Three patients with post-operative fractures type B were treated by osteosynthesis, and one patient with post-operative fracture type A was treated conservatively. All intra-operative fractures needed cerclage wire and in one case long cemented stem. All our periprosthetic fractures healed. Surgical treatment with osteosynthesis in type B post-operative fractures with a stable stem is recommended. Conservative treatment is sufficient in non-displaced type A post-operative fracture. Special attention should be paid to bone quality patients using non-cemented stems in primary surgery but especially in revision shoulder surgery.

  1. [Osteosynthesis and cup revision in periprosthetic acetabulum fractures using a Kocher-Langenbeck approach].

    PubMed

    Schwabe, P; Märdian, S; Perka, C; Schaser, K-D

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction/stable fixation of the acetabular columns to create an adequate periacetabular requirement for the implantation of a revision cup. Displaced/nondisplaced fractures with involvement of the posterior column. Resulting instability of the cup in an adequate bone stock situation. Periprosthetic acetabulum fractures with inadequate bone stock. Extended periacetabular defects with loss of anchorage options. Isolated periprosthetic fractures of the anterior column. Septic loosening. Dorsal approach. Dislocation of hip. Mechanical testing of inlaying acetabular cup. With unstable cup situation explantation of the cup, fracture fixation of acetabulum with dorsal double plate osteosynthesis along the posterior column. Cup revision. Hip joint reposition. Early mobilization; partial weight bearing for 12 weeks. Thrombosis prophylaxis. Clinical and radiological follow-ups. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture in 17 patients with 9 fractures after primary total hip replacement (THR), 8 after revision THR. Fractures: 12 due to trauma, 5 spontaneously; 7 anterior column fractures, 5 transverse fractures, 4 posterior column fractures, 1 two column fracture after hemiendoprosthesis. 5 type 1 fractures and 12 type 2 fractures. Operatively treated cases (10/17) received 3 reinforcement ring, 2 pedestal cup, 1 standard revision cup, cup-1 cage construct, 1 ventral plate osteosynthesis, 1 dorsal plate osteosynthesis, and 1 dorsal plate osteosynthesis plus cup revision (10-month Harris Hip Score 78 points). Radiological follow-up for 10 patients: consolidation of fractures without dislocation and a fixed acetabular cup. No revision surgeries during follow-up; 2 hip dislocations, 1 transient sciatic nerve palsy.

  2. Revision total knee arthroplasty for failure of primary treatment of periprosthetic knee fractures.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ammar M I; Morgan-Jones, Rhidian L

    2014-10-01

    Periprosthetic knee fractures and their complications are expected to increase as the numbers of knee arthroplasties continue to rise. We report our experience with revision knee arthroplasty for failure of primary fracture treatment. Five periprosthetic knee non-unions and 1 mal-union in 6 patients, with ages ranging from 65 to 83years (average 74.6years) were treated with revision total knee arthroplasty, and were followed up for 3 to 10years (average 4.5years). Union occurred in 8 to 18weeks (average 12.5weeks). All patients were ambulatory at the latest follow-up, with a range of motion averaging 84.2° (P = 0.03), and an Oxford Knee Score averaging 35 (P = 0.03). We conclude that union complications of periprosthetic knee fractures can be satisfactorily addressed with revision arthroplasty.

  3. Midterm Results of Consecutive Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures Vancouver Type A and B

    PubMed Central

    Trieb, Klemens; Fiala, Rainer; Briglauer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures has a high complication and mortality rate of more than 10%. The aim of this study is to report the outcome of a consecutive single center patient group. Thirty-four consecutive patients (mean age 81.2+/-8.5 years, 14 male, 20 female) with a periprosthetic femoral fracture Vancouver type A (n=5) or type B (n=29) were followed-up after 43.2 months, none of the patients were lost to follow-up. Nineteen of the patients were treated through change of the stem and cerclage fixation, five by plates and ten by cerclage cables. One successfully treated infection was observed. No further complications have been reported peri- or postoperatively, therefore resulting in 2.9% overall complication rate. These results demonstrate that precisely selected revision surgery protocol following periprosthetic femoral fractures within elderly multimorbid patients may lead to beneficial outcomes at a low risk of complications. PMID:27777712

  4. Good stability but high periprosthetic bone mineral loss and late-occurring periprosthetic fractures with use of uncemented tapered femoral stems in patients with a femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sjöö, Helene; Kelly-Pettersson, Paula; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas; Stark, André; Muren, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose We previously evaluated a new uncemented femoral stem designed for elderly patients with a femoral neck fracture and found stable implant fixation and good clinical results up to 2 years postoperatively, despite substantial periprosthetic bone mineral loss. We now present the medium-term follow-up results from this study. Patients and methods In this observational prospective cohort study, we included 50 patients (mean age 81 (70–92) years) with a femoral neck fracture. All patients underwent surgery with a cemented cup and an uncemented stem specifically designed for fracture treatment. Outcome variables were migration of the stem measured with radiostereometry (RSA) and periprosthetic change in bone mineral density (BMD), measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Hip function and health-related quality of life were assessed using the Harris hip score (HHS) and the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D). DXA and RSA data were collected at regular intervals up to 4 years, and data concerning reoperations and hip-related complications were collected during a mean follow-up time of 5 (0.2–7.5) years. Results At 5 years, 19 patients had either passed away or were unavailable for further participation and 31 could be followed up. Of the original 50 patients, 6 patients had suffered a periprosthetic fracture, all of them sustained after the 2-year follow-up. In 19 patients, we obtained complete RSA and DXA data and no component had migrated after the 2-year follow-up. We also found a continuous total periprosthetic bone loss amounting to a median of –19% (–39 to 2). No changes in HHS or EQ-5D were observed during the follow-up period. Interpretation In this medium-term follow-up, the stem remained firmly fixed in bone despite considerable periprosthetic bone mineral loss. However, this bone loss might explain the high number of late-occurring periprosthetic fractures. Based on these results, we would not recommend uncemented femoral stems for the

  5. Perioperative Periprosthetic Fractures Associated With Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwan J; Menendez, Mariano E; Barnes, C Lowry

    2017-03-01

    Periprosthetic fracture (PPF) is a rare but devastating complication of primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). While PPF is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, early revision rate, and poor patient outcome, there is a paucity of data on patient and hospital-dependent risk factors. Using a large administrative database, we investigated epidemiology and the risk factors associated with perioperative PPF after primary THA. We performed a retrospective review of the National Inpatient Sample records from 2006 to 2011 and identified 1062 PPFs of 1,187,969 patients using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for PPF (996.44). We then analyzed sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics of our study population. The overall incidence of PPF in National Inpatient Sample database was 0.089% (8.9 per 10,000 THAs). Patient-dependent risk factors were: female (odds ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.67-2.22), low household income (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.18-1.65), Medicaid (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.39-2.57), and uninsured (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.63-4.61). Patients with malnutrition and hemiparesis/hemiplegia were associated 10-fold and 6-fold risk of PPF. Nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.32), hospitals in northeast (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.59), and rural hospitals (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.53) had higher incidence of PPF. Our study demonstrates that the incidence of PPF was low in our study population, and greater awareness is needed when performing primary THAs in patients with risk factors identified in our study to prevent PPF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tantalum in type IV and V Paprosky periprosthetic acetabular fractures surgery in Paprosky type IV and V periprosthetic acetabular fractures surgery.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, G; Piscopo, A; Rollo, G; Medici, A; Grubor, P; Bisaccia, M; Pipola, V; Cioffi, R; Nobile, F; Meccariello, L

    2017-09-30

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures represent a growing and serious complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of the study is to report our experience in the use of tantalum for the treatment of Paprosky type IV and V periprosthetic acetabular fractures. We analyzed 24 patients with type IV and V periprosthetic acetabular fractures. Patients were treated with a revision surgery using tantalum components, in some cases in association with posterior plating. Outcomes were evaluated using VAS, Harris hip score and considering the average time of integration of the acetabulum and the number of complications. The endpoint evaluation was established at 24 months. Results show that the average time of integration of the neoacetabulum in tantalum was 12.3 months (range 6-18 months). The average VAS pain is 8.7/10 cm at time 0 and gradually returns to basic pre-injury values in the following months. The average value of HHS at time 0 is 13.5 points. This value tends to increase progressively until reaching a mean score of 89.3 points at 24 months, higher than the average pre-trauma value of 84.3 points. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum with bone loss are a rare but potentially disastrous complication of total hip prostheses. Their management and therapeutic choice will test the ability of the orthopedic surgeon. It is important to determine the type of fracture and characteristics in order to pursue an adequate therapeutic strategy. The modern biomaterials, such as porous tantalum, offer a greater potential in replacing bone loss, promoting bone regrowth and obtaining a stable implant.

  7. Principles of internal fixation and selection of implants for periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Giannoudis, Peter V; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2007-06-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) are increasing as a result of changes in population demographics and the increase in the number of total hip replacements performed. The overall incidence has been reported to range from 0.1% to 6% of all total hip arthroplasties. Management of these fractures is often particularly demanding, complex and expensive. In many cases, the surgeon has to solve the simultaneous problems of implant loosening, bone loss and fracture. A thorough understanding of the unique characteristics of the different fracture types, the principles of PFF treatment and a familiarity with the various fixation devices, grafts and prosthetic implants are all of paramount importance. Internal fixation is used either alone or as an adjunct to stem revision. The stability of the original implant and the configuration of the fracture itself are the basic factors that influence the decision-making process. The current study reviews the existing literature on internal fixation of femoral periprosthetic fractures.

  8. Treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures following total hip arthroplasty with femoral component revision.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Berry, Daniel J; Lewallen, David G

    2003-11-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty is indicated for most periprosthetic fractures that occur around the stem of the femoral implant. The purpose of the present study was to assess the results and complications of revision total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures. We evaluated 118 hips in 116 patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty because of an acute Vancouver type-B periprosthetic femoral fracture. The femoral implant used for the revision was a cemented stem in forty-two hips, a proximally porous-coated uncemented stem in twenty-eight, an extensively porous-coated stem in thirty, and an allograft-prosthesis composite or tumor prosthesis in eighteen. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that the probability of survival was 90% at five years and 79.2% at ten years with revision or removal of the femoral implant for any reason as the end point. Sixteen femoral components were rerevised: ten were rerevised because of loosening; three, because of loosening in association with a fracture nonunion; two, because of recurrent dislocation; and one, because of a new periprosthetic fracture. Additionally, six femoral implants were resected because of deep infection (five) or prosthetic loosening (one). Radiographs of the ninety-six hips with a surviving implant showed that twenty-one had evidence of loosening of the femoral implant, four had a nonunion of the femoral fracture, and two had both a nonunion and loosening of the femoral implant. Revision total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of a periprosthetic fracture around the stem of the femoral implant successfully restored function for most patients. The greatest long-term problems were prosthetic loosening and fracture nonunion. Better results were seen when an uncemented, extensively porous-coated stem was used.

  9. Locking attachment plate fixation around a well-fixed stem in periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Bom; Cho, Jae-Woo; Lee, Young Ho; Shon, Won-Yong; Park, Jung Wee; Kim, Jinil; Oh, Jong-Keon

    2017-07-08

    Periprosthetic fractures are difficult to manage. Plating technique has been considered a reliable form of management of periprosthetic fractures with a well-fixed stem, but a dependable and stable method of plate fixation to the bone is lacking. This study reports the clinical results using a locking attachment plate (LAP) instead of cable fixation to fix locking plates to a periprosthetic femoral shaft fracture. Nineteen patients with periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures around well-fixed stemmed implants were studied between August 2012 and December 2014. Patients were followed up for at least 1 year postoperatively. Median age was 74 years (range 56-96 years). Fractures were classified according to the Unified Classification System, Vancouver classification, and Su classification. Open reduction was performed under minimal incision and the locking plate was fixed to the lateral cortex of the femoral shaft. The part of the shaft without a stem was fixed to the plate using 5.0-mm locking screws, and the part with an underlying stem was fixed using 3.5-mm locking screws through the LAP instead of cables. Postoperatively, patients were managed using general principles for femoral shaft fractures. Average follow-up was 16 months (range 12-36 months). All cases achieved fracture healing without loss of reduction. There were no cases of implant breakage or stem loosening at final follow-up. The average number of LAPs per fixation construct was 2.1 (range 1-4), and the average number of 3.5-mm locking screws through each LAP was 3.3 (range 2-4). The average value of plate screw density was 0.55 (range 0.37-0.8), and the average working length was four holes (range 2-8). Using the LAP to manage periprosthetic fractures with a well-fixed stem could obviate the need for cable around the stem area and yield acceptable outcomes.

  10. Locking plate fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures with and without cerclage wires.

    PubMed

    Ebraheim, Nabil A; Sochacki, Kyle R; Liu, Xiaochen; Hirschfeld, Adam G; Liu, Jiayong

    2013-08-01

    The number of patients requiring knee and hip arthroplasty has been steadily increasing, and periprosthetic fractures are on the rise. Locking plates are the most common treatment for periprosthetic fractures, but the use of cerclage wires with locking plate fixation has been controversial. Forty-seven patients with periprosthetic femur fractures were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-four patients received locking plate alone and twenty-three patients were treated with locking plate and cerclage wires. Patients were evaluated for clinical and radiographic signs of union at two, six, twelve, twenty-four, and forty-eight weeks postoperatively. The average follow-up time in the plate group was 9.4 ± 6.7 months, while it was 6.0 ± 4.2 months in the cerclage wire group. The time to union in the cerclage wire group (3.6 ± 1.0 months) was significantly less than the plate group (4.8 ± 2.6 months). The group with the cerclage wires had a significantly lower revision rate of 0% compared to 20.8%. There was no statistical significance of union rate and complication rate between the two groups. Cerclage wires used with locking plate fixation successfully treats periprosthetic fractures of the femur with faster time to union, less complication, and fewer revisions. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Concepts and Potential Future Developments for Treatment of Periprosthetic Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Ettinger, Max; Omar, Mohamed; Hawi, Nael; Krettek, Christian; Petri, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures are a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon, with a continuously increasing incidence due to aging populations and concordantly increasing numbers of total hip replacements. Surgical decision-making mainly depends on the stability of the arthroplasty, and the quality of bone stock. As patients final outcomes mainly depend on early mobilization, a high primary stability of the construct is of particular relevance. Osteosynthetic procedures are usually applied for fractures with a stable arthroplasty, while fractures with a loosened endoprosthesis commonly require revision arthroplasty. Osteoporotic bone with insufficient anchoring substance for screws poses one major concern for cases with well-fixed arthroplasties. Complication rates and perioperative mortality have remained unacceptably high, emphasizing the need for new innovations in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures. Transprosthetic drilling of screws through the hip stem as the most solid and reliable part in the patient might represent a promising future approach, with auspicious results in recent biomechanical studies.

  12. Concepts and Potential Future Developments for Treatment of Periprosthetic Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Ettinger, Max; Omar, Mohamed; Hawi, Nael; Krettek, Christian; Petri, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures are a major challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon, with a continuously increasing incidence due to aging populations and concordantly increasing numbers of total hip replacements. Surgical decision-making mainly depends on the stability of the arthroplasty, and the quality of bone stock. As patients final outcomes mainly depend on early mobilization, a high primary stability of the construct is of particular relevance. Osteosynthetic procedures are usually applied for fractures with a stable arthroplasty, while fractures with a loosened endoprosthesis commonly require revision arthroplasty. Osteoporotic bone with insufficient anchoring substance for screws poses one major concern for cases with well-fixed arthroplasties. Complication rates and perioperative mortality have remained unacceptably high, emphasizing the need for new innovations in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures. Transprosthetic drilling of screws through the hip stem as the most solid and reliable part in the patient might represent a promising future approach, with auspicious results in recent biomechanical studies. PMID:26401164

  13. Periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum during total hip arthroplasty in a patient with Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    McGrory, B J

    1999-04-01

    The case of a patient with Paget's disease of the pelvis (acetabulum) who had an intraoperative posterior wall fracture during the insertion of a noncemented acetabular component into an under-reamed acetabular bed of sclerotic Pagetoid bone is reported. This unusual complication has not, to my knowledge, been previously reported. Patients with sclerotic bone, like those with osteoporotic bone, may also be at risk for periprosthetic acetabular fractures when an under-reaming technique is used.

  14. Finite element analysis modelling of proximal femoral fractures, including post-fixation periprosthetic fractures.

    PubMed

    Noor, Saqib; Pridham, Cerianne; Fawcett, Tim; Barclay, Mark; Feng, Y T; Hassan, Oubay; Pallister, Ian

    2013-06-01

    Biomechanical testing has been a cornerstone for the development of surgical implants used in fracture stabilisation. In a multi-disciplinary collaboration complex at the University of Wales, Swansea, novel computerised clinically relevant models were developed using advanced computational engineering. In-house software (developed initially for commercial aerospace engineering), allowed accurate finite element analysis (FEA) models of the whole femur to be created, including the internal architecture of the bone, by means of linear interpolation of greyscale images from multiaxial CT scans. This allowed for modelling the changing trabecular structure and bone mineral density as seen in progressive osteoporosis. Falls from standing were modelled in a variety of directions (with and without muscle action) using analysis programmes which resulted in fractures consistent with those seen in clinical practice. By meshing implants into these models and repeating the mechanism of injury in simulation, periprosthetic fractures were also recreated. Further development with simulated physiological activities (e.g. walking and rising from sitting) along with attrition in the bone (in the boundary zones where stress concentration occurs) will allow further known modes of failure in implants to be reproduced. Robust simulation of macro and micro-scale events will allow the testing of novel new designs in simulations far more complex than conventional biomechanical testing will allow.

  15. Fixation of a Periprosthetic Intertrochanteric Hip Fracture below a Birmingham Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, J.; Robinson, A.; Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    This case report involves a 56-year-old female (Mrs X) with a traumatic intertrochanteric hip fracture with subtrochanteric extension below a previous Birmingham hip resurfacing. Periprosthetic fractures following hip resurfacing are usually subcapital and treated with a revision or conservative management. We present an unusual surgical problem with an interesting solution stabilising the fracture using a proximal femoral locking compression plate (LCP). Eight months following surgery the patient is able to walk pain free and there is good fixation and stability. PMID:24995142

  16. Periprosthetic Occult Fractures of the Acetabulum Occur Frequently During Primary THA.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kabata, Tamon; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Inoue, Daisuke; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum occurring during primary THA are rare. Periprosthetic occult fractures are defined as those not identified by the surgeon during the procedure which might be missed on a routine postoperative radiograph. However, it is unclear how frequently these fractures occur and whether their presence affects functional recovery. In this study, using routine CT scans that were obtained as part of another primary hip arthroplasty study protocol, we retrospectively assessed (1) the prevalence of occult fractures of the acetabulum occurring during primary THA, (2) the location of occult fractures of the acetabulum during THA, and (3) risk factors contributing to such occult fractures. Between 2004 and 2013, our institute performed 585 primary THAs (cementless or hybrid) in 494 patients with DICOM pre- and postoperative CT; during the period in question, all patients undergoing THA underwent CT before and after surgery. Preoperative CT images were taken as part of a CT-based three-dimensional templating software and navigation system. Postoperative CT images were taken an average of 1 week after surgery as part of a different protocol to evaluate cup position, restoration of leg length and offset, volume of postoperative hematoma to assess anticoagulation effects after THA, and fractures that were not found on routine postoperative radiographs (which we defined as occult fractures). Patients with a history of prior pelvic osteotomy, trauma, and infection were excluded (88 patients/99 hips); 406 patients (102 males and 304 females; 486 hips) form the basis of this report. The mean age of the patients was 60 ± 11 years, with a mean BMI of 23 ± 4 kg/m(2). The mean followup of the patients with periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum was 58 ± 28 months (range, 12-131 months). Potential risk factors for occult acetabular fracture including age, sex, BMI, preoperative diagnosis, additional dome screw fixation, composition and size of each

  17. [Importance of revision- and tumor-endoprosthetics in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures of the lower extremity].

    PubMed

    Prodinger, P M; Harrasser, N; Suren, C; Pohlig, F; Mühlhofer, H; Schauwecker, J; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-04-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of hip and knee prostheses are gaining clinical significance due to the increasing numbers of of primary arthroplasties. Additionally, these fractures are often associated with poor bone quality or present in patients after multiple revision procedures and concomitant excessive bone defects precluding those patients to be adequately treated by conventional osteosynthesis. Revision implants provide a wide range of options for the treatment of these fractures in order to achieve good clinical results. In the acetabular region cavitary defects associated with periprosthetic fractures can be treated by the use of megacups. Extensive segmental defects and pelvic discontinuity necessitate the use of cups with additional iliac support or even customized implants. Proximal femoral fractures can usually be fixed with modular stems and diaphyseal anchorage. Periprosthetic knee joint fractures can be treated with revision implants with modular sleeves or augment-combinations allowing sufficient bridging of bony defects. Functional reconstruction or refixation of the extensor mechanism is of crucial importance.

  18. Spontaneous acetabular periprosthetic fracture in a patient continuously having zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Tantavisut, Saran; Tanavalee, Aree; Thanakit, Voranuch; Ngarmukos, Srihatach; Wilairatana, Vajara; Wangroongsub, Yongsak

    2014-09-01

    Zoledronic acid has been used for prevention of osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis. This case report illustrates an undesirable consequence from prolonged usage of zoledronic acid in bone metastasis prevention. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture in a patient treated with zoledronic acid for 7 years was reported. The clinical presentation, radiographic and pathological results were described. This is a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty which should not be ignored especially in patients who received long term bisphosphonate.

  19. Spontaneous Acetabular Periprosthetic Fracture in a Patient Continuously Having Zoledronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tantavisut, Saran; Thanakit, Voranuch; Ngarmukos, Srihatach; Wilairatana, Vajara; Wangroongsub, Yongsak

    2014-01-01

    Zoledronic acid has been used for prevention of osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastasis. This case report illustrates an undesirable consequence from prolonged usage of zoledronic acid in bone metastasis prevention. Periprosthetic acetabular fracture in a patient treated with zoledronic acid for 7 years was reported. The clinical presentation, radiographic and pathological results were described. This is a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty which should not be ignored especially in patients who received long term bisphosphonate. PMID:25177464

  20. The Biological Metallic versus Metallic Solution in Treating Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures: Outcome Assessment.

    PubMed

    Carta, Serafino; Fortina, Mattia; Riva, Alberto; Meccariello, Luigi; Manzi, Enrico; Di Giovanni, Antonio; Ferrata, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The periprosthetic fracture of the femur is, in order of frequency, the fourth leading cause (5.9%) of surgical revision. Our study aims to demonstrate how the grafting of bone splint betters the outcomes. Materials. We treated 15 periprosthetic femoral fractures divided into two groups: PS composed of 8 patients treated with plates and splints and PSS involving 7 patients treated only with plates. The evaluation criteria for the two groups during the clinical and radiological follow-up were the quality of life measured by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), Harris Hip Score (HHS), Modified Cincinnati Rating System Questionnaire (MCRSQ), bone healing measured by the Radiographic Union Score (RUS), postoperative complications, and mortality. The evaluation endpoint was set at 24 months for both groups (p < 0.05). Results. The surgery lasted an average of 124.5 minutes for the PS group and 112.6 minutes for the PSS. At 24 months all clinical and radiographic scores were p < 0.05 for the PS group. During follow-up 4 patients (2 in each group) died of causes not related to surgery. Conclusions. The use of the metal plate as opposed to cortical allogenic splint should be taken into consideration as a noteworthy point for periprosthetic femoral fractures.

  1. The Biological Metallic versus Metallic Solution in Treating Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures: Outcome Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Serafino; Fortina, Mattia; Riva, Alberto; Manzi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The periprosthetic fracture of the femur is, in order of frequency, the fourth leading cause (5.9%) of surgical revision. Our study aims to demonstrate how the grafting of bone splint betters the outcomes. Materials. We treated 15 periprosthetic femoral fractures divided into two groups: PS composed of 8 patients treated with plates and splints and PSS involving 7 patients treated only with plates. The evaluation criteria for the two groups during the clinical and radiological follow-up were the quality of life measured by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), Harris Hip Score (HHS), Modified Cincinnati Rating System Questionnaire (MCRSQ), bone healing measured by the Radiographic Union Score (RUS), postoperative complications, and mortality. The evaluation endpoint was set at 24 months for both groups (p < 0.05). Results. The surgery lasted an average of 124.5 minutes for the PS group and 112.6 minutes for the PSS. At 24 months all clinical and radiographic scores were p < 0.05 for the PS group. During follow-up 4 patients (2 in each group) died of causes not related to surgery. Conclusions. The use of the metal plate as opposed to cortical allogenic splint should be taken into consideration as a noteworthy point for periprosthetic femoral fractures. PMID:27990462

  2. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability and validity of the Vancouver classification system of periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Gohar A; Baig, Shakoor A; Awan, Nasir

    2012-06-01

    The Vancouver classification system of periprosthetic fractures has been revalidated in this study, using the radiographs of 45 patients. Three consultants and 3 trainees reviewed the radiographs independently, on 2 separate occasions, at least 2 weeks apart. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement and validity were analyzed, using weighted κ statistics. The mean κ value for interobserver agreement was found to be 0.69 (0.63-0.72) for consultants and 0.61 (0.56-0.65) for the trainees, both representing substantial agreement. Intraobserver κ values ranged from 0.74 to 0.90, showing substantial agreement. Validity analysis of 37 type B cases revealed 81% agreement within B1, B2, and B3 subgroups with a κ value of 0.68 (substantial agreement). This study has reconfirmed the reliability and validity of the Vancouver classification while it also emphasizes the intraoperative assessment of implant stability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Periprosthetic femoral fractures and trying to avoid them: what is the contribution of femoral component design to the increased risk of periprosthetic femoral fracture?

    PubMed

    Carli, A V; Negus, J J; Haddad, F S

    2017-01-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) following total hip arthroplasty (THA) are devastating complications that are associated with functional limitations and increased overall mortality. Although cementless implants have been associated with an increased risk of PFF, the precise contribution of implant geometry and design on the risk of both intra-operative and post-operative PFF remains poorly investigated. A systematic review was performed to aggregate all of the PFF literature with specific attention to the femoral implant used. A systematic search strategy of several journal databases and recent proceedings from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons was performed. Clinical articles were included for analysis if sufficient implant description was provided. All articles were reviewed by two reviewers. A review of fundamental investigations of implant load-to-failure was performed, with the intent of identifying similar conclusions from the clinical and fundamental literature. In total 596 articles were initially identified, with 34 being eligible for analysis. Aggregate analysis of 1691 PFFs in 342 719 primary THAs revealed a significantly higher number of PFFs with cementless femoral implants (p < 0.001). Single-wedge and double-wedge (fit-and-fill) femoral implants were associated with a threefold increase in PFF rates (p < 0.001) compared with anatomical, fully coated and tapered/rounded stems. Within cemented stems, loaded-taper (Exeter) stems were associated with more PFFs than composite-beam (Charnley) stems (p = 0.004). Review of the fundamental literature revealed very few studies comparing cementless component designs. Very few studies within the PFF literature provide detailed implant information. Cementless implants, specifically those of single-wedge and double-wedge, have the highest PFF rates in the literature, with most investigations recommending against their use in older patients with osteoporotic bone. This review illustrates the need

  4. Subject specific finite element modeling of periprosthetic femoral fracture using element deactivation to simulate bone failure.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Shi, Angela; Li, Qing; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Subject-specific finite element (FE) modeling methodology could predict peri-prosthetic femoral fracture (PFF) for cementless hip arthoplasty in the early postoperative period. This study develops methodology for subject-specific finite element modeling by using the element deactivation technique to simulate bone failure and validate with experimental testing, thereby predicting peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in the early postoperative period. Material assignments for biphasic and triphasic models were undertaken. Failure modeling with the element deactivation feature available in ABAQUS 6.9 was used to simulate a crack initiation and propagation in the bony tissue based upon a threshold of fracture strain. The crack mode for the biphasic models was very similar to the experimental testing crack mode, with a similar shape and path of the crack. The fracture load is sensitive to the friction coefficient at the implant-bony interface. The development of a novel technique to simulate bone failure by element deactivation of subject-specific finite element models could aid prediction of fracture load in addition to fracture risk characterization for PFF.

  5. The prevention of periprosthetic fractures of the femur during and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Philip A; Greidanus, Nelson V; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of periprosthetic fractures of the femur associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA) is caused by several factors, including the increasing use of cementless prostheses in both primary and revision procedure, the rise in THAs in younger patients, who are more at risk of high-energy trauma, and the increasing longevity of elderly patients after THA. With approximately 200,000 THAs performed annually in North America, fracture prevention is extremely important for the individual patient and has a significant impact on the health care system.

  6. Periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem: overcoming challenges and avoiding pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.

    2015-01-01

    Management of periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem after total hip arthroplasty (THA) represents a significant challenge and optimal treatment remains controversial. The most common treatment paradigm involves treating fractures around a well-fixed stem with osteosynthesis, whereas fractures around a loose stem require revision arthroplasty and those with poor bone require augmentation with bone graft. Paradoxically, the literature reports a higher rate of failure for osteosynthesis around prostheses considered to be well-fixed. Such a high rate of poor outcomes may result not only from difficult fracture fixation and compromised biologic healing, but also from unrecognized peri-implant pathology. Therefore, proper preoperative and intraoperative evaluation is key, and a subset of patients may benefit from alternative management. We review the appropriate methods for evaluation and treatment of Vancouver type B fractures with particular emphasis on avoiding missteps that can lead to failure. PMID:26539451

  7. Periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem: overcoming challenges and avoiding pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Andrew N; Chen, Antonia F

    2015-09-01

    Management of periprosthetic fractures around the femoral stem after total hip arthroplasty (THA) represents a significant challenge and optimal treatment remains controversial. The most common treatment paradigm involves treating fractures around a well-fixed stem with osteosynthesis, whereas fractures around a loose stem require revision arthroplasty and those with poor bone require augmentation with bone graft. Paradoxically, the literature reports a higher rate of failure for osteosynthesis around prostheses considered to be well-fixed. Such a high rate of poor outcomes may result not only from difficult fracture fixation and compromised biologic healing, but also from unrecognized peri-implant pathology. Therefore, proper preoperative and intraoperative evaluation is key, and a subset of patients may benefit from alternative management. We review the appropriate methods for evaluation and treatment of Vancouver type B fractures with particular emphasis on avoiding missteps that can lead to failure.

  8. Administration of teriparatide treatment for a challenging case of nonunion of periprosthetic fracture after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Ikari, Katsunori; Naomi, Akari; Momohara, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Management of a periprosthetic fracture after total knee arthroplasty is often challenging because it typically occurs in elderly patients, who often have osteoporotic bone with a high risk of delayed union and nonunion. Thus, administration of a medication that could effectively accelerate fracture healing to prevent a delayed union or nonunion should significantly improve treatment outcome and patient's quality of life. We report the case of a 74-year-old rheumatoid arthritis woman with nonunion of a periprosthetic fracture after total knee arthroplasty, in whom bone union could not be achieved even after she underwent internal fixation and bone grafting twice; however, successful bone fusion was achieved after simple once-weekly administration of teriparatide for 6 months. Although we report only one patient, the present case may suggest the advantage of preventive administration of teriparatide in addition to surgical procedures for treating nonunion of a periprosthetic fracture after total knee arthroplasty.

  9. Could Patient Undergwent Surgical Treatment for Periprosthetic Femoral Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty Return to Their Status before Trauma?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Long; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Noh, Chang-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare preoperative clinical outcomes before occurrence of periprosthetic femoral fracture (status before trauma) with postoperative clinical outcomes (status after operation) in patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods A retrospective review was performed of all periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty treated surgically at our institution from January 2010 to January 2014. Among 29 patients who underwent surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty, 3 patients excluded because of non-union of the fracture site. The clinical outcomes were determined by using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS), Harris hip score (HHS), and ambulatory ability using Koval classification. VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability was assessed for all the included patients at the last follow-up of status before trauma and after operation. Results The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status before trauma was 2.2 (range, 0-4), 78.9 (range, 48-92) and 1.9 (range, 1-5), respectively. The mean VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability at the last follow-up of status after operation was 3.1 (range, 1-5), 68.4 (range, 46-81) and 2.9 (range, 2-6), respectively. The clinical outcome of VAS, HHS and ambulatory ability were significantly worsened after surgical treatment for periprosthetic femoral fracture (P=0.010, P=0.001, and P=0.002, respectively). Conclusion Patients with periprosthetic femoral fracture after hip arthroplasty could not return to their status before trauma, although patients underwent appropriate surgical treatment and the fracture union achieved. PMID:27536650

  10. Impaction bone grafting for periprosthetic fractures around a total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Bishoy; Pavlou, George; Shah, Nikhil; Macheras, George; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of periprosthetic fractures has been reported to be between 1 and 20.9% and appears to be on the rise. Fractures that occur around the femoral stem, particularly when the stem is loose or there is a loss of bone stock pose a technical challenge. These are rare injuries and there is considerable debate regarding their optimal treatment. Reconstruction with large segment endoprosthetic replacement is an acceptable solution for elderly patients who have limited functional demands and where the prosthesis is expected to outlive the patient. The younger patient poses a much greater challenge, the bone must be reconstituted and the femoral canal geometry must sufficiently restored to allow the stable insertion of a prosthesis. There are very few techniques that exist in this scenario. One such technique is impaction bone grafting and revision to a long smooth tapered cemented stem. This allows the restoration of bone stock and the stable insertion of a prosthesis. The aim of this article is to discuss the theory behind impaction bone grafting, the technical aspects and challenges of this technique, including fracture reduction methods, and to appraise all the literature available on impaction bone grafting for periprosthetic fractures.

  11. Treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures after previous hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: Introduction of a new implant.

    PubMed

    Resch, H; Krappinger, D; Moroder, P; Blauth, M; Becker, J

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of displaced periprosthetic acetabular fractures in elderly patients. The goal is to stabilize an acetabular fracture independent of the fracture pattern, by inserting the custom-made roof-reinforcement plate and starting early postoperative full weight-bearing mobilization. Acetabular fracture with or without previous hemi- or total hip arthroplasty. Non-displaced acetabular fractures. Watson-Jones approach to provide accessibility to the anterior and supraacetabular part of the iliac bone. Angle-stable positioning of the roof-reinforcement plate without any fracture reduction. Cementing a polyethylene cup into the metal plate and restoring prosthetic femoral components. Full weight-bearing mobilization within the first 10 days after surgery. In cases of two column fractures, partial weight-bearing is recommended. Of 7 patients with periprosthetic acetabular fracture, 5 were available for follow-up at 3, 6, 6, 15, and 24 months postoperatively. No complications were recognized and all fractures showed bony consolidation. Early postoperative mobilization was started within the first 10 days. All patients except one reached their preinjury mobility level. This individual and novel implant is custom made for displaced acetabular and periprosthetic fractures in patients with osteopenic bone. It provides a hopeful benefit due to early full weight-bearing mobilization within the first 10 days after surgery. In case of largely destroyed supraacetabular bone or two-column fractures according to Letournel additional synthesis via an anterior approach might be necessary. In these cases partial weight bearing is recommended.

  12. Simultaneous periprosthetic acetabular fracture and contralateral B-type compression injury of the pelvic ring: a case report of a rare injury combination.

    PubMed

    Märdian, Sven; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Wichlas, Florian; Schwabe, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum is a rare injury, and its management is only sporadically reported in the literature. A few case reports are available which mainly focus on periprosthetic acetabular fractures in the elderly population. In our case, a 32-year-old patient suffered from a periprosthetic acetabular fracture in combination with a pelvic ring injury following a high velocity accident. The fracture morphology allowed a salvage of the prosthesis with an open reduction and internal fixation with a good radiographic and functional outcome one year after trauma.

  13. Simultaneous Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture and Contralateral B-Type Compression Injury of the Pelvic Ring: A Case Report of a Rare Injury Combination

    PubMed Central

    Märdian, Sven; Wichlas, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum is a rare injury, and its management is only sporadically reported in the literature. A few case reports are available which mainly focus on periprosthetic acetabular fractures in the elderly population. In our case, a 32-year-old patient suffered from a periprosthetic acetabular fracture in combination with a pelvic ring injury following a high velocity accident. The fracture morphology allowed a salvage of the prosthesis with an open reduction and internal fixation with a good radiographic and functional outcome one year after trauma. PMID:24222878

  14. Uncemented revision stem for biological osteosynthesis in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Eingartner, C; Volkmann, R; Pütz, M; Weller, S

    1997-01-01

    Fractures around a femoral prosthesis have been treated with plating and additional cement, but this leads to further reduction of bone stock in the proximal femur. Since February 1992, we have dealt with this problem in 12 patients by revision using a long uncemented stem and distal interlocking combined with homologous bone grafting. Bony ingrowth and remodelling led to restoration of the proximal femur. After bone healing, removal of the distal interlocking screws converts the distal load transfer to the proximal anchoring of the revision stem so that osteointegration can occur in the trochanteric region. The clinical results were good in all the patients after a mean follow up of 23.5 months. This is a method which provides biological osteosynthesis and is especially indicated in younger patients.

  15. Managing Vancouver B1 fractures by cerclage system compared to locking plate fixation - a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Katharina; Winkler, Martin; Hofstädter, Thomas; Dorn, Ulrich; Augat, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With increasing life expectancy and number of total hip arthroplasties (THA), the need for revision surgery is increasing too. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal fracture treatment for a clinically characteristic Vancouver B1 fracture. We hypothesized that locking plate fixation has biomechanical advantages over fixation with a simple cerclage system. Additionally, we hypothesized that removal of the primary short stem and revision with a long stem would show biomechanical benefit. The biomechanical testing was performed with a static and a dynamic loading protocol on twenty 4th Generation sawbones. These were divided into four different groups (n = 5 each). In group 1, the primary uncemented short stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a locking plate. In group 2, the primary stem remained and the fracture was stabilized with a cerclage stabilization system containing two stabilizers and four cerclages. In group 3, the primary stem was replaced by an uncemented long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with a locking plate. In group 4, the short stem was replaced by a long revision stem and the fracture was fixed with the cerclage system. Static testing revealed that the revision of the short stem with the long stem caused a 2-fold (p < 0.001, ANOVA) increase of axial stiffness. In dynamic testing, the number of cycles to failure was 4 times (p < 0.001, ANOVA) higher with the long revision stem. Compared to locked plating cerclage wiring demonstrated a 26% more cycles to failure (p = 0.031, ANOVA). The load to failure was 91% larger (p < 0.001, ANOVA) with the long revision stem and 11% smaller with locked plating (p < 0.001, ANOVA). In conclusion, the present biomechanical study indicates that periprosthetic Vancouver B1 fractures can be sufficiently fixed by simple cerclage systems. Revision with a long replacement stem provides a superior mechanical stability regardless of type of osteosynthesis fixation and is therefore a viable

  16. Cable plates and onlay allografts in periprosthetic femoral fractures after hip replacement: laboratory and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jonathan R; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Greidanus, Nelson V; Duncan, Clive P

    2004-01-01

    Fractures of the femur after total hip replacement are an increasingly common and technically challenging problem. The results of nonsurgical treatment are poor. When the general condition of the patient allows, these injuries should be treated surgically. Several surgical treatments can be used to treat these fractures, and classification of the fracture assists the surgeon in the choice of procedure. Over the past decade, cable plate fixation systems and onlay strut allografts have become two of the most commonly used methods of fixation for fractures associated with hip prostheses. The ideal method of fixation is yet to be determined. However, laboratory studies have shown that dual fixation using either a lateral plate and anterior strut graft or two strut grafts produces the strongest construct. Cables rather than smooth wires should be used for fixation, and fixation strength increases with the number of cables used. The use of screws proximally produces a strong fixation but there are theoretical disadvantages to using screws around a femoral implant. Clinical data show high rates of fracture union using cable plate fixation, cortical onlay allograft fixation, and combined fixation methods for fractures that occur around well-fixed implants. Results have been less encouraging when these techniques have been used to fix fractures around prostheses that are either loose or malaligned; such fractures are better managed by revision of the femoral component to a long-stemmed device. Care should also be taken when there has been previous periosteal stripping of the femur because this may predispose to fracture nonunion. Periprosthetic fractures of the femur are a complex surgical problem and require specialized training in a range of surgical techniques.

  17. Hammering sound frequency analysis and prevention of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures during total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Rina; Kikuchi, Aki; Morita, Towa; Takahira, Naonobu; Uchiyama, Katsufumi; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Moriya, Mistutoshi; Uchida, Kentaro; Fukushima, Kensuke; Tanaka, Kensei; Takaso, Masashi; Itoman, Moritoshi; Mabuchi, Kiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Adequate fixation at the time of cementless stem implantation depends on the operator's experience. An objective evaluation method to determine whether the stem has been appropriately implanted may be helpful. We studied the relationship between the hammering sound frequency during stem implantation and internal stress in a femoral model, and evaluated the possible usefulness of hammering sound frequency analysis for preventing intraoperative fracture. Three types of cementless stem (BiCONTACT®, SL-PLUS®, and AI-Hip®) were used. Surgeons performed stem insertion using a procedure similar to that employed in a routine operation. Stress was estimated by finite element analysis, the hammering force was measured, and frequency analysis of hammering sound data obtained using a microphone. Finite element analysis showed a decrease in the hammering sound frequency with an increase in the estimated maximum stress. When a decrease in frequency was observed, adequate hammering had occurred, and the continuation of hammering risked fracture. Based on the relationship between stress and frequency, the evaluation of changes in frequency may be useful for preventing the development of intraoperative fractures. Using our method, when a decrease in frequency is observed, the hammering force should be reduced. Hammering sound frequency analysis may allow the prediction of bone fractures that can be visually confirmed, and may be a useful objective evaluation method for the prevention of intraoperative periprosthetic fractures during stem insertion.

  18. Revision hip arthroplasty as a treatment of Vancouver B3 periprosthetic femoral fractures without bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Qi; Gao, You-Shui; Mei, Jiong; Rao, Zhi-Tao; Wang, Shu-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is conventionally considered that bone grafting is mandatory for Vancouver B3 periprosthetic femoral fractures (PFF) although few clinical studies have challenged the concept previously. The aim of the current study was to investigate the radiographic and functional results of Vancouver B3 PFF treated by revision total hip or hemiarthroplasty (HA) in combination with appropriate internal fixation without bone grafting. Materials and Methods: 12 patients with Vancouver B3 PFF were treated by revision THA/HA without bone grafting between March 2004 and May 2008. There were nine females and three males, with an average age of 76 years. PFFs were following primary THA/HA in nine patients and following revision THA/HA in three. Postoperative followup was 5.5 years on average (range, 3.5-6.5 years). At the final followup, radiographic results were evaluated with Beals and Tower's criteria and functional outcomes were evaluated using the Merle d’Aubigné scoring system. Results: All fractures healed within an average of 20 weeks (range, 12-28 weeks). There was no significant deformity and shortening of the affected limb and the implant was stable. The average Merle d’Aubigné score was 15.8. Walking ability was regained in 10 patients without additional assistance, while 2 patients had to use crutches. There were 2 patients with numbness of lateral thigh, possibly due to injury to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. There were no implant failures, dislocation and refractures. Conclusions: Revision THA/HA in combination with appropriate internal fixation without bone grafting is a good option for treatment of Vancouver B3 periprosthetic femoral fractures in the elderly. PMID:24133303

  19. Management of periprosthetic acetabular fractures in elderly patients--a minimally invasive approach.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Ralph; Eschbach, Daphne; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2015-09-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures are rare and in the current literature largely underreported. The management is reported to be difficult. Treatment varies from non-operative to open reduction and internal fixation up to revision of the acetabular components. A prospective consecutive case series in acetabular fractures was performed in a level 1 trauma centre. All patients with pre-existing total hip replacement were followed up for one year. Perioperative data, complications, radiological results, functional outcome and quality of life were measured. Eight (15%) of 53 patients who were included in the study underwent total hip arthroplasty before and had stable implants at time of fracture. Mean age of the patients was 83 years. All of them were female. Mean operative time was 85 minutes. There were no soft tissue complications like infection or nerve damage in the post-operative course. No revision was needed. Two patients died in between the follow up. The Harris hip score was a mean of 77, with quality of life comparable to persons in the same age. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the anterior column is a viable method to conserve stable acetabular components in this type of fracture. Short operation time and limited incisions are the most conclusive advantages.

  20. Primary versus secondary distal femoral arthroplasty for treatment of total knee arthroplasty periprosthetic femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antonia F; Choi, Lisa E; Colman, Matthew W; Goodman, Mark A; Crossett, Lawrence S; Tarkin, Ivan S; McGough, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Current methods of fixing periprosthetic fractures after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are variable, and include open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) via plating, retrograde nailing, or revision using standard revision TKA components or a distal femoral arthroplasty (DFA). The purpose of this study is to compare patients who failed plating techniques requiring subsequent revision to DFA to patients who underwent primary DFA. Of the 13 patients (9.2%) who failed primary ORIF, causes included nonunion (53.8%), infection (30.8%), loosening (7.7%), and refracture (7.7%). There were significantly more surgical procedures for ORIF revision to DFA compared to primary DFA. Complications for patients who underwent primary reconstruction with DFAs included extensor mechanism disruption (8.3%), infection (5.6%), and dislocation (2.8%). Primary reconstruction via ORIF is beneficial for preserving bone stock, but primary DFA may be preferred in osteopenic patients, or those at high risk for nonunion.

  1. Plate fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures: What happens to the cement mantle?

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmidt, Benjamin; Bernstein, Anke; Hirschmüller, Anja; Schröter, Steffen; Südkamp, Norbert Paul; Helwig, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Osteosynthesis of periprosthetic femur fractures by screw fixation around the implanted prosthetic stem is currently regarded as the biomechanically superior option compared with cerclage. The aim of this biomechanical study was damage analysis of the cement mantle after revision screw insertion. A prosthetic stem (Bicontact) was implanted in 20 cadaveric femora in cemented technique. A locking compression plate (Synthes) was then applied to the lateral femur at the level of the prosthetic stem. The method of plate fixation to the femur was assigned randomly to three groups: bicortical non-locking screws, monocortical locking screws, and bicortical locking screws. This was followed by applying a fluctuating axial load (2100 N, 0.5 Hz) for 20,000 cycles. After testing, macroscopic and microscopic evaluations of the cement mantle were conducted. Cracks formed in the cement mantle in 14% of the 80 screw holes. The type of screw (bicortical or monocortical; locking or non-locking) had no significant effect on the number of cracks (p = 0.52). The relationship between manifestation of crack damage and cement mantle thickness was not significant (p = 0.36), whereas the relationship between crack formation and screw position was significant (p = 0.019). Those screws whose circumference was only partially within the cement mantle yielded a significantly lower number of cracks compared with screws positioned completely within the cement mantle or even touching the prosthetic stem. In order to reduce the incidence of crack formation in the cement mantle during plate osteosynthesis of periprosthetic femur fractures, the screws should not be either placed within the cement mantle or make direct contact with the stem.

  2. Proximal femoral replacement and allograft prosthesis composite in the treatment of periprosthetic fractures with significant proximal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Porat, Manny D; Hozack, William J; Parvizi, Javad

    2012-11-01

    Femoral bone loss due to periprosthetic fracture, a challenging problem in total hip arthroplasty (THA), is increasingly encountered due to a rise in the number of revision THAs performed. Allograft prosthesis composite (APC) and proximal femoral replacement (PFR) are two available options for management of patients with difficult type-B3 Vancouver periprosthetic fractures. The treatment algorithm for patients with these fractures has been extensively studied and is influenced by the age and activity level of the patient. APC is often preferred in young and active patients in an attempt to preserve bone stock while older and less active patients are considered candidates for PFR. In spite of the high rate of overall complications with these two procedures, reported survivorship is acceptable. Treating patients with these complicated fractures is fraught with complications and, even with successful treatment, the outcomes are not as promising as those associated with primary hip replacement. In this paper, we aimed to review available published reports about PFR and APC for treatment of periprosthetic fractures around THAs.

  3. Larger femoral periprosthetic bone mineral density decrease following total hip arthroplasty for femoral neck fracture than for osteoarthritis: a prospective, observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Tobias; Eisler, Thomas; Bodén, Henrik; Muren, Olle; Stark, André; Salemyr, Mats; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-04-01

    Studies on patients with degenerative joint disease of the hip show that femoral periprosthetic bone mineral decreases following total hip arthroplasty. Scarcely any osteodensitometric data exist on femoral neck fracture (FNF) patients and periprosthetic bone remodelling. In two parallel cohorts we enrolled 87 patients (mean age, 72 ± 12 years; male:female ratio, 30:57) undergoing total hip arthroplasty for either primary osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip (n = 37) or for an acute FNF (n = 50) and followed them for a mean of 5.4 years. Outcomes were bone mineral density (BMD) changes in the periprosthetic Gruen zones 1-7, the incidence of periprosthetic fractures and clinical outcome. The bone mineral loss in the fracture group was more than twice that of the osteoarthritis group, -16.9% versus -6.8% (p = 0.004). The incidence of periprosthetic fractures was 12% (6/50) in the fracture cohort compared with none (0%) in the OA cohort (p = 0.03). Periprosthetic bone mineral loss following total hip arthroplasty is significantly greater in patients who are treated for acute FNF than in OA patients. This decrease of BMD follows a different pattern with the FNF patients losing larger proportions of bone in Gruen zones 1, 2, 6, and 7 while the OA patients tend to have larger losses only in zones 1 and 7. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Periprosthetic fracture around a stable femoral stem treated with locking plate osteosynthesis: distal femoral locking plate alone versus with cerclage cable.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Soo; Han, Seung-Beom

    2017-07-01

    To promote rapid bone healing, an adequate stable fixation implant with a percutaneous reduction instrument should be used for Vancouver type B1 or C fractures. The objective of this study was to describe radiographic and clinical outcomes of patients with periprosthetic fracture (PPF) around a stable femoral stem, treated with a distal femoral locking plate alone or with a cerclage cable. A total of 21 patients with PPF amenable to either a reverse distal femoral locking plate (LCP DF(®)) alone or with a cerclage cable, with a mean age of 75.7 years, were included. In these patients, ten fractures were treated with a reverse LCP DF(®) alone and were classified as group I, and 11 additionally received a cerclage cable and were classified as group II. Group II had a significantly longer operation time (P = 0.019) than group I and included one patient with nonunion at the final 24-month follow-up visit after the initial fracture reduction. However, this difference in nonunion rate for the two groups is more likely to inappropriate indications than surgical techniques. When comparing the stability of the fractures in both groups, there was no statistically significant difference, which might be attributed to the stable fixed-angle implant.

  5. High risk of early periprosthetic fractures after primary hip arthroplasty in elderly patients using a cemented, tapered, polished stem

    PubMed Central

    Brodén, Cyrus; Mukka, Sebastian; Muren, Olle; Eisler, Thomas; Boden, Henrik; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPF) after hip arthroplasty is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We assessed the incidence and characteristics of periprosthetic fractures in a consecutive cohort of elderly patients treated with a cemented, collarless, polished and tapered femoral stem (CPT). Patients and methods In this single-center prospective cohort study, we included 1,403 hips in 1,357 patients (mean age 82 (range 52–102) years, 72% women) with primary osteoarthritis (OA) or a femoral neck fracture (FNF) as indication for surgery (367 hips and 1,036 hips, respectively). 64% of patients were ASA class 3 or 4. Hip-related complications and need for repeat surgery were assessed at a mean follow-up time of 4 (1–7) years. A Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate risk factors associated with PPF. Results 47 hips (3.3%) sustained a periprosthetic fracture at median 7 (2–79) months postoperatively; 41 were comminute Vancouver B2 or complex C-type fractures. The fracture rate was 3.8% for FNF patients and 2.2% for OA patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 4; 95% CI: 1.3–12). Patients > 80 years of age also had a higher risk of fracture (HR = 2; 95% CI: 1.1–4.5). Interpretation We found a high incidence of early PPF associated with the CPT stem in this old and frail patient group. A possible explanation may be that the polished tapered stem acts as a wedge, splitting the femur after a direct hip contusion. Our results should be confirmed in larger, registry-based studies, but we advise caution when using this stem for this particular patient group. PMID:25280133

  6. Distal locking stem for revision femoral loosening and peri-prosthetic fractures.

    PubMed

    Mertl, Patrice; Philippot, Remy; Rosset, Philippe; Migaud, Henri; Tabutin, Jacques; Van de Velde, Denis

    2011-02-01

    Revision total hip arthroplasty in the setting of a large proximal femoral deficiency or a peri-prosthetic fracture remains a challenging problem. We describe the development, surgical technique and the use of cementless revision stems with distal inter-locking screws to provide immediate stability of the femoral implant. Results were assessed in a large multicentre French study conducted with the french hip and knee surgery society (SFHG). We retrospectively reviewed 725 revisions using interlocking stems from 14 French orthopaedic departments. Seven different stems were used in this series. In-patient records were retrieved, and in addition to demographic data the indication for revision, the preoperative and postoperative PMA and Harris hip scores were documented. The bone deficiency was classified on the basis of the French National Orthopaedic Meeting (SOFCOT) classification. Intraoperative complications and problems if any were retrieved from operative notes. Clinical status and radiographs at the final follow-up were evaluated, paying special attention to the metaphyseal filling index. Average follow-up was 4.5 years. As for the clinical results, the mean Harris hip score at last follow-up was 81. Therefore, it increased by an average of 31 points. Bone reconstruction was assessed on the cortico-medullary index in the metaphyseal area and at mid-shaft increasing from 36 to 45 and 54 to 63, respectively. Radiologically, 637 implants were stable, and 40 demonstrated subsidence. Forty-eight implants have been revised. We found a significant relation between the metaphyseal filling index, the stability of the stem and the quality of bone reconstruction. Results were analysed with respect to three groups of stems: group 1 was a straight, partially HA-coated implant; group 2 was a curved, fully HA-coated implant; and group 3 was a curved, partially-coated implant. Group 1 showed a significantly higher rate of failure when compared with the others types of implants

  7. Peri-prosthetic femoral fractures of hip or knee arthroplasty. Analysis of 34 cases and a review of Spanish series in the last 20 years.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ochoa, M; Miranda, I; Orenga, S; Hurtado-Oliver, V; Sendra, F; Roselló-Añón, A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate peri-prosthetic femoral fractures by analysing type of patient, treatment and outcomes, and to compare them with Spanish series published in the last 20 years. A retrospective review of the medical records of patients with peri-prosthetic femoral fractures treated in our hospital from 2010 to 2014, and telephone survey on the current status. A total of 34 peri-prosthetic femoral fractures were analysed, 20 in hip arthroplasty and 14 in knee arthroplasty. The mean age of the patients was 79.9 years, and 91% had previous comorbidity, with up to 36% having at least 3 prior systemic diseases. Mean hospital stay was 8.7 days, and was higher in surgically-treated than in conservative-treated patients. The majority (60.6%) of patients had complications, and mortality was 18%. Functional status was not regained in 61.5% of patients, and pain was higher in hip than in knee arthroplasty. Peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are increasing in frequency. This is due to the increasing number of arthroplasties performed and also to the increasing age of these patients. Treatment of these fractures is complex because of the presence of an arthroplasty component, low bone quality, and comorbidity of the patients. Peri-prosthetic femoral fractures impair quality of life. They need individualised treatment, and have frequent complications and mortality. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Early Definitive Fixation of an Open Periprosthetic Femur Fracture in the Polytraumatized Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Ilyas S; Bhandari, Mohit; Elizalde, Sebastian Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the femur after total hip arthroplasty are increasing in frequency. In the polytraumatized patient with long-bone fracture, an ongoing debate exists regarding early definitive stabilization versus initial damage control orthopaedics, followed by delayed fixation. It remains to be seen whether this rationale applies to the polytraumatized patient with periprosthetic fracture. We present the case of a 73-years old Caucasian woman who sustained bilateral Gustillo-Anderson grade III open femur fractures; the fracture on the right was a Vancouver C open periprosthetic fracture after cemented total hip arthroplasty. After massive fluid resuscitation in the trauma bay she was taken to the intensive care unit in a hemodynamically unstable condition. She was subsequently operated and underwent early definitive fixation of both femurs with the rationale of potentially reducing pulmonary complications and promoting early mobilization. Early definitive stabilization versus delayed fixation in the polytraumatized patient with an open periprosthetic femur fracture is reviewed. Although several treatment algorithms based on fracture classification and implant stability exist, further study is required to delineate the preferred method and timeline of fixation for this growing cohort of patients.

  9. Early Definitive Fixation of an Open Periprosthetic Femur Fracture in the Polytraumatized Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Ilyas S; Bhandari, Mohit; Elizalde, Sebastian Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periprosthetic fractures of the femur after total hip arthroplasty are increasing in frequency. In the polytraumatized patient with long-bone fracture, an ongoing debate exists regarding early definitive stabilization versus initial damage control orthopaedics, followed by delayed fixation. It remains to be seen whether this rationale applies to the polytraumatized patient with periprosthetic fracture. Case presentation: We present the case of a 73-years old Caucasian woman who sustained bilateral Gustillo-Anderson grade III open femur fractures; the fracture on the right was a Vancouver C open periprosthetic fracture after cemented total hip arthroplasty. After massive fluid resuscitation in the trauma bay she was taken to the intensive care unit in a hemodynamically unstable condition. She was subsequently operated and underwent early definitive fixation of both femurs with the rationale of potentially reducing pulmonary complications and promoting early mobilization. Conclusion: Early definitive stabilization versus delayed fixation in the polytraumatized patient with an open periprosthetic femur fracture is reviewed. Although several treatment algorithms based on fracture classification and implant stability exist, further study is required to delineate the preferred method and timeline of fixation for this growing cohort of patients. PMID:27299122

  10. Impact of intraprosthetic drilling on the strength of the femoral stem in periprosthetic fractures: A finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Stephan; Bauer, Michael; Petri, Maximilian; Schrader, Julian; Maier, Hans J; Krettek, Christian; Hassel, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures after total hip arthroplasty remains a major challenge in orthopedic surgery. Recently, a novel surgical technique using intraprosthetic screw fixation has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of drilling the femoral hip stem on integrity and strength of the implant. The hypothesis was that intraprosthetic drilling and screw fixation would not cause the load limit of the prosthesis to be exceeded and that deformation would remain within the elastic limit. A sawbone model with a conventional straight hip stem was used and a Vancouver C periprosthetic fracture was created. The fracture was fixed with a nine-hole less invasive stabilization system plate with two screws drilled and inserted through the femoral hip stem. Three different finite element models were created using ANSYS software. The models increased in complexity including joint forces and stress risers from three different dimensions. A variation of drilling positions was analyzed. Due to the complexity of the physiological conditions in the human femur, the most complex finite element model provided the most realistic results. Overall, significant changes in the stresses to the prosthesis caused by the drilling procedure were observed. While the stresses at the site of the bore hole decreased, the load increased in the surrounding stem material. This effect is more pronounced and further the holes were apart, and it was found that increasing the number of holes could counteract this. The maximum load was still found to be in the area of the prosthesis neck. No stresses above the load limit of titanium alloy were detected. All deformations of the prosthesis stem remained in the elastic range. These results may indicate a potential role for intraprosthetic screw fixation in the future treatment of periprosthetic femur fractures.

  11. Survival of ceramic bearings in total hip replacement after high-energy trauma and periprosthetic acetabular fracture.

    PubMed

    Salih, S; Currall, V A; Ward, A J; Chesser, T J S

    2009-11-01

    Surgeons remain concerned that ceramic hip prostheses may fail catastrophically if either the head or the liner is fractured. We report two patients, each with a ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement who sustained high-energy trauma sufficient to cause a displaced periprosthetic acetabular fracture in whom the ceramic bearings survived intact. Simultaneous fixation of the acetabular fracture, revision of the cementless acetabular prosthesis and exchange of the ceramic bearings were performed successfully in both patients. Improved methods of manufacture of new types of alumina ceramic with a smaller grain size, and lower porosity, have produced much stronger bearings. Whether patients should be advised to restrict high-impact activities in order to protect these modern ceramic bearings from fracture remains controversial.

  12. Temporary total hip arthroplasty-like spacer for treating an infected periprosthetic femoral fracture using a long stem: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoo; Katsura, Yoshiaki; Kasahara, Nina; Kasahara, Takashi; Kanamura, Masashi; Kawanabe, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Infected periprosthetic femoral fractures are among the most complex and significant complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA). We report the novel use of a temporary THA-like spacer for treating an infected periprosthetic femoral fracture after revision surgery using a long stem. We present a 72-year-old woman sustained a left infected periprosthetic femoral fracture after revi - streptococci in the culture sample. On suspicion of a periprosthetic joint infection, we planned a two-stage procedure. We used a temporary THA-like spacer comprising the removed femoral long stem, which was autoclaved and then reimplanted, and applied a new polyethylene acetabular liner. Both components were cemented in place with antibioticloaded bone cement, without applying strong pressure. Pain control waseasily achieved postoperatively because the fracture had been stabilized early. The THA-like spacer was stable, and allowed a good range of motion without pain. She was allowed to move with a wheelchair and was walk with partial weight bearing without pain. Seven week after the initial THAlike spacer placement, we performed a revision THA after successful control of infection. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient remained free of infection. Temporary antibiotic-loaded cement-coated THA-like spacer using a long stem facilitated the eradication of infection, fracture stabilization, and enables partial weight bearing without pain. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Proximal femoral replacement in the management of acute periprosthetic fractures of the hip: a competing risks survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Matthew; Choi, Lisa; Chen, Antonia; Crossett, Lawrence; Tarkin, Ivan; McGough, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To examine the mortality and implant survivorship of proximal femoral replacement (PFR), revision total hip arthroplasty (REV) and open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) in the treatment of acute periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur, we retrospectively reviewed 97 consecutive acute periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures from 2000–2010. Three groups were defined: PFR (n=21), REV (n=19), and ORIF (n=57). Outcome measures were all-cause mortality, implant failure, and reoperation. Competing Risks survival analysis of overall mortality during the mean 35-month follow-up showed no statistical difference between the three groups (p=0.65; 12 and 60 month mortality for PFR: 37%, 45%; REV: 16%, 46%; ORIF: 14%, 100%). Implant survival was worse for the PFR group (p=0.03, 12 and 60-month implant failure rate for PFR: 5%, 39%; REV: 7%, 7%; ORIF 2%, 2%). We conclude that PFR as compared with REV or ORIF may have worse medium-term implant survival, primarily due to instability and dislocation. PMID:23856062

  14. Proximal femoral replacement in the management of acute periprosthetic fractures of the hip: a competing risks survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Colman, Matthew; Choi, Lisa; Chen, Antonia; Crossett, Lawrence; Tarkin, Ivan; McGough, Richard

    2014-02-01

    To examine the mortality and implant survivorship of proximal femoral replacement (PFR), revision total hip arthroplasty (REV) and open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) in the treatment of acute periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur, we retrospectively reviewed 97 consecutive acute periprosthetic proximal femoral fractures from 2000 to 2010. Three groups were defined: PFR (n=21), REV (n=19), and ORIF (n=57). Outcome measures were all-cause mortality, implant failure, and reoperation. Competing Risks survival analysis of overall mortality during the mean 35-month follow-up showed no statistical difference between the three groups (P=0.65; 12 and 60 month mortality for PFR: 37%, 45%; REV: 16%, 46%; ORIF: 14%, 100%). Implant survival was worse for the PFR group (P=0.03, 12 and 60-month implant failure rate for PFR: 5%, 39%; REV: 7%, 7%; ORIF 2%, 2%). We conclude that PFR as compared with REV or ORIF may have worse medium-term implant survival, primarily due to instability and dislocation.

  15. Better Axial Stiffness of a Bicortical Screw Construct Compared to a Cable Construct for Comminuted Vancouver B1 Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jamie T; Taheri, Arash; Day, Robert E; Yates, Piers J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the Locking attachment plate (LAP) construct in comparison to a Cable plate construct, for the fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures after cemented total hip arthroplasty. Each construct incorporated a locking compression plate with bi-cortical locking screws for distal fixation. In the Cable construct, 2 cables and 2 uni-cortical locking screws were used for proximal fixation. In the LAP construct, the cables were replaced by a LAP with 4 bi-cortical locking screws. The LAP construct was significantly stiffer than the cable construct under axial load with a bone gap (P=0.01). The LAP construct offers better axial stiffness compared to the cable construct in the fixation of comminuted Vancouver B1 proximal femoral fractures. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of operative interventions for hemi or total hip arthroplasty patients who sustain a Vancouver B2 peri-prosthetic femoral fracture: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Ianunzio, Jamie Raffaele; Munn, Zachary; Mandziak, Daniel; Stephenson, Matthew; Cain, Megan Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of operative interventions for individuals who have undergone a hemi or total hip arthroplasty who sustain a Vancouver type B2 peri-prosthetic femoral fracture or equivalent. Specifically, this review will investigate open reduction and internal fixation and femoral revision arthroplasty with or without internal fixation.

  17. Cement-in-cement stem revision for Vancouver type B periprosthetic femoral fractures after total hip arthroplasty. A 3-year follow-up of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Briant-Evans, Toby W; Veeramootoo, Darmaraja; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Hubble, Matthew J

    2009-10-01

    Revision surgery for periprosthetic femoral fractures around an unstable cemented femoral stem traditionally requires removal of existing cement. We propose a new technique whereby a well-fixed cement mantle can be retained in cases with simple fractures that can be reduced anatomically when a cemented revision is planned. This technique is well established in femoral stem revision, but not in association with a fracture. We treated 23 Vancouver type B periprosthetic femoral fractures by reducing the fracture and cementing a revision stem into the pre-existing cement mantle, with or without supplementary fixation. 3 patients died in the first 6 months for reasons unrelated to surgery. In addition, 1 was too frail to attend follow-up and was therefore excluded from the study, and 1 patient underwent revision surgery for a nonunion. The remaining 18 cases all healed with radiographic union after an average time of 4.4 (2-11) months. There was no sign of loosening or subsidence of the revision stems within the old cement mantle in any of these cases at the most recent follow-up after an average of 3 (0.3-9) years. Our results support the use of the cement-in-cement revision in anatomically reducible periprosthetic fractures with a well-preserved pre-existing cement mantle. This technique is particularly useful for the elderly patient and for those who are not fit for prolonged surgical procedures.

  18. Long-term Bisphosphonate Therapy-induced Periprosthetic Femoral Stress Fracture in a Sliding Hip Screw Implant: A Unique Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mark R; Dunn, Conor; Sirkin, Michael S; Reilly, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Long-term bisphosphonate therapy for osteoporosis is associated with an increased risk of low-to-no energy atypical subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures with characteristic radiologic findings. There are few reports of patients with long-term bisphosphonate-induced periprosthetic fractures, all of them had a hip arthroplasty prosthesis. In this report, we present a unique case of a 90-year-old Caucasian female on long-term bisphosphonate therapy with a sliding hip screw implant who sustained a periprosthetic fracture of the femoral shaft at the distal aspect of the plate. Case Report: In April 2014, a 90-year-old female presented with left thigh pain after a fall from standing height. She had a previous fixation of a left intertrochanteric hip fracture with a sliding hip screw in 1999 and a 9-year history of bisphosphonate therapy. Radiographs obtained in the emergency department revealed a left-sided femoral shaft fracture at the distal aspect of the previously applied five-hole side plate. Of note, the periprosthetic fracture demonstrated cortical thickening at the fracture site of the lateral femoral cortex, lack of comminution as well as a transverse appearance. The patient was taken to the operating room the next day for retrograde placement of an intramedullary nail of the left femur with revision of left intertrochanteric femur fracture fixation. By 3 months postoperatively, she had obtained full radiographic union. Conclusion: This case report highlights the possibility of an atypical fracture distal to the sliding hip screw implant after open reduction internal fixation of an intertrochanteric hip fracture in patients on long-term bisphosphonates. PMID:28164053

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of adjunctive cerclage wire fixation for the prevention of periprosthetic femur fractures using cementless press-fit total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Scott A; Kim, Stanley E; Roe, Simon; Pozzi, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Periprosthetic femoral fractures are a common complication associated with cementless press-fit total hip arthroplasty. The use of prophylactic cerclage wire fixation has been advocated to reduce this complication. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a double loop cerclage wire, used as adjunctive fixation, increased the peak torsional load to failure in femora implanted with press-fit cementless stems. Peak torsional load to failure was compared between femora without adjunctive fixation and femora receiving a 1 mm double loop cerclage wire placed proximally to the lesser trochanter. Femora treated with adjunctive cerclage wire fixation failed at 20% greater peak torque (P = 0.0001). In conclusion, a double loop cerclage wire may aid in the prevention of periprosthetic fractures associated with press-fit cementless femoral stems.

  20. Acute periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum associated with osteolytic pelvic lesions: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sotelo, J; McGrory, B J; Berry, D J

    2000-01-01

    Three cases of acute acetabular fracture around uncemented porous-coated acetabular components associated with osteolytic lesions of the pelvis are reported. In each case, the fracture occurred through an area of severe osteolysis that contributed to the structural failure of the pelvis. None of the fractures were associated with significant trauma, and none of the implants demonstrated evidence of loosening before the fracture. When marked pelvic osteolysis develops around the acetabular component of a total hip arthroplasty, the possibility of pelvic fracture must be considered. Total hip arthroplasty patients with osteolysis should be followed with radiographs at regular and frequent intervals. When osteolysis progresses, early intervention should be strongly considered because appropriate treatment may prevent fracture occurrence.

  1. Recent Advances and Developments in Knee Surgery: Principles of Periprosthetic Knee Fracture Management

    PubMed Central

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Khan, Wasim; Johnstone, David

    2012-01-01

    The management of distal femoral, tibial and patellar fractures after total knee arthroplasty can be complex. The incidence of these fractures is increasing as the number of total knee arthroplasties being performed and patient longevity is increasing. There is a wide range of treatment options including revision arthroplasty for loose implants. This review article discusses the epidemiology, risk factors, classification and treatment of these fractures. PMID:22888380

  2. Novel fixation method of a periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum using burr holes through the retained cup for locking screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Browne, James A; Weiss, David B

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum associated with a total hip arthroplasty is relatively low but may be increasing. Treatment options depend upon the stability of the prosthesis. In this case, we report an unusual fracture pattern where a large portion of posterior column remained osseointegrated to a displaced uncemented acetabular component and removal of the cup would have resulted in massive structural bone loss and potential pelvic discontinuity. A metal cutting burr was used to create additional screw holes in the cup to allow us to retain the original implant and also obtain fixation of the fracture. The patient had a good outcome at one year with a healed fracture, stable implant, and excellent function. To our knowledge, this technique has not been previously described and offers surgeons an approach to fix these challenging fractures.

  3. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute.

    PubMed

    Svacina, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty.

  4. Traumatic Periprosthetic Acetabular Fracture Treated with One-Stage Exchange and Bone Reconstruction Using a Synthetic Bone Graft Substitute

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case of a traumatic periprosthetic acetabular fracture in an elderly patient, which was treated by one-stage hip exchange with implantation of an antiprotrusio cage and reconstruction of the acetabular bone loss with an injectable calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute, is reported. The paste-like bone graft substitute was injected through the holes of the antiprotrusio cage. After a setting time of 15 minutes, a low-profile cup was cemented onto the cage using polymethylmethacrylate and a new stem was inserted. The patient was encouraged to ambulate three days postoperatively weight-bearing as tolerated. At the one-year follow-up visit the patient was ambulatory and full weight-bearing without any walking aids. The follow-up radiographs demonstrated stable position and articulation of the revision hip arthroplasty with no signs of loosening of the antiprotrusio cage. However, the most interesting finding was that the bone graft substitute had remodelled to a great extent into bone. This calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite composite shows high osteoconductive potential and can be used to regenerate bone stock in revision arthroplasty. PMID:27446621

  5. Comparison of retrograde nailing and minimally invasive plating for treatment of periprosthetic supracondylar femur fractures (OTA 33-A) above total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin; Lee, Ju Hong

    2016-03-01

    Retrograde intramedullary (IM) nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) using locking plate are typically considered the gold standards of treatment for periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures above total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Forty-one consecutive patients treated with either retrograde nailing (nail group, n = 20) or minimally invasive plating (plate group, n = 21) for periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures between March 2003 and January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical functions [arc range of motion and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score] and bony outcomes (bony union and malunion) were evaluated. There was no statistical difference between the nail and plate groups in age (p = 0.665), one-year postoperative arc range of motion (p = 0.642), preoperative WOMAC score (p = 0.076), postoperative one-year WOMAC score (p = 0.135), and union time (p = 0.081). The mean union time of the nail group and the plate group was 4.3 months (range 3-12 months) and 3.6 months (range 3-5 months), respectively. There were three cases of malalignment in the nail group, whereas there was one case of malalignment in the plate group (p = 0.343). One case of nailing using a short nail demonstrated nail breakage. Although retrograde nailing was found to have a slightly higher rate of malunion compared to minimally invasive plating, there was no statistically significant difference between both treatment options in terms of clinical outcomes. Regardless of which implant is used, the proper application is essential in management of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures above TKA.

  6. The economic impact of surgically treated peri-prosthetic hip fractures on a university teaching hospital in Wales 7.5-year study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew R; Williams, Tim; Paringe, Vishal; White, Simon P

    2016-02-01

    The number of total hip replacements taking place across the UK continues to grow. In an ageing population, with people placing greater demands on their prostheses, the number of peri-prosthetic fractures is increasing. We studied the economic impact this has on a large teaching hospital. All patients with peri-prosthetic femoral fracture in a 7.5 year period were identified. Radiographic and case note analysis was performed. Costings from the finance departments were obtained. 90 cases were identified, 58 female and 32 male, with a mean age of 76 (range: 38-91). 89 of the cases were managed surgically, 66% undergoing revision and 33% receiving open reduction and internal fixation. According to the Vancouver Classification, 3% were Type A, 79% Type B and 18% Type C. The mean length of stay was 43 days. The mean cost of management was £31,370 (range: £6885-£112,327). Patients with type C fractures had the highest mean length of stay at 53 days and mean cost of £33,417. Including rehabilitation costs, our study illustrated a mean cost of £31,370, roughly four times the current basic NHS tariff of £8552. Although implant costs are greater, treatment with revision where appropriate allows earlier weight bearing, reduced length of stay and lower overall cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Periprosthetic femur fractures. Experience at hospital Español de México with a 2-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ahedo, C E; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Gil-Orbezo, F I; Valles-Figueroa, J F; García-Félix, Diaz G; Antúnez-García, M

    2011-01-01

    Periprosthetic fractures have had an increasing incidence in the past decades; their resolution is a difficult challenge even for the most experienced orthopedist surgeons. The Vancouver classification has contributed to a great extent to their better characterization and therapeutic guidance. The purpose of this paper is to make a review of the most recent advances on the topic and present our experience in the treatment of these fractures. We describe the characteristics of a sample of 20 patients with periprosthetic femur fractures treated at our hospital from March 2008 to March 2010 and typed according to the Vancouver classification. Mean age was 74.5 years with a range of 65-87 years. Females were predominant (70%). Five cases were type A in the classification, 10 cases type B, and 5 cases type C. Nineteen underwent surgical treatment. The mean total length of stay was 7 days, with a range of 5-12. The mean healing time for types B and C was 4 months (range 3-6 months). Four patients had complications. The resolution was assessed as excellent in 5 cases (25%), good in 11 cases (55%), and poor in 4 cases (20%). A thorough individual assessment based on the Vancouver classification, age and the patient's functional requirements are the major parameters for treatment success.

  8. The suitability of an uncemented hydroxyapatite coated (HAC) hip hemiarthroplasty stem for intra-capsular femoral neck fractures in osteoporotic elderly patients: the Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal Index, a solution to preventing intra-operative periprosthetic fracture.

    PubMed

    Chana, Rishi; Mansouri, Reza; Jack, Chris; Edwards, Max R; Singh, Ravi; Keller, Carmel; Khan, Farid

    2011-11-18

    This study will seek to identify a measurable radiographic index, the Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal Index (MDI) score to determine whether intra-operative fracture in osteoporotic bone can be predicted.A 5 year prospective cohort of 560 consecutive patients, undergoing hemiarthroplasty (cemented or uncemented), was evaluated. A nested case-control study to determine risk factors affecting intra-operative fracture was carried out. The Vancouver Classification was used to classify periprosthetic fracture. The MDI score was calculated using radiographs from the uncemented group. As a control (gold standard), Yeung et al's Canal Bone Ratio (CBR) score was also calculated. From this, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was formulated for both scores and area under the curve (AUC) compared. Intra and inter-observer correlations were determined. Cost analysis was also worked out for adverse outcomes. Four hundred and seven uncemented and one hundred and fifty-three cemented stems were implanted. The use of uncemented implants was the main risk factor for intra-operative periprosthetic fracture. Sixty-two periprosthetic fractures occurred in the uncemented group (15.2%), nine occurred in the cemented group (5.9%), P < 0.001. The revision rate for sustaining a periprosthetic fracture (uncemented group) was 17.7%, P < 0.001 and 90 day mortality 19.7%, P < 0.03. MDI's AUC was 0.985 compared to CBR's 0.948, P < 0.001. The MDI score cut-off to predict fracture was 21, sensitivity 98.3%, specificity 99.8%, positive predictive value 90.5% and negative predictive value 98%. Multivariate regression analysis ruled out any other confounding factors as being significant. The intra and inter-observer Pearson correlation scores were r = 0.99, P < 0.001. JRI uncemented hemiarthroplasty has a significantly higher intra-operative fracture rate. We recommend cemented arthroplasty for hip fractures. We propose a radiographic system that may allow surgeons to select patients who are good

  9. The suitability of an uncemented hydroxyapatite coated (HAC) hip hemiarthroplasty stem for intra-capsular femoral neck fractures in osteoporotic elderly patients: the Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal index, a solution to preventing intra-operative periprosthetic fracture

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study will seek to identify a measurable radiographic index, the Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal Index (MDI) score to determine whether intra-operative fracture in osteoporotic bone can be predicted. A 5 year prospective cohort of 560 consecutive patients, undergoing hemiarthroplasty (cemented or uncemented), was evaluated. A nested case-control study to determine risk factors affecting intra-operative fracture was carried out. The Vancouver Classification was used to classify periprosthetic fracture. The MDI score was calculated using radiographs from the uncemented group. As a control (gold standard), Yeung et al's Canal Bone Ratio (CBR) score was also calculated. From this, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was formulated for both scores and area under the curve (AUC) compared. Intra and inter-observer correlations were determined. Cost analysis was also worked out for adverse outcomes. Four hundred and seven uncemented and one hundred and fifty-three cemented stems were implanted. The use of uncemented implants was the main risk factor for intra-operative periprosthetic fracture. Sixty-two periprosthetic fractures occurred in the uncemented group (15.2%), nine occurred in the cemented group (5.9%), P < 0.001. The revision rate for sustaining a periprosthetic fracture (uncemented group) was 17.7%, P < 0.001 and 90 day mortality 19.7%, P < 0.03. MDI's AUC was 0.985 compared to CBR's 0.948, P < 0.001. The MDI score cut-off to predict fracture was 21, sensitivity 98.3%, specificity 99.8%, positive predictive value 90.5% and negative predictive value 98%. Multivariate regression analysis ruled out any other confounding factors as being significant. The intra and inter-observer Pearson correlation scores were r = 0.99, P < 0.001. JRI uncemented hemiarthroplasty has a significantly higher intra-operative fracture rate. We recommend cemented arthroplasty for hip fractures. We propose a radiographic system that may allow surgeons to select patients who are

  10. The use of uncemented extensively porous-coated femoral components in the management of Vancouver B2 and B3 periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, K; Quinlan, J F; Kutty, S; Mulcahy, D; Brady, O H

    2005-12-01

    We assessed the outcome of patients with Vancouver type B2 and B3 periprosthetic fractures treated with femoral revision using an uncemented extensively porous-coated implant. A retrospective clinical and radiographic assessment of 22 patients with a mean follow-up of 33.7 months was performed. The mean time from the index procedure to fracture was 10.8 years. There were 17 patients with a satisfactory result. Complications in four patients included subsidence in two, deep sepsis in one, and delayed union in one. Concomitant acetabular revision was required in 19 patients. Uncemented extensively porous-coated femoral stems incorporate distally allowing stable fixation. We found good early survival rates and a low incidence of nonunion using this implant.

  11. Field testing the Unified Classification System for periprosthetic fractures of the femur, tibia and patella in association with knee replacement: an international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Van der Merwe, J M; Haddad, F S; Duncan, C P

    2014-12-01

    The Unified Classification System (UCS) was introduced because of a growing need to have a standardised universal classification system of periprosthetic fractures. It combines and simplifies many existing classification systems, and can be applied to any fracture around any partial or total joint replacement occurring during or after operation. Our goal was to assess the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the UCS in association with knee replacement when classifying fractures affecting one or more of the femur, tibia or patella. We used an international panel of ten orthopaedic surgeons with subspecialty fellowship training and expertise in adult hip and knee reconstruction ('experts') and ten residents of orthopaedic surgery in the last two years of training ('pre-experts'). They each received 15 radiographs for evaluation. After six weeks they evaluated the same radiographs again but in a different order. The reliability was assessed using the Kappa and weighted Kappa values. The Kappa values for inter-observer reliability for the experts and the pre-experts were 0.741 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.707 to 0.774) and 0.765 (95% CI 0.733 to 0.797), respectively. The weighted Kappa values for intra-observer reliability for the experts and pre-experts were 0.898 (95% CI 0.846 to 0.950) and 0.878 (95% CI 0.815 to 0.942) respectively. The UCS has substantial inter-observer reliability and 'near perfect' intra-observer reliability when used for periprosthetic fractures in association with knee replacement in the hands of experienced and inexperienced users. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. A systematic review of open reduction and internal fixation of periprosthetic femur fractures with or without allograft strut, cerclage, and locked plates.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ryan E; Baldwin, Keith; Austin, Matthew S; Mehta, Samir

    2014-05-01

    Few comparative studies exist for open reduction and internal fixation of Vancouver B1 and C fractures. We therefore performed a systematic review of fractures treated with or without an allograft strut, and using various fixation techniques. Thirty-seven manuscripts including 682 fractures were identified between 1992 and 2012. Percent union was similar for Vancouver B1 fractures treated with or without an allograft strut (90.7% vs. 91.5%). Time to union (4.4 vs. 6.6 months) and deep infection (3.8% vs. 8.3%) were increased with use of allograft struts. Percent union and time to union were unaffected by plate type or use of cerclage. We conclude that due to increased infection and time to union, allograft struts should be used cautiously during operative treatment of Vancouver B1 factures.

  13. Primary cementless hip arthroplasty as a potential risk factor for non-union after long-stem revision arthroplasty in periprosthetic femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Boesmueller, Sandra; Michel, Marc; Hofbauer, Marcus; Platzer, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In case of stem loosening in periprosthetic femoral fractures (PPFF), revision arthroplasty should be performed. The first hypothesis of this study was that advanced patient age and female gender shows higher non-union rates. The second hypothesis was that primary cementless arthroplasty is associated with a higher non-union rate compared to cemented primary hip arthroplasty. All PPFF occurring between January 2000 and June 2010 treated by revision arthroplasty were included. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify independent variables leading to fracture non-union. Eighty one patients (78 % female) met the inclusion criteria. In 20/81 patients (24.7 %) no adequate fracture healing could be determined on radiographs 12 months after revision surgery. Although age and female gender showed a positive correlation with bony non-union after PPFF as expected, the p-values were not statistically significant. Multiple regression analysis revealed primary cementless prosthesis (p = 0.001) to be the only independent variable associated with non-union. Non-cemented primary prosthesis might be a negative predicting factor for the development of non-union after long-stem revision arthroplasty in PPFF. We therefore recommend the thorough debridement of pannus tissue thus inducing bone healing before the implantation of revision prostheses.

  14. Is there an increased stem migration or compromised osteointegration of the Mayo short-stemmed prosthesis following cerclage wiring of an intrasurgical periprosthetic fracture?

    PubMed

    Zeh, Alexander; Radetzki, Florian; Diers, Verena; Bach, Dirk; Röllinghoff, Marc; Delank, Karl Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Short-stemmed prostheses are increasingly regarded as implants of first choice in primary THA. As a result of the press-fit fixation in the femoral metaphysis, the occurrence of intraoperative fractures were reported. The aim of this study was to analyze the postoperative results of the Mayo short-stem prosthesis following treatment of an intrasurgical femur fracture with cerclage wiring. From 1999 to 2005, in 38 patients (18 females, 20 males; mean age 56 years; mean BMI = 27) with the diagnosis of coxarthrosis in whom a Mayo short-stemmed prosthesis has been implanted, an intraoperative fracture was observed. The fractures were treated with cerclage wiring (1 cerclage, n = 32; 2 cerclages, n = 5; 3 cerclages, n = 1). Postoperatively, all patients were prescribed mobilization without weight-bearing (floor contact) on the treated leg for 6 weeks. Using the Wristing software, longitudinal stem migration and varus-valgus femoral stem alignment were examined digitally in anteroposterior X-rays taken immediately after surgery, after 6 weeks and on average after 5.7 years (Zeh et al., Z Orthop Unfall 149:200-205, 2011). Additionally, the incidence of periprosthetic radiolucent lines was captured in the anteroposterior X-rays and assigned to the Gruen zones. Additionally, a DEXA scan was performed. The X-rays of a matched control group after the implantation of a Mayo prosthesis without femur fracture were analyzed by the same method. There was no significant migration of the Mayo prosthesis in the study or control groups during postoperative follow-up (t test, P > 0.05). The cerclage group compared with the control group showed a statistically significant valgus tilt of 1.5° on average during the follow-up, which is regarded to be clinically not relevant. The frequency of occurrence of radiolucent lines was not statistically different (chi-square test, χ = 0.42, P = 0.51). DEXA scans showed no differences of the bone mineral density in the Gruen zones compared with a

  15. HSD11B1 polymorphisms predicted bone mineral density and fracture risk in postmenopausal women without a clinically apparent hypercortisolemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Ghi Su; Koh, Jung-Min; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Hong, Jung Min; Park, Eui Kyun; Lee, Jong-Young; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) may participate in bone physiology, even in subjects with no glucocorticoid excess. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD11B1) is a primary regulator catalyzing the reduction of inactive cortisone to active cortisol. To elucidate genetic relevance of HSD11B1 variants to vertebral fracture and osteoporosis, we investigated the potential involvement of six HSD11B1 SNPs in postmenopausal women. All exons, their boundaries and the promoter region (approximately 1.5 kb) were directly sequenced in 24 individuals. Six polymorphisms were selected and genotyped in all study participants (n=1329). BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. HSD11B1 +16374C>T and +27447G>C were associated with reduced vertebral fracture risk (p=0.016 and 0.032, respectively). Two of these (LD block2) in intron 5 (rs1000283 and rs932335) were significantly associated with bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck (p=0.00005 and 0.0002, respectively). Specifically, HSD11B1 +16374C>T and +27447G>C polymorphisms were associated with higher BMD values of the femoral neck in multiple comparison (p=0.0002 and 0.0004, respectively) and Bonferroni corrected significance level (97% power). Consistent with these results, HSD11B1-ht21 and -ht22 comprising both SNPs also showed the evidence of association with BMD values of the femoral neck (p(domiant)=0.0002 and p(recessive)=0.00005, respectively). Our results provide preliminary evidence supporting an association of HSD11B1 with osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Also, these findings demonstrate that +16374C>T polymorphism may be useful genetic markers for bone metabolism.

  16. Periprosthetic Shoulder Infection

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Vincenzo; Chillemi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is considered the most effective surgical procedure for endstage shoulder pain from different causes including osteoarthritis, cuff-tear arthropathy, trauma, and tumors. Although uncommon and less frequent than knee or hip periprosthetic infection, periprosthetic shoulder infection represents a devastating complication and, despite treatment, is associated with unsatisfactory results. The most commonly identified microorganisms in periprosthetic shoulder infections are Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Propionibacterium acnes. Diagnosis is not always easy and mainly derives from the integration of clinical symptoms, laboratory exams, radiological studies and microbiological swabs. Different options are available for treatment, including antibiotic therapy, lavage and debridement with retention of the prosthesis, one-stage reimplantation, two-stage reimplantation with antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer and resection arthroplasty. The aim of this review is to describe the current knowledge regarding risk factors, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic shoulder infection. PMID:23919098

  17. Contribution of a common variant in the promoter of the 1-α-hydroxylase gene (CYP27B1) to fracture risk in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Nguyen, Tuan V; Au, Amy; Bullock, Martyn; Cameron, Ian; Cumming, Robert; Chen, Jian Sheng; March, Lyn M; Seibel, Markus J; Sambrook, Philip N

    2011-02-01

    CYP27B1 encodes mitochondrial 1α-hydroxylase, which converts 25-hydroxyvitamin D to its active 1,25-dihydroxylated metabolite. We tested the hypothesis that common variants in the CYP27B1 promoter are associated with fracture risk. The study was designed as a population-based genetic association study, which involved 153 men and 596 women aged 65-101 years, who had been followed for 2.2 years (range 0.1-5.5) between 1999 and 2006. During the follow-up period, the incidence of fragility fractures was ascertained. Bone ultrasound attenuation (BUA) was measured in all individuals, as were serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations; 86% subjects had vitamin D insufficiency. Genotypes were determined for the -1260C>A (rs10877012) and +2838T>C (rs4646536) CYP27B1 polymorphisms. A reporter gene assay was used to assess functional expression of the -1260C>A CYP27B1 variants. The association between genotypes and fracture risk was analyzed by Cox's proportional hazards model. We found that genotypic distribution of CYP27B1 -1260 and CYP27B1 +2838 polymorphisms was consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law. The two polymorphisms were in high linkage disequilibrium, with D' = 0.96 and r² = 0.94. Each C allele of the CYP27B1 -1260 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of fracture (hazard ratio = 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.73), after adjustment for age, sex, number of falls, and BUA. In transient transfection studies, a reporter gene downstream of the -1260(A)-containing promoter was more highly expressed than that containing the C allele. These data suggest that a common but functional variation within the CYP27B1 promoter gene is associated with fracture risk in the elderly.

  18. Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Ana Lucia L.; Oliveira, Priscila R.; Carvalho, Vladimir C.; Saconi, Eduardo S.; Cabrita, Henrique B.; Rodrigues, Marcelo B.

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of joint prostheses is becoming increasingly common, especially for the hip and knee. Infection is considered to be the most devastating of prosthesis-related complications, leading to prolonged hospitalization, repeated surgical intervention, and even definitive loss of the implant. The main risk factors to periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are advanced age, malnutrition, obesity, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection at an advanced stage, presence of distant infectious foci, and antecedents of arthroscopy or infection in previous arthroplasty. Joint prostheses can become infected through three different routes: direct implantation, hematogenic infection, and reactivation of latent infection. Gram-positive bacteria predominate in cases of PJI, mainly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PJIs present characteristic signs that can be divided into acute and chronic manifestations. The main imaging method used in diagnosing joint prosthesis infections is X-ray. Computed tomography (CT) scan may assist in distinguishing between septic and aseptic loosening. Three-phase bone scintigraphy using technetium has high sensitivity, but low specificity. Positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) presents very divergent results in the literature. Definitive diagnosis of infection should be made by isolating the microorganism through cultures on material obtained from joint fluid puncturing, surgical wound secretions, surgical debridement procedures, or sonication fluid. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic infections in arthroplasty cases. Treatment in a single procedure is appropriate in carefully selected cases. PMID:24023542

  19. [Diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections].

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, C M; Schütze, N; Rudert, M

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic infection requires a clear definition itself and structured procedure concerning anamnesis, clinical examination, laboratory findings, puncture and imaging diagnostics. The clinical presentation may vary considerable due to the time of their occurrence as early, delayed, or late infection. Recognition of risk factors and knowledge of differential diagnoses facilitate and confirm the diagnosis. The synovial fluid is assessed with regard to leukocyte count, protein content, and glucose. Intraoperative tissue specimen sampling has to be performed correctly; the histopathological and microbiological studies must be assessed using specific criteria. The examination and classification of periprosthetic membranes make discrimination of the causal pathological mechanism possible, especially distinction between septic and aseptic loosening. In this manner statements with regard to etiology and prosthesis durability are possible. Different causative microorganisms appear postoperatively at specific times. Pathogens that grow as biofilms are of great significance, as they may compound diagnosis and therapy. Early infections are often caused by virulent microorganisms (S. aureus) with acute onset. Delayed (low grade) infections are usually caused by less virulent microorganisms, such as S. epidermidis or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Many diagnostic imaging methods have been used in the assessment of periprosthetic infection: plain radiographs, arthrography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Nuclear medicine with bone scintigraphy or positron-emission tomography enhance diagnostic capabilities. Cultures of samples obtained by sonication of prostheses are more sensitive than conventional periprosthetic tissue culture. Multiplex PCR of sonication fluid is a promising test for diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection. The promising diagnostic accuracy for interleukin-6 and procalcitonin has yet not been

  20. Peri-prosthetic humeral non-union: Where biology meets bio-mechanic. A case report.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Ciurlia; Leonardo, Puddu; Gianfilippo, Caggiari; Matteo, Andreozzi; Doria, Carlo

    2017-08-05

    The worldwide incidence of traumatic fractures has been growing over the last years due to the progressive aging of the population. Today, the increase of arthroplasty procedures in orthopaedic surgery is related to a high rate of peri-prosthetic fractures. Healing of the fracture is a multifactorial metabolic process; if these factors are impaired, healing process could be interrupted resulting in non-union. We report our experience about a case of a humeral diaphysis non-union secondary to peri-prosthetic fracture (reverse shoulder arthroplasty) treated by conservative approach. We treated this patient using a multilevel approach, consisting of revision surgery and drug therapy. We assume that an aggressive revision surgery done with bone autograft implant and a bone healing therapy administering teriparatide off-label can reduce the convalescence in non-unions and can improve prognosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Alisina; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a calamitous complication with high morbidity and substantial cost. The reported incidence is low but it is probably underestimated due to the difficulty in diagnosis. PJI has challenged the orthopaedic community for several years and despite all the advances in this field, it is still a real concern with immense impact on patients, and the healthcare system. Eradication of infection can be very difficult. Therefore, prevention remains the ultimate goal. The medical community has executed many practices with the intention to prevent infection and treat it effectively when it encounters. Numerous factors can predispose patients to PJI. Identifying the host risk factors, patients’ health modification, proper wound care, and optimizing operative room environment remain some of the core fundamental steps that can help minimizing the overall incidence of infection. In this review we have summarized the effective prevention strategies along with the recommendations of a recent International Consensus Meeting on Surgical Site and Periprosthetic Joint Infection. PMID:26110171

  2. The Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Infection

    PubMed Central

    del Arco, Alfonso; Bertrand, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PJI) is the most serious joint replacement complication, occurring in 0.8-1.9% of knee arthroplasties and 0.3-1.7% of hip arthroplasties. A definition of PJI was proposed in the November 2011 issue of the journal Clinical Orthopedics and Related Research. The presence of a fistula or of local inflammatory signs is indicative of PJI, but in many cases local pain is the only symptom. In the absence of underlying inflammatory conditions, C-reactive protein measurement is the most useful preoperative blood test for detecting infection associated with a prosthetic joint. The most useful preoperative diagnostic test is the aspiration of synovial joint fluid to obtain a total and differential cell count and culture. Intraoperative frozen sections of periprosthetic tissues produce excellent accuracy in predicting a diagnosis of PJI but only moderate accuracy in ruling out the diagnosis. In this process, obtaining a quality sample is the first step, and determines the quality of microbiological results. Specimens for culture should be obtained prior to the initiation of antibiotic treatment. Sonication of a removed implant may increase the culture yield. Plain radiography has low sensitivity and low specificity for detecting infection associated with a prosthetic joint. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the evaluation of complex cases, but metal inserts interfere with these tests, and abnormalities may be non-specific. Labelled-leucocyte imaging (e.g., leucocytes labelled with indium-111) combined with bone marrow imaging with the use of technetium-99m–labelled sulphur colloid is considered the imaging test of choice when imaging is necessary. PMID:23898349

  3. Successful cementless cup reimplantation using cortical bone graft augmentation after an acetabular fracture and cup displacement.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bryan T; Chambers, Jonathan N; Budsberg, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    To report repair of a periprosthetic acetabular fracture with concurrent component displacement after cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Clinical case report. Dog (n=1) with an acetabular fracture after THA. Acetabular repair was performed on a highly comminuted periprosthetic acetabular fracture after cementless THA. A bulk, structural corticocancellous autograft from the ipsilateral ilial wing was used for repair and reconstruction of the dorsal acetabular wall before reimplantation of a cementless acetabular component. Repair of a periprosthetic acetabular fracture with a bulk structural autograft was successful in reconstruction of the dorsal acetabular wall and in reestablishing a stable, functional cementless THA acetabular prosthesis. Structural corticocancellous autografts from the ilium can be successfully used in repair of periprosthetic acetabular fractures after THA. Structural corticocancellous grafting from the ilium can be considered as a treatment option for repair of periprosthetic acetabular fractures after THA.

  4. Periprosthetic femoral bone loss in total hip arthroplasty: systematic analysis of the effect of stem design.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Ashleen R; Lau, Nicole; Longjohn, Donald B; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N

    2017-02-21

    Periprosthetic bone loss may lead to major complications in total hip arthroplasty (THA), including loosening, migration, and even fracture. This study analysed the influence of femoral implant designs on periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) after THA. The results of all previous published studies reporting periprosthetic femoral BMD following THA were compiled. Using these results, we compared percent changes in bone loss as a function of: femoral stem fixation, material, and geometry. The greatest bone loss was in the calcar region (Gruen Zone 7). Overall, cemented stems had more bone loss distally than noncemented stems, while noncemented stems had more proximal bone loss than cemented stems. Within noncemented stems, cobalt-chromium (CoCr) stems had nearly double the proximal bone loss compared to titanium (Ti) alloy stems. Finally, within noncemented titanium alloy group, straight stems had less bone loss than anatomical, tapered, and press-fit designs. The findings from the present study quantified percent changes in periprosthetic BMD as a function of fixation method, alloy, and stem design. While no one stem type was identified as ideal, we now have a clearer understanding of the influence of stem design on load transfer to the surrounding bone.

  5. Treatment of Periprosthetic Infections: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vaquero, Daniel; Fernández-Fairen, Mariano; Torres, Ana; Menzie, Ann M.; Fernández-Carreira, José Manuel; Murcia-Mazon, Antonio; Merzthal, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the existing economic literature, assesses the value of current data, and presents procedures that are the less costly and more effective options for the treatment of periprosthetic infections of knee and hip. Optimizing antibiotic use in the prevention and treatment of periprosthetic infection, combined with systemic and behavioral changes in the operating room, the detection and treatment of high-risk patient groups, as well as the rational management of the existing infection by using the different procedures according to each particular case, could allow for improved outcomes and lead to the highest quality of life for patients and the lowest economic impact. Nevertheless, the costeffectiveness of different interventions to treat periprosthetic infections remains unclear. PMID:23781163

  6. The Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D

    2015-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection remains one of the most common failure modes following total hip and total knee arthroplasty. As such, a systematic and cost effective approach to the evaluation and work-up of a patient with a suspected periprosthetic joint infection should be undertaken in every patient with a painful total joint. Although we have many diagnostic tools, a history and physical remain the most important. Many of the current laboratory tests are indirect measure of infection, lack specificity for diagnosis of infection, but serve as sensitive and cost effective screening tools. In addition, a new definition of periprosthetic infection helps to standardize the diagnosis. Biomarkers hold the promise of improved specificity and are becoming increasingly popular as a diagnostic tool.

  7. Periprosthetic Knee Infection: Ten Strategies That Work

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Priscilla Ku; Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most serious complications following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The demand for TKA is rapidly increasing, resulting in a subsequent increase in infections involving knee prosthesis. Despite the existence of common management practices, the best approach for several aspects in the management of periprosthetic knee infection remains controversial. This review examines the current understanding in the management of the following aspects of PJI: preoperative risk stratification, preoperative antibiotics, preoperative skin preparation, outpatient diagnosis, assessing for infection in revision cases, improving culture utility, irrigation and debridement, one and two-stage revision, and patient prognostic information. Moreover, ten strategies for the management of periprosthetic knee infection based on available literature, and experience of the authors were reviewed. PMID:24368992

  8. Triple fracture during rehabilitation after revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christof; Szalay, Gabor; Alt, Volker; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of periprosthetic fractures after knee-joint implant revisions is increasing in prevalence. We present a method of treatment for a patient who sustained a triple fracture--a periprosthetic femur fracture, a patella fracture, and a tibial shaft fracture. The femoral fracture was treated with a specially designed intramedullary nail, the patella fracture with a figure-of-eight suture, and the tibial shaft fracture by a minimal-invasive plate osteosynthesis using a percutaneous plating technique. Osseous consolidation was confirmed, and the patient presented a satisfying range of movement under full-weight-bearing conditions after mobilisation. Simultaneous multiple periprosthetic fractures are a special challenge, and in situ coupling of the endoprosthesis with a slotted hollow nail presents a valuable option for the treatment. Level V, Expert opinion.

  9. Microstructural effects on the deformation and fracture of the alloy Ti-25Al-10Nb-3B-1Mo. Final report, 1 July 1988-15 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.H.

    1992-12-01

    The effects of microstructure and temperature on tensile and fracture behavior were explored for the titanium aluminide alloy Ti-25Al-lONb-3V-lMo (atomic percent). Three microstructures were selected for this study in an attempt to determine the role of the individual microstructural constituents. the three microstructures studied were an alpha-2 + beta processed microstructure with a fine Widmanstaetten microstructure, a beta processed microstructure with a fine Widmanstaetten microstructure, and a beta processed microstructure with a coarse Widmanstaetten microstructure. Tensile testing of both round and flat specimens was conducted in vacuum at elevated temperature and in air at room and elevated temperatures. Extensive fractography and specimen sectioning were used to study tensile deformation and the effects of environment on this alloy. Room temperature fracture toughness testing using compact tension specimens was conducted. Elevated temperature toughness testing was performed using J-bend bar specimens in an air environment. Again, extensive fractography and specimen sectioning were used to study the elevated temperature toughening mechanisms of this alloy.... Titanium, Titanium aluminide, Intermetallic, Fracture toughness, Tensile behavior, Fractography environmental interaction.

  10. The role of osteoblasts in peri-prosthetic osteolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, S C; Queally, J M; Devitt, B M; Doran, P P; O'Byrne, J M

    2013-08-01

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening is the most common reason for revising total hip replacements. Wear particles originating from the prosthetic components interact with multiple cell types in the peri-prosthetic region resulting in an inflammatory process that ultimately leads to peri-prosthetic bone loss. These cells include macrophages, osteoclasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The majority of research in peri-prosthetic osteolysis has concentrated on the role played by osteoclasts and macrophages. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis. In peri-prosthetic osteolysis, wear particles may affect osteoblasts and contribute to the osteolytic process by two mechanisms. First, particles and metallic ions have been shown to inhibit the osteoblast in terms of its ability to secrete mineralised bone matrix, by reducing calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity and its ability to proliferate. Secondly, particles and metallic ions have been shown to stimulate osteoblasts to produce pro inflammatory mediators in vitro. In vivo, these mediators have the potential to attract pro-inflammatory cells to the peri-prosthetic area and stimulate osteoclasts to absorb bone. Further research is needed to fully define the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis and to explore its potential role as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  11. Ibandronate and periprosthetic bone mass: new therapeutic approach in periprosthetic loosening prevention

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A prosthetic implant modifies the physiological transmission of loads to the bone, initiating a remodeling process. Studies of the mechanisms responsible for periprosthetic bone loss contributed to the definition of new pharmacological strategies that may prevent aseptic implant loosening. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs useful to this purpose, and have been shown to be effective in reducing periprosthetic resorption during the first year after the implant. We aimed to assess the inhibitory effect on periprosthetic osteolysis of ibandronate, a highly potent aminobisphosphonate, administered orally and IV with an extended interval between doses and optimal treatment adherence. In view of the fact that periprosthetic remodeling takes place during the first 6-12 months after surgery and is ultimately responsible for prosthesis longevity, we may conclude that the administration of high dosage ibandronate postsurgery by IV bolus and subsequently as cyclic oral treatment reduced cortical osteopenia in the metaphyseal region, and in the calcar region of the proximal femur. This therapy might therefore be used as preventive measure against postsurgical osteopenia and probably also against aseptic loosening. PMID:22461804

  12. New definition for periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    Diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains a real challenge to the orthopedic community. Currently, there is no single standard definition for PJI. This communication presents the diagnostic criteria that have been proposed by a workgroup convened by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. The diagnostic criteria were developed after the evaluation of available evidence. The role of every diagnostic test was examined, and the literature was reviewed in detail to determine the threshold for each test. It is hoped that the proposed definition for PJI will be adopted universally, bringing standardization into a field that has suffered extensive variability and heterogeneity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reducing periprosthetic joint infection: what really counts?

    PubMed Central

    SOLARINO, GIUSEPPE; ABATE, ANTONELLA; VICENTI, GIOVANNI; SPINARELLI, ANTONIO; PIAZZOLLA, ANDREA; MORETTI, BIAGIO

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) remains one of the most challenging complications after joint arthroplasty. Despite improvements in surgical techniques and in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, it remains a major cause of implant failure and need for revision. PJI is associated with both human host-related and bacterial agent-related factors that can interact in all the phases of the procedure (preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative). Prevention is the first strategy to implement in order to minimize this catastrophic complication. The present review focuses on the preoperative period, and on what to do once risk factors are fully understood and have been identified. PMID:26904527

  14. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement and periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antonia F; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) is commonly used for antibiotic delivery during total joint arthroplasty (TJA) for prevention or treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). ALBC is commonly used in two-stage exchange arthroplasty with static and dynamic spacers, beads, rods, and other custom spacers. The use of commercially available or hand-made ALBC for primary and revision TJA to prevent infection has also been studied. Commonly used antibiotics include gentamicin, tobramycin, and vancomycin powder, and these antibiotics can be used alone or in combination, depending on the organism present. ALBC can be prepared by hand mixing to increase porosity and improve antibiotic elution or by vacuum-mixing to improve tensile fatigue strength. Vacuum-mixed cement is predominantly used in primary TJA, whereas hand-mixed cement is often used in two-stage exchange arthroplasty for shaping spacers and beads. Inadequate strength of ALBC spacers can result in mechanical failure, including fracture or dislocation of spacers. Additionally, studies have demonstrated that the use of antibiotics in cement, especially aminoglycosides like gentamicin and tobramycin that can elute into the bloodstream, may result in acute renal failure. Using antibiotics in ALBC can also theoretically increase antibiotic resistance and the likelihood of obtaining a negative culture if subsequent aspirations are performed. Overall, ALBC is an effective medical implant tool that can be used for treating and preventing PJI.

  15. Periprosthetic bone loss: diagnostic and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Loredana; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Total joint replacement surgery is being performed on an increasingly large part of the population. Clinical longevity of implants depends on their osseointegration, which is influenced by the load, the characteristics of the implant and the bone-implant interface, as well as by the quality and quantity of the surrounding bone. Aseptic loosening due to periprosthetic osteolysis is the most frequent known cause of implant failure. Wear of prosthetic materials results in the formation of numerous particles of debris that cause a complex biological response. Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) is regarded as an accurate method to evaluate Bone Mineral Density (BMD) around hip or knee prostheses. Further data may be provided by a new device, the Bone Microarchitecture Analysis (BMA), which combines bone microarchitecture quantification and ultra high resolution osteo-articular imaging. Pharmacological strategies have been developed to prevent bone mass loss and to extend implant survival. Numerous trials with bisphosphonates show a protective effect on periprosthetic bone mass, up to 72 months after arthroplasty. Strontium ranelate has been demonstrated to increase the osseointegration of titanium implants in treated animals with improvement of bone microarchitecture and bone biomaterial properties. PMID:25642325

  16. Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin/niacinamide), vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), vitamin ... in appropriate amounts, although rare allergic reactions and skin irritation have occurred. It is also LIKELY SAFE ...

  17. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  18. Diagnosis and Management of Periprosthetic Shoulder Infections.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Garrigues, Grant E

    2014-06-04

    ➤ The unique bacterial flora of the shoulder present diagnostic and treatment challenges that are distinct from those seen with failed hip and knee arthroplasties.➤ The presentation, diagnosis, and management of suppurative periprosthetic joint infections of the shoulder are similar to those of the hip and the knee.➤ Failed arthroplasties with positive cultures (FAPCs) are poorly performing shoulder reconstructions associated with low-virulence microorganisms that do not evoke a suppurative inflammatory response. Propionibacterium acnes is the predominant bacterium isolated from these cases.➤ With improved surgeon awareness and the addition of longer tissue-culture incubation times, detection of FAPCs has become more common. However, management is hampered by the lack of reliable, timely tests that can determine the presence of less virulent organisms in the preoperative or intraoperative settings.➤ The implications of positive culture results in FAPCs are unclear. Key test characteristics such as the false-positive rate and the prevalence of positive cultures in well-performing shoulders are unknown as there is no useful confirmatory test to validate the culture data and no reliable way to detect the presence of less virulent microorganisms without reoperation.➤ Soft-tissue and osseous deficits are frequently encountered when revising previously infected shoulders. The rate of complications in these scenarios is high, and the outcomes are the least favorable compared with revisions for any other indication.➤ The development of a consensus definition of a periprosthetic shoulder infection is critical to future investigations of these devastating complications.

  19. Numerical analysis of an osseointegrated prosthesis fixation with reduced bone failure risk and periprosthetic bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, P K; van Diest, M; Bulstra, S K; Verdonschot, N; Verkerke, G J

    2012-07-26

    Currently available implants for direct attachment of prosthesis to the skeletal system after transfemoral amputation (OPRA system, Integrum AB, Sweden and ISP Endo/Exo prosthesis, ESKA Implants AG, Germany) show many advantages over the conventional socket fixation. However, restraining biomechanical issues such as considerable bone loss around the stem and peri-prosthetic bone fractures are present. To overcome these limiting issues a new concept of the direct intramedullary fixation was developed. We hypothesize that the new design will reduce the peri-prosthetic bone failure risk and adverse bone remodeling by restoring the natural load transfer in the femur. Generic CT-based finite element models of an intact femur and amputated bones implanted with 3 analyzed implants were created and loaded with a normal walking and a forward fall load. The strain adaptive bone remodeling theory was used to predict long-term bone changes around the implants and the periprosthetic bone failure risk was evaluated by the von Mises stress criterion. The results show that the new design provides close to physiological distribution of stresses in the bone and lower bone failure risk for the normal walking as compared to the OPRA and the ISP implants. The bone remodeling simulations did not reveal any overall bone loss around the new design, as opposed to the OPRA and the ISP implants, which induce considerable bone loss in the distal end of the femur. This positive outcome shows that the presented concept has a potential to considerably improve safety of the rehabilitation with the direct fixation implants.

  20. Avermectin B1

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Avermectin B1 ; CASRN 65195 - 55 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  1. Fatigue fracture of an Austin Moore uncemented hemi-arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D Martin; Ashford, Robert U; Collier, Andrew M

    2004-09-01

    Prosthetic component failure occurs in total hip arthroplasty infrequently. Fractures of hemi-arthroplasty components are extremely uncommon. A recent case report highlighted two cases of stem failures in hydroxyapatite- (HA) coated implants. Uncemented Austin Moore hemi-arthroplasties typically fail by loosening or periprosthetic fracture. We report a case and the management of a fractured implant.

  2. Transcriptome-Wide High-Density Microarray Analysis Reveals Differential Gene Transcription in Periprosthetic Tissue From Hips With Chronic Periprosthetic Joint Infection vs Aseptic Loosening.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mohamed; Klawonn, Frank; Brand, Stephan; Stiesch, Meike; Krettek, Christian; Eberhard, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Differentiating between periprosthetic hip infection and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening can be challenging, especially in patients with chronic infections. This study used whole-genome microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptomes of periprosthetic hip tissues to identify genes that are differentially transcripted between chronic periprosthetic hip infection and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. In this pilot study, a total of 24 patients with either chronic periprosthetic hip infection (n = 12) or aseptic hip prosthesis loosening (n = 12) were analyzed. Periprosthetic hip infection was diagnosed based on modified criteria of the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. To evaluate differences in gene transcription, whole-genome microarray analysis was performed on the mRNA of periprosthetic tissue. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene transcription in periprosthetic hip tissue affected by chronic hip infection vs aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. A total of 39 genes had area under the curve values greater than 0.9 for diagnosing chronic periprosthetic hip infection; 5 genes had annotations relevant to infection and metabolism. The 39 genes also included 7 genes that were differentially transcribed but that have no apparent connection to immune response processes plus 27 genes with unknown function. Differences in gene transcription profiles might represent novel diagnostic targets that can be used to differentiate between chronic periprosthetic hip infections and aseptic hip prosthesis loosening. Secondary metabolites of differentially transcripted genes might serve as easily accessible markers for detecting chronic periprosthetic joint infection in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Boeing XF2B-1 (F2B-1): Serving as the prototype for the F2B-1 shipboard fighter, the XF2B-1 differed visually in having a pointed spinner and an unbalanced rudder. Like many aircraft of its day, the Boeing model 69 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  4. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  5. Management of Periprosthetic Hip Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Dong; Prashant, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Total hip joint replacement offers dramatic improvement in the quality of life but periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is the most devastating complication of this procedure. The infection threatens the function of the joint, the preservation of the limb, and occasionally even the life of the patient due to long term hospitalization and high cost. For the surgeon it is a disastrous burden, which requires repeated, complicated procedures to eradicate infection and to provide a mobile joint without pain. Yet in the absence of a true gold standard, the diagnosis of PJI can be elusive. Synovial fluid aspiration, diagnostic imaging, traditional culture, peripheral serum inflammatory markers, and intraoperative frozen sections each have their limitations but continue to be the mainstay for diagnosis of PJI. Treatment options mainly include thorough irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, or a two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. Success in treating PJI depends on extensive surgical debridement and adequate and effective antibiotic therapy. Treatment in two stages using a spacer is recommended for most chronic PJI. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention is the obvious choice for treatment of acute PJI, with good success rates in selected patients. This article presents an overview of recent management concepts for PJI of the hip emphasizing diagnosis and the clinical approach, and also share own experience at our institution. PMID:27536605

  6. The Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Küçükdurmaz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total joint arthroplasty (TJA) adversely affects patient quality of life and health status, and places a huge financial burden on the health care. The first step in combating this complication is prevention, which may include implementation of strategies during the preoperative, intraoperative, or postoperative period. Optimization of the patient with appreciation of the modifiable and non-modifiable factors is crucial. Preoperative optimization involves medical optimization of patients with comorbidities such as diabetes, anemia, malnutrition and other conditions that may predispose the patient to PJI. Among the intraoperative strategies, administration of appropriate and timely antibiotics, blood conservation, gentle soft tissue handling, and expeditious surgery in an ultra clean operating room are among the most effective strategies. During the postoperative period, all efforts should be made to minimize ingress or proliferation of bacteria at the site of the index arthroplasty from draining the wound and hematoma formation. Although the important role of some preventative measures is known, further research is needed to evaluate the role of unproven measures that are currently employed and to devise further strategies for prevention of this feared complication. PMID:28144372

  7. The reconstruction of periprosthetic pelvic discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benedict A; Whittingham-Jones, Paul M; Mitchell, Philip A; Safir, Oleg A; Bircher, Martin D; Gross, Allan E

    2012-09-01

    The surgical techniques and outcomes of acetabular reconstruction for periprosthetic pelvic discontinuity cases are reported. The mean time to surgery for 9 patients with acute pelvic discontinuity was 16.3 days, with 8 patients (88%) having posterior column plating and a porous metal acetabular cup. No cases required revision surgery, with a mean follow-up of 34 months (range, 24-67 months). Of the 62 chronic pelvic discontinuity cases, 20 had an ilioischial cage, with a revision rate of 29%. There were 42 cup-cage reconstructions with an 8-year survivorship of 86.3%, with a mean follow-up of 35 months (range, 24-93 months). Stable reconstruction of chronic pelvic discontinuity was achievable by distraction using a cup-cage acetabular reconstruction; however, satisfactory stability of acute pelvic discontinuity was achieved with compression of the posterior column using screw augmentation of the acetabular shell supplemented by posterior column plating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Plesiomonas shigelloides Periprosthetic Knee Infection After Consumption of Raw Oysters.

    PubMed

    Hustedt, Joshua W; Ahmed, Sarim

    Periprosthetic infections are a leading cause of morbidity after total joint arthroplasty. Common pathogens include Staphylococcus aureus, streptococcus, enterococcus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, there are many cases in which rare bacteria are isolated. This case report describes a periprosthetic knee infection caused by Plesiomonas shigelloides. In the United States, P shigelloides and 2 other Vibrionaceae family members, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, are most often contracted from eating raw oysters and shellfish. P shigelloides usually causes a self-limiting watery diarrhea, but in immunosuppressed people it can cause septicemia. In this case report, a chemically and biologically immunosuppressed man consumed raw oysters and developed P shigelloides septicemia and acute periprosthetic knee infection that required surgical intervention.

  9. Osteoclastogenesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of periprosthetic osteolysis patients and the phenotype of T cells localized in periprosthetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Roato, Ilaria; Caldo, Davide; D'Amico, Lucia; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Godio, Laura; Patanè, Salvatore; Astore, Franco; Grappiolo, Guido; Boggio, Maurizio; Scagnelli, Roberto; Molfetta, Luigi; Ferracini, Riccardo

    2010-10-01

    Arthroplasty is a very successful medical procedure. Failures depend on aseptic loosening caused by periprosthetic osteolysis, where T cells have a contradictory role. We analyzed osteoclastogenesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures of periprosthetic osteolysis patients and the phenotype of T cells localized in periprosthetic tissues. We enrolled 45 subjects with periprosthetic osteolysis (15), stable prosthesis (15) and healthy controls (15). We performed PBMC cultures to study osteoclastogenesis. Osteoclasts and T cell phenotype were examined by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and flow citometry. Periprosthetic osteolysis patients showed spontaneous osteoclastogenesis, which was inhibited by RANK-Fc and T cell depletion. In periprosthetic osteolysis patients' PBMC cultures, CD4 and CD8 T cells increased and CD8 T cells did not express CD25. In periprosthetic tissues T cells were close to osteoclasts, suggesting their interaction. Local CD8 T cells showed a regulatory phenotype, expressing CD25 and FoxP3, while CD4 T cells did not express activation markers. Our data suggest that, in an early stage of periprosthetic osteolysis, T cells may promote osteoclastogenesis, whereas subsequently osteoclasts activate FoxP3/CD8 T cells, which inhibit CD4 effector T cells. This mechanism may explain the previous finding of non-active T cells in periprosthetic tissues.

  10. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  11. Periprosthetic Cyst Formation: An Unusual Complication of Polytetrafluorethylene Prosthesis Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, R.R.; Vincente, L.C.; Ferrer, F.D.; Grau, L.J.; Mulet, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of periprosthetic cyst formation after polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) graft implantation are reported. This complication may have resulted from imperfect incorporation of the graft material by the surrounding tissues. The cause of such defective incorporation, and hence the means of prevention, remains unknown. Images PMID:15226962

  12. Strategies for the prevention of periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Adeli, B; Parvizi, J

    2012-11-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication which can follow a total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although rare, this ongoing threat undermines the success of TJA, a historically reputable procedure. It has haunted the orthopedic community for decades and several ongoing studies have provided insights and new approaches to effectively battle this multilayered problem.

  13. Economical Analysis on Prophylaxis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Periprosthetic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fairen, Mariano; Torres, Ana; Menzie, Ann; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Fernandez-Carreira, José Manuel; Murcia-Mazon, Antonio; Guerado, Enrique; Merzthal, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The economic burden of periprosthetic infections is enormous, but the number of economic studies dealing with this issue is very scarce. This review tries to know the economic literature existing, assess the value of current data, and recognize the less costly and more effective procedures for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic infections. Forty five studies meeting the inclusion criteria and adhering to the quality criteria used were carefully analyzed to extract the economic data of relevance in evaluating the magnitude of problem and the more cost-effective solutions. However, because the heterogeneity and the low-quality of most of these studies meta-analytical technique has not been possible. Instead, the studies have been reviewed descriptively. Optimizing the antibiotic use in the prevention and treatment of periprosthetic infection, combined with systemic and behavioral changes in the operating room; detecting and treating the high-risk groups; a quick, simple, reliable, safe, and cost-effective diagnosis, and the rationale management of the instituted infection, specifically using the different procedures according to each particular case, could allow to improve outcomes and produce the highest quality of life for patients and the lowest economic impact. Nevertheless, the cost effectiveness of different interventions to prevent and to treat the periprosthetic infection remains unclear. PMID:24082966

  14. [Patella fractures in knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Roth, A; Ghanem, M; Fakler, J

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic patella fractures occur both with and without retropatellar joint replacement. A non-operative treatment yields satisfactory results with low morbidity. It can be applied in minimally displaced fractures that have an intact retropatellar component and an intact extensor mechanism, combined with an initial immobilization. The surgical treatment is associated with relatively poor results and with high complication rates. There was only minor improvement of functional results, no matter which surgical technique was used. Surgical intervention is still required in fractures with a loosening of the patellar component, considerable dislocations of fragments, and damage to or rupture of the extensor mechanism. In particular, type II fractures require repair of the extensor mechanism and the fracture or patellectomy. Type III fractures require a revision or resection of the patella, a patelloplasty or total patellectomy. In addition, early or late reconstruction using allograft to restore the extensor mechanism can be taken in consideration.

  15. [Histopathologic diagnostics in endoprosthetics: periprosthetic neosynovialitis, hypersensitivity reaction, and arthrofibrosis].

    PubMed

    Krenn, V; Otto, M; Morawietz, L; Hopf, T; Jakobs, M; Klauser, W; Schwantes, B; Gehrke, T

    2009-06-01

    The durability of endoprosthetic implants of the large joints has increased over the last decades. North American studies have shown a 10-year durability of 94% for prosthetic hip implants, and European studies have shown 10-year durabilities of 88-95%. Pathologists differentiate three etiological disease patterns for the"pathology of endoprosthetics" that lead to reduction of implant durability: 1) periprosthetic particle disease (aseptic loosening), 2) infection, and 3) arthrofibrosis. Four types of neosynovitis/periprosthetic membrane have been determined in a consensus classification: particle-induced type (type I), with a mean prosthesis durability (MPD) of 12 years; infectious type (type II), MPD 2.5 years; combined type (type III), MPD 4.2 years; and indeterminate type (type IV), MPD 5.5 years. There are three histopathologic degrees of arthrofibrosis; grade 1 always needs clinical information for diagnosis, whereas grades 2 and 3 are distinct histopathologic entities.

  16. The role of the macrophage in periprosthetic bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Santerre, J. Paul; Labow, Rosalind S.; Boynton, Erin L.

    2000-01-01

    Aseptic loosening after total joint replacement remains the most common reason for long-term implant failure. Macrophages activated by submicron wear particles of the polyethylene liner used in joint replacement have been shown to be the source of periprosthetic bone loss. Understanding the role of material chemistry in macrophage activation and the subsequent effects that macrophage-derived enzymes play in the degradation of implanted biomaterials is key to developing methods for prolonging the lifespan of implantable materials. PMID:10851410

  17. Boeing F3B-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served aboard the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers Lexington and Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine.

  18. The role of ultrasonography in the assessment of peri-prosthetic hip complications.

    PubMed

    Sdao, Silvana; Orlandi, Davide; Aliprandi, Alberto; Lacelli, Francesca; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sardanelli, Francesco; Serafini, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a widespread option for treating hip osteoarthritis. Peri-prosthetic complications after THA represent a common event influencing patient outcome and costs. The purpose of this paper is to report the use of ultrasonography (US) to detect peri-prosthetic complications in symptomatic patients who underwent THA. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with THA who underwent imaging evaluation between January 2009 and December 2012 at two different institutions. We evaluated the presence/absence of superficial and/or deep peri-prosthetic collections as well as the presence/absence of a cutaneous sinus tract. For patients who underwent both MRI and US, a concordance correlation analysis between US and MR findings was performed. In the reference period, 532 symptomatic patients (mean age ± standard deviation 74 ± 12 years) underwent X-ray and MRI examinations for suspected peri-prosthetic complications. Among them, 111 (20.9 %) underwent also US. Overall, 108 patients underwent both US and MRI. US findings included 67 superficial collections, 48 subcutaneous fistulas, 74 deep peri-prosthetic collections. Twenty-four patients had solid, mass-like peri-prosthetic collections. In 11 patients, no peri-prosthetic complications were seen. MRI findings included 68 superficial collections, 49 subcutaneous fistulas, 79 deep peri-prosthetic collections. Twenty-four patients had solid, mass-like peri-prosthetic collections. In four patients, no peri-prosthetic complications were seen. Concordance analysis between US and MRI findings showed almost perfect agreement (k ≥ 0.89). US is an efficient and practical imaging modality to evaluate peri-prosthetic complications in patients with THA, being almost comparable to MRI in detecting and characterizing these complications.

  19. Diagnosing periprosthetic infection: false-positive intraoperative Gram stains.

    PubMed

    Oethinger, Margret; Warner, Debra K; Schindler, Susan A; Kobayashi, Hideo; Bauer, Thomas W

    2011-04-01

    Intraoperative Gram stains have a reported low sensitivity but high specificity when used to help diagnose periprosthetic infections. In early 2008, we recognized an unexpectedly high frequency of apparent false-positive Gram stains from revision arthroplasties. The purpose of this report is to describe the cause of these false-positive test results. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of all intraoperative Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasty cases during a 3-month interval using microbiologic cultures of the same samples as the gold standard. Methods of specimen harvesting, handling, transport, distribution, specimen processing including tissue grinding/macerating, Gram staining, and interpretation were studied. After a test modification, results of specimens were prospectively collected for a second 3-month interval, and the sensitivity and specificity of intraoperative Gram stains were calculated. The retrospective review of 269 Gram stains submitted from revision arthroplasties indicated historic sensitivity and specificity values of 23% and 92%, respectively. Systematic analysis of all steps of the procedure identified Gram-stained but nonviable bacteria in commercial broth reagents used as diluents for maceration of periprosthetic membranes before Gram staining and culture. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing showed mixed bacterial DNA. Evaluation of 390 specimens after initiating standardized Millipore filtering of diluent fluid revealed a reduced number of positive Gram stains, yielding 9% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Clusters of false-positive Gram stains have been reported in other clinical conditions. They are apparently rare related to diagnosing periprosthetic infections but have severe consequences if used to guide treatment. Even occasional false-positive Gram stains should prompt review of laboratory methods. Our observations implicate dead bacteria in microbiologic reagents as potential sources of false-positive Gram

  20. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  1. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up.

  2. In vivo compatibility of Dynesys(®) spinal implants: a case series of five retrieved periprosthetic tissue samples and corresponding implants.

    PubMed

    Neukamp, M; Roeder, C; Veruva, S Y; MacDonald, D W; Kurtz, S M; Steinbeck, M J

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether particulate debris is present in periprosthetic tissue from revised Dynesys(®) devices, and if present, elicits a biological tissue reaction. Five Dynesys(®) dynamic stabilization systems consisting of pedicle screws (Ti alloy), polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) spacers and a polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) cord were explanted for pain and screw loosening after a mean of 2.86 years (1.9-5.3 years). Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate wear, deformation and surface damage, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to assess surface chemical composition of the spacers. Periprosthetic tissue morphology and wear debris were determined using light microscopy, and PCU and PET wear debris by polarized light microscopy. All implants had surface damage on the PCU spacers consistent with scratches and plastic deformation; 3 of 5 exhibited abrasive wear zones. In addition to fraying of the outer fibers of the PET cords in five implants, one case also evidenced cord fracture. The pedicle screws were unremarkable. Patient periprosthetic tissues around the three implants with visible PCU damage contained wear debris and a corresponding macrophage infiltration. For the patient revised for cord fracture, the tissues also contained large wear particles (>10 μm) and giant cells. Tissues from the other two patients showed comparable morphologies consisting of dense fibrous tissue with no inflammation or wear debris. This is the first study to evaluate wear accumulation and local tissue responses for explanted Dynesys(®) devices. Polymer wear debris and an associated foreign-body macrophage response were observed in three of five cases.

  3. Microorganisms responsible for periprosthetic knee infections in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Holleyman, Richard J; Baker, Paul; Charlett, Andre; Gould, Kate; Deehan, David J

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to delineate epidemiology of infecting microorganism genus in first-time revision knee arthroplasty for indication of periprosthetic joint infection in England and Wales using linked registry data. From the National Joint Registry database for England and Wales, a consecutive series of primary knee arthroplasties performed between April 2003 and January 2014 that went on to have a revision for periprosthetic infection were identified (n = 2810). Each case was then linked to microbiology data held by Public Health England in order to identify infecting microorganism at time of revision surgery established from intra-operative cultures. Following data linkage, 403 culture results at time of revision surgery were identified in a group of 331 patients. The demographic characteristics of five microorganism groups were compared: pure staphylococcus (single genus), pure streptococcus (single genus), other gram-positive infections (single genus), gram-negative infections (single genus) and mixed genus infections. Staphylococcus species was the most common organism genus isolated after revision of a primary implant for infection and present in 72 % of cases overall (71.3 % of patients with a single-genus infection and 76.8 % of patients with mixed genus infection). A pure staphylococcal infection was present in 59 % of all cases. A single-genus infection was responsible for infection in 83.1 % of cases, and mixed genera were responsible in 16.9 % of cases. A significant difference was observed for mean age at primary procedure in the cohort of patients where there was an isolated pure streptococcal infection (73.2 years) when compared to gram-negative infections (65.0 years). No other significant differences were observed between microorganism groups in terms of BMI, gender, ASA grade, indication for primary procedure and primary implant characteristics. Staphylococci were the most commonly isolated organism species responsible for periprosthetic

  4. Emerging ideas: Instability-induced periprosthetic osteolysis is not dependent on the fibrous tissue interface.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Bostrom, Mathias P G; Fahlgren, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Stable initial fixation of a total joint arthroplasty implant is critical to avoid the risk of aseptic loosening and premature clinical failure. With implant motion, a fibrous tissue layer forms at the bone-implant interface, leading to implant migration and periprosthetic osteolysis. At the time of implant revision surgery, proresorptive signaling cytokines are expressed in the periimplant fibrous membrane. However, the exact role of this fibrous tissue in causing periprosthetic osteolysis attributable to instability remains unknown. We propose an alternative mechanism of periprosthetic osteolysis independent of the fibrous tissue layer, where pressurized fluid flow along the bone-implant interface activates mechanosensitive osteocytes in the periprosthetic bone, causing the release of proresorptive cytokines and subsequent osteoclast differentiation and osteolysis. An animal model for instability-induced osteolysis that mimics the periprosthetic bone-implant interface will be used. In this model, a fibrous tissue membrane is allowed to form in the periprosthetic zone, and pressurized fluid flow transmitted through this membrane reliably creates osteolytic lesions in the periprosthetic bone. In this study, half of the rats will have the fibrous tissue present, while the other half will not. We will determine whether the fibrous tissue membrane is essential for the release of proosteoclastic cytokines, leading to osteoclast differentiation and periprosthetic bone loss, by measuring the volume of bone resorption and presence of proresorptive cytokines at the bone-implant interface. We will determine whether the fibrous tissue membrane is crucial for osteoclastogenic signaling in the setting of periimplant osteolysis. In the future, this will allow us to test therapeutic interventions, such as specific cytokine inhibitors or alterations in implant design, which may translate into new, clinically relevant strategies to prevent osteolysis.

  5. [Periprosthetic joint infection caused by Rhodococcus equi. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sallai, Imre; Péterfy, Nóra; Sanatkhani, Mohammad; Bejek, Zoltán; Antal, Imre; Prinz, Gyula; Kristóf, Katalin; Skaliczki, Gábor

    2017-07-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare pathogen in humans causing infections mostly in immunocompromised hosts. We present the first case of periprosthetic joint infection caused by Rhodococcus equi. An 88-year-old male patient was referred to our clinic with a history of fever and right hip pain. The patient had multiple hip surgeries including total joint arthroplasty and revision for aseptic loosening on the right side. He was immunocompetent, but his additional medical history was remarkable for diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy and stroke with hemiplegia resulting in immobilization. Radiography showed stable components, joint aspirate yielded Rhodococcus equi. Irrigation and debridement was proposed, but the patient refused any surgical intervention. Therefore antibiotic therapy was administered. At the last follow-up the patient is free of complaints but the C-reactive protein level is still elevated. This case illustrates the possible role of Rhodococcus equi in medical device-associated infections. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(27): 1071-1074.

  6. Forced-Air Warming Discontinued: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Rates Drop.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Scott D

    2017-06-23

    Several studies have shown that the waste heat from forced-air warming (FAW) escapes near the floor and warms the contaminated air resident near the floor. The waste heat then forms into convection currents that rise up and contaminate the sterile field above the surgical table. It has been shown that a single airborne bacterium can cause a periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following joint replacement surgery. We retrospectively compared PJI rates during a period of FAW to a period of air-free conductive fabric electric warming (CFW) at three hospitals. Surgical and antibiotic protocols were held constant. The pooled multicenter data showed a decreased PJI rate of 78% following the discontinuation of FAW and a switch to air-free CFW (n=2034; P=0.002). The 78% reduction in joint implant infections observed when FAW was discontinued suggests that there is a link between the waste FAW heat and PJIs.

  7. Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (pigmented villonodular synovitis-)-like changes in periprosthetic interface membranes.

    PubMed

    Söder, Stephan; Sesselmann, Stefan; Aigner, Thomas; Oehler, Stephan; Agaimy, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TSGCT; synonym, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)) is a rare low-grade mesenchymal neoplasm of either intra-articular or extra-articular origin. The etiopathogenesis of TSGCT is still uncertain, but recent studies showed a translocation involving colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) gene in a subset of cases. Histological features mimicking TSGCT can sometimes be encountered in periprosthetic interface membranes. To investigate the frequency and morphologic spectrum of this phenomenon, we conducted a systematic analysis of 477 periprosthetic interface membranes and performed immunohistochemical analysis on a subset of lesions compared to genuine TSGCT. In 26 of 477 periprosthetic membrane samples (5 %), at least some TSGCT-like features were found and 18 cases (4 %) strongly resembled it. Wear particles were detected in 100 % of the TSGCT-like lesions but only in 63.3 % of the whole cohort of periprosthetic membranes (p value <0.001). Immunohistochemistry comparing true TSGCT and TSGCT-like membranes showed similar inflammatory infiltrates with slightly elevated CD3+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and a slightly higher proliferation index in TSGCT samples. In conclusion, TSGCT-like changes in periprosthetic membranes likely represent exuberant fibrohistiocytic inflammatory response induced by wear particles and should be distinguished from genuine (neoplastic) TSGCT. Although TSGCT and TSGCT-like periprosthetic membranes represent different entities, their comparable morphology might reflect analogous morphogenesis.

  8. Fracture Mechanics Evaluation of B-1 Materials. Volume I. Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    cation with- ti fication E = Kisec In a material number) lot ( pieLe number on ’ layout drawing) For weldments, the specimen orientation is that of the...directio’n of 1.5" Ti-6-4 plate 8-07 _____OhI A. 62N~w4-32 (M.A.) --- B- 62NEw4-291 (STOA) -c- 62N~w 4-34 (DBTC .- -. .- , Puw 62NRw 4- 281 (B.A...DEL fA K ( PIel FJ ( t) A. Figure 8.2.1.6-18 Effect of test direction on STW-FGR at __R.T., R=0.08, 60 epm in 2.5" TI-6-4 ring 8-52 ~Vi rolled plus

  9. Temporal radiographic texture analysis in the detection of periprosthetic osteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Chinander, Michael R.; Engh, Charles A. Sr.; Hopper, Robert H. Jr.; Martell, John M.

    2008-01-15

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is one of the most serious long-term problems in total hip arthroplasty. It has been primarily attributed to the body's inflammatory response to submicron polyethylene particles worn from the hip implant, and it leads to bone loss and structural deterioration in the surrounding bone. It was previously demonstrated that radiographic texture analysis (RTA) has the ability to distinguish between osteolysis and normal cases at the time of clinical detection of the disease; however, that analysis did not take into account the changes in texture over time. The goal of this preliminary analysis, however, is to assess the ability of temporal radiographic texture analysis (tRTA) to distinguish between patients who develop osteolysis and normal cases. Two tRTA methods were used in the study: the RTA feature change from baseline at various follow-up intervals and the slope of the best-fit line to the RTA data series. These tRTA methods included Fourier-based and fractal-based features calculated from digitized images of 202 total hip replacement cases, including 70 that developed osteolysis. Results show that separation between the osteolysis and normal groups increased over time for the feature difference method, as the disease progressed, with area under the curve (AUC) values from receiver operating characteristic analysis of 0.65 to 0.72 at 15 years postsurgery. Separation for the slope method was also evident, with AUC values ranging from 0.65 to 0.76 for the task of distinguishing between osteolysis and normal cases. The results suggest that tRTA methods have the ability to measure changes in trabecular structure, and may be useful in the early detection of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  10. Principles of management and results of treating the fractured femur during and after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Nelson V; Mitchell, Philip A; Masri, Bassam A; Garbuz, Donald S; Duncan, Clive P

    2003-01-01

    The management of fractures of the femur during and after total hip arthroplasty can be difficult, and treatment can be fraught with complications. The ideal scenario would be one in which these fractures are prevented. It is important that the surgeon has a through understanding of the principles of managing these fractures and has access to a variety of fixation and prosthetic devices and allograft bone when necessary in order to provide the best treatment. Because periprosthetic fractures range from the very simple (requiring no surgical intervention) to the complex (requiring major revision), a classification system of these fractures aids in understanding both the principles of management and results of treatment.

  11. Treatment of Humeral Fracture after Shoulder Arthroplasty using Functional Brace: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Terabayashi, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Kazu; Takigami, Iori; Ito, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A periprosthetic humeral fracture is rare after shoulder arthroplasty, and such cases have considerable problems. Patients with this kind of fracture are often complicated by osteopenia, other types of severe disease, or are elderly. Surgical treatment of this fracture type carries some risk, and surgeons may be unsure about the most appropriate approach to adopt. Case report: The present case occurred in a 78-year-old woman with an osteoporotic humeral bone, and chronic dislocation of shoulder after shoulder arthroplasty. There were many risk factors for revision surgery or ostheosynthesis. Therefore, we decided to treat the patient by functional bracing. Fortunately, complete radiographic union was confirmed at 17 weeks. She returned to daily life with good functional activity. Conclusion: In our opinion, it is acceptable to select functional bracing for periprosthetic humeral fractures after shoulder arthroplasty without stem loosening in elderly patients with an osteoporotic humeral bone. PMID:28111621

  12. Modulation and Predictors of Periprosthetic Bone Mineral Density following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Felser, Sabine; Skripitz, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) leads to a loss of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD). Great importance is attached to the prevention of periprosthetic bone loss with a view to ensuring a long service life of the prosthesis. In order to provide appropriate recommendations for preventive movement therapy measures to combat peri-implant bone loss, it is necessary to know the predictors of periprosthetic BMD. The aim of this study was (1) to determine the change of periprosthetic BMD of the femur and tibia and (2) to analyse the effects of different predictors on periprosthetic BMD. Twenty-three patients with primary TKA were evaluated 10 days and 3 months postoperatively. The data analysis comprised (1) the change in periprosthetic BMD from pretest to posttest and (2) the correlations between BMD and the variables isometric maximum voluntary force, lean mass, physical activity (step count), and BMI using multiple linear regression and structural equation modelling (SEM). BMD of the distal femur was significantly reduced by 19.7% (P = 0.008) 3 months after surgery, while no changes were found in BMD of the tibia. The results of SEM demonstrate that 55% of the BMD variance was explained by the model (χ2 = 0.002; df = 1; P = 0.96; χ2/df = 0.002; RMSEA < 0.01; TLI = 1.5; CFI = 1.0). A significant direct effect was only evidenced by the variable lean mass (β = 0.38; b = 0.15; SE = 0.07; C.R. = 2.0; P = 0.046). It can be assumed that a large muscle mass with accompanying distribution of high mechanical load in the bones can contribute to local changes of periprosthetic BMD. Concrete recommendations for preventing peri-implant bone loss therefore include exercises which have the aim of maintaining or building up muscle mass. PMID:25793194

  13. Superiority of the sonication method against conventional periprosthetic tissue cultures for diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Tani, Sofia; Lepetsos, Panagiotis; Stylianakis, Antonios; Vlamis, John; Birbas, Konstantinos; Kaklamanos, Ioannis

    2017-07-17

    Diagnosis of periprosthetic infections is challenging. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional periprosthetic tissue culture and culture of sonication fluid of the explanted prostheses. We prospectively enrolled 114 patients undergoing revision hip or knee arthroplasty because of loosening of the prostheses, at our institution, between July 2012 and July 2016. Patients' medical history and demographic characteristics were recorded. The explanted hardware was separated in sterile containers and sonicated under sterile conditions. At least five samples of periprosthetic tissue were sent for culture and histological examination. We compared the culture of samples obtained by sonication of explanted hip and knee prostheses with conventional culture of periprosthetic tissue for the microbiological diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection. Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines were used for the definition of prosthetic joint infection. Sixty-one patients had periprosthetic infection and 53 aseptic loosening (73 hip prostheses and 41 knee prostheses). The sensitivity of sonication fluid culture was 77.04%, and the sensitivity of conventional tissue cultures was 55.73% (p value = 0.012). The specificities of the two methods were 98.11 and 94.34%, respectively. The sensitivity of the histopathological examination of the periprosthetic tissue was 72.10%. There were 17 patients with PJI where the isolated pathogen was detected in SFC but not in PTC, while in five cases the pathogen was detected only in PTC. There were nine patients where no bacteria were detected by any microbiological method and the diagnosis was based on clinical and histological findings, according to the guidelines. The sonication method represents a reliable test for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections with a greater sensitivity and specificity than the conventional periprosthetic tissue cultures.

  14. Detection of bacteria with molecular methods in prosthetic joint infection: sonication fluid better than periprosthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Rak, Mitja; KavčIč, Martina; Trebše, Rihard; CőR, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - The correct diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be difficult because bacteria form a biofilm on the surface of the implant. The sensitivity of culture from sonication fluid is better than that from periprosthetic tissue, but no comparison studies using molecular methods on a large scale have been performed. We assessed whether periprosthetic tissue or sonication fluid should be used for molecular analysis. Patients and methods - Implant and tissue samples were retrieved from 87 patients who underwent revision operation of total knee or total hip arthroplasty. Both sample types were analyzed using broad-range (BR-) PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. The results were evaluated based on the definition of periprosthetic joint infection from the Workgroup of the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. Results - PJI was diagnosed in 29 patients, whereas aseptic failure was diagnosed in 58 patients. Analysis of sonication fluid using BR-PCR detected bacteria in 27 patients, whereas analysis of periprosthetic tissue by BR-PCR detected bacteria in 22 patients. In 6 of 7 patients in whom BR-PCR analysis of periprosthetic tissue was negative, low-virulence bacteria were present. The sensitivity and specificity values for periprosthetic tissue were 76% and 93%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity values for sonication fluid were 95% and 97%. Interpretation - Our results suggest that sonication fluid may be a more appropriate sample than periprosthetic tissue for BR-PCR analysis in patients with PJI. However, further investigation is required to improve detection of bacteria in patients with so-called aseptic failure.

  15. Management of periprosthetic joint infection: the current knowledge: AAOS exhibit selection.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Javad; Adeli, Bahar; Zmistowski, Benjamin; Restrepo, Camilo; Greenwald, Alan Seth

    2012-07-18

    Periprosthetic joint infection continues to frustrate the medical community. Although the demand for total joint arthroplasty is increasing, the burden of such infections is increasing even more rapidly, and they pose a unique challenge because their accurate diagnosis and eradication can prove elusive. This review describes the current knowledge regarding diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic joint infection. A number of tools are available to aid in establishing a diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection. These include the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein concentration, synovial white blood-cell count and differential, imaging studies, tissue specimen culturing, and histological analysis. Multiple definitions of periprosthetic joint infection have been proposed but there is no consensus. Tools under investigation to diagnose such infections include the C-reactive protein concentration in the joint fluid, point-of-care strip tests for the leukocyte esterase concentration in the joint fluid, and other molecular markers of periprosthetic joint infection. Treatment options include irrigation and debridement with prosthesis retention, one-stage prosthesis exchange, two-stage prosthesis exchange with intervening placement of an antibiotic-loaded spacer, and salvage treatments such as joint arthrodesis and amputation. Treatment selection is dependent on multiple factors including the timing of the symptom onset, patient health, the infecting organism, and a history of infection in the joint. Although prosthesis retention has the theoretical advantages of decreased morbidity and improved return to function, two-stage exchange provides a lower rate of recurrent infection. As the burden of periprosthetic joint infection increases, the orthopaedic and medical community should become more familiar with the disease. It is hoped that the tools currently under investigation will aid clinicians in diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection in an

  16. Optimal Periprosthetic Tissue Specimen Number for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Trisha N.; Spelman, Tim; Dylla, Brenda L.; Hughes, John G.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Cheng, Allen C.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated improved sensitivity of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) diagnosis using an automated blood culture bottle system for periprosthetic tissue culture [T. N. Peel et al., mBio 7(1):e01776-15, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01776-15]. This study builds on the prior research by examining the optimal number of periprosthetic tissue specimens required for accurate PJI diagnosis. Current guidelines recommend five to six, which is impractical. We applied Bayesian latent class modeling techniques for estimating diagnostic test properties of conventional culture techniques (aerobic and anaerobic agars and thioglycolate broth) compared to inoculation into blood culture bottles. Conventional, frequentist receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted as a sensitivity analysis. The study was conducted at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, from August 2013 through April 2014 and included 499 consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty from whom 1,437 periprosthetic tissue samples were collected and processed. For conventional periprosthetic tissue culture techniques, the greatest accuracy was observed when four specimens were obtained (91%; 95% credible interval, 77 to 100%), whereas when using inoculation of periprosthetic tissues into blood culture bottles, the greatest accuracy of diagnosis was observed when three specimens were cultured (92%; 95% credible intervals, 79 to 100%). Results of this study show that the greatest accuracy of PJI diagnosis is obtained when three periprosthetic tissue specimens are obtained and inoculated into blood culture bottles or four periprosthetic tissue specimens are obtained and cultured using standard plate and broth cultures. Increasing the number of specimens to five or more, per current recommendations, does not improve accuracy of PJI diagnosis. PMID:27807152

  17. Detection of bacteria with molecular methods in prosthetic joint infection: sonication fluid better than periprosthetic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Mitja; KavčIč, Martina; Trebše, Rihard; CőR, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose The correct diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be difficult because bacteria form a biofilm on the surface of the implant. The sensitivity of culture from sonication fluid is better than that from periprosthetic tissue, but no comparison studies using molecular methods on a large scale have been performed. We assessed whether periprosthetic tissue or sonication fluid should be used for molecular analysis. Patients and methods Implant and tissue samples were retrieved from 87 patients who underwent revision operation of total knee or total hip arthroplasty. Both sample types were analyzed using broad-range (BR-) PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. The results were evaluated based on the definition of periprosthetic joint infection from the Workgroup of the Musculoskeletal Infection Society. Results PJI was diagnosed in 29 patients, whereas aseptic failure was diagnosed in 58 patients. Analysis of sonication fluid using BR-PCR detected bacteria in 27 patients, whereas analysis of periprosthetic tissue by BR-PCR detected bacteria in 22 patients. In 6 of 7 patients in whom BR-PCR analysis of periprosthetic tissue was negative, low-virulence bacteria were present. The sensitivity and specificity values for periprosthetic tissue were 76% and 93%, respectively, and the sensitivity and specificity values for sonication fluid were 95% and 97%. Interpretation Our results suggest that sonication fluid may be a more appropriate sample than periprosthetic tissue for BR-PCR analysis in patients with PJI. However, further investigation is required to improve detection of bacteria in patients with so-called aseptic failure. PMID:27123818

  18. 3D printed liner for treatment of periprosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Won B; Lopez, Osvaldo J; Sharkey, Jillian P; Marden, Kyle R; Murshed, Muhammad Ridwan; Ranganathan, Shivakumar I

    2017-05-01

    In the United States, long standing deep infections of joint arthroplasty, such as total knee and total hip replacements, are treated with two-stage exchange. This requires the removal of the prior implant, placement of an antibiotic eluting spacer block made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), followed by re-implantation of a new implant after treatment with intravenous antibiotics for six to eight weeks. Unfortunately, the use of PMMA as a spacer material has limitations in terms of mechanical and drug-eluting properties. PMMA is brittle and elutes most of the antibiotics within the first few days. Furthermore, the polymerization reaction for PMMA is highly exothermic, thereby limiting the use to heat-stable antibiotics. We hypothesize that the use of a 3D printed polymeric liner made of polylactic acid (PLA) would overcome the limitations of PMMA because it is a stronger and a less brittle material than PMMA. Furthermore, the liner can also act as a controlled drug delivery vehicle by using built in reservoirs and a network of micro-channels as well as by incorporating antibiotics directly into the polymer during manufacturing stage. Finally, the liner can be 3D printed according to the anatomy of the patient and thereby has the potential to transform the manner in which periprosthetic joint infections are currently treated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Retrieval analysis of motion preserving spinal devices and periprosthetic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla; Ianuzzi, Allyson; van Ooij, André; Punt, Ilona M.; Isaza, Jorge; Ross, E.R.S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews certain practical aspects of retrieval analysis for motion preserving spinal implants and periprosthetic tissues as an essential component of the overall revision strategy for these implants. At our institution, we established an international repository for motion-preserving spine implants in 2004. Our repository is currently open to all spine surgeons, and is intended to be inclusive of all cervical and lumbar implant designs such as artificial discs and posterior dynamic stabilization devices. Although a wide range of alternative materials is being investigated for nonfusion spine implants, many of the examples in this review are drawn from our existing repository of metal-on-polyethylene, metal-on-metal lumbar total disc replacements (TDRs), and polyurethane-based dynamic motion preservation devices. These devices are already approved or nearing approval for use in the United States, and hence are the most clinically relevant at the present time. This article summarizes the current literature on the retrieval analysis of these implants and concludes with recommendations for the development of new test methods that are based on the current state of knowledge of in vivo wear and damage mechanisms. Furthermore, the relevance and need to evaluate the surrounding tissue to obtain a complete understanding of the biological reaction to implant component corrosion and wear is reviewed. PMID:25802641

  20. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a...

  1. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.1 Definitions. For purposes of this part— (a...

  2. 8 CFR 343b.1 - Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Application. 343b.1 Section 343b.1 Aliens... NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.1 Application. A naturalized citizen who desires to obtain recognition as a citizen of the United States by a foreign state shall submit an application on...

  3. 45 CFR 5b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions. 5b.1 Section 5b.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.1 Definitions. As... the designee of either such officer or individual. (j) Routine use means the disclosure of a record...

  4. 34 CFR 5b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Definitions. 5b.1 Section 5b.1 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.1 Definitions. As used in this part: (a... records to whom requests may be made, or the designee of either such officer or individual. (j) Routine...

  5. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regents. 242b.1 Section 242b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed...

  6. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regents. 242b.1 Section 242b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed...

  7. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regents. 242b.1 Section 242b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed...

  8. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regents. 242b.1 Section 242b.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS GENERAL... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed...

  9. Stabilization of an acetabular fracture with cables for acute total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mears, D C; Shirahama, M

    1998-01-01

    A critical stage of total hip arthroplasty for an acute acetabular fracture where extensive comminution, impaction, and osteopenia thwart the application of conventional open or closed methods, especially in the elderly, is stable fixation of the acetabulum. The use of 2-mm braided cables permits effective immobilization of the fracture for use in conjunction with a hybrid arthroplasty. The method is consistent with the use of a conventional arthroplastic incision and is suitable for other applications including the fixation of periprosthetic fractures, bulk allografts, and conventional acetabular fractures.

  10. Porous tantalum tibial component prevents periprosthetic loss of bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty for five years-a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Yukihide; Kobayashi, Akio; Ikebuchi, Mitsuhiko; Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Inori, Fumiaki; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    In 21 knees receiving porous tantalum tibial component and 21 knees receiving a cemented cobalt-chromium tibial component, dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed for five years post-operatively. The postoperative decrease in the bone mineral density in the lateral aspect of the tibia was significantly less in knees with porous tantalum tibial components (11.6%) than in knees with cemented cobalt-chromium tibial components (29.6%) at five years (p < 0.05). No prosthetic migration or periprosthetic fracture was detected in either group. The present study is one of the studies with the longest follow-up period on bone mineral density after total knee arthroplasty. Porous tantalum tibial component has a favorable effect on the bone mineral density of the proximal tibia after total knee arthroplasty up to five years. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Citrobacter koseri as a cause of early periprosthetic infection after primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Adam M; Watters, Tyler Steven; Henderson, Robert A; Wellman, Samuel S; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2011-09-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection in the acute setting is usually caused by gram-positive species and remains a major problem facing total joint surgeons. We report a case of a 53-year-old male who presented with drainage 3 weeks after primary total hip arthroplasty. Citrobacter koseri was cultured from an infected hematoma in his deep tissues. Surgical treatment included irrigation and debridement with femoral head and liner exchange. He received a 6-week course of ertapenem and is currently asymptomatic. We present C. koseri as a rare cause of acute periprosthetic infection and offer an effective treatment protocol.

  12. Special Issues Involving Periprosthetic Infection in Immunodeficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tornero, Eduard; Riba, Josep; Garcia-Ramiro, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic systemic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver cirrhosis, neoplasia, etc. have been clearly associated with high rates of SWI. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these observations are still under investigation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in our society. Many of these patients will require an arthroplasty and it appears that the prosthetic infection risk for these types of patients is much higher than in the normal population. The risk of complications due to infection seems to be lower in patients with kidney transplants than in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Both prophylaxis and treatment of infection in patients with CKD should be carried out with a strict monitoring of potentially nephrotoxic antibiotics. The literature on the prognosis and risk of infection in patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant is scarce and occasionally contradictory. The optimal time for the surgery should be determined by taking into account the immunological state of the patient and should be avoided, as much as possible, during the first year after the HSCT. Child’s classification system is the most widely used method of stratifying the surgical risk for patients with cirrhosis; the infection appeared to be associated in a statistically significant way with advanced age and a Child B pre-operative classification. The prevention of prosthetic joint infections in HIV-infected patients should not be significantly different from the prevention for any other patient. Those patients that receive adequate antiretroviral treatment and periodic laboratory control show infection rates and periprosthetic complications that are similar to those for patients not affected by HIV. Therefore, the patient’s level of immunodeficiency is the most important prognostic factor for prosthetic infection. The particular immunological condition of these patients can lead to infections due to particular microorganisms

  13. Periprosthetic breast capsules and immunophenotypes of inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Meza Britez, Maria Elsa; Caballero Llano, Carmelo; Chaux, Alcides

    2012-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Silicone gel-containing breast implants have been widely used for aesthetic and reconstructive mammoplasty. The development of a periprosthetic capsule is considered a local reparative process against the breast implant in which a variety of inflammatory cells may appear. Nevertheless, only few reports have evaluated the immunophenotypes of those inflammatory cells. Herein, we aim to provide more information in this regard evaluating 40 patients with breast implants. METHODS: We studied the immunophenotype of the inflammatory cells of capsular implants using antibodies against lymphocytes (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD45, and CD30) and histiocytes (CD68). Percentages of CD3 and CD20 positive cells were compared using the unpaired Student's t test. Fisher's test was also used to compare Baker grades by implant type, implant profile, and location and the presence of inflammatory cells by implant type. RESULTS: The associations between Baker grades and implant type and location were statistically nonsignificant (p = 0.42 in both cases). However, the use of low profile implants was significantly associated (p = 0.002) with a higher proportion of Baker grades 3 and 4. We found evidence of inflammation in 92.5 % of all implant capsules, with a statistically significant (p = 0.036) higher proportion in textured breast implants. T cells predominated over B cells. Textured implants elicited a more marked response to T cells than smooth implants, with a similar proportion of helper and cytotoxic T cells. Textured implants showed statistically significant higher percentages of CD3 positive cells than smooth implants. Percentages of CD20 positive cells were similar in textured and smooth implants. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that textured breast implants might induce a stronger local T cell immune response. Our findings could shed some light to understand the association of silicone breast implants and some cases of anaplastic large cell lymphomas

  14. The Central Role of Wear Debris in Periprosthetic Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Nestor, Bryan J.; Sculco, Thomas P.

    2006-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains the leading complication of total hip arthroplasty, often resulting in aseptic loosening of the implant, and a requirement for revision surgery. Wear-generated particular debris is the main cause of initiating this destructive process. The purpose of this article is to review recent advances in our understanding of how wear debris causes osteolysis, and emergent strategies for the avoidance and treatment of this disease. The most important cellular target for wear debris is the macrophage, which responds to particle challenge in two distinct ways, both of which contribute to increased bone resorption. First, it is well known that wear debris activates proinflammatory signaling, which leads to increased osteoclast recruitment and activation. More recently, it has been established that wear also inhibits the protective actions of antiosteoclastogenic cytokines such as interferon gamma, thus promoting differentiation of macrophages to bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and possibly lymphocytes may also be involved in responses to wear. At a molecular level, wear particles activate MAP kinase cascades, NFκB and other transcription factors, and induce expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling. Strategies to reduce osteolysis by choosing bearing surface materials with reduced wear properties (such as metal-on-metal) should be balanced by awareness that reducing particle size may increase biological activity. Finally, although therapeutic agents against proinflammatory mediators [such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)] and osteoclasts (bisphosphonates and molecules blocking RANKL signaling) have shown promise in animal models, no approved treatments are yet available to osteolysis patients. Considerable efforts are underway to develop such therapies, and to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:18751821

  15. Clindamycin-rifampin combination therapy for staphylococcal periprosthetic joint infections: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Leijtens, Borg; Elbers, Joris B W; Sturm, Patrick D; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Schreurs, Berend W

    2017-05-02

    Staphylococcal species account for more than 50% of periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) and antimicrobial therapy with rifampin-based combination regimens has been shown effective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of clindamycin in combination with rifampin for the management of staphylococcal PJI. In this retrospective cohort study, patients were included who received clindamycin-rifampin combination therapy to treat a periprosthetic hip or knee infection by Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients were treated according to a standardized treatment algorithm and followed for a median of 54 months. Of the 36 patients with periprosthetic staphylococcal infections, 31 had an infection of the hip, and five had an infection of the knee. Eighteen patients underwent debridement and retention of the implant (DAIR) for an early infection, the other 18 patients underwent revision of loose components in presumed aseptic loosening with unexpected positive cultures. In this study, we report a success rate of 86%, with five recurrent/persistent PJI in 36 treated patients. Cure rate was 78% (14/18) in the DAIR patients and 94% (17/18) in the revision group. Five patients (14%) discontinued clindamycin-rifampin due to side effects. Of the 31 patients completing the clindamycin-rifampin regimen 29 patients (94%) were cured. Combined therapy with clindamycin and rifampin is a safe, well tolerated and effective regimen for the treatment of staphylococcal periprosthetic infection.

  16. Periprosthetic bone turnover after primary total hip arthroplasty measured by single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Venesmaa, P; Vanninen, E; Miettinen, H; Kröger, H

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in periprosthetic bone are common sequlae of prosthetic implants.This prospective 3-year study was performed to follow regional periprosthetic bone turnover after uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty (THA) using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Eighteen patients (nine men, nine women: mean age 61 years, range from 50 to 73 years) with primary hip osteoarthritis underwent either uncemented or cemented THA. The SPECT measurements were taken 6, 12, and 36 months after THA. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed on the patients during follow-up. The mean SPECT uptake ratios decreased significantly in the regions of interest (ROIs) during follow-up compared to baseline value, in the trochanter major (p = 0.006), the trochanter minor (p = 0.009) and the total area (p = 0.018). Despite these decreases the uptake ratios in the medial cortex (p = 0.014), tip (p = 0.002) and total area (p = 0.016) remained significantly higher in the operated side than in the contralateral side (non-operated) 3 years after THA. Changes in bone turnover in the vicinity of the implant did not correlate with changes in periprosthetic BMD. Local periprosthetic bone turnover decreased slowly after THA and did not recover to the level typical of non-operated hips. This led us to suggest that bone turnover around the femoral implants remains increased more than 3 years after THA even if there are no signs of failure of the prosthesis.

  17. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Söylemez, Mehmet Salih; Özkan, Korhan; Kılıç, Bülent; Erinç, Samet

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:26929628

  18. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE PERSONAL...

  19. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE PERSONAL...

  20. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE PERSONAL...

  1. 18 CFR 3b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose. 3b.1 Section 3b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES COLLECTION, MAINTENANCE, USE, AND DISSEMINATION OF RECORDS OF IDENTIFIABLE PERSONAL...

  2. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF... and informally any matter within the Commission's jurisdiction concerning natural gas pipelines, oil...

  3. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF... and informally any matter within the Commission's jurisdiction concerning natural gas pipelines, oil...

  4. 18 CFR 1b.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definitions. 1b.1 Section 1b.1 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF... and informally any matter within the Commission's jurisdiction concerning natural gas pipelines, oil...

  5. 45 CFR 73b.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Public Health Service, because of violation of the post-employment restrictions of the conflict of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope. 73b.1 Section 73b.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION DEBARMENT OR SUSPENSION OF FORMER...

  6. 45 CFR 73b.1 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Public Health Service, because of violation of the post-employment restrictions of the conflict of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope. 73b.1 Section 73b.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION DEBARMENT OR SUSPENSION OF FORMER...

  7. Peri-prosthetic tissue cells show osteogenic capacity to differentiate into the osteoblastic lineage.

    PubMed

    Schoeman, Monique Ae; Oostlander, Angela E; de Rooij, Karien E; Valstar, Edward R; Nelissen, Rob Ghh

    2016-10-07

    During the process of aseptic loosening of prostheses, particulate wear debris induces a continuous inflammatory-like response resulting in the formation of a layer of fibrous peri-prosthetic tissue at the bone-prosthesis interface. The current treatment for loosening is revision surgery which is associated with a high morbidity rate, especially in old patients. Therefore, less invasive alternatives are necessary. One approach could be to re-establish osseointegration of the prosthesis by inducing osteoblast differentiation in the peri-prosthetic tissue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of peri-prosthetic tissue cells to differentiate into the osteoblast lineage. Cells isolated from peri-prosthetic tissue samples (n = 22) - obtained during revision surgeries - were cultured under normal and several osteogenic culture conditions. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by measurement of Alkaline Phosphatse (ALP), mineralization of the matrix and expression of several osteogenic genes. Cells cultured in osteogenic medium showed a significant increase in ALP staining (p = 0.024), mineralization of the matrix (p < 0.001) and ALP gene expression (p = 0.014) compared to normal culture medium. Addition of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), a specific GSK3β inhibitor (GIN) or a combination of BMP and GIN to osteogenic medium could not increase ALP staining, mineralization and ALP gene expression. In one donor, addition of GIN was required to induce mineralization of the matrix. Overall, we observed a high inter-donor variability in response to osteogenic stimuli. In conclusion, peri-prosthetic tissue cells, cultured under osteogenic conditions, can produce alkaline phosphatase and mineralized matrix and therefore show characteristics of differentiation into the osteoblastic lineage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Modified fixations for distal femur fractures following total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and clinical relevance study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Tai, Ching-Lung; Yu, Tzai-Chiu; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chen-Yu; Liu, Keng-Chang

    2016-10-01

    Distal femur fractures adjacent to total knee arthroplasty are a rare yet complex problem. Recently, extramedullary locking plate and retrograde intramedullary nail fixations have become popular options, but the complication rates associated with these procedures are 15-20 %. Modified fixations were assessed in an effort to reduce complications from unstable periprosthetic fractures. Using experimental and finite element methods, this study compared the construct behaviours of a locking plate, a retrograde intramedullary nail, and their modifications (a spiral-blade supplemented in an intramedullary nail or a locking plate/allograft hybrid) when subjected to various fracture types, locations, loading conditions, and bony strength. The implanted models were used to assess construct stiffness, fracture micromotion, and implant stress under different osteoporotic conditions. Finally, we collected 40 cases for radiological analysis to indicate the appropriate procedure for treating periprosthetic fractures following total knee arthroplasty. Regardless of the fracture type, femoral constructs fixed with a conventional or spiral-blade supplemented intramedullary nail exhibited higher axial but lower torsional stiffness than those fixed with a locking plate. Torsional deformation occurred if the lower-positioned fracture had no medial support. The locking plate/allograft construct exhibited the highest stiffness and the least micromotion. A review of 40 clinical cases confirmed the above findings regarding the locking plate/allograft construct. The spiral-blade supplement of retrograde intramedullary nail and locking plate/allograft modified constructs significantly stabilizes the unstable fractured gaps. The locking plate/allograft is recommended for the periprosthetic fractures with deficient bone stock and severe osteoporosis to improve alignment and healing potentials.

  9. Skull fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull fracture Skull fracture ...

  10. B-1 cells temper endotoxemic inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Faintuch, Joel; Ariga, Suely K Kubo; Mariano, Mario; Popi, Ana Flávia; de Souza, Heraldo Possolo; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Soriano, Francisco Garcia

    2011-03-01

    Sepsis syndrome is caused by inappropriate immune activation due to bacteria and bacterial components released during infection. This syndrome is the leading cause of death in intensive care units. Specialized B-lymphocytes located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities are known as B-1 cells. These cells produce IgM and IL-10, both of which are potent regulators of cell-mediated immunity. It has been suggested that B-1 cells modulate the systemic inflammatory response in sepsis. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments in order to investigate a putative role of B-1 cells in a murine model of LPS-induced sepsis. Macrophages and B-1 cells were studied in monocultures and in co-cultures. The B-1 cells produced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in response to LPS. In the B-1 cell-macrophage co-cultures, production of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite) was lower than in the macrophage monocultures, whereas that of IL-10 was higher in the co-cultures. Co-culture of B-1 IL-10(-/-) cells and macrophages did not reduce the production of the proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite). After LPS injection, the mortality rate was higher among Balb/Xid mice, which are B-1 cell deficient, than among wild-type mice (65.0% vs. 0.0%). The Balb/Xid mice also presented a proinflammatory profile of TNF-α, IL-6 and nitrite, as well as lower levels of IL-10. In the early phase of LPS stimulation, B-1 cells modulate the macrophage inflammatory response, and the main molecular pathway of that modulation is based on IL-10-mediated intracellular signaling.

  11. Observation of B Meson decays to b1pi and b1K.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Vazquez, W Panduro; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-12-14

    We present the results of searches for decays of B mesons to final states with a b1 meson and a charged pion or kaon. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 382x10(6) BB[over ] pairs produced in e+e- annihilation. The results for the branching fractions are, in units of 10(-6), B(B+-->b1(0)pi+)=6.7+/-1.7+/-1.0, B(B+-->b1(0)K+)=9.1+/-1.7+/-1.0, B(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=10.9+/-1.2+/-0.9, and B(B0-->b1(-)K+)=7.4+/-1.0+/-1.0, with the assumption that B(b1-->omega pi)=1. We also measure charge and flavor asymmetries A(ch)(B+-->b1(0)pi+)=0.05+/-0.16+/-0.02, Ach(B+-->b1(0)K+)=-0.46+/-0.20+/-0.02, A(ch)(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-0.05+/-0.10+/-0.02, C(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-0.22+/-0.23+/-0.05, DeltaC(B0-->b1(-/+)pi(+/-))=-1.04+/-0.23+/-0.08, and A(ch)(B0-->b1(-)K+)=-0.07+/-0.12+/-0.02. The first error quoted is statistical, and the second systematic.

  12. MR fingerprinting with simultaneous B1 estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sawiak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose MR fingerprinting (MRF) can be used for quantitative estimation of physical parameters in MRI. Here, we extend the method to incorporate B1 estimation. Methods The acquisition is based on steady state free precession MR fingerprinting with a Cartesian trajectory. To increase the sensitivity to the B1 profile, abrupt changes in flip angle were introduced in the sequence. Slice profile and B1 effects were included in the dictionary and the results from two‐ and three‐dimensional (3D) acquisitions were compared. Acceleration was demonstrated using retrospective undersampling in the phase encode directions of 3D data exploiting redundancy between MRF frames at the edges of k‐space. Results Without B1 estimation, T2 and B1 were inaccurate by more than 20%. Abrupt changes in flip angle improved B1 maps. T1 and T2 values obtained with the new MRF methods agree with classical spin echo measurements and are independent of the B1 field profile. When using view sharing reconstruction, results remained accurate (error <10%) when sampling under 10% of k‐space from the 3D data. Conclusion The methods demonstrated here can successfully measure T1, T2, and B1. Errors due to slice profile can be substantially reduced by including its effect in the dictionary or acquiring data in 3D. Magn Reson Med 76:1127–1135, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:26509746

  13. Large dynamic range relative B1+ mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Aaron T.; Aljabar, Paul; Malik, Shaihan J.; Jezzard, Peter; Robson, Matthew D.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Koopmans, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Parallel transmission (PTx) requires knowledge of the B1+ produced by each element. However, B1+ mapping can be challenging when transmit fields exhibit large dynamic range. This study presents a method to produce high quality relative B1+ maps when this is the case. Theory and Methods The proposed technique involves the acquisition of spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images at multiple radiofrequency drive levels for each transmitter. The images are combined using knowledge of the SPGR signal equation using maximum likelihood estimation, yielding an image for each channel whose signal is proportional to the B1+ field strength. Relative B1+ maps are then obtained by taking image ratios. The method was tested using numerical simulations, phantom imaging, and through in vivo experiments. Results The numerical simulations demonstrated that the proposed method can reconstruct relative transmit sensitivities over a wide range of B1+ amplitudes and at several SNR levels. The method was validated at 3 Tesla (T) by comparing it with an alternative B1+ mapping method, and demonstrated in vivo at 7T. Conclusion Relative B1+ mapping in the presence of large dynamic range has been demonstrated through numerical simulations, phantom imaging at 3T and experimentally at 7T. The method will enable PTx to be applied in challenging imaging scenarios at ultrahigh field. Magn Reson Med 76:490–499, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26308375

  14. Periprosthetic Artifact Reduction Using Virtual Monochromatic Imaging Derived From Gemstone Dual-Energy Computed Tomography and Dedicated Software.

    PubMed

    Reynoso, Exequiel; Capunay, Carlos; Rasumoff, Alejandro; Vallejos, Javier; Carpio, Jimena; Lago, Karen; Carrascosa, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of combined virtual monochromatic imaging and metal artifact reduction software (MARS) for the evaluation of musculoskeletal periprosthetic tissue. Measurements were performed in periprosthetic and remote regions in 80 patients using a high-definition scanner. Polychromatic images with and without MARS and virtual monochromatic images were obtained. Periprosthetic polychromatic imaging (PI) showed significant differences compared with remote areas among the 3 tissues explored (P < 0.0001). No significant differences were observed between periprosthetic and remote tissues using monochromatic imaging with MARS (P = 0.053 bone, P = 0.32 soft tissue, and P = 0.13 fat). However, such differences were significant using PI with MARS among bone (P = 0.005) and fat (P = 0.02) tissues. All periprosthetic areas were noninterpretable using PI, compared with 11 (9%) using monochromatic imaging. The combined use of virtual monochromatic imaging and MARS reduced periprosthetic artifacts, achieving attenuation levels comparable to implant-free tissue.

  15. B-1a Lymphocytes Attenuate Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Chng, MH; Alonso, Michael N.; Yuan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-associated insulin resistance, a common precursor of type 2 diabetes, is characterized by chronic inflammation of tissues, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Here we show that B-1a cells, a subpopulation of B lymphocytes, are novel and important regulators of this process. B-1a cells are reduced in frequency in obese high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice, and EGFP interleukin-10 (IL-10) reporter mice show marked reductions in anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by B cells in vivo during obesity. In VAT, B-1a cells are the dominant producers of B cell–derived IL-10, contributing nearly half of the expressed IL-10 in vivo. Adoptive transfer of B-1a cells into HFD-fed B cell–deficient mice rapidly improves insulin resistance and glucose tolerance through IL-10 and polyclonal IgM-dependent mechanisms, whereas transfer of B-2 cells worsens metabolic disease. Genetic knockdown of B cell–activating factor (BAFF) in HFD-fed mice or treatment with a B-2 cell–depleting, B-1a cell–sparing anti-BAFF antibody attenuates insulin resistance. These findings establish B-1a cells as a new class of immune regulators that maintain metabolic homeostasis and suggest manipulation of these cells as a potential therapy for insulin resistance. PMID:25249575

  16. Enhancement of Periprosthetic Bone Quality with Topical Hydroxyapatite-Bisphosphonate Composite

    PubMed Central

    Suratwala, Sanjeev J.; Cho, Samuel K.; van Raalte, Jonathan J.; Park, Sang Hyun; Seo, Sung Wook; Chang, Seong-Sil; Gardner, Thomas R.; Lee, Francis Young-In

    2008-01-01

    Background: Implant loosening is associated with inflammatory bone loss induced by ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris. We hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite-bisphosphonate composite improves periprosthetic bone quality and osseous integration of an intramedullary implant even in the presence of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles in an experimental rat femur model. Methods: A preliminary in vitro study determined the optimal concentration of zoledronate (50 μM) that would maximally decrease osteoclasts without harming osteoblasts. Hydroxyapatite-coated intramedullary nails were implanted bilaterally in the femora of sixteen rats (the control group), and hydroxyapatite-zoledronate-coated nails were implanted bilaterally in the femora of sixteen rats (the experimental group). Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles were introduced into the femoral canal before implantation. Eight rats from each group were killed at six weeks, and the remaining rats were killed at six months. Periprosthetic bone mass was analyzed by dual x-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography. Osseous integration was examined by biomechanical testing of pullout strength. Results: The mean bone area (and standard deviation) in the periprosthetic bone region was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) in the hydroxyapatite-zoledronate group (2.388 ± 0.960 mm2) than in the control group (0.933 ± 0.571 mm2). This difference was larger in the six-week group than in the six-month group (p = 0.03). The average peak pullout force for the treated femora (241.0 ± 95.1 N) was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) than that for the controls (55.6 ± 49.0 N). This difference was similar in the six-week and six-month groups. The energy required for nail pullout was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) for the treated femora (521.6 ± 293.8 N-mm) than for the controls (142.2 ± 152.1 N-mm). This difference in energy to pullout was similar in the six-week and six

  17. Enhancement of periprosthetic bone quality with topical hydroxyapatite-bisphosphonate composite.

    PubMed

    Suratwala, Sanjeev J; Cho, Samuel K; van Raalte, Jonathan J; Park, Sang Hyun; Seo, Sung Wook; Chang, Seong-Sil; Gardner, Thomas R; Lee, Francis Young-In

    2008-10-01

    Implant loosening is associated with inflammatory bone loss induced by ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris. We hypothesized that a hydroxyapatite-bisphosphonate composite improves periprosthetic bone quality and osseous integration of an intramedullary implant even in the presence of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles in an experimental rat femur model. A preliminary in vitro study determined the optimal concentration of zoledronate (50 microM) that would maximally decrease osteoclasts without harming osteoblasts. Hydroxyapatite-coated intramedullary nails were implanted bilaterally in the femora of sixteen rats (the control group), and hydroxyapatite-zoledronate-coated nails were implanted bilaterally in the femora of sixteen rats (the experimental group). Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene particles were introduced into the femoral canal before implantation. Eight rats from each group were killed at six weeks, and the remaining rats were killed at six months. Periprosthetic bone mass was analyzed by dual x-ray absorptiometry and microcomputed tomography. Osseous integration was examined by biomechanical testing of pullout strength. The mean bone area (and standard deviation) in the periprosthetic bone region was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) in the hydroxyapatite-zoledronate group (2.388 +/- 0.960 mm2) than in the control group (0.933 +/- 0.571 mm2). This difference was larger in the six-week group than in the six-month group (p = 0.03). The average peak pullout force for the treated femora (241.0 +/- 95.1 N) was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) than that for the controls (55.6 +/- 49.0 N). This difference was similar in the six-week and six-month groups. The energy required for nail pullout was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) for the treated femora (521.6 +/- 293.8 N-mm) than for the controls (142.2 +/- 152.1 N-mm). This difference in energy to pullout was similar in the six-week and six-month groups. Regression

  18. Risk Factors for Subtrochanteric and Diaphyseal Fractures: The Study of Osteoporotic Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Nicola; Schwartz, Ann V.; Palermo, Lisa; Jin, Jenny J.; Wustrack, Rosanna; Cauley, Jane A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Kelly, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Context: Patients on long-term bisphosphonate therapy may have an increased incidence of low-energy subtrochanteric and diaphyseal (SD) femoral fractures. However, the incidence and risk factors associated with these fractures have not been well defined. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for low-energy SD fractures in the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF). Design: Low-energy SD fractures were identified from a review of radiographic reports obtained between 1986 and 2010 in women in the SOF. Among the SD fractures, pathological, periprosthetic, and traumatic fractures were excluded. We assessed risk factors for SD fractures as well as risk factors for femoral neck (FN) and intertrochanteric (IT) hip fractures using both age-adjusted and multivariate time-dependent proportional hazards models. During this follow-up, only a small minority had ever used bisphosphonates. Results: Forty-five women sustained low-energy subtrochanteric/diaphyseal femoral fractures over a total follow-up of 140 000 person-years. The incidence of SD fracture was 3.2 per 10 000 person-years compared with a total hip fracture incidence of 110 per 10 000 person-years. A total of about 12% of women reported bisphosphonate use at 1 or more visits. In multivariate analyses, age, total hip bone mineral density (BMD), bisphosphonate use, and history of diabetes emerged as independent risk factors for SD fractures. Risk factors for FN and IT fractures included age, BMD, and history of falls or prior fractures. Bisphosphonate use was protective against FN fractures, whereas there was an increased risk of SD fractures (hazard ratio 2.58, P = .049) with bisphosphonate use after adjustment for other risk factors for fracture. Conclusions: In SOF, low-energy SD fractures were rare occurrences, far outnumbered by FN and IT fractures. Typical risk factors were associated with FN and IT fractures, whereas only age, total hip BMD, and history of

  19. Altered load transfer in the pelvis in the presence of periprosthetic osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jacob T; Fernandez, Justin W; Millar, James S; Walker, Cameron G; Howie, Donald W; Shim, Vickie B

    2014-11-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis in the retroacetabular region with cancellous bone loss is a recognized phenomenon in the long-term follow-up of total hip replacement. The effects on load transfer in the presence of defects are less well known. A validated, patient-specific, 3D finite element (FE) model of the pelvis was used to assess changes in load transfer associated with periprosthetic osteolysis adjacent to a cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) component. The presence of a cancellous defect significantly increased (p < 0.05) von Mises stress in the cortical bone of the pelvis during walking and a fall onto the side. At loads consistent with single leg stance, this was still less than the predicted yield stress for cortical bone. During higher loads associated with a fall onto the side, highest stress concentrations occurred in the superior and inferior pubic rami and in the anterior column of the acetabulum with larger cancellous defects.

  20. Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection: The Role of Nuclear Medicine May Be Overestimated.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio; Lamberton, Courtney; Lichstein, Paul; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-06-01

    Although the International Consensus Meeting on Periprosthetic Joint Infection's definition of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) does not include nuclear imaging as part of the diagnostic criteria, many contemporary nuclear imaging studies are reporting exceptional results in PJI diagnosis. We conducted a systematic review of studies published from 2004 to 2012 reporting the accuracy of nuclear imaging for diagnosis of PJI, utilizing a specially designed tool (QUADAS-2) for critical appraisal and investigation of bias. Our results revealed high risk of bias as well as high levels of concern regarding the clinical applicability of these tests in a majority of the studies. On the basis of our findings, we recommend that the use of nuclear imaging for diagnosis of PJI be limited to a few select cases.

  1. Revision of late periprosthetic infections of total hip endoprostheses: pros and cons of different concepts

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Many concepts have been devised for the treatment of late periprosthetic infections of total hip prostheses. A two-stage revision with a temporary antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer and a cemented prosthesis appears to be the most preferred procedure although, in recent times, there seems to be a trend towards cementless implants and a shorter period of antibiotic treatment. Because of the differences in procedure, not only between studies but also within studies, it cannot be decided which period of parenteral antibiotic treatment and which spacer period is the most suitable. The fact that comparable rates of success can be achieved with different treatment regimens emphasises the importance of surgical removal of all foreign materials and the radical debridement of all infected and ischaemic tissues and the contribution of these crucial procedures to the successful treatment of late periprosthetic infections. PMID:19834595

  2. Aflatoxin B1 in common Egyptian foods.

    PubMed

    Selim, M I; Popendorf, W; Ibrahim, M S; el Sharkawy, S; el Kashory, E S

    1996-01-01

    Samples of common Egyptian foods (17 nuts and seeds, 10 spices, 31 herbs and medicinal plants, 12 dried vegetables, and 28 cereal grains) were collected from markets in Cairo and Giza. A portion of each sample was extracted with chloroform, and the concentrated extract was cleaned by passing through a silica gel column. Aflatoxin B1 was determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection. The highest prevalence of aflatoxin B1 was in nuts and seeds (82%), followed by spices (40%), herbs and medicinal plants (29%), dried vegetables (25%), and cereal grains (21%). The highest mean concentration of aflatoxin B1 was in herb and medicinal plants (49 ppb), followed by cereals (36 ppb), spices (25 ppb), nuts and seeds (24 ppb), and dried vegetables (20 ppb). Among nuts and seeds, the prevalence of aflatoxin B1 was highest (100%) in watermelon seeds, inshell peanuts, and unshelled peanuts. The lowest prevalence and concentrations were in hommos (garbanzo beans). The highest concentrations of aflatoxin B1 were detected in foods that had no potential for field contamination but required drying during processing and storage, such as pomegranate peel, watermelon seeds, and molokhia.

  3. Improved Diagnosis of Prosthetic Joint Infection by Culturing Periprosthetic Tissue Specimens in Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Trisha N.; Dylla, Brenda L.; Hughes, John G.; Lynch, David T.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Cheng, Allen C.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite known low sensitivity, culture of periprosthetic tissue specimens on agars and in broths is routine. Culture of periprosthetic tissue samples in blood culture bottles (BCBs) is potentially more convenient, but it has been evaluated in a limited way and has not been widely adopted. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of inoculation of periprosthetic tissue specimens into blood culture bottles with standard agar and thioglycolate broth culture, applying Bayesian latent class modeling (LCM) in addition to applying the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) criteria for prosthetic joint infection. This prospective cohort study was conducted over a 9-month period (August 2013 to April 2014) at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and included all consecutive patients undergoing revision arthroplasty. Overall, 369 subjects were studied; 117 (32%) met IDSA criteria for prosthetic joint infection, and 82% had late chronic infection. Applying LCM, inoculation of tissues into BCBs was associated with a 47% improvement in sensitivity compared to the sensitivity of conventional agar and broth cultures (92.1 versus 62.6%, respectively); this magnitude of change was similar when IDSA criteria were applied (60.7 versus 44.4%, respectively; P = 0.003). The time to microorganism detection was shorter with BCBs than with standard media (P < 0.0001), with aerobic and anaerobic BCBs yielding positive results within a median of 21 and 23 h, respectively. Results of our study demonstrate that the semiautomated method of periprosthetic tissue culture in blood culture bottles is more sensitive than and as specific as agar and thioglycolate broth cultures and yields results faster. PMID:26733067

  4. What is a "periprosthetic shoulder infection"? A systematic review of two decades of publications.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jason E; Somerson, Jeremy S; Vo, Kiet V; Matsen, Frederick A

    2017-04-01

    While as many as 50% of revision shoulder arthroplasties are culture positive, a consistent, clinically useful definition of a "periprosthetic shoulder infection" is lacking. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature with respect to (1) the definition of a "periprosthetic shoulder infection", (2) the pre-operative evaluation for possible infection, and (3) the harvesting and culturing of specimens at the time of surgical revision. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, we identified 20 studies concerning infection at the time of revision shoulder arthroplasty. The review was registered in the international Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. An explicit definition of infection was not present in six studies (27%). Classification systems used for periprosthetic hip and knee infections were used in three studies (14%). Clinical signs and symptoms were used in all definitions, but most studies did not report microbiologic results or culturing practices. Synthesis of the literature on failed arthroplasties with positive cultures is compromised by lack of standardization, leaving surgeons without secure evidence on which to base diagnostic and treatment decisions. These decisions would be better informed if authors used a consistent approach in the evaluation of failed arthroplasties with respect to the number and source of specimens submitted, the culture technique, the number of specimens that became culture positive, the bacteria identified, and the bacterial load recovered from the shoulder. This was a systematic review of reports of all levels.

  5. Expression of CD11c in periprosthetic tissues from failed total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Chamaon, Kathrin; Barber, Henriette; Awiszus, Friedemann; Feuerstein, Bernd; Lohmann, Christoph H

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we characterize integrin CD11c (αXß2) expression in periprosthetic tissues of 45 hip revisions. Tissues were retrieved from 23 ceramic-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), 20 metal-on-UHMWPE, and 2 metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (THAs). Capsular tissue retrieved during primary THA from 19 patients served as controls. We identified a system to identify important immunohistochemical markers that are expressed in aseptic loosening. We focused on CD11c, CD68 and CD14. We observed that the CD11c molecule possesses four different cellular patterns in the periprosthetic tissues. Three of them are associated with the occurrence of UHMWPE abrasive material. Double staining with CD14 and CD68 was used for a more detailed analysis of the CD11c expressing cells. We observed that all forms of CD11c positive cells are CD68 positive however, only two forms of CD11c expressing cells are positive for CD14. Providing cellular diversity of CD11c expression in periprosthetic tissue, our results provide a contribution toward the further understanding of different cellular mechanisms to foreign body material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Efficacy of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in determining periprosthetic hip infections.

    PubMed

    Costa, Christopher R; Johnson, Aaron J; Naziri, Qais; Maralunda, German A; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    The diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections is often challenging. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) level blood laboratory tests are commonly used to aid in the diagnosis. We studied the sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative rates of ESR and CRP level in a prospective group of patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty between 2000 and 2008. Seventy-seven patients with periprosthetic hip infections and ESR and CRP data were identified. Chi-square analysis was performed to determine the significance of false-negatives, compared with sex, body mass index, primary diagnosis, infection type, and immunity status. ESR had 89% sensitivity and 69% specificity. CRP level had 93% sensitivity and 40% specificity. The false-negative rate was 10.8% for ESR and 7% for CRP level. The false-negative rate for ESR and CRP level combined (with either result positive) was 3%. All false-negatives in the combined group were immunocompromised. Chi-square analysis did not find a significant correlation between false-negatives and any other variables. ESR and CRP level are useful in the diagnosis of periprosthetic hip infections. Ordering these tests concurrently reduces the chance of false-negative results.

  7. 7 CFR 1b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.1 Purpose. (a) This part supplements the regulations for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), for which regulations were published by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in 40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508. This...

  8. 7 CFR 1b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.1 Purpose. (a) This part supplements the regulations for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), for which regulations were published by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in 40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508. This part...

  9. 7 CFR 1b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.1 Purpose. (a) This part supplements the regulations for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), for which regulations were published by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in 40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508. This part...

  10. 7 CFR 1b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.1 Purpose. (a) This part supplements the regulations for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), for which regulations were published by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in 40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508. This part...

  11. 7 CFR 1b.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 1b.1 Purpose. (a) This part supplements the regulations for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), for which regulations were published by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in 40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508. This part...

  12. 32 CFR 242b.1 - Regents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SCIENCES § 242b.1 Regents. (a) History and name. The Congress of the United States in the Uniformed... to conduct the business of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and designated this body “the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences,” referred...

  13. B1 bradykinin receptors and sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. L.; Naeem, S.; Phagoo, S. B.; Campbell, E. A.; Urban, L.; Burgess, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The location of the B1 bradykinin receptors involved in inflammatory hyperalgesia was investigated. 2. No specific binding of the B1 bradykinin receptor ligand [3H]-des-Arg10-kallidin was detected in primary cultures of rat dorsal root ganglion neurones, even after treatment with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1). 3. In dorsal root ganglion neurones, activation of B2 bradykinin receptors stimulated polyphosphoinositidase C. In contrast, B1 bradykinin receptor agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM) failed to activate polyphosphoinositidase C, even in neurones that had been treated with interleukin-1 beta (100 iu ml-1), prostaglandin E2 (1 microM) or prostaglandin I2 (1 microM). 4. Dorsal root ganglion neurones removed from rats (both neonatal and 14 days old) that had been pretreated with inflammatory mediators (Freund's complete adjuvant, or carrageenan) failed to respond to B1 bradykinin receptor selective agonists (des-Arg9-bradykinin up to 10 microM and des-Arg10-kallidin up to 1 microM). 5. Bradykinin (25 nM to 300 nM) evoked ventral root responses when applied to peripheral receptive fields or central terminals of primary afferents in the neonatal rat spinal cord and tail preparation. In contrast, des-Arg9-bradykinin (50 nM to 500 nM) failed to evoke ventral root depolarizations in either control rats or in animals that developed inflammation following ultraviolet irradiation of the tail skin. 6. The results of the present study imply that the B1 bradykinin receptors that contribute to hypersensitivity in models of persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia are located on cells other than sensory neurones where they may be responsible for releasing mediators that sensitize or activate the nociceptors. PMID:8832074

  14. Femoral head fractures: hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Ullmark, Gösta

    2014-10-02

    Most femoral neck fractures are osteoporotic fractures in the elderly. The one-year mortality after neck fracture in this group is 24%.For hemiarthroplasty (HA) the bipolar heads have a risk reduction for reoperation due to acetabular erosion compared with monoblock heads. Surprisingly, the bipolar head had an increased reoperation risk for dislocation, infection and for periprosthetic fracture.Total hip arthroplasty (THA) after fracture has a four-fold raised risk for dislocation compared with THA after osteoarthritis. A larger head on the same neck (head to neck ratio) results in a theoretically larger range of movement and hence less risk for dislocation. The dual mobility bearing has, theoretically, the largest range of movement and good clinical results.Functional results are better for THA compared with HA. Arthroplasty for fracture has much better results compared with arthroplasty after a failed internal fixation; the risk for reoperation is more than doubled for the latter.A Swedish hip arthroplasty register study found a 20-fold higher risk for periprosthetic fracture when comparing uncemented HA with matt cemented HA. Also a polished cemented stem had 13½-fold higher risks compared with a matt.The mortality during the first day after surgery is higher for cemented compared with uncemented arthroplasties, but lower after one week, one month and one year. Analysing the time points together resulted in no difference.A matt cemented THA with a maximum head size, maybe dual mobility, has the best results, and is also for the low-demanding elderly.

  15. Hemiarthroplasty for Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in the Elderly Has a Low Conversion Rate.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Matthew J; Danoff, Jonathan R; Murtaugh, Taylor S; Trofa, David P; Sawires, Andrew N; Macaulay, William B

    2017-01-01

    Hemiarthroplasty (HA) has been a mainstay treatment for displaced femoral neck fractures for many years. The purpose of this study was to report the conversion rate of HA to total hip arthroplasty (THA) for displaced femoral neck fractures and compare outcomes between implant constructs (bipolar vs unipolar), fixation options (cemented vs cementless stems), and age groups (<75 years vs ≥75 years). We retrospectively reviewed the results of a consecutive cohort of 686 patients who underwent HA for the treatment of femoral neck fractures at our institution between 1999 and 2013 with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. The overall component revision rate, including conversion to THA, revision HA, revision with open reduction internal fixation, and Girdlestone procedure, was 5.6% (39/686). Seventeen patients (2.5%) were converted from HA to THA at an average of 1.9 years after index procedure. A significantly lower conversion rate of 1.4% (7/499 patients) was found in the older patient cohort (≥75 years old) compared to 5.3% (11/187) in the younger cohort. The most common causes for conversion surgery to THA were acetabular wear (5 patients), aseptic loosening (4 patients), and periprosthetic fracture (3 patients). There was a significantly lower rate of periprosthetic fracture (0.4% vs 2.5%, P value .025) in the cemented implant group compared to the cementless group. We observed a higher rate of dislocations in the bipolar vs unipolar group (3.8% vs 1%, P value .02) and no other significant differences between these groups. We observed a low reoperation rate for this cohort of patients, relatively higher conversion rates for the younger population, fewer periprosthetic fractures with the use of cemented stems, and no advantage of bipolar over unipolar prostheses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraoperative subcutaneous wound closing culture sample: a predicting factor for periprosthetic infection after hip- and knee-replacement?

    PubMed

    Frank, Christian B; Adams, Martin; Kroeber, Markus; Wentzensen, Andreas; Heppert, Volkmar; Schulte-Bockholt, Dietrich; Guehring, Thorsten

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether intraoperative subcutaneous wound closing culture samples (WCCS) are useful to predict periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Here we prospectively followed 167 out of a total of 175 consecutive patients with primary total hip (THR) or knee replacement (TKR) between 01/2002 and 12/2002 for a mean follow-up period of 5 years; of those patients, n = 159 (96.8%) underwent WCCS. The results showed a positive WCCS in n = 9 cases (5.8%). Nine patients developed postoperative wound complication and required revision surgery. Two patients developed signs of a deep periprosthetic infection; however, only one out of nine patients had initial positive WCCS. Our results thus indicate that WCCS during primary joint replacement is not an appropriate predictive method to identify patients at risk for periprosthetic joint infections.

  17. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  18. Feasibility Study B-1 Power Controller.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    Study performed by the Autonetics Strategic Systems Division ( ASSD ) of Rockwell International on Contract N62269-79-C-0294. The objective of this study...Modify the design of the ASSD B-1 SSPC, Part Number 12880-507-1, to be a 115 Vac quadruple SSPC unit, with a SOSTEL compatible interface. 3.1.2 115 Vac...Primary Power Modifications. The ASSD SSPC Unit, Appendix A, contains four identical PC’s operating from 230 Vac primary power. Referring to Figure 1

  19. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by ... up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of a ...

  20. Greenstick Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Greenstick fractures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A greenstick fracture occurs when a bone bends and cracks, instead of breaking completely into separate pieces. The fracture looks similar to what happens when you try ...

  1. B-1 AFT Nacelle Flow Visualization Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celniker, Robert

    1975-01-01

    A 2-month program was conducted to perform engineering evaluation and design tasks to prepare for visualization and photography of the airflow along the aft portion of the B-1 nacelles and nozzles during flight test. Several methods of visualizing the flow were investigated and compared with respect to cost, impact of the device on the flow patterns, suitability for use in the flight environment, and operability throughout the flight. Data were based on a literature search and discussions with the test personnel. Tufts were selected as the flow visualization device in preference to several other devices studied. A tuft installation pattern has been prepared for the right-hand aft nacelle area of B-1 air vehicle No.2. Flight research programs to develop flow visualization devices other than tufts for use in future testing are recommended. A design study was conducted to select a suitable motion picture camera, to select the camera location, and to prepare engineering drawings sufficient to permit installation of the camera. Ten locations on the air vehicle were evaluated before the selection of the location in the horizontal stabilizer actuator fairing. The considerations included cost, camera angle, available volume, environmental control, flutter impact, and interference with antennas or other instrumentation.

  2. The direct anterior approach in hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kerstin; Audigé, Laurent; Kuehnel, Stefanie-Peggy; Helmy, Naeder

    2012-09-01

    Hip replacement is the most common treatment for displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly, and minimally invasive surgery is popular in the field of orthopaedic surgery. This study evaluated the outcome of monopolar hemiarthroplasty by the direct anterior approach over a postoperative period up to 2.5 years. A total of 86 patients with displaced femoral neck fractures were included (mean age of 86.5 years). Surviving patients were reviewed three months (retrospectively) and one to 2.5 years (prospectively) after surgery. One-year mortality was 36 %. For all stems, implant positioning with respect to stem alignment, restoration of leg length and femoral offset was correct. Acetabular protrusion was observed in 55 % of the patients one to 2.5 years postoperatively. Subsidence and intraoperative periprosthetic fractures occurred in three patients (3 %) each. All revision stems for postoperative periprosthetic fractures could be implanted using the initial surgical technique without extension of the previous approach. The mean Harris hip score was 85 points at the one to 2.5-year follow-up; 85 % of the patients were satisfied with their hip and 57 % returned to their preoperative level of mobility. Based on these findings, hemiarthroplasty for hip fractures can be performed safely and effectively via the direct anterior approach with good functional outcome and high patient satisfaction.

  3. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Hanford 118-B-1 Burial Ground Treatability Study has been required by milestone change request {number_sign}M-15-93-04, dated September 30, 1993. The change request requires that a treatability test be conducted at the 100-B Area to obtain additional engineering information for remedial design of burial grounds receiving waste from 100 Area removal actions. This treatability study has two purposes: (1) to support development of the Proposed Plan (PP) and Record of Decision (ROD), which will identify the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and (2) to provide specific engineering information for receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test also will provide critical performance and cost information necessary for remedy evaluation in the detailed analysis of alternatives during preparation of the focused feasibility study (FFS). This treatability testing supports the following 100 Area alternatives: (1) excavation and disposal, and (2) excavation, sorting, (treatment), and disposal.

  4. 118-B-1 excavation treatability test procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Frain, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    This treatability study has two purposes: to support development of the approach to be used for burial ground remediation, and to provide specific engineering information for the design of burial grounds receiving waste generated from the 100 Area removal actions. Data generated from this test will also provide performance and cost information necessary for detailed analysis of alternatives for burial ground remediation. Further details on the test requirements, milestones and data quality objectives are described in detail in the 118-B-1 Excavation Treatability Test Plan (DOE/RL-94-43). These working procedures are intended for use by field personnel to implement the requirements of the milestone. A copy of the detailed Test Plan will be kept on file at the on-site field support trailer, and will be available for review by field personnel.

  5. Unyvero i60 implant and tissue infection (ITI) multiplex PCR system in diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Randau, Thomas M; Buhr, Johanna K; Wimmer, Matthias D; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Gravius, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most challenging complications in orthopedic surgery. In cases of suspected periprosthetic joint infection several diagnostic methods are available. In this study we investigated the performance of the newly available Unyvero i60 implant and tissue infection (ITI) multiplex PCR System. 62 specimens from 31 patients with suspected PJI or aseptic loosening of a painful joint arthoplasty were included in this study. Besides the established diagnostic procedures we included a commercial multiplex PCR detection system for diagnosis of PJI. The PCR results obtained from analysis of sonication and synovial fluids (62 specimens) showed a sensitivity of 66.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 68.4% when compared to cultural methods. Notably, cultures from sonication fluid displayed a sensitivity of 88.9%, a specificity of 61.5%, a PPV of 76.2% and a NPV of 80.0% when compared to tissue cultures. In conclusion, multiplex PCR is an additional - rapid - method for diagnosing PJI. Positive results with the PCR assay used in this study were always confirmed by subsequent matching culture positivity. However, apart from the time saved the nucleic acid amplification technique did not yield additional information than that obtained from microbiological cultures.

  6. Advancements in Diagnosing Periprosthetic Joint Infections after Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ripal; Alijanipour, Pouya; Parvizi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a complication of total joint arthroplasty that is challenging to diagnose. Currently, there is no “gold standard” for definite diagnosis of PJI. A multi-criteria definition has been described for PJI based on microbiology cultures, serum markers, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial fluid biomarkers, such as leukocyte esterase and histopathology assessment of the periprosthetic tissue. The conventional serum markers are generally nonspecific and can be elevated in inflammatory conditions. Therefore, they cannot be relied on for definite diagnosis of PJI. Hence, with the use of proteomics, synovial fluid biomarkers such as α-defensin, IL-6, and CRP have been proposed as more accurate biomarkers for PJI. Current methods to culture micro-organisms have several limitations, and can be false-negative and false-positive in a considerable number of cases. In an attempt to improve culture sensitivity, diagnostic methods to target biofilms have recently been studied. The understanding of the concept of biofilms has also allowed for the development of novel techniques for PJI diagnosis, such as visualizing biofilms with fluorescent in-situ hybridization and detection of bacteria via DNA microarray. Lastly, the use of amplification-based molecular techniques has provided methods to identify specific species of bacteria that cause culture-negative PJI. While diagnosing PJI is difficult, these advances could be valuable tools for clinicians. PMID:28144375

  7. Particle Disease: A Current Review of the Biological Mechanisms in Periprosthetic Osteolysis After Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sukur, Erhan; Akman, Yunus Emre; Ozturkmen, Yusuf; Kucukdurmaz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory responses to wear debris cause osteolysis that leads to aseptic prosthesis loosening and hip arthroplasty failure. Although osteolysis is usually associated with aseptic loosening, it is rarely seen around stable implants. Aseptic implant loosening is a simple radiologic phenomenon, but a complex immunological process. Particulate debris produced by implants most commonly causes osteolysis, and this is called particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO). Objective: The objective of this review is to outline the features of particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis to allow the physician to recognise this condition and commence early treatment, thereby optimizing patient outcome. Methods: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases, including Pubmed, to cover important research published covering particle-associated PPO. Results: Although osteolysis causes bone resorption, clinical, animal, and in vitro studies of particle bioreactivity suggest that particle-associated PPO represents the culmination of several biological reactions of many cell types, rather than being caused solely by the osteoclasts. The biological activity is highly dependent on the characteristics and quantity of the wear particles. Conclusion: Despite advances in total hip arthroplasty (THA), particle-associated PPO and aseptic loosening continue to be major factors that affect prosthetic joint longevity. Biomarkers could be exploited as easy and objective diagnostic and prognostic targets that would enable testing for osteolysis after THA. Further research is needed to identify new biomarkers in PPO. A comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms is crucial for developing new therapeutic interventions to reverse or suppress biological responses to wear particles. PMID:27499822

  8. Histological characterization of periprosthetic tissue responses for metal-on-metal hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Eual A; Klein, Gregg R; Cates, Harold E; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla

    2014-01-01

    The histology of periprosthetic tissue from metal-on-metal (MOM) hip devices has been characterized using a variety of methods. The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the suitability of two previously developed aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesions (ALVAL) scoring systems for periprosthetic hip tissue responses retrieved from MOM total hip replacement (THR) systems revised for loosening. Two ALVAL scoring systems (Campbell and Oxford) were used to perform histological analyses of soft tissues from 17 failed MOM THRs. The predominant reactions for this patient cohort were macrophage infiltration and necrosis, with less than half of the patients (41%) showing a significant lymphocytic response or a high ALVAL reaction (6%). Other morphological changes varied among patients and included hemosiderin accumulation, cartilage formation, and heterotopic ossification. Both scoring systems are useful for correlating macrophage and lymphocyte responses and for comparison with the other; however, given the diversity and variability of the current responses, the Oxford-ALVAL system is more suitable for scoring tissues from MOM THR patients revised for loosening. It is important that standardized methods of scoring MOM tissue responses be used consistently so multiple study results can be compared and a consensus can be generated.

  9. Histological characterization of periprosthetic tissue responses for metal-on-metal hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Eual A.; Klein, Gregg R.; Cates, Harold E.; Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla J.

    2014-01-01

    The histology of periprosthetic tissue from metal-on-metal (MOM) hip devices has been characterized by a variety of methods. The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the suitability of two previously developed aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesions (ALVAL) scoring systems for periprosthetic hip tissue responses retrieved from MOM THR systems revised for loosening. Two ALVAL scoring systems (Campbell and Oxford) were used to perform histological analysis of soft tissues from seventeen failed MOM THRs. The predominant reactions for this patient cohort were macrophage infiltration and necrosis, with less than half of the patients (41%) showing a significant lymphocytic response or a high ALVAL reaction (6%). Other morphological changes which varied among patients included hemosiderin accumulation, cartilage formation and heterotopic ossification. Both scoring systems correlated with macrophage and lymphocyte responses and with each other, however given the diversity and variability of the current responses the Oxford-ALVAL system was more suitable for scoring tissues from MOM THR patients revised for loosening. It is important that standardized methods to score MOM tissue responses be used consistently so multiple study results can be compared to one another and a consensus can be generated. PMID:24941402

  10. Particle disease: Biologic mechanisms of periprosthetic osteolysis in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Goodman, Stuart B; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Raska, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies provide detailed insight into the triggering and amplification mechanisms of the inflammatory response associated with prosthetic wear particles, promoting final dominance of bone resorption over bone formation in multiple bone multicellular units around an implant. In fact, inflammation is a highly regulated process tightly linked to simultaneous stimulation of tissue protective and regenerative mechanisms in order to prevent collateral damage of periprosthetic tissues. A variety of cytokines, chemokines, hormones and specific cell populations, including macrophages, dendritic and stem cells, attempt to balance tissue architecture and minimize inflammation. Based on this fact, we postulate that the local tissue homeostatic mechanisms more effectively regulate the pro-inflammatory/pro-osteolytic cells/pathways in patients with none/mild periprosthetic osteolysis (PPOL) than in patients with severe PPOL. In this line of thinking, ‘particle disease theory’ can be understood, at least partially, in terms of the failure of local tissue homeostatic mechanisms. As a result, we envision focusing current research on homeostatic mechanisms in addition to traditional efforts to elucidate details of pro-inflammatory/pro-osteolytic pathways. We believe this approach could open new avenues for research and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:22751380

  11. Surface grafting of artificial joints with a biocompatible polymer for preventing periprosthetic osteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Toru; Takatori, Yoshio; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Konno, Tomohiro; Takigawa, Yorinobu; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Chung, Ung-Il; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis-bone loss in the vicinity of a prosthesis-is the most serious problem limiting the longevity of artificial joints. It is caused by bone-resorptive responses to wear particles originating from the articulating surface. This study investigated the effects of graft polymerization of our original biocompatible phospholipid polymer 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) onto the polyethylene surface. Mechanical studies using a hip-joint simulator revealed that the MPC grafting markedly decreased the friction and the amount of wear. Osteoclastic bone resorption induced by subperiosteal injection of particles onto mouse calvariae was abolished by the MPC grafting on particles. MPC-grafted particles were shown to be biologically inert by culture systems with respect to phagocytosis and resorptive cytokine secretion by macrophages, subsequent expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand in osteoblasts, and osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow cells. From the mechanical and biological advantages, we believe that our approach will make a major improvement in artificial joints by preventing periprosthetic osteolysis.

  12. Periprosthetic atypical mycobacterial infection in breast implants: a new kid on the block!

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mohan; D'Silva, James A; Borole, Ateesh J; Chilgar, Ram M

    2013-01-01

    Breast augmentation is one of the most commonly performed cosmetic surgical procedures. Infection in the breast implant surgery can range from simple wound infection to periprosthetic infection usually with skin commensals such as staphylococci. However, with routine use of broad-spectrum antibiotics atypical mycobacterial infections are being increasingly reported. We studied 12 cases of atypical mycobacterial breast implant infections over a period of 8 years from 2002 to 2010. Six of them were primarily operated at our centre and six referred from elsewhere after implant infection. Age range was 30-40 years and follow-up after secondary surgery ranged from 1 to 5 years. All patients were explanted and started on combination antibiotics namely, clarithromycin, gatifloxacillin and linezolid for 3 months. After a period of 3 months, all patients underwent implant surgery again with the same antibiotic cover for 6 weeks. All the secondary implant augmentations were successful. Organisms grown in primary culture were Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. chelonei. All patients were satisfied with the final breast form and size achieved. The possibility of an atypical mycobacterial infection should always be at the back of the mind of an alert surgeon to prevent a periprosthetic infection from compromising the final aesthetic result of a breast implant procedure. Diagnosed early and eradicated in time, the final result is not compromised. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The use of nuclear imaging for the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection after knee and hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Yue, Bing; Tang, Tingting

    2015-04-01

    Periprosthetic infection and aseptic prosthesis loosening remain the most common and serious complications of total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. The differentiation of septic from aseptic prosthetic loosening is of great importance because the treatment of the two conditions is vastly different. Anatomical imaging procedures such as conventional radiography, computed tomography, or MRI are unable to differentiate septic and aseptic loosening, mainly because of hardware-induced artifacts. Nuclear imaging, however, reflects functional rather than anatomical changes and is not hampered by the presence of a metallic prosthesis. The commonly used nuclear imaging techniques include triple-phase bone scintigraphy, 67Ga, leukocyte scintigraphy, leukocyte/bone marrow scintigraphy, monoclonal antibodies/antibody fragments, radiolabeled ciprofloxacin, antimicrobial peptides, etc. Besides infection detection, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET with computed tomography (SPECT/CT and PET/CT) provide additional information on the location of the infection foci, which is clinically important for surgeons to select the most appropriate treatment and guide the intraoperative clearance of the infection foci. The current review will describe the working mechanism, clinical practice, and pros and cons of these techniques in the evaluation of periprosthetic infection.

  14. Periprosthetic bone mineral density and fixation of the uncemented CLS stem related to different weight bearing regimes

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Per; Milbrink, Jan; Larsson, Sune; Mallmin, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the best rehabilitation regime after uncemented total hip arthroplasty. Theoretically, bone ingrowth into the implant should benefit from initial partial weight bearing. We investigated whether the degree of postoperative weight bearing influences the periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) and/or the stability of the CLS stem. Patients and methods 38 patients received an uncemented CLS stem and were randomized to either unrestricted postoperative weight bearing or to partial weight bearing for 3 months. Periprosthetic BMD was measured in the 7 Gruen zones with DXA and the stability of the femoral stem was assessed by radiostereometric analysis (RSA) after surgery and at 3, 12, 24, and 60 months. Results Periprosthetic BMD was not influenced by the type of postoperative weight bearing. BMD was reduced by 8–15% in all Gruen zones at 3 months. Restoration toward initial BMD was observed in all zones except in zone 7 (calcar region), where BMD was reduced by 22% at 5 years. Immediate weight bearing after surgery had no influence on the stability of the CLS stem, as assessed by RSA. Interpretation Immediate full weight bearing after uncemented total hip arthroplasty is safe. There is no difference in the periprosthetic BMD or in stability of the stem as measured by RSA compared to partial weight bearing for 3 months. BMD is reduced by more than 20% in the calcar region around a CLS stem after 5 years. PMID:20446828

  15. Phylogeography of E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and analysis of its subclades in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Reguig, Ahmed; Harich, Nourdin; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Rouba, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed 295 unrelated Berber-speaking men from northern, central, and southern Morocco to characterize frequency of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup and to refine the phylogeny of its subclades: E1b1b1b1-M107, E1b1b1b2-M183, and E1b1b1b2a-M165. For this purpose, we typed four biallelic polymorphisms: M81, M107, M183, and M165. A large majority of the Berber-speaking male lineages belonged to the Y-chromosomal E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup. The frequency ranged from 79.1% to 98.5% in all localities sampled. E1b1b1b2-M183 was the most dominant subclade in our samples, ranging from 65.1% to 83.1%. In contrast, the E1b1b1b1-M107 and E1b1b1b2a-M165 subclades were not found in our samples. Our results suggest a predominance of the E1b1b1b-M81 haplogroup among Moroccan Berber-speaking males with a decreasing gradient from south to north. The most prevalent subclade in this haplogroup was E1b1b1b2-M183, for which diffferences among these three groups were statistically significant between central and southern groups. Copyright © 2014 Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Michigan 48201-1309.

  16. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative bacteriological samples in 85 chronic peri-prosthetic infections.

    PubMed

    Matter-Parrat, V; Ronde-Oustau, C; Boéri, C; Gaudias, J; Jenny, J-Y

    2017-04-01

    Whether pre-operative microbiological sampling contributes to the management of chronic peri-prosthetic infection remains controversial. We assessed agreement between the results of pre-operative and intra-operative samples in patients undergoing single-stage prosthesis exchange to treat chronic peri-prosthetic infection. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative samples exceeds 75% in patients undergoing single-stage exchange of a hip or knee prosthesis to treat chronic peri-prosthetic infection. This single-centre retrospective study included 85 single-stage prosthesis exchange procedures in 82 patients with chronic peri-prosthetic infection at the hip or knee. Agreement between pre-operative and intra-operative sample results was evaluated. Changes to the initial antibiotic regimen made based on the intra-operative sample results were recorded. Of 149 pre-operative samples, 109 yielded positive cultures, in 75/85 cases. Of 452 intra-operative samples, 354 yielded positive cultures, in 85/85 cases. Agreement was complete in 54 (63%) cases and partial in 9 (11%) cases; there was no agreement in the remaining 22 (26%) cases. The complete agreement rate was significantly lower than 75% (P=0.01). The initial antibiotic regimen was inadequate in a single case. Pre-operative sampling may contribute to the diagnosis of peri-prosthetic infection but is neither necessary nor sufficient to confirm the diagnosis and identify the causative agent. The spectrum of the initial antibiotic regimen cannot be safely narrowed based on the pre-operative sample results. We suggest the routine prescription of a probabilistic broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen immediately after the prosthesis exchange, even when a pathogen was identified before surgery. IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo Metabolism of Hydrolyzed Fumonisin B1 and Fumonisin B1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is the most prevalent fumonisin mycotoxin found in corn and corn-based foods. It inhibits ceramide synthase, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism and function, is toxic to animals, causes cancer in rodents, and induces neural tube defects in some mouse strains. Its human health effect...

  18. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary E; Hirsch, Joseph A; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Jordan, Barry D; Cirio, Rosanna T; Elder, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    The earliest and perhaps best example of an interaction between nutrition and dementia is related to thiamine (vitamin B1). Throughout the last century, research showed that thiamine deficiency is associated with neurological problems, including cognitive deficits and encephalopathy. Multiple similarities exist between classical thiamine deficiency and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in that both are associated with cognitive deficits and reductions in brain glucose metabolism. Thiamine-dependent enzymes are critical components of glucose metabolism that are reduced in the brains of AD patients and by thiamine decline, and a decrease in their levels could account for the reduction in glucose metabolism. In preclinical models, reduced thiamine can drive AD-like abnormalities, including memory deficits, neuritic plaques, and hyperphosphorylation of tau. Furthermore, excess thiamine diminishes AD-like pathologies. In addition to dietary deficits, drugs or other manipulations that interfere with thiamine absorption can cause thiamine deficiency. Elucidating the reasons why the brains of AD patients are functionally thiamine deficient and determining the effects of thiamine restoration may provide critical information to help treat patients with AD.

  19. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Jordon, Barry D.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Elder, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The earliest and perhaps best example of an interaction between nutrition and dementia is related to thiamine (vitamin B1). Throughout the last century, research showed that thiamine deficiency is associated with neurological problems, including cognitive deficits and encephalopathy. Multiple similarities exist between classical thiamine deficiency and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in that both are associated with cognitive deficits and reductions in brain glucose metabolism. Thiamine-dependent enzymes are critical components of glucose metabolism that are reduced in the brains of AD patients and by thiamine deficiency, and their decline could account for the reduction in glucose metabolism. In preclinical models, reduced thiamine can drive AD-like abnormalities, including memory deficits, plaques, and hyperphosphorylation of tau. Furthermore, excess thiamine diminishes AD-like pathologies. In addition to dietary deficits, drugs, or other manipulations that interfere with thiamine absorption can cause thiamine deficiency. Elucidating the reasons why the brains of AD patients are functionally thiamine deficient and determining the effects of thiamine restoration may provide critical information to help treat patients with AD. PMID:26971083

  20. Systematic Errors in measurement of b1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, S. A.

    2014-10-01

    A class of spin observables can be obtained from the relative difference of or asymmetry between cross sections of different spin states of beam or target particles. Such observables have the advantage that the normalization factors needed to calculate absolute cross sections from yields often divide out or cancel to a large degree in constructing asymmetries. However, normalization factors can change with time, giving different normalization factors for different target or beam spin states, leading to systematic errors in asymmetries in addition to those determined from statistics. Rapidly flipping spin orientation, such as what is routinely done with polarized beams, can significantly reduce the impact of these normalization fluctuations and drifts. Target spin orientations typically require minutes to hours to change, versus fractions of a second for beams, making systematic errors for observables based on target spin flips more difficult to control. Such systematic errors from normalization drifts are discussed in the context of the proposed measurement of the deuteron b1 structure function at Jefferson Lab.

  1. Fumonisin B(1): a neurotoxic mycotoxin.

    PubMed

    Domijan, Ana-Marija

    2012-12-01

    Fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium spp. moulds that contaminate crop, predominantly maize, all around the world. More than 15 types of fumonisins have been indentified so far, but FB(1) is the most abundant and toxicologically the most significant one. FB(1) has a wide range of toxic effects, depending on animal species. In horses FB(1) causes equine leukoencephalomalacia (ELEM), in pigs pulmonary oedema and in experimental rodents nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. In humans exposure to FB(1) is linked with higher incidence of primary liver cancer and oesophageal cancer, which are frequent in certain regions of the world (such as Transkei region in South Africa) where maize is staple food. The occurrence of neural tube defect in children in some countries of Central America (such as Mexico and Honduras) is connected with the consumption of FB(1)-contaminated maize-based food. However, possible involvement of FB(1) in the development of human diseases is not clear. Nevertheless, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified FB(1) as a possible carcinogen to humans (group 2B). FB(1) is a causative agent of ELEM, a brain disorder in equines, indicating that brain is a target organ of FB(1) toxicity. Several studies on experimental animals or on cell cultures of neural origin have established that FB(1) has a neurodegenerative potential, although the mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still vague. The aim of this article is to give an overview of available literature on FB(1) neurotoxicity and involved mechanisms, and to offer a new perspective for future studies.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of bradykinin B(1)/B(2) and selective B(1) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Amblard, M; Bedos, P; Olivier, C; Daffix, I; Luccarini, J M; Dodey, P; Pruneau, D; Paquet, J L; Martinez, J

    2000-06-15

    We recently described a potent bradykinin B(2) receptor agonist (JMV1116) obtained by replacing the D-Tic-Oic dipeptide moiety of HOE140 by a (3S)-amino-5-(carbonylmethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1, 5-benzothiazepin-4(5H)-one (D-BT) moiety. This compound inhibited the specific binding of [(3)H]BK on membranes of CHO cells expressing the human cloned B(2) receptor with nanomolar affinity and contracted both isolated rat uterus and human umbilical vein. These data demonstrated that D-BT could be a good mimic of the Pro-Phe dipeptide. In the present study we characterized B(1) receptor antagonists containing the D-BT moiety. We prepared an analogue of compound JMV1116 deleting the C-terminal arginine residue. The resulting compound (1) had an affinity of 83 nM for the human cloned B(1) receptor. The most remarkable property of 1 is its ability to bind also the B(2) receptor with an affinity of 4.4 nM despite the absence of the C-terminal arginine residue. Modifications at the N-terminal part of 1 associated with the substitution of the thienylalanine residue by alpha-(2-indanyl)glycine resulted in analogues selectively binding to the B(1) receptor with an affinity in the picomolar range.

  3. Patient-related medical risk factors for periprosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee

    PubMed Central

    Eka, Aleeson

    2015-01-01

    Despite advancements and improvements in methods for preventing infection, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Prevention is the most important strategy to deal with this disabling complication, and prevention should begin with identifying patient-related risk factors. Medical risk factors, such as morbid obesity, malnutrition, hyperglycemia, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), preoperative anemia, cardiovascular disorders, chronic renal failure, smoking, alcohol abuse and depression, should be evaluated and optimized prior to surgery. Treating patients to get laboratory values under a specified threshold or cessation of certain modifiable risk factors can decrease the risk of PJI. Although significant advances have been made in past decades to identify these risk factors, there remains some uncertainty regarding the risk factors predisposing TJA patients to PJI. Through a review of the current literature, this paper aims to comprehensively evaluate and provide a better understanding of known medical risk factors for PJI after TJA. PMID:26539450

  4. Variety in diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic joint infections in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, J W P; Vos, S; Burger, T J; Colen, S

    2016-08-01

    Recently, guidelines regarding diagnosis and treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) have been published, but it is unknown how well these are -followed in the Netherlands and Belgium. Therefore, a survey study was performed in the Netherlands and Belgium. 81 orthopedic departments responded (54% in the Netherlands, 52% in Belgium). The majority used protocols for antibiotic and surgical treatment. To discriminate between early and late infection, differences in periods used were seen between respondents, and between countries. Empirical antibiotic treatment varied greatly. Debridement, antibiotics, irrigation and retention of the prosthesis (DAIR) is the -almost unanimous treatment of choice for early PJI. Guidelines are available, but seem not (yet) to be -followed accurately, and do not have answers to all possible treatment options. Perhaps, national guidelines might produce more standardized care, and -consequentially, easier comparison for research, more transparency for patients, and less health care costs.

  5. Lower Urinary Tract Infection and Periprosthetic Joint Infection after Elective Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Ho; Lee, Young-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a grave complication. Urinary tract infection (UTI) as a source for PJI is controversial. Our purposes were, (1) to evaluate the incidence of PJI after elective primary THA and (2) to determine whether UTI was associated with a risk of PJI after elective primary THA. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 527 patients who underwent elective primary THA by using universal aseptic technique from May 2003 to October 2007. UTI group (13 patients) was defined as patients who underwent THA in status of having an UTI, and the remaining patients were defined as control group (514 patients). We compared the incidence of PJI in both groups. Results During the study period, the incidence of PJI was 0%, regardless of existence (or presence) of UTI. Conclusion There was no significant association between UTI and PJI, when cautiously performed THA. PMID:28316960

  6. Inflammation, Fracture and Bone Repair

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Florence; Córdova, Luis A.; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-hua; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2016-01-01

    The reconstitution of lost bone is a subject that is germane to many orthopaedic conditions including fractures and non-unions, infection, inflammatory arthritis, osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, metabolic bone disease, tumors, and periprosthetic particle-associated osteolysis. In this regard, the processes of acute and chronic inflammation play an integral role. Acute inflammation is initiated by endogenous or exogenous adverse stimuli, and can become chronic in nature if not resolved by normal homeostatic mechanisms. Dysregulated inflammation leads to increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. Crosstalk amongst inflammatory cells (polymorphonuclear leukocytes and cells of the monocyte-macrophage-osteoclast lineage) and cells related to bone healing (cells of the mesenchymal stem cell-osteoblast lineage and vascular lineage) is essential to the formation, repair and remodeling of bone. In this review, the authors provide a comprehensive summary of the literature related to inflammation and bone repair. Special emphasis is placed on the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, and potential interventions that can favorably modulate the outcome of clinical conditions that involve bone repair. PMID:26946132

  7. [Atlas fractures].

    PubMed

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  8. The risk factors of failed reimplantation arthroplasty for periprosthetic hip infection.

    PubMed

    Jhan, Shun-Wun; Lu, Yu-Der; Lee, Mel S; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kuo, Feng-Chih

    2017-06-12

    Two-stage reimplantation arthroplasty is one of the standard treatments for chronic periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Scanty data exist regarding the risk factors for failure after two-stage reimplantation for periprosthetic hip infection. The purpose of this study was to investigate and identify the risk factors associated with failure after two-stage reimplantation hip arthroplasty. Sixty-two patients with hip PJI treated with a two-stage reimplantation protocol at our institution from 2005 to 2012 were reviewed. Patients requiring medical treatment or reoperation for recurrent infection were defined as treatment failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the risk factors associated with treatment failure. Of the 62 patients, 11 (17.7%) patients had developed reinfection after the two-stage reimplantation with a mean follow-up of 5.7 years. The implant survival was 82.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 75.19-92.55) at 10 years. Multivariate analysis revealed BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) (hazard ratio [HR] 9.16; 95% CI 1.51-55.3; p = 0.0158), liver cirrhosis (HR 6.39; 95% CI 1.09-37.4; p = 0.0398), gram-negative organism (HR 5.68; 95% CI 1.18-27.4; p = 0.0303), and presence of sinus tract (HR 18.2; 95% CI 2.15-153; p = 0.0077) as the independent risk factors for treatment failure. We found obesity, liver cirrhosis, gram-negative organism, and the presence of sinus tract were significantly related to the risks of failure after reimplantation arthroplasties.

  9. Chronic periprosthetic hip infection: micro-organisms responsible for infection and re-infection.

    PubMed

    Kliushin, Nikolai M; Ermakov, Artem M; Malkova, Tatiana A

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to delineate the infecting micro-organisms identified at the first-time revision for infected THA, analyze pre-operative versus intra-operative findings, as well as intra-operative ones against re-infection micro-organisms. Microbiological laboratory findings were studied in 73 patients (mean age, 51.93 ± 10.9 years) with chronic periprosthetic hip infection pre-operatively and intra-operatively. Forty-three patients had a two-stage revision THA while 30 patients were treated with a modified resection arthroplasty using the Ilizarov apparatus. Re-infection developed in 29 cases. Its microbial species were identified. Pre-operative findings on micro-organisms coincided 50.7 % with the intra-operative ones. Bacterial growth in the intra-operative tests was detected in 72 (98.5 %) cases. Gram-positive single genus infection was identified in 35 patients (48 %); microbe associations were present in 33 patients (45 %). Staphylococcus species prevailed. Gram-negative infection was detected in 5.5 % of cases. One case (1.5 %) did not have any microbe growth. Re-infection happened in 10 cases (23.2 %) in a two-stage revision THA. In the resection arthroplasty group, early re-infection was observed in 63.3 % of cases. Among a total of 29 re-infection cases, staphylococcus species were identified in 19 cases, present either in associations or as single germs. Intra-operative microbiological tests at the first-time revision for infected THR detect a reliable spectrum of micro-organisms to assess microbial resistance to antibiotics, develop treatment protocols, and for prognostic purposes. Preventive measures at primary THR and strategies to fight periprosthetic infection and reinfection should be targeted on staphylococci.

  10. Distinct Immunohistomorphologic Changes in Periprosthetic Hip Tissues from Historical and Highly-crosslinked UHMWPE Implant Retrievals

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ryan M; Ianuzzi, Allyson; Freeman, Theresa A; Kurtz, Steven M; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of immune response to implant wear debris in periprosthetic tissue following total hip arthroplasty suggests that multiple factors are involved in the loss implant function. The current study investigated wear debris and the associated immunohistomorphologic changes in tissues from nine patients with historical (gamma air-sterilized) and nine highly-crosslinked UHMWPE implant components. Paraffin embedded tissue sections were evaluated for the presence of histiocytes, giant cells, fibrocartilage/bone and necrosis. To determine the incidence, degree and co-localization of immunohistomorphologic changes and wear, overlapping full-field tissue arrays were collected in brightfield and polarized light. The historical cohort tissues predominantly showed histiocytes associated with significant accumulations of small wear (0.5–2 μm), and giant cells associated with large wear (≥2 μm). Frequently, focal regions of necrosis were observed in association with wear debris. For the highly-crosslinked cohort, inflammation and associated wear debris were limited, but in tissues from patients revised after implantation times of >2 years a response was observed. Whereas significant amounts of fibrocartilage/bone were observed in patients at earlier implantation times. In both cohorts, tissue responses were more extensive in the retroacetabular or proximal femoral regions. The current findings suggest that wear debris-induced inflammation may be a major contributor to the loss of implant function for both the historical and highly-crosslinked cohorts, but it is not the primary cause of early implant loosening. This study highlights the importance of using a more quantitative and standardized assessment of immunohistomorphologic responses in periprosthetic tissues, and emphasizes differences in specific anatomical regions of individual patient tissues. PMID:20740602

  11. Imputation methods for temporal radiographic texture analysis in the detection of periprosthetic osteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Engh, Charles A., Sr.; Hopper, Robert H., Jr.; Martell, John M.

    2007-03-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is a disease triggered by the body's response to tiny wear fragments from total hip replacements (THR), which leads to localized bone loss and disappearance of the trabecular bone texture. We have been investigating methods of temporal radiographic texture analysis (tRTA) to help detect periprosthetic osteolysis. One method involves merging feature measurements at multiple time points using an LDA or BANN. The major drawback of this method is that several cases do not meet the inclusion criteria because of missing data, i.e., missing image data at the necessary time intervals. In this research, we investigated imputation methods to fill in missing data points using feature averaging, linear interpolation, and first and second order polynomial fitting. The database consisted of 101 THR cases with full data available from four follow-up intervals. For 200 iterations, missing data were randomly created to simulate a typical THR database, and the missing points were then filled in using the imputation methods. ROC analysis was used to assess the performance of tRTA in distinguishing between osteolysis and normal cases for the full database and each simulated database. The calculated values from the 200 iterations showed that the imputation methods produced negligible bias, and substantially decreased the variance of the AUC estimator, relative to excluding incomplete cases. The best performing imputation methods were those that heavily weighted the data points closest to the missing data. The results suggest that these imputation methods appear to be acceptable means to include cases with missing data for tRTA.

  12. 12 CFR 261b.1 - Basis and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis and scope. 261b.1 Section 261b.1 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 261b.1 Basis and scope. This part is issued by the Board of...

  13. 26 CFR 1.643(b)-1 - Definition of income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of income. 1.643(b)-1 Section 1.643(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.643(b)-1 Definition of income...

  14. 40 CFR Figure B-1 to Subpart B of... - Example

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Example B Figure B-1 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Fig. B-1 Figure B-1 to Subpart B...

  15. 40 CFR Figure B-1 to Subpart B of... - Example

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Example B Figure B-1 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Fig. B-1 Figure B-1 to Subpart B...

  16. 40 CFR Figure B-1 to Subpart B of... - Example

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Example B Figure B-1 to Subpart B of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 Pt. 53, Subpt. B, Fig. B-1 Figure B-1 to Subpart B...

  17. 29 CFR 2520.104b-1 - Disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sponsor's electronic information system is an integral part of those duties; or (ii) A participant... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure. 2520.104b-1 Section 2520.104b-1 Labor... REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104b-1 Disclosure. (a) General...

  18. 26 CFR 1.7702B-1 - Consumer protection provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Consumer protection provisions. 1.7702B-1 Section 1.7702B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7702B-1 Consumer...

  19. 26 CFR 1.367(b)-1 - Other transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other transfers. 1.367(b)-1 Section 1.367(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES Effects on Corporation § 1.367(b)-1 Other transfers. (a) Scope. The regulations promulgated... earnings and profits, basis of stock or securities, basis of assets, or other relevant tax attributes....

  20. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.267(b)-1 Relationships. (a) In general. (1) The persons... partnership separately. Therefore, if the other person and a partner are within any one of the relationships...

  1. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1...) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.267(b)-1 Relationships. (a) In general. (1) The persons referred to... partnership separately. Therefore, if the other person and a partner are within any one of the relationships...

  2. 26 CFR 1.7702B-1 - Consumer protection provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Consumer protection provisions. 1.7702B-1 Section 1.7702B-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) General Actuarial Valuations § 1.7702B-1 Consumer protection...

  3. The mechanism of fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    In this book eighty-five papers look at fractures. Topics covered are fracture mechanics, fracture mechanisms, evaluating fracture resistance, fracture toughness, predicting crack growth, surface cracking, crack initiation and propagation, weld fractures, engineering applications of fracture mechanics, fracture and failure in nonmetallic materials, dynamic fractures, test techniques, radiation embrittlement, applications of fracture mechanics, design concepts, and creep.

  4. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  5. Stress Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  6. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) prevents periprosthetic inflammatory loosening through FBXL2-TRAF6 ubiquitination pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Gangsheng; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Chen, Yunlin; Hu, Bin; Yan, Shigui

    2017-04-05

    Previous studies have shown that Low intensity pulsed ultrasound(LIPUS) prevents polyethylene-debris-induced periprosthetic loosening in vivo, but the details of the mechanism by which it does so remain unclear. In this article, we used polyethylene debris induced RAW 264.7 cells as the in vitro model, and tested the effect of LIPUS on this model. Changes in the level of inflammatory cytokines, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. Gene overexpression and siRNA technique were applied, and the levels of expression of FBXL2, TRAF6, ERK, and related inflammatory cytokines were also measured. Results indicated that FBXL2-mediated TRAF6 ubiquitination and degradation also plays an important role in aseptic periprosthetic loosening process, and LIPUS prevents such loosening by strengthening this pathway.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) prevents periprosthetic inflammatory loosening through FBXL2-TRAF6 ubiquitination pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Gangsheng; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Chen, Yunlin; Hu, Bin; Yan, Shigui

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Low intensity pulsed ultrasound(LIPUS) prevents polyethylene-debris-induced periprosthetic loosening in vivo, but the details of the mechanism by which it does so remain unclear. In this article, we used polyethylene debris induced RAW 264.7 cells as the in vitro model, and tested the effect of LIPUS on this model. Changes in the level of inflammatory cytokines, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. Gene overexpression and siRNA technique were applied, and the levels of expression of FBXL2, TRAF6, ERK, and related inflammatory cytokines were also measured. Results indicated that FBXL2-mediated TRAF6 ubiquitination and degradation also plays an important role in aseptic periprosthetic loosening process, and LIPUS prevents such loosening by strengthening this pathway. PMID:28378753

  8. Effects of Aflatoxin B1 and Fumonisin B1 on Blood Biochemical Parameters in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Eliana N. C.; Kobashigawa, Estela; Cardoso, Ana Lúcia S. P.; Ledoux, David R.; Rottinghaus, George E.; Oliveira, Carlos A. F.

    2010-01-01

    The individual and combined effects of dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) on liver pathology, serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and plasma total protein (TP) of broilers were evaluated from 8 to 41 days of age. Dietary treatments included a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement with three levels of AFB1 (0, 50 and 200 μg AFB1/kg), and three levels of FB1 (0, 50 and 200 mg FB1/kg). At 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed 50 mg FB1 only, concentrations of AST were higher (p < 0.05) in all other treatment groups when compared with controls. Plasma TP was lower (p < 0.05) at six days post feeding in groups fed 200 μg AFB1/kg alone or in combination with FB1. At day 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed the highest combination of AFB1 and FB1 which had higher plasma TP than control birds, plasma TP of birds fed other dietary treatments were similar to controls. Broilers receiving the highest levels of AFB1 and FB1 had bile duct proliferation and trabecular disorder in liver samples. AFB1 singly or in combination with FB at the levels studied, caused liver damage and an increase in serum levels of AST. PMID:22069595

  9. Effects of aflatoxin B(1) and fumonisin B(1) on blood biochemical parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Tessari, Eliana N C; Kobashigawa, Estela; Cardoso, Ana Lúcia S P; Ledoux, David R; Rottinghaus, George E; Oliveira, Carlos A F

    2010-04-01

    The individual and combined effects of dietary aflatoxin B(1 )(AFB(1)) and fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) on liver pathology, serum levels of aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and plasma total protein (TP) of broilers were evaluated from 8 to 41 days of age. Dietary treatments included a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement with three levels of AFB(1 )(0, 50 and 200 μg AFB(1)/kg), and three levels of FB(1 )(0, 50 and 200 mg FB(1)/kg). At 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed 50 mg FB(1 )only, concentrations of AST were higher (p < 0.05) in all other treatment groups when compared with controls. Plasma TP was lower (p < 0.05) at six days post feeding in groups fed 200 μg AFB(1)/kg alone or in combination with FB(1). At day 33 days post feeding, with the exception of birds fed the highest combination of AFB(1 )and FB(1 )which had higher plasma TP than control birds(, )plasma TP of birds fed other dietary treatments were similar to controls. Broilers receiving the highest levels of AFB(1) and FB(1) had bile duct proliferation and trabecular disorder in liver samples. AFB(1) singly or in combination with FB at the levels studied, caused liver damage and an increase in serum levels of AST.

  10. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone [1–34] Prevents Particle-Induced Periprosthetic Osteolysis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Liu, An; Shen, Yue; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone [1–34] (PTH[1–34]; 60 μg/kg/day) can prevent the negative effects of titanium (Ti) particles on implant fixation and periprosthetic osteolysis in a rat model. Eighteen adult male rats (12 weeks old, bones still growing) received intramedullary Ti implants in their bilateral femurs; 6 rats from the blank group received vehicle injections, and 12 rats from the control group and PTH treatment group received Ti particle injections at the time of operation and intra-articular injections 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Six of the rats that received Ti particles from the PTH group also received PTH[1–34] treatment. Six weeks postoperatively, all specimens were collected for assessment by X-ray, micro-CT, biomechanical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic histomorphometry. A lower BMD, BV/TV, Tb.N, maximal fixation strength, and mineral apposition rate were observed in the control group compared to the blank group, demonstrating that a periprosthetic osteolysis model had been successfully established. Administration of PTH[1–34] significantly increased the bone mineral density of the distal femur, BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Con.D, SMI, and maximal fixation strength in the PTH group compared to that in the control group. SEM revealed higher bone–implant contact, thicker lamellar bone, and larger trabecular bone area in the PTH group than in the control group. A higher mineral apposition rate was observed in the PTH group compared to both the blank and control groups. These findings imply that intermittent administration of PTH[1–34] prevents periprosthetic osteolysis by promoting bone formation. The effects of PTH[1–34] were evaluated at a suprapharmacological dosage to the human equivalent in rats; therefore, additional studies are required to demonstrate its therapeutic potential in periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26441073

  11. Diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection using alpha-defensin test or multiplex-PCR: ideal diagnostic test still not found.

    PubMed

    Suda, Arnold J; Tinelli, Marco; Beisemann, Nils D; Weil, Yoram; Khoury, Amal; Bischel, Oliver E

    2017-07-01

    Diagnosing periprosthetic infection remains a challenge. Multiplex-PCR and biomarkers such as alpha-defensin are potentially useful and fast methods for detecting periprosthetic infection. This study compared these new methods with clinical assessment, conventional microbiological methods and histo-pathological examination. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with 30 joints and a mean age of 67.7 years (range 39 to 88) with removal of total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee replacement (TKR) were included in this study. Patients were classified according to the modified Musculoskeletal Infection Society score (MSIS) for infected joints. Punction fluid and tissue specimens were taken for conventional microbiological examination, alphadefensin test was performed, a synovial membrane specimen was used for multiplex-PCR and histopathological examination was carried out. The alpha-defensin test and multiplex-PCR showed a sensitivity of 76.9 vs. 30.8% and a specificity of 82.4 vs. 100%, respectively. We found a significant difference between the positive and negative results (p = 0.0023). The conventional microbiological methods were not significantly different from the alpha-defensin test (p = 0.244) with a sensitivity of 84.6% and a specificity of 100% but did differ significantly from the multiplex PCR (p = 0.0030). There was a significant difference between modified MSIS classification and multiplex PCR (p = 0.0007). Neither alpha-defensin test nor multiplex-PCR could detect periprosthetic infection immediately and reliably. Multiplex-PCR was suitable for detecting the non-infected but not the truly infected. Alpha-defensin test was helpful but showed no satisfactory results. Conventional microbiological methods remain the most reliable for periprosthetic infection diagnosis.

  12. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone [1-34] Prevents Particle-Induced Periprosthetic Osteolysis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Liu, An; Shen, Yue; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone [1-34] (PTH[1-34]; 60 μg/kg/day) can prevent the negative effects of titanium (Ti) particles on implant fixation and periprosthetic osteolysis in a rat model. Eighteen adult male rats (12 weeks old, bones still growing) received intramedullary Ti implants in their bilateral femurs; 6 rats from the blank group received vehicle injections, and 12 rats from the control group and PTH treatment group received Ti particle injections at the time of operation and intra-articular injections 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Six of the rats that received Ti particles from the PTH group also received PTH[1-34] treatment. Six weeks postoperatively, all specimens were collected for assessment by X-ray, micro-CT, biomechanical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic histomorphometry. A lower BMD, BV/TV, Tb.N, maximal fixation strength, and mineral apposition rate were observed in the control group compared to the blank group, demonstrating that a periprosthetic osteolysis model had been successfully established. Administration of PTH[1-34] significantly increased the bone mineral density of the distal femur, BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Con.D, SMI, and maximal fixation strength in the PTH group compared to that in the control group. SEM revealed higher bone-implant contact, thicker lamellar bone, and larger trabecular bone area in the PTH group than in the control group. A higher mineral apposition rate was observed in the PTH group compared to both the blank and control groups. These findings imply that intermittent administration of PTH[1-34] prevents periprosthetic osteolysis by promoting bone formation. The effects of PTH[1-34] were evaluated at a suprapharmacological dosage to the human equivalent in rats; therefore, additional studies are required to demonstrate its therapeutic potential in periprosthetic osteolysis.

  13. Total hip prosthesis complication, periprosthetic infection with external fistulizing due to Enterobacter cloacae complex multiple drugs resistance: A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Amorese, V; Corda, M; Donadu, M; Usai, D; Pisanu, F; Milia, F; Marras, F; Sanna, A; Delogu, D; Mazzarello, V; Manzoni, G; Conti, M; Meloni, G B; Zanetti, S; Doria, C

    2017-01-01

    The Enterobacter cloacae is a microorganism found in the intestinal flora of the majority of animals, including humans. Primary infections caused by E. cloacae are rare in immunocompetent patients, but are very common in hospital settings in newborns and immunocompromised patients, and can be aggravated by the insurgence of antibiotic resistance. The incidence of periprosthetic hip infections is just below 2%. A 76year old woman with multiple comorbidities underwent surgical implantation of intermediary total hip prosthesis of the left hip, in a different health facility, in February 2014, after the basicervical fracture of the upper femur extremity due to trauma. After an episode of dislocation of the prosthetic implant, in September 2014, she underwent a surgical operation to implant the acetabular component. A month later not in our facility, following a re-hospitalization for the dislocation of the arthroprosthesis, an infection from E. cloacae complex was discovered. After 2 years of chronic infection she came to our attention; the clinical picture featured coxalgia and secreting fistula in the surgical wound. Following a specific antibiotic therapy, carried out intravenously over the course of a month, we decided to intervene removing the left hip arthroprosthesis and placing an antibiotic spacer following the direction deduced from the antibiogram study of August 2016. The patient was hospitalized in our facility and 2 months later she underwent another operation to remove the antibiotic spacer and to place a new total hip arthroprosthesis. Multiple swabs showed the complete healing from the infection, which was confirmed a couple of months later. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Fixation of supracondylar femoral fractures following total knee arthroplasty: is there any difference comparing angular stable plate fixation versus rigid interlocking nail fixation?

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Silke; Schuster, Rupert; Haas, Nicole; Erhart, Jochen; Strickner, Markus; Blutsch, Beate; Wernhart, Simon; Leitgeb, Johannes; Platzer, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    Literature does not provide any reliable comparison between angular stable plate fixation and rigid nail fixation for stabilization of supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fractures. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare these two implants in clinical practice relating to fracture healing, functional results and treatment-related complications. In this retrospective study (level IV), clinical and radiographic records of 86 patients (62 female and 24 male, average age: 75.6) with supracondylar periprosthetic femoral fractures between 1996 and 2010 were analyzed. 48 patients underwent lateral plate fixation by an angular stable plate system (LISS), whereas 38 patients were stabilized by a rigid interlocking nail device. Sixty-four (76 %) patients returned to their pre-injury activity level and were satisfied with their clinical outcome. We had an overall Oxford outcome score of 2.21, with patients following angular stable plate fixation of 2.22, and patients after rigid nail fixation of 2.20. Successful fracture healing within 6 months was achieved in 74 (88 %) patients. Comparing between plate fixation and nail fixation, statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences. Overall, we had a relatively high rate of fracture healing and a satisfactory functional outcome with both implants. Both methods of fixation showed similar results relating to the functional outcome and individual satisfaction of the patients. However, with regards to fracture healing and treatment-related complications, intramedullary nail fixation showed slight advantages.

  15. Interindividual and interethnic variability in drug disposition: polymorphisms in organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1; SLCO1B1).

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah H; Ho, Richard H

    2017-06-01

    OATP1B1 (SLCO1B1) is predominantly expressed at the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes and is critically important for the hepatic uptake and clearance of numerous drug substrates and endogenous compounds. In general, the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP; SLCO) represent a superfamily of uptake transporters that mediate the sodium-independent transport of a diverse range of amphipathic organic compounds including bile salts, steroid conjugates, thyroid hormones, anionic peptides, numerous drugs and other xenobiotic substances. OATP1B1 is highly polymorphic and a number of relevant and ethnically dependent polymorphisms have been identified and functionally characterized. In particular, the SLCO1B1 521T>C and 388A>G polymorphisms are commonly occurring variants in ethnically diverse populations and numerous in vitro and clinical studies have evaluated the consequences of these variants to interindividual differences in drug disposition and response. OATP1B1 is particularly important for the disposition of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, as it is known to efficiently transport most statins to their site of action within hepatocytes. Many studies have focused on the consequences of OATP1B1 variants to statin disposition in vitro and in vivo and would suggest that genetic variability in SLCO1B1 has important implications for statin pharmacokinetics, risk for statin-induced myopathy, and modulation of statin treatment response. This review describes what is currently known regarding SLCO1B1 genotype, OATP1B1 protein expression and interindividual and interethnic consequences to drug disposition, with particular focus on statin pharmacokinetics and implications for drug response and toxicity. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Rapid modulation of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1 (OATP2B1, SLCO2B1) function by protein kinase C-mediated internalization.

    PubMed

    Köck, Kathleen; Koenen, Anna; Giese, Bernd; Fraunholz, Martin; May, Karen; Siegmund, Werner; Hammer, Elke; Völker, Uwe; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Kroemer, Heyo K; Grube, Markus

    2010-04-09

    Members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) family are involved in various pharmacological, pathophysiological, and physiological processes, such as hepatic drug uptake, progress of cancer, or transport of hormones. Although variability in expression and function of OATPs has been investigated in detail, data concerning regulation are rather limited. Here, we report a novel mechanism for rapid regulation of OATP2B1 mediated by protein kinase C (PKC) resulting in significant changes of transport activity. PKC activation by the phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA) resulted in increased phosphorylation of OATP2B1 as well as reduced OATP2B1 transport activity with a decrease in V(max) of E(1)S uptake (288 +/- 21 (control) versus 165 +/- 16 pmol/min/mg of protein (PMA)). This effect was sensitive to the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I (BIM-I). Confocal microscopy, fluorescence-based internalization assay, and live-cell imaging using green fluorescent protein-tagged OATP2B1 revealed that transport inhibition was due to internalization of the transporter. Furthermore, colocalization with LAMP-2 and chloroquine-sensitive degradation of OATP2B1 suggest that the internalized protein is targeted to a lysosomal degradation pathway. With regard to the underlying mechanism inhibition of caveolin/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis failed to prevent OATP2B1 internalization, whereas inhibition of clathrin-mediated processes blocked OATP2B1 sequestration. However, small interfering RNA-mediated clathrin knock-down affected general trafficking of OATP2B1 and resulted in intracellular accumulation in the absence of PMA. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that OATP2B1 function is regulated by PKC-mediated, clathrin-dependent internalization and followed by lysosomal degradation. Furthermore, internalization could be shown in an ex vivo placenta perfusion. Our findings represent a new, rapid mechanism in regulation of human OATPs.

  17. Determinants of Human Cyclin B1 Association with Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Kathleen L.; King, Randall W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin B1–CDK1 activity is essential for mitotic entry, but questions remain regarding how the activity of this kinase is spatially regulated. Previous studies showed that the cyclin B1 subunit localizes to several compartments of a mitotic cell, including the centrosomes, mitotic spindle, kinetochores and chromosomes via distinct sequence elements. Mitotic chromosome association occurs through the unstructured N-terminal domain of cyclin B1 and is independent of CDK1 binding. Here, we use live cell imaging of human cyclin B1 fused to GFP to precisely define the sequence elements within cyclin B1 that mediate its association with condensed mitotic chromosomes. We find that a short, evolutionarily conserved N-terminal motif is required for cyclin B1 to localize to mitotic chromosomes. We further reveal a role for arginine residues within and near the destruction box sequence in the chromosome association of cyclin B1. Additionally, our data suggest that sequences further downstream in cyclin B1, such as the cytoplasmic retention sequence and the cyclin box, may negatively modulate chromosome association. Because multiple basic residues are required for cyclin B1 association with mitotic chromosomes, electrostatic interactions with DNA may facilitate cyclin B1 localization to chromosomes. PMID:23505570

  18. Atypical Presentation of Tuberculosis of Elbow Joint in Operated Case of Distal Humerus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Yogesh; Khadilkar, Madhav; Ranade, Ashish S.; Vartak, Devendra N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A typical presentations of tuberculosis are not uncommon. Periprosthetic infection with tuberculosis after total joint replacement has well published. Tuberculosis of the elbow following open reduction internal fixation of a distal humerus fraeture is extremely rare. Case Report: We report case of a healthy, immunocompetenet 49-year-old male who underwent open reduction and internal fixation with bicolumnar plating for distal humerus fracture and presented after 18 month with cystic swelling over medial aspect of operated site. There was no wound dehiscence and the underlying fracture was healed well without any signs of implant loosening or bony involvement. Cystic swelling was excised and histopathology provided the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Patient was treated with anti tubercular chemotherapy and patient made uneventful recovery. Conclusion: Although synovial tuberculosis after fracture fixation is a rare entity, tuberculosis should be kept as a differential diagnosis. Surgeons should have high index of suspicion to diagnose atypical presentations of tuberculosis. PMID:27299044

  19. MAN1B1 Deficiency: An Unexpected CDG-II

    PubMed Central

    Millón, María B.; Race, Valérie; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Mills, Philippa; Clayton, Peter; Asteggiano, Carla G.; Quelhas, Dulce; Cansu, Ali; Martins, Esmeralda; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Gonçalves-Rocha, Miguel; Topaloglu, Haluk; Jaeken, Jaak; Foulquier, François; Matthijs, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency. PMID:24348268

  20. Quinazoline derivatives as selective CYP1B1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mohd Siddique, Mohd Usman; McCann, Glen J P; Sonawane, Vinay R; Horley, Neill; Gatchie, Linda; Joshi, Prashant; Bharate, Sandip B; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan; Sinha, Barij N; Chaudhuri, Bhabatosh

    2017-04-21

    CYP1B1 is implicated to have a role in the development of breast, ovarian, renal, skin and lung carcinomas. It has been suggested that identification of potent and specific CYP1B1 inhibitors can lead to a novel treatment of cancer. Flavonoids have a compact rigid skeleton which fit precisely within the binding cavity of CYP1B1. Systematic isosteric replacement of flavonoid 'O' atom with 'N' atom led to the prediction that a 'quinazoline' scaffold could be the basis for designing potential CYP1B1 inhibitors. A total of 20 quinazoline analogs were synthesized and screened for CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 inhibition in Sacchrosomes™. IC50 determinations of six compounds with capability of inhibiting CYP1B1 identified quinazolines 5c and 5h as the best candidates for CYP1B1 inhibition, with IC50 values in the nM range. Further selectivity studies with homologous CYPs, belonging to the CYP1, CYP2 and CYP3 family of enzymes, showed that the compounds are likely to be free from critical drug-drug interaction liability. Molecular modelling studies were performed to rationalize the observed enzymatic inhibitions. Further biological studies in live yeast and human cells, harboring CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 enzymes, have illustrated the most potent compounds' cellular permeability and capability of potently inhibiting CYP1B1 enzyme expressed within live cells.

  1. Repeat Two-Stage Exchange Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Knee Infection Is Dependent on Host Grade.

    PubMed

    Fehring, Keith A; Abdel, Matthew P; Ollivier, Matthieu; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D

    2017-01-04

    Two-stage exchange arthroplasty after a previous, failed 2-stage exchange procedure is fraught with difficulties, and there are no clear guidelines for treatment or prognosis given the heterogeneous group of patients in whom this procedure has been performed. The Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) staging system was developed in an attempt to stratify patients according to infection type, host status, and local soft-tissue status. The purpose of this study was to report the results of 2-stage exchange arthroplasty following a previous, failed 2-stage exchange protocol for periprosthetic knee infection as well as to identify risk factors for failure. We retrospectively identified 45 patients who had undergone 2 or more 2-stage exchange arthroplasties for periprosthetic knee infection from 2000 to 2013. Patients were stratified according to the MSIS system, and risk factors for failure were analyzed. The minimum follow-up was 2 years (mean, 6 years; range, 24 to 132 months). At the time of follow-up, twenty-two (49%) of the patients had undergone another revision due to infection and 28 (62%) had undergone another revision for any reason. The infection recurred in 6 (75%) of 8 substantially immunocompromised hosts (MSIS type C) and in 3 (30%) of 10 uncompromised hosts (type A) following the second 2-stage exchange arthroplasty (p = 0.06). The infection recurred in 4 (80%) of 5 patients with compromise of the extremity (MSIS type 3) and 3 (33%) of 9 patients with an uncompromised extremity (type 1) (p = 0.27). Both extremely compromised hosts with an extremely compromised extremity (type C3) had recurrence of the infection whereas 3 (30%) of the 10 uncompromised patients with no or less compromise of the extremity (type A1 or A2) did. Five patients in the failure group underwent a third 2-stage exchange arthroplasty following reinfection, and 3 of them were infection-free at the time of the latest follow-up. Uncompromised hosts (MSIS type A) with an acceptable

  2. Hamate fractures.

    PubMed

    Sarabia Condés, J M; Ibañez Martínez, L; Sánchez Carrasco, M A; Carrillo Julia, F J; Salmerón Martínez, E L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present our experience in the treatment of the fractures of the hamate and to make a review of the literature on this topic. We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients treated in our clinic between 2005-2012 suffering from fractures of the hamate. Six cases were fractures of the body and four were fractures of the hamate. Five cases were of associated injuries. Diagnostic delay ranged from 30 days to 2 years. Patient follow-up ranged from 1 to 10 years. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using the DASH questionnaire. Five patients with a fracture of the body underwent surgery, and one was treated conservatively. Two patients with fracture of the hook of the hamate were treated with immobilization, and two more patients had the fragment removed. The grip strength and the digital clip were reduced in 2 cases. Flexion and extension of the wrist was limited in 3 cases. The mobility of the fingers was normal in all the cases, except in one. The results obtained from the DASH questionnaire were normal in all the cases, except in one case of fracture of the hamate, and in two cases of fracture of the body. The surgical treatment should reduce the dislocation and stabilize the injuries with osteosynthesis. The fractures of the hamate are usually diagnosed late, and the most recommended treatment is removal of the fragment, although it cannot be deduced from this study. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, David B; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A; Morrison, Richard S

    2015-07-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1(-/-) mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1(-/-) mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer's disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1(-/-) mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn enhances amyloid

  4. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061... EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4061(b)-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section...

  5. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061... EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber, and Taxable Fuel Automotive and Related Items § 48.4061(b)-1 Imposition of tax. (a) In general. Section 4061(b...

  6. 77 FR 46419 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  7. 77 FR 46417 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  8. 78 FR 26326 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  9. 77 FR 52698 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  10. 78 FR 26330 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  11. 77 FR 35363 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  12. 76 FR 72184 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  13. 77 FR 53180 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. ] This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  14. 76 FR 77809 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  15. 78 FR 48424 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  16. 76 FR 72182 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  17. 78 FR 78941 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  18. 76 FR 79658 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  19. 76 FR 76954 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  20. 76 FR 69707 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  1. 78 FR 26324 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  2. 78 FR 78939 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  3. 78 FR 49482 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  4. 76 FR 65701 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  5. 76 FR 68432 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  6. 77 FR 46415 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  7. 76 FR 66044 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  8. 76 FR 66046 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  9. 78 FR 26328 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  10. 77 FR 53182 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  11. 77 FR 49430 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B....

  12. 77 FR 49434 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  13. 78 FR 46579 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.643(b)-1 - Definition of income.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of income. 1.643(b)-1 Section 1.643(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX... of subparts A through D, part I, subchapter J, chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code, “income,”...

  15. 26 CFR 31.6011(b)-1 - Employers' identification numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Employers' identification numbers. 31.6011(b)-1... Subtitle F, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.6011(b)-1 Employers' identification numbers. (a... Insurance Contributions Act, but who prior to such day neither has been assigned an identification number...

  16. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Information requirements. 1.669(b)-1 Section 1... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(b)-1 Information requirements. The election of a beneficiary who is... following information with respect to the operation and accounts of the foreign trust created by a U.S...

  17. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... interest are accrued. (3) Under section 267(b)(9), the control of certain educational and...

  18. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... interest are accrued. (3) Under section 267(b)(9), the control of certain educational and...

  19. 26 CFR 1.267(b)-1 - Relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Relationships. 1.267(b)-1 Section 1.267(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED... interest are accrued. (3) Under section 267(b)(9), the control of certain educational and...

  20. 26 CFR 11.410(b)-1 - Minimum coverage requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum coverage requirements. 11.410(b)-1 Section 11.410(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT...

  1. 26 CFR 48.4061(b)-1 - Imposition of tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Imposition of tax. 48.4061(b)-1 Section 48.4061(b)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS EXCISE TAXES Motor Vehicles, Tires, Tubes, Tread Rubber,...

  2. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  3. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  4. 26 CFR 1.168(b)-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definitions. 1.168(b)-1 Section 1.168(b)-1... tangible, depreciable property that is placed in service after December 31, 1986 (or after July 31, 1986, if the taxpayer made an election under section 203(a)(1)(B) of the Tax Reform Act of 1986; 100...

  5. 77 FR 65185 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English, DSCA...

  6. SerpinB1 Promotes Pancreatic β Cell Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Hu, Jiang; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Shirakawa, Jun; Hou, Lifei; Goodman, Jessica; Karampelias, Christos; Qiang, Guifeng; Boucher, Jeremie; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A.; De Jesus, Dario F.; Kahraman, Sevim; Bhatt, Shweta; Smith, Richard D.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Jungtrakoon, Prapaporn; Gong, Yanping; Goldfine, Allison B.; Liew, Chong Wee; Doria, Alessandro; Andersson, Olov; Qian, Wei-Jun; Remold-O’Donnell, Eileen; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance is a common feature in diabetes. We recently reported that liver-derived factors participate in this compensatory response in the liver insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a model of significant islet hyperplasia. Here we show that serpinB1 is a liver-derived secretory protein that controls β-cell proliferation. SerpinB1 is abundant in the hepatocyte secretome and sera derived from LIRKO mice. SerpinB1 and small molecule compounds that partially mimic serpinB1 activity enhanced proliferation of zebrafish, mouse and human β-cells. We report that serpinB1-induced β-cell replication requires protease inhibition activity and mice lacking serpinB1 exhibit attenuated β-cell replication in response to insulin resistance. Finally, SerpinB1-treatment of islets modulated signaling proteins in growth and survival pathways such as MAPK, PKA and GSK3. Together, these data implicate SerpinB1 as a protein that can potentially be harnessed to enhance functional β-cell mass in patients with diabetes.

  7. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise allowable...

  8. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  9. 26 CFR 1.280B-1 - Demolition of structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Demolition of structures. 1.280B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280B-1 Demolition of structures. (a) In general. Section 280B provides that, in the case of the demolition of any structure, no deduction otherwise...

  10. 76 FR 60467 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of...: a Foreign Military Sales Order II (FMSO II) to provide funds for blanket order requisitions,...

  11. 76 FR 56181 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security... a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section.... (vi) Sales Commission, Fee, etc., Paid, Offered, or Agreed to be Paid: None. (vii) Sensitivity...

  12. 26 CFR 1.269B-1 - Stapled foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stapled foreign corporations. 1.269B-1 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.269B-1 Stapled foreign corporations. (a) Treatment as a domestic corporation—(1) General rule. Except as otherwise provided, if a foreign corporation is a...

  13. 26 CFR 301.269B-1 - Stapled foreign corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stapled foreign corporations. 301.269B-1....269B-1 Stapled foreign corporations. In accordance with section 269B(a)(1), a stapled foreign corporation is subject to the same taxes that apply to a domestic corporation under Title 26 of the...

  14. 26 CFR 1.677(b)-1 - Trusts for support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trusts for support. 1.677(b)-1 Section 1.677(b... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Grantors and Others Treated As Substantial Owners § 1.677(b)-1 Trusts for support. (a) Section 677(b) provides that a grantor is not treated as the owner of a trust merely because...

  15. 17 CFR 260.10b-1 - Calculation of percentages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of percentages. 260.10b-1 Section 260.10b-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Calculation of percentages. The percentages of voting securities and other securities specified in section...

  16. 76 FR 103 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English...

  17. 76 FR 107 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English...

  18. 76 FR 30670 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English...

  19. 76 FR 30676 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated 21 July 1996. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. B. English...

  20. Two-stage Revision for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Gabr, Ayman; Das, Rishi; Sukeik, Mohamed; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) continues to be one of the leading causes of failure following hip and knee surgery. The diagnostic workflow of PJI includes detailed clinical examination, serum markers, imaging and aspiration/biopsy of the affected joint. The goals of treatment are eradication of the infection, alleviation of pain, and restoration of joint function. Surgical management of PJI consists of debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) and single or two-stage revision procedures. Two-stage revision remains the gold standard for treatment of PJIs. We aim to discuss the two stage procedure in this article and report the outcomes. Methods: The first stage of the two stages consists of removal of all components and associated cement with aggressive debridement and placement of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. Patients are then treated with variable periods of parenteral antibiotics, followed by an antibiotic free period to help ensure the infection has been eradicated. If the clinical evaluation and serum inflammatory markers suggest infection control, then the second stage can be undertaken and this involves removal of the cement spacer, repeat debridement, and placement of a new prosthesis. Results: Common themes around the two-stage revision procedure include timing of the second stage, antibiotics used in the interim period, length of the interim period before consideration of reimplantation and close liaising with microbiologists. Conclusion: Successful eradication of infection and good functional outcome using the two stage procedure is dependent on a multidisciplinary approach and having a standard reproducible startegy. PMID:28144371

  1. Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a serious pathogen in periprosthetic joint infections: comparison to Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Lourtet-Hascoët, J; Bicart-See, A; Félicé, M P; Giordano, G; Bonnet, E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to compare these to the characteristics of PJI due to Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. A retrospective multicentre study including all consecutive cases of S. lugdunensis PJI (2000-2014) was performed. Eighty-eight cases of staphylococcal PJI were recorded: 28 due to S. lugdunensis, 30 to S. aureus, and 30 to S. epidermidis, as identified by Vitek 2 or API Staph (bioMérieux). Clinical symptoms were more often reported in the S. lugdunensis group, and the median delay between surgery and infection was shorter for the S. lugdunensis group than for the S. aureus and S. epidermidis groups. Regarding antibiotic susceptibility, the S. lugdunensis strains were susceptible to antibiotics and 61% of the patients could be treated with levofloxacin + rifampicin. The outcome of the PJI was favourable for 89% of patients with S. lugdunensis, 83% with S. aureus, and 97% with S. epidermidis. S. lugdunensis is an emerging pathogen with a pathogenicity quite similar to that of S. aureus. This coagulase-negative Staphylococcus must be identified precisely in PJI, in order to select the appropriate surgical treatment and antibiotics . Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Two-stage Revision for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections.

    PubMed

    Kini, Sunil Gurpur; Gabr, Ayman; Das, Rishi; Sukeik, Mohamed; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) continues to be one of the leading causes of failure following hip and knee surgery. The diagnostic workflow of PJI includes detailed clinical examination, serum markers, imaging and aspiration/biopsy of the affected joint. The goals of treatment are eradication of the infection, alleviation of pain, and restoration of joint function. Surgical management of PJI consists of debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) and single or two-stage revision procedures. Two-stage revision remains the gold standard for treatment of PJIs. We aim to discuss the two stage procedure in this article and report the outcomes. The first stage of the two stages consists of removal of all components and associated cement with aggressive debridement and placement of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer. Patients are then treated with variable periods of parenteral antibiotics, followed by an antibiotic free period to help ensure the infection has been eradicated. If the clinical evaluation and serum inflammatory markers suggest infection control, then the second stage can be undertaken and this involves removal of the cement spacer, repeat debridement, and placement of a new prosthesis. Common themes around the two-stage revision procedure include timing of the second stage, antibiotics used in the interim period, length of the interim period before consideration of reimplantation and close liaising with microbiologists. Successful eradication of infection and good functional outcome using the two stage procedure is dependent on a multidisciplinary approach and having a standard reproducible startegy.

  3. Financial Analysis of Treating Periprosthetic Joint Infections at a Tertiary Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Bradford S; Briski, David C; Meyer, Mark S; Ochsner, John L; Chimento, George F

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a significant challenge to the orthopedic surgeon, patient, hospital, and insurance provider. Our study compares the financial information of self-originating and referral 2-stage revision hip and knee surgeries at our tertiary referral center for hip or knee PJI over the last 4 years. We performed an in-house retrospective financial review of all patients who underwent 2-stage revision hip or knee arthroplasty for infection between January 2008 and August 2013, comparing self-originating and referral cases. We found an increasing number of referrals over the study period. There was an increased cost of treating hips over knees. All scenarios generated a positive net income; however, referral hip PJIs offered lower reimbursement and net income per case (although not statistically significant), whereas knee PJIs offered higher reimbursement and net income per case (although not statistically significant). With referral centers treating increased numbers of infected joints performed elsewhere, we show continued financial incentive in accepting referrals, although with less financial gain than when treating one's own hip PJI and an increased financial gain when treating referral knee PJIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The value of arthroscopic neosynovium biopsies to diagnose periprosthetic knee joint low-grade infection.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Leif; Ettinger, Sarah; Pastor, Marc-Frederic; Budde, Stefan; Windhagen, Henning; Floerkemeier, Thilo

    2016-12-01

    The diagnostic algorithm in cases of assumed low-grade infection after total knee arthroplasty is discussed controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of neosynovium biopsies via knee arthroscopies in predicting a periprosthetic knee joint infection (PJI). From 2010 to 2015, 56 consecutive patients received a diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee joint by reason of an assumed PJI. In 34 cases, a revision arthroplasty was performed after the diagnostic arthroscopy. The microbiologic and histologic results from neosynovium biopsies were compared to intraoperative findings of the consecutively performed revision arthroplasty. The arthroscopic neosynovium biopsies had a sensitivity of 0.88 (0.47-1.0 95 % confidence interval), a specificity of 0.88 (0.7-0.98), a positive predictive value of 0.7 (0.35-0.93), and a negative predictive value of 0.96 (0.79-1.0). The accuracy was 0.88. We determined a higher sensitivity of neosynovium biopsies compared to C-reactive protein (p = 0.038) and white blood cell count (p < 0.001) in serum. The itemized evaluation of histologic results showed a significant higher sensitivity compared to microbiologic results (p = 0.045) and a higher accuracy. The analysis of arthroscopic neosynovium biopsies can be helpful to verify or exclude a PJI in selected patients. Especially, histologic assessment showed a high accordance with final results. Level of evidence IV, retrospective study.

  5. Treating periprosthetic joint infections as biofilms: key diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Alice; Tzeng, Tony H; Vasdev, Sonia; Korth, Kyle; Healey, Travis; Parvizi, Javad; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-03-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that microbial biofilms play an important role in periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) pathogenesis. Compared to free-floating planktonic bacteria, biofilm bacteria are more difficult to culture and possess additional immune-evasive and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, making infections harder to detect and eradicate. This article reviews cutting-edge advances in biofilm-associated infection diagnosis and treatment in the context of current PJI guidelines and highlights emerging technologies that may improve the efficacy and reduce costs associated with PJI. Promising PJI diagnostic tools include culture-independent methods based on sequence comparisons of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene, which offer higher throughput and greater sensitivity than culture-based methods. For therapy, novel methods based on disrupting biofilm-specific properties include quorum quenchers, bacteriophages, and ultrasound/electrotherapy. Since biofilm infections are not easily detected or treated by conventional approaches, molecular diagnostic techniques and next-generation antibiofilm treatments should be integrated into PJI clinical practice guidelines in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. One-stage Exchange Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Manny; Sukeik, Mohamed; Zahar, Akos; Nizam, Ikram; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication of joint replacement surgery. In an aging population of the developed world, the increasing numbers of hip and knee replacements will inevitably lead to increasing incidence of PJI, carrying with (it) significant patient morbidity and cost to the health care system. Two-stage exchange arthroplasty is currently the gold standard but it is associated with multiple operations, prolonged hospitalization and impaired functionality. One-stage exchange arthroplasty is similar to the two-stage procedure but the interval between removal of the prosthesis and reimplantation of a new one is only a few minutes. It has the theoretical benefits of a single anesthetic, shorter hospitalization, less cost and improved function. Methods: We reviewed the current literature regarding the outcomes of one-stage exchange arthroplasties focusing on re-infection rates and functional outcomes. Results: Current themes around the one-stage exchange procedure include the indications for the procedure, definition of re-infection, surgical techniques used to provide fixation and differences in approach for hip and knee replacements. Conclusion: The current literature on one-stage exchange procedure is promising, with comparable results to two-stage revisions for hips and knees in selected patients. However, there is a great need for a large multi-centred randomized control trial, focusing on re-infection rates and functional scores postoperatively, to provide concrete guidelines in managing this complex condition. PMID:28144374

  7. Fungal periprosthetic joint infection in total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Oliver; Schoof, Benjamin; Klatte, Till Orla; Schmidl, Stefan; Fensky, Florian; Guenther, Daniel; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-03-03

    Fungal periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare but devastating complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A standardized procedure regarding an accurate treatment of this serious complication of knee arthroplasty is lacking. In this systematic review, we collected data from 36 studies with a total of 45 reported cases of a TKA complicated by a fungal PJI. Subsequently, an analysis focusing on diagnostic, medicaments and surgical procedures in the pre-, intra- and postoperative period was performed. Candida spp. accounts for about 80% (36 out of 45 cases) of fungal PJIs and is therefore the most frequently reported pathogen. A systemic antifungal therapy was administered in all but one patient whereas a local antifungal therapy, e.g. the use of an impregnated spacer, is of inferior relevance. Resection arthroplasty with delayed re-implantation (two-stage revision) was the surgical treatment of choice. However, in 50% of all reported cases the surgical therapy was heterogeneous. The outcome under a combined therapy was moderate with recurrent fungal PJI in 11 patients and subsequent bacterial PJI as a main complication in 5 patients. In summary, this systematic review integrates data from up to date 45 reported cases of a fungal PJI of a TKA. On the basis of the current literature strategies for the treatment of this devastating complication after TKA are discussed.

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated prior to dental procedures for prevention of periprosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Willem M H; Walenkamp, Geert H I M; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Hendriks, Johannes G E; Goedendorp, Theo A; Rozema, Frederik R

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - To minimize the risk of hematogenous periprosthetic joint infection (HPJI), international and Dutch guidelines recommended antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental procedures. Unclear definitions and contradictory recommendations in these guidelines have led to unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions. To formulate new guidelines, a joint committee of the Dutch Orthopaedic and Dental Societies conducted a systematic literature review to answer the following question: can antibiotic prophylaxis be recommended for patients (with joint prostheses) undergoing dental procedures in order to prevent dental HPJI? Methods - The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), reviews, and observational studies up to July 2015. Studies were included if they involved patients with joint implants undergoing dental procedures, and either considered HPJI as an outcome measure or described a correlation between HPJI and prophylactic antibiotics. A guideline was formulated using the GRADE method and AGREE II guidelines. Results - 9 studies were included in this systematic review. All were rated "very low quality of evidence". Additional literature was therefore consulted to address clinical questions that provide further insight into pathophysiology and risk factors. The 9 studies did not provide evidence that use of antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the incidence of dental HPJI, and the additional literature supported the conclusion that antibiotic prophylaxis should be discouraged in dental procedures. Interpretation - Prophylactic antibiotics in order to prevent dental HPJI should not be prescribed to patients with a normal or an impaired immune system function. Patients are recommended to maintain good oral hygiene and visit the dentist regularly.

  9. Implant retention after acute and hematogenous periprosthetic hip and knee infections: Whom, when and how?

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllopoulos, Georgios K; Soranoglou, Vasileios; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Poultsides, Lazaros A

    2016-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and the knee are grossly classified as early post-operative, acute hematogenous and late chronic infections. Whereas two-stage exchange arthroplasty is the standard of care in North America for treating chronic infections, irrigation and debridement (I and D) with retention of implants has been used in an attempt to treat the other two types of PJIs. The rationale of this approach is that a PJI may be eradicated without the need of explanting the prostheses, as long as it has not transitioned into a chronic state. With the present paper, we review current evidence regarding the role of I and D with implant retention for treating PJIs of the hip and the knee. While a very wide range of success rates is reported in different studies, a short period of time between initiation of symptoms and intervention seems to play a prominent role with regards to a successful outcome. Moreover, pathogens of higher virulence and resistance to antibiotics are associated with a poorer result. Specific comorbidities have been also correlated with a less favorable outcome. Finally, one should proceed with serial I and Ds only under the condition that a predefined, aggressive protocol is applied. In conclusion, when treating a PJI of the hip or the knee, all the above factors should be considered in order to decide whether the patient is likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:27672567

  10. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  11. First Case Report of a Late Onset Knee Periprosthetic Joint Infection Caused by Lactococcus garvieae

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is known as a Gram-positive, catalase-negative, and facultatively anaerobic fish pathogen. The association between Lactococcus spp. and human infectious diseases is described as being mainly associated with lumbar osteomyelitis, hepatic abscess, and infective endocarditis. In the literature of orthopedic post-prosthetic infections, L. garvieae was associated with a case of hip prosthetic infection in a fishmonger woman. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities, who is admitted to our center with a 5-day history of pain, swelling, and motility disorder of the right knee by the presence of a bicondylar knee replacement surgery, which was performed due to gonarthrosis 17 years ago. The radiographies of the right knee revealed no signs of displacement or loosening of the prothesis. After multiple radical debridements including VAC therapy and targeted antibiotic therapy we have managed to defeat the infection without exchange arthroplasty. Although we could not demonstrate the source of infection, we can only presume that in our case the source of infection was represented by the ingestion of possibly contaminated food. The patient had a habit of eating Nile perch fish (Lates niloticus) every 4 weeks. We illustrated once more the possibility of a late onset L. garvieae related orthopedic periprosthetic joint infection by multiple comorbidities. PMID:27833769

  12. Fracture Mechanics Evaluation of B-1 Materials. Volume 2. Fatigue Crack Growth Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    t-t-t-l—t—t—t—t-t-lTi t-t-t^ vo t^t^t^ ^ J t^ t-^ t^ t-^ ^ t^-1^- gg|g§gg§ gggg ggg g gg§ gggßggggg IAVO t— ON O H CO H CV1 00-4 IAC0...p. ooooooooooooooo )VOV£^ iss: o o o o o UMAIAIAUN OOOOOOO^-^J--*OOO vovovovovovovo t-1-1-IAVO ggggg gggggggggggg gggggggggg& gggg t—Q rj mco

  13. CYP1B1 and hormone-induced cancer.

    PubMed

    Gajjar, Ketan; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Martin, Francis L

    2012-11-01

    Cancers in hormone-responsive tissues (e.g., breast, ovary, endometrium, prostate) occur at high incidence rates worldwide. However, their genetic basis remains poorly understood. Studies to date suggest that endogenous/exogenous oestrogen and environmental carcinogens may play a role in development and/or progression of hormone-induced cancers via oxidative oestrogen metabolism. Cytochrome P450 1B1 is a key enzyme in its oestrogen metabolism pathway, giving rise to hydroxylation and conjugation. Although CYP1B1 is expressed in many cancers, particularly high levels of expression are observed in oestrogen-mediated disease. CYP1B1 is more readily found in tumour tissue compared to normal. Given the role of CYP1B1 in pro-carcinogen and oestrogen metabolism, polymorphisms in CYP1B1 could result in modifications in its enzyme activity and subsequently lead to hormone-mediated carcinogenesis. CYP1B1 may also be involved in progression of the disease by altering the tissue response to hormones and clinical response to chemotherapy. The exact mechanism behind these events is complex and unclear. Only a few functional single nucleotide polymorphisms of CYP1B1 are known to result in amino acid substitutions and have been extensively investigated. Studies examining the contribution of different CYP1B1 alleles to hormone-mediated cancer risks are inconsistent. The main focus of this review is to appraise the available studies linking the pathogenesis of the hormone-induced cancers to various CYP1B1 polymorphisms. Additionally, we explore the role of a neuronal protein, γ-synuclein, in CYP1B1-mediated pathogenesis.

  14. The potential role of the osteoblast in the development of periprosthetic osteolysis: review of in vitro osteoblast responses to wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Vermes, C; Glant, T T; Hallab, N J; Fritz, E A; Roebuck, K A; Jacobs, J J

    2001-12-01

    Limited information is available on the responses of osteoblasts to wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and on the roles of altered osteoblast functions in the development of periprosthetic bone loss. Wear debris-challenged osteoblasts exhibit altered functions resulting in the loss of their capacity to produce bone matrix and to replace the resorbed bone. Also, osteoblasts may secrete cytokines, which act in a paracrine fashion to recruit inflammatory cells into the periprosthetic space and to stimulate osteoclastic bone resorption. These effects may be mediated in part by ionic metal dissolution products. We review the mechanisms by which altered osteoblast functions, in response to particulate wear debris, corrosion products, and cytokines and growth factors, may contribute to the development and the progression of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  15. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Malleolar fracture; Tri-malleolar; Bi-malleolar; Distal tibia fracture; Distal fibula fracture; Malleolus fracture ... Some ankle fractures may require surgery when: The ends of the bone are out of line with each other (displaced). The ...

  16. Clinical and surgical approach of severe bone fragility fracture: clinical case of 4 fragility fracture in patient with heavy osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Pini, Erica; Dell’Osso, Giacomo; De Paola, Gaia; Guido, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Summary An accurate diagnosis of osteoporosis and a proper treatment are today recognized to be the most important facts for prevention and for a correct arrangement and treatment of fragility fractures. In the text the Authors describe a case of severe osteoporosis aggravated by 2 femur fractures and 2 periprosthetic fractures occurred in 2 months. In such cases the orthopaedic surgeon needs to formulate first a clinical osteoporotic pattern, than its treatment together with a surgery suitable choice, that has to take into consideration of the bone structural characteristics. In the case described one can note that fractures healing occurred thanks to both an improvement in surgical techniques and antiosteoporotic pharmacological support; in the specific case the Authors used strontium ranelate for its osteoinductive capacity. In our opinion is crucial that the treatment used by orthopaedic surgeons is not related only to the “by-hand” treatment but take into consideration both the underlying disease and the possibility of positively affect bone healing with specific drug therapy. PMID:23858312

  17. The Role of B-1 Cells in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Monowar; Holodick, Nichol E.; Rothstein, Thomas L.; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    B-1 lymphocytes exhibit unique phenotypic, ontogenic, and functional characteristics that differ from the conventional B-2 cells. B-1 cells spontaneously secrete germline-like, repertoire skewed polyreactive natural antibody, which acts as a first line of defense by neutralizing a wide range of pathogens before launching of the adaptive immune response. Immunomodulatory molecules, such as interleukin-10 (IL-10), adenosine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-3, and IL-35 are also produced by B-1 cells in the presence or absence of stimulation, which regulate acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Considerable progress has been made during the past three decades since the discovery of B-1 cells, which has not only improved our understanding of their phenotypic and ontogenic uniqueness but also their role in various inflammatory diseases including influenza, pneumonia, sepsis, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), autoimmunity, obesity and diabetes mellitus. Recent identification of human B-1 cells widens the scope of this field, leading to novel innovations that can be implemented from bench to bedside. Among the vast number of studies on B-1 cells, we have carried out a literature review highlighting current trends in the study of B-1 cell involvement during inflammation, which may result in a paradigm shift towards sustainable therapeutics in various inflammatory diseases. PMID:26427372

  18. Lower periprosthetic bone loss and good fixation of an ultra-short stem compared to a conventional stem in uncemented total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Salemyr, Mats; Muren, Olle; Ahl, Torbjörn; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — We hypothesized that an ultra-short stem would load the proximal femur in a more physiological way and could therefore reduce the adaptive periprosthetic bone loss known as stress shielding. Patients and methods — 51 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis were randomized to total hip arthroplasty (THA) with either an ultra-short stem or a conventional tapered stem. The primary endpoint was change in periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD), measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in Gruen zones 1 and 7, two years after surgery. Secondary endpoints were change in periprosthetic BMD in the entire periprosthetic region, i.e. Gruen zones 1 through 7, stem migration measured with radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and function measured with self-administered functional scores. Results — The periprosthetic decrease in BMD was statistically significantly lower with the ultra-short stem. In Gruen zone 1, the mean difference was 18% (95% CI: −27% to −10%). In zone 7, the difference was 5% (CI: −12% to −3%) and for Gruen zones 1–7 the difference was also 5% (CI: −9% to −2%). During the first 6 weeks postoperatively, the ultra-short stems migrated 0.77 mm more on average than the conventional stems. 3 months after surgery, no further migration was seen. The functional scores improved during the study and were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation — Up to 2 years after total hip arthroplasty, compared to the conventional tapered stem the ultra-short uncemented anatomical stem induced lower periprosthetic bone loss and had equally excellent stem fixation and clinical outcome. PMID:26134386

  19. Lower periprosthetic bone loss and good fixation of an ultra-short stem compared to a conventional stem in uncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Salemyr, Mats; Muren, Olle; Ahl, Torbjörn; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that an ultra-short stem would load the proximal femur in a more physiological way and could therefore reduce the adaptive periprosthetic bone loss known as stress shielding. 51 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis were randomized to total hip arthroplasty (THA) with either an ultra-short stem or a conventional tapered stem. The primary endpoint was change in periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD), measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in Gruen zones 1 and 7, two years after surgery. Secondary endpoints were change in periprosthetic BMD in the entire periprosthetic region, i.e. Gruen zones 1 through 7, stem migration measured with radiostereometric analysis (RSA), and function measured with self-administered functional scores. The periprosthetic decrease in BMD was statistically significantly lower with the ultra-short stem. In Gruen zone 1, the mean difference was 18% (95% CI: -27% to -10%). In zone 7, the difference was 5% (CI: -12% to -3%) and for Gruen zones 1-7 the difference was also 5% (CI: -9% to -2%). During the first 6 weeks postoperatively, the ultra-short stems migrated 0.77 mm more on average than the conventional stems. 3 months after surgery, no further migration was seen. The functional scores improved during the study and were similar in the 2 groups. Up to 2 years after total hip arthroplasty, compared to the conventional tapered stem the ultra-short uncemented anatomical stem induced lower periprosthetic bone loss and had equally excellent stem fixation and clinical outcome.

  20. [Influence of preoperative bone mass density in periprosthetic bone remodeling after implantation of ABG-II prosthesis: A 10-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Ezquerra, A; Panisello Sebastiá, J J; Mateo Agudo, J

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative bone mass index has shown to be an important factor in peri-prosthetic bone remodelling in short follow-up studies. Bone density scans (DXA) were used to perform a 10-year follow-up study of 39 patients with a unilateral, uncemented hip replacement. Bone mass index measurements were made at 6 months, one year, 3 years, 5 years, and 10 years after surgery. Pearson coefficient was used to quantify correlations between preoperative bone mass density (BMD) and peri-prosthetic BMD in the 7 Gruen zones at 6 months, one year, 3 years, 5 years, and 10 years. Pre-operative BMD was a good predictor of peri-prosthetic BMD one year after surgery in zones 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6 (Pearson index from 0.61 to 0.75). Three years after surgery it has good predictive power in zones 1, 4 and 5 (0.71-0.61), although in zones 3 and 7 low correlation was observed one year after surgery (0.51 and 0.57, respectively). At the end of the follow-up low correlation was observed in the 7 Gruen zones. Sex and BMI were found to not have a statistically significant influence on peri-prosthetic bone remodelling. Although preoperative BMD seems to be an important factor in peri-prosthetic remodelling one year after hip replacement, it loses its predictive power progressively, until not being a major factor in peri-prosthetic remodelling ten years after surgery. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management.

  2. What is the Accuracy of Nuclear Imaging in the Assessment of Periprosthetic Knee Infection? A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Steven J; Sonnega, Remko J A; Temmerman, Olivier P P; Raijmakers, Pieter G

    2017-05-01

    In the assessment of possible periprosthetic knee infection, various imaging modalities are used without consensus regarding the most accurate technique. To perform a meta-analysis to compare the accuracy of various applied imaging modalities in the assessment of periprosthetic knee infection. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted with a comprehensive search of MEDLINE and Embase(®) in accordance with the PRISMA and Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) recommendations to identify clinical studies in which periprosthetic knee infection was investigated with different imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of each imaging technique were determined and compared with the results of microbiologic and histologic analyses, intraoperative findings, and clinical followup of more than 6 months. A total of 23 studies, published between 1990 and 2015, were included for meta-analysis, representing 1027 diagnostic images of symptomatic knee prostheses. Quality of the included studies showed low concerns regarding external validity, whereas internal validity indicated more concerns regarding the risk of bias. The most important concerns were found in the lack of uniform criteria for the diagnosis of a periprosthetic infection and the flow and timing of the included studies. Differences among techniques were tested at a probability less than 0.05 level. Where there was slight overlap of confidence intervals for two means, it is possible for the point estimates to be statistically different from one another at a probability less than 0.05. The z-test was used to statistically analyze differences in these situations. Bone scintigraphy was less specific than all other modalities tested (56%; 95% CI, 0.47-0.64; p < 0.001), and leukocyte scintigraphy (77%; 95% CI, 0.69-0.85) was less specific than antigranulocyte scintigraphy (95%; 95% CI, 0.88-0.98; p < 0.001) or combined leukocyte and bone marrow scintigraphy (93%; 95% CI, 0

  3. Fragility fractures of the ankle in the frail elderly patient: treatment with a long calcaneotalotibial nail.

    PubMed

    Al-Nammari, S S; Dawson-Bowling, S; Amin, A; Nielsen, D

    2014-06-01

    Conventional methods of treating ankle fractures in the elderly are associated with high rates of complication. We describe the results of treating these injuries in 48 frail elderly patients with a long calcaneotalotibial nail. The mean age of the group was 82 years (61 to 96) and 41 (85%) were women. All were frail, with multiple medical comorbidities and their mean American Society of Anaesthesiologists score was 3 (3 to 4). None could walk independently before their operation. All the fractures were displaced and unstable; the majority (94%, 45 of 48) were low-energy injuries and 40% (19 of 48) were open. The overall mortality at six months was 35%. Of the surviving patients, 90% returned to their pre-injury level of function. The mean pre- and post-operative Olerud and Molander questionnaire scores were 62 and 57 respectively. Complications included superficial infection (4%, two of 48); deep infection (2%, one of 48); a broken or loose distal locking screw (6%, three of 48); valgus malunion (4%, two of 48); and one below-knee amputation following an unsuccessful vascular operation. There were no cases of nonunion, nail breakage or peri-prosthetic fracture. A calcaneotalotibial nail is an excellent device for treating an unstable fracture of the ankle in the frail elderly patient. It allows the patient to mobilise immediately and minimises the risk of bone or wound problems. A long nail which crosses the isthmus of the tibia avoids the risk of peri-prosthetic fracture associated with shorter devices. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. MISR Level 1B1 Radiance Data (MI1B1_V1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    summary, the Level 1B1 Product contains the Data Numbers (DNs) radiometrically-scaled to radiances with no geometric resampling. [Location=GLOBAL] [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=275 m for red band only; Longitude_Resolution=275 m for red band only; Horizontal_Resolution_Range=250 meters - < 500 meters; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day; Temporal_Resolution_Range=Daily - < Weekly, about 15 orbits/day, Daily - < Weekly].

  5. MISR Level 1B1 Radiance Data (MI1B1_V2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    summary, the Level 1B1 Product contains the Data Numbers (DNs) radiometrically-scaled to radiances with no geometric resampling. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180] [Data_Resolution: Latitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Longitude_Resolution=1.1 km; Temporal_Resolution=about 15 orbits/day; Temporal_Resolution_Range=about 15 orbits/day].

  6. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in acute fractures of the proximal humerus: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brorson, Stig; Rasmussen, Jeppe V.; Olsen, Bo S.; Frich, Lars H.; Jensen, Steen L.; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2013-01-01

    The indications for surgical intervention in complex fractures of the proximal humerus are disputed. In elderly patients with poor bone stock it may be impossible to obtain satisfactory fixation of the tuberosities to a hemiarthroplasty (HA). In such cases primary insertion of a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has been suggested. We aimed to review clinical studies reporting benefits and harms of RSA in acute fractures. A systematic review. We included 18 studies containing 430 RSA in acute fractures. We found no randomized clinical trials. Four studies compared outcome after RSA with a historical control group of HA. The median constant score was 58 (range 44-68) which is comparable to previous reviews of HA in 4-part fractures. Complications included dislocation, infection, hematoma, instability, neurological injury, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, intraoperative fractures, periprosthetic fractures, and baseplate failure. Scapular notching was reported in 11 studies with a median value of 25% (range 0-94). Heterogeneity of study designs and lack of primary data precluded statistical pooling of data. No high quality evidence was identified. Based on the available evidence the use of RSA in acute fractures is questionable. The complication rate was high and the clinical implications of long term scapular notching are worrying. Randomized studies with long term follow up using the latest techniques of tubercular reinsertion in RSA toward HA should be encouraged. PMID:23960366

  7. Radiographic Measurement of Displacement in Acetabular Fractures: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Andrew; Osterhoff, Georg; Guy, Pierre; Lefaivre, Kelly A

    2016-06-01

    To report methods of measurement of radiographic displacement and radiographic outcomes in acetabular fractures described in the literature. A systematic review of the English literature was performed using EMBASE and Medline in August 2014. Inclusion criteria were studies of operatively treated acetabular fractures in adults with acute (<6 weeks) open reduction and internal fixation that reported radiographic outcomes. Exclusion criteria included case series with <10 patients, fractures managed >6 weeks from injury, acute total hip arthroplasty, periprosthetic fractures, time frame of radiographic outcomes not stated, missing radiographic outcome data, and non-English language articles. Basic information collected included journal, author, year published, number of fractures, and fracture types. Specific data collected included radiographic outcome data, method of measuring radiographic displacement, and methods of interpreting or categorizing radiographic outcomes. The number of reproducible radiographic measurement techniques (2/64) and previously described radiographic interpretation methods (4) were recorded. One radiographic reduction grading criterion (Matta) was used nearly universally in articles that used previously described criteria. Overall, 70% of articles using this criteria documented anatomic reductions. The current standard of measuring radiographic displacement in publications dealing with acetabulum fractures almost universally lacks basic description, making further scientific rigor, such as testing reproducibility, impossible. Further work is necessary to standardize radiographic measurement techniques, test their reproducibility, and qualify their validity or determine which measurements are important to clinical outcomes. Diagnostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. [Craniofacial fractures].

    PubMed

    Benech, A; Gerbino, G

    1990-12-01

    Results of early combined maxillo-facial and neurosurgical treatment of 53 craniofacial fractures are referred. The fracture location was in 31 cases central midfrontal, 10 lateral supraorbital and 12 combined central and lateral fractures. 35 fractures interested the floor and the posterior wall of frontal sinus, lacerating the underlying dura and cortical tissue. In 19 fractures orbital displacement was present. The key points in the management of these patients are: 1) Early (within 1 to 5 days) and one stage neurosurgical-maxillofacial procedure. Immediate intervention is indicated only in case of evolutive neurological lesions; 2) wide exposition of all the injuries through bicoronal incision and bone flap; 3) assessment of fractures pattern and amount of bone loss; 4) reconstruction of craniofacial frame with osteosynthesis and autologous bone grafts (35 cases iliac crest, 7 split calvarial graft); 5) interosseous wiring is used in sutured mosaic, small bone fragments and intraoperative temporary fixation; miniplates are used for rigid fixation of craniofacial pillars; 6) for optimal cosmetic result reconstruction of supraorbital ridge, nasoglabellar region and zygomatic arch is essential; 7) fractures involving the sinus floor, posterior wall and the nasofrontal duct result in direct communication between the nose and intracranial cavity with high risk of infection and mucocele formation. Cranialization of the sinus removing the posterior wall and all the mucosa is mandatory. The nasofrontal duct, the floor and sinus dead space are obliterated with autologous bone chips. Osteoneogenesis occurred in all the cases.

  9. Fracture line distribution of olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Bart; Mellema, Jos J; Janssen, Stein J; Ring, David

    2017-01-01

    The association between specific olecranon fracture characteristics (e.g., displacement, fragmentation, subluxation) and fracture line distribution might help surgeons predict intra-articular fracture location based on fracture characteristics that can be determined on radiographs. We hypothesized that fracture mapping techniques would reveal different fracture patterns for minimally displaced fractures, displaced fractures, and fracture-dislocations of the olecranon. A consecutive series of 78 patients with olecranon fractures were evaluated using initial radiographs and computed tomography scans and characterized according to the Mayo classification. Fracture lines were identified based on reduced three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and graphically superimposed onto a standard template to create two-dimensional fracture maps. The fracture maps were then converted into fracture heat maps. Based on fracture and heat maps, fracture line location and patterns were determined. Six (7.7%) patients had a non- or minimally displaced fracture, 22 (28%) a displaced fracture, and 50 (64%) a fracture-dislocation of the olecranon. There were 27 (54%) anterior and 23 (46%) posterior olecranon fracture-dislocations. Fracture lines of non- or minimally displaced fractures and posterior fracture-dislocations enter and exit the trochlear notch at the base of the coronoid, while fracture lines of displaced fractures and anterior fracture-dislocations were spread more broadly over the depths of the trochlear notch. Based on fracture characteristics depicted on radiographs, one can anticipate the amount of the olecranon involved (how close is the fracture line to the coronoid) and the orientation of the fracture line. Computer tomography could be reserved for when more specific knowledge of the fracture line might affect treatment. III.

  10. Stress shielding in periprosthetic bone following a total knee replacement: Effects of implant material, design and alignment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Hang; Cossey, Andrew; Tong, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Periprosthetic bone strain distributions in some of the typical cases of total knee replacement (TKR) were studied with regard to the selection of material, design and the alignments of tibial components to examine which conditions are more forgiving than the others to stress shielding post a TKR. Four tibial components with two implant designs (cruciate sacrificing and cruciate retaining) and material properties (metal-backed (MB) and all-polyethylene (AP)) were considered in a specimen-specific finite element tibia bone model loaded in a neutral position. The influence of tibial material and design on the periprosthetic bone strain response was investigated under the peak loads of walking and stair descending/ascending. Two of the models were also modified to examine the effect of selected implant malalignment conditions (7° posterior, 5° valgus and 5° varus) on stress shielding in the bone, where the medio-lateral load share ratios were adjusted accordingly. The predicted increases of bone density due to implantation for the selected cases studied were also presented. For the cases examined, the effect of stress shielding on the periprosthetic bone seems to be more significantly influenced by the implant material than by the implant geometry. Significant stress shielding is found in MB cases, as opposed to increase in bone density found in AP cases, particularly in the bones immediately beneath the baseplate. The effect of stress shielding is reduced somewhat for the MB components in the malaligned positions compared with the neutral case. In AP cases, the effect of stress shielding is mostly low except in the varus position, possibly due to off-loading of lateral condyle. Increases in bone density are found in both MB and AP cases for the malaligned conditions. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic-loaded synthetic calcium sulfate beads for prevention of bacterial colonization and biofilm formation in periprosthetic infections.

    PubMed

    Howlin, R P; Brayford, M J; Webb, J S; Cooper, J J; Aiken, S S; Stoodley, P

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 10(6) CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection.

  12. Practical management of periprosthetic leakage in patients rehabilitated with a Provox® 2 voice prosthesis after total laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Eviatar; Pinacho Martínez, Paloma; Poletti Serafini, Daniel; Martín-Oviedo, Carlos; Martínez Guirado, Tomás; Scola Yurrita, Bartolomé

    Periprosthetic leakage of liquids is a common complication in patients rehabilitated with voice prostheses. Our objective was to describe and review the results of procedures for treating periprosthetic leakage. This was a retrospective analysis of 41 patients rehabilitated with Provox® 2 voice prostheses between 1997 and 2015. We describe 3 techniques: periprosthetic silicon collar placement, injection of hyaluronic acid into the tracheoesophageal wall and the combination of the 2 techniques. We present a method to reduce the diameter of the tracheoesophageal fistula by removing the voice prosthesis and placing a nasogastric tube through the fistula. In the 3 groups treated with silicone collar (n=5, 13 procedures), hyaluronic acid injection (n=5, 9 procedures) and the combination of both techniques (n=3, 5 procedures), we observed an increase in prosthesis lifespan of an average of 56 days (range 7-118 days), 32 days (range 3-55 days) and 63 days (range 28-136 days), respectively. The tracheoesophageal fistula diameter reduction was performed in 100% (n=6) of patients. The use of silicone collars, injection of hyaluronic acid into the tracheoesophageal wall and the combination of both techniques for the treatment of periprosthesis leakage increase the lifespan of the prosthesis. Temporary prosthesis removal and placement of nasogastric tube has also been shown effective in our experience. These techniques are simple, inexpensive and reproducible, thereby reducing healthcare costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic-Loaded Synthetic Calcium Sulfate Beads for Prevention of Bacterial Colonization and Biofilm Formation in Periprosthetic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Howlin, R. P.; Brayford, M. J.; Webb, J. S.; Cooper, J. J.; Aiken, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 106 CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection. PMID:25313221

  14. 76 FR 46754 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  15. 78 FR 36538 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  16. 78 FR 41039 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21,...

  17. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Aflatoxin B 1 from Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research describes the development of a Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) method to recover aflatoxin B1 from fortified soil. The effects of temperature, pressure, modifier (identity and percentage), and extraction type were assessed. Using the optimized SFE conditions, ...

  18. B-1 cells as a source of IgA.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin found primarily on mucosal surfaces. The generation of IgA and its involvement in mucosal immune responses have been intensely studied over the past years. IgA can be generated in T cell-dependent and T cell-independent pathways, and it has an important impact on maintaining homeostasis within the mucosal immune system. There is good evidence that B-1 cells contribute substantially to the production of mucosal IgA and thus play an important role in regulating commensal microbiota. However, whether B-1 cells produce antigen-specific or only nonspecific IgA remains to be determined. This review will discuss what is currently known about IgA production by B-1 cells and the functional relevance of B-1 cell-derived IgA both in vitro and in vivo. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Properties of L=1 B(1) and B(2)* mesons.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Williams, M R J; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-10-26

    This Letter presents the first strong evidence for the resolution of the excited B mesons B(1) and B(2)* as two separate states in fully reconstructed decays to B(+)(*)pi(-). The mass of B(1) is measured to be 5720.6+/-2.4+/-1.4 MeV/c(2) and the mass difference DeltaM between B(2)* and B(1) is 26.2+/-3.1+/-0.9 MeV/c;{2}, giving the mass of the B(2)* as 5746.8+/-2.4+/-1.7 MeV/c(2). The production rate for B(1) and B(2)* mesons is determined to be a fraction (13.9+/-1.9+/-3.2)% of the production rate of the B+ meson.

  20. 76 FR 68434 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996.

  1. 77 FR 37881 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996.

  2. 77 FR 37879 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996.

  3. 76 FR 66048 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ...The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section 36(b)(1) arms sales notification. This is published to fulfill the requirements of section 155 of Public Law 104-164 dated July 21, 1996.

  4. 26 CFR 31.3401(b)-1 - Payroll period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Payroll period. 31.3401(b)-1 Section 31.3401(b... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(b)-1 Payroll period. (a) The term payroll period means the period of service for which a payment of wages is ordinarily made to an employee by his employer. It is...

  5. Benzodiazepines as potent and selective bradykinin B1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael R; Kim, June J; Han, Wei; Dorsey, Bruce D; Homnick, Carl F; DiPardo, Robert M; Kuduk, Scott D; MacNeil, Tanya; Murphy, Kathy L; Lis, Edward V; Ransom, Richard W; Stump, Gary L; Lynch, Joseph J; O'Malley, Stacey S; Miller, Patricia J; Chen, Tsing-Bau; Harrell, Charles M; Chang, Raymond S L; Sandhu, Punam; Ellis, Joan D; Bondiskey, Peter J; Pettibone, Douglas J; Freidinger, Roger M; Bock, Mark G

    2003-05-08

    Antagonism of the bradykinin B(1) receptor was demonstrated to be a potential treatment for chronic pain and inflammation. Novel benzodiazepines were designed that display subnanomolar affinity for the bradykinin B(1) receptor (K(i) = 0.59 nM) and high selectivity against the bradykinin B(2) receptor (K(i) > 10 microM). In vivo efficacy, comparable to morphine, was demonstrated for lead compounds in a rodent hyperalgesia model.

  6. Periprosthetic Infection following Primary Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: The Impact of Limiting the Postoperative Surveillance Period.

    PubMed

    Roth, Virginia R; Mitchell, Robyn; Vachon, Julie; Alexandre, Stéphanie; Amaratunga, Kanchana; Smith, Stephanie; Vearncombe, Mary; Davis, Ian; Mertz, Dominik; Henderson, Elizabeth; John, Michael; Johnston, Lynn; Lemieux, Camille; Pelude, Linda; Gravel, Denise

    2017-02-01

    BACKGROUND Hip and knee arthroplasty infections are associated with considerable healthcare costs. The merits of reducing the postoperative surveillance period from 1 year to 90 days have been debated. OBJECTIVES To report the first pan-Canadian hip and knee periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) rates and to describe the implications of a shorter (90-day) postoperative surveillance period. METHODS Prospective surveillance for infection following hip and knee arthroplasty was conducted by hospitals participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) using standard surveillance definitions. RESULTS Overall hip and knee PJI rates were 1.64 and 1.52 per 100 procedures, respectively. Deep incisional and organ-space hip and knee PJI rates were 0.96 and 0.71, respectively. In total, 93% of hip PJIs and 92% of knee PJIs were identified within 90 days, with a median time to detection of 21 days. However, 11%-16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections were not detected within 90 days. This rate was reduced to 3%-4% at 180 days post procedure. Anaerobic and polymicrobial infections had the shortest median time from procedure to detection (17 and 18 days, respectively) compared with infections due to other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS PJI rates were similar to those reported elsewhere, although differences in national surveillance systems limit direct comparisons. Our results suggest that a postoperative surveillance period of 90 days will detect the majority of PJIs; however, up to 16% of deep incisional and organ-space infections may be missed. Extending the surveillance period to 180 days could allow for a better estimate of disease burden. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:147-153.

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcal periprosthetic joint infections can be effectively controlled by systemic and local daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Feng-Chih; Yen, Shih-Hsiang; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Wang, Jun-Wen; Lee, Mel S

    2016-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus remains a serious problem in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Higher failure rates were reported when vancomycin was used in 2-stage exchange arthroplasty. Therefore a better therapeutic drug is needed to treat PJI caused by methicillin-resistant organisms. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of daptomycin when administered in bone cement combined with systemic use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococci PJI. We conducted a retrospective study from January 2010 to December 2012. Twenty-two patients (10 knees and 12 hips) with PJI caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species underwent 2-stage revision arthroplasty. In the first stage, 10% daptomycin (weight daptomycin per weight bone cement) was incorporated into polymethylmethacrylate bone cement, and systemic daptomycin (6 mg/kg) was administered postoperatively for 14 days. In the second stage, 2.5% w/w daptomycin was used in the bone cement. The minimum follow-up was 2 years or until recurrence of infection. The infecting organisms included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in 10 patients, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis in 8 patients and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci in 4 patients. The mean follow-up duration was 33.7 months (range, 24-51 months). The treatment success rate was 100%. Only one patient developed asymptomatic transient elevation of the creatine phosphokinase level. No patient experienced any adverse effects related to daptomycin such as myositis, rhabdomyolysis, peripheral neuropathy, derangement of liver function, or eosinophilic pneumonia. In this series, no serious adverse events occurred. Our protocol, using daptomycin-impregnated cement combined with short duration of systemic daptomycin, appears to be an effective and safe treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus PJI.

  8. A resorbable antibiotic eluting bone void filler for periprosthetic joint infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Jones, Zachary; Brooks, Amanda E; Ferrell, Zachary; Grainger, David W; Sinclair, Kristofer D

    2016-11-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) following total knee arthroplasty is a globally increasing procedural complication. These infections are difficult to treat and typically require revision surgery. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement is frequently utilized to deliver antibiotics to the site of infection; however, bone cement is a nondegrading foreign body and known to leach its antibiotic load, after an initial burst release, at subtherapeutic concentrations for months. This work characterized a resorbable, antibiotic-eluting bone void filler designed to restore bone volume and prevent PJI. Three device formulations were fabricated, consisting of different combinations of synthetic inorganic bone graft material, degradable polymer matrices, salt porogens, and antibiotic tobramycin. These formulations were examined to determine the antibiotic's elution kinetics and bactericidal potential, the device's degradation in vitro, as well as osteoconductivity and device resorption in vivo using a pilot rabbit bone implant model. Kirby-Bauer antibiotic susceptibility tests assessed bactericidal activity. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry measured antibiotic elution kinetics, and scanning electron microscopy was used to qualitatively assess degradation. Results indicated sustained antibiotic release from all three formulations above the Staphylococcus aureus minimum inhibitory concentration for a period of 5 to 8 weeks. Extensive degradation was observed with the Group 3 formulation after 90 days in phosphate-buffered saline, with a lesser degree of degradation observed in the other two formulations. Results from the pilot rabbit study showed the Group 3 device to be biocompatible, with minimal inflammatory response and no fibrous encapsulation in bone. The device was also highly osteoconductive-exhibiting an accelerated mineral apposition rate. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1632-1642, 2016.

  9. Preoperative Hip Injections Increase the Rate of Periprosthetic Infection After Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schairer, William W; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Mayman, David J; Lyman, Stephen; Jerabek, Seth A

    2016-09-01

    Intraarticular injections are both diagnostic and therapeutic for patients with osteoarthritis. A potential risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may occur from direct inoculation and/or immune suppression by corticosteroids. Large population-level databases were used to evaluate hip injection on the 1-year rate of PJI in patients undergoing primary THA. State-level ambulatory surgery and inpatient databases for Florida and California (2005-2012) were used to identify primary THA patients with 1-year preoperative and postoperative windows to evaluate possible injections or PJI, respectively. Patients were grouped as no injection or as THA performed 6-12 months, 3-6 months, or 0-3 months after injection. Risk adjustment was performed with multivariable regression. A total of 173,958 patients were included; 5421 (3.1%) underwent THA after an injection: 1395 (1.1%) of patients after 6-12 months, 1863 patients after 3-6 months, and 2163 (1.2%) after 0-3 months. In the 0-3 month group, PJI was significantly increased at 3 months (1.58%, P = .015), 6 months (1.76%, P = .022), and 1 year (2.04%, P = .031) compared with the noninjection control group (1.04%, 1.21%, and 1.47%, respectively). There were no differences in the 3- to 6-month and 6- to 12-month injection groups. There is an increased risk of PJI when THA is performed within 3 months of hip injection. We recommend that patients and their surgeons consider delaying elective THA until 3 months after an injection to avoid this elevated risk of infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of periprosthetic osteolysis after total hip replacement in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perez Alamino, Rodolfo; Casellini, Carolina; Baňos, Andrea; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Gagliardi, Susana Alicia; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis (PO) is a frequent complication in patients with joint implants. There are no data regarding the prevalence of PO in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of PO in patients with RA, JCA, AS, and OA, who have undergone total hip replacement (THR), and to identify factors associated with its development. Methods The study included patients diagnosed with RA (ACR 1987), AS (modified New York criteria), JCA (European 1977 criteria), and osteoarthritis (OA) (ACR 1990 criteria) with unilateral or bilateral THR. Demographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were collected. Panoramic pelvic plain radiographs were performed, to determine the presence of PO at acetabular and femoral levels. Images were read by two independent observers. Results One hundred twenty-two hip prostheses were analyzed (74 cemented, 30 cementless, and 18 hybrids). The average time from prosthesis implantation to pelvic radiograph was comparable among groups. PO was observed in 72 hips (59%). In 55% of cases, PO was detected on the femoral component, with a lower prevalence in RA (53%) vs AS (64.7%) and JCA (76.5%). Acetabular PO was more frequent in JCA patients (58.8%), compared with RA (11.6%) and OA (28.5%) patients (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.06, respectively). There was no significant association between the presence of PO and clinical, functional, or therapeutic features. Conclusion The prevalence of PO was 59%, being more frequent at the femoral level. Larger studies must be carried out to determine the clinical significance of radiologic PO. PMID:27790012

  11. Periprosthetic infection: where do we stand with regard to Gram stain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Elie; Ketonis, Constantinos; Restrepo, Camilo; Joshi, Ashish; Barrack, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose One of the routinely used intraoperative tests for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection (PPI) is the Gram stain. It is not known if the result of this test can vary according to the type of joint affected or the number of specimen samples collected. We examined the role of this diagnostic test in a large cohort of patients from a single institution. Materials and methods A positive gram stain was defined as the visualization of bacterial cells or “many neutrophils” (> 5 per high-power field) in the smear. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of each individual diagnostic arm of Gram stain were determined. Combinations were performed in series, which required both tests to be positive to confirm infection, and also in parallel, which necessitated both tests to be negative to rule out infection. Results The presence of organisms and “many” neutrophils on a Gram smear had high specificity (98–100%) and positive predictive value (89–100%) in both THA and TKA. The sensitivities (30–50%) and negative predictive values (70–79%) of the 2 tests were low for both joint types. When the 2 tests were combined in series, the specificity and positive predictive value were absolute (100%). The sensitivity and the negative predictive value improved for both THA and TKA (43–64% and 82%, respectively). Interpretation Although the 2 diagnostic arms of Gram staining can be combined to achieve improved negative predictive value (82%), Gram stain continues to have little value in ruling out PPI. With the advances in the field of molecular biology, novel diagnostic modalities need to be designed that can replace these traditional and poor tests. PMID:19297787

  12. Periprosthetic infection: where do we stand with regard to Gram stain?

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Elie; Ketonis, Constantinos; Restrepo, Camilo; Joshi, Ashish; Barrack, Robert; Parvizi, Javad

    2009-02-01

    One of the routinely used intraoperative tests for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection (PPI) is the Gram stain. It is not known if the result of this test can vary according to the type of joint affected or the number of specimen samples collected. We examined the role of this diagnostic test in a large cohort of patients from a single institution. A positive gram stain was defined as the visualization of bacterial cells or "many neutrophils" (> 5 per high-power field) in the smear. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of each individual diagnostic arm of Gram stain were determined. Combinations were performed in series, which required both tests to be positive to confirm infection, and also in parallel, which necessitated both tests to be negative to rule out infection. The presence of organisms and "many" neutrophils on a Gram smear had high specificity (98-100%) and positive predictive value (89-100%) in both THA and TKA. The sensitivities (30-50%) and negative predictive values (70-79%) of the 2 tests were low for both joint types. When the 2 tests were combined in series, the specificity and positive predictive value were absolute (100%). The sensitivity and the negative predictive value improved for both THA and TKA (43-64% and 82%, respectively). Although the 2 diagnostic arms of Gram staining can be combined to achieve improved negative predictive value (82%), Gram stain continues to have little value in ruling out PPI. With the advances in the field of molecular biology, novel diagnostic modalities need to be designed that can replace these traditional and poor tests.

  13. The effect of depth of centrifuged synovial fluid on leukocyte esterase test for periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Ruangsomboon, Pakpoom; Chinprasertsuk, Sriprapa; Khejonnit, Varanya; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2017-03-17

    Centrifugation of aspirated synovial fluid before leukocytes esterase (LE) testing for diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) may make blood tinged specimens interpretable. We aimed to establish the proper sampling depth of centrifuged specimens for LE testing as one diagnostic criterion and also AS-D chloroacetate esterase (CAE) staining testing as an adjunctive tool. A definite PJI knee joint group and an aseptic primary total knee arthroplasty control group were studied quasi-experimentally (N = 46). At 2000 g for 15 minutes, 3 ml of synovial fluid was centrifuged. LE strip testing and median synovial WBC count were performed at 2, 4, and 6 mm depths. CAE staining test characterized LE particles. ROC curve, area under the curve, and significant differences were determined. The proper predictive depth to diagnose PJI was sought by forward stepwise logistic regression. All fresh blood-tinged specimens had uncertain interpretations. Centrifugation increased interpretability (55% to 100%). ROC curve and area under the curve at 2, 4, and 6 mm depths were 0.822, 0.804, and 0.786, respectively. The cut point of ++ to diagnose PJI was statistically significant (p < 0.05) at all depths. P-values of forward stepwise logistic regression at 2, 4, and 6 mm were 0.001, 0.752, and 0.756, respectively. CAE staining confirmed extracellular LE release by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). A specimen at < 2 mm from the surface of centrifuged synovial fluid at a grading of ++ or more for PJI diagnosis is proper for LE testing. CAE staining testing adjunctively characterizes LE particles and cell morphology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell-independent B-1a lineage.

    PubMed

    Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Yang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The accepted dogma has been that a single long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LT-HSC) can reconstitute all components of the immune system. However, our single-cell transfer studies have shown that highly purified LT-HSCs selectively fail to reconstitute B-1a cells in otherwise fully reconstituted hosts (i.e., LT-HSCs fully reconstitute follicular, marginal zone, and B-1b B cells, but not B-1a cells). These results suggest that B-1a cells are a separate B cell lineage that develops independently of classical LT-HSCs. We provide an evolutionary two-pathway development model (HSC independent versus HSC dependent), and suggest that this lineage separation is employed not only by B cells but by all hematopoietic lineages. Collectively, these findings challenge the current notion that LT-HSCs can reconstitute all components of the immune system and raise key questions about human HSC transplantation. We discuss the implications of these findings in light of our recent studies demonstrating the ability of B-1a cells to elicit antigen-specific responses that differ markedly from those mounted by follicular B cells. These findings have implications for vaccine development, in particular vaccines that may elicit the B-1a repertoire.

  15. B1(+) interferometry for the calibration of RF transmitter arrays.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2009-06-01

    Multiple-channel RF transmission holds great promise for MRI, especially for human applications at high fields. For calibration it requires mapping the effective RF magnetic fields, B(1) (+), of the transmitter array. This is challenging to do accurately and fast due to the large dynamic range of B(1) (+) and tight SAR constraints. In the present work, this problem is revisited and solved by a novel mapping approach relying on an interference principle. The B(1) (+) fields of individual transmitter elements are measured indirectly by observing their interference with a SAR-efficient baseline RF field. In this fashion even small RF fields can be observed in the B(1) (+) -sensitive large-flip-angle regime. Based on a set of such experiments B(1) (+) maps of the individual transmitter channels are obtained by solving a linear inverse problem. Confounding relaxation and off-resonance effects are addressed by an extended signal model and nonlinear fitting. Using the novel approach, 2D mapping of an 8-channel transmitter array was accomplished in less than a minute. For validation it is demonstrated that mapping results do not vary with T(1) or parameters of the mapping sequence. In RF shimming experiments it is shown that the measured B(1) (+) maps accurately reflect the linearity of RF superposition.

  16. CYP1B1-mediated Pathobiology of Primary Congenital Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Qadri, Rizwana; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-01-01

    CYP1B1 is a dioxin-inducible enzyme belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily. It has been observed to be important in a variety of developmental processes including in utero development of ocular structures. Owing to its role in the developmental biology of eye, its dysfunction can lead to ocular developmental defects. This has been found to be true and CYP1B1 mutations have been observed in a majority of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) patients from all over the globe. Primary congenital glaucoma is an irreversibly blinding childhood disorder (onset at birth or early infancy) typified by anomalous development of trabecular meshwork (TM). How CYP1B1 causes PCG is not known; however, some basic investigations have been reported. Understanding the CYP1B1 mediated etiopathomechanism of PCG is very important to identify targets for therapy and preventive management. In this perspective, we will make an effort to reconstruct the pathomechanism of PCG in the light of already reported information about the disease and the CYP1B1 gene. How to cite this article: Faiq MA, Dada R, Qadri R, Dada T. CYP1 B1-mediated Pathobiology of Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):77-80.

  17. CYP1B1-mediated Pathobiology of Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Qadri, Rizwana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CYP1B1 is a dioxin-inducible enzyme belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily. It has been observed to be important in a variety of developmental processes including in utero development of ocular structures. Owing to its role in the developmental biology of eye, its dysfunction can lead to ocular developmental defects. This has been found to be true and CYP1B1 mutations have been observed in a majority of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) patients from all over the globe. Primary congenital glaucoma is an irreversibly blinding childhood disorder (onset at birth or early infancy) typified by anomalous development of trabecular meshwork (TM). How CYP1B1 causes PCG is not known; however, some basic investigations have been reported. Understanding the CYP1B1 mediated etiopathomechanism of PCG is very important to identify targets for therapy and preventive management. In this perspective, we will make an effort to reconstruct the pathomechanism of PCG in the light of already reported information about the disease and the CYP1B1 gene. How to cite this article: Faiq MA, Dada R, Qadri R, Dada T. CYP1 B1-mediated Pathobiology of Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):77-80. PMID:26997841

  18. Specificity Determinants of CYP1B1 Estradiol Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Clinton R.; Everett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450)-catalyzed oxidation of the aromatic ring of estradiol can result in 2- or 4-hydroxylation. Which of these products is formed is biologically important, as the 4-hydroxylated metabolite is carcinogenic, whereas the 2-hydroxylated metabolite is not. Most human P450 enzymes, including CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, exhibit a high preference for estradiol 2-hydroxylation, but human CYP1B1 greatly favors 4-hydroxylation. Here we show that heterologous expression of the human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse CYP1B1 enzymes yields active proteins that differ in their estradiol hydroxylation specificity. The monkey and dog orthologs, like the human enzyme, preferentially catalyze 4-hydroxylation, but the rat and mouse enzymes favor 2-hydroxylation. Analysis of the CYP1B1 sequences in light of these findings suggested that one residue, Val395 in human CYP1B1, could account for the differential hydroxylation specificities. In fact, mutation of this valine in human CYP1B1 to the leucine present in the rat enzyme produces a human enzyme that has the 2-hydroxylation specificity of the rat enzyme. The converse is true when the leucine in the rat enzyme is mutated to the human valine. The role of CYP1B1 in estradiol carcinogenicity thus depends on the identity of this single amino acid residue. PMID:23821647

  19. Hip Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... make older people more likely to trip and fall — one of the most common causes of hip ... Taking steps to maintain bone density and avoid falls can help prevent hip fracture. Signs and symptoms ...

  20. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  1. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  2. Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda L

    2008-01-01

    Many people "slip and fall", especially in the icy areas of the winter season. To prevent an injury to the head, most people put their hand out to hit the ground first, so the wrist usually gets injured. The most frequent injury from this type of "intervention" is a fracture to the distal radius and/or ulna, which is frequently called a "Colles' fracture."

  3. Boxer's fracture.

    PubMed

    Altizer, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Boxer's fracture is a common name for a fracture of the distal fifth metacarpal and received its name from one of its most common causes, punching an object with a closed fist. It can occur from a fistfight or from punching a hard object. The injury of a "Boxer's Fracture" earned the name from the way in which the injury occurred, punching an immovable object with a closed fist and no boxing mitt (Figure 1). Naturally, a "Boxer" usually punches his fist into his opponent's face or body. An angry person may perform the same action into a person, or into the wall. The third person may be performing a task and strike something with his fist with forceful action accidentally. In any event, if the closed fist "punches" into an immovable or firm object with force, the most frequent injury sustained would be a fracture of the fifth metacarpal neck. Some caregivers would also call a fourth metacarpal neck fracture a boxer's fracture.

  4. Evidence for the eta_b(1S) in the Decay Upsilon(2S)-> gamma eta_b(1S)

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-12-14

    We have performed a search for the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the {Upsilon}(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6 million {Upsilon}(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at E{sub {gamma}} = 610.5{sub -4.3}{sup +4.5}(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) MeV, corresponding to an {eta}{sub b}(1S) mass of 9392.9{sub -4.8}{sup +4.6}(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The branching fraction for the decay {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S) is determined to be (4.2{sub -1.0}{sup +1.1}(stat) {+-} 0.9(syst)) x 10{sup -4}. The ratio {Beta}({Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S))/{Beta}({Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}{eta}{sub b}(1S)) = 0.89{sub -0.23}{sup +0.25}(stat){sub -0.16}{sup +0.12}(syst) is consistent with the ratio expected for magnetic dipole transitions to the {eta}{sub b}(1S) meson.

  5. The 1990 vertical distribution of two important halons (F-12B1 and F-13B1) in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, O. N.; Borchers, R.; Lal, Shyam; Subbarya, B. H.; Krueger, Bernd C.; Fabian, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The first vertical profiles of F-12B1 and F-13B1 had been obtained in the tropical troposphere and stratosphere by us in 1987. The measurement of these substances responsible for almost the entire anthropogenic contribution to the stratospheric BrO(x) budget is important in the tropics, as tropical upwelling provides their injection along with that of other pollutants, into the stratosphere. To ascertain the trends of these distributions and foster the data, the 1987 experiment was repeated in April 1990. Like 1987, the MPAE cryogenic whole air sampler was launched on a balloon from Hyderabad, India (17.5 deg N), and 14 samples were collected between 10 and 35 km altitude. The results obtained by means of GC and GC-MS analyses showed that the atmospheric abundance of both F-12B1 and F-13B1 is increasing at a fast rate, respectively by about 15 percent and 10 percent per year. From 1987 to 1990, F-12B1 and F-13B1 tropospheric mixing ratios have been growing from 1.2 and 1.3 ppt to 1.8 and 1.7 ppt, respectively. The vertical profiles will be discussed.

  6. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of an absorbable membrane to position biologically inductive materials in the periprosthetic space of cemented joints.

    PubMed

    DiResta, Gene R; Brown, Holly; Aiken, Sean; Doty, Steven; Schneider, Robert; Wright, Timothy; Healey, John H

    2006-01-01

    A device is presented that positions ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) debris against periprosthetic bone surfaces. This can facilitate the study of aseptic loosening associated with cemented joint prostheses by speeding the appearance of this debris within the periprosthetic space. The device, composed of a 100 microm thick bioabsorbable membrane impregnated with 1.4 x 10(9) sub-micron particles of UHMWPE debris, is positioned on the endosteum of the bone prior to the insertion of the cemented orthopedic implant. An in vitro pullout study and an in vivo canine pilot study were performed to investigate its potential to accelerate "time to aseptic loosening" of cemented prosthetic joints. Pullout studies characterized the influence of the membrane on initial implant fixation. The tensile stresses (mean+/-std.dev.) required to withdraw a prosthesis cemented into canine femurs with and without the membrane were 1.15+/-0.3 and 1.54+/-0.01 MPa, respectively; these findings were not significantly different (p > 0.4). The in vivo pilot study, involving five dogs, was performed to evaluate the efficacy of the debris to accelerate loosening in a canine cemented hip arthroplasty. Aseptic loosening and lameness occurred within 12 months, quicker than the 30 months reported in a retrospective clinical review of canine hip arthroplasty.

  8. Different influence of Ti, PMMA, UHMWPE, and Co-Cr particles on peripheral blood monocytes during periprosthetic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Yang, Shang-You; Yang, Shuye; Bai, Ling; Li, Peng; Liu, Dong; Schurman, John R; Wooley, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated cellular trafficking and inflammatory markers in orthopedic biomaterial particle-challenged human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) using a murine immunodeficiency (SCID) model. Periprosthetic tissues from aseptic loosening patients were transplanted into muscles of SCID mice. PBMCs from the same patients were stimulated in vitro with Ti-6Al-4V, PMMA, UHMWPE, or Co-Cr particles for 3 days before administered intraperitoneally to the periprosthetic tissue-implanted mice. The xenografts were harvested 2 weeks later for histological and molecular analyses. Significant cell infiltration was obvious in the transplanted tissues from mice transfused with Ti-alloy, PMMA and UHMWPE-provoked PBMCs compared to controls, and UHMWPE-provoked PBMCs group accumulated significantly more cells among all groups. There were ubiquitous TRAP+ stained cells in all xenografts from particle-stimulated PBMCs mice. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that significantly more IL-1β and TNF positive cells occurred in Ti and PMMA groups; while the UHMWPE group resulted in stronger positive MCP-1 and IL-6 stains. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed overexpression of both IL-1β and TNF in Ti and PMMA-stimulated groups; and more MIP-1α gene expression developed in the UHMWPE group. Overall, different type of orthopedic materials influenced the trafficking ability of particle-activated PBMCs which may depend on upregulation of various proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

  9. The economic impact of periprosthetic infections following total knee arthroplasty at a specialized tertiary-care center.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; McElroy, Mark J; Issa, Kimona; Johnson, Aaron J; Bozic, Kevin J; Mont, Michael A

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) on the length of hospitalization, readmissions, and the associated costs. Between 2007 and 2011, our prospectively collected infection database was reviewed to identify PJIs that occurred following primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA), which required a two-stage revision. We identified 21 consecutive patients and matched them to 21 non-infected patients who underwent uncomplicated primary TKA. The patients who had PJIs had significantly longer hospitalizations (5.3 vs. 3.0 days), more readmissions (3.6 vs. 0.1), and more clinic visits (6.5 vs. 1.3) when compared to the matched group, respectively. The mean annual cost was significantly higher in the infected cohort ($116,383; range, $44,416 to $269,914) when compared to the matched group ($28,249; range, $20,454 to $47,957). Periprosthetic infections following TKA represent a tremendous economic burden for tertiary-care centers and to patients.

  10. Wear and periprosthetic osteolysis in a match-paired study of modular and nonmodular uncemented acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    González Della Valle, Alejandro; Su, Edwin; Zoppi, Adriana; Sculco, Thomas P; Salvati, Eduardo A

    2004-12-01

    The wear and prevalence of periprosthetic osteolysis at 5 to 8 years of follow-up of the Trilogy cup, which has a modular liner assembled during surgery, was compared with the Implex cup, which has a fixed liner preassembled at the factory. Sixty-three patients (65 hips) with a Trilogy cup and 64 patients (65 hips) with an Implex cup were match-paired for sex, age, height, weight, and diagnosis (osteoarthritis). All patients had a cemented stem with a 28-mm head and a successful clinical and radiographic result. After an average follow-up of 5.65 years, radiographs were studied to determine the total penetration, using the Livermore technique, and the presence of osteolysis. The average total wear in the Trilogy group was 0.47 mm (range, 0-1.95 mm); for the Implex cup, it was 0.43 mm (range, 0-1.45 mm) (P.99). One patient in each group presented with periacetabular osteolysis (P.99). There was no difference in the wear rate and prevalence of periprosthetic osteolysis between the 2 groups.

  11. SerpinB1 Promotes Pancreatic β Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Hu, Jiang; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Shirakawa, Jun; Hou, Lifei; Goodman, Jessica; Karampelias, Christos; Qiang, Guifeng; Boucher, Jeremie; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A; De Jesus, Dario F; Kahraman, Sevim; Bhatt, Shweta; Smith, Richard D; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Jungtrakoon, Prapaporn; Gong, Yanping; Goldfine, Allison B; Liew, Chong Wee; Doria, Alessandro; Andersson, Olov; Qian, Wei-Jun; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2016-01-12

    Although compensatory islet hyperplasia in response to insulin resistance is a recognized feature in diabetes, the factor(s) that promote β cell proliferation have been elusive. We previously reported that the liver is a source for such factors in the liver insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) mouse, an insulin resistance model that manifests islet hyperplasia. Using proteomics we show that serpinB1, a protease inhibitor, which is abundant in the hepatocyte secretome and sera derived from LIRKO mice, is the liver-derived secretory protein that regulates β cell proliferation in humans, mice, and zebrafish. Small-molecule compounds, that partially mimic serpinB1 effects of inhibiting elastase activity, enhanced proliferation of β cells, and mice lacking serpinB1 exhibit attenuated β cell compensation in response to insulin resistance. Finally, SerpinB1 treatment of islets modulated proteins in growth/survival pathways. Together, these data implicate serpinB1 as an endogenous protein that can potentially be harnessed to enhance functional β cell mass in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in natural products

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Guilherme; Altoé, Aline F.; Gomes, Tatiana C. B.; Leal, Alexandre S.; Morais, Vanessa A. D.; Oliveira, Marize S.; Ferreira, Marli B.; Gomes, Mateus B.; Paschoal, Fabiano N.; von S. Souza, Rafael; Silva, Daniela A.; Cruz Madeira, Jovita E. G.

    2012-01-01

    The media claims for the consumption of natural resource-based food have gradually increased in both developing and developed countries. The interest in the safety of these products is partially due to the possible presence of toxigenic fungi acting as mycotoxin producers, such as aflatoxins produced during the secondary metabolism of Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus and A. nomius. Aflatoxins, mainly aflatoxin B1, are directly associated with liver cancer in human beings. This paper is aimed at evaluating the presence of aflatoxin B1 in a few vegetable drugs, dried plant extracts and industrialized products traded in 2010 in the city of Belo Horizonte, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The method used for the quantification of aflatoxin B1 was based on extraction through acetone:water (85:15), immunoaffinity column purification followed by separation and detection in high efficiency liquid chromatography. Under the conditions of analysis, the Limits of Detection and Quantification were 0.6 µg kg-1 and 1.0 µg kg-1 respectively. The complete sets of analyses were carried out in duplicate. Aflatoxin B1 was noticed in a single sample (< 1.0 µg kg-1). The results revealed low aflatoxin B1 contamination in the products under analysis. However, it is required to establish a broad monitoring program in order to obtain additional data and check up on the actual extension of contamination. PMID:24031973

  13. B-1 cells and concomitant immunity in Ehrlich tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M C; Palos, M C; Osugui, L; Laurindo, M F; Masutani, D; Nonogaki, S; Bachi, A L L; Melo, F H M; Mariano, M

    2014-05-01

    Concomitant immunity is a phenomenon in which a tumour-bearing host is resistant to the growth of an implanted secondary tumour. Metastases are considered to be secondary tumours that develop spontaneously during primary tumour growth, suggesting the involvement of concomitant immunity in controlling the rise of metastases. It has been demonstrated that B-1 cells, a subset of B-lymphocytes found predominantly in pleural and peritoneal cavities, not only increase the metastatic development of murine melanoma B16F10, but also are capable of differentiating into mononuclear phagocytes, modulating inflammatory responses in wound healing, in oral tolerance and in Paracoccidiose brasiliensis infections. Here, we studied B-1 cells' participation in concomitant immunity during Ehrlich tumour progression. Our results show that B-1 cells obtained from BALB/c mice previously injected with Ehrlich tumour in the footpad were able to protect BALB/c and BALB/Xid mice against Ehrlich tumour challenge. In addition, it was demonstrated that BALB/Xid show faster tumour growth and have lost concomitant immunity, and that this state can be partially restored by reconstituting these animals with B-1 cells. However, further researches are required to establish the mechanism involving B-1 cells in Ehrlich tumour growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. B1 Mapping by Bloch-Siegert Shift

    PubMed Central

    Sacolick, Laura I.; Wiesinger, Florian; Hancu, Ileana; Vogel, Mika W.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for B1+ field mapping based on the Bloch-Siegert shift is presented. Unlike conventionally applied double-angle or other signal magnitude-based methods it encodes the B1 information into signal phase, resulting in important advantages in terms of acquisition speed, accuracy and robustness. The Bloch Siegert frequency shift is caused by irradiating with an off-resonance RF pulse following conventional spin excitation. When applying the off-resonance RF in the kHz range, spin nutation can be neglected and the primarily observed effect is a spin precession frequency shift. This shift is proportional to the square of the RF field magnitude B12. Adding gradient image encoding following the off-resonance pulse allows one to acquire spatially resolved B1 maps. The frequency shift from the Bloch-Siegert effect gives a phase shift in the image that is proportional to B12. The phase difference of two acquisitions, with the RF pulse applied at two frequencies symmetrically around the water resonance is used to eliminate undesired off-resonance effects due to B0 inhomogeneity and chemical shift. In-vivo Bloch Siegert B1 mapping with 25 seconds / slice is demonstrated to be quantitatively comparable to a 21 minute double-angle map. As such this method enables robust, high resolution B1+ mapping in a clinically acceptable time frame. PMID:20432302

  15. Association of Endophilin B1 with Cytoplasmic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhui; Barylko, Barbara; Eichorst, John P; Mueller, Joachim D; Albanesi, Joseph P; Chen, Yan

    2016-08-09

    Endophilins are SH3- and BAR domain-containing proteins implicated in membrane remodeling and vesicle formation. Endophilins A1 and A2 promote the budding of endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, whereas endophilin B1 has been implicated in vesicle budding from intracellular organelles, including the trans-Golgi network and late endosomes. We previously reported that endophilins A1 and A2 exist almost exclusively as soluble dimers in the cytosol. Here, we present results of fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy analyses indicating that, in contrast, the majority of endophilin B1 is present in multiple copies on small, highly mobile cytoplasmic vesicles. Formation of these vesicles was enhanced by overexpression of wild-type dynamin 2, but suppressed by expression of a catalytically inactive dynamin 2 mutant. Using dual-color heterospecies partition analysis, we identified the epidermal growth factor receptor on endophilin B1 vesicles. Moreover, a proportion of endophilin B1 vesicles also contained caveolin, whereas clathrin was almost undetectable on those vesicles. These results raise the possibility that endophilin B1 participates in dynamin 2-dependent formation of a population of transport vesicles distinct from those generated by A-type endophilins. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A numerical investigation into the influence of the properties of cobalt chrome cellular structures on the load transfer to the periprosthetic femur following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hazlehurst, Kevin Brian; Wang, Chang Jiang; Stanford, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Stress shielding of the periprosthetic femur following total hip arthroplasty is a problem that can promote the premature loosening of femoral stems. In order to reduce the need for revision surgery it is thought that more flexible implant designs need to be considered. In this work, the mechanical properties of laser melted square pore cobalt chrome molybdenum cellular structures have been incorporated into the design of a traditional monoblock femoral stem. The influence of incorporating the properties of cellular structures on the load transfer to the periprosthetic femur was investigated using a three dimensional finite element model. Eleven different stiffness configurations were investigated by using fully porous and functionally graded approaches. This investigation confirms that the periprosthetic stress values depend on the stiffness configuration of the stem. The numerical results showed that stress shielding is reduced in the periprosthetic Gruen zones when the mechanical properties of cobalt chrome molybdenum cellular structures are used. This work identifies that monoblock femoral stems manufactured using a laser melting process, which are designed for reduced stiffness, have the potential to contribute towards reducing stress shielding. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Adjuvant Teriparatide Therapy for Surgical Treatment of Femoral Fractures; Does It Work?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek; Jeong, Hyung Jun; Lee, Soong Joon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Atypical femoral fracture (AFF), periprosthetic femoral fracture (PPFF) and femoral nonunion (FNU) are recalcitrant challenges for orthopedic surgeons. Teriparatide (TPTD) had been demonstrated to have anabolic effects on bone in various studies. We postulated that adjuvant TPTD after operation would enhance biologic stimulation for bone formation. We investigated (1) whether the adjuvant TPTD could achieve satisfactory union rate of surgically challenging cases such as displaced AFF, PPFF and FNU; (2) whether the adjuvant TPTD could promote development of abundant callus after surgical fixation; (3) whether the adjuvant TPTD had medically serious adverse effects. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients who agreed to off label use of TPTD in combination of operation were included in this retrospective case series. Median patients' age was 68.7 years, and there were three male and ten female patients. Their diagnoses were nonunion in six patients and acute fracture in seven. Medical records and radiographic images were reviewed. Results Twelve of thirteen fractures were united both clinically and radiologically within a year after adjuvant TPTD. Union completed radiologically median 5.4 months and clinically 5.7 months after the medication, respectively. Callus appeared abundantly showing median 1.4 of fracture healing response postoperatively. There was no serious adverse reaction of medication other than itching, muscle cramp, or nausea. Conclusion Even appropriate surgical treatment is a mainstay of treatment for AFF, PPFF, and FNU, the current report suggested that adjuvant TPTD combined with stable fixation results in satisfactory outcome for the challenging fractures of femur. PMID:27777917

  18. Acute fracture of the acetabulum secondary to a convulsive seizure 3 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Atilla, Bulent; Caglar, Omur; Akgun, Rahmi Can

    2008-03-01

    While aseptic loosening, osteolysis, and infection are the most common causes of failure after total hip arthroplasty (THA), late hip pain can also be the result of acetabular fracture related to trauma and resultant prosthetic failure. However, atraumatic fracture of the acetabulum around a well-fixed acetabular component is unusual. We present a patient with an acetabular fracture resulting from a generalized convulsive attack 3 years after an uncomplicated primary THA. A 33-year-old man presented with acute left hip pain. He had chronic renal insufficiency and had undergone bilateral THA due to avascular necrosis. The night prior to his admission, he suffered a generalized convulsive attack with severe extremity contractions. Afterwards, he had acute left groin pain and had difficulty walking. Physical examination revealed moderate left hip pain as well as a 1-cm shortening of the affected limb. Radiological examination demonstrated an acetabular fracture with medial wall comminution. The acetabular component had migrated medially and rotated horizontally. Revision of the acetabular component with a reinforcement ring and implantation of a cemented acetabular component was realized. Severe muscle spasms during generalized seizures are known to lead to various musculoskeletal injuries (fractures of the proximal humerus, femur, acetabulum, and dislocation of the shoulder). Seizures could also lead to acute periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum in patients with osteopenia. Therefore careful reaming is required to avoid overmedialization of the acetabular component in those patients.

  19. Comparative Study of Surgical Management of Fracture Neck of Femur with Cemented Versus Uncemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is evidence for use of cemented hemiarthroplasty resulting in greater anchoring and lesser peri prosthetic fracture. However, this procedure results in more haemodynamic instability and cardiopulmonary complications termed as ‘cement reaction’ or bone cement implantation syndrome. There has been a heightened interest among surgeons to compare cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty for fracture neck of femur. Aim To compare cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty in terms of blood loss during the procedure, post-operative complications, mortality, functional recovery and long term clinical outcome. Materials and Methods In a prospective study spanning 8 years from January 2006 to January 2014 in a tertiary care hospital, 52 cases of fracture of neck were selected. Twenty four patients underwent cemented and 28 patients underwent uncemented hemiarthroplasty. Mean follow up duration was 59.3 months. Harris Hip Score evaluation was done at each follow up. Radiological evaluation was done at each follow up for calcar length and periprosthetic fractures. Results Mean age of patients was 70 years. Harris Hip scores at 3, 6 and 12 months did not show statistically significant differences. Periprosthetic osteolysis or loosening was not seen in the present study. No complications noted in uncemented hemiarthroplasty. Four patients who had cemented hemiarthroplasty had infections. No mortality occurred during admission and within 12 months after surgery. Conclusion No significant difference was noted between the cemented and uncemented hemiarthroplasty procedures on long term follow up in terms of functionality. No re-operations and no mortality reported. Cemented hemiarthroplasty had more blood loss and minimal post-operative complications. PMID:28384949

  20. Younger age is associated with a higher risk of early periprosthetic joint infection and aseptic mechanical failure after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Meehan, John P; Danielsen, Beate; Kim, Sunny H; Jamali, Amir A; White, Richard H

    2014-04-02

    Although early aseptic mechanical failure after total knee arthroplasty has been reported in younger patients, it is unknown whether early revision due to periprosthetic joint infection is more or less frequent in this patient subgroup. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the incidence of early periprosthetic joint infection requiring revision knee surgery is significantly different in patients younger than fifty years of age compared with older patients following primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. A large population-based study was conducted with use of the California Patient Discharge Database, which allows serial linkage of all discharge data from nonfederal hospitals in the state over time. Patients undergoing primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty during 2005 to 2009 were identified. Principal outcomes were partial or complete revision arthroplasty due to periprosthetic joint infection or due to aseptic mechanical failure within one year. Multivariate analysis included risk adjustment for important demographic and clinical variables. The effect of hospital total knee arthroplasty volume on the outcomes of infection and mechanical failure was analyzed with use of hierarchical modeling. At one year, 983 (0.82%) of 120,538 primary total knee arthroplasties had undergone revision due to periprosthetic joint infection and 1385 (1.15%) had undergone revision due to aseptic mechanical failure. The cumulative incidence in patients younger than fifty years of age was 1.36% for revision due to periprosthetic joint infection and 3.49% for revision due to aseptic mechanical failure. In risk-adjusted models, the risk of periprosthetic joint infection was 1.8 times higher in patients younger than fifty years of age (odds ratio = 1.81, 95% confidence interval = 1.33 to 2.47) compared with patients sixty-five years of age or older, and the risk of aseptic mechanical failure was 4.7 times higher (odds ratio = 4.66, 95% confidence interval = 3.77 to

  1. Evaluation of particulate air samplers for airborne aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Silas, J.C.; Harrison, M.A.; Carpenter, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Five air samplers (Millipore, all-glass impinger, centrifugal, Andersen, and absorbent cotton) were evaluated for their ability to collect airborne grain particles contaminated with aflatoxin B1. Corn dust containing 100 micrograms aflatoxin B1/g was aerosolized within a containment system. Each device sampled 100 I air, thus exchanging the air in the chamber two times. Aflatoxin B1 was extracted from all sampling matrices and was detected and quantitated with thin-layer chromatography and scanning fluorodensitometry. The highest efficiency was obtained with the Millipore sampler, while the efficiencies of the centrifugal and the cotton samplers were almost identical. Efficiency of an Andersen was less, with no toxin recovered from an all-glass impinger. Measurement of particle size was accomplished with the Andersen sampler.

  2. B1-Metallo-beta-Lactamases: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Maria F.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Fast, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Metallo-beta-Lactamases (MBLs) are class B β-lactamases that hydrolyze almost all clinically-available β-lactam antibiotics. MBLs feature the distinctive αβ/βα sandwich fold of the metallo-hydrolase / oxidoreductase superfamily and possess a shallow active-site groove containing one or two divalent zinc ions, flanked by flexible loops. According to sequence identity and zinc ion dependence, MBLs are classified into three subclasses (B1, B2 and B3), of which the B1 subclass enzymes have emerged as the most clinically significant. Differences among the active site architectures, the nature of zinc ligands, and the catalytic mechanisms have limited the development of a common inhibitor. In this review, we will describe the molecular epidemiology and structural studies of the most prominent representatives of class B1 MBLs (NDM-1, IMP-1 and VIM-2) and describe the implications for inhibitor design to counter this growing clinical threat. PMID:26424398

  3. Slice-by-slice B1+ shimming at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew T; Gilbert, Kyle M; Klassen, L Martyn; Gati, Joseph S; Menon, Ravi S

    2012-10-01

    Parallel transmission has been used to reduce the inevitable inhomogeneous radiofrequency fields produced in human high-field MRI greater than 3 T. Further improvements in the transmit homogeneity and efficiency are possible by leveraging the additional degree of freedom permitted by multislice acquisitions. Compared to simple scaling of the flip angle to compensate for B1+ falloff along the radiofrequency coil, calculation of B1+ shim solutions on a slice-by-slice basis can markedly improve homogeneity and/or reduce transmitted power and global SAR. Performance measures were acquired at 7 T with a 15-channel head-only transceive array featuring elements distributed over all three logical axes, facilitating B1+ shimming over arbitrary orientations. Compared to a circularly polarized volume mode of the same coil, shimming to maximize excitation efficiency on a slice-by-slice basis yielded improvements in mean B1+ by 12.8±2.4% and a reduction in standard deviation of B1+ of 16.3±6.8%, while reducing relative SAR by 6.2±3.1%. When shimming for greater uniformity, the mean and standard deviation of B1+ were further improved by 15.9±2.6% and 26.2±10.4%, respectively, at the expense of a 135±8% increase in global SAR. Robust multislice-shim solutions are demonstrated that can be quickly calculated, applied in real time, and reliably improve on volume coil modes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Thymoma type B1 arising in a giant supradiaphragmatic thymolipoma.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Tevfik; Han, Serdar; Han, Unsal; Atac, Gokce Kaan; Yanik, Serdar

    2014-11-01

    Thymolipomas are uncommon tumors of the anterior mediastinum. They may extend into, but rarely stem from, the chest cavity. Furthermore, thymoma arising in a thymolipoma is extremely rare. We report a unique case of thymoma type B1 that originated form a giant thymolipoma located in the chest cavity, which was resected by a lateral thoracotomy in a 23-year-old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of thymoma type B1 arising within a giant thymolipoma. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  6. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  7. Fracture types (1) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fracture which goes at an angle to the axis Comminuted - a fracture of many relatively small fragments Spiral - a fracture which runs around the axis of the bone Compound - a fracture (also called ...

  8. Galeazzi fracture.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  9. Leukocyte Esterase as a Biomarker in the Diagnosis of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi; Li, Rui; Wang, Qi; Duan, Jinyan; Wang, Chengbin

    2017-01-01

    Background Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has been one of the most rewarding interventions for treating patients suffering from joint disorders. However, periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a serious complication that frequently accompanies TJA. Our study aimed to investigate the application of the leukocyte esterase (LE) strip in the diagnosis of PJI. Material/Methods From October 2014 to July 2015, 72 patients who had undergone joint puncture after arthroplasty in our hospital were enrolled in this trial. One drop of synovial fluid from each available patient was applied to the LE strip, and the results were observed after 1–3 min. If the color turned to dark purple, we recognized this as a positive result, while other colors were regarded as negative results. Centrifugation was used when the synovial fluid was mixed with blood. The Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS) definition was used as the standard reference to identify whether PJI was found in patients or not. The results of diagnosis and LE strips test were compared, and indicators reflecting diagnostic value were calculated. Correlation of the LE data with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial white blood cell (WBC) counts, and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) percentage was calculated. Results By MSIS criteria, 38 patients were diagnosed with PJI and 34 patients were not infected. Two types of LE strip presented the same results with sensitivity of 84.21% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.75~93.98%), specificity of 97.06% (95% CI: 84.67~99.93%), positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.97% (95% CI: 84.24~99.92%), and negative predictive value (NPV) of 84.62% (95% CI: 69.47~94.14%). There were one false-positive case and six false-negative cases in this trial. There is a strong correlation between LE strip and synovial fluid PMN percentage. Conclusions The sensitivity and specificity of the LE strip in the diagnosis of PJI are quite high, which means

  10. Treatment of acute periprosthetic infections with prosthesis retention: Review of current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Jesse WP; Willink, Robin Tjeenk; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; Colen, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a devastating complication after total joint arthroplasty, occurring in approximately 1%-2% of all cases. With growing populations and increasing age, PJI will have a growing effect on health care costs. Many risk factors have been identified that increase the risk of developing PJI, including obesity, immune system deficiencies, malignancy, previous surgery of the same joint and longer operating time. Acute PJI occurs either postoperatively (4 wk to 3 mo after initial arthroplasty, depending on the classification system), or via hematogenous spreading after a period in which the prosthesis had functioned properly. Diagnosis and the choice of treatment are the cornerstones to success. Although different definitions for PJI have been used in the past, most are more or less similar and include the presence of a sinus tract, blood infection values, synovial white blood cell count, signs of infection on histopathological analysis and one or more positive culture results. Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) is the primary treatment for acute PJI, and should be performed as soon as possible after the development of symptoms. Success rates differ, but most studies report success rates of around 60%-80%. Whether single or multiple debridement procedures are more successful remains unclear. The use of local antibiotics in addition to the administration of systemic antibiotic agents is also subject to debate, and its pro’s and con’s should be carefully considered. Systemic treatment, based on culture results, is of importance for all PJI treatments. Additionally, rifampin should be given in Staphylococcal PJIs, unless all foreign material is removed. The most important factors contributing to treatment failure are longer duration of symptoms, a longer time after initial arthroplasty, the need for more debridement procedures, the retention of exchangeable components, and PJI caused by Staphylococcus (aureus or

  11. 26 CFR 1.669(b)-1 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.669(b)-1 Information requirements. The election of a beneficiary who is... unless the beneficiary, at or before the time the election is made, supplies, in a letter addressed to.... person for each of the preceding taxable years, on the last day of which an amount is deemed...

  12. 76 FR 18726 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section...

  13. 75 FR 41820 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of five section...

  14. 76 FR 55651 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of... foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a...

  15. 75 FR 76415 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  16. 76 FR 27022 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  17. 75 FR 20571 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of two section...

  18. 75 FR 69953 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  19. 76 FR 32958 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  20. 75 FR 51445 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section...

  1. 75 FR 29998 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section...

  2. 76 FR 40703 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  3. 75 FR 69922 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  4. 75 FR 69957 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  5. 76 FR 17111 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  6. 75 FR 69938 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  7. 75 FR 47275 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of two section...

  8. 75 FR 61440 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of three...

  9. 76 FR 28956 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  10. 75 FR 69931 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  11. 75 FR 76412 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  12. 75 FR 5971 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of six section...

  13. 75 FR 60424 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notifications AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of two section...

  14. 76 FR 27026 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  15. 77 FR 71401 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency... proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a friendly country that has been, and continues to be, an important...

  16. 75 FR 81993 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 249 (Wednesday, December 29, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 81993-81998] [FR Doc No: 2010-32755] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary [Transmittal No. 10-62] 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation...

  17. 78 FR 42758 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of... $250 million. This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of...

  18. 75 FR 74014 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Security Cooperation Agency. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text...

  19. 76 FR 26707 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified...

  20. 75 FR 11865 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification AGENCY: Defense Security Cooperation Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Defense is publishing the unclassified text of a section...