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  1. Baby-Friendly Hospital Practices and Birth Costs

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica A.; Longenecker, Holly B.; Perrine, Cria G.; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital practices supportive of breastfeeding can improve breastfeeding rates. There are limited data available on how improved hospital practices are associated with hospital costs. We describe the association between the number of breastfeeding supportive practices a hospital has in place and the cost of an uncomplicated birth. Methods Data from hospitals in 20 states that participated in the 2007 Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey and Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID) were merged to calculate the average median hospital cost of uncomplicated vaginal and cesarean section births by number of ideal practices from the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Linear regression analyses were conducted to estimate change in birth cost for each additional ideal practice in place. Results Sixty-one percent of hospitals had ideal practice on 3–5 of the 10 steps, whereas 29 percent of hospitals had ideal practice on 6–8. Adjusted analyses of uncomplicated births revealed a higher but nonsignificant increase in any of the birth categories (all births, $19; vaginal, $15; cesarean section, $39) with each additional breastfeeding supportive maternity care practice in place. Conclusions Our results revealed that the number of breastfeeding supportive practices a hospital has in place is not significantly associated with higher birth costs. Concern for higher birth costs should not be a barrier for improving maternity care practices that support women who choose to breastfeed. PMID:24344702

  2. Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: evaluation of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Soraia da Silva; Laignier, Mariana Rabello; Primo, Cândida Caniçali; Leite, Franciéle Marabotti C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the performance of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding in an university hospital. METHODS: Descriptive and quantitative research, in which 103 people were interviewed in the outpatient prenatal clinic, in the maternity-ward and in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital in Vitória, Southeast Brazil. The "Institutional Self-Evaluation Questionnaire" of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative was applied. Using this tool, the outcome was measured by the concordance index (CI) proposed by the World Health Organization and by the United Nations Children's Fund. RESULTS: Although the hospital does not have a policy that addresses promotion, protection and support for breastfeeding, 93.3% of the mothers had contact with their babies immediately after birth (step 4), 83.3% of the professionals guided mothers how to breastfeed (step 5), 86.6% of the neonates did not receive any food or drink other than breast milk (step 6), 100% of babies were housed together with their mothers (step 7), 83.3% of the women were encouraged for breastfeeding on demand (step 8) and 100% of the infants did not use bottles or pacifiers (step 9). CONCLUSIONS: 60% of the steps were completed by the hospital. The greatest difficulty was to inform pregnant women about the importance and the management of breastfeeding (step 3). Therefore, visits to pregnant women are recommended, in order to prepare them for breastfeeding and to explain about the infants' healthy feeding habits. PMID:24473954

  3. Meeting the challenge: implementing the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative in a culturally diverse country.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Grace; Abdulali, Jane; Kumar, Rajakumari Ravi

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the successful implementation of the WHO/Unicef Baby Friendly Hospital initiative (BFHI) in a large, culturally diverse hospital in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Breastfeeding rates in the UAE are high (>90 per cent), although mixed feeding is considered the norm. Traditional religious practices for birth are common which may inhibit exclusive breastfeeding. An action research methodology was chosen as the most appropriate method in which to implement BFHI and a five stage cyclic approach was used. Staff knowledge around breastfeeding and BFHI varied enormously because of the diversity of ethnicity amongst staff. It was initially difficult to engage staff, particularly staff in the delivery suite and theatres, as breastfeeding was not seen as a high priority. There was a great resistance to closing the nurseries as both women and staff felt it was a benefit for the women to have some rest away from their babies, and the concepts of bonding and early feeding cues were unknown. By the time of the assessment for BFHI there was a theory-practice transformation. The implementation of BFHI and the successful achievement of the award can be attributed to ownership. PMID:21739730

  4. Impact of a Baby-Friendly hospital on breastfeeding indicators in Shaqlawa district in Erbil governorate, Kurdistan region of Iraq.

    PubMed

    Shaker, N Z; Hasan, S S; Ismail, Z A

    2016-03-15

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative on WHO-defined breastfeeding indicators in Shaqlawa district in Kurdistan region of Iraq. A household survey was carried out on a purposive non-probability sample of 200 mothers with a child aged < 30 months. Mothers were interviewed using a structured form to determine demographic data and feeding practices of the most recent child. The rate of early initiation of breastfeeding was 38.1%, exclusive breastfeeding was 15.4% and continued breastfeeding was 61.0% and 39.5% at 1 and 2 years of age respectively. A significant relationship was found between delivery at the Baby- Friendly accredited hospital and early initiation of breastfeeding but not with exclusive or continued breastfeeding. While continued breastfeeding at 1 year and 2 year was good, early initiation and exclusive breastfeeding indicators were not at an acceptable level, which indicates an ineffective role for the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

  5. Becoming Baby-Friendly and Transforming Maternity Care in a Safety-Net Hospital on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    Eganhouse, Deborah J; Gutierrez, Leticia; Cuellar, Lorena; Velasquez, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Nurse leaders used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's survey on Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care, as well as Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative guidelines, to transform maternity care in a safety-net hospital with more than 3,500 births annually. Implementing evidence-based guidelines to support breastfeeding was essential for a vulnerable population characterized by minimal prenatal care and high rates of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and poverty. Research showing the importance of breastfeeding in protecting against these factors guided extensive changes in our maternity care model. The nursing and medical teams changed long-held practices that separated women from their newborns and observed substantial improvements in breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding rates at discharge. PMID:27520602

  6. Hypernatraemic dehydration in Jamaican breastfed neonates: a 12-year review in a baby-friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Trotman, H; Lord, C; Barton, M; Antoine, M

    2004-12-01

    A 12-year retrospective review of neonates admitted with hypernatraemic dehydration to the neonatal unit of the University Hospital of the West Indies was conducted between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2001. Twenty-four infants fulfilled the criteria for hypernatraemic dehydration. Nineteen (79%) women were either nulliparous or primiparous with a mean (SD) age of 26.9 (4.4) yrs. Modal length of hospital stay for mothers was 24 hrs. Twenty (83.3%) infants were exclusively breastfed. Mean (SD) age at presentation was 7.4 (3.8) days. Mean (SD) percentage weight loss between birth and presentation was 18.9% (6.3). Mean (SD) serum sodium at presentation was 164.8 (13.9) mmol/L. Babies visited at home by nurses had a lower mean serum sodium, were less dehydrated and were significantly less acidiotic. Their mean (SD) length of hospital stay was also significantly less [4.2 (1.4) days] than those who were not visited [7.9 (3.8) days] (p < 0.05). Complications occurred in 19 (79%) of infants and included renal failure (19, 79%), seizures (3, 13%) and intraventricular haemorrhage (1, 4%), and one died (4%). Hypernatraemic dehydration is an uncommon complication of failure to establish breastfeeding but is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Education programmes are needed to increase awareness amongst health-care workers and mothers in order to prevent the problem.

  7. Pregnant & Lactating Mothers' Attitudes and Practice of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding at King Fahd Hospital of University (KFHU)--Khobar, Saudi Arabia: Appraisal of Baby Friendly Hospital Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Laila Younis Abu; Al Madani, Maha Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: World Health organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) have been recommended the application of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) in order to promote & support breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to assess pregnant and lactating mothers' attitudes…

  8. Bringing Baby-Friendly to the Indian Health Service: A Systemwide Approach to Implementation.

    PubMed

    Karol, Susan; Tah, Tina; Kenon, Clifton; Meyer, Jenna; Yazzie, Jeannette; Stephens, Celissa; Merewood, Anne

    2016-05-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) increases exclusive breastfeeding. Breastfeeding protects against obesity and diabetes, conditions to which American Indians and Alaska Natives are particularly prone. As part of the First Lady'sLet's Move! in Indian Countryinitiative, the US Department of Health and Human Services' Indian Health Service (IHS) began implementing the BFHI in 2011. The IHS administers 13 US birthing hospitals. There are 5 tribally administered hospitals in the lower 48 states that receive IHS funding, and the IHS encouraged them to seek Baby-Friendly designation also. In the 13 federally administered hospitals, the IHS implemented a Baby-Friendly infant feeding policy, extensive clinician training, and Baby-Friendly compatible medical records. All hospitals also became compliant with the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes. Strategies and solutions were shared systemwide via webinars and conference calls. Quality improvement methods, technical assistance, and site visits assisted with the implementation process. Between 2011 and December 2014, 100% (13 of 13) of IHS federally administered hospitals gained Baby-Friendly designation. The first Baby-Friendly hospitals in Arizona, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota were all IHS sites; 6% of all US Baby-Friendly hospitals are currently IHS hospitals. One tribal site has also been Baby-Friendly designated and 3 of the 5 remaining tribally administered hospitals in the lower 48 states are pursuing Baby-Friendly status. Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative implementation systemwide is possible in a US government agency serving a high-risk, underprivileged population. Other systems looking to implement the BFHI can learn from the IHS model. PMID:26561492

  9. Implementing baby-friendly practices: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pat Bohling; Moore, Karen; Peters, Liz

    2012-01-01

    Breastfeeding is widely viewed as the optimal feeding method for infants among professional nursing and medical organizations. Its health benefits have been comprehensively studied and documented for both infants and mothers. Hospitals and birthing centers can strongly influence the outcomes for mothers who choose to breastfeed by establishing effective breastfeeding behaviors immediately after birth and during the hospital stay. The Baby-Friendly USA initiative outlines 10 steps to successful breastfeeding. Although these steps have been successfully supported in practice, they can be difficult to implement due to a variety of factors, including resistance to change. Specific steps generate more barriers to overcome than others--namely exclusive breastfeeding without supplementation or pacifiers, rooming-in for 23 out of 24 hours, and skin-to-skin contact with a parent immediately after birth and during the hospital stay. Our hospital spent 5 years implementing Baby-Friendly practices to prepare for a successful site visit. In the process, barriers to key Baby-Friendly steps were overcome through creative approaches and strategic education for staff, physicians, and parents. The purpose of this article is to outline specific actions taken that assisted our hospital in its successful journey. Those actions and strategies will hopefully be of value to others in their journey toward designation. PMID:22596036

  10. The Baby-Friendly Initiative: Protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Pound, Catherine M; Unger, Sharon L

    2012-06-01

    Breastfeeding confers extensive and well-established benefits and is recognized as an extremely effective preventative health measure for both mothers and babies. Except in very few specific medical situations, breastfeeding should be universally encouraged for all mothers and infants. To improve worldwide breastfeeding initiation and duration rates, the WHO and UNICEF launched the Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI) in 1991. The goal was to protect, promote and support breastfeeding by adherence to the WHO's "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding". Since then, more than 20,000 hospitals in 156 countries have achieved Baby-Friendly status, with a resultant increase in both breastfeeding initiation and duration. Still, only 500 hospitals are currently designated Baby-Friendly in industrialized countries, including 37 health centres or health authorities in Canada. Health care practitioners have a unique and influential role in promoting and supporting breastfeeding. Provincial and territorial government leadership is essential to ensuring implementation of the BFI in all health care facilities delivering services to families with young children.

  11. Trends in Baby-Friendly® Care in the United States: Historical Influences on Contemporary Care.

    PubMed

    Salera-Vieira, Jean; Zembo, Cynthia T

    2016-01-01

    The protection that breast-feeding affords both mother and infant against acute and chronic illness is well documented. The grassroots, public health, and governmental supports for breast-feeding have influenced changes in maternal and newborn care. History indicates that the additional influence has come in the form of governmental workshops and initiatives, professional organizations, as well as The Joint Commission. This includes the influence that the Baby-Friendly® Hospital Initiative and the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding have had on infant care throughout the years. The requirements that hospitals must follow to implement all, or some, of the Ten Steps lead to change in care that not only increases breast-feeding rates but also leads to health improvements. This article reviews how an upward trend in the adoption of Baby-Friendly practices to support breast-feeding impacts infant care. PMID:27465459

  12. Being baby friendly: evidence-based breastfeeding support.

    PubMed

    Cleminson, J; Oddie, S; Renfrew, M J; McGuire, W

    2015-03-01

    Breast feeding improves important outcomes for mothers and infants. In the UK, breastfeeding rates have historically been low, particularly among socially disadvantaged young women. Although there have been gradual increases in breastfeeding initiation rates since 2000, rates of exclusive breast feeding and continuation until 6 months remain lower than those in similar countries. This review summarises the evidence for effective and cost-effective strategies to help women, particularly those in low income groups, make informed choices, overcome barriers and establish and maintain breast feeding. We describe the development and impact of the Unicef Baby Friendly Initiative, and the roles and responsibilities, and challenges and opportunities that clinicians have in promoting breast feeding and maintaining a baby-friendly culture and environment.

  13. Nurses' Perspectives on the Process of Attaining Baby-Friendly Designation.

    PubMed

    Lundeen, Suzanne; Sorensen, Sherrill; Bland, Michelle; George, Sybil; Snyder, Brenton

    2016-01-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative is a global initiative that aims to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. This study explores and describes the process of attaining Baby-Friendly designation from nurses' perspectives. A purposive sampling design was used to recruit registered nurse participants in a large, safety-net, tertiary care facility. Data were collected via semistructured interviews and were analyzed using descriptive interpretative analysis. The following themes were revealed: Resistance, Culture, Investment in the Journey, Teamwork, and Source of Pride. Results indicate that comfortable yet antiquated practices led to fear of change and resistance. Initial culture shock was mediated by a successful education model, powerful experiences, and positive outcomes. PMID:27287354

  14. Field trials of the Baby Check score card in hospital.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A J; Morley, C J; Cole, T J; Green, S J; Walker, K A; Rennie, J M

    1991-01-01

    The Baby Check score card was used by junior paediatric doctors to assess 262 babies under 6 months old presenting to hospital. The duty registrar and two consultants independently graded the severity of each baby's illness without knowledge of the Baby Check score. The registrars assessed the babies at presentation while the consultants reviewed the notes. The consultants and registrars agreed about the need for hospital admission only about 75% of the time. The score's sensitivity and predictive values were similar to those of the registrars' grading. The score's specificity was 87%. Babies with serious diagnosis scored high, while minor illnesses scored low. The predictive value for requiring hospital admission increased with the score, rising to 100% for scores of 20 or more. The appropriate use of Baby Check should improve the detection of serious illness. It could also reduce the number of babies admitted with minor illness, without putting them at increased risk.

  15. The Massachusetts baby-friendly collaborative: lessons learned from an innovation to foster implementation of best practices.

    PubMed

    Bartick, Melissa; Edwards, Roger A; Walker, Marsha; Jenkins, Lucia

    2010-11-01

    Collaborative efforts among hospitals can facilitate the exchange of ideas, provide a forum for discussing the development of new policies or practices or changes to existing policies and practices, and increase the implementation of best practices. In November 2008, the Massachusetts Breastfeeding Coalition formed a collaborative of maternity facilities wishing to pursue Baby-Friendly designation. Members provided insights from experiences and shared models and examples from outside. We describe highlights from the first 15 months of the Collaborative and present 4 recommendations for overcoming barriers: (1) manage expectations of patients, family/friends, and staff; (2) restrict access to materials that can undermine breastfeeding; (3) adopt the appropriate perspectives to creatively implement change; and (4) bundle, reframe, and harness larger forces. The strategies can be applied across diverse hospital settings. PMID:20876344

  16. Battered baby syndrome at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Muita, J W; Nduati, R W

    1990-12-01

    Thirty children presenting with Battered Baby Syndrome over a five year period were studied retrospectively. The male:female ratio was 1:1.1. The majority (60%) were aged 0-11 months. 14 children (46%) were abandoned while six (20%) had multiple fractures, six (20%) multiple bruises and bites, and four (13.3%) had other forms of abuse. Twelve (40%) children were malnourished while eight of the babies (26.6%) were small for gestational age. Children were most frequently brought to hospital by the police or their mothers. The children were most frequently abused by their mothers either through abandonment or through physical battering. Details of mothers of the 14 abandoned children were unknown. Among the mothers of the other children, nine mothers were single, seven married and living with spouses and one stepmother. Two children (6.6%) died while the fate of two others was not known. Three children were sent home without intervention of the social worker, while twenty three children were discharged following intervention of the social worker; fourteen sent home, nine to a childrens' home and one through the juvenile court.

  17. A little help from my friends: caring for premature babies in a war zone

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Heather

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a narrative of some aspects of my work as a midwife with Médecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) in West Africa. I was situated in an isolated north-western regional hospital in an area under rebel military control in 2004–2005 in the Côte d'Ivoire during the civil war which divides the north and south of the country. Access to health care is severely curtailed in this politically unstable environment resulting in much avoidable illness including many premature births. It is a short account of methods used to care for premature babies in a resource poor setting. Equipment was basic, necessitating a creative use of available resources. Providing warmth, oxygen and adequate feeding were often sufficient for a successful outcome for many premature babies. This paper is a combination of descriptions of health care interspersed with case studies. PMID:17274826

  18. Towards age-friendly hospitals and health services.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we reviewed rationale for an age-friendly hospital (or health service) and propose our framework in detail. In a rapidly aging society, development of policies and programs to optimize people's wellbeing and function as they age is an urgent issue. Most older persons extensively use health care. Unfortunately, current practices are unfriendly and may even add risks to the older person. Health-promotion interventions delivered in clinical settings and management of admissions have been shown to be associated with better outcomes. We developed Taiwan's Framework of Age-Friendly Hospitals to address the responsibility of health-care organizations and provide systematic guidance on hospital management policy, communication and services, physical environments, and care processes. This framework takes a life-course perspective and population approach and includes evaluation and quality improvement as an integral part of an age-friendly initiative. The diffusion and adaptation of age-friendly practices in hospitals can be monitored and its impact evaluated in the future.

  19. Effectiveness of the Baby Friendly Community Initiative in Italy: a non-randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Adriano; Bettinelli, Maria Enrica; Chapin, Elise; Macaluso, Anna; Córdova do Espírito Santo, Lílian; Murante, Anna Maria; Montico, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of the Baby Friendly Community Initiative (BFCI) on exclusive breast feeding at 6 months. Design Controlled, non-randomised trial. Setting 18 Local Health Authorities in 9 regions of Italy. Participants 5094 mother/infant dyads in 3 cohorts were followed up to 12 months after birth in 3 rounds of data collection: at baseline, after implementation of the intervention in the early intervention group and after implementation in the late intervention group. 689 (14%) dyads did not complete the study. Intervention Implementation of the 7 steps of the BFCI. Main outcome measures The rate of exclusive breast feeding at 6 months was the primary outcome; breast feeding at discharge, 3 and 12 months was also measured. Results The crude rates of exclusive breast feeding at discharge, 3 and 6 months, and of any breast feeding at 6 and 12 months increased at each round of data collection after baseline in the early and late intervention groups. At the end of the project, 10% of infants were exclusively breast fed at 6 months and 38% were continuing to breast feed at 12 months. However, the comparison by adjusted rates and logistic regression failed to show statistically significant differences between groups and rounds of data collection in the intention-to-treat analysis, as well as when compliance with the intervention and training coverage was taken into account. Conclusions The study failed to demonstrate an effect of the BFCI on the rates of breast feeding. This may be due, among other factors, to the time needed to observe an effect on breast feeding following this complex intervention. PMID:27154476

  20. [Practices of nursing staff in the process of preterm baby hospital discharge].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kayna Trombini; Terassi, Mariélli; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the strategies used by the nursing team in the neonatal unity care of a school-hospital during the preparation of the family for the premature baby discharge. It is a descriptive study with qualitative approach. The data was collected between March and June 2011, by means of observation and semi-structured interviews. From the discourse analysis two categories appeared: Orientations and professional strategies in preparing the family for the premature baby hospital discharge and Difficulties and potentialities in the neonatal attention space. The main strategy mentioned was the family early insertion in the caring process and the stressed difficulty was the parents' absence during the child's hospital staying. The potentialities and limitations pointed out in this study revealed that the assistance process is dynamic, asking for constant correction and adequacies to effectively and wholly care for the premature baby and its family.

  1. Low-birth-weight babies among hospital deliveries in Nepal: a hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Arun K; Bhatta, Dharma N

    2015-01-01

    Background Birth weight is an important indicator of a population’s health and is associated with numerous interrelated factors in the infant, mother, and physical environment. The objective of this study was to assess the proportion of low birth weight and identify the associated factors for low birth weight in a liveborn infant among the women in Morang, Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out from December 2010 to March 2011 among 255 mothers who gave birth during the study period at the Koshi Zonal Hospital, Nepal. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire with face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed through logistic regression and presented with crude and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The study showed that the prevalence of low-birth-weight babies was 23.1% (95% CI: 17.9–28.1). The mean (standard deviation) age of mothers was 23.23 (4.18) years. The proportion of low birth weight of previous baby was 3.9% (95% CI: 0.1–7.9), and 15.7% (95% CI: 11.5–20.5) of the respondents had preterm delivery. Nearly one-third (36.1%; 95% CI: 26.4–45.6) of the respondents had >2 years’ gap after the previous delivery. Nonformal employment (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 0.523–8.74), vegetarian diet (AOR: 1.47; 95% CI: 0.23–9.36), and no rest during pregnancy (AOR: 1.38; 95% CI: 0.41–4.39) were factors more likely to determine low birth weight. However, none of the variables showed a significant association between low birth weight and other dependent variables. Conclusion Low birth weight is an important factor for perinatal morbidity and mortality and is a common problem in the developing world. The proportion of low-birth-weight babies was high in hospital delivery, and ethnicities, Hindu religion, education, nonformal employment, food habit, rest during pregnancy, and type of delivery were found to influence the birth weight. Hence, it is important to strengthen health education services at the

  2. Debating life after disaster: charity hospital babies and bioscientific futures in post-Katrina New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Anne M

    2011-06-01

    In Louisiana's unique, populist-derived charity health system, the self-designation Charity Hospital Baby expresses situational identity anchored in the life cycle and the inversion of racist and authoritative connotations. This article draws on theoretical perspectives of stratified reproduction and the politics of time to examine the controversy in which Babies advocate reopening the Katrina-damaged New Orleans Charity Hospital, and administrators and planners support a new state-of-the-art biosciences district, GNOBED. Babies evoke the present, ethical urgency (kairos) of responding to sickness and disability; GNOBED implies prolonging or saving future lives through biotechnologies under development in accelerated time (chronos). As preservationists and residents threatened with displacement join "re-open Charity" proponents, planners symbolically engage in prolepsis, rhetorically precluding opposing arguments with flash forward of supposedly "done deals." At stake is nothing less than social death for a segment of this ethnically diverse city. [public

  3. The impact of the Baby Friendly Health Initiative in the Australian health care system: a critical narrative review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Atchan, Marjorie; Davis, Deborah; Foureur, Maralyn

    2013-07-01

    Studies have identified that the practices of maternity facilities and health professionals are crucial to women's experience of support and breastfeeding 'success'. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched globally in 1991 to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. While a direct causal effect has not been established and critics suggest the rhetoric conflicts with women's lived experiences as new mothers, a positive association between the Initiative and breastfeeding prevalence is apparent. Internationally, impact studies have demonstrated that where the Initiative is well integrated, there is an increase in rates of breastfeeding initiation and, to a lesser extent, duration. In consideration of the known health risks associated with the use of artificial baby milks this would suggest that BFHI implementation and accreditation should be a desirable strategy for committed health facilities. However, a variation in both BFHI uptake and breastfeeding prevalence between nations has been reported. This narrative review critically discusses a variety of issues relevant to the uptake and support of breastfeeding and the BFHI, utilising Australia as a case study. Whilst it enjoys 'in principle' policy support, Australia also suffers from a lack of uniformity in uptake and perception of the benefits of BFHI at all levels of the health system. Australian and international studies have identified similar enablers and barriers to implementation. PMID:23957177

  4. The impact of the Baby Friendly Health Initiative in the Australian health care system: a critical narrative review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Atchan, Marjorie; Davis, Deborah; Foureur, Maralyn

    2013-07-01

    Studies have identified that the practices of maternity facilities and health professionals are crucial to women's experience of support and breastfeeding 'success'. The Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched globally in 1991 to protect, promote and support breastfeeding. While a direct causal effect has not been established and critics suggest the rhetoric conflicts with women's lived experiences as new mothers, a positive association between the Initiative and breastfeeding prevalence is apparent. Internationally, impact studies have demonstrated that where the Initiative is well integrated, there is an increase in rates of breastfeeding initiation and, to a lesser extent, duration. In consideration of the known health risks associated with the use of artificial baby milks this would suggest that BFHI implementation and accreditation should be a desirable strategy for committed health facilities. However, a variation in both BFHI uptake and breastfeeding prevalence between nations has been reported. This narrative review critically discusses a variety of issues relevant to the uptake and support of breastfeeding and the BFHI, utilising Australia as a case study. Whilst it enjoys 'in principle' policy support, Australia also suffers from a lack of uniformity in uptake and perception of the benefits of BFHI at all levels of the health system. Australian and international studies have identified similar enablers and barriers to implementation.

  5. The Loneliest Babies: Foster Care in the Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicker, Sheryl

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an ignored problem--the plight of infants and toddlers in foster care who find themselves hospitalized. A majority of the children in foster care will be hospitalized for medical treatment while in foster care because they are more likely to have serious medical problems or developmental disabilities than their age peers.…

  6. Breastfeeding-Friendly Erie County: Establishing a Baby Café Network.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Deborah J; Dennison, Barbara A; Restina, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Community-based lactation support groups help improve breastfeeding duration by offering practical peer and professional help and counseling through the sharing of information and experiences in a relaxed setting. The objective of this project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was to establish at least 5 Baby Cafés in organizations that reach low-income women living in a high-need, racially/ethnically diverse, urban county with 1 of the lowest rates of breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration in New York. The New York State Department of Health partnered with the P(2) Collaborative of Western New York and United Way of Buffalo & Erie County's Healthy Start Healthy Future for All Coalition to facilitate the recruitment of 11 community-based agencies in Erie County, New York, to provide and/or enhance breastfeeding support. Six organizations were funded to establish licensed Baby Cafés, which provided skilled, free-of-charge, drop-in lactation support and counseling to mothers at easily accessible locations. The organizations provided staff training and staffing at the Baby Cafés, established coordinated hours of operation between all locations, and jointly marketed their services. Collectively, the 6 Baby Cafés provided 11 drop-in sessions per week. During the 7-month start-up time, mothers/babies made 276 visits and they averaged 75 visits per month, representing at least 150 clients. After the funding ended, 5 organizations continued to support and staff the Baby Cafés whereas 1 organization added another Baby Café. Future evaluation is needed to determine their effect on breastfeeding exclusivity and duration.

  7. Breastfeeding-Friendly Erie County: Establishing a Baby Café Network.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Deborah J; Dennison, Barbara A; Restina, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Community-based lactation support groups help improve breastfeeding duration by offering practical peer and professional help and counseling through the sharing of information and experiences in a relaxed setting. The objective of this project, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was to establish at least 5 Baby Cafés in organizations that reach low-income women living in a high-need, racially/ethnically diverse, urban county with 1 of the lowest rates of breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and duration in New York. The New York State Department of Health partnered with the P(2) Collaborative of Western New York and United Way of Buffalo & Erie County's Healthy Start Healthy Future for All Coalition to facilitate the recruitment of 11 community-based agencies in Erie County, New York, to provide and/or enhance breastfeeding support. Six organizations were funded to establish licensed Baby Cafés, which provided skilled, free-of-charge, drop-in lactation support and counseling to mothers at easily accessible locations. The organizations provided staff training and staffing at the Baby Cafés, established coordinated hours of operation between all locations, and jointly marketed their services. Collectively, the 6 Baby Cafés provided 11 drop-in sessions per week. During the 7-month start-up time, mothers/babies made 276 visits and they averaged 75 visits per month, representing at least 150 clients. After the funding ended, 5 organizations continued to support and staff the Baby Cafés whereas 1 organization added another Baby Café. Future evaluation is needed to determine their effect on breastfeeding exclusivity and duration. PMID:26319111

  8. [The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].

    PubMed

    Heller, A R; Heller, S C

    2009-06-01

    The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital

  9. [The family-friendly hospital: (how) does it work?].

    PubMed

    Heller, A R; Heller, S C

    2009-06-01

    The demographic development in Germany is heading towards a significant shortage in specialists within the next 10-15 years with an increased demand for health services at the same time. The three-stage model of family life planning (work, family phase, return) will also be gradually replaced by a model of simultaneous compatibility of family and work. This change in values, although initiated by the parents themselves, may turn out to be a crucial countermeasure in national economy against the demography-related loss of qualified personnel. For these three trends the economic need arises to minimize family-related absence of our well-trained, motivated and reliable doctors from the clinical departments through implementation of family-friendly human resources policies and supporting measures by the employers. In a representative survey 26% of respondents with children had in the past already changed their workplace to ensure a better match of work and family duties. In this regard the compatibility of family and professional responsibilities had a higher impact on the selection of the employer than a high income. Accordingly, a work-life competence oriented business plan will represent the crucial factor within the competition between universities, hospitals and professional disciplines to attract high potential bearers although a sustained change of the traditional hospital culture is mandatory. Anaesthesia-related fields of development regarding family-friendly corporate governance are working hours and organization of work, part-time jobs even for managers and fathers, and staff development. In the hospital daily routine, in particular, creative solutions meeting the local demands are deemed necessary that do not involve the use of high financial resources. Family-friendly personnel policy not only arises from altruistic enthusiasm but also pays off economically. This article discusses the necessity, opportunities and threads of family-oriented hospital

  10. Age-Related Incidence Curve of Hospitalized Shaken Baby Syndrome Cases: Convergent Evidence for Crying as a Trigger to Shaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Ronald G.; Trent, Roger B.; Cross, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an age-specific incidence of hospitalized cases of Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) that has similar properties to the previously reported ''normal crying curve,'' as a form of indirect evidence that crying is an important stimulus for SBS. Design and setting: The study analyzed cases of Shaken Baby Syndrome by…

  11. Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective - improving hospital care for migrant children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Results Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient’s family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. Conclusions International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care

  12. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health) Initiative (BFHI) is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23%) have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the current processes used to

  13. The global epidemic of abuse and disrespect during childbirth: History, evidence, interventions, and FIGO's mother-baby friendly birthing facilities initiative.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suellen; Lalonde, Andre

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that disrespectful/abusive/coercive service delivery by skilled providers in facilities, which results in actual or perceived poor quality of care, is directly and indirectly associated with adverse maternal and newborn outcomes. The present article reviews the evidence for disrespectful/abusive care during childbirth in facilities (DACF), describes examples of DACF, discusses organizations active in a rights-based respectful maternity care movement, and enumerates some strategies and interventions that have been identified to decrease DACF. It concludes with a discussion of one strategy, which has been recently implemented by FIGO with global partners-the International Pediatrics Association, International Confederation of Midwives, the White Ribbon Alliance, and WHO. This strategy, the Mother and Baby Friendly Birth Facility (MBFBF) Initiative, is a criterion-based audit process based on human rights' doctrines, and modeled on WHO/UNICEF's Baby Friendly Facility Initiative. PMID:26433506

  14. Crying babies, tired mothers - challenges of the postnatal hospital stay: an interpretive phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background According to an old Swiss proverb, "a new mother lazing in childbed is a blessing to her family". Today mothers rarely enjoy restful days after birth, but enter directly into the challenge of combining baby- and self-care. They often face a combination of infant crying and personal tiredness. Yet, routine postnatal care often lacks effective strategies to alleviate these challenges which can adversely affect family health. We explored how new mothers experience and handle postnatal infant crying and their own tiredness in the context of changing hospital care practices in Switzerland. Methods Purposeful sampling was used to enroll 15 mothers of diverse parity and educational backgrounds, all of who had given birth to a full term healthy neonate. Using interpretive phenomenology, we analyzed interview and participant observation data collected during the postnatal hospital stay and at 6 and 12 weeks post birth. This paper reports on the postnatal hospital experience. Results Women's personal beliefs about beneficial childcare practices shaped how they cared for their newborn's and their own needs during the early postnatal period in the hospital. These beliefs ranged from an infant-centered approach focused on the infant's development of a basic sense of trust to an approach that balanced the infants' demands with the mother's personal needs. Getting adequate rest was particularly difficult for mothers striving to provide infant-centered care for an unsettled neonate. These mothers suffered from sleep deprivation and severe tiredness unless they were able to leave the baby with health professionals for several hours during the night. Conclusion New mothers often need permission to attend to their own needs, as well as practical support with childcare to recover from birth especially when neonates are fussy. To strengthen family health from the earliest stage, postnatal care should establish conditions which enable new mothers to balance the care of their

  15. Serratia marcescens-contaminated baby shampoo causing an outbreak among newborns at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Madani, T A; Alsaedi, S; James, L; Eldeek, B S; Jiman-Fatani, A A; Alawi, M M; Marwan, D; Cudal, M; Macapagal, M; Bahlas, R; Farouq, M

    2011-05-01

    During November 2008 to January 2009, 11 babies in the neonatal intensive care (NICU) and three babies in the nursery were infected with Serratia marcescens at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Saudi Arabia. Overall, fifteen infections were identified among 11 newborns in the NICU: septicaemia (five cases), purulent conjunctivitis (three), urinary tract infection (two), meningitis (two) and cellulitis (one). Three newborns in the nursery had three infections: purulent conjunctivitis (two cases) and omphalitis (one). Thirteen of 14 babies recovered fully but one died from S. marcescens meningitis and septicaemia. All infections were traced to intrinsically contaminated baby shampoo introduced to the units five days before the first reported case. The outbreak terminated following withdrawal of the shampoo product.

  16. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  17. Comparison Between Immunological Markers in Cord Blood of Preterm and Term Babies in Hospital USM

    PubMed Central

    Ashari, Noor Suryani Mohd; Hussin, Che Maraina Che; Musa, Mustaffa; Rostenberghe, Han Vans

    2008-01-01

    A cross sectional pilot study using convenient sampling method was conducted to evaluate various immunological parameters in preterm babies and term babies. Cord blood from 36 preterm and 36 term babies was taken and the following parameters were determined: Immunoglobulin G, A and M, Complement 3 and 4 and NBT. The results showed that NBT was significantly reduced in preterm babies compared to term babies (7.5% versus 12.0%; p= 0.001). The complement levels, C3 (0.5114 versus 0.7192 g/l; p<0.001) and C4 (0.07 versus 0.14g/l; p<0.001) were significantly lower in preterm babies than in the term babies. The mean IgG level in preterm babies was significantly lower than in term babies (9.5583 versus 14.2806 g/l, p<0.001). IgM (0.1 versus 0.2g/l; p<0.001) and IgA (0.210 versus 0.225g/l; p=0.036l) levels were significantly lower in the preterm than in term babies. In conclusion, we found that NBT reduction, IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 and C4 levels were significantly lower in the preterm compared to term babies. PMID:22589619

  18. The Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative education program for acute care nurses and staff.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Janice L; Lach, Helen W; McGillick, Janis; Murphy-White, Maggie; Carroll, Maria B; Armstrong, Johanna L

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias have 3.2 million hospital stays annually, which is significantly more than older individuals without dementia. Hospitalized patients with dementia are at greater risk of delirium, falls, overwhelming functional decline that may extend the hospital stay, and prolonged or complicated rehabilitation. These risks highlight the need for staff education on the special care needs of this vulnerable population. This article describes a one-day education program, the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative, designed to teach staff how to provide the specialized care required by patients with dementia. Participants (N = 355) from five different hospitals, including 221 nurses, completed a pretest-posttest evaluation for the program. Changes in participants attitudes and practices, confidence, and knowledge were evaluated. Scores indicated significant improvement on the posttest. The evaluation provides further evidence for recommending dissemination of the Dementia Friendly Hospital Initiative. PMID:25299008

  19. Evaluation of Patient Safety Indicators in Semnan City Hospitals by Using the Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI)

    PubMed Central

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Nemati, Roghayeh Khabiri; Nobahar, Monir; Keighobady, Seifullah; Ghazavi, Soheila; Izadi-Sabet, Farideh; Najafpour, Zhila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, patient safety issue is among one of the main concerns of the hospital policy worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in hospitals affiliated to Semnan city, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in summer 2014. Methods: That was a cross sectional descriptive study that addressed patient safety, which explained the current status of safety in the Semnan hospitals using by instrument of Patient safety friendly initiative standards (PSFHI). Data was collected from 5 hospitals in Semnan city during four weeks in May 2014. Results: The finding of 5 areas examined showed that some components in critical standards had disadvantages. Critical standards of hospitals including areas of leadership and administration, patient and public involvement and safe evidence-based clinical practice, safe environment with and lifetime education in a safe and secure environment were analyzed. The domain of patient and public involvement obtained the lowest mean score and the domain of safe environment obtained the highest mean score in the surveyed hospitals. Conclusion: All the surveyed hospitals had a poor condition regarding standards based on patient safety. Further, the identified weak points are almost the same in the hospitals. Therefore, In order to achieve a good level of all aspects of the protocol, the goals should be considered in the level of strategic planning at hospitals. An effective execution of patient safety creatively may depend on the legal infrastructure and enforcement of standards by hospital management, organizational liability to expectation of patients, safety culture in hospitals. PMID:27045391

  20. Nurse-Friendly Hospital Project: enhancing nurse retention and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Martha; Grobe, Susan J; Tabone, Stephanie; Wainwright, Mary; Shelton, Steve; Yu, Lydia; Jordan, Clair

    2008-01-01

    The present shortage of nurses in the United States is expected to continue. Nurse shortage, the nature of the work environment, and employers' expectations and attitudes, among other factors, influence both nurse retention and quality of patient care. The Nurse-Friendly Hospital Project was designed to improve nurses' work environment in rural and small hospitals in Texas. Findings demonstrate improvements in nurse retention, nurse staffing, and quality of care. PMID:18354333

  1. Comparative analysis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase levels in pre-term and term babies delivered at University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Obasa, Temitope Olorunsola; Adesiyun, Omotayo Olukemi; Mokuolu, Olugbenga Ayodeji; Ojuawo, Ayodele Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) is an enzyme in the hexose monophosphate shunt required for the production of reducing equivalents needed to mop up free radicals. thereby keeping hemoglobin in its free state. Deficiency of the enzyme can cause severe neonatal jaundice. The aim of this study was to compare G6PD levels in pre-term and term babies, and evaluate the extent to which G6PD deficiency determines the severity of jaundice in various gestational age groups. Samples of cord blood collected from consecutively delivered babies in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, were assayed for G6PD levels, and the babies were observed for jaundice during the first week of life. Those who developed jaundice had serial serum bilirubin measured. Nine hundred and thirty-three babies had G6PD assayed, with 348 being G6PD deficient, giving a hospital based prevalence of 37.3%. Of the 644 who were followed up, 143 (22.2%) were pre-term and 501(77.8%) were term babies. Babies with gestational age (GA) 27–29 weeks had the highest G6PD levels. However, there was no significant variation among the different gestational age groups (F=0.64, P=0.64). Jaundice occurred more in pre-term compared to term babies with a relative risk of 2.41 (χ2=60.95, P=0.00001). Occurrence of jaundice in pre-term babies was irrespective of G6PD status (χ2=0.2, P=0.66, RR=1.09, CI=0.83babies are more likely to have higher G6PD levels, but occurrence of jaundice in pre-term babies is irrespective of G6PD status. More severe jaundice (especially for gestational age) occurring in pre-term babies requires critical care. PMID:22690313

  2. Babies who die from labour-related intrapartum hypoxia: a confidential enquiry in South African public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, E J; Pattinson, R C

    2006-01-01

    Seventeen hospitals, from a range of health-care environments, participated in confidential enquiries of perinatal deaths resulting from labour-related intrapartum hypoxia. There were 102 deaths, including 22 stillbirths and 80 neonatal deaths. The mean birthweight was 3021 g. The active phase of the first stage of labour was prolonged beyond 12 h in six cases, and oxytocin was used for induction or augmentation in 10 women. Fetal heart decelerations were detected in 39 (49%) of the babies that went on to die in the neonatal period, and meconium passage was evident in 50 (63%). There were six breech presentations, and seven cases of cord prolapse. The majority of these deaths occurred in low-risk women with apparently uncomplicated labour. There appears to be a failure to detect or respond to evidence of fetal distress. Intrapartum care for all women in labour requires close attention to detail in monitoring fetal health.

  3. Towards Age-Friendly Hospitals in Developing Countries: A Case Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ahmad; Seyedin, Hesam; Fadaye-Vatan, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Developing countries such as Iran are experiencing a growth in the elderly population. This is a challenge for healthcare providers and their families. This study investigated the extent in which hospitals at Tehran meet the criteria of age-friendly hospitals. Methods: In this descriptive study, using convenience sampling, 26 hospitals were selected in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The instrument was a checklist included 50 items in the three dimensions of information and training of service providers, management systems in health care centers, physical environment and accessibility of hospitals. Results: Most hospitals were in a good condition regarding physical environment and access to public transportation, but in a poor condition for special healthcare programs for the elderly, teaching principles of geriatrics and gerontology, interaction of medical staff, physicians and nurses with senior patients and systems of priority for them. Conclusion: Due to the growing elderly population, it is necessary for health policymakers, especially in developing countries, to consider seriously the issue of elderly healthcare and their need for special outpatient and inpatient services. PMID:26000245

  4. A system-wide analysis using a senior-friendly hospital framework identifies current practices and opportunities for improvement in the care of hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken S; Ryan, David P; Liu, Barbara A

    2014-11-01

    Older adults are vulnerable to hospital-associated complications such as falls, pressure ulcers, functional decline, and delirium, which can contribute to prolonged hospital stay, readmission, and nursing home placement. These vulnerabilities are exacerbated when the hospital's practices, services, and physical environment are not sufficiently mindful of the complex, multidimensional needs of frail individuals. Several frameworks have emerged to help hospitals examine how organization-wide processes can be customized to avoid these complications. This article describes the application of one such framework-the Senior-Friendly Hospital (SFH) framework adopted in Ontario, Canada-which comprises five interrelated domains: organizational support, processes of care, emotional and behavioral environment, ethics in clinical care and research, and physical environment. This framework provided the blueprint for a self-assessment of all 155 adult hospitals across the province of Ontario. The system-wide analysis identified practice gaps and promising practices within each domain of the SFH framework. Taken together, these results informed 12 recommendations to support hospitals at all stages of development in becoming friendly to older adults. Priorities for system-wide action were identified, encouraging hospitals to implement or further develop their processes to better address hospital-acquired delirium and functional decline. These recommendations led to collaborative action across the province, including the development of an online toolkit and the identification of accountability indicators to support hospitals in quality improvement focusing on senior-friendly care.

  5. Baby Your Baby with Sunscreen

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159390.html Baby Your Baby With Sunscreen For starters, apply it at least 15 minutes ... way to protect babies is to avoid direct sun exposure, especially between 10 a.m. and 2 p. ...

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of the “Helping Babies Breathe” Program in a Missionary Hospital in Rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Vossius, Corinna; Lotto, Editha; Lyanga, Sara; Mduma, Estomih; Msemo, Georgina; Perlman, Jeffrey; Ersdal, Hege L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Helping Babies Breathe” (HBB) program is an evidence-based curriculum in basic neonatal care and resuscitation, utilizing simulation-based training to educate large numbers of birth attendants in low-resource countries. We analyzed its cost-effectiveness at a faith-based Haydom Lutheran Hospital (HLH) in rural Tanzania. Methods Data about early neonatal mortality and fresh stillbirth rates were drawn from a linked observational study during one year before and one year after full implementation of the HBB program. Cost data were provided by the Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), the research department at HLH, and the manufacturer of the training material Lærdal Global Health. Findings Costs per life saved were USD 233, while they were USD 4.21 per life year gained. Costs for maintaining the program were USD 80 per life saved and USD 1.44 per life year gained. Costs per disease adjusted life year (DALY) averted ranged from International Dollars (ID; a virtual valuta corrected for purchasing power world-wide) 12 to 23, according to how DALYs were calculated. Conclusion The HBB program is a low-cost intervention. Implementation in a very rural faith-based hospital like HLH has been highly cost-effective. To facilitate further global implementation of HBB a cost-effectiveness analysis including government owned institutions, urban hospitals and district facilities is desirable for a more diverse analysis to explore cost-driving factors and predictors of enhanced cost-effectiveness. PMID:25006802

  7. [The influence of the "Friend of Children Hospital" campaign on breast-feeding].

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Bulhosa, Michele Salum

    2004-01-01

    The paper investigates the awareness of women who gave birth in a 'Friend of Children' Hospital (FCH) of the influence of this campaign on their decision to breast-feed. We conducted semi-structured interviews, focusing the maternal breast-feeding process, expectations, experiences, and the importance of the health staff. The data analysis was based on the "Ten Steps to Successful Maternal Breast-Feeding." We found out that in situations regarded by women as problematic and lacking in answers that could attenuate their discomfort and suffering in the face of their desire to breast-feed, they stopped breast-feeding. We believe that by maintaining the FCH support to women (so that they can face those difficulties), its influence can be decisive to the continuation of breast-feeding.

  8. Special report. Hospitals that are becoming 'hotel friendly' to guests ... and the role played by security officers.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Faced with increasing competition, hospitals in New York City are developing programs to become more user friendly and, like hotels, to treat patients more as "guests" than as "customers." These programs, which have particular applications for security personnel, are also seeking to improve communications and relationships among the hospital's medical staff and other employees. In this report, we'll describe some of these efforts in which hospitals are turning to hoteliers, consultants, and others for advice in the area of customer service, and the role seen for hospital security. PMID:10154274

  9. Babies Need Tummy Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Printer-Friendly Email Page Skip sharing on social media links Babies Need Tummy Time! Page Content Tummy Time is not ...

  10. Postnatal demoralisation among women admitted to a hospital mother-baby unit: validation of a psychometric measure.

    PubMed

    Bobevski, I; Rowe, H; Clarke, D M; McKenzie, D P; Fisher, J

    2015-12-01

    Demoralisation is a psychological state characterised by experiences of distress and sadness, helplessness, subjective incompetence and hopelessness, in the context of a stressful situation. Experiences of demoralisation may be particularly relevant to women who have recently given birth, who can feel incompetent, isolated and helpless. The psychometric properties of the Demoralisation Scale among women in the postnatal period participating in a clinical program were examined. Women admitted with their infants to a hospital mother-baby unit in Australia for five nights were recruited consecutively (N = 209) and assessed at admission and discharge. The Demoralisation Scale was perceived as relevant and exhibited high reliability, acceptable construct validity and good sensitivity to change. The mean demoralisation score was high (M = 30.9, SD = 15.5) and associated with negative experiences of motherhood and functional impairment, independent of depression and anxiety symptoms. Mean demoralisation decreased significantly after program completion (M = 18.4, SD = 12.4). More participants showed a significant improvement in demoralisation (57.5 %) than in depression (34.8 %) and anxiety (9.8 %) symptoms. Demoralisation can provide a useful framework for understanding and measuring the experiences of women participating in postnatal clinical programs and in directing treatment towards helping women to acquire the necessary caregiving skills and increasing parental efficacy. The Demoralisation Scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing intervention effects. PMID:25520260

  11. Validation of the existing modified screening criteria for detection of all cases of Retinopathy of Prematurity in preterm babies – 11 year study from a governorate referral hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Mary K.; Sawardekar, Kiran P.; Ayoub, Hani Gameel; Busaidi, Ibrahim Al

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study appropriateness of our modified screening criteria for detection of all cases of Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) among preterm babies. Method Retrospective observational cohort study among preterm neonates who underwent ROP screening as per set protocol for 11 years at Nizwa Hospital, Al Dhakilya Governorate, Oman. We screened all babies with gestational age ⩽32 weeks or BW ⩽ 1500 g. Preterm babies >32 weeks of GA or BW > 1500 g with unstable clinical course believed to be at high risk by the attending neonatologist also were screened. Results During the study period 528 babies were screened for ROP of which 76 babies were excluded due to death, associated congenital ocular malformation and loss for follow-up either due to transfer to other institution or defaulting. Thus 452 babies were included in the final analysis. Incidence of ROP was 46.4% of which 27.9% had mild ROP, 11.3% had severe ROP which regressed and 7.3% had severe ROP who were treated. The incidence of ROP among infants with GA < 26 wks, 26–28 wks, 29–30 wks, 31–32 wks and above 32 weeks was 100.0%, 80.0%, 59.3%, 34.4% and 19.4% respectively. 56 babies of this cohort belonged to Extended (modified) criteria group. Among these 12 babies had ROP out of which 9 had mild ROP and 3 had severe ROP. Among cases with severe ROP, two cases regressed spontaneously and one case needed treatment. Multivariate analysis using stepwise regression model showed statistically significant association of GA and BW to development of ROP. We would have missed few babies with ROP if we had followed other criteria. Conclusion Our modified screening criteria seem to be appropriate as no infant with severe ROP was missed during the study period. Incidence of severe ROP among babies in the extended criteria group (5.4%) is low but significant compared to lower gestational age. We plan to formulate a scoring system following all risk factor analysis to enable us to optimize the

  12. Baby universes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TOPOLOGY CHANGE AND THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 0+1 DIMENSIONS * Third Quantization of Free One-dimensional Universes * Third Quantization of Interacting One-Dimensional Universes * The Single-Universe Approximation and Dynamical Determination of Coupling Constants * The Third Quantized Uncertainty Principle * THIRD QUANTIZATION IN 3+1 DIMENSIONS * The Gauge Invariant Action * Relation to Other Formalisms * PARENT AND BABY UNIVERSES * The Hybrid Action * Baby Universe Field Operators and Spacetime Couplings * INSTANTONS-FROM QUANTUM MECHANICS TO QUANTUM GRAVITY * Quantum Mechanics * Quantum Field Theory * Quantum Gravity * Axionic Instantons * The Small Expansion Parameter * THE AXION MODEL AND THE INSTANTON APPROXIMATION * THE COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT * The Hawking-Baum Argument * Baby Universes and Coleman's Argument * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  13. Baby massage.

    PubMed

    Carr, Helen

    2013-09-01

    Having initially trained as a nurse and then a midwife, massage for me was back to hands on care. In 1992, as part of my continuing professional development, I undertook an anatomy, physiology and massage course. My aim was to acquire skills that could benefit the mothers I cared for. My journey with baby massage began when I had my first son in 1993. At that time there were no courses or sessions on baby massage available but I did adapt some of the massage techniques I had learnt during my massage course to benefit me and my son. PMID:24163920

  14. Breast is best for babies.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K. C.; Sauve, Reginald S.

    2005-01-01

    Breastfeeding is the optimal method of infant feeding. Breast milk provides almost all the necessary nutrients, growth factors and immunological components a healthy term infant needs, Other advantages of breastfeeding include reduction of incidences and severity of infections; prevention of allergies; possible enhancement of cognitive development; and prevention of obesity, hypertension and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Health gains for breastfeeding mothers include lactation amenorrhea, early involution of the uterus, enhanced bonding between the mother and the infant, and reduction in incidence of ovarian and breast cancer. From the economic perspective, breastfeeding is less expensive than formula feeding. In most cases, maternal ingestion of medications and maternal infections are not contraindications to breastfeeding. Breastfeeding, however, is contraindicated in infants with galactosemia. The management of common breastfeeding issues, such as breast engorgement, sore nipples, mastitis and insufficient milk, is discussed. Breastfeeding should be initiated as soon after delivery as possible. To promote, protect and support breastfeeding, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) developed the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) 10 Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Healthcare professionals have an important role to play in promoting and protecting breastfeeding. PMID:16080672

  15. Comparative outcome of low birth weight babies.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Mishra, R N; Mishra, O P; Bhargava, V; Prakash, A

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and fifty six babies with birth weight between 1500-2000 g and 103 full term-appropriate for gestational age (FT-AGA) babies delivered at University Hospital, District Hospital and village homes were included for a comparative study of mortality, morbidity and growth pattern. The low birth weight (LBW) babies from the three centres had similar birth weight and gestational age. Neonatal mortality rates for the LBW babies were similar at the three centres. The main cause of death were infections and aspiration with rates again being similar. Diarrhea and respiratory tract infections were common causes of morbidity. The mortality rates for the LBW babies were significantly higher as compared to FT-AGA babies irrespective of the place of delivery. The incidence of morbidities like diarrhea and respiratory infections were also higher in LBW babies. However, the differences were statistically significant mostly in the preterm group. The weight gain of all LBW babies was similar up to 3 months of age. The findings of an identical outcome for the LBW babies at village level to those managed at hospitals is an encouraging trend to increasing domiciliary care for LBW babies. PMID:8406701

  16. Preparedness of County Referral Health Facilities in Implementing Adolescent Friendly Health Services: A Case Study of Mama Lucy Kibaki Hospital.

    PubMed

    Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi; Mwaura-Tenembergen, Wanja; Adoyo, Maureen; Kiilu, Elizabeth M

    2015-03-25

    Health service delivery is a key pillar of the health system management. The World Health Organization recently emphasized the need to develop adolescent -friendly health services to improve the care provided to young people throughout the world. However, there is limited peer reviewed literature on this subject therefore necessitating assessment of whether the existing health facilities are prepared to implement the adolescent friendly health services. Adolescent friendly health services remains a relatively new and sensitive area mainly due to restrictive norms and policies guiding the services. After International Conference on Population and Development in 1994, countries started implementing adolescent friendly health services. The Government of Kenya together with partners in an attempt to address the health challenges came up with the Adolescent package of care (APOC) in 2013 whose guidelines were finalized in November 2014 and released for use by service providers . Despite this package of care, there is still ineffective staff capacity in relation to skills and knowledge gap of health professionals, training needs, health resources as well as health system factors that can affect implementation of AFHS. The study explored ways of mitigating or addressing the barriers to implementation of these services. The study used both quantitative and qualitative approaches to collect data. The study utilized survey research adapting descriptive cross sectional design and semi-structured questionnaire to interview 348 health care providers and 472 adolescents in Mam Lucy Kibaki Hospital from 3rd May 2014 to 16 June 2014. The key informants were mainly nurses, clinical officers and Medical doctors who were working at the health service delivery area at the time of study and were interviewed using an interview guide. The managers at the hospital were interviewed using an in-depth interview guide while the adolescents were interviewed through interview guide and focused

  17. ["Baby cradle coop slots" for abandoned (anonymous) babies: legal problems].

    PubMed

    Riedel, U

    2006-04-01

    It is illegal to propagate or offer anonymous births or to "cradle" abandoned babies in anonymous coop slots ("Babyklappen" in German). Such offers must be rescinded. Offers concerning anonymity of births are ill-suited, since they do not save life. They are unnecessary, because women and children can be assisted even if they are in dire straits, by utilising available help as offered by statutory German child and adolescent aid institutions. Those illegal offers do not solve any problems but create new difficulties and result in lifelong misery for children and parents. Offers for anonymousness create a previously non-existent demand and discredit legal help facilities. Persons assisting anonymous deliveries or recovering "baby cradle" ("Babyklappen") children are obliged to report this to the local registrar's office (in hospitals by the hospital director). Anonymous babies must be immediately reported by hospitals or institutions to local police authorities, and they should be reported to the municipal Youth Office.

  18. Baby Steps to Better Care: One Hospital's Story of Success in Health Care Improvement for Newborns and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minear, Susan; Pedulla, Mary Jo; Philipp, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    Multidisciplinary support for families of newborns is critical for their health and safety. This article describes three programs at one urban hospital which were implemented to (a) improve breastfeeding support, (b) enhance practitioners' observation and communication skills, and (c) provide a comprehensive social response to the urgent…

  19. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  20. Newborn measles antibody profile in a teaching hospital: Can sex of babies determine measles IgG acquisition from their respective mothers?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadu, Baba Usman; Yakubu, Mava; Abdullahi, Ibrahim Bello; Pwavimbo, Ambe Jose; Mahmud, Talba Aliyu; Clapton, Difirwiti Harry

    2013-01-01

    Known sex specific differences in fetal, neonatal morbidity and mortality have been documented. Sex differences also exist in birth-weight centile with males being larger than females at birth. However, these sex differences are not fully explored when studying passive measles immunity acquired by babies from their mothers. Moreover, the mechanisms that confer these sex differences are to a large extent unknown. Therefore, this study assessed sex of babies as a determinant of measles immunoglobulin G acquisition from their respective mothers. One hundred and seventy four newborn babies were enrolled in this study. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure maternal measles antibodies (MMA) from sera collected from these babies at birth. Gestational age of the newborn babies was determined using the Nagele rule, ultrasound scan reports and the Dubowitz criteria. Sex and mean MMA of these babies was compared using the Student’s t test. Significant comparison existed between mean MMA and sex of post term babies (P = 0.000), such that post term males had higher levels of MMA than females. However, overall sex and mean MMA comparison of these babies was not significant (P = 0.977). There were more MMA in male post term babies relative to their female peers; however, overall sex comparison of MMA was not significant. Therefore, there is the need for further study.

  1. Newborn measles antibody profile in a teaching hospital: Can sex of babies determine measles IgG acquisition from their respective mothers?

    PubMed

    Ahmadu, Baba Usman; Yakubu, Mava; Abdullahi, Ibrahim Bello; Pwavimbo, Ambe Jose; Mahmud, Talba Aliyu; Clapton, Difirwiti Harry

    2013-03-01

    Known sex specific differences in fetal, neonatal morbidity and mortality have been documented. Sex differences also exist in birth-weight centile with males being larger than females at birth. However, these sex differences are not fully explored when studying passive measles immunity acquired by babies from their mothers. Moreover, the mechanisms that confer these sex differences are to a large extent unknown. Therefore, this study assessed sex of babies as a determinant of measles immunoglobulin G acquisition from their respective mothers. One hundred and seventy four newborn babies were enrolled in this study. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure maternal measles antibodies (MMA) from sera collected from these babies at birth. Gestational age of the newborn babies was determined using the Nagele rule, ultrasound scan reports and the Dubowitz criteria. Sex and mean MMA of these babies was compared using the Student's t test. Significant comparison existed between mean MMA and sex of post term babies (P = 0.000), such that post term males had higher levels of MMA than females. However, overall sex and mean MMA comparison of these babies was not significant (P = 0.977). There were more MMA in male post term babies relative to their female peers; however, overall sex comparison of MMA was not significant. Therefore, there is the need for further study. PMID:27625835

  2. Gender Issues in Parenting Cleft Lip and Palate Babies in Southern Nigeria: A Study of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umweni, A. A.; Okeigbemen, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    There is a scarcity of studies on gender issues in parenting cleft lip and palate (CLAP) babies. The birth of a CLAP child presents an immediate visible handicap that is distressing to parents. The aims and objectives of this study are to determine the influence of gender on the attitude of parents on the birth of CLAP babies, to articulate the…

  3. Babies and shots

    MedlinePlus

    Babies and vaccines; Babies and immunizations; Babies and vaccinations; Chickenpox - shots; DTaP - shots; Hepatitis A - shots; Hepatitis B - shots; Hib - shots; Haemophilus influenza - shots; Influenza - shots; Meningococcal - ...

  4. Babies and heat rashes

    MedlinePlus

    Heat rashes and babies; Prickly heat rash; Red miliaria ... To avoid heat rash , keep your baby cool and dry during warm weather. Some helpful suggestions: During the hot season, dress your baby in lightweight, soft, cotton clothing. Cotton ...

  5. Breastfeeding Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ029 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Breastfeeding Your Baby • How long should I breastfeed my baby? • How does breastfeeding benefit my baby? • How does breastfeeding benefit me? • ...

  6. Shaken baby symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby syndrome is a severe form of head injury caused by the baby's brain rebounding inside of the baby's skull when shaken. In this injury there is bruising of the brain, swelling, pressure, and bleeding (intracerebral hemorrhage). This can ...

  7. Postnatal Support Strategies for Improving Rates of Exclusive Breastfeeding in Case of Caesarean Baby.

    PubMed

    Jesmin, E; Chowdhury, R B; Begum, S; Shapla, N R; Shahida, S M

    2015-10-01

    Despite awarness of the many advantages of breast feeding exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) rate is still lower than recommended practice and the rate is less in case of caesarean baby. In an effort towards achieving better breast feeding practices, UNICEF and WHO launched the baby friendly hospital initiative in 1991 to ensure that all maternity facilities support mothers in making the best choice about feeding. The implementation of effective programs improves rates of short and long term exclusive breast feeding even in case of caesarean baby. The objective of present study was to investigate whether postnatal support improves the rate of exclusive breast feeding in case of caesarean baby compared with usual hospital care. This was a longitudinal study over one and half year period, from April 2009 to October 2011 done in Combined Military Hospital in Mymensingh. A total of 565 pregnant women were included this study. Primary outcome was early establishment of breast feeding after caesarean section. Secondary outcome was exclusive breast feeding at discharge from hospital, two weeks and six weeks after caesarean section delivery. Early establishment of breast feeding within one hour after caesarean section was higher in postnatal support group than usual care group (70.29% vs. 57.14%). Rates of exclusive breastfeeding in the postnatal support strategies group were significantly higher when compared with those who received usual hospital care at discharge (89.13% vs. 75.94%, p=0.004), at 2 weeks (85.51% vs. 53.38%, p<0.001) and at 6 weeks (74.64% vs. 38.35%, p<0.001). Postnatal lactation support, as single intervention based in hospital significantly improves rates of exclusive breast feeding.

  8. Immunizations for Preterm Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Immunizations For Preterm Babies Page Content Some parents of ... full-term and preterm babies. The hepatitis B vaccine deserves special mention. In most circumstances, the AAP ...

  9. Bonding with Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... middle-of-the-night feeding and diaper change reading or singing to baby giving the baby a ...

  10. Breastfeed Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips 9 of 10 sections Take Action: Vitamin D Give your baby vitamin D. Babies need vitamin D for healthy bone growth. Even if you take extra vitamin D, your breast milk won’t provide enough vitamin ...

  11. Your Colicky Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... of swallowing too much air while crying. Some theories suggest that colic happens when food moves too ... baby's digestive system or is incompletely digested. Other theories are that colic is due to a baby's ...

  12. The Physics of Babies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemella, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Since the 2011 birth of my daughter I have been a 100% as a stay-at-home dad and 50% researcher. My ``Routine Adventures'' in the baby universe are the subject of this fun talk that presents the unique challenges of baby physics. Topics include ``Schroedinger's Baby'' and ``The Entropy of Rice.''

  13. Field trials of the Baby Check score card in general practice.

    PubMed

    Morley, C J; Thornton, A J; Green, S J; Cole, T J

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen general practitioners (GPs) used the Baby Check score card to assess illness severity in 86 babies under 6 months old. Their reactions to Baby Check were positive: in 79 (92%) it gave an accurate assessment of the baby's illness and 16 (100%) said they would trust it. Fifteen (94%) found it useful, and most of those who did not said the baby was not ill or had an obvious diagnosis. Thirteen (81%) said they would use it and wanted their health visitors and midwives to use it and 15 (94%) wanted the mothers in their practice to use it. The majority (64%) of babies scored 0-7; 31% scored 8 to 19; and only 5% scored over 20. Well babies had low scores, while the two sickest babies, needing urgent hospital treatment, scored 29 and 33. The use of Baby Check by GPs would help them assess babies thoroughly and quantify illness severity objectively.

  14. Early Mother/Baby Contact: Consequences/Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorster, de Wet

    To assess the effect of early mother-infant proximity on later stress and behavior, two studies were made which involved a sample of mother-baby pairs that was larger than samples utilized in previous studies. In Study 1, involving 300 consecutive mother-baby couples at the Maternity Hospital in Plymouth, England clinical medical officers used a…

  15. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  16. Babies and Briefcases: Creating a Family-Friendly Workplace for Fathers. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    Hearings on family-friendly workplaces for fathers were held in an effort to help create a corporate culture that allows fathers to take advantage of and support different workplace policies. Fathers' impact on children's development, and the reasons why it is important for fathers to be part of the parenting process, are examined. Representative…

  17. The Baby Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Darby L.; Verdeyen, Tasha B.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a project about babies undertaken by a class of children ranging in age from 2.9 years to 3.9 years old in a small Illinois town. Throughout this project, the children studied equipment and supplies needed to care for babies. They made dolls for the classroom, constructed a cradle, made observational drawings, created topic…

  18. MotherToBaby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Explore Fact Sheets 1 Check Out Our Latest Facebook Posts MotherToBaby 4 hours ago If you are ... part of your routine. If you... View on Facebook · Share MotherToBaby 2 days ago A powerful piece ...

  19. Hepatology in the 21st century. Gene transfer, hepatocyte transplantation, DNA chips, cyberspace and ... a friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P L

    1999-12-01

    What to expect for hepatology in the 21st century? If science is allowed to proceed at its current rate, expectations can hardly be underestimated. Bound by the present day's limitations we are only able to see a glimpse of what could be available 100 years from now. For the next few decades, the global eradication of viral hepatitis will be on the agenda. For the treatment of inherited and acquired metabolic, toxic and immune liver disease, targeted drugs, genes and antisense oligonucleotides will be added to our therapeutic repertoire. The completion of the human genome project in 2003 will have far-reaching consequences: the widespread use of prenatal diagnosis, using DNA chip technology, may be expected to cause a dramatic decrease in the incidence of inherited diseases. Liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and inborn errors of metabolism may be treated by gene transfer or gene repair therapy. Although eventually these developments may decrease the need for organ transplantation, this by no means is the case yet and no solution is available for an increased demand and a decreased supply of organs. In the long run, diseases caused by multi-drug-resistant infectious agents and diseases associated with the abuse of alcohol and drugs are expected to become major problems. The future of university-based research is uncertain. The staggering costs of research and limited career possibilities may force universities to the limited task of higher education, with as a result biotech companies, shareholders and corporate finance ruling the scientific waves in the next century. The 21st century patient will know the way in cyberspace and will go shopping for the best doctor, for the best treatment and for the best, or friendliest, hospital. PMID:10628176

  20. Mother-baby package.

    PubMed

    Tamburlini, G

    1995-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme developed the Mother-Baby package to facilitate the development of national strategies and plans of action. It was presented at an international meeting in Geneva in April 1994. The goals of the package are by the year 2000 to reduce maternal mortality by half and perinatal and neonatal mortality by 30-40% of 1990 levels. The package comprises: 1) a section on the technical basis and underlying strategies, 2) a section describing intervention before and during pregnancy, and during and after delivery, and 3) detailed recommendations on operating the program. The underlying strategy aims to reduce the number of high-risk and unwanted pregnancies; the number of obstetric complications; and the case fatality rate in women with complications. Interventions are based on a fourfold approach of family planning, quality antenatal care, clean and safe delivery, and access to essential obstetric care for high-risk pregnancies and complications. The district health system is the basic unit for planning and implementing the interventions. Midwives who live in the community are best equipped to provide appropriate community-based care to pregnant women. Pregnancy and obstetric complications requiring surgery and anesthesia should be available in the district hospital with an adequate referral system. Upgrading the skills of traditional birth attendants is also essential. National authorities should undertake a series of steps to carry out the interventions. A basic infrastructure, the upgrading of peripheral facilities, the development of human resources for safe motherhood, the effective delegation of responsibility, information, education, and communication (IEC), the involvement of nongovernmental organizations and women's groups, and the monitoring of results are other important elements in carrying out the interventions.

  1. Bringing Your Baby Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid suffocation. Chances are much better that you'll bring home a calm, contented baby if you ... by the manufacturer before the second birthday, you'll need to use a convertible seat designed for ...

  2. Shaken Baby Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Randell C.; Smith, Wilbur L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the history, epidemiology, biomechanics, diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, long-term management, and prevention of shaken baby syndrome. It presents medical-legal issues as well as a discussion of programs aimed at prevention of physical abuse. (Author/DB)

  3. Baby supplies you need

    MedlinePlus

    ... because some babies are sensitive to them. Vaseline (petroleum jelly): good to prevent diaper rash, and to ... 2014 Updated by: Cynthia D. White, MD, Fellow American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Group Health Cooperative, ...

  4. How Your Baby Grows

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain, the heart and lungs, are forming. The placenta grows in your uterus and supplies the baby ... like alcohol, cigarette smoke and drugs through the placenta, too. So don’t drink alcohol , smoke , use ...

  5. Isospinning baby Skyrmion solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Haberichter, Mareike

    2013-12-01

    We perform full two-dimensional (2D) numerical relaxations of isospinning soliton solutions in the baby Skyrme model in which the global O(3) symmetry is broken by the 2D analogue of the pion mass term in the Skyrme model. In our calculations we explicitly allow the isospinning solitons to deform and to break the symmetries of the static configurations. We find that stable isospinning baby Skyrme solutions can be constructed numerically for all angular frequencies ω≤min⁡(μ,1), where μ is the mass parameter of the model. Stable, rotationally symmetric baby Skyrmion solutions for higher angular velocities are simply an artefact of the hedgehog approximation. Isospinning multisoliton solutions of topological charge B turn out to be unstable to break up into their B charge-1 constituents at some critical breakup frequency value. Furthermore, we find that for μ sufficiently large the rotational symmetry of charge-2 baby Skyrmions becomes broken at a critical angular frequency ω.

  6. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... old, most babies have developed the fine motor skills — the small, precise movements — needed to pick up ... practice soon evolves into a masterful and efficient skill. Allow your child to self-feed as much ...

  7. Shaken Baby Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Shaken Baby Syndrome ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  8. Infants & Toddlers: "Baby Moves"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2007-01-01

    By three to four months of age, most babies placed on their tummies on a safe, warm surface push down with their arms and raise their chests, so that they can turn their heads to look about at the world around them. By five months, babies stretch both feet and hands upward in order to swipe at interesting mobiles placed overhead. At seven to nine…

  9. Baby universes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Barkley, J.; Budd, T.; Loll, R.

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of baby universes has been an important ingredient in understanding and quantifying non-critical string theory or, equivalently, models of two-dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity coupled to matter. Within a regularized description based on dynamical triangulations, we amend an earlier conjecture by Jain and Mathur on the scaling behavior of genus-g surfaces containing particular baby universe 'necks', and perform a non-trivial numerical check on our improved conjecture.

  10. Baby factories taint surrogacy in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Makinde, Olufunmbi Olukemi; Olaleye, Olalekan; Brown, Brandon; Odimegwu, Clifford O

    2016-01-01

    The practice of reproductive medicine in Nigeria is facing new challenges with the proliferation of 'baby factories'. Baby factories are buildings, hospitals or orphanages that have been converted into places for young girls and women to give birth to children for sale on the black market, often to infertile couples, or into trafficking rings. This practice illegally provides outcomes (children) similar to surrogacy. While surrogacy has not been well accepted in this environment, the proliferation of baby factories further threatens its acceptance. The involvement of medical and allied health workers in the operation of baby factories raises ethical concerns. The lack of a properly defined legal framework and code of practice for surrogacy makes it difficult to prosecute baby factory owners, especially when they are health workers claiming to be providing services to clients. In this environment, surrogacy and other assisted reproductive techniques urgently require regulation in order to define when ethico-legal lines have been crossed in providing surrogacy or surrogacy-like services. PMID:26602942

  11. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option. PMID:19857299

  12. When Babies Scream: Why Babies Scream and What to Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    When a baby screams, that is a signal that all is not well for the body of the baby, for her emotional well-being, and/or for the baby's relationship with the teacher. During the first year of life, infants learn that adults are in control of providing reassuring care. Adults will "make things better" when a baby's tummy feels horribly empty, when…

  13. The History and Examination of the Shaken Baby Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaton, Scott Larue

    2013-01-01

    The History and Examination of the Shaken Baby Project looks at the use of a Child Abuse prevention program at a Southwestern Community Hospital. The origination of the program is researched that uncovers the inception of the curriculum used in the medical facility. The Administrative and Hospital Staff are surveyed to determine their viewpoint to…

  14. Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Zika & Pregnancy Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before Birth KidsHealth > For Parents > Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before ... A Text Size Prenatal Surgery: Helping Babies Before Birth Operating on a baby before birth may seem ...

  15. The baby killers are still at large.

    PubMed

    Power, J

    1994-08-12

    This newspaper editorial reports that the UN Children's Fund's (UNICEF) executive director and recent US Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient believes that 1.5 million infants would survive annually if breast feeding declines worldwide were reversed. UNICEF adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in the World Health Assembly in 1981. The code restricts direct advertising, inadequate labels, saleswomen dressed as nurses, and promotion of free samples. The Baby Food Action Network is reported to have released a report which states that baby food companies are still donating free supplies of infant formula to hospitals. The UNICEF position is that provision of free supplies is the most important disincentive to breast feeding. 81 governments adopted the guidelines, but 41 countries have hospitals which accept free samples. 28 of these 41 countries adopted the ban. The Nestle Company, which was cited 20 years age for this practice, won the legal battle and today defies the guidelines in 22 countries, including China, Zimbabwe, and Bangladesh. A US company, Mead Johnson, uses advertising on its label that shows Beatrice Potter's Peter Rabbit being bottle fed. The International Code restricts idealization of bottle feeding. Nutrician, a large conglomerate ownership of US and European infant formula companies, brazenly advertises in the Peruvian daily newspapers with photos of baby milk boxes being donated to hospitals. Dr. Derek Jelliffe, an infant nutritionist, is credited with being the first to publicize the dangers of commercialized malnutrition 21 years ago. PMID:12319575

  16. Assessing the Quality of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care: The State of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    The author explores the extent to which infants and toddlers are regularly in the care of nonparental relatives, friends, and neighbors and notes the limited research on the quality of care provided by family, friends, and neighbors. (Note: This article is an excerpt from "Who's Watching the Babies?: Improving the Quality of Family, Friend, and…

  17. Positioning your baby for breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adjust your baby's position if you need to. FOOTBALL HOLD Use the football hold if you had a C-section. This ... large breasts or flat nipples also like the football hold. Hold your baby like a football. Tuck ...

  18. Health Issues of Premature Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... because the lungs of preterm babies often lack surfactant, a liquid substance that allows the lungs to remain expanded. Treatment: Artificial surfactants can be used to treat these babies, along ...

  19. Boosting Your Baby's Brain Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel-Smothers, Holly; Heim, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    With more than 100 billion neurons that would stretch more than 60,000 miles, a newborn baby's brain is quite phenomenal! These neurons must generally form connections within the first eight months of a baby's life to foster optimal brain growth and lifelong learning. Mommies, daddies, and caregivers are extremely vital to ensuring babies reach…

  20. Bah's Baby Brother Is Born.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapahonso, Luci

    This illustrated story, written for Native American children, stresses the importance of not drinking alcohol and taking care of oneself during pregnancy. The story centers on Bah, a young Native American girl whose mother is going to have a baby. Bah is very excited about getting a baby brother or sister and wants the baby to be healthy and…

  1. No Baby Left behind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Dorothy

    2007-01-01

    "No Baby Left Behind" was created to have an impact on the school readiness of children in the community today and in the future. Each year, there are an increasing number of students who have learning difficulties. Many of these problems are preventable. Accidents, poor nutrition (of the mother and/or child), drug use, alcohol use, and lack of…

  2. Improving hospital breastfeeding policies in New York State: development of the model hospital breastfeeding policy.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Bethany A; Dennison, Barbara A; Hisgen, Stephanie

    2013-02-01

    The public health importance of breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding, is gaining increased recognition. Despite a strong evidence base that key hospital maternity practices (Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding) impact breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity in the hospital and breastfeeding duration post-discharge, they are not widely implemented. In 2009, written hospital breastfeeding policies were collected from all New York State (NYS) hospitals providing maternity care services (n=139). A systematic assessment of the policies found that, on average, approximately half (19/32) the components required under NYS hospital regulations were included. Inclusion of each of the Ten Steps varied from 14% to 98%. An evidence-based Model Hospital Breastfeeding Policy was developed that included required components (based on NYS hospital regulations and legislation) and recommendations from expert groups such as the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, Baby Friendly USA, Inc., and the United States Breastfeeding Committee. Improved hospital breastfeeding policies are a critical first step in improving hospital maternity care to better promote, support, and protect breastfeeding. Additional efforts throughout health care, the workplace, and the broader community will be required to make breastfeeding the norm.

  3. Aloof baby Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Petja; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We show that a suitable choice for the potential term in the two-dimensional baby Skyrme model yields solitons that have a short-range repulsion and a long-range attraction. The solitons are therefore aloof, in the sense that static multi-soliton bound states have constituents that preserve their individual identities and are sufficiently far apart that tail interactions yield small binding energies. The static multi-soliton solutions are found to have a cluster structure that is reproduced by a simple binary species particle model. In the standard three-dimensional Skyrme model of nuclei, solitons are too tightly bound and are often too symmetric, due to symmetry enhancement as solitons coalesce to form bound states. The aloof baby Skyrmion results endorse a way to resolve these issues and provides motivation for a detailed study of the related three-dimensional version of the Skyrme model.

  4. Babies and the moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepker, Terrence P.

    2000-02-01

    ``More babies are born under a full moon than at any other time.'' Many of us have heard this assertion, and a few years ago I tried to get data that would support it. The note ``A Lesson in Curve Fitting'' by Scott Calvin (Phys. Teach. 37, 340, Sept. 1999) provoked me to pass some of the data on to readers of The Physics Teacher.

  5. "Baby rattle" pelvis dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cormier-Daire, V; Savarirayan, R; Lachman, R S; Neidich, J A; Grace, K; Rimoin, D L; Wilcox, W R

    2001-04-15

    We report an apparently previously undescribed lethal skeletal dysplasia, clinically resembling achondrogenesis, but with distinct radiologic and chondro-osseous morphologic features. These comprise bifid distal ends of the long bones of the limbs, absent vertebral body ossification, a unique "baby rattle" pelvic configuration with tall and broad ilia, absent endochondral ossification, regions of mesenchymal cells within the resting cartilage, and abnormal mesenchymal ossification. PMID:11337746

  6. On the death of a baby.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, R; Stinson, P

    1981-01-01

    Andrew was a desperately premature baby weighing under two pounds. He died after months of "heroic' efforts in an intensive care facility. The story of his short cruel institutionalised life is a case study in the limits and excesses of modern medicine. The night he told us our son Andrew was about to die the doctor who had taken charge of him six months before also told us we were "intellectually tight' that we had "no feelings only thoughts and words and strategies'. We were "bad parents'. As the parents of a five-year-old daughter we knew the love a mother and father feels for children. Yet as Andrew's parents we were used to condemnation and insult. Andrew was a baby born 15 weeks prematurely weighing only 1lb 12oz and in a state of painful deterioration almost from the start. We wanted him to be allowed to die a natural death. Andrew's story is the story of what can happen when a baby becomes hopelessly entrapped in an intensive care unit where the machinery is more sophisticated than the code of law and ethics governing its use. The letter printed below was sent to the administrator and numerous personnel of the hospital that controlled the life and death of our son. The physician-in-chief of that hospital characterised it as a "carefully documented critique'. The letter appear here somewhat edited and abridged and the names of people and institutions have been changed all but our own. It is the personal record of what happened to our baby and to us. PMID:7205897

  7. [Baby online to support the mother-baby relationship in neonatalogy].

    PubMed

    Durand, Marie-France; Biondini, Christophe; Boyer, Christelle

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal separations are always harmful to the development of the parent/baby relationship. At Alès general hospital, the Bébé online scheme enables live images to be transmitted remotely and safely between maternity wards and neonatalogy, physically distant from each other. Supervised by the nursing team, it supports the attachment process by giving parents the possibility of maintainingvisual contact with their newborn.

  8. [Manufactured baby food: safety expectations].

    PubMed

    Davin, L; Van Egroo, L-D; Galesne, N

    2010-12-01

    Food safety is a concern for parents of infants, and healthcare professionals are often questioned by them about this topic. Baby food European regulation ensures high levels of safety and is more rigorous than common food regulation. Maximal limit for pesticides in baby food demonstrates the high level of requirements. This limit must be below the 10 ppb detection threshold, whatever the chemical used. Other contaminants such as nitrates are also the subject of greater expectations in baby food. Food safety risks control needs a specific know-how that baby food manufacturers have acquired and experienced, more particularly by working with producers of high quality raw material.

  9. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  10. Mapping the Baby Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    In June, NASA plans to launch the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) to survey the ancient radiation in unprecedented detail. MAP will map slight temperature fluctuations within the microwave background that vary by only 0.00001 C across a chilly radiation that now averages 2.73 C above absolute zero. The temperature differences today point back to density differences in the fiery baby universe, in which there was a little more matter here and a little less matter there. Areas of slightly enhanced density had stronger gravity than low-density areas. The high-density areas pulled back on the background radiation, making it appear slightly cooler in those directions.

  11. Feeding Tips For Your Baby with CHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a combination of breast- and bottle-feeding. Breast-Feeding Your Baby If your baby is diagnosed with ... use too. If your baby needs surgery after breast-feeding has been established, you can pump your breasts ...

  12. Your baby in the birth canal

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby's head to pass through the pelvis. Internal Rotation As your baby's head descends further, the head ... rotates under and around the pubic bone. External Rotation As the baby's head is delivered, it will ...

  13. Baby universes with induced gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yihong; Gao, Hongbo

    1989-12-01

    Some quantum effects of baby universes with induced gravity are discussed. The authors prove that the interactions between the baby-parent universes are non-local, and argue that the induced low-energy cosmological constant is zero. This argument does not depend on the detail of the induced potential.

  14. Linking Data for Mothers and Babies in De-Identified Electronic Health Data

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ruth; Cromwell, David; van der Meulen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Linkage of longitudinal administrative data for mothers and babies supports research and service evaluation in several populations around the world. We established a linked mother-baby cohort using pseudonymised, population-level data for England. Design and Setting Retrospective linkage study using electronic hospital records of mothers and babies admitted to NHS hospitals in England, captured in Hospital Episode Statistics between April 2001 and March 2013. Results Of 672,955 baby records in 2012/13, 280,470 (42%) linked deterministically to a maternal record using hospital, GP practice, maternal age, birthweight, gestation, birth order and sex. A further 380,164 (56%) records linked using probabilistic methods incorporating additional variables that could differ between mother/baby records (admission dates, ethnicity, 3/4-character postcode district) or that include missing values (delivery variables). The false-match rate was estimated at 0.15% using synthetic data. Data quality improved over time: for 2001/02, 91% of baby records were linked (holding the estimated false-match rate at 0.15%). The linked cohort was representative of national distributions of gender, gestation, birth weight and maternal age, and captured approximately 97% of births in England. Conclusion Probabilistic linkage of maternal and baby healthcare characteristics offers an efficient way to enrich maternity data, improve data quality, and create longitudinal cohorts for research and service evaluation. This approach could be extended to linkage of other datasets that have non-disclosive characteristics in common. PMID:27764135

  15. Shaken baby syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, I

    2002-01-01

    Shaken baby syndrome is the most common cause of death or serious neurological injury resulting from child abuse. It is specific to infancy, when children have unique anatomic features. Subdural and retinal haemorrhages are markers of shaking injury. An American radiologist, John Caffey, coined the name whiplash shaken infant syndrome in 1974. It was, however, a British neurosurgeon, Guthkelch who first described shaking as the cause of subdural haemorrhage in infants. Impact was later thought to play a major part in the causation of brain damage. Recently improved neuropathology and imaging techniques have established the cause of brain injury as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive and specific method of confirming a shaking injury. Families of children with subdural haemorrhages should be thoroughly investigated by social welfare agencies. PMID:12509690

  16. [Shaken baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reith, W; Yilmaz, U; Kraus, C

    2016-05-01

    The shaken baby syndrome (SBS) or shaking trauma describes the occurrence of subdural hematoma, retinal hemorrhage and diffuse injury to the brain by vigorous shaking of an infant that has a poor prognosis. Rapid cranial acceleration and deceleration leads to tearing of bridging veins, retinal hemorrhages and diffuse brain injuries. In addition to clinical symptoms, such as irritability, feeding difficulties, somnolence, apathy, seizures, apnea and temperature regulation disorders, vomiting also occurs due to increased intracranial pressure. Milder forms of SBS often go undiagnosed and the number of unreported cases (grey area) is probably much higher. Up to 20 % of patients die within days or weeks due to SBS and survivors often show cognitive deficits and clinical symptoms, such as physical disabilities, impaired hearing, impaired vision up to blindness, epilepsy and mental retardation as well as a combination of these conditions; therefore, prevention is very important.

  17. [Shaken baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reith, W; Yilmaz, U; Kraus, C

    2016-05-01

    The shaken baby syndrome (SBS) or shaking trauma describes the occurrence of subdural hematoma, retinal hemorrhage and diffuse injury to the brain by vigorous shaking of an infant that has a poor prognosis. Rapid cranial acceleration and deceleration leads to tearing of bridging veins, retinal hemorrhages and diffuse brain injuries. In addition to clinical symptoms, such as irritability, feeding difficulties, somnolence, apathy, seizures, apnea and temperature regulation disorders, vomiting also occurs due to increased intracranial pressure. Milder forms of SBS often go undiagnosed and the number of unreported cases (grey area) is probably much higher. Up to 20 % of patients die within days or weeks due to SBS and survivors often show cognitive deficits and clinical symptoms, such as physical disabilities, impaired hearing, impaired vision up to blindness, epilepsy and mental retardation as well as a combination of these conditions; therefore, prevention is very important. PMID:27118366

  18. In re Baby M.

    PubMed

    1988-02-01

    In 1985 William Stern and Mary Beth Whitehead signed a surrogate parenting agreement which provided that Whitehead would be inseminated with Stern's semen and would surrender any resulting child to him and his wife, at which time she would be paid $10,000. Whitehead subsequently tried to keep the child, but the New Jersey Superior Court (Chancery Division/Family Part, Bergen County) awarded temporary custody of "Baby M" to the Sterns and then ruled on 31 March 1987 that the surrogacy contract was valid and that Stern should have sole custody, with Whitehead's parental rights to be terminated and Mrs. Stern given the right to adopt the child. In the current decision, the New Jersey Supreme Court upholds the awarding of custody to Mr. Stern as in the child's best interest, but holds the contract to be unenforceable and restores Whitehead's parental rights, leaving the terms of her visitation rights as noncustodial parent to be established by the trial court.

  19. Isorotating baby Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halavanau, A.; Shnir, Ya.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss how internal rotation with fixed angular frequency can affect the solitons in the baby Skyrme model in which the global O(3) symmetry is broken to the SO(2). Two particular choices of the potential term are considered, the “old” potential and the “new” double vacuum potential, We do not impose any assumptions about the symmetry on the fields. Our results confirm existence of two types of instabilities determined by the relation between the mass parameter of the potential μ and the angular frequency ω. It is shown that multi-Skyrmions in the model with old potential at some critical value of the angular frequency become unstable with respect to decay into single Skyrmion constituents.

  20. "BABY, BABY I'VE GOT HEADACHE".

    PubMed

    Kaiksow, F A; Bhatnagar, D

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with no prior medical history presented post-partum with altered mental status. She had no complications during pregnancy and had a spontaneous vaginal delivery at term one week prior. On post-partum day five, she began complaining of headaches, initially responsive to ibuprofen but eventually worsened with no relief. On the evening of admission, her boyfriend noted strange behavior and movements consistent with a tonic-clonic seizure. On the way to the hospital, she had two more similar seizures witnessed by emergency medical serevices (EMS). EMS reported her blood pressures in route to be 200/100s. She was given 5 mg of magnesium by EMS due to concern for postpartum eclampsia. Upon arrival at the emergency room, she was somnolent but arousable although unable to answer any questions. She was mildly tachycardic at 106 beats per minute and had a temperature of 38.2°C. Her blood pressure was elevated at 165/95 mm Hg. On exam, dried blood was noted on her lips and her tongue was swollen. On auscultation, she was tachycardic with clear lung sounds. Her abdomen was soft and non-tender and there was no vaginal bleeding or other discharge. Laboratory values revealed a sodium of 142, potassium of 3.3, chloride of 110, bicarbonate of 16, creatinine of 1.1, magnesium of 3.9, and white blood cell count of 12.3 x103/mm3 with 88% neutrophils and no bands. A toxicology panel was negative for opiates, benzodiazepines, or other illicit drugs. Urine was remarkable for large blood, 448 red blood cells, protein, moderate leukocyte esterase, and 73 white blood cells. Chest x-ray and CT scan of the head were both normal. She was admitted to the medical intensive care unit for close monitoring, neurological checks, and continued magnesium administration. By hospital day two, her mental status had improved significantly. PMID:27159471

  1. Working with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers: Lessons from Four Diverse Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    This article is excerpted from "Who's Watching the Babies? Improving the Quality of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care" by Douglas R. Powell ("ZERO TO THREE," 2008). The article explores questions about program development and implementation strategies for supporting Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) caregivers: How do programs and their host…

  2. What do parents expect antenatally and do babies teach them?

    PubMed Central

    Delight, E; Goodall, J; Jones, P W

    1991-01-01

    Antenatal inquiry of 658 parents in the North Staffordshire District Health Authority showed at least 13% to lack knowledge about a baby's potential for personal interaction when under 1 week old. Mothers and fathers varied significantly, independent of parity. Experienced parents expected later smiles. Two hundred and seventy eight of the same families were questioned three to four months after birth. Most parents had observed their baby's early responsiveness. Specific responses (Looking, listening) were noted earlier when anticipated and looked for. Significant among postnatal non-responders was their antenatal selection of predominantly impersonal stimulation for a baby. The greatest degree of warmth noted in postnatal observations correlated notably with a father's antenatal interest and postnatal support from him and their friends, a mother's commitment to breast feeding and her knowledge that a very young baby can see, like faces, and cries for emotional reasons. This highlights areas for antenatal tuition and postnatal encouragement, aiming to enhance warm early mutual regard between parents and child. PMID:1755644

  3. What do parents expect antenatally and do babies teach them?

    PubMed

    Delight, E; Goodall, J; Jones, P W

    1991-11-01

    Antenatal inquiry of 658 parents in the North Staffordshire District Health Authority showed at least 13% to lack knowledge about a baby's potential for personal interaction when under 1 week old. Mothers and fathers varied significantly, independent of parity. Experienced parents expected later smiles. Two hundred and seventy eight of the same families were questioned three to four months after birth. Most parents had observed their baby's early responsiveness. Specific responses (Looking, listening) were noted earlier when anticipated and looked for. Significant among postnatal non-responders was their antenatal selection of predominantly impersonal stimulation for a baby. The greatest degree of warmth noted in postnatal observations correlated notably with a father's antenatal interest and postnatal support from him and their friends, a mother's commitment to breast feeding and her knowledge that a very young baby can see, like faces, and cries for emotional reasons. This highlights areas for antenatal tuition and postnatal encouragement, aiming to enhance warm early mutual regard between parents and child. PMID:1755644

  4. Rourke Baby Record 2014

    PubMed Central

    Riverin, Bruno; Li, Patricia; Rourke, Leslie; Leduc, Denis; Rourke, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To update the 2011 edition of the Rourke Baby Record (RBR) by reviewing current best evidence on health supervision of infants and children from birth to 5 years of age. Quality of evidence The quality of evidence was rated with the former (until 2006) Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care classification system and GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation) approach. Main message New evidence has been incorporated into the 2014 RBR recommendations related to growth monitoring, nutrition, education and advice, development, physical examination, and immunization. Growth is monitored with the World Health Organization growth charts that were revised in 2014. Infants’ introduction to solid foods should be based on infant readiness and include iron-containing food products. Delaying introduction to common food allergens is not currently recommended to prevent food allergies. At 12 months of age, use of an open cup instead of a sippy cup should be promoted. The education and advice section counsels on injuries from unstable furniture and on the use of rear-facing car seats until age 2, and also includes information on healthy sleep habits, prevention of child maltreatment, family healthy active living and sedentary behaviour, and oral health. The education and advice section has also added a new environmental health category to account for the effects of environmental hazards on child health. The RBR uses broad developmental surveillance to recognize children who might be at risk of developmental delays. Verifying tongue mobility and patency of the anus is included in the physical examination during the first well-baby visit. The 2014 RBR also provides updates regarding the measles-mumps-rubella, live attenuated influenza, and human papillomavirus vaccines. Conclusion The 2014 RBR is the most recent update of a longstanding evidence-based, practical knowledge translation tool with related Web-based resources

  5. Colostrum: Your Baby's First Meal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your ... Your Baby's First Meal Page Content Article Body Colostrum provides all the nutrients and fluid that your newborn needs in the early days, ...

  6. Shaken Baby Syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Mian, Maha; Shah, Janki; Dalpiaz, Amanda; Schwamb, Richard; Miao, Yimei; Warren, Kelly; Khan, Sardar

    2015-06-01

    Shaken Baby Syndrome occurs in infants as a result of the brain pushing against the skull due to severe acceleration-deceleration forces. Symptoms of Shaken Baby Syndrome include subdural, subarachnoid, and retinal hemorrhages. MRI and ocular examinations are used to determine the extent of mental and visual damage and β-amyloid precursor protein immunohistochemical staining is used to detect axonal injuries. Surgeries such as Subdural hemorrhage (SDH) evacuation surgery and the Burr hole craniotomy are used to treat Shaken Baby Syndrome; however, the prognosis is poor in many cases. Because of the severity of Shaken Baby Syndrome and its traumatic and sometimes fatal effects, it is important to educate new parents, nurses, and doctors on the syndrome in order to prevent incidents.

  7. The Baby Boomers’ Intergenerational Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Pillemer, Karl A.; Silverstein, Merril; Suitor, J. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As Baby Boomers enter late life, relationships with family members gain importance. This review article highlights two aspects of their intergenerational relationships: (a) caregiving for aging parents and (b) interactions with adult children in the context of changing marital dynamics. Design and Methods: The researchers describe three studies: (a) the Within Family Differences Study (WFDS) of mothers aged 65–75 and their multiple grown children (primarily Baby Boomers) ongoing since 2001; (b) the Family Exchanges Study (FES) of Baby Boomers aged 42–60, their spouses, parents, and multiple grown children ongoing since 2008; and (c) the Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSoG) of 351 three-generation families started when the Baby Boomers were teenagers in 1971, with interviews every 3–5 years from 1985 to 2005. Results: These studies show that the Baby Boomers in midlife navigate complex intergenerational patterns. The WFDS finds aging parents differentiate among Baby Boomer children in midlife, favoring some more than others. The FES shows that the Baby Boomers are typically more involved with their children than with their aging parents; Boomers’ personal values, family members’ needs, and personal rewards shape decisions about support. The LSoG documents how divorce and remarriage dampen intergenerational obligations in some families. Moreover, loosening cultural norms have weakened family bonds in general. Implications: Reviews of these studies provide insights into how the Baby Boomers may negotiate caregiving for aging parents as well as the likelihood of family care they will receive when their own health declines in the future. PMID:22250130

  8. Breastfeeding status and marketing practices of baby food manufactured in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Mathur, G P; Pandey, P K; Mathur, S; Mishra, V K; Singh, K; Bhatt, O P; Loomba, R K; Luthra, C; Taneja, S; Kapoor, R

    1993-11-01

    In January 1993 in Kanpur, India, a survey of 7 private nursing homes revealed that infant formula was given to most newborns (52.4%). The most common brands included Lactogen-I, Milk Care, Raptakos, Dexolac Special Care, and Lactodex. Staff at 5 nursing homes gave prelacteal feeds (water, glucose water, and infant formula) to newborns when they were separated from their mothers. Staff at only 2 nursing homes gave the newborn to the mother immediately after delivery. The longest period between delivery and giving the newborn to the mother was 24 hours. All but one of the nursing homes did not know about the government policy and the recent bill that bars free or low-cost infant formula supplies to hospitals. The administration of the nursing homes did not inform the procurement department, in writing, of the government policy. 4 nursing homes bought low-cost supplies of infant formula from the companies. The companies sold the infant formula to the nursing homes at a price 48.3% to 86.7% lower than the market price. Medical stores inside or outside the nursing homes sold the infant formula to parents at the other 3 homes. The nursing homes used, on average, 2-50 kg/month. Nestle (Lactogen-I) and Dalmia Industries (Milk Care) had a monopoly in infant formula in 4 and 3 nursing homes, respectively. Infant formula was in stock in 5 nursing homes. None of the nursing homes gave mothers free or low-cost infant formula at discharge. Lower than market price and increased number of calls to the hospitals and physicians by company personnel were marketing techniques used by the manufacturers to maintain market share. These results show that, despite government policy and the bill, hospitals continue to use infant formula. The government should use the mass media to increase awareness about its policy on infant foods and the concept of the Baby Friendly Hospital. PMID:8039859

  9. Breastfeeding status and marketing practices of baby food manufactured in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Mathur, G P; Pandey, P K; Mathur, S; Mishra, V K; Singh, K; Bhatt, O P; Loomba, R K; Luthra, C; Taneja, S; Kapoor, R

    1993-11-01

    In January 1993 in Kanpur, India, a survey of 7 private nursing homes revealed that infant formula was given to most newborns (52.4%). The most common brands included Lactogen-I, Milk Care, Raptakos, Dexolac Special Care, and Lactodex. Staff at 5 nursing homes gave prelacteal feeds (water, glucose water, and infant formula) to newborns when they were separated from their mothers. Staff at only 2 nursing homes gave the newborn to the mother immediately after delivery. The longest period between delivery and giving the newborn to the mother was 24 hours. All but one of the nursing homes did not know about the government policy and the recent bill that bars free or low-cost infant formula supplies to hospitals. The administration of the nursing homes did not inform the procurement department, in writing, of the government policy. 4 nursing homes bought low-cost supplies of infant formula from the companies. The companies sold the infant formula to the nursing homes at a price 48.3% to 86.7% lower than the market price. Medical stores inside or outside the nursing homes sold the infant formula to parents at the other 3 homes. The nursing homes used, on average, 2-50 kg/month. Nestle (Lactogen-I) and Dalmia Industries (Milk Care) had a monopoly in infant formula in 4 and 3 nursing homes, respectively. Infant formula was in stock in 5 nursing homes. None of the nursing homes gave mothers free or low-cost infant formula at discharge. Lower than market price and increased number of calls to the hospitals and physicians by company personnel were marketing techniques used by the manufacturers to maintain market share. These results show that, despite government policy and the bill, hospitals continue to use infant formula. The government should use the mass media to increase awareness about its policy on infant foods and the concept of the Baby Friendly Hospital.

  10. Senior friendly health services.

    PubMed

    Hart, Brian; Frank, Christopher; Hoffman, Jennifer; Dickey, Donna; Kristjansson, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    As our population continues to age and to put increasing pressures on the health care system, we need to evolve the system to be sensitive to the unique needs of seniors. There are many examples of innovative, evidence-based strategies that have been shown to improve outcomes for elderly individuals utilizing health services. The association between the physical environment and its negative impact on outcomes for hospitalized geriatric patients is well recognized. The use of strategies such as an audit tool to guide modifications of the physical environment or formal programs such as HELP, are good examples of practical approaches that can be implemented. The challenge today is for leaders in the healthcare system to champion and develop principles and a vision of care that supports implementation of these elder-friendly approaches.

  11. Quantum entanglement of baby universes

    SciTech Connect

    Essman, Eric P.; Aganagic, Mina; Okuda, Takuya; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2006-12-07

    We study quantum entanglements of baby universes which appear in non-perturbative corrections to the OSV formula for the entropy of extremal black holes in type IIA string theory compactified on the local Calabi-Yau manifold defined as a rank 2 vector bundle over an arbitrary genus G Riemann surface. This generalizes the result for G=1 in hep-th/0504221. Non-perturbative terms can be organized into a sum over contributions from baby universes, and the total wave-function is their coherent superposition in the third quantized Hilbert space. We find that half of the universes preserve one set of supercharges while the other half preserve a different set, making the total universe stable but non-BPS. The parent universe generates baby universes by brane/anti-brane pair creation, and baby universes are correlated by conservation of non-normalizable D-brane charges under the process. There are no other source of entanglement of baby universes, and all possible states are superposed with the equal weight.

  12. Baby Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Grady, Carol

    2012-01-01

    What did our solar system look like in its infancy,...... when the planets were forming? We cannot travel back in time to take an image of the early solar system, but in principle we can have the next best thing: images of infant planetary systems around Sun-like stars with ages of 1 to 5 million years, the time we think it took for the giant planets to form. Infant exoplanetary systems are critically important because they can help us understand how our solar system fits within the context of planet formation in general. More than 80% of stars are born with gas- and dust-rich disks, and thus have the potential to form planets. Through many methods we have identified more than 760 planetary systems around middle-aged stars like the Sun, but many of these have architectures that look nothing like our solar system. Young planetary systems are important missing links between various endpoints and may help us understand how and when these differences emerge. Well-known star-forming regions in Taurus, Scorpius. and Orion contain stars that could have infant planetary systems. But these stars are much more distant than our nearest neighbors such as Alpha Centauri or Sirius, making it extremely challenging to produce clear images of systems that can reveal signs of recent planet formation, let alone reveal the planets themselves. Recently, a star with the unassuming name LkCa 15 may have given us our first detailed "baby picture" of a young planetary system similar to our solar system. Located about 450 light-years away in the Taurus starforming region. LkCa 15 has a mass comparable to the Sun (0.97 solar mass) and an age of l to 5 million years, comparable to the time at which Saturn and perhaps Jupiter formed. The star is surrounded by a gas-rich disk similar in structure to the one in our solar system from which the planets formed. With new technologies and observing strategies, we have confirmed suspicions that LkCa 15's disk harbors a young planetary system.

  13. 'Dodo' and 'Baby Bear' Trenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image on Sol 11 (June 5, 2008), the eleventh day after landing. It shows the trenches dug by Phoenix's Robotic Arm. The trench on the left is informally called 'Dodo' and was dug as a test. The trench on the right is informally called 'Baby Bear.' The sample dug from Baby Bear will be delivered to the Phoenix's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The Baby Bear trench is 9 centimeters (3.1 inches) wide and 4 centimeters (1.6 inches) deep.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Designer babies--why not?

    PubMed

    Evans, M

    2001-02-01

    Though many objections can be levelled against the idea of the practice of genetic intervention to produce 'designer babies', upon examination they are shown to hinge on features which concern parental intentions towards their children, rather than features specific to the means involved. These intentions may be pursued by a variety of social practices which may, though need not, involve a measure of 'traditional' genetic selection (i.e. in terms of the identity and characteristics of the reproducing partners). This paper reviews a number of these objections and, by parity of reasoning, rejects their claim to count specifically or decisively against genetic intervention in pursuit of 'designer babies'. Rejecting these objections does not lead to the endorsement of 'designing babies, but it shows that any unease must be grounded elsewhere and defended by other arguments.

  15. Magnetothermodynamics of BPS baby skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2014-11-01

    The magnetothermodynamics of skyrmion type matter described by the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model at zero temperature is investigated. We prove that the BPS property of the model is preserved also for boundary conditions corresponding to an asymptotically constant magnetic field. The BPS bound and the corresponding BPS equations saturating the bound are found. Further, we show that one may introduce pressure in the gauged model by a redefinition of the superpotential. Interestingly, this is related to non-extremal type solutions in the so-called fake supersymmetry method. Finally, we compute the equation of state of magnetized BSP baby skyrmions inserted into an external constant magnetic field H and under external pressure P , i.e., V = V ( P, H), where V is the "volume" (area) occupied by the skyrmions. We show that the BPS baby skyrmions form a ferromagnetic medium.

  16. Designer babies--why not?

    PubMed

    Evans, M

    2001-02-01

    Though many objections can be levelled against the idea of the practice of genetic intervention to produce 'designer babies', upon examination they are shown to hinge on features which concern parental intentions towards their children, rather than features specific to the means involved. These intentions may be pursued by a variety of social practices which may, though need not, involve a measure of 'traditional' genetic selection (i.e. in terms of the identity and characteristics of the reproducing partners). This paper reviews a number of these objections and, by parity of reasoning, rejects their claim to count specifically or decisively against genetic intervention in pursuit of 'designer babies'. Rejecting these objections does not lead to the endorsement of 'designing babies, but it shows that any unease must be grounded elsewhere and defended by other arguments. PMID:15586985

  17. "Babies Grow a Long Time": A Preschool Project about Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Andromahi

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project related to babies undertaken by preschoolers in a university-affiliated child care center in the Midwest. Following a description of the class, the author discusses the three phases of the project. Photographs taken during the project are included throughout the article. The article concludes with the author's…

  18. Having a Baby (Especially for Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs Having a Baby (Especially for Teens) Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Having a Baby (Especially for Teens) Especially for ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  19. Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funds Request Information Get Involved Surviving the Sudden Death of a Baby Home Grieving Families Surviving the ... Candle on For Families Who Have Experienced the Death of a Baby The numbers are staggering. Every ...

  20. Feeding patterns and diet - babies and infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... a day). Feed your baby when they seems hungry. Signs include smacking lips, making suckling movements, and ... to feed her. This means she is very hungry. Your baby should not sleep more than 4 ...

  1. Babies' Sleep 'Twitching' May Aid Their Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160211.html Babies' Sleep 'Twitching' May Aid Their Development Tiny movements help ... 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When parents watch babies sleep, they often assume that the tiny twitches they ...

  2. Breastfeeding FAQs: Sleep - Yours and Your Baby's

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Breastfeeding FAQs: Sleep - Yours and Your Baby's KidsHealth > For ... sleep sooner. continue My baby falls asleep while nursing. What can I do? Newborns often fall asleep ...

  3. Spring and Baby Poultry are Here!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Spring and Baby Poultry are Here! Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... do people get Salmonella infections from live baby poultry? Live poultry may have Salmonella germs in their ...

  4. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during...

  5. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during...

  6. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during...

  7. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during...

  8. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during...

  9. Newborn Screening Tests for your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... decides which tests are required. Ask your baby’s health care provider which tests your baby will have. If your baby has ... state requires different tests, so ask your baby’s health care provider which tests your baby will have. You also can visit ...

  10. Understanding How Babies Build Language Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    Language is a great communication system. Through language, humans can express logical reasoning, grief, happiness, wishes, descriptions, and a rich array of feelings and ideas. Every baby deserves the gift of language power! In this article, the author discusses how babies build language skills and presents activities to help babies build…

  11. Shaken Baby Syndrome. The Arc Q & A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Susan

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to summarize what is known about shaken baby syndrome, brain damage resulting from forceful shaking of an infant or young child. Questions and answers address the following topics: what shaken baby syndrome is and other names for the condition; the diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome; the incidence…

  12. How to Care for Your Baby's Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... twice a day as soon as the first tooth appears. Until your child is 1 year old, you can use a wet washcloth or gauze to clean your baby's teeth and gums. Start using a soft baby toothbrush and a small dab of toothpaste that does not have fluoride in it when your baby is between 1 ...

  13. Compassionate Roots Begin with Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Long before babies understand words, they understand touch. The first experience of compassion infants receive is gentle, caring touch, which gives a strong message, especially when accompanied by eye contact and a soft tone of voice. The kind of relationship a compassionate caregiver strives to develop with an infant creates attachment, an…

  14. The Baby Boomers' Intergenerational Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Pillemer, Karl A.; Silverstein, Merril; Suitor, J. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As Baby Boomers enter late life, relationships with family members gain importance. This review article highlights two aspects of their intergenerational relationships: (a) caregiving for aging parents and (b) interactions with adult children in the context of changing marital dynamics. Design and Methods: The researchers describe three…

  15. Babies, Toddlers and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that America's babies and toddlers live in a world full of television sets, VCRs, computers, videogames, and interactive toys, this…

  16. Care of the Migrant Baby.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Susan; Mestas, Leonard

    Prepared mainly for paraprofessional staff of the Colorado Migrant Council, this 1970 handbook, available in either English or Spanish, presents information on caring fo r the migrant child. Three sections -- Baby, Child, and Sick Child -- discuss general care and specific care for such topics as hand washing, bathing, diapering, rashes, weight,…

  17. Drug Affected Babies: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR. Dept. of Research, Evaluation, and Testing.

    This 42-item annotated bibliography, represents a comprehensive effort to gather information on the educational problems of infant children of substance-abusing parents. Extensive searches were conducted in databases in the fields of education, medicine, social sciences, and the humanities. In particular, studies on the problems of "crack babies"…

  18. Allergy-Friendly Gardening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergy Library ▸ Allergy-friendly gardening Share | Allergy-Friendly Gardening This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, ... of pollen spores that you breathe in. Leave gardening tools and clothing (such as gloves and shoes) ...

  19. Baby Signs: How To Talk with Your Baby before Your Baby Can Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acredolo, Linda; Goodwyn, Susan

    Based on research in infant sign language, this book teaches parents methods of communicating with their infants through the use of simple bodily movements that signify objects, events, and needs. Noting that communication between parent and child can flourish between 9 months and 30 months, when a baby's desire to communicate outstrips the…

  20. The baby boom, the baby bust, and the housing market.

    PubMed

    Mankiw, N G; Weil, D N

    1989-05-01

    This paper explores the impact of demographic changes on the housing market in the US, 1st by reviewing the facts about the Baby Boom, 2nd by linking age and housing demand using census data for 1970 and 1980, 3rd by computing the effect of demand on price of housing and on the quantity of residential capital, and last by constructing a theoretical model to plot the predictability of the jump in demand caused by the Baby Boom. The Baby Boom in the U.S. lasted from 1946-1964, with a peak in 1957 when 4.3 million babies were born. In 1980 19.7% of the population were aged 20-30, compared to 13.3% in 1960. Demand for housing was modeled for a given household from census data, resulting in the finding that demand rises sharply at age 20-30, then declines after age 40 by 1% per year. Thus between 1970 and 1980 the real value of housing for an adult at any given age jumped 50%, while the real disposable personal income per capita rose 22%. The structure of demand is such that the swelling in the rate of growth in housing demand peaked in 1980, with a rate of 1.66% per year. Housing demand and real price of housing were highly correlated and inelastic. If this relationship holds in the future, the real price of housing should fall about 3% per year, or 47% by 2007. The theoretical model, a variation of the Poterba model, ignoring inflation and taxation, suggests that fluctuations in prices caused by changes in demand are not foreseen by the market, even though they are predictable in principle 20 years in advance. As the effects of falling housing prices become apparent, there may be a potential for economic instability, but people may be induced to save more because their homes will no longer provide the funds for retirement.

  1. Protein in Breast Milk May Reduce Hospital Infections in Preemies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161498.html Protein in Breast Milk May Reduce Hospital Infections in Preemies Lactoferrin is ... 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A protein in breast milk helps protect premature babies from hospital-acquired infections, ...

  2. Recommendations for involving the family in developmental care of the NICU baby

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J W; Glick, C; Phillips, R; Hall, S L; Smith, J; Browne, J

    2015-01-01

    Family involvement is a key to realize the potential for long-lasting positive effects on physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of all babies, including those in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Family-centered developmental care (FCDC) recognizes the family as vital members of the NICU health-care team. As such, families are integrated into decision-making processes and are collaborators in their baby's care. Through standardized use of FCDC principles in the NICU, a foundation is constructed to enhance the family's lifelong relationship with their child and optimize development of the baby. Recommendations are made for supporting parental roles as caregivers of their babies in the NICU, supporting NICU staff participation in FCDC and creating NICU policies that support this type of care. These recommendations are designed to meet the basic human needs of all babies, the special needs of hospitalized babies and the needs of families who are coping with the crisis of having a baby in the NICU. PMID:26597804

  3. Recommendations for involving the family in developmental care of the NICU baby.

    PubMed

    Craig, J W; Glick, C; Phillips, R; Hall, S L; Smith, J; Browne, J

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is a key to realize the potential for long-lasting positive effects on physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of all babies, including those in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Family-centered developmental care (FCDC) recognizes the family as vital members of the NICU health-care team. As such, families are integrated into decision-making processes and are collaborators in their baby's care. Through standardized use of FCDC principles in the NICU, a foundation is constructed to enhance the family's lifelong relationship with their child and optimize development of the baby. Recommendations are made for supporting parental roles as caregivers of their babies in the NICU, supporting NICU staff participation in FCDC and creating NICU policies that support this type of care. These recommendations are designed to meet the basic human needs of all babies, the special needs of hospitalized babies and the needs of families who are coping with the crisis of having a baby in the NICU. PMID:26597804

  4. ["Designer baby" changed to French for "double hope baby"].

    PubMed

    Fagniez, P-L; Loriau, J; Tayar, C

    2005-10-01

    Scientific advances during the last decades regarding potential intervention on embryos arouse many questions in society to prepare the ground concerning the limits that should be set for these practices. For the first time in 1994, a parliamentary proceeding allowed the definition of a French model of bioethics through laws of the same name. These laws, among others, authorized in a well and strictly defined setting the practice of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Because of technical progress concerning PGD, new questions arose, especially concerning the accomplishment of designer babies. The French Chamber of Representatives came in with a new law that banishes the concept of designer babies and replaces it with another concept: double hope babies, in French "bébé du double espoir". A first hope of a pregnancy giving birth to a healthy child and the second being that this child conceived with the aid of PGD could help treat an elder brother. Because of the issuing of two specific laws in a ten years interval, France occupies a privileged place in a Europe where bioethical issues continue to be debated, particularly PGD.

  5. ["Designer baby" changed to French for "double hope baby"].

    PubMed

    Fagniez, P-L; Loriau, J; Tayar, C

    2005-10-01

    Scientific advances during the last decades regarding potential intervention on embryos arouse many questions in society to prepare the ground concerning the limits that should be set for these practices. For the first time in 1994, a parliamentary proceeding allowed the definition of a French model of bioethics through laws of the same name. These laws, among others, authorized in a well and strictly defined setting the practice of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Because of technical progress concerning PGD, new questions arose, especially concerning the accomplishment of designer babies. The French Chamber of Representatives came in with a new law that banishes the concept of designer babies and replaces it with another concept: double hope babies, in French "bébé du double espoir". A first hope of a pregnancy giving birth to a healthy child and the second being that this child conceived with the aid of PGD could help treat an elder brother. Because of the issuing of two specific laws in a ten years interval, France occupies a privileged place in a Europe where bioethical issues continue to be debated, particularly PGD. PMID:16139550

  6. Neonatologists and bioethics after Baby Doe.

    PubMed

    Carter, B S

    1993-01-01

    The use of hospital ethics committees or infant care review committees has been recommended for difficult decision making. In a survey of military and civilian neonatologists, ethics committees had been established in 27 of their 28 hospitals and fewer than 50% had infant care review committees. Despite the frequently of potential cases for committee review, they were seldom consulted. Inquiry into the educational background of respondents revealed that at least 62% of neonatologists had received ethics education during their professional careers. Most made difficult decisions in conjunction with parents or used a multidisciplinary patient care conference. The use of these conferences antedated any federal regulations. Sixty-seven percent indicated that the Baby Doe regulations had affected neither their thinking about ethical issues nor their practice. In 13 different hypothetical cases in delivery room, intensive care nursery, and long-term care settings, the provision of comfort care, limited care, or withdrawal of support was noted by a sizable percentage of neonatologists; exceptions included meningomyelocele and trisomy 21. The need for ethics committee input in decision making for neonates is questionable. PMID:8515309

  7. Baby universes in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Gopakumar, Rajesh; Ooguri, Hirosi; Vafa, Cumrun

    2006-03-15

    We argue that the holographic description of four-dimensional Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield black holes naturally includes multicenter solutions. This suggests that the holographic dual to the gauge theory is not a single AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2} but a coherent ensemble of them. We verify this in a particular class of examples, where the two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory gives a holographic description of the black holes obtained by branes wrapping Calabi-Yau cycles. Using the free fermionic formulation, we show that O(e{sup -N}) nonperturbative effects entangle the two Fermi surfaces. In an Euclidean description, the wave function of the multicenter black holes gets mapped to the Hartle-Hawking wave function of baby universes. This provides a concrete realization, within string theory, of effects that can be interpreted as the creation of baby universes. We find that, at least in the case we study, the baby universes do not lead to a loss of quantum coherence, in accord with general arguments.

  8. Quit4baby: Results From a Pilot Test of a Mobile Smoking Cessation Program for Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Text messaging (short message service, SMS) programs have been shown to be effective in helping adult smokers quit smoking. This study describes the results of a pilot test of Quit4baby, a smoking cessation text messaging program for pregnant smokers that was adapted from Text2quit. Objective The study aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and acceptability of Quit4baby for women currently enrolled in Text4baby, a perinatal health text messaging program. Methods Pregnant women enrolled in Text4baby and who were current smokers or had quit within the last 4 weeks (n=20) were enrolled in Quit4baby. Those under the age of 18, not pregnant, not current smokers, those using nicotine replacement therapy, and those not interested in participating were ineligible. Participants were surveyed at baseline and at 2 and 4 weeks postenrollment. Results Most participants responded to the program favorably. Highly rated aspects included the content of the program, skills taught within the program, and encouragement and social support provided by the program. Participants reported that the program was helpful in quitting, that the program gave good ideas on quitting, and that they would recommend the program to a friend. Suggestions for improvement included increasing the message dose and making the quitpal more interactive. Conclusions This pilot test provides support for the feasibility and acceptability of Quit4baby. Future studies are needed to assess whether Quit4baby is effective for smoking cessation during pregnancy. PMID:25650765

  9. Field trials of the Baby Check score card: mothers scoring their babies at home.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A J; Morley, C J; Green, S J; Cole, T J; Walker, K A; Bonnett, J M

    1991-01-01

    The Baby Check score card has been developed to help parents and health professionals grade the severity of acute illness in babies. This paper reports the results of two field trials in which mothers used Baby Check at home, 104 mothers scoring their babies daily for a week and 56 using it for six months. They all found Baby Check easy to use, between 68% and 81% found it useful, and 96% would recommended it to others. Over 70% of those using it daily used it very competently. Those using it infrequently did less well, suggesting that familiarity with the assessment is important. The scores obtained show that Baby Check's use would not increase the number of mothers seeking medical advice. With introduction and practice most mothers should be able to use Baby Check effectively. It should help them assess their babies' illnesses and make appropriate decisions about seeking medical advice.

  10. Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB II) Scoring System in Prediction of Mortality in Premature Babies

    PubMed Central

    Ezz-Eldin, Zahraa Mohamed; Hamid, Tamer A. Abdel; Nabil, Hossam El-Din

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical Risk Index for Babies scoring system (CRIB II) score is a recently developed tool to predict initial risk of mortality amongst low birth weight babies, the utility of which is scarce in many developing countries. Objective To assess the efficiency of CRIB II score as a tool to predict the risk for neonatal mortality among the LBW babies admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at a tertiary care facility Kasr El-Aini paediatric hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Materials and Methods Prospective cohort study design where 113 neonates, admitted during the first 24 hours to the NICU of Kasr El-Aini Hospital, from November 2013 till May 2014 were included. On admission, history taking, neonatal examination, arterial blood gas analysis and variables of CRIB II score were done. Subjects were followed up from admission till discharge or death. Results Male to female ratio was 1.1:1. Gestational age ranged from 25-32 weeks, the birth weight ranged from 700-1500 gm with mean of 1134.5 (± 202). CRIB II score ranged from 1-19 with a mean of 9.9 (± 4.0). The total mortality in the included cohort was 34.5% (31/113). Significant positive correlations were found between gestational age, birth weight, temperature, excess base, CRIB II score and the occurrence of mortality and with progressive increase in mortality with increasing CRIB II score (p=0.001). CRIB II score ≥ 11, gestational age ≤ 28 and birth weight ≤ 1100 were all found to be significantly associated with neonatal mortality. Area under ROC curve for CRIB II, gestational age and birth weight were found to be (0.968, 0.900 and 0.834) respectively. CRIB II score with cutoff point of ≥ 11 was the most sensitive (94.9%) with the predictive value (74.0%) and specificity (82.4%) compared to birth weight and gestational age. CRIB II score showed good calibration to predict neonatal mortality as demonstrated with Hosmer-lemeshow goodness of fit test (p= 0.952). Conclusion CRIB II score is a valid

  11. Can Babies Learn to Read? A Randomized Trial of Baby Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley; Strouse, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Targeted to children as young as 3 months old, there is a growing number of baby media products that claim to teach babies to read. This randomized controlled trial was designed to examine this claim by investigating the effects of a best-selling baby media product on reading development. One hundred and seventeen infants, ages 9 to 18 months,…

  12. Stop experimenting on my baby!

    PubMed

    Holzman, I R

    1999-09-01

    Having a small sick baby in a neonatal intensive care unit can be an extremely difficult experience for any family. A minority family brings to this setting the additional burden of a concern that racism may affect the care their child receives. While the technology may be overwhelming, the unique rules and an apparent disparity in the enforcement of these rules can suggest discrimination. In some cases, these parental perceptions lead to a charge of experimentation. An increased understanding by health care providers of the cultural differences and life experiences that families bring to stressful situations can improve communication.

  13. Water Babies: an evolutionary parable.

    PubMed

    Beatty, John; Hale, Piers J

    2008-12-01

    The nineteenth-century Anglican theologian Charles Kingsley was immediately impressed by Darwin's Origin of Species. Whilst many in Victorian Britain reacted against the idea of natural selection, Kingsley saw in the contingency of selection a divinely ordained imperative for human endeavour, not least the pursuit of scientific knowledge. Here, Kingsley believed, was a crucial insight into the seemingly indifferent laws of nature, one that humankind could use to elevate themselves to ever-greater heights. Kingsley chose to teach these lessons about the moral nature of evolution through 'Water Babies', one of the most charming and enduring of children's fairy tales.

  14. Water Babies: an evolutionary parable.

    PubMed

    Beatty, John; Hale, Piers J

    2008-12-01

    The nineteenth-century Anglican theologian Charles Kingsley was immediately impressed by Darwin's Origin of Species. Whilst many in Victorian Britain reacted against the idea of natural selection, Kingsley saw in the contingency of selection a divinely ordained imperative for human endeavour, not least the pursuit of scientific knowledge. Here, Kingsley believed, was a crucial insight into the seemingly indifferent laws of nature, one that humankind could use to elevate themselves to ever-greater heights. Kingsley chose to teach these lessons about the moral nature of evolution through 'Water Babies', one of the most charming and enduring of children's fairy tales. PMID:18995909

  15. [Shaken baby syndrome: which lesions in imaging ?].

    PubMed

    Adamsbaum, C; Husson, B

    2012-09-01

    Non-accidental brain trauma (also called shaken baby syndrome) represent the main cause for morbidity and mortality in the context of child abuse. It often occur in young infants aged less than 8months. The shaking leading to brain injuries are very violent and sometimes associated with a final impact. Intracranial injuries may be isolated without skeletal trauma or bruising. In any suspicion of such a diagnosis, emergency hospitalization is indicated. Brain CT, easy to perform in emergency, is the diagnostic key. It discloses diffuse subdural hematomas in typical sites as vertex, interhemispheric space and tentorium. There is no clear background of trauma and the related story is changing over time. The 3D analysis of the skull looks for signs of recent impact as a fracture that is sometimes complex and/or a soft tissue swelling of the scalp. Intraparenchymal injuries (contusions, tearing, and overall anoxic ischemic injuries) are better analyzed with MRI. The prognosis depends on their extent. Ophtalmologic examination is systematically performed looking for retinal hemorrhages (around one third of cases) which may be very subtle. Bruising is a major diagnostic sign, but inconstantly present. A precise datation of skeletal and/or brain injuries is not possible with imaging and the only indication of use is to establish the presence of "age different lesions". This indicates repeated trauma and thereby a high risk of recurrence.

  16. Friends' Discovery Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Seth

    2008-01-01

    This article features Friends' Discovery Camp, a program that allows children with and without autism spectrum disorder to learn and play together. In Friends' Discovery Camp, campers take part in sensory-rich experiences, ranging from hands-on activities and performing arts to science experiments and stories teaching social skills. Now in its 7th…

  17. Libraries Are for Babies, Too! [Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This video, produced and shot in Maine libraries, provides a tour of five different approaches to library services for babies. Highlights include: "Finger Fun for Babies" at the Portland Public Library; "Small Is Beautiful" at the Wells Library; unique outreach activities sponsored by the Casco Library and Warren Library in Westbrook; and a…

  18. Motor Development Programming in Trisomic-21 Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, Teresa; Menendez, Javier; Rosique, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The present study contributes to the understanding of gross motor development in babies with Down's syndrome. Also, it facilitates the comprehension of the efficiency of the early motor stimulation as well as of beginning it as early as possible. We worked with two groups of babies with Down's syndrome, beginning the early motor training in each…

  19. Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Zika & Pregnancy Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby KidsHealth > For Parents > Finding a Doctor for Your New Baby Print A A A Text Size What's ... recommendations. If you've recently moved to a new area, you may not have personal or social ...

  20. Welcoming a New Baby into Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Welcoming a New Baby Into Your Family KidsHealth > For Kids > Welcoming a New Baby Into Your Family Print A A A ... familia If you're going to have a new brother or sister, you'll want to know ...

  1. Designer Babies: Eugenics Repackaged or Consumer Options?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    "Designer babies" is a term used by journalists and commentators--not by scientists--to describe several different reproductive technologies. These technologies have one thing in common: they give parents more control over what their offspring will be like. Designer babies are made possible by progress in three fields: (1) Advanced Reproductive…

  2. Visiting your baby in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are having a hard time with your emotions, ask for the social worker in the NICU. Or, talk to your doctor. It is ok to ask for help. By taking care of yourself, you are taking care of your baby too. Your baby needs your love and touch to grow and improve.

  3. Baby Blues’ highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baby Blues’ is a new highbush blueberry from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Baby Blues’ is a vigorous, high-yielding, very small-f...

  4. Rich Responses Help Babies Learn and Thrive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Linda; Parlakian, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This article reminds infant care teachers of the ways thoughtful interactions between adults and very young children teach babies and toddlers who they are as individuals. "When teachers take the time to respond respectfully and thoughtfully, babies and young children learn and thrive."

  5. The "baby lung" became an adult.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Marini, John J; Pesenti, Antonio; Quintel, Michael; Mancebo, Jordi; Brochard, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The baby lung was originally defined as the fraction of lung parenchyma that, in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), still maintains normal inflation. Its size obviously depends on ARDS severity and relates to the compliance of the respiratory system. CO2 clearance and blood oxygenation primarily occur within the baby lung. While the specific compliance suggests the intrinsic mechanical characteristics to be nearly normal, evidence from positron emission tomography suggests that at least a part of the well-aerated baby lung is inflamed. The baby lung is more a functional concept than an anatomical one; in fact, in the prone position, the baby lung "shifts" from the ventral lung regions toward the dorsal lung regions while usually increasing its size. This change is associated with better gas exchange, more homogeneously distributed trans-pulmonary forces, and a survival advantage. Positive end expiratory pressure also increases the baby lung size, both allowing better inflation of already open units and adding new pulmonary units. Viewed as surrogates of stress and strain, tidal volume and plateau pressures are better tailored to baby lung size than to ideal body weight. Although less information is available for the baby lung during spontaneous breathing efforts, the general principles regulating the safety of ventilation are also applicable under these conditions. PMID:26781952

  6. Binocular Fixation in the Newborn Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Alan M.; Findlay, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Three experiments are reported in which 15 babies were presented with visual stimuli which varied in shape and distance from the eye. Results indicated that the majority of subjects binocularly fixated all three stimuli and it was concluded that the newborn baby has the basic requirements for binocular vision. (Author/GO)

  7. Infants and Toddlers: Soothing and Comforting Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2004-01-01

    Babies thrive on security. In early months, secure feelings stem from being warm, cuddled closely, and comfortable in their tummies (and in having clean bottoms!). In this article, the author discusses how to soothe infants and toddlers. The strategies to help ease babies' distress are described. Some of the recommended strategies include: (1) to…

  8. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  9. Babies, Television and Videos: How Did We Get Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartella, Ellen; Richert, Rebekah A.; Robb, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Baby media have exploded in the past decade, and children younger than 2 are showing increased use of these baby media. This paper examines the historical evidence of babies' use of television since the 1950s as well as the various factors that have given rise to the current increase in screen media for babies. We also consider the ubiquitous role…

  10. Dementia-friendly design resource.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-02-01

    Although estimates suggest that, on average, some 30 per cent of all patients in general acute medical wards may have some form of dementia, Stirling University's Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC), one of the leading international knowledge centres working to improve the lives of dementia sufferers, says progress in designing healthcare facilities that address such patients' needs has been 'patchy at best'. With the number of individuals living with dementia expected to double in the next 25 years, the DSDC has recently worked with Edinburgh-based architects, Burnett Pollock Associates, to develop an online resource that clearly illustrates, via 15 simulated 'dementia-friendly' healthcare 'spaces', some of the key principles to consider when designing effectively for this fast-growing group. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, attended the launch of the so-called 'Virtual Hospital'.

  11. Dementia-friendly design resource.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-02-01

    Although estimates suggest that, on average, some 30 per cent of all patients in general acute medical wards may have some form of dementia, Stirling University's Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC), one of the leading international knowledge centres working to improve the lives of dementia sufferers, says progress in designing healthcare facilities that address such patients' needs has been 'patchy at best'. With the number of individuals living with dementia expected to double in the next 25 years, the DSDC has recently worked with Edinburgh-based architects, Burnett Pollock Associates, to develop an online resource that clearly illustrates, via 15 simulated 'dementia-friendly' healthcare 'spaces', some of the key principles to consider when designing effectively for this fast-growing group. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, attended the launch of the so-called 'Virtual Hospital'. PMID:24620491

  12. Morbidity status of low birth weight babies in rural areas of Assam: A prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Madhur; Baruah, Rupali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low birth weight (LBW) infants suffer more episodes of common childhood diseases and the spells of illness are more prolonged and serious. Longitudinal studies are useful to observe the health and disease pattern of LBW babies over time. Aims: This study was carried out in rural areas of Assam to assess the morbidity pattern of LBW babies during their first 6 months of life and to compare them with normal birth weight (NBW) counterparts. Materials and Methods: Total 30 LBW babies (0-2 months) and equal numbers of NBW babies from three subcenters under Boko Primary Health Centre of Assam were followed up in monthly intervals till 6 months of age in a prospective fashion. Results: More than two thirds of LBW babies (77%) were suffering from moderate or severe under-nutrition during the follow up. Acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) was the predominant morbidity suffered by LBW infants. The other illnesses suffered by the LBW infants during the follow up were diarrhea, skin disorders, fever and ear disorders. LBW infants had more episodes of hospitalization (65%) than the NBW infants (35%). Incidence rate of episodes of morbidity was found to be higher among those LBW infants who remained underweight at 6 months of age (Incidence rate of 49.3 per 100 infant months) and those who were not exclusively breast fed till 6 months of age (Incidence rate of 66.7 per 100 infant months). Conclusion: The study revealed that during the follow up, incidence of morbidities were higher among the LBW babies compared to NBW babies. It was also observed that ARI was the predominant morbidity in the LBW infants during first 6 months of age. PMID:26288777

  13. Music Therapy Helps Preemie Babies Thrive

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160627.html Music Therapy Helps Preemie Babies Thrive Mom's singing helps ... of over a dozen clinical trials, found that music therapy helped stabilize premature newborns' breathing rate during ...

  14. Minding the baby a reflective parenting program.

    PubMed

    Slade, Arietta; Sadler, Lois; De Dios-Kenn, Cheryl; Webb, Denise; Currier-Ezepchick, Janice; Mayes, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Minding the Baby, an interdisciplinary, relationship based home visiting program, was initiated to help young, at-risk new mothers keep their babies (and themselves) "in mind" in a variety of ways. The intervention--delivered by a team that includes a nurse practitioner and clinical social worker--uses a mentalization based approach; that is, we work with mothers and babies in a variety of ways to develop mothers' reflective capacities. This approach--which is an adaptation of both nurse home visiting and infant-parent psychotherapy models--seems particularly well suited to highly traumatized mothers and their families, as it is aimed at addressing the particular relationship disruptions that stem from mothers' early trauma and derailed attachment history. We discuss the history of psychoanalytically oriented and attachment based mother-infant intervention, the theoretical assumptions of mentalization theory, and provide an overview of the Minding the Baby program. The treatments of two teenage mothers and their infants are described.

  15. Preparing Your Family for a New Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a new sibling include Look at picture books about a new baby . At the very least, ... he starts asking about mom's growing "stomach." Picture books for preschoolers can be very helpful. So can ...

  16. Questions Parents Ask about Baby Shots

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby against these diseases? No. Breastfeeding offers temporary immunity against some minor infections like colds, but it ... preferable to “artificial” vaccination, leading to a “natural” immunity. Some even arrange chickenpox “parties” to ensure their ...

  17. Why lions roar like babies cry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    When an angry lion roars, the sounds it emits can terrify anyone within earshot. But, as Ingo Titze explains, the properties of a lion's roar have some surprising similarities with those of a crying baby.

  18. Help Protect Babies from Whooping Cough

    MedlinePlus

    ... cough infographic . Keep Your Baby's Whooping Cough Vaccine Current Getting the whooping cough vaccine during pregnancy provides ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do ...

  19. Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & ... problems with memory and attention severe mental retardation cerebral palsy Even in milder cases, in which babies look ...

  20. Mineral profile of Spanish commercial baby food.

    PubMed

    Mir-Marqués, Alba; González-Masó, Anna; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Commercial baby foods are an important part of the daily intake of babies from 6 to 12 months. The mineral profile of commercial baby foods in Spain was determined to establish levels of essential and non-essential elements, and their contribution to adequate intake (AI) and estimated average requirement (EAR). Thirty-five jars of commercial foods containing meat, fish, vegetables and fruit were obtained from the Spanish market and the mineral composition determined for 14 elements. In general, the baby foods analysed were sufficient for an adequate mineral intake, but contributions to AI and EAR for iron, zinc and calcium were very low (5-20%, 10-60% and 10-70%, respectively). This deficiency could be associated with growth problems or diseases in adulthood, and fortification of commercial products is recommended.

  1. Your Baby's Development: The First Trimester

    MedlinePlus

    ... During this stage, the baby is called an embryo. What changes occur during the embryonic stage? During ... parts begin to develop. The cells of the embryo (called embryonic stem cells) multiply and change into ...

  2. Will Stress during Pregnancy Affect My Baby?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Will stress during pregnancy affect my baby? Skip sharing on ... health care provider during your prenatal visits. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Pregnancy PTSD is a more ...

  3. Healthy Family 2009: Bringing in Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Bringing in Baby Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... Down syndrome and other common genetic disorders, inherited family conditions, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, or disorders ...

  4. Protect Your Baby from Group B Strep!

    MedlinePlus

    ... from spreading to your baby. The antibiotic (usually penicillin) is given to you through an IV (in ... vein) during childbirth. If you are allergic to penicillin, there are other antibiotics to help treat you ...

  5. Protect Yourself and Your Baby from Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent dengue virus infection during pregnancy » Use mosquito repellents with up to 50% DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or ... For babies over 2 months of age, use repellents with up to 30% DEET, picaridin or IR3535. ...

  6. Disposable baby wipes: efficacy and skin mildness.

    PubMed

    Odio, M; Streicher-Scott, J; Hansen, R C

    2001-04-01

    The results of a series of four clinical studies demonstrated that disposable baby wipes were milder to the skin than use of a cotton washcloth and water, recognized as a "gold standard" for skin mildness. Importantly, the baby wipes caused no significant change from the baseline value in any of the skin parameters examined. This observation verified that the test wipes are minimally disruptive to the epidermal barrier and thus suitable for use on intact or compromised, irritated skin. PMID:11917305

  7. Exact BPS bound for noncommutative baby Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domrin, Andrei; Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Linares, Román; Maceda, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The noncommutative baby Skyrme model is a Moyal deformation of the two-dimensional sigma model plus a Skyrme term, with a group-valued or Grassmannian target. Exact abelian solitonic solutions have been identified analytically in this model, with a singular commutative limit. Inside any given Grassmannian, we establish a BPS bound for the energy functional, which is saturated by these baby Skyrmions. This asserts their stability for unit charge, as we also test in second-order perturbation theory.

  8. Assessment of newborn baby's temperature by human touch: a potentially useful primary care strategy.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Rao, G; Malhotra, A K; Deorari, A K

    1992-04-01

    Fifty healthy term neonates delivered at All India Institute of Medical Sciences Hospital were assessed by three pediatricians for skin temperature to the nearest +/- 0.5 degrees C at the three body sites, i.e., mid-forehead, abdomen and dorsum of right foot by touch. The predicted temperatures at different sites were compared with simultaneously recorded temperatures at the same sites with the help of an electronic thermometer having a sensitivity of +/- 0.1 degree C. Rectal temperature was also recorded in all the babies with a rectal thermister to compare the variations between the core and skin temperatures. There was a good correlation between the skin temperatures of the babies as perceived by touch and values recorded with the help of an electronic thermometer. All the hypothermic babies were correctly picked up by all the observers. There was good correlation between core temperature and skin temperature at different sites except forehead. It is amazing that even during the month of May, when ambient temperature was maintained between 26-28 degrees C, nearly one fifth of the healthy term babies were under cold stress as evidenced by greater than 2 degrees C difference between the core and peripheral skin temperatures. It is recommended that health professionals and mothers should be explained the importance of evaluating the core and peripheral skin temperature by touch for early identification of babies under cold stress in order to prevent occurrence of life threatening hypothermia.

  9. Lipoid pneumonia secondary to baby oil aspiration: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reyes de la Rocha, S; Cunningham, J C; Fox, E

    1985-06-01

    Baby oil is a common household product that is frequently used when there are infants or toddlers in the house. However, it is often overlooked as a potential source of danger to these youngsters. In 1983, 36,700 cases of ingestion were reported to the poisoning surveillance and epidemiology branch of the Food and Drug Administration. Topical preparations used in the care of infants accounted for 480 of the cases. Ten percent of these required hospitalization. In 36 cases, the product ingested was baby oil. This figure does not include baby lotions and other skin products with a mineral oil base. Aspiration of mineral oil, the main component of baby oil, has been described as a cause of lipoid pneumonia and oleomas. However, there is very little information in the modern literature concerning acute lipoid pneumonitis in children. We herein present a patient with lipoid pneumonia caused by aspirated baby oil, who followed a severe clinical course. The paucity of information regarding this subject points to the need for increased public and physician awareness of the problem and for their direct participation in the prevention of this potentially fatal condition. PMID:3843437

  10. The ART of marketing babies.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana

    2010-01-01

    New legislation can be oppressive for a significant population depending upon the politics of its drafters. The current upsurge of the surrogacy trade in India, and the label of a "win-win" situation that it has acquired, points towards an unfettered commercialisation of assisted reproductive technology and the practice of surrogacy that is blinding its middle class users as well as providers, policy makers and law makers, and charging an imagination that is already caught up in spiralling consumerism. This paper analyses the Draft Assisted Reproductive Technology (Regulation) Bill and Rules, 2008, in the Indian socioeconomic context. It identifies the interests of the affected women, and examines the contradictions of the proposed Bill with their interests, as well as with current health and population policies, confining itself to the handling of surrogacy and not the entire content of the Bill. The bases of the analytical perspective used are: the context of poverty and the health needs of the Indian population; the need to locate surrogacy services within the overall public health service context and its epidemiological basis; the need to restrain direct human experimentation for the advancement of any technology; the use of safer methods; and, finally, the rights of surrogate mothers and their babies, in India, as opposed to the compulsion or dynamics of the medical market and reproductive tourism. PMID:22106569

  11. The ART of marketing babies.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, Imrana

    2010-01-01

    New legislation can be oppressive for a significant population depending upon the politics of its drafters. The current upsurge of the surrogacy trade in India, and the label of a "win-win" situation that it has acquired, points towards an unfettered commercialisation of assisted reproductive technology and the practice of surrogacy that is blinding its middle class users as well as providers, policy makers and law makers, and charging an imagination that is already caught up in spiralling consumerism. This paper analyses the Draft Assisted Reproductive Technology (Regulation) Bill and Rules, 2008, in the Indian socioeconomic context. It identifies the interests of the affected women, and examines the contradictions of the proposed Bill with their interests, as well as with current health and population policies, confining itself to the handling of surrogacy and not the entire content of the Bill. The bases of the analytical perspective used are: the context of poverty and the health needs of the Indian population; the need to locate surrogacy services within the overall public health service context and its epidemiological basis; the need to restrain direct human experimentation for the advancement of any technology; the use of safer methods; and, finally, the rights of surrogate mothers and their babies, in India, as opposed to the compulsion or dynamics of the medical market and reproductive tourism.

  12. When to transfuse preterm babies

    PubMed Central

    Bell, EF

    2009-01-01

    The physiological anaemia experienced by preterm babies is exacerbated by common care practices such as early clamping of the umbilical cord at birth and gradual exsanguination by phlebotomy for laboratory monitoring. The need for subsequent transfusion with red blood cells can be reduced by delaying cord clamping for 30–60 s in infants who do not require immediate resuscitation. The need for transfusions can be further reduced by limiting phlebotomy losses, providing good nutrition, and using standard guidelines for transfusion based on haemoglobin or haematocrit. What those guidelines should be is not clear. Analysis of two recent large clinical trials comparing restrictive and liberal transfusion guidelines leads to several conclusions. Restrictive transfusion guidelines may reduce the number of transfusions given, but there is no reduction in donor exposures if a single-donor transfusion programme is used. There is some evidence that more liberal transfusion guidelines may help to prevent brain injury, but information on the impact of transfusion practice on long-term outcome is lacking. Until further guidance emerges, transfusion thresholds lower than those used in the two trials should not be used, as there is no evidence that lower thresholds are safe. PMID:18653585

  13. After a C-section - in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000620.htm After a C-section - in the hospital To use the sharing ... for your baby. What to Expect after a C-section Right after surgery you may feel: Groggy ...

  14. Fathers & Babies: How Babies Grow and What They Need from You, from Birth to 18 Months.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzollo, Jean

    This book provides fathers with specific developmental theory and practical skills and advice concerning how babies grow and what they need from fathers from the time they are born until they turn 18 months. Each chapter provides information and theory on age appropriate play activities and specific information on a baby's growth and developmental…

  15. Bringing Up Baby with Baby Signs: Language Ideologies and Socialization in Hearing Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizer, Ginger; Walters, Keith; Meier, Richard P.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the functional roles of "baby signing" in three hearing families in the United States, as well as a discussion of the social and ideological implications of the practice. Baby signing fits neatly into the parenting ideologies prevalent in the professional class in the United States that value early…

  16. Baby Culture and the Curriculum of Consumption: A Critical Reading of the Film "Babies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maudlin, Julie G.; Sandlin, Jennifer A.; Thaller, Jonel

    2012-01-01

    We focus on the recently emerging "baby culture" that is fostering a curriculum of consumption and consumerism among parents-to-be and infants aged zero-to-three. To gain insight into how the cultural artifacts, practices, and trends emerging from this demographic are shaping the way we think and act in a consumer culture, we investigate "Babies,"…

  17. Liver transplantation in small babies.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, J; Gámez, M; Santamaría, M L; Murcia, J; Díaz, M C; Camarena, C; Jara, P; Tovar, J A

    1993-08-01

    Pediatric liver transplantation is an effective treatment for end-stage liver disease with 1- and 5-year survivals approaching 90% and 70%, respectively. Survival is influenced by the recipient's age, weight, primary disease, vascular malformations, and nutritional status. Younger patients weighing less than 13 kg are considered to be a high-risk group. The aim of this article is to evaluate the impact of this group of patients on the overall results of our pediatric liver transplant program. From January 1986 through January 1992 we performed 76 liver transplants in 59 pediatric patients. Sixteen received a second graft and a third was required in one. Fourteen patients weighed less than 13 kg (mean, 11 kg; range, 6 to 13 kg). Their mean age was 12 months, with a range of 8 to 36 months. Indications for transplantation were: biliary atresia (9), Byler's disease (1), tyrosinemia (3), and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency (1). The incidence of rejection in this group (52%) was not significantly different from that in other patients (61%). Ten episodes of acute rejection required only steroids: in one monoclonal antibodies were added. Five patients had a new graft implanted, four for hepatic artery thrombosis and one for primary liver nonfunction. Nine patients are alive (64%) with the follow-up time ranging from 2 to 56 months (mean, 31). Five patients died of multiorgan failure (3), portal vein thrombosis (1), and primary liver nonfunction (1). Four-year graft and patient survival rates were 47% and 64%, respectively. Small babies are a high-risk group in a pediatric liver transplant program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Parents' experiences of their premature infants' transportation from a university hospital NICU to the NICU at two local hospitals.

    PubMed

    Granrud, Marie Dahlen; Ludvigsen, Elin; Andershed, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how the parents of premature infants experience the transportation of their baby from the neonatal intensive care unit at a university hospital (NICU-U) to such a unit at a local hospital (NICU-L). This descriptive qualitative study comprises interviews with nine sets of parents and two mothers. The qualitative content analysis resulted in one theme: living in uncertainty about whether the baby will survive, and three categories: being distanced from the baby; fearing that something would happen to the baby during transportation; and experiencing closeness to the baby. The results also revealed that the parents experienced developmental, situational and health-illness transitions.

  19. Nonverbal Communication in "Friends"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yanrong

    2006-01-01

    This activity uses video clips from a popular sitcom, "Friends," to help students grasp the relational, rule-governed, and culture-specific nature of nonverbal communication. It opens students' eyes to nonverbal behaviors that are happening on a daily basis so that they not only master the knowledge but are able to apply it. While other popular…

  20. Recommend to a Friend?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Jennifer Lynham

    2012-01-01

    New York's Cornell University spends millions of dollars and thousands of staff and volunteer hours to produce more than 1,400 events around the world each year. That's one event every six hours. Is it worth it? Do the 40,000 alumni, parents, and friends who attend feel closer to Cornell after these events? Do they disengage because Cornell didn't…

  1. In Canada: Friendly Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Heather-jane

    2004-01-01

    One of Canada's more frequently quoted political malapropisms is attributed to Robert Thompson, who sternly reminded his fellow parliamentarians in 1973 that "the Americans are our best friends, whether we like it or not." This cross-border friendship is partly expedient, partly geographic, partly genuine, sometimes one-sided, and almost always…

  2. Babies behind bars; an Irish perspective.

    PubMed

    Enright, F; Boyle, T; Murphy, J

    2007-01-01

    In the Irish Prison service prison is not deemed suitable for babes. Rarely are mothers separated from their children in Ireland as they get temporary release renewed weekly to keep her at home with her baby. The governor explained the system of the prison which I detail below. The women's prison is now known as the Dochas Centre meaning hope, named so by the women themselves. We found that 14 babies lived in the centre with their mothers in the last 4 years. Their length of stay ranged from 2 days to 3 months. Of the 14 babies in prison, five were born to women who were pregnant on admission and the other nine brought their babies with them. Six women are separated from their children, in total 24, due to her incarceration. The implications are that a formal system is needed to plan the baby's admission, stay and discharge with formal links with HSE health and child protection systems where necessary. The HSE and the Irish prison's service are looking at further amalgamation or integration of health care into the prison system.

  3. Baby Skyrme models without a potential term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcroft, Jennifer; Haberichter, Mareike; Krusch, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    We develop a one-parameter family of static baby Skyrme models that do not require a potential term to admit topological solitons. This is a novel property as the standard baby Skyrme model must contain a potential term in order to have stable soliton solutions, though the Skyrme model does not require this. Our new models satisfy an energy bound that is linear in terms of the topological charge and can be saturated in an extreme limit. They also satisfy a virial theorem that is shared by the Skyrme model. We calculate the solitons of our new models numerically and observe that their form depends significantly on the choice of parameter. In one extreme, we find compactons while at the other there is a scale invariant model in which solitons can be obtained exactly as solutions to a Bogomolny equation. We provide an initial investigation into these solitons and compare them with the baby Skyrmions of other models.

  4. Letter from the Friends Chairman

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Letter from the Friends Chairman Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents ... FNLM Chairman Paul Rogers converse at a recent Friends function at the National Library of Medicine. Photo ...

  5. VTR module: weaning foods for baby.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Weaning should start when the baby turns 4 months old. At this stage (4 to 6 months), milk is no longer enough. Parents should introduce new foods which can meet the fast-increasing nutrition needs of the child. Among the latest materials produced by the Video Radio Production Division of the Nutrition Center of the Philippines is a VTR training module entitled "Karagdagang Pagkain ni Baby" (Weaning Foods for Baby), designed to strengthen this important aspect of child care. Specifically, the module seeks to encourage parents to introduce foods in addition to breastmilk to their 4 to 6 month old children and to start giving them "complete" meals from 6 months onward. It provides suggestions on the kinds of foods or food combinations to give to the baby and encourages home food production (backyard gardening, poultry-raising etc) to supply food requirements of growing children. Contents of the module include how-to's on weaning food preparation (mashing, straining, flaking, chopping, scraping, etc), prescriptions on the kinds and amounts of foods for babies; and food combinations (porridge or rice and a viand from the 3 basic food groups: energy-giving, body building and regulating). For instance, at 4 months old, the baby may be given lugao (porridge), soup and fruits; at 5 months, eggs, vegetables and beans; at 6 months, fish/meat, oil or gata (coconut oil). With a running time of 18 minutes, the module uses computer graphics to highlight food items, recommended amounts, and age group requirements in the text, and applies digital multi-effects to ensure smooth traditions. PMID:12287620

  6. VTR module: weaning foods for baby.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Weaning should start when the baby turns 4 months old. At this stage (4 to 6 months), milk is no longer enough. Parents should introduce new foods which can meet the fast-increasing nutrition needs of the child. Among the latest materials produced by the Video Radio Production Division of the Nutrition Center of the Philippines is a VTR training module entitled "Karagdagang Pagkain ni Baby" (Weaning Foods for Baby), designed to strengthen this important aspect of child care. Specifically, the module seeks to encourage parents to introduce foods in addition to breastmilk to their 4 to 6 month old children and to start giving them "complete" meals from 6 months onward. It provides suggestions on the kinds of foods or food combinations to give to the baby and encourages home food production (backyard gardening, poultry-raising etc) to supply food requirements of growing children. Contents of the module include how-to's on weaning food preparation (mashing, straining, flaking, chopping, scraping, etc), prescriptions on the kinds and amounts of foods for babies; and food combinations (porridge or rice and a viand from the 3 basic food groups: energy-giving, body building and regulating). For instance, at 4 months old, the baby may be given lugao (porridge), soup and fruits; at 5 months, eggs, vegetables and beans; at 6 months, fish/meat, oil or gata (coconut oil). With a running time of 18 minutes, the module uses computer graphics to highlight food items, recommended amounts, and age group requirements in the text, and applies digital multi-effects to ensure smooth traditions.

  7. Migration of bisphenol A from plastic baby bottles, baby bottle liners and reusable polycarbonate drinking bottles.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, C; Kosarac, I; Stewart, B; Gauthier, B R; Lalonde, K; Lalonde, P J

    2009-06-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has recently received special attention. It has been shown that exposure to BPA may occur through the consumption of beverages or foods that have been in contact with polycarbonate (PC) plastic containers or epoxy resins in food packaging. A BPA migration study was conducted using a variety of plastic containers, including polycarbonate baby bottles, non-PC baby bottles, baby bottle liners, and reusable PC drinking bottles. Water was used to simulate migration into aqueous and acidic foods; 10% ethanol solution to simulate migration to low- and high-alcoholic foods; and 50% ethanol solution to simulate migration to fatty foods. By combining solid-phase extraction, BPA derivatization and analysis by GC-EI/MS/MS, a very low detection limit at the ng l(-1) level was obtained. Migration of BPA at 40 degrees C ranged from 0.11 microg l(-1) in water incubated for 8 h to 2.39 microg l(-1) in 50% ethanol incubated for 240 h. Residual BPA leaching from PC bottles increased with temperature and incubation time. In comparison with the migration observed from PC bottles, non-PC baby bottles and baby bottle liners showed only trace levels of BPA. Tests for leachable lead and cadmium were also conducted on glass baby bottles since these represent a potential alternative to plastic bottles. No detectable lead or cadmium was found to leach from the glass. This study indicated that non-PC plastic baby bottles, baby bottle liners and glass baby bottles might be good alternatives for polycarbonate bottles.

  8. [Severe hypernatraemic dehydration in collodion baby].

    PubMed

    Magid, Tobias; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper; Nymann, Peter; Hansen, Bo Mølholm

    2007-03-26

    Case report on severe hypernatraemic dehydration in a non-recognised collodion baby who also suffered from hydrops fetalis caused by supraventricular tachycardia. Excessive transcutaneous fluid loss caused s-Na+ reaching 182 mmol/l within 36 hours of birth. The infant was cautiously rehydrated during the following three days. No sign of neurologic impairment was observed. It is emphasized that early observation of the collodion baby must take place in a humidified incubator. Major weight changes in the newborn should always result in analysis of serum sodium.

  9. Bathing or washing babies after birth?

    PubMed

    Henningsson, A; Nyström, B; Tunnell, R

    One group of healthy full-term newborn babies was washed after birth and another was bathed to remove vernix caseosa and clean the skin. Few infections, none of them serious, occurred in either group. Bacterial colonisation of the umbilical cord on the third day of life was similar in both groups. The rectal temperature fell further and more infants cried during washing than during bathing. Thus bathing the baby after birth makes it calmer, quieter, and more comfortable than washing and causes less heat-loss. Clinical signs of infection and bacterial colonisation rates are no higher after bathing than after washing. PMID:6118769

  10. Hyperbiliverdinemia in the bronze baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purcell, S M; Wians, F H; Ackerman, N B; Davis, B M

    1987-01-01

    The bronze baby syndrome is an unusual complication of phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in the neonate. The pigment or pigments responsible for the discoloration in this syndrome have not yet been identified. Suspected pigments include photodegradation products of bilirubin and copper-porphyrins. We present here the case of a neonate with bronze baby syndrome whose serum had increased spectral absorbance in the region of maximum absorbance for biliverdin. We suggest that biliverdin pigments may also contribute to the "bronze" color associated with this syndrome.

  11. Children's Restrictive Disclosure to Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Ken J.; Sliz, Dave

    1988-01-01

    Children's restrictive disclosure to friends, which is a facet of intimate friendship, was investigated. It was found that children in kindergarten, second, and fourth grade showed restrictive disclosure to friends, and that greater disclosure of positive personal information to friends than to nonfriends was exhibited with age. (PCB)

  12. Taking babies' temperatures: science versus social taboos in battle over Baby Check.

    PubMed

    Handysides, S

    1993-09-11

    Baby Check, a scoring system for assessing the severity of illness in babies under 6 months old, has not met with the success its developers expected. The inclusion of rectal temperature in the assessment was strongly opposed by the Royal College of Midwives, which refused to alter its view despite evidence of the safety and accuracy of rectal thermometry. British parents appear not to like rectal thermometers either. Most other medical bodies have supported Baby Check and the reason for midwives' opposition may have more to do with professional pique at not being consulted than clinical wisdom. PMID:8401058

  13. Decision tree and postpartum management for preventing dehydration in the "breastfed" baby.

    PubMed

    Newman, J

    1996-06-01

    Dehydration and poor weight gain in breastfed infants are common but potentially preventable problems. Serious consequences are severe hypernatremic dehydration, severe weight loss, and severe hyperbilirubinemia with possible irreversible damage to the baby's brain or other vital organs. The dangers of dehydration have been emphasized by recent media reports of severe cases. These reports have resulted in increased, but often inappropriate, intervention in breastfeeding. On the basis of our experience at the Hospital for Sick Children, and the Doctors Hospital (Toronto), we have developed a decision tree and management protocol to assess breastfeeding, intervene effectively, and prevent such problems. If all breastfeeding mothers and babies are evaluated by qualified staff before discharge using this tool, it is expected that the serious consequences associated with babies leaving hospital appearing to be breastfeeding, but in fact not breastfeeding at all, will be prevented. Application of this approach, however, will require considerable upgrading of nurses' and physicians' skills and knowledge with regard to breastfeeding. A case report is presented.

  14. 'Baby-Led' Weaning Doesn't Raise Choking Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies who feed themselves solid foods early on may not be at increased ... known as "baby-led" weaning: Instead of introducing solid foods the traditional way -- spoon-feeding rice cereal, ...

  15. Babies Often Put to Sleep in Unsafe Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160434.html Babies Often Put to Sleep in Unsafe Positions About 3,500 U.S. infants ... Despite decades of warnings from the "Back to Sleep" campaign, many parents are still putting their babies ...

  16. Why at Least 39 Weeks Is Best for Your Baby?

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need to have a c-section. A c-section can cause problems for your baby. Babies ... through the vagina, also called the birth canal.) C-sections can cause problems in future pregnancies. Once ...

  17. Healthy Birth Practice #3: Bring a Loved One, Friend, or Doula for Continuous Support

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeanne; Hotelling, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    All women should be allowed and encouraged to bring a loved one, friend, or doula to their birth without financial or cultural barriers. Continuous labor support offers benefits to mothers and their babies with no known harm. This article is an updated evidence-based review of the “Lamaze International Care Practices that Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #3: Continuous Labor Support,” published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007. PMID:25411539

  18. Healthy birth practice #3: bring a loved one, friend, or doula for continuous support.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeanne; Hotelling, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    All women should be allowed and encouraged to bring a loved one, friend, or doula to their birth without financial or cultural barriers. Continuous labor support offers benefits to mothers and their babies with no known harm. This article is an updated evidence-based review of the "Lamaze International Care Practices that Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #3: Continuous Labor Support," published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007.

  19. Infants & Toddlers: How Babies Use Gestures to Communicate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2004-01-01

    Evolution has provided babies with wonderful ways to get the loving attention and care that they need from adults. When a baby is distressed, his cry is the most primitive and powerful tool for bringing help. By the time a baby is 2 or 3 months old, his dazzling smile and crooked grin evokes tenderness, smiles, and nurturance from adults who are…

  20. Portrait of Promise: Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome. [Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of St. Paul, MN.

    Shaken baby syndrome describes the serious injuries that can occur when a very young child is severely or violently shaken, causing the brain to move back and forth inside the skull. The syndrome usually originates when a parent or other caregiver shakes a baby out of anger or frustration, often because the baby would not stop crying or…

  1. Shaken Baby Syndrome: What Caregivers Need To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Paula

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the causes of shaken baby syndrome and how to recognize, respond to, and prevent it. Identifies horseplay to avoid and recommends never shaking baby even for apnea. Offers 12 tips for working with crying babies and includes ten discussion questions to test knowledge of the syndrome. (DLH)

  2. Infant & Toddlers: How to Calm an Exuberant Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    It is important to understand that babies differ in temperament. Some are sensationally exuberant and loud. Others are more withdrawn and quiet. Babies also differ in tempo and style. Some eat with gusto. Others deliberately scoop a bit of cooked cereal onto a spoon and slowly munch on their food. Helping a baby learn to modulate voice tones means…

  3. Implementing the Fussy Baby Network[R] Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Linda; Hofherr, Jennifer; Heffron, Mary Claire; Sims, Jennifer Murphy; Jalowiec, Barbara; Bromberg, Stacey R.; Paul, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Erikson Institute Fussy Baby Network[R] (FBN) developed an approach to engaging parents around their urgent concerns about their baby's crying, sleeping, or feeding in a way which builds their longer-term capacities as parents. This approach, called the FAN, is now in place in new Fussy Baby Network programs around the country and is being infused…

  4. BabySQUID: A mobile, high-resolution multichannel magnetoencephalography system for neonatal brain assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoshio; Pratt, Kevin; Atwood, Christopher; Mascarenas, Anthony; Reineman, Richard; Nurminen, Jussi; Paulson, Douglas

    2006-02-01

    We developed a prototype of a mobile, high-resolution, multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, called babySQUID, for assessing brain functions in newborns and infants. Unlike electroencephalography, MEG signals are not distorted by the scalp or the fontanels and sutures in the skull. Thus, brain activity can be measured and localized with MEG as if the sensors were above an exposed brain. The babySQUID is housed in a moveable cart small enough to be transported from one room to another. To assess brain functions, one places the baby on the bed of the cart and the head on its headrest with MEG sensors just below. The sensor array consists of 76 first-order axial gradiometers, each with a pickup coil diameter of 6mm and a baseline of 30mm, in a high-density array with a spacing of 12-14mm center-to-center. The pickup coils are 6±1mm below the outer surface of the headrest. The short gap provides unprecedented sensitivity since the scalp and skull are thin (as little as 3-4mm altogether) in babies. In an electromagnetically unshielded room in a hospital, the field sensitivity at 1kHz was ˜17fT/√Hz. The noise was reduced from ˜400to200fT/√Hz at 1Hz using a reference cancellation technique and further to ˜40fT/√Hz using a gradient common mode rejection technique. Although the residual environmental magnetic noise interfered with the operation of the babySQUID, the instrument functioned sufficiently well to detect spontaneous brain signals from babies with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of as much as 7.6:1. In a magnetically shielded room, the field sensitivity was 17fT/√Hz at 20Hz and 30fT/√Hz at 1Hz without implementation of reference or gradient cancellation. The sensitivity was sufficiently high to detect spontaneous brain activity from a 7month old baby with a SNR as much as 40:1 and evoked somatosensory responses with a 50Hz bandwidth after as little as four averages. We expect that both the noise and the sensor gap can be reduced further by

  5. With Babies and Banners: Illustrated Historical Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Lyn; Gray, Lorraine

    Background reading materials are provided in this booklet developed to be used in conjunction with the award winning color documentary film "With Babies and Banners." The film records the role that the women of Flint, Michigan, played in the great General Motors sit-down strike of 1937. The readings are suitable for college audiences and for…

  6. Evaluation of products for treating babies' napkins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaya, H.; Thirlwall, J.; Shaw, E. J.; Hassam, Z.

    1979-01-01

    A test is described for assessing the sanitizing effect of napkin treatment products on naturally urine-wetted and faecally-contaminated napkins. This test defines in-use conditions which closely resemble typical domestic situations. One napkin treatment product ('Napisan'), tested at two different concentrations and with challenges of different numbers of babies' napkins, performed satisfactorily under the conditions used. PMID:448064

  7. Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and…

  8. Social Early Stimulation of Trisomy-21 Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Maria Teresa Sanz; Balana, Javier Menendez

    2003-01-01

    This study was initiated with twenty Down's syndrome babies to verify whether subjects undergoing social early stimulation would benefit from this type of treatment. An experimental study was designed with two training groups: visual or written instructions. The analyses of the results established statistically significant differences in the…

  9. Got Diabetes? Thinking about Having a Baby?

    MedlinePlus

    ... suh-lin) if ordered by your doctor. 4 Monitor your blood sugar often • Be aware that your blood sugar can ... you begin to take care of your baby. ✓ Monitor and control your blood sugar. ✓ See your doctor regularly. Usually twice a year, ...

  10. Completion Agenda for Baby Boomers. Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Seth

    2011-01-01

    In the article, "Completion Agenda for Baby Boomers", Moltz highlights how community colleges are currently implementing programs, such as the American Association of Community Colleges' Plus 50 Completion strategy, to encourage older learners to return to America's college campuses. The effects of the recent recession and the educational desires…

  11. Back to School for Retired Baby Boomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumgardner, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Across the nation, schools increasingly are tapping into a vast resource pool--retired educators. The potential effects of the retirement boom--baby boomers reaching retirement age--have been well documented. An April 2009 "New York Times" article estimates that by 2013, more than one-third of the nation's 3.2 million teachers could retire. One…

  12. The Baby Boom--Entering Midlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouvier, Leon F.; De Vita, Carol J.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. baby-boom generation, born between 1946 and 1964, is the largest generation in the nations's history. Numbering over 80 million people in 1990, this giant generation has indelibly changed U.S. society, requiring adjustments in schools, labor markets, housing markets, and government programs. Perhaps more than any other institution,…

  13. [New documentation on the Robert baby bottle].

    PubMed

    Julien, P

    1996-01-01

    The author makes known about a dozen unpublished documents (puzzle-cards, invoice, advertisements, post card, stamped tin signs printed in colors, catalogue, prospectuses) which shed light on the history of the manufacture Robert baby bottles (located successively in Dijon, Paris and in Martres-de-Veyre) and on the practice of bottle feeding. PMID:11624777

  14. Anonymous birth law saves babies--optimization, sustainability and public awareness.

    PubMed

    Grylli, Chryssa; Brockington, Ian; Fiala, Christian; Huscsava, Mercedes; Waldhoer, Thomas; Klier, Claudia M

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study are to assess the impact of Austria's anonymous birth law from the time relevant statistical records are available and to evaluate the use of hatches versus anonymous hospital delivery. This study is a complete census of police-reported neonaticides (1975-2012) as well as anonymous births including baby hatches in Austria during 2002-2012. The time trends of neonaticide rates, anonymous births and baby hatches were analysed by means of Poisson and logistic regression model. Predicted and observed rates were derived and compared using a Bayesian Poisson regression model. Predicted numbers of neonaticides for the period of the active awareness campaign, 2002-2004, were more than three times larger than the observed number (p = 0.0067). Of the 365 women who benefitted from this legislation, only 11.5% chose to put their babies in a baby hatch. Since the law was introduced, a significant decreasing tendency of numbers of anonymous births (p = 047) was observed, while there was significant increase of neonaticide rates (p = 0.0001). The implementation of the anonymous delivery law is associated with a decrease in the number of police-reported neonaticides. The subsequent significantly decreasing numbers of anonymous births with an accompanying increase of neonaticides represents additional evidence for the effectiveness of the measure. PMID:26267063

  15. Anonymous birth law saves babies--optimization, sustainability and public awareness.

    PubMed

    Grylli, Chryssa; Brockington, Ian; Fiala, Christian; Huscsava, Mercedes; Waldhoer, Thomas; Klier, Claudia M

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study are to assess the impact of Austria's anonymous birth law from the time relevant statistical records are available and to evaluate the use of hatches versus anonymous hospital delivery. This study is a complete census of police-reported neonaticides (1975-2012) as well as anonymous births including baby hatches in Austria during 2002-2012. The time trends of neonaticide rates, anonymous births and baby hatches were analysed by means of Poisson and logistic regression model. Predicted and observed rates were derived and compared using a Bayesian Poisson regression model. Predicted numbers of neonaticides for the period of the active awareness campaign, 2002-2004, were more than three times larger than the observed number (p = 0.0067). Of the 365 women who benefitted from this legislation, only 11.5% chose to put their babies in a baby hatch. Since the law was introduced, a significant decreasing tendency of numbers of anonymous births (p = 047) was observed, while there was significant increase of neonaticide rates (p = 0.0001). The implementation of the anonymous delivery law is associated with a decrease in the number of police-reported neonaticides. The subsequent significantly decreasing numbers of anonymous births with an accompanying increase of neonaticides represents additional evidence for the effectiveness of the measure.

  16. Acute diarrhea and rotavirus infection in newborn babies and children in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, from June 1978 to June 1979.

    PubMed

    Soenarto, Y; Sebodo, T; Ridho, R; Alrasjid, H; Rohde, J E; Bugg, H C; Barnes, G L; Bishop, R F

    1981-08-01

    A longitudinal study of acute diarrhea in children in Yogyakarta, Indonesia (June 1978 to June 1979), showed little variation throughout most months of the year in numbers of children admitted to hospital and in numbers infected with rotaviruses. Both decreased during November and December coincidentally with seasonal change from dry to wet conditions. Rotavirus particles were identified by electron microscopy in fecal specimens from 126 of 334 (38%) infants and children with acute diarrhea. Nosocomial rotavirus infections occurred in 11% of control children admitted to hospital for other reasons. Socioeconomic level and preexisting nutritional status did not influence the incidence of rotavirus excretion. Rotavirus infections were most common in children aged 6 to 24 months. There was a low incidence of infection in infants less than 6 months old. Rotavirus infection was seldom observed in newborn babies delivered in an urban hospital nursery, in a rural health center, or at home. One of 72 newborn babies with diarrhea excreted rotavirus. One of 53 healthy newborn babies excreted rotavirus. It is concluded that, in Indonesia, rotavirus infection is a major cause of childhood diarrhea throughout the year, but is an uncommon cause of diarrhea in newborn babies. PMID:6268656

  17. [Natural, normal, and friendly, childbirth: homonymous terms].

    PubMed

    Dutra, Ivete Lourdes; Meyer, Dagmar Estermann

    2007-06-01

    This qualitative investigation discusses homonymy of the terms natural, normal, and friendly childbirth and their effects on childbirth care. Under the perspective of the contemporary cultural theories and gender studies, the Program for Humanizing labor and delivery are analyzed, based on the contents of semi-structured interviews with physicians and nurses of a training hospital in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. This article highlights and explores convergences, ambiguities, overlaps, and conflicts among these three delivery types, indicating polysemies, and blurring of boundaries among terms and inside each term, which influence care.

  18. Dementia-friendly neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Six research projects that will improve understanding of dementia are to receive £20 million in funding from the UK government. The projects, which will be overseen by the National Institute for Health Research and the Economic and Social Research Council, include investigations into creating dementia-friendly neighbourhoods; the lifestyle changes that can reduce the risk of developing the condition; training care home staff to support patients who become agitated; improving predictions of the future financial costs of dementia; living well with the condition; and the effects of visual aids on wellbeing and quality of life.

  19. Born Too Soon: Care for the preterm baby

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    As part of a supplement entitled "Born Too Soon", this paper focuses on care of the preterm newborn. An estimated 15 million babies are born preterm, and the survival gap between those born in high and low income countries is widening, with one million deaths a year due to direct complications of preterm birth, and around one million more where preterm birth is a risk factor, especially amongst those who are also growth restricted. Most premature babies (>80%) are between 32 and 37 weeks of gestation, and many die needlessly for lack of simple care. We outline a series of packages of care that build on essential care for every newborn comprising support for immediate and exclusive breastfeeding, thermal care, and hygienic cord and skin care. For babies who do not breathe at birth, rapid neonatal resuscitation is crucial. Extra care for small babies, including Kangaroo Mother Care, and feeding support, can halve mortality in babies weighing <2000 g. Case management of newborns with signs of infection, safe oxygen management and supportive care for those with respiratory complications, and care for those with significant jaundice are all critical, and are especially dependent on competent nursing care. Neonatal intensive care units in high income settings are de-intensifying care, for example increasing use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and this makes comprehensive preterm care more transferable. For health systems in low and middle income settings with increasing facility births, district hospitals are the key frontier for improving obstetric and neonatal care, and some large scale programmes now include specific newborn care strategies. However there are still around 50 million births outside facilities, hence home visits for mothers and newborns, as well as women's groups are crucial for reaching these families, often the poorest. A fundamental challenge is improving programmatic tracking data for coverage and quality, and measuring disability

  20. Effectiveness of Baby‐friendly community health services on exclusive breastfeeding and maternal satisfaction: a pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Langsrud, Øyvind; Løland, Beate F.; Tufte, Elisabeth; Tylleskär, Thorkild; Fretheim, Atle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The WHO/UNICEF Baby‐friendly Hospital Initiative has been shown to increase breastfeeding rates, but uncertainty remains about effective methods to improve breastfeeding in community health services. The aim of this pragmatic cluster quasi‐randomised controlled trial was to assess the effectiveness of implementing the Baby‐friendly Initiative (BFI) in community health services. The primary outcome was exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months in healthy babies. Secondary outcomes were other breastfeeding indicators, mothers' satisfaction with the breastfeeding experience, and perceived pressure to breastfeed. A total of 54 Norwegian municipalities were allocated by alternation to the BFI in community health service intervention or routine care. All mothers with infants of five completed months were invited to participate (n = 3948), and 1051 mothers in the intervention arm and 981 in the comparison arm returned the questionnaire. Analyses were by intention to treat. Women in the intervention group were more likely to breastfeed exclusively compared with those who received routine care: 17.9% vs. 14.1% until 6 months [cluster adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.72; P = 0.03], 41.4% vs. 35.8% until 5 months [cluster adjusted OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.77; P = 0.01], and 72.1% vs. 68.2% for any breastfeeding until 6 months [cluster adjusted OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.54; P = 0.06]. The intervention had no effect on breastfeeding until 12 months. Maternal breastfeeding experience in the two groups did not differ, neither did perceived breastfeeding pressure from staff in the community health services. In conclusion, the BFI in community health services increased rates of exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months. © 2015 Blackwell Publishing Ltd PMID:27062084

  1. Chimpanzees Trust Their Friends.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Jan M; Herrmann, Esther

    2016-01-25

    The identification and recruitment of trustworthy partners represents an important adaptive challenge for any species that relies heavily on cooperation [1, 2]. From an evolutionary perspective, trust is difficult to account for as it involves, by definition, a risk of non-reciprocation and defection by cheaters [3, 4]. One solution for this problem is to form close emotional bonds, i.e., friendships, which enable trust even in contexts where cheating would be profitable [5]. Little is known about the evolutionary origins of the human tendency to form close social bonds to overcome the trust problem. Studying chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), one of our closest living relatives, is one way of identifying these origins. While a growing body of research indicates that at least some of the properties of close human relationships find parallels in the social bonds of chimpanzees [6-10] and that chimpanzees extend favors preferentially toward selected individuals [11-14], it is unclear whether such interactions are based on trust. To fill this gap in knowledge, we observed the social interactions of a group of chimpanzees and established dyadic friendship relations. We then presented chimpanzees with a modified, non-verbal version of the human trust game and found that chimpanzees trust their friends significantly more frequently than their non-friends. These results suggest that trust within closely bonded dyads is not unique to humans but rather has its evolutionary roots in the social relationships of our closest primate relatives. PMID:26776735

  2. [Pregnancy after perinatal death: concerning the relationship of mother with the survivor baby].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manola

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the maternal mood after pregnancy and premature childbirth after perinatal loss which is defined as the fetal death occurred in the last weeks of gestation or the newborn in the first few weeks after delivery. The study is part of the work executed during a phD course in Woman's Health (Fundação Oswaldo Cruz-Instituto Fernandes Figueira) using the qualitative method of research in health for the construction of life histories by means of techniques of opened, non-directive interviews, and participant comment. The field work consisted in accompanying of the double mother-baby during hospitalization and six months after discharge. The sample of the selected subjects was chosen from the relative criterion to the accompaniment by 24 hours of internments with equal or superior duration of 30 days. This article if relates one of four histories of constructed lives. The result was the production of knowledge on the state of maternal mood in mothers of premature babies after hospital discharge through the identification of emotional reactions characteristics of a work of mourning linked to specific perinatal loss in its relationship with the syndromes of the "baby of substitution" and "vulnerable child".

  3. Passive smoking in babies: The BIBE study (Brief Intervention in babies. Effectiveness)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence that exposure to passive smoking in general, and in babies in particular, is an important cause of morbimortality. Passive smoking is related to an increased risk of pediatric diseases such as sudden death syndrome, acute respiratory diseases, worsening of asthma, acute-chronic middle ear disease and slowing of lung growth. The objective of this article is to describe the BIBE study protocol. The BIBE study aims to determine the effectiveness of a brief intervention within the context of Primary Care, directed to mothers and fathers that smoke, in order to reduce the exposure of babies to passive smoking (ETS). Methods/Design Cluster randomized field trial (control and intervention group), multicentric and open. Subject: Fathers and/or mothers who are smokers and their babies (under 18 months) that attend pediatric services in Primary Care in Catalonia. The measurements will be taken at three points in time, in each of the fathers and/or mothers who respond to a questionnaire regarding their baby's clinical background and characteristics of the baby's exposure, together with variables related to the parents' tobacco consumption. A hair sample of the baby will be taken at the beginning of the study and at six months after the initial visit (biological determination of nicotine). The intervention group will apply a brief intervention in passive smoking after specific training and the control group will apply the habitual care. Discussion Exposure to ETS is an avoidable factor related to infant morbimortality. Interventions to reduce exposure to ETS in babies are potentially beneficial for their health. The BIBE study evaluates an intervention to reduce exposure to ETS that takes advantage of pediatric visits. Interventions in the form of advice, conducted by pediatric professionals, are an excellent opportunity for prevention and protection of infants against the harmful effects of ETS. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier

  4. Current pattern of Ponderal Indices of term small-for-gestational age in a population of Nigerian babies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small-for-gestational age (SGA) newborns constitute a special group of neonates who may have suffered varying degrees of intrauterine insults and deprivation. Variations in birth weight, length and Ponderal Index (PI) depend on the type and degree of intrauterine insults the babies were exposed to. The objective of the study was to determine the current prevalence of term SGA births in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital and the current pattern of Ponderal Indices among term SGA in a population of Nigerian babies. Methods Subjects comprised of consecutive term singleton mother-baby pairs in the first 24 hours of life. It was a cross sectional study. The anthropometric parameters of each baby were recorded and the PI was also determined. Results Out of 1,052 live births during the study period (September to December, 2009), 825 were term, singleton babies. Five hundred and eight-one babies (70.4%) fall into the upper socio-economic classes 1 and II, 193 (23.4%) in the middle class and 51 (6.2%) were of the lower classes IV and V. None of the mothers indicated ingestion of alcohol or smoking of cigarette. Fifty-nine babies (7.2%) were small-for gestational age (SGA). Of the 59 SGA subjects, 26 (44.1%) were symmetrical SGA while 33 (55.9%) were asymmetrical SGA. There was no significant sex or socioeconomic predilection for either symmetrical or asymmetrical growth (p = 0.59, 0.73 respectively). Conclusion The findings showed that proportionality in SGA fetuses is a continuum, with the PI depending on the duration of intrauterine insult and the extent of its effects on weight and length before delivery. PMID:23875695

  5. The antiabortion movement and Baby Jane Doe.

    PubMed

    Paige, C; Karnofsky, E B

    1986-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the leadership of the antiabortion movement became involved in a campaign to establish legal rights to extraordinary medical care for seriously handicapped newborns. Armed with political contacts in the Reagan administration and Congress, and allied with advocates for the disabled, the antiabortion movement searched for a test case to guide through the courts. Antiabortion advocate Lawrence Washburn found such a case in Baby Jane Doe, who was being treated at Stony Brook Medical Center. The movement went on to amend the Child Abuse Act to include protections for handicapped newborns. Activists in the movement chose the issue of Baby Jane Doe because they believed it would attract welcome publicity, give them the appearance of supporting civil rights, and enhance their argument as to the legal rights of the fetus and thus strengthen the case against abortion. The movement was partially successful in obtaining its goals.

  6. The antiabortion movement and Baby Jane Doe.

    PubMed

    Paige, C; Karnofsky, E B

    1986-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the leadership of the antiabortion movement became involved in a campaign to establish legal rights to extraordinary medical care for seriously handicapped newborns. Armed with political contacts in the Reagan administration and Congress, and allied with advocates for the disabled, the antiabortion movement searched for a test case to guide through the courts. Antiabortion advocate Lawrence Washburn found such a case in Baby Jane Doe, who was being treated at Stony Brook Medical Center. The movement went on to amend the Child Abuse Act to include protections for handicapped newborns. Activists in the movement chose the issue of Baby Jane Doe because they believed it would attract welcome publicity, give them the appearance of supporting civil rights, and enhance their argument as to the legal rights of the fetus and thus strengthen the case against abortion. The movement was partially successful in obtaining its goals. PMID:3745839

  7. Delta-storage pool disease as a mimic of abusive head trauma in a 7-month-old baby: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Leeuw, Marc; Beuls, Emile; Jorens, Philippe; Parizel, Paul; Jacobs, Werner

    2013-07-01

    A seven-month-old baby was admitted to a hospital emergency department after collapsing suddenly while staying with his nanny. The baby displayed classic symptoms of shaken baby syndrome, including subdural haemorrhage, cytotoxic cerebral oedema, and bilateral retinal hemorrhages. Child protection services were informed, but both the parents and the nanny denied any involvement. In the subsequent weeks, the baby developed three other episodes of new subdural bleeding and a medico-legal investigation was started into the origin of the repeated subdural bleeding. Eventually, platelet aggregation tests and electron microscopy diagnosed a delta-storage pool disease; that is, a haemostatic disorder involving dense granules of the platelets. Initial minor blunt trauma may have resulted in subdural bleeding, while subsequent retinal haemorrhage could have been facilitated by the underlying haemostatic disorder. Delta-storage pool disease should be considered as a possible mimic of abusive head trauma similar to other rare conditions such as Menkes disease and type 1 glutaric aciduria.

  8. Traumatic brain injury and shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Wellingson S; Soares, Matheus S; Amorim, Robson L O; de Andrade, A Ferreira; Matushita, Hamilton; Teixeira, Manoel J

    2011-01-01

    Shaken baby syndrome is a serious form of physical child abuse, which is frequently overlooked. It is defined as vigorous manual shaking of an infant who is being held by the extremities or shoulders, leading to whiplash-induced intracranial and intraocular bleeding and no external signs of head trauma. This syndrome is seen most commonly in children under 2 years, mainly in children under 6 months. This article summarizes issues related to clinical presentation, diagnosis, risk factors, and interventions for healthcare professionals.

  9. A baby owl is found at CCAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A baby owl, possibly a screech owl, displays its wings at the photographer snapping its picture. The owl was found on the stairs inside Hangar G, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It had apparently tried to fly from a nest near the ceiling but couldn't get back to it. Workers called an Audubon rescue center near Orlando, which captured it and will ensure the bird is returned to the wild when it's ready.

  10. A baby owl is found at CCAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A baby owl, possibly a screech owl, stares at the photographer snapping its picture. The owl was found on the stairs inside Hangar G, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It had apparently tried to fly from a nest near the ceiling but couldn't get back to it. Workers called an Audubon rescue center near Orlando, which captured it and will ensure the bird is returned to the wild when it's ready.

  11. A baby owl is found at CCAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A baby owl, possibly a screech owl, shows its fear and resentment of the photographer snapping its picture. The owl was found on the stairs inside Hangar G, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. It had apparently tried to fly from a nest near the ceiling but couldn't get back to it. Workers called an Audubon rescue center near Orlando, which captured it and will ensure the bird is returned to the wild when it's ready.

  12. Misshapen Heads in Babies: Position or Pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Bronfin, Daniel R.

    2001-01-01

    A newborn's skull is highly malleable and rapidly expanding. As a result, any restrictive or constrictive forces applied to a baby's head can result in dramatic distortions. These changes can be mild, reversible deformations or severe, irreversible malformations that can result in brain injury. This paper reviews the anatomy and physiology of normal and abnormal brain and skull growth, the etiology of cranial deformation, the types of craniosynostosis most commonly seen in infants, and the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21765737

  13. Community Colleges Offer Baby Boomers an Encore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emeagwali, N. Susan

    2007-01-01

    A 2005 MetLife Foundation/Civic Ventures New Face of Work Survey found that many baby boomers are eager to make career changes that can launch a new chapter in their working lives while they make social contribution. The survey found that 50 percent of Americans age 50 to 70 want jobs that contribute to the greater good. It found that more than 53…

  14. Friends with Benefits: Women Want "Friends", Men Want "Benefits"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Kristen; Knox, David; Zusman, Marty E.

    2007-01-01

    One-hundred-and-seventy undergraduates at a large southeastern university completed a confidential anonymous 23 item questionnaire designed to assess the prevalence, attitudes, and sex differences of involvement in a "friends with benefits" (FWB) relationship (non romantic friends who also have a sexual relationship). Almost sixty percent of both…

  15. The dynamics of aloof baby Skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Petja; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aloof baby Skyrme model is a (2+1)-dimensional theory with solitons that are lightly bound. It is a low-dimensional analogue of a similar Skyrme model in (3+1)-dimensions, where the lightly bound solitons have binding energies comparable to nuclei. A previous study of static solitons in the aloof baby Skyrme model revealed that multi-soliton bound states have a cluster structure, with constituents that preserve their individual identities due to the short-range repulsion and long-range attraction between solitons. Furthermore, there are many different local energy minima that are all well-described by a simple binary species particle model. In this paper we present the first results on soliton dynamics in the aloof baby Skyrme model. Numerical field theory simulations reveal that the lightly bound cluster structure results in a variety of exotic soliton scattering events that are novel in comparison to standard Skyrmion scattering. A dynamical version of the binary species point particle model is shown to provide a good qualitative description of the dynamics.

  16. Bronze baby syndrome: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Jori, G; Reddi, E; Rubaltelli, F F

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the appropriateness of an animal model for the bronze baby syndrome. Ligation of the common bile duct in adult Wistar rats induces an accumulation of porphyrins and copper in the liver and a 20% conversion of protoporphyrin IX into (Cu(II)-protoporphyrin IX. Upon irradiation of these animals with super-blue lamps, the plasma content of Cu(II)-protoporphyrin increases by about 30%. Cholestasis also increases the recovery of porphyrins in the urine, although light treatment of ligated rats further increases urinary porphyrin excretion. The spectroscopic changes induced by irradiation of sera of ligated rats are consistent with the formation of products that have the typical spectrum found in bronze baby syndrome patients, i.e. a reduced absorbance in the visible region and an increased absorption in near-UV and red spectral regions. The products responsible for the brown discoloration found in bronze baby syndrome seem to result from phototransformation of copper-porphyrins subsequent to an electron transfer between photoexcited bilirubin and the copper ion.

  17. The dynamics of aloof baby Skyrmions

    DOE PAGES

    Salmi, Petja; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2016-01-25

    The aloof baby Skyrme model is a (2+1)-dimensional theory with solitons that are lightly bound. It is a low-dimensional analogue of a similar Skyrme model in (3+1)- dimensions, where the lightly bound solitons have binding energies comparable to nuclei. A previous study of static solitons in the aloof baby Skyrme model revealed that multi-soliton bound states have a cluster structure, with constituents that preserve their individual identities due to the short-range repulsion and long-range attraction between solitons. Furthermore, there are many different local energy minima that are all well-described by a simple binary species particle model. In this paper wemore » present the first results on soliton dynamics in the aloof baby Skyrme model. Numerical field theory simulations reveal that the lightly bound cluster structure results in a variety of exotic soliton scattering events that are novel in comparison to standard Skyrmion scattering. A dynamical version of the binary species point particle model is shown to provide a good qualitative description of the dynamics.« less

  18. Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Doepker, Candace; Lieberman, Harris R; Smith, Andrew Paul; Peck, Jennifer D; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Welsh, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The debate on the safety of and regulatory approaches for caffeine continues among various stakeholders and regulatory authorities. This decision-making process comes with significant challenges, particularly when considering the complexities of the available scientific data, making the formulation of clear science-based regulatory guidance more difficult. To allow for discussions of a number of key issues, the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) convened a panel of subject matter experts for a caffeine-focused session entitled "Caffeine: Friend or Foe?," which was held during the 2015 ILSI Annual Meeting. The panelists' expertise covered topics ranging from the natural occurrence of caffeine in plants and interindividual metabolism of caffeine in humans to specific behavioral, reproductive, and cardiovascular effects related to caffeine consumption. Each presentation highlighted the potential risks, benefits, and challenges that inform whether caffeine exposure warrants concern. This paper aims to summarize the key topics discussed during the session.

  19. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  20. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Thank you! Over the past 20 months AGU has received a record 22,159 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from four federal agencies (NASA, NOAA, EPA, and USGS). Together their generosity has benefited AGU non-revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000+) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($250-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$249). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are recognized as our most loyal Supporters.

  1. Freud's friend Fliess.

    PubMed

    Young, Annie Riddington

    2002-12-01

    Fliess, an ENT surgeon, was Freud's closest friend and confidant. They both believed that sexual problems were the chief cause of neurosis. Fliess pstulated that reflex nasal neurosis was based on the important physiological connection between the nose and the genitals. He described specific genital spots located on the nasal inferior turbinate. Fliess' second preoccupation was with vital periodicities. He believed that the symptoms of his reflex nasal neurosis followed regular 28-day cycles as does menstruation. He further proposed a male 23-day menstrual cycle, that he centred specifically on the nasal turbinate. Clearly, Fliess' fanciful theories of neurosis based on the turbinates have never held any scientific validity and are presented for their curiosity. This eccentric rhinolaryngologist, however, exerted a profound influence on Freud's conception of human development, that is often undervalued. PMID:12537609

  2. Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Doepker, Candace; Lieberman, Harris R; Smith, Andrew Paul; Peck, Jennifer D; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Welsh, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The debate on the safety of and regulatory approaches for caffeine continues among various stakeholders and regulatory authorities. This decision-making process comes with significant challenges, particularly when considering the complexities of the available scientific data, making the formulation of clear science-based regulatory guidance more difficult. To allow for discussions of a number of key issues, the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) convened a panel of subject matter experts for a caffeine-focused session entitled "Caffeine: Friend or Foe?," which was held during the 2015 ILSI Annual Meeting. The panelists' expertise covered topics ranging from the natural occurrence of caffeine in plants and interindividual metabolism of caffeine in humans to specific behavioral, reproductive, and cardiovascular effects related to caffeine consumption. Each presentation highlighted the potential risks, benefits, and challenges that inform whether caffeine exposure warrants concern. This paper aims to summarize the key topics discussed during the session. PMID:26735800

  3. Baby-led weaning: transitioning to solid foods at the baby's own pace.

    PubMed

    Rapley, Gill

    2011-06-01

    Baby-led weaning is an approach to the introduction of solid foods that is being followed by increasing numbers of parents, but what is it, and should health visitors be encouraging it? This paper aims to refresh practitioners' background knowledge of complementary feeding and to outline the key features of baby-led weaning, as well as to explore the evidence that supports this approach as a logical adjunct to the move to six months for the introduction of solid foods. The more common concerns of parents and professionals, such as choking and iron intake, are addressed. Tips for implementing baby-led weaning are included and some of the potential benefits identified.

  4. Your Friends the Quaker Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric W.

    1981-01-01

    The Friends Council on Education is a coordinating organization that provides oversight, special services, and inspiration to 68 Friends schools in the United States and Canada. The functions of the Council and the educational and philosophical goals of Quaker schools are discussed. (MLF)

  5. Understanding Friendship between Critical Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Paul; Angelides, Panayiotis

    2008-01-01

    This conceptual article discusses the issue of friendship implied by the term "critical friends". Our argument relates to the generalized use of the term "friendship" and the assumptions that it may carry compared with the actuality of the roles played by critical friends. We attempt to build a more precise definition of friendship which we…

  6. Riyadh Mother and Baby Multicenter Cohort Study: The Cohort Profile

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeil, Samia; Alzeidan, Rasmieh; Elawad, Mamoun; Tabassum, Rabeena; Hansoti, Shehnaz; Magzoup, Mohie Edein; Al-Kadri, Hanan; Elsherif, Elham; Al-Mandil, Hazim; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer; Zakaria, Nasria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity, on the mother and the infant. Methods A multicentre cohort study was conducted in three hospitals in the city of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. All Saudi women and their babies who delivered in participating hospitals were eligible for recruitment. Data on socio-demographic characteristics in addition to the maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy were collected. The cohort demographic profile was recorded and the prevalence of maternal conditions including gestational diabetes, pre-gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and obesity were estimated. Findings The total number of women who delivered in participating hospitals during the study period was 16,012 of which 14,568 women participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 29 ± 5.9 years and over 40% were university graduates. Most of the participants were housewives, 70% were high or middle income and 22% were exposed to secondhand smoke. Of the total cohort, 24% were married to a first cousin. More than 68% of the participants were either overweight or obese. The preterm delivery rate was 9%, while 1.5% of the deliveries were postdate. The stillbirth rate was 13/1000 live birth. The prevalence of gestational diabetes was 24% and that of pre-gestational diabetes was 4.3%. The preeclampsia prevalence was 1.1%. The labour induction rate was 15.5% and the cesarean section rate was 25%. Conclusion Pregnant women in Saudi Arabia have a unique demographic profile. The prevalence of obesity and diabetes in pregnancy are among the highest in the world. PMID:26937965

  7. Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2011-09-01

    Cyber friendly fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public. The

  8. What midwives need to know about baby massage.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Cheryl

    2012-09-01

    Baby massage has become increasingly popular in the West among parents and healthcare practitioners alike, with numerous studies continuing to hail the benefits of taking time to massage and bond with your baby. Newborn and infant massage is of particular interest to midwives in their primary role, helping families to bond and heal the pain of traumatic births, but now many midwives are offering baby massage sessions privately in their spare time also. Here's the low down. PMID:23082398

  9. Make a Friend...Be a Friend...Start a Friends of the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothlisberg, Allen P.

    This paper suggests that, in times of economic crisis, libraries may find support by establishing "Friends of the Library" groups, and reports that, with the assistance of Arizona's Northland Pioneer College's (NPC) Department of Library/Media Technology, several such library groups have been established. The success of the Friends of Holbrook…

  10. Design of paediatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Veronica

    2016-05-01

    The impact of healthcare environments on children and young people's (CYP) health and psychosocial wellbeing has attracted much attention in recent years. This sits within the realm of the political drive for enhanced awareness of the need to take account of the rights and voice of the child. Perhaps as a direct result of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and recognition from evidence in adult population studies of the impact of healthcare environments on psychosocial healing, contemporary times have witnessed a discernible movement towards enhancing quality care by promoting child and adolescent-friendly hospital environments. The Council of Europe guidelines on child-friendly health care moved to place the rights and needs of children at the heart of health care. The Council acknowledges that the delivery of child-oriented services, which includes the notion of family-centred care, should be delivered in child and family friendly environments. However, knowledge about what constitutes a child-friendly healthcare environment from CYP's perspective is often lacking with hospital architectural blueprints predominantly designed around adult proxy-reported assumptions about the needs and desires of children.

  11. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area. PMID:25801347

  12. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area.

  13. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-09-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well. PMID:20549448

  14. Friends of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten members of Congress have been presented with the Friends of Science Award by the National Coalition for Science and Technology (NCST). The awards, honoring significant contributions to science, engineering, and science education, are made every 2 years at the end of the congressional session. The recipients this year are Sen. Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.), Rep. Joseph D. Early (D-Mass.), Rep. Bill Frenzel (R-Minn.), Rep. Albert Gore, Jr. (D-Tenn.), Rep. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D-Hawaii), Rep. Stan Lundine (D-N.Y.), Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.), and Rep. Ed Zschau (R-Calif).Except for Sen. Inouye, whose term expires in 1986, all of this year's recipients were up for reelection in the national elections held November 6. All were successful in securing another term in Congress. In addition, Albert Gore was successful in his bid for a Senate seat, filling the vacancy left by the retiring Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker (R-Tenn.)

  15. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-09-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well.

  16. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Avi

    2005-12-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production. The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species. They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well.

  17. Baby Minds: Brain-Building Games Your Baby Will Love. Birth to Age Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acredolo, Linda; Goodwyn, Susan

    Recent research points to the inborn abilities of infants and shows how early experiences influence cognitive skills. This book presents activities for parents and their infants--building on activities babies instinctively love--to develop their unique abilities. The book is organized around six intellectual skills: (1) problem solving; (2)…

  18. Manual Activity and Onset of First Words in Babies Exposed and Not Exposed to Baby Signing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Brenda C.; DePaolis, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    Support for baby signing (BS) with hearing infants tends to converge toward three camps or positions. Those who advocate BS to advance infant language, literacy, behavioral, and cognitive development rely heavily on anecdotal evidence and social media to support their claims. Those who advocate BS as an introduction to another language, such as…

  19. We want what’s best for our baby: Prenatal Parenting of Babies with Lethal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Arsenault, Denise; Krowchuk, Heidi; Hall, Wendasha Jenkins; Denney-Koelsch, Erin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on qualitative research into the experience of couples who chose to continue their pregnancies after receiving a lethal fetal diagnosis, and to embrace the parenting of their baby in the shortened time they have. This analysis of interview data is part of a larger research project describing parents’ experiences of continuing pregnancy with a known lethal fetal diagnosis (LFD). PMID:26594107

  20. Leaching of bisphenol A from new and old babies' bottles, and new babies' feeding teats.

    PubMed

    Tan, B L L; Mustafa, A M

    2003-01-01

    Bisphenol A is the monomer used in the manufacture of polycarbonate. Bisphenol A is also known to mimic the female hormone estrogen. In this study, the possibility of the leaching of bisphenol A from polycarbonate babies' bottles and feeding teats was investigated. Bisphenol A was extracted from water samples exposed to the bottles and teats using liquid-liquid extraction. Bisphenol A was analysed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer with quadrapole detector in selected ion monitoring mode. Mean leaching of bisphenol A from 100 used babies' bottles when filled with water at 25 degrees C and 80 degrees C were 0.71 +/- 1.65 ng/cm2 (mean +/- standard deviation) and 3.37 +/- 5.68 ng/cm2 respectively. Mean leaching of bisphenol A from 30 new babies' bottles when filled with water at 25 degrees C and 80 degrees C were 0.03 +/- 0.02 ng/cm2 and 0.18 degrees 0.30 ng/cm2 respectively. Bisphenol A was observed to have leached from babies' feeding teats into 37 degrees C water ranged from non-detectable to 22.86 ng/g. The technique employed in this study is fast, reliable and economical. PMID:15038686

  1. [Outcome after a shaken baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lind, K; Laurent-Vannier, A; Toure, H; Brugel, D-G; Chevignard, M

    2013-04-01

    The Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is a severe inflicted brain injury due to an adult violently shaking an infant. Diagnostic guidelines have been recently published by the "Haute Autorité de santé". The mortality rate after SBS is 21.6 % and the long-term outcome is good for only 8 to 36 % patients followed over more than 5 years. The aim of this article is to describe sequelae after a SBS, their mechanisms, prognostic factors and recommendations for a better long-term care of the patients.

  2. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    PubMed

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted.

  3. Inspecting baby Skyrmions with effective metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.; Goulart, E.

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper we investigate the causal structure of the baby Skyrme model using appropriate geometrical tools. We discuss several features of excitations propagating on top of background solutions and show that the evolution of high frequency waves is governed by a curved effective geometry. Examples are given for which the effective metric describes the interaction between waves and solitonic solutions such as kinks, antikinks, and hedgehogs. In particular, it is shown how violent processes involving the collisions of solitons and antisolitons may induce metrics which are not globally hyperbolic. We argue that it might be illuminating to calculate the effective metric as a diagnostic test for pathological regimes in numerical simulations.

  4. Advising parents on washing babies' clothes.

    PubMed

    Scowen, P

    1996-01-01

    Detergents and other laundry products are generally effective and safe for all the family, but use carefully according to the maker's instructions and keep out of the reach of children. Rinse thoroughly to remove detergent residue from fabrics. If handwashing clothes, dissolve detergent before immersing hands. Wear rubber gloves if possible. Wash, rinse and dry hands thoroughly after contact with detergent. If a baby or parent has eczema, it may be necessary to try different products to see which one the client can tolerate. A non-perfumed, non-enzyme product may be found less irritating. PMID:9077252

  5. Perceptions of baby talk, frequency of receiving baby talk, and self-esteem among community and nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, B P; Rigby, H

    1996-03-01

    Community-living seniors (n = 113) and nursing home residents (n = 43) provided their impressions of baby-talk and neutral-talk scenarios and completed measures of functional health, need for succorance, and self-esteem. Two orthogonal dimensions were found in perceptions of baby talk: Warmth and Superiority. The personality trait of need for succorance was consistently associated with perceptions of warmth in baby talk, whereas functional health, age, and institutionalization were associated with perceptions of superiority. Significant interactions were found between perceptions of baby talk and frequency of receiving baby talk in the prediction of self-esteem, providing suggestive evidence for previously expressed concerns about potentially harmful effects of receiving baby talk on self-esteem among seniors who have negative perceptions of baby talk. However, older persons with positive perceptions of baby talk reported higher self-esteem when they frequently received baby talk, in accordance with person-environment theory. The self-esteem interaction for men occurred on the Superiority dimension, whereas the interaction for women occurred on the Warmth dimension.

  6. Design friendly double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    2012-03-01

    Double patterning using 193nm immersion has been adapted as the solution to enable 2x nm technology nodes until the arrival of EUV tools. As a result the past few years have seen a huge effort in creating double patterning friendly design flows. These flows have so far proposed a combination of decomposition rules at cell level and/or at placement level as well as sophisticated decomposition tools with varying density, design iteration and decomposition complexity penalties. What is more, designers have to familiarize themselves with double patterning challenges and decomposition tools. In this paper an alternative approach is presented that allows the development of dense standard cells with minimal impact on design flow due to double patterning. A real case study is done on 20nm node first metal layer where standard cells are designed without considering decomposition restrictions. The resulting layout is carefully studied in order to establish decomposition or color rules that can map the layout into two masks required for double patterning but without the need of complex coloring algorithms. Since the rules are derived from a decomposition unaware design they do not in return impose heavy restrictions on the design at the cell or placement level and show substantial density gains compared to previously proposed methods. Other key advantages are a simplified design flow without complex decomposition tools that can generate a faster time to market solution all at the same time keeping designers isolated from the challenges of the double patterning. The derived design rules highlight process development path required for design driven manufacturing.

  7. Risks associated with obesity in pregnancy, for the mother and baby: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Marchi, J; Berg, M; Dencker, A; Olander, E K; Begley, C

    2015-08-01

    Maternal obesity is linked with adverse outcomes for mothers and babies. To get an overview of risks related to obesity in pregnant women, a systematic review of reviews was conducted. For inclusion, reviews had to compare pregnant women of healthy weight with women with obesity, and measure a health outcome for mother and/or baby. Authors conducted full-text screening, quality assurance using the AMSTAR tool and data extraction steps in pairs. Narrative analysis of the 22 reviews included show gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, depression, instrumental and caesarean birth, and surgical site infection to be more likely to occur in pregnant women with obesity compared with women with a healthy weight. Maternal obesity is also linked to greater risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age babies, foetal defects, congenital anomalies and perinatal death. Furthermore, breastfeeding initiation rates are lower and there is greater risk of early breastfeeding cessation in women with obesity compared with healthy weight women. These adverse outcomes may result in longer duration of hospital stay, with concomitant resource implications. It is crucial to reduce the burden of adverse maternal and foetal/child outcomes caused by maternal obesity. Women with obesity need support to lose weight before they conceive, and to minimize their weight gain in pregnancy.

  8. Risks associated with obesity in pregnancy, for the mother and baby: a systematic review of reviews.

    PubMed

    Marchi, J; Berg, M; Dencker, A; Olander, E K; Begley, C

    2015-08-01

    Maternal obesity is linked with adverse outcomes for mothers and babies. To get an overview of risks related to obesity in pregnant women, a systematic review of reviews was conducted. For inclusion, reviews had to compare pregnant women of healthy weight with women with obesity, and measure a health outcome for mother and/or baby. Authors conducted full-text screening, quality assurance using the AMSTAR tool and data extraction steps in pairs. Narrative analysis of the 22 reviews included show gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, depression, instrumental and caesarean birth, and surgical site infection to be more likely to occur in pregnant women with obesity compared with women with a healthy weight. Maternal obesity is also linked to greater risk of preterm birth, large-for-gestational-age babies, foetal defects, congenital anomalies and perinatal death. Furthermore, breastfeeding initiation rates are lower and there is greater risk of early breastfeeding cessation in women with obesity compared with healthy weight women. These adverse outcomes may result in longer duration of hospital stay, with concomitant resource implications. It is crucial to reduce the burden of adverse maternal and foetal/child outcomes caused by maternal obesity. Women with obesity need support to lose weight before they conceive, and to minimize their weight gain in pregnancy. PMID:26016557

  9. Let Baby Set the Delivery Date: Wait Until 39 Weeks if You Can

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Human Services Latest Issue This Issue Features Autism Spectrum Disorder Let Baby Set the Delivery Date Health Capsules ... the lifelong health of that baby.” search Features Autism Spectrum Disorder Let Baby Set the Delivery Date Wise Choices ...

  10. Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation: Challenges to Nurses and Outcome in Extremely Preterm Babies.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Rachel A

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, about 15 million infants are born prematurely each year. Technological advances, including invasive mechanical ventilation, play a major role in the survival of extremely preterm babies. Those who survive may have prolonged morbid conditions that result in long-term sequelae. Nurses face several challenges during the hospitalization of these infants. Vigilant care, monitoring, and careful handling of the infants can prevent infections and long-term complications. Newer, less invasive technologies are promising for improved outcomes in extremely preterm infants. PMID:26232802

  11. Mortality pattern in babies delivered by cesarean section and vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, N; Pal, S; Roy, A

    1989-03-01

    A total of 7077 cases of delivery were studied in a rural based hospital where most of the mothers come without any antenatal care, from November, 1979 to December, 1980 to observe the mortality pattern in different types of delivery. Only live born babies were included in the study in which the mortality rate in elective cesarean section was found to be nearly equal to that in vaginal delivery. The percentage of mortality was higher (5.4%) in emergency cesarean section-the chief causes being asphyxia neonatorum, low gestational age and low birth weight. PMID:2753552

  12. How should very low birthweight babies best be managed in Papua New Guinea?

    PubMed

    Brown, N

    1996-03-01

    Short-term outcome in very low birthweight babies has never been closely examined in Papua New Guinea. A cohort of neonates born over a year at Port Moresby General Hospital was followed from birth to death or discharge. Intrauterine growth retardation was an important contributor to low birthweight. Simple, inexpensive care resulted in respectable survival figures. Improving antenatal surveillance will have much more impact in reducing mortality in this group in the future than trying to emulate sophisticated and costly western neonatal care.

  13. Environmentally friendly and biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobased and environmentally friendly lubricants are finding applications in many areas ranging from hydraulic fluids to grease. They offer excellent biodegradability and very low ecotoxicity; high viscosity index; improved tribological properties; lower volatility and flash points relative to petro...

  14. Conceptualizing age-friendly communities.

    PubMed

    Menec, Verena H; Means, Robin; Keating, Norah; Parkhurst, Graham; Eales, Jacquie

    2011-09-01

    On the political and policy front, interest has increased in making communities more "age-friendly", an ongoing trend since the World Health Organization launched its global Age-Friendly Cities project. We conceptualize age-friendly communities by building on the WHO framework and applying an ecological perspective. We thereby aim to make explicit key assumptions of the interplay between the person and the environment to advance research or policy decisions in this area. Ecological premises (e.g., there must be a fit between the older adult and environmental conditions) suggest the need for a holistic and interdisciplinary research approach. Such an approach is needed because age-friendly domains (the physical environment, housing, the social environment, opportunities for participation, informal and formal community supports and health services, transportation, communication, and information) cannot be treated in isolation from intrapersonal factors, such as age, gender, income, and functional status, and other levels of influence, including the policy environment.

  15. Baby Galaxies in the Adult Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This artist's conception illustrates the decline in our universe's 'birth-rate' over time. When the universe was young, massive galaxies were forming regularly, like baby bees in a bustling hive. In time, the universe bore fewer and fewer 'offspring,' and newborn galaxies (white circles) matured into older ones more like our own Milky Way (spirals).

    Previously, astronomers thought that the universe had ceased to give rise to massive, young galaxies, but findings from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer suggest that may not be the case. Surveying thousands of nearby galaxies with its highly sensitive ultraviolet eyes, the telescope spotted three dozen that greatly resemble youthful galaxies from billions of years ago. In this illustration, those galaxies are represented as white circles on the right, or 'today' side of the timeline.

    The discovery not only suggests that our universe may still be alive with youth, but also offers astronomers their first close-up look at what appear to be baby galaxies. Prior to the new result, astronomers had to peer about 11 billion light-years into the distant universe to see newborn galaxies. The newfound galaxies are only about 2 to 4 billion light-years away.

  16. Japan's baby bust: an economic issue?

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    This brief article articulates that the solution to the declining birthrate in Japan is to change the corporate culture and societal values and begin putting the family first. At the present rate of fertility decline, Japan could well have just over 67 million total population in another 100 years, which is 50% of the present total. In 1990, the Finance Minister tried to convince Japanese couples to have more babies by abandoning policies that led women to higher education. The implication is that women would then want to stay at home and have babies. The prosperity of the late 1980s and early 1990s did not encourage higher fertility. The likely reason for low fertility is the male-dominated, corporate culture where male workers leave home early in the morning and work till late at night. Wives are left to care for children and maintain a full-time job. The total fertility rate (TFR) was 3.65 in 1950 and 1.39 in 1998. Both Germany and Italy have lower fertility but higher rates of immigration. The decline in the TFR is responsible for many of the current economic policies. New taxes were introduced in 1997 to pay for social security of the aged, and then the economy stalled. Life expectancies continue to rise. The elderly are a larger proportion of total population than children aged under 15 years. Women marry late, and the divorce rate is high. PMID:12348885

  17. Massage Changes Babies' Body, Brain and Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Chihiro; Shiga, Takashi

    Tactile stimulation is an important factor in mother-infant interactions. Many studies on both human and animals have shown that tactile stimulation during the neonatal period has various beneficial effects in the subsequent growth of the body and brain. In particular, massage is often applied to preterm human babies as “touch care”, because tactile stimulation together with kinesthetic stimulation increases body weight, which is accompanied by behavioral development and the changes of endocrine and neural conditions. Among them, the elevation of insulin-like growth factor-1, catecholamine, and vagus nerve activity may underlie the body weight gain. Apart from the body weight gain, tactile stimulation has various effects on the nervous system and endocrine system. For example, it has been reported that tactile stimulation on human and animal babies activates parasympathetic nervous systems, while suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenalcortical (HPA) axis, which may be related to the reduction of emotionality, anxiety-like behavior, and pain sensitivity. In addition, animal experiments have shown that tactile stimulation improves learning and memory. Facilitation of the neuronal activity and the morphological changes including the hippocampal synapse may underlie the improvement of the learning and memory. In conclusion, it has been strongly suggested that tactile stimulation in early life has beneficial effects on body, brain structure and function, which are maintained throughout life.

  18. Safety evaluation of superabsorbent baby diapers.

    PubMed

    Kosemund, Kirstin; Schlatter, Harald; Ochsenhirt, Jennifer L; Krause, Edburga L; Marsman, Daniel S; Erasala, Geetha N

    2009-03-01

    Superabsorbent disposable baby diapers are sophisticated, well-engineered products that provide many benefits including convenience, comfort, exceptional leakage protection, improved hygiene and skin care benefits compared with cloth diapers. Safety assurance is an integral part of the diaper development process at Procter & Gamble, with the goal of ensuring safety for both caregivers and babies. A systematic, stepwise approach to safety assessment starts with a thorough evaluation of new design features and materials, using the principles of general risk assessment including, as appropriate, controlled trials to assess clinical endpoints or independent scientific review of safety data. The majority of the diaper materials are polymers that are safe and do not have inherent toxicity issues. Trace amounts of non-polymeric materials, such as colorants, are assessed based on their skin contact potential. New materials or design features are introduced in marketed products only if they have been shown to be safe under the conditions of recommended or foreseeable use. The product safety continues to be confirmed after launch by means of in-market monitoring. This article provides a broad overview of human safety exposure-based risk assessment used at Procter & Gamble for absorbent hygiene products. PMID:18992296

  19. Motivations of Baby Boomer Doctoral Learners: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julia J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a substantive theory of the motivations of Baby Boomer doctoral learners, using the grounded theory approach. These Baby Boomers possess a wealth of wisdom. Their experiences, coupled with educational credentials, could take their leadership abilities to the next level. The grounded theory method developed by…

  20. Baby Boomers and Community College: A Study of Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, DiAnne H.

    2009-01-01

    Scope and method of study. This descriptive case study was designed to describe the critical issues surrounding Baby Boomers and their motivations to attend community college, in addition to their perceptions of learning and curriculum needs. Additionally the study explored what these Baby Boomers plan to do after completing their courses and…

  1. Hepatitis B Shots Are Recommended for All New Babies

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B Shots Are Recommended for All New Babies. Hepatitis B Vaccine Helps Protect Your Baby’s Future! What is hepatitis B and why do I need to protect my baby now? Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by the ...

  2. Babies' Self-Regulation: Taking a Broad Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Enid; Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation is a complex process that involves coordinating various systems of the body and mind, including feelings. It's not only about emotions but also about cognition. Self-regulation has an impact on social development, influencing how babies and toddlers get along with others. Through self-regulation, babies and toddlers learn to pay…

  3. CDC Vital Signs: Hepatitis C: Testing Baby Boomers Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... tested for hepatitis C. Doctors, nurses and other health care providers can: Test all baby boomers and people with other risks ... hepatitis C and all doctors, nurses, and other health care providers should test all their patients who are baby boomers for ...

  4. Infants & Toddlers "What's Going On? How to Hold Squriming Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2005-01-01

    Using Simple strategies, caregivers can learn to effectively communicate with infants through touch. This article offers suggestions and techniques for calming squirming babies of all types and ages who seem to be unable to find a comfortable position while being held. She begins by suggesting that care givers of very small babies be patient and…

  5. Baby Boom Equals Career Bust. Monographs on Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Charles Guy

    Presenting the Baby Boom (1946-1965) as both a potential social problem and opportunity for American leadership, this monograph discusses the following aspects of this population concern: (1) its immediate and long-term impact on career opportunities for those college graduates who make up the baby boom generation; (2) its impact on those whose…

  6. Baby Care Basics: What Every Infant Caregiver Needs To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents information on caring for infants in a child care setting. Suggestions include responding quickly to crying, setting the schedule to baby's pace, talking to the baby, using proper hand-washing procedures, checking the room daily for safety, going outdoors every day, and building partnerships with parents. Includes a sample form for…

  7. The Effects of Baby Sign Training on Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Vannesa; Sepulveda, Amanda; Rodriguez, Sarai

    2014-01-01

    Although Baby Sign is gaining in popularity, there is a scarcity of research supporting its use. The research that has been conducted is conflicting. In the current study, nine families with children ranging in age from six months to two years and five months participated in a baby sign workshop. A pre--post-test design was used to assess the…

  8. Pedagogy with Babies: Perspectives of Eight Nursery Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfer, Peter; Page, Jools

    2015-01-01

    The last 30 years have seen a significant increase in babies attending nursery, with corresponding questions about the aims and organisation of practice. Research broadly agrees on the importance of emotionally consistent, sensitive and responsive interactions between staff and babies. Policy objectives for nursery and expectations of parents and…

  9. Better Baby Care: A Book for Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Margaret; Tate, Costella

    A resource for child caregivers providing family day care for infants and toddlers, this book is designed to provide information and suggestions in a format that is easy to follow, and in language that is easy to read. Chapter 1 gives tips on "baby-proofing" the home, as well as ideas for toys, equipment, and how to integrate a baby into the…

  10. Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guberman, Nancy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Blein, Laure; Olazabal, Ignace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many Baby Boomers are faced with the care of aging parents, as well as that of disabled or ill spouses or children. This study examines how Baby Boomers in Quebec, Canada, perceive and play their role as caregivers and how this might differ from their parents' generation. Design and methods: This was a qualitative and empirical study…

  11. Teenagers and Their Babies: A Perinatal Home Visitor's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardone, Ida; Gilkerson, Linda; Wechsler, Nick

    2008-01-01

    "Teenagers and Their Babies" is a self-study and preparation guide for paraprofessional home-based visitors to engage expectant and new parents in an exploration of their baby's development and their expectations for parenthood. The guide includes service interventions--strategies, techniques, and activities--for home visitors and doulas to use…

  12. Talking with Your Baby: Family as the First School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Brophy, Holly Elisabeth

    Noting that children s first words are exciting for parents to hear, this book describes how babies can "talk" before they learn to say actual words and shows ways parents can help babies learn language. The book addresses a neglected area in child development--how to help low literacy parents and parents for whom English is a Second Language…

  13. A retrospective benefit-cost analysis of the 1997 stair-fall requirements for baby walkers.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Gregory B; Leland, Elizabeth W

    2008-01-01

    Based on estimates from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were about 25,000 baby walker-related injuries treated annually in U.S. hospital emergency departments during the early 1990s. This amounted to about 8 injuries for every 1000 baby walkers in use. Most injuries resulted from falls down stairs. After CPSC initiated a regulatory proceeding in 1994, the CPSC staff worked with industry to address the stair-fall hazard. This cooperative effort resulted in requirements designed to prevent stair-fall injuries that became effective in 1997 as part of a revised voluntary safety standard. This study presents a retrospective benefit-cost analysis of the 1997 stair-fall requirements. The benefits were defined as the reduction in the costs of injuries resulting from the use of the safer walkers. The costs were defined as the additional resource costs associated with making baby walkers safer. The study found that the stair-fall requirements were highly effective in reducing the risk of stair-fall injury, and that the benefits of the requirements substantially exceeded the costs. The expected net benefits (i.e., benefits minus costs) amounted to an average of about $169 per walker, over the walker's expected product life. Given current U.S. sales of about 600,000 baby walkers annually, the present value of the expected net benefits associated with 1 year's production amounts to over $100 million annually. A sensitivity analysis showed that the major findings were robust with respect to variations in underlying assumptions.

  14. The total thermal insulation of the new-born baby

    PubMed Central

    Hey, E. N.; Katz, G.; O'Connell, Bridget

    1970-01-01

    1. One hundred and seventeen healthy new-born babies weighing between 0·9 and 4·8 kg at delivery have been studied during the first ten days of life, and sixteen of these babies have been studied serially for 6 weeks after birth. The babies lay supine in a draught-free environment (air speed 4-5 cm/sec) of moderate humidity. The operative temperature was between 26 and 38° C for the babies who were studied naked. 2. Total non-evaporative heat loss was calculated from simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption, evaporative water loss and the concomitant change in mean body temperature. 3. Approximately 10% of the total body surface area was in contact with the mattress or floor. Conductive heat loss accounted for only about 5% of all non-evaporative heat loss when the naked baby was lying on a thick foam mattress, but for as much as 25% when the baby was lying in a water-jacketed chamber with a floor of clear plastic ∼ 5 mm thick. 4. Insulation to heat loss by convection and radiation varied with environmental temperature. Total specific insulation was low in a warm environment when the naked baby vasodilated, and rose by between 16 and 25% to a maximum in an environment of 31° C. It decreased significantly when the baby became physically active in environments with a temperature less than this. 5. Total specific insulation in an environment of 31° C varied with body size: it averaged 0·156° C.m2.hr/kcal in seven naked babies weighing 0·9-1·2 kg, rose to 0·190° C.m2.hr/kcal in twelve babies weighing 1·8-2·2 kg, and averaged 0·201° C.m2.hr/kcal in the thirty-four babies who weighed over 3 kg. Tissue insulation accounted for 23% of this total specific insulation in the smaller babies, and about 28% of the total in babies weighing over 3 kg. 6. Clothing ten babies in a vest, napkin and long cotton nightdress increased the total specific insulation by an average of 0·23° C.m2.hr/kcal. PMID:5503276

  15. A comparative study of bifidobacteria in human babies and adults

    PubMed Central

    KHONSARI, Shadi; SUGANTHY, Mayuran; BURCZYNSKA, Beata; DANG, Vu; CHOUDHURY, Manika; PACHENARI, Azra

    2015-01-01

    The composition and diversity of the gut microbiota are known to be different between babies and adults. The aim of this project was to compare the level of bifidobacteria between babies and adults and to investigate the influence of lifestyle factors on the level of this bacterium in the gut. During this study, the levels of bifidobacteria in 10 human babies below 2 years of age were compared with that of 10 human adults above 40 years. The level of bifidobacteria proved to be significantly higher in babies in comparison with adults. This investigation concluded that a combination of several factors, such as age, diet, and BMI, has an important effect on the level of bifidobacteria in adults, while in babies, a combination of diet and age may influence the level of intestinal bifidobacteria. PMID:27200263

  16. 7 CFR 319.56-48 - Conditions governing the entry of baby squash and baby courgettes from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... vertebratus, Diaphania indica, Helicoverpa armigera, and Spodoptera littoralis. (a) Approved greenhouses. The baby squash and baby courgettes must be grown in Zambia in insect-proof, pest-free greenhouses approved jointly by the Zambian national plant protection organization (NPPO) and APHIS. (1) The greenhouses...

  17. 7 CFR 319.56-48 - Conditions governing the entry of baby squash and baby courgettes from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be equipped with double self-closing doors. (2) Any vents or openings in the greenhouses (other than the double self-closing doors) must be covered with 1.6 mm screening in order to prevent the entry of... identity of the greenhouse. While packing the baby squash or baby courgettes for export to the...

  18. 7 CFR 319.56-48 - Conditions governing the entry of baby squash and baby courgettes from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be equipped with double self-closing doors. (2) Any vents or openings in the greenhouses (other than the double self-closing doors) must be covered with 1.6 mm screening in order to prevent the entry of... identity of the greenhouse. While packing the baby squash or baby courgettes for export to the...

  19. Growth and development of children conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Pruksananonda, C

    2001-06-01

    A number of concerns have been raised about children conceived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). In this study, 75 babies in the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital ICSI programme were determined during pediatric follow-up to assess the growth, development and congenital malformations from April 1997 to December 2000. Male to female ratio was 1:1.27. Mean birth weight for singletons was not different from the general population. Thirty six per cent of the babies weighed less than 2,500 g, which was almost four times higher than naturally conceived babies. Approximately 27 per cent of deliveries were multiple pregnancies compared to 0.93 per cent from natural conception. Prematurity rate was 25 per cent and 85.7 per cent of deliveries were carried out by caesarian section. One baby (1.3%) had major congenital malformation and 37 babies (49.3%) had one or more minor defects. Most of the babies had weight, height, and head circumference within normal ranges. After correction for gestational age, all the premature babies caught up growth within the first year of life. Eleven babies (14.7%) had abnormal or questionable results or Denver II at different ages. Longer-term follow-up is necessary to properly assess the growth and developmental outcome of the ICSI babies. PMID:11529384

  20. 76 FR 81467 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Baby...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Collection; Importation of Baby Corn and Baby Carrots From Zambia AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... with regulations for the importation of baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. DATES: We will consider...: For information on regulations for the importation of baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia,...

  1. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, C A; Butterworth, G; Roberts, T; Graupner, L; Hole, G

    1994-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face. PMID:7845772

  2. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face. PMID:24601036

  3. Power outages, power externalities, and baby booms.

    PubMed

    Burlando, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    Determining whether power outages have significant fertility effects is an important policy question in developing countries, where blackouts are common and modern forms of family planning are scarce. Using birth records from Zanzibar, this study shows that a month-long blackout in 2008 caused a significant increase in the number of births 8 to 10 months later. The increase was similar across villages that had electricity, regardless of the level of electrification; villages with no electricity connections saw no changes in birth numbers. The large fertility increase in communities with very low levels of electricity suggests that the outage affected the fertility of households not connected to the grid through some spillover effect. Whether the baby boom is likely to translate to a permanent increase in the population remains unclear, but this article highlights an important hidden consequence of power instability in developing countries. It also suggests that electricity imposes significant externality effects on rural populations that have little exposure to it.

  4. Malnutrition and hypernatraemia in breastfed babies.

    PubMed

    Paul, A C; Ranjini, K; Muthulakshmi; Roy, A; Kirubakaran, C

    2000-09-01

    Despite the well-known advantages of breast-feeding to both mother and infant, malnutrition of breastfed infants does occur. We report two term neonates who presented in the 3rd week of life with severe wasting, hypernatraemic dehydration and pre-renal failure while being exclusively breastfed. Breast-milk sodium levels were markedly elevated on admission. Both infants recovered following adequate hydration and showed excellent catch-up growth during follow-up while exclusive breast-feeding was maintained. The critical malnutrition in both cases was detected by the family physician during routine postnatal visits. Both mothers were well motivated toward breast-feeding and were unaware of the severity of the baby's illness.

  5. Facial aesthetics: babies prefer attractiveness to symmetry.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Curtis A; Butterworth, George; Roberts, Tony; Graupner, Lida; Hole, Graham

    2013-01-01

    The visual preferences of human infants for faces that varied in their attractiveness and in their symmetry about the midline were explored. The aim was to establish whether infants' visual preference for attractive faces may be mediated by the vertical symmetry of the face. Chimeric faces, made from photographs of attractive and unattractive female faces, were produced by computer graphics. Babies looked longer at normal and at chimeric attractive faces than at normal and at chimeric unattractive faces. There were no developmental differences between the younger and older infants: all preferred to look at the attractive faces. Infants as young as 4 months showed similarity with adults in the 'aesthetic perception' of attractiveness and this preference was not based on the vertical symmetry of the face.

  6. Failure to thrive in babies and toddlers.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lay Hoon; How, Choon How; Ng, Kar Hui

    2016-06-01

    Failure to thrive in a child is defined as 'lack of expected normal physical growth' or 'failure to gain weight'. Diagnosis requires repeated growth measurements over time using local, age-appropriate growth centile charts. Premature babies with appropriate growth velocity and children with 'catch-down' growth, constitutional growth delay or familial short stature show normal growth variants, and usually do not require further evaluation. In Singapore, the most common cause of failure to thrive in children is malnutrition secondary to psychosocial and caregiver factors. 'Picky eating' is common in the local setting and best managed with an authoritative feeding style from caregivers. Other causes are malabsorption and existing congenital or chronic medical conditions. Child neglect or abuse should always be ruled out. Iron deficiency is the most common complication. The family doctor plays a pivotal role in early detection, timely treatment, appropriate referrals and close monitoring of 'catch-up' growth in these children.

  7. Surrogate mothers: whose baby is it?

    PubMed

    Cohen, B

    1984-01-01

    Advances in medical technology offer infertile couples who wish to raise children alternatives to adoption. The increasing number of surrogate mother contracts creates a myriad of legal issues surrounding the rights of the natural mother, the natural father and the child that is produced. In this Article, the Author discusses the legal issues and rights of the parties under the Constitution, the surrogate contract and family law principles. The Author proposes that courts should consider a surrogate contract as a revocable prebirth agreement which allows the natural mother to keep the child if she chooses. In addition, the Author advocates an interpretation of the statutes forbidding baby selling that would prohibit surrogate contracts in which the mother is paid a fee for the child.

  8. Primary health care of the newborn baby.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    More than 50% of infant deaths in India occur during the neonatal period. High priority therefore needs to be given to improving the survival of newborns. A large number of neonatal deaths have their origin in the perinatal period and are mainly determined by the health and nutritional status of the mother, the quality of care during pregnancy and delivery, and the immediate care of the newborn at birth. Main causes of neonatal mortality are birth asphyxia, respiratory problems, and infections, especially tetanus. Most such deaths occur among low birthweight babies. Hypothermia, undernutrition, and mismanaged breast feeding may also indirectly contribute to neonatal mortality. Community-based studies have, however, demonstrated that most neonatal mortality can be affordably prevented through primary health care. Efforts are underway to expand the health care infrastructure, but the outreach of maternal and child health care remains unsatisfactory especially in rural areas. PMID:12319228

  9. Boltzmann babies in the proper time measure

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Yang, I-S.

    2008-05-15

    After commenting briefly on the role of the typicality assumption in science, we advocate a phenomenological approach to the cosmological measure problem. Like any other theory, a measure should be simple, general, well defined, and consistent with observation. This allows us to proceed by elimination. As an example, we consider the proper time cutoff on a geodesic congruence. It predicts that typical observers are quantum fluctuations in the early universe, or Boltzmann babies. We sharpen this well-known youngness problem by taking into account the expansion and open spatial geometry of pocket universes. Moreover, we relate the youngness problem directly to the probability distribution for observables, such as the temperature of the cosmic background radiation. We consider a number of modifications of the proper time measure, but find none that would make it compatible with observation.

  10. Boltzmann babies in the proper time measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Yang, I.-Sheng

    2008-05-01

    After commenting briefly on the role of the typicality assumption in science, we advocate a phenomenological approach to the cosmological measure problem. Like any other theory, a measure should be simple, general, well defined, and consistent with observation. This allows us to proceed by elimination. As an example, we consider the proper time cutoff on a geodesic congruence. It predicts that typical observers are quantum fluctuations in the early universe, or Boltzmann babies. We sharpen this well-known youngness problem by taking into account the expansion and open spatial geometry of pocket universes. Moreover, we relate the youngness problem directly to the probability distribution for observables, such as the temperature of the cosmic background radiation. We consider a number of modifications of the proper time measure, but find none that would make it compatible with observation.

  11. Boltzmann babies in the proper time measure

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Yang, I-Sheng

    2007-12-20

    After commenting briefly on the role of the typicality assumption in science, we advocate a phenomenological approach to the cosmological measure problem. Like any other theory, a measure should be simple, general, well defined, and consistent with observation. This allows us to proceed by elimination. As an example, we consider the proper time cutoff on a geodesic congruence. It predicts that typical observers are quantum fluctuations in the early universe, or Boltzmann babies. We sharpen this well-known youngness problem by taking into account the expansion and open spatial geometry of pocket universes. Moreover, we relate the youngness problem directly to the probability distribution for observables, such as the temperature of the cosmic background radiation. We consider a number of modifications of the proper time measure, but find none that would make it compatible with observation.

  12. Failure to thrive in babies and toddlers.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lay Hoon; How, Choon How; Ng, Kar Hui

    2016-06-01

    Failure to thrive in a child is defined as 'lack of expected normal physical growth' or 'failure to gain weight'. Diagnosis requires repeated growth measurements over time using local, age-appropriate growth centile charts. Premature babies with appropriate growth velocity and children with 'catch-down' growth, constitutional growth delay or familial short stature show normal growth variants, and usually do not require further evaluation. In Singapore, the most common cause of failure to thrive in children is malnutrition secondary to psychosocial and caregiver factors. 'Picky eating' is common in the local setting and best managed with an authoritative feeding style from caregivers. Other causes are malabsorption and existing congenital or chronic medical conditions. Child neglect or abuse should always be ruled out. Iron deficiency is the most common complication. The family doctor plays a pivotal role in early detection, timely treatment, appropriate referrals and close monitoring of 'catch-up' growth in these children. PMID:27353148

  13. EVALUATION OF ALL BABIES CRY, A SECOND GENERATION UNIVERSAL ABUSIVE HEAD TRAUMA PREVENTION PROGRAM

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Allison C.; McElaney, Lisa; Peixotto, Betsy; VanVleet, Marcia; Sege, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Child maltreatment results in significant individual, family, and societal costs. This study assessed the efficacy of All Babies Cry (ABC), a media-based infant maltreatment prevention program, using a mixed-method, quasi-experimental staged evaluation design. ABC’s messaging, designed and tested through a series of focus groups, provides strategies for reducing parental stress and soothing infants. Participants (n = 423) were first-time parents, 70% fathers, recruited at two hospitals. The first 211 were controls; the next 212 received ABC. Participants were interviewed 3 times: at baseline in hospital, and by telephone 5 weeks (n = 359; 85%) and 17 weeks (n = 326; 77%) later. Researchers measured parents’ perceptions, intentions, and use of strategies to calm crying and manage caregiver stress. Outcomes were based on the Strengthening Families Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior. The intervention was well received, appears effective in improving mediators of behavior, and may change parental behavior. PMID:26456987

  14. Care of low birth weight babies in slums.

    PubMed

    Patel, R B

    1989-01-01

    We studied 289 newborn infants from birth till one year of age. Low birth weight babies (less than 2.5 kg) were 52.9%. Boys suffered 9.7 episodes of sickness, and girls 8.6 episodes of sickness. The mean episodes of various sicknesses, and their impact on weight gain, feeding pattern and growth pattern are discussed. Six deaths were observed, of which 4 were among the low birth weight babies. Mortality in babies born less than 2 kg was 44.4% and above 2 kg was less than 1%. PMID:2807450

  15. "Friends" Raping Friends. Could It Happen to You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Jean O'Gorman; Sandler, Bernice R.

    This publication concerning rape committed by acquaintances and "friends" is designed to provide information and support for college students. The early warning signs and how to react to potential "acquaintance" or "date" rape are addressed. Consideration is given to why this type of rape occurs and information is provided on how to avoid date…

  16. The myth of the miracle baby: how neonatal nurses interpret media accounts of babies of extreme prematurity.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-09-01

    Improved life sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has resulted in an increased probability of survival in extremely premature babies. Miracle baby stories in the popular press are a regular occurrence and these reports are often the first source from which the general public learn about extremely premature babies. The research from which this paper is drawn sought to explore the care-giving and ethical dilemmas of neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies 24 weeks gestation and less. This current paper aims to outline the views of neonatal nurses on miracle baby stories in the media. Data were collected via a questionnaire to 760 Australian neonatal nurses with 414 returned, representing a response rate of 54.4%. Narrative was collected from semi-structured interviews with 24 experienced neonatal nurses in NSW, Australia. A qualitative approach utilising thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data. The theme the myth of the miracle baby is seen as generating myths and unrealistic expectations on the part of vulnerable families and the public. Neonatal nurses, as the primary caregivers for tiny babies and their families, viewed popular media publications with suspicion, believing published reports to be incomplete, inaccurate and biased towards the positive.

  17. Intermediate peer contexts and educational outcomes: Do the friends of students' friends matter?

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, William; Workman, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Sociologists of education have long been interested in the effects of peer relations on educational outcomes. Recent theory and research on adolescence suggest that peers on the boundaries of students' friendship networks may play an important role in shaping behaviors and educational outcomes. In this study, we examine the importance of a key "intermediate peer context" for students' outcomes: the friends of a student's friends. Our findings indicate both friends' and friends' friends' characteristics independently predict students' college expectations and their risk of dropping out of high school (although only friends' characteristics predict GPA). Our models suggest the magnitude of students' friends-of-friends' characteristics are at least as large their friends' characteristics. Together, the association between the peer context and students outcomes is considerably larger when accounting for both the characteristics of students' friends and the friends of their friends. PMID:27194659

  18. Intermediate peer contexts and educational outcomes: Do the friends of students' friends matter?

    PubMed

    Carbonaro, William; Workman, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Sociologists of education have long been interested in the effects of peer relations on educational outcomes. Recent theory and research on adolescence suggest that peers on the boundaries of students' friendship networks may play an important role in shaping behaviors and educational outcomes. In this study, we examine the importance of a key "intermediate peer context" for students' outcomes: the friends of a student's friends. Our findings indicate both friends' and friends' friends' characteristics independently predict students' college expectations and their risk of dropping out of high school (although only friends' characteristics predict GPA). Our models suggest the magnitude of students' friends-of-friends' characteristics are at least as large their friends' characteristics. Together, the association between the peer context and students outcomes is considerably larger when accounting for both the characteristics of students' friends and the friends of their friends.

  19. Free Our Friends in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stidham, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Many secrets can be told by the physical surroundings of library media centers. Whether the center is kid-friendly is one of the first obvious tell-tale signs. When a library center has Arthur & D.W., Clifford, Pooh & Eeyore, shells, special rocks, etc. hidden by the circulation center or in the back in boxes, it's time to revolt. The movie Free…

  20. Patients, friends, and relationship boundaries.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, J. T.; Smith, L. F.; Brown, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    When patient and physician are close friends, both professional and personal relationships can suffer. Jointly exploring and setting explicit boundaries can help avoid conflict and maintain these valuable relationships. This is particularly important when the physician practises in a small community where such concurrent relationships are unavoidable. PMID:8292931

  1. The "Shaken Baby" syndrome: pathology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Squier, Waney

    2011-11-01

    The "Shaken Baby" syndrome (SBS) is the subject of intense controversy; the diagnosis has in the past depended on the triad of subdural haemorrhage (SDH), retinal haemorrhage and encephalopathy. While there is no doubt that infants do suffer abusive injury at the hands of their carers and that impact can cause catastrophic intracranial damage, research has repeatedly undermined the hypothesis that shaking per se can cause this triad. The term non-accidental head injury has therefore been widely adopted. This review will focus on the pathology and mechanisms of the three physiologically associated findings which constitute the "triad" and are seen in infants suffering from a wide range of non-traumatic as well as traumatic conditions. "Sub" dural bleeding in fact originates within the deep layers of the dura. The potential sources of SDH include: the bridging veins, small vessels within the dura itself, a granulating haemorrhagic membrane and ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Most neuropathologists do not routinely examine eyes, but the significance of this second arm of the triad in the diagnosis of Shaken Baby syndrome is such that it merits consideration in the context of this review. While retinal haemorrhage can be seen clinically, dural and subarachnoid optic nerve sheath haemorrhage is usually seen exclusively by the pathologist and only rarely described by the neuroradiologist. The term encephalopathy is used loosely in the context of SBS. It may encompass anything from vomiting, irritability, feeding difficulties or floppiness to seizures, apnoea and fulminant brain swelling. The spectrum of brain pathology associated with retinal and subdural bleeding from a variety of causes is described. The most important cerebral pathology is swelling and hypoxic-ischaemic injury. Mechanical shearing injury is rare and contusions, the hallmark of adult traumatic brain damage, are vanishingly rare in infants under 1 year of age. Clefts and haemorrhages in the immediate

  2. Appropriately grown baby with multiple congenital abnormalities: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Devangi; Aladangady, Narendra

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a full-term baby girl (Baby A) born with multiple congenital abnormalities that were suggested by prenatal scans. The mother had declined further antenatal diagnostic testing. Postnatal chromosomal analyses revealed the karyotype of the baby to be trisomy 18. After detailed, compassionate discussions with the parents, it was decided to provide palliative care in the best interest of the baby, who died on day 15 of life. This case illustrates ethical difficulties in the care of neonates with congenital anomalies with poor prognoses, such as trisomy 18. Recommending palliative care and "do not resuscitate" orders to optimistic parents is extremely difficult and needs to be done in the most sensitive manner possible.

  3. Collodion baby: a follow-up study of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Van Gysel, D; Lijnen, R L P; Moekti, S S; de Laat, P C J; Oranje, A P

    2002-09-01

    Seventeen cases of collodion baby are reported. Clinical aspects, complications, treatment, final outcome and family history were studied. We did not observe any clinical features in the collodion baby that could serve as a clue in predicting the final diagnosis. Infections were observed in nine, hypothermia in five and hypernatraemic dehydration in four cases. Skin infection mainly occurred in babies treated with emollients (petrolatum, lanolin and cetomacrogolis cream were used). We therefore recommend treating the collodion baby in a humidified incubator, if necessary with intravenous rehydration, but not to use emollients. The final outcome of these study patients was erythrodermic autosomal recessive lamellar ichthyosis in seven cases (41%), non-erythrodermic autosomal recessive lamellar ichthyosis in three cases (18%), Sjögren-Larsson in one case (6%), epidermolytic hyperkeratosis in one case (6%), acute neonatal variant of Gaucher disease in one case (6%) and normal skin in four cases (24%).

  4. Life-threatening hypernatraemic dehydration in breastfed babies.

    PubMed

    Shroff, R; Hignett, R; Pierce, C; Marks, S; van't Hoff, W

    2006-12-01

    We describe five babies, who were exclusively breast fed, with life-threatening complications of hypernatraemic dehydration secondary to inadequate breast feeding. An increased awareness among health professionals is required so that this potentially devastating condition can be prevented.

  5. Researchers Find Another Way Zika Can Harm Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160694.html Researchers Find Another Way Zika Can Harm Babies Close to 6 percent who ... yet another example of the damage that maternal Zika infection can inflict on a fetus during the ...

  6. Every Day in The Womb Boosts Babies' Brain Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161778.html Every Day in the Womb Boosts Babies' Brain Development: Study ... What this study shows us is that every day and every week of in utero development is ...

  7. 1st Baby Born with DNA from 3 Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_161176.html 1st Baby Born With DNA From 3 Parents Technique designed to help couples ... be born using a controversial technique that combines DNA from three people -- two women and a man. ...

  8. Pregnancy Problems? Boost the Chance of Having a Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chance of Having a Baby For those who dream of being parents, pregnancy problems can be tremendously ... doesn’t work, doctors may recommend medication, surgery, artificial insemination (in which a woman is injected with ...

  9. Your Body After Baby: The First 6 Weeks

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy. Eat healthy foods. Limit sweets and foods with a lot of fat. Drink lots of water. Do something active every day . Walking and swimming are great activities for new moms. Breastfeed your baby . Breastfeeding helps ...

  10. EVALUATION OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING PESTICIDES IN BABY FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three extraction methods and two detection techniques for determining pesticides in baby food were evaluated. The extraction techniques examined were supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), enhanced solvent extraction (ESE), and solid phase extraction (SPE). The detection techni...

  11. Buying and Caring for Baby Bottles and Nipples

    MedlinePlus

    ... collapses as baby drinks, which helps prevent air bubbles. Liners save on cleanup, and are handy for ... have a venting system inside to prevent air bubbles. They are said to help prevent colic and ...

  12. Phonetic features by babies with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    O'Gara, M M; Logemann, J A; Rademaker, A W

    1994-11-01

    Twenty-three babies with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate were audiotaped at regular intervals from 5 to 35 months of age. Narrow phonetic transcription of their comfort-state vocalizations and word approximations was accomplished to describe phonetic development over time and according to the nonrandomized age of palatoplasty. The babies that had earlier palatal repair produced significantly higher percentages of oral stops after 12 months of age than babies with similar clefts that had later palatal repair. No significant differences are evident, however, according to age of palatoplasty, for mean frequency use of oral fricatives up to 3 years of age. For all 23 babies, regardless of the age of palatoplasty intervention, time is an even stronger variable than age of palatoplasty for development of palatal, alveolar and velar place features, oral stops, and oral fricatives.

  13. Pregnancy Choices: Raising the Baby, Adoption, and Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... PREGNANCY Pregnancy Choices: Raising the Baby, Adoption, and Abortion • What are my options if I find out ... is financial help available? • If I am considering abortion, what should I know about my state’s laws? • ...

  14. [An epidemiologic study on low-birth-weight babies].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K

    1984-07-01

    A case-control study was made in Gunma Prefecture of 1,390 mothers of babies born weighing 2,500 grams or less and an equal number of mothers of 3,000-up to-4,000 gram babies matched by place and month of birth. A correlation was found between low-birth-weight babies and maternal age, stature, menstrual history and past history. The mother's occupation, educational career, smoking habits, amount of sleep each day, date of issue of the Mother's Handbook and the number of the periodical health examinations received can be listed as socio-medical factors. Bleeding and lower abdominal pain during pregnancy, anemia and toxemia of pregnancy are found as prenatal factors. Low-birth-weight babies are found to be correlated with multiple pregnancy, breech presentation, placenta previa and premature separation of the placenta, also. PMID:6747384

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) in Infants and Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) A parent's guide for infants and babies ... Herpes infections are caused by both herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus ...

  16. Mother and baby yoga is good for you.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Cheryl

    2013-05-01

    Mother and baby yoga is becoming more and more popular in the western world, as postpartum mothers discover the benefits of being able to 'work out', bond with their baby and relax, all in one session. Postnatal yoga can offer calm and a sense of wellbeing, helping mothers to improve and stabilise their emotional health and to bond. Additionally the mother is able to focus on her relationship with her baby, rebuild the weakened pelvic floor, strengthen the abdominal muscles and even alleviate back and neck pain. For babies, yoga can aid digestion and alleviate colic; help to strengthen tiny limbs; improve sleep patterns; and enhance their ability to interact with their mother and other people. PMID:23789249

  17. Baby Boomers and Generation X: strategies to bridge the gap.

    PubMed

    Bertholf, L; Loveless, S

    2001-09-01

    Health care staffing challenges for the next few years necessitate the need to develop strategies to integrate the Generation Xer into a predominantly Baby Boomer work force. Strategies to assist Baby Boomers and Generation Xers to engage one another in constructive relationships are discussed. Misunderstanding and stereotyping create barriers that focus on differences and perceived limitations rather than identification of common thinking and focusing on strengths of each generation.

  18. Color View 'Dodo' and 'Baby Bear' Trenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image on Sol 14 (June 8, 2008), the 14th Martian day after landing. It shows two trenches dug by Phoenix's Robotic Arm.

    Soil from the right trench, informally called 'Baby Bear,' was delivered to Phoenix's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA, on Sol 12 (June 6). The following several sols included repeated attempts to shake the screen over TEGA's oven number 4 to get fine soil particles through the screen and into the oven for analysis.

    The trench on the left is informally called 'Dodo' and was dug as a test.

    Each of the trenches is about 9 centimeters (3 inches) wide. This view is presented in approximately true color by combining separate exposures taken through different filters of the Surface Stereo Imager.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Frequency of neonatal hyperglycaemia at Gaafar Ibnauf Children's Hospital: Clinical aspects and short term outcome.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Monera Mm; Abdel Rahman, Sirageldin Mk

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia has become a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality of the smaller fragile infants surviving the neonatal period. Its risk is inversely related to gestational age, birth weight and baby's clinical condition. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, some clinical aspects and immediate outcome of hyperglycaemia in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gaafar Ibnauf Children's Hospital, Khartoum. The study was a prospective, descriptive and hospital-based, conducted during the period of 1st January to 31st December 2014. Eighty-five neonates out of 345 had neonatal hyperglycaemia with a frequency rate of (24.6%). Fifty-two (61.2%) were males (male: female ratio=1.6:1), 61.2% of the babies were in the age group (0-7) days, and 25.9% in age group (8-14) days. Forty-two (49.4%) were preterm, while 43 (50.6%) were term babies. Four (4.7%) of the mothers had diabetes, and 6(7.1%) had hypertension. Neonatal sepsis was a predominant risk factor of hyperglycaemia occurring in 67 babies (78.8%), followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28 (32.9%) babies. Ten babies (11.8%) were diagnosed as acute kidney injury, four babies (4.7%) had hypernatraemic dehydration and seven babies (8.3%) were having hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Out of 85 hyperglycaemic neonates death was reported in 10 babies (11.8%), 75 (88.2%) survived. All cases had transient hyperglycaemia; therefore insulin intervention was not necessary. Currently, at Gaafar Ibnauf Children's Hospital, specific protocol for management of hyperglycaemia is lacking. Further studies are recommended to assess long term sequels of hyperglycaemia in neonates.

  20. Frequency of neonatal hyperglycaemia at Gaafar Ibnauf Children's Hospital: Clinical aspects and short term outcome.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Monera Mm; Abdel Rahman, Sirageldin Mk

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia has become a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality of the smaller fragile infants surviving the neonatal period. Its risk is inversely related to gestational age, birth weight and baby's clinical condition. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, some clinical aspects and immediate outcome of hyperglycaemia in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gaafar Ibnauf Children's Hospital, Khartoum. The study was a prospective, descriptive and hospital-based, conducted during the period of 1st January to 31st December 2014. Eighty-five neonates out of 345 had neonatal hyperglycaemia with a frequency rate of (24.6%). Fifty-two (61.2%) were males (male: female ratio=1.6:1), 61.2% of the babies were in the age group (0-7) days, and 25.9% in age group (8-14) days. Forty-two (49.4%) were preterm, while 43 (50.6%) were term babies. Four (4.7%) of the mothers had diabetes, and 6(7.1%) had hypertension. Neonatal sepsis was a predominant risk factor of hyperglycaemia occurring in 67 babies (78.8%), followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28 (32.9%) babies. Ten babies (11.8%) were diagnosed as acute kidney injury, four babies (4.7%) had hypernatraemic dehydration and seven babies (8.3%) were having hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Out of 85 hyperglycaemic neonates death was reported in 10 babies (11.8%), 75 (88.2%) survived. All cases had transient hyperglycaemia; therefore insulin intervention was not necessary. Currently, at Gaafar Ibnauf Children's Hospital, specific protocol for management of hyperglycaemia is lacking. Further studies are recommended to assess long term sequels of hyperglycaemia in neonates. PMID:27651553

  1. Friends of the National Library of Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Friends of the National Library of Medicine Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of ... Paul G. Rogers Chairman, Friends of the National Library of Medicine and former member of the U.S. ...

  2. Parent Misidentification Leading to the Breastfeeding of the Wrong Baby in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 2 month Final Diagnosis: 2 month old 32 weeks’ gestational age preterm infant Symptoms: Prematurity Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Accidental breastfeeding of the wrong baby Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Because there are clear benefits to breast milk over formula for infants, the goal of the World Health Organization is to increase breastfeeding rates. As more women are breastfeeding and providing breast milk to newborns in hospitals, there is increased risk for administration error. Case Report: A hospitalized preterm infant was breastfed by the wrong mother when the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurse failed to properly identify the mother. An infectious disease workup done on the donor mother was negative, but the recipient infant was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Since the donor mother who accidentally breastfed the wrong infant was CMV-negative, the baby in our case had likely been exposed to CMV from his biological mother. The attending physician apologized to all of the family members involved, but the father of one infant continued to express anger. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first case of accidental breastfeeding in a hospital setting to be described in the literature. Parental misidentification and a language barrier led to the error. An infectious disease workup did not find any evidence of disease transmission from this event. Increased attention to minimize breast milk errors is needed. Despite a long history of wet nursing, unregulated breast milk sharing and cross nursing is not recommended. Instead, if a mother cannot provide breast milk herself, pasteurized donor breast milk from breast milk banks is encouraged. PMID:27515898

  3. For Professors, "Friending" Can Be Fraught

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    People connect on Facebook by asking to "friend" one another. A typical user lists at least 100 such connections, while newbies are informed, "You don't have any friends yet." A humbling statement. It might make one want to find some. But friending students can be even dicier than befriending them. In the real world, casual professors may ask…

  4. 75 FR 63851 - Draft Friends Organizations Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Draft Friends Organizations Policy AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... effectiveness in achieving the Service's mission through partnerships with Friends organizations (volunteer/advocate). Today, Friends organizations play a vital role in helping to fulfill the Service's mission...

  5. Classroom Friends and Very Best Friends: A Short-Term Longitudinal Analysis of Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McChristian, Chrystal L.; Ray, Glen E.; Tidwell, Pamela S.; LoBello, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Second-, third-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children evaluated relationship qualities of a self-nominated friend and a self-nominated very best friend over a 6-month school year period. Results demonstrated that 76% of the friend relationships and 50% of the very best friend relationships were maintained over the course of the study. Children in…

  6. Talking about Babies, Toddlers, and Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindell, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Jodi Mindell, PhD, the associate director of the Sleep Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, describes how parents and caregivers can help children develop healthy sleeping habits beginning in infancy. Healthy sleep habits are an essential skill for children's overall health and well-being, and they impact family functioning. Dr.…

  7. η Carinae Baby Homunculus Uncovered by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Zulema; Falceta-Gonçalves, Diego; Beaklini, Pedro P. B.

    2014-08-01

    We report observations of η Carinae obtained with ALMA in the continuum of 100, 230, 280, and 660 GHz in 2012 November, with a resolution that varied from 2.''88 to 0.''45 for the lower and higher frequencies, respectively. The source is not resolved, even at the highest frequency; its spectrum is characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung of a compact source, but different from the spectrum of optically thin wind. The recombination lines H42α, He42α, H40α, He40α, H50β, H28α, He28α, H21α, and He21α were also detected, and their intensities reveal non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. We found that the line profiles could only be fit by an expanding shell of dense and ionized gas, which produces a slow shock in the surroundings of η Carinae. Combined with fittings to the continuum, we were able to constrain the shell size, radius, density, temperature, and velocity. The detection of the He recombination lines is compatible with the high-temperature gas and requires a high-energy ionizing photon flux, which must be provided by the companion star. The mass-loss rate and wind velocity, necessary to explain the formation of the shell, are compatible with an luminous blue variable eruption. The position, velocity, and physical parameters of the shell coincide with those of the Weigelt blobs. The dynamics found for the expanding shell correspond to matter ejected by η Carinae in 1941 in an event similar to that which formed the Little Homunculus; for that reason, we called the new ejecta the "Baby Homunculus."

  8. η Carinae Baby Homunculus uncovered by ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Zulema; Beaklini, Pedro P. B.; Falceta-Gonçalves, Diego

    2014-08-20

    We report observations of η Carinae obtained with ALMA in the continuum of 100, 230, 280, and 660 GHz in 2012 November, with a resolution that varied from 2.''88 to 0.''45 for the lower and higher frequencies, respectively. The source is not resolved, even at the highest frequency; its spectrum is characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung of a compact source, but different from the spectrum of optically thin wind. The recombination lines H42α, He42α, H40α, He40α, H50β, H28α, He28α, H21α, and He21α were also detected, and their intensities reveal non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects. We found that the line profiles could only be fit by an expanding shell of dense and ionized gas, which produces a slow shock in the surroundings of η Carinae. Combined with fittings to the continuum, we were able to constrain the shell size, radius, density, temperature, and velocity. The detection of the He recombination lines is compatible with the high-temperature gas and requires a high-energy ionizing photon flux, which must be provided by the companion star. The mass-loss rate and wind velocity, necessary to explain the formation of the shell, are compatible with an luminous blue variable eruption. The position, velocity, and physical parameters of the shell coincide with those of the Weigelt blobs. The dynamics found for the expanding shell correspond to matter ejected by η Carinae in 1941 in an event similar to that which formed the Little Homunculus; for that reason, we called the new ejecta the 'Baby Homunculus'.

  9. Where are the Sunday babies? II. Declining weekend birth rates in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerchl, Alexander; Reinhard, Sarah C.

    2008-02-01

    Birth dates from almost 3 million babies born between 1969 and 2005 in Switzerland were analyzed for the weekday of birth. As in other countries but with unprecedented amplitude, a very marked non-random distribution was discovered with decreasing numbers of births on weekends, reaching -17.9% in 2005. While most of this weekend births avoidance rate is due to fewer births on Sundays (up to -21.7%), the downward trend is primarily a consequence of decreasing births on Saturdays (up to -14.5%). For 2005, these percentages mean that 3,728 fewer babies are born during weekends than could be expected from equal distribution. Most interestingly and surprisingly, weekend birth-avoiding rates are significantly correlated with birth numbers ( r = 0.86), i.e. the lower the birth number per year, the lower the number of weekend births. The increasing avoidance of births during weekends is discussed as being a consequence of increasing numbers of caesarean sections and elective labor induction, which in Switzerland reach 29.2 and 20.5%, respectively, in 2004. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that both primary and secondary caesarean sections are significantly correlated with weekend birth avoidance rates. It is therefore likely that financial aspects of hospitals are a factor determining the avoidance of weekend births by increasing the numbers of caesarean sections.

  10. A case of shaken baby syndrome after discharge from the newborn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jacqueline M

    2005-06-01

    Preterm infants may be at higher risk of physical abuse after hospital discharge. Nonaccidental or inflicted head neurotrauma is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in physical-abuse cases, and shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is the most common form of abuse. In the majority of the cases, parents who shake their infant do not intend to harm the infant. This article presents a report of a former preterm infant who presented to the pediatrician's office with a maternal report of an accidental fall. Shaken baby syndrome was suspected based on bilateral subdural hemorrhages of varying ages, which were inconsistent with the history provided. The differential diagnosis and systematic clinical evaluation for SBS are provided, and medical and nursing management is discussed. Patient care, advocacy, and mandatory reporting are reviewed. The newborn intensive care unit caregivers' role in preventing SBS in this high-risk population, including specific parent teaching and anticipatory guidance, is reviewed with an emphasis on teaching all caregivers about the dangers of shaking an infant.

  11. Amitriptyline poisoning of a baby: how informative can hair analysis be?

    PubMed

    Allibe, Nathalie; Eysseric-Guerin, Hélène; Kintz, Pascal; Bartoli, Mireille; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Grenier, Florian; Scolan, Virginie; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    We reported a case of a 6-month-old baby girl who was hospitalized in the pediatric emergency for central nervous system disorders then coma. Toxicology analysis showed the presence of amitriptyline (AMI) and its metabolite nortriptyline (NOR) in blood and urine of the baby. Additional investigations suggested a shaken baby syndrome. Given the family context, a judge ordered hair tests for both the child and his parents to document drug exposure. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was then developed to quantify AMI and NOR in hair. After decontamination and segmentation, 20 mg of hair was incubated overnight at 55 °C in methanol (MeOH). The LC-MS/MS method used an online solid phase extraction and the analysis was performed using two transitions per compound. The LOQ and LOD for the two compounds were estimated at 0.0075 ng/mg and 0.005 ng/mg respectively. All hair segments tested for both parents were negative. For the baby two strands of hair were collected one day after the acute intoxication for the first and 5 weeks later for the second. The first strand was not decontaminated before analysis to avoid losing specimen. The high and relatively homogenous concentrations of AMI (with a range of value from 6.65 to 9.69 ng/mg) and NOR (with a range of value from 7.12 to 8.96 ng/mg) measured suggested that contamination could have occurred. The analysis of the second strand after decontamination allowed to detect AMI and NOR in all hair segments. The obtained values varied between 0.54 and 1.41 ng/mg for AMI and between 1.26 and 4.00 ng/mg for NOR. These results supported the hypothesis of a chronic exposure during several months before hair collection with regular increase. However a single overdose could not be totally excluded. The interpretation of results must take into account the pharmacological and physiological parameters of hair of the children.

  12. E835 Store Baby Sitting Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2002-01-01

    Control of the RF frequency: (1) 'RF Freq Check' on P85 (E835 Baby Sitter) should be turned OFF. (2) The RF frequency should be adjusted so that it is in the notch of the 4-8 GHz momentum cooling pickup response. The RF frequency device to be controlled depends on which RF system is on. If ARF2 is on, the RF frequency device is A:RLLFS1. If ARF3 is on, the RF frequency device is A:RLLFS0. IMPORTANT NOTE: A:RLLFS0 and A:RLLFS1 have very different data base scaling (A:RLLFS0 is 4 bytes and A:RLLFS1 is 2 bytes). A:RLLFS0 can be safely knobbed with a mult factor of 1.0 (i.e. no multiplier is required). A:RLLFS1 requires a mult factor of 0.02 or smaller. The monitoring and adjustment of the RF frequency is accomplished by the following steps: (3) Set up SA1 so that it is connected to CP48-SCH (4-8 GHz momentum cooling pickup). Set the SA center frequency to a harmonic of the RF frequency. This is most easily accomplished by doing one of the following: (a) If ARF3 is on, send P41 file 22 to SA1. (b) If ARF2 is on, set A:RLLFS0 to the set value of A:RLLFS1 then send P41 file 22 to SA1. (4) SA1 can be viewed on CATV channel pbar 20. If the notch in the momentum cooling pickup response is not at the center frequecy of SA1 adjust the RF. (On the low energy ramp, 1 division on the SA1 display at 5.5 GHz corresponds to 2.3 Hz in revolution frequency). Once you've made an adjustment to the RF frequency you should reset the SA1 display according to step 3 above.

  13. Where have all the babies gone?

    PubMed

    1992-05-15

    Critical comment is provided on the phenomena of couples postponing childbearing in Singapore. In spite of a media campaign to promote childbearing and tax incentives, women are choosing to be DINKS, couples with double incomes and no kids. Women's reasons for not having children are to enjoy more freedom and a better material life and maintain a career. Seet Ai Mee, the junior minister of community development, in 1990 spoke in a public address about women's lack of belief in marriage and the loss of independence and career prospects when children come along. Official concern is based on the rising median age of childbearing which has gone from 23.4 years in 1970 to 27.7 years in 1991. A continuing trend would put women 30 years old at the age of 1st childbearing in the year 2000. 1 of 5 women presently do not have children. 2.9% fewer babies were born in the 1st 10 months of 1991 compared with 1990. The Director of the Population Planning Unite believes that the campaign has been successful in promoting coupling, but not procreation. Examples are given of 4 women who chose not to have children. 1 was a 26-year old university graduate who was a product manager. She is married and thinks that the ad campaign is not appropriately geared to an educated population. Romance and hard sell are out of place. Another psychotherapist expressed the opinion that women wanted a house a car before having children, and later age at childbearing was desired because the desire was to a small family anyway. Freedom has a greater value over the desire for children. A 30-year old writer finds women with children boring, and later age at childbearing means greater maternal maturity. Several examples are given of women who desire an earlier start on childbearing because of the demands placed on older mothers. The director of a counseling and care center defines DINKS as educated higher income people who want a career, personal goals, travel, and other things. There should not be a

  14. Fatal spontaneous subdural bleeding due to neonatal giant cell hepatitis: a rare differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guddat, Saskia S; Ehrlich, Edwin; Martin, Hubert; Tsokos, Michael

    2011-09-01

    A 7-week-old girl showed vomiting after feeding, facial pallor, loss of muscle tone and respiratory depression. An emergency doctor performed successful resuscitation and after arrival in hospital, cranial ultrasound showed left-sided subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema with a shift of the midline, and a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Ophthalmologic examination showed retinal hemorrhage. In view of this, the doctors suspected shaken baby syndrome and approached the parents with their suspicions, but they denied any shaking or trauma. Despite surgery for the subdural hemorrhage the girl died a few hours later with a severe coagulopathy. Autopsy verified subdural hemorrhage, cerebral edema and retinal hemorrhage, but also revealed intact bridging veins and a lack of optic nerve sheath hemorrhage, therefore shaken baby syndrome could not be proven by autopsy. Histological examination showed severe neonatal giant cell hepatitis as the cause of the severe coagulopathy and the associated spontaneous subdural bleeding. Neonatal giant cell hepatitis may be responsible for unexpected deaths in infancy and, although rarely associated with subdural bleeding, must be considered as a potential differential diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome.

  15. Babies born dying: just bad karma? A discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Kain, Victoria J

    2014-12-01

    The paper examines the notion of being born dying and karma. Karma is a belief upheld by Buddhists and non-Buddhists: That is, karma follows people from their previous lives into their current lives. This raises a difficult question: Does karma mean that a baby's death is its own fault? While great peace can be found from a belief in karma, the notion of a baby's karma returning in some sort of retributive, universal justice can be de-emphasized and is considered "un-Buddhist." Having an understanding of karma is intrinsic to the spiritual care for the dying baby, not only from the perspective of parents and families who have these beliefs, but also for reconciling one's own beliefs as a healthcare practitioner.

  16. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P, H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V = V( P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the "volume", i.e., area of the solitons.

  17. Dexamethasone and infection in preterm babies: a controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P C; Thomson, M A; Dear, P R

    1990-01-01

    To find out if the use of steroids affected the incidence of infection in babies who were nursed in the neonatal intensive care unit for nine weeks or more, 24 preterm babies who had received a three weeks course of dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg/day, reducing to 0.3 mg/kg/day after a week, and 0.15 mg/kg/day after two weeks) were compared with 18 preterm babies who had not been so treated. No differences were found in the incidence or pattern of septicaemia or other bacteriologically proved infections between the groups. Of 57 episodes of septicaemia, 44 (77%) were caused by coagulase negative staphylococci. PMID:2306135

  18. Evidence-based well-baby care. Part 1: Overview of the next generation of the Rourke Baby Record.

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotou, L.; Rourke, L. L.; Rourke, J. T.; Wakefield, J. G.; Winfield, D.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Well baby and child care in the primary care setting has not always been based on evidence that has been shown to be effective in preventing and detecting disease and injury. OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM: To help physicians and nurses provide care that is more effective than a routine complete examination, the Rourke Baby Record has been revised to include evidence-based recommendations for preventive care for infants and young children. The revision incorporates the approach and recommendations of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination. The updated record is now called the Rourke Baby Record: Evidence-Based Infant/Child Health Maintenance Guide (Rourke Baby Record: EB). MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Part 1 of this two-part article briefly describes the background for development and presents an overview of the revised record. Part 2 discusses in detail the evidence that exists for maneuvers included in the education and advice section of the revised record. CONCLUSION: Using the Rourke Baby Record: EB and incorporating it into their office record systems as a working guide will help increase the effectiveness of the primary preventive care physicians provide to infants and young children. PMID:9559196

  19. Fall prevention in our healthiest patients: assessing risk and preventing injury for moms and babies.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, Ann D

    2015-01-01

    Attention is needed in preventing patient falls in newborns and in obstetric units of hospitals. The majority of prenatal, postpartum, and newborn falls are preventable. Little effort has been made to address fall risk during the prenatal period, during labor, and after delivery in the postpartum period for moms and babies. Risk factors for falls in these populations have been identified, and targeted risk assessments and fall prevention interventions have been developed to eliminate these falls. Evidence demonstrates success in reducing falls with a variety of low-cost but high-return initiatives, comprising prenatal education, patient and family engagement, implementation of unique fall risk assessment tools, postpartum mobility assessments, and changes in patient rounding frequency.

  20. Gastrointestinal colonization with ESBL-producing Klebsiella in preterm babies--is vancomycin to blame?

    PubMed

    Ofek-Shlomai, N; Benenson, S; Ergaz, Z; Peleg, O; Braunstein, R; Bar-Oz, B

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we examine the possible association between treatment with vancomycin and colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Variables compared between newborns which developed rectal colonization and those who did not include: gestational age, birth weight, gender, and total length of hospital stay until positive stool culture or discharge, treatment with vancomycin, and positive blood culture for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. We found that lower birth weight, younger gestational age, and treatment with vancomycin were statistically significant risk factors for gastrointestinal colonization with ESBL-producing Klebsiella. When applying a multivariate model, treatment with vancomycin, both for a full 10-day course and for a short 3-day empirical treatment, remained statistically significant. Treatment with vancomycin is a risk factor for gastrointestinal colonization with ESBL-producing Klebsiella in premature babies.

  1. Labor and Delivery Experiences of Mothers with Suspected Large Babies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Erika R.; Declercq, Eugene R.; Belanoff, Candice; Stotland, Naomi E.; Iverson, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the prevalence of and factors associated with clinicians’ prenatal suspicion of a large baby; and to determine whether communicating fetal size concerns to patients was associated with labor and delivery interventions and outcomes. Methods We examined data from women without a prior cesarean who responded to Listening to Mothers III, a nationally representative survey of women who had given birth between July 2011 and June 2012 (n=1,960). We estimated the effect of having a suspected large baby (SLB) on the odds of six labor and delivery outcomes. Results Nearly one-third (31.2%) of women were told by their maternity care providers that their babies might be getting “quite large”; however, only 9.9% delivered a baby weighing ≥4,000 grams (19.7% among mothers with SLBs, 5.5% without). Women with SLBs had increased adjusted odds of medically-induced labor (AOR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.4–2.6), attempted self-induced labor (AOR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.4–2.7), and use of epidural analgesics (AOR 2.0; 95% CI: 1.4–2.9). No differences were noted for overall cesarean rates, although women with SLBs were more likely to ask for (AOR 4.6; 95% CI: 2.8–7.6) and have planned (AOR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.0–4.5) cesarean deliveries. These associations were not affected by adjustment for gestational age and birthweight. Conclusion Only one in five US women who were told that their babies might be getting quite large actually delivered infants weighing ≥4,000 grams. However, the suspicion of a large baby was associated with an increase in perinatal interventions, regardless of actual fetal size. PMID:26140835

  2. Pedagogy with babies: perspectives of eight nursery managers

    PubMed Central

    Elfer, Peter; Page, Jools

    2015-01-01

    The last 30 years have seen a significant increase in babies attending nursery, with corresponding questions about the aims and organisation of practice. Research broadly agrees on the importance of emotionally consistent, sensitive and responsive interactions between staff and babies. Policy objectives for nursery and expectations of parents and staff give rise to different and sometimes conflicting aims for such interactions; for example attachments to staff, peer interactions or early learning. Research shows marked variations of pedagogy aims and organisation with babies in nurseries in different national and cultural contexts. It also demonstrates variation between nurseries in similar contexts and between staff in their beliefs and values about work with babies. This paper reports on an exploratory study of the beliefs, aspirations and approaches of eight managers concerning pedagogy with babies in two similar English local authorities. These managers spoke of the importance of being responsive to the concerns and priorities of parents, whilst being sensitive to the demands of the work on their staff. The main finding was of the contradictions and confusions managers felt were inherent in the work, arising from both conflicting policy objectives and personal beliefs and aspirations; sometimes their own and sometimes those of individual staff and parents. Urban, Vandenbroeck, Van Laere, Lazzari, and Peeters' [(2012). Towards competent systems in early childhood education and care. Implications for policy and practice. European Journal of Education, 47(4), 508–526.] concept of the ‘competent system’ is used to recommend a grounded approach to the development of a more culturally, socially and individually responsive pedagogy with babies than appears to exist at present. PMID:26692633

  3. What can be done to keep babies' skin healthy?

    PubMed

    Atherton, David; Mills, Kathryn

    2004-07-01

    Establishing a skincare routine that keeps babies' skin healthy remains a challenge for midwives and parents, since up to 50% of babies suffer from at least one episode of nappy rash at some time. Nappy rash is an irritant contact dermatitis caused by the interaction of several factors, particularly the prolonged contact of the skin with urine and faeces, which makes the skin more prone to disruption through friction with the nappy. Infection is not a primary cause of nappy rash, though secondary infection by Candida albicans can occur. Prevention of nappy rash is the ultimate goal, but if the condition does develop, treatment should aim to reverse the skin damage and prevent recurrence. We propose that routine baby skincare should comprise gentle cleansing whenever the nappy is soiled (using warm water or alcohol-free baby wipes), the use of good-quality super-absorbent nappies, and the application of a barrier preparation at every nappy change. Ideally, a barrier preparation should be clinically proven to be effective in babies and mimic the skin's natural function by forming a long-lasting barrier to maintain optimum moisture levels. It should not contain any unnecessary ingredients, including antiseptic, preservative or perfume (or other potential sensitisers), or any ingredients that are toxic or have undocumented safety. Treatment of nappy rash should comprise essentially the same actions as its prevention. Application of a barrier ointment at every nappy change can help to both prevent and treat this condition. Topical steroid therapy should be reserved for use where the condition has failed to respond to other approaches, and antifungal treatment should only be employed where Candida infection is established or suspected. Implementing these measures would form a simple skincare routine that could help keep babies' skin healthy.

  4. Baby Skyrme model, near-BPS approximations, and supersymmetric extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, S.; Zakrzewski, W.

    2015-02-01

    We study the baby Skyrme model as a theory that interpolates between two distinct BPS systems. For this, a near-BPS approximation can be used when there is a small deviation from each of the two BPS limits. We provide analytical explanation and numerical support for the validity of this approximation. We then study the set of all possible supersymmetric extensions of the baby Skyrme model with N =1 and the particular ones with extended N =2 supersymmetries and relate this to the above mentioned almost-BPS approximation.

  5. "Collodion baby": A unique challenge for newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Kayla M; Gaudreau, Philip; Cartee, Todd V; Reilly, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with collodion membrane who had an obstructed external auditory canal, causing the infant to fail her newborn hearing screen (otoacoustic emissions) bilaterally. An auditory brainstem response (ABR) test was deferred due to the reported increased risk of infections in these babies. Meticulous but gentle debridement of the membranes on the external auditory canal, using a combination of otic drops (ofloxacin), emollients (baby oil/mineral oil), and suctioning, permitted the infant to ultimately pass otoacoustic emissions bilaterally and subsequent serial audiograms. PMID:27178521

  6. "Collodion baby": A unique challenge for newborn hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Kayla M; Gaudreau, Philip; Cartee, Todd V; Reilly, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    We present an infant with collodion membrane who had an obstructed external auditory canal, causing the infant to fail her newborn hearing screen (otoacoustic emissions) bilaterally. An auditory brainstem response (ABR) test was deferred due to the reported increased risk of infections in these babies. Meticulous but gentle debridement of the membranes on the external auditory canal, using a combination of otic drops (ofloxacin), emollients (baby oil/mineral oil), and suctioning, permitted the infant to ultimately pass otoacoustic emissions bilaterally and subsequent serial audiograms.

  7. Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Preventative Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Montgomery, Eliza; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry; Back, Teddy; Balles, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the Ground Systems Development and Operations Program Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings and Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) project is to identify, test, and develop qualification criteria for the use of environmentally friendly corrosion protective coatings and CPCs for flight hardware and ground support equipment. This document is the Final Report for Phase I evaluations, which included physical property, corrosion resistance, and NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing and analysis of fifteen CPC types. The CPCs consisted of ten different oily film CPCs and five different wax or grease CPC types. Physical property testing encompassed measuring various properties of the bulk CPCs, while corrosion resistance testing directly measured the ability of each CPC material to protect various metals against corrosion. The NASA spaceport environment compatibility testing included common tests required by NASA-STD-6001, "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion". At the end of Phase I, CPC materials were down-selected for inclusion in the next test phases. This final report includes all data and analysis of results obtained by following the experimental test plan that was developed as part of the project. Highlights of the results are summarized by test criteria type.

  8. Taking Care of You and Your Baby While You're Pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    ... tilefish. These fish sometimes have high levels of mercury, which could hurt your baby. If you eat ... and other heavy metals (such as copper and mercury), could be damaging to the baby. However, working ...

  9. From Baby Bottle to Cup: Choose Training Cups Carefully, Use Them Temporarily

    MedlinePlus

    ... DENTAL PATIENT ... From baby bottle to cup Choose training cups carefully, use them temporarily T ooth decay ... you make the change from baby bottle to training cup, be very careful about d what kind ...

  10. Excess Pre-Pregnancy Weight May Slightly Raise Baby's Cerebral Palsy Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Excess Pre-Pregnancy Weight May Slightly Raise Baby's Cerebral Palsy Risk But, study found overall odds remain quite ... slight increased risk of having a baby with cerebral palsy, a new study suggests. After reviewing data from ...

  11. Parent Misidentification Leading to the Breastfeeding of the Wrong Baby in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Charles W; Marc-Aurele, Krishelle L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Because there are clear benefits to breast milk over formula for infants, the goal of the World Health Organization is to increase breastfeeding rates. As more women are breastfeeding and providing breast milk to newborns in hospitals, there is increased risk for administration error. CASE REPORT A hospitalized preterm infant was breastfed by the wrong mother when the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurse failed to properly identify the mother. An infectious disease workup done on the donor mother was negative, but the recipient infant was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Since the donor mother who accidentally breastfed the wrong infant was CMV-negative, the baby in our case had likely been exposed to CMV from his biological mother. The attending physician apologized to all of the family members involved, but the father of one infant continued to express anger. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this is the first case of accidental breastfeeding in a hospital setting to be described in the literature. Parental misidentification and a language barrier led to the error. An infectious disease workup did not find any evidence of disease transmission from this event. Increased attention to minimize breast milk errors is needed. Despite a long history of wet nursing, unregulated breast milk sharing and cross nursing is not recommended. Instead, if a mother cannot provide breast milk herself, pasteurized donor breast milk from breast milk banks is encouraged. PMID:27515898

  12. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... Symptoms start within 24 to 48 hours of infection, and can last for 1 ... norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  13. Rocking & Rolling: Supporting Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families. Helping Babies Make Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Sarah; Britt, Donna

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss three steps to helping babies with transitions: observe, ask, and respond (OAR). They advise teachers about how to ask a family questions about their baby and how to give the family suggestions to alleviate the baby's stress, without offending family members. This column includes a list of recommended resources. (Contains 7…

  14. Organizing the Baby Boomer Construct: An Exploration of Marketing, Social Systems, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Hilt, Michael L.; Reilly, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Baby boomer trends are applied in the development of a conceptual framework that offers a social systems and cultural model for future studies. While there has been considerable recent attention paid to baby boomers, the studies lack a coherent theoretical base that would allow for more advanced and continuing research. Aging baby boomers heading…

  15. Orchestrating Professional Development for Baby Room Practitioners: Raising the Stakes in New Dialogic Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goouch, Kathleen; Powell, Sacha

    2013-01-01

    This article has emerged from a research and development project, The Baby Room, which was designed to examine how babies are cared for in daycare settings. Within the project, a form of professional development was created which designated a central space for dialogic encounter, primarily to enable the baby room practitioners who participated in…

  16. The Baby Boomer Generation--Impact on Public Libraries: Theoretical and Practical Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlert, Maureen V.

    This paper discusses the impact of the Baby Boomer generation on public libraries. The paper has five main objectives: (1) to provide a statistical and demographic profile of the Baby Boomers at the local, state, and national levels within Australia; (2) to provide characteristics of the Baby Boomer generation; (3) to present comparative results…

  17. Bringing New Families to the Museum One Baby at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    "Bring Your Baby to the Danforth Museum of Art" is a program for mothers. Unlike other museum programs that focus on the needs of children, Bring Your Baby caters to the intellectual interests of the adult parent. Parents learn about artworks, play with babies in a beautiful environment, and socialize with other families. The program is a joyful…

  18. The Loss of a Baby and the Birth of the Next Infant: The Mother's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Marguerite

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the area of perinatal death by focusing on the mother's experience. An argument is made for questioning whether mothers attempt to replace a dead infant. It is suggested instead that they long to mother their lost baby and as a result their new infant is mothered in the shadow of the dead baby. The term "penumbra baby" is…

  19. Efficacy of baby-CIMT: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial on infants below age 12 months, with clinical signs of unilateral CP

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants with unilateral brain lesions are at high risk of developing unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Given the great plasticity of the young brain, possible interventions for infants at risk of unilateral CP deserve exploration. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is known to be effective for older children with unilateral CP but is not systematically used for infants. The development of CIMT for infants (baby-CIMT) is described here, as is the methodology of an RCT comparing the effects on manual ability development of baby-CIMT versus baby-massage. The main hypothesis is that infants receiving baby-CIMT will develop manual ability in the involved hand faster than will infants receiving baby-massage in the first year of life. Method and design The study will be a randomised, controlled, prospective parallel-group trial. Invited infants will be to be randomised to either the baby-CIMT or the baby-massage group if they: 1) are at risk of developing unilateral CP due to a known neonatal event affecting the brain or 2) have been referred to Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital due to asymmetric hand function. The inclusion criteria are age 3–8 months and established asymmetric hand use. Infants in both groups will receive two 6-weeks training periods separated by a 6-week pause, for 12 weeks in total of treatment. The primary outcome measure will be the new Hand Assessment for Infants (HAI) for evaluating manual ability. In addition, the Parenting Sense of Competence scale and Alberta Infant Motor Scale will be used. Clinical neuroimaging will be utilized to characterise the brain lesion type. To compare outcomes between treatment groups generalised linear models will be used. Discussion The model of early intensive intervention for hand function, baby-CIMT evaluated by the Hand Assessment for Infants (HAI) will have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of how early intervention of upper limb function in infants at risk of

  20. Keeping Your Baby Healthy: A Practical Manual for Black Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Sharon, Ed.

    Based on the belief that black parents have the power to prevent many of their children's health problems, and thus the responsibility to do so, this manual provides practical advice and lists resources in seven chapters. Chapters concern: (1) prenatal care; (2) having a baby; (3) the child's first 12 months; (4) information every parent should…

  1. Darwin's Intertextual Baby: Erasmus Darwin as Precursor in Child Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Ben S.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that Charles Darwin's observations on babies are not examples of data collected to test hypotheses. Draws from Bakhtin to argue that they extend and vary existing modes of discourse, primarily debates about the place of instinct in language acquisition, traceable to his grandfather, Erasmus Darwin. Concludes that the significance of Darwin's…

  2. Life‐threatening hypernatraemic dehydration in breastfed babies

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, R; Hignett, R; Pierce, C; Marks, S; Hoff, W van't

    2006-01-01

    We describe five babies, who were exclusively breast fed, with life‐threatening complications of hypernatraemic dehydration secondary to inadequate breast feeding. An increased awareness among health professionals is required so that this potentially devastating condition can be prevented. PMID:16690697

  3. 82. Historic American Buildings Survey VIEW SHOWING BABY HOUSE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. Historic American Buildings Survey VIEW SHOWING BABY HOUSE AND PATIO WHERE TENT ROOM NOW LOCATED PHOTOCOPY OF PLATE FROM IRVIN L. SCOTT, 'MARALAGO', THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT (JUNE 20, 1928), P. 797 - Mar-a-Lago, 1100 South Ocean Boulevard, Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  4. Shaken Baby Syndrome: The Problem and a Model for Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showers, Jacy

    1992-01-01

    Examines the problem of shaken baby syndrome (SBS), which involves the injury or death of an infant as a result of severe shaking. Advocates a national media campaign to promote awareness of SBS and to prevent needless injuries and deaths. (MDM)

  5. Revisiting the Measurement of Shaken Baby Syndrome Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Beth S.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 10 years, over 80% of adults surveyed report some familiarity with Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) and the dangers of shaking infants younger than 2 years of age ([Dias et al., 2005] and [Russell and Britner, 2006]). Hence, in the context of SBS prevention, the question of whether caregivers knew the safety risks of shaking an infant…

  6. Health benefits of encore careers for baby boomers.

    PubMed

    Topiwala, Anya; Patel, Shivani; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-05-01

    Baby boomers now represent an aging population group at risk of the diseases of older age. Their relatively high education, amongst other attributes, means that they can make a significant contribution to the work force beyond the statutory retirement age. On an individual level, potential health benefits may motivate them to pursue encore careers. We review some of the evidence supporting such a trend.

  7. Developing Baby Bag Design by Using Kansei Engineering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janari, D.; Rakhmawati, A.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer's preferences and market demand are essential factors for product's success. Thus, in achieving its success, a product should have design that could fulfill consumer's expectation. Purpose of this research is accomplishing baby bag product as stipulated by Kansei. The results that represent Kanseiwords are; neat, unique, comfortable, safe, modern, gentle, elegant, antique, attractive, simple, spacious, creative, colorful, durable, stylish, smooth and strong. Identification value on significance of correlation for durable attribute is 0,000 < 0,005, which means significant to baby's bag. While the value of coefficient regression is 0,812 < 0,005, which means that durable attribute insignificant to baby's bag.The result of the baby's bag final design selectionbased on the questionnaire 3 is resulting the combination of all design. Space for clothes, diaper's space, shoulder grip, side grip, bottle's heater pocket and bottle's pocket are derived from design 1. Top grip, space for clothes, shoulder grip, and side grip are derived from design 2.Others design that were taken are, spaces for clothes from design 3, diaper's space and clothes’ space from design 4.

  8. Preparing children for pregnancy and a new baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child may get clingy. Your child may act up. Set limits with your child as you always ... books with you Avoid telling your child to act like a big boy or a big girl. Remember that your child thinks of themselves as your baby.

  9. When Your Baby's in the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit)

    MedlinePlus

    ... leads can count your child's heart rate and breathing rate. A pulse oximetry (or pulse ox) machine also may display your baby's blood oxygen levels on the monitor. Also painless, the ... ventilator (or breathing machine) via an endotracheal tube (a plastic tube ...

  10. Reducing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay. A SERVE Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE), Tallahassee, FL.

    This pamphlet discusses strategies for reducing baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) among Native American children. BBTD in infants and toddlers is a painful disease characterized by extensive decay of the upper front and side teeth. It is caused by prolonged exposure of teeth to carbohydrates, such as those contained in infant formula, milk, and fruit…

  11. Challenging Our Assumptions: Helping a Baby Adjust to Center Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Enid

    2003-01-01

    Contends that assumptions concerning infants' adjustment to child center care need to be tempered with attention to observation, thought, and commitment to each individual baby. Describes the Options Daycare program for pregnant teens and young mothers. Presents a case study illustrating the need for openness in strategy and planning for…

  12. Sign Language with Babies: What Difference Does It Make?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Susan Kubic

    2010-01-01

    Teaching sign language--to deaf or other children with special needs or to hearing children with hard-of-hearing family members--is not new. Teaching sign language to typically developing children has become increasingly popular since the publication of "Baby Signs"[R] (Goodwyn & Acredolo, 1996), now in its third edition. Attention to signing with…

  13. Ritualized Embarrassment at "Coed" Wedding and Baby Showers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braithwaite, Dawn O.

    1995-01-01

    Finds that women embarrassed men at "coed" wedding and baby showers by teasing and causing them to look unpoised, and that men used avoidance, humor, remediation, and justification strategies. Adds a new strategy, compliance, to previous frameworks to explain males' reaction to embarrassment. Discusses the importance of context and degree of…

  14. Will the Retiring Baby Boomers Return to Rural Periphery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauhiainen, Jussi S.

    2009-01-01

    Many belonging to large post-war age cohorts in the western countries moved from rural areas to larger industrializing cities. They retire soon and can consider moving back to the childhood places. This article studies these baby boomers and the issues about their return to peripheral rural areas. The case regards one rural municipality,…

  15. Infant feeding. 5. Managing baby related feeding challenges.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Joyce

    2013-02-01

    'Infant feeding' is the 12th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to inform and encourage readers to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. In this fifth article Joyce Marshall considers a range of baby related issues that pose challenges for both mothers and midwives in relation to infant feeding.

  16. Baby Boomers in an Active Adult Retirement Community: Comity Interrupted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Erin G.; Keimig, Lynn; Rubinstein, Robert L.; Morgan, Leslie; Eckert, J. Kevin; Goldman, Susan; Peeples, Amanda D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This article explores a clash between incoming Baby Boomers and older residents in an active adult retirement community (AARC). We examine issues of social identity and attitudes as these groups encounter each other. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from a multiyear ethnographic study of social relations in senior housing.…

  17. Just a Talking Book? Word Learning from Watching Baby Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Michael B.; Richert, Rebekah A.; Wartella, Ellen A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between viewing an infant DVD and expressive and receptive language outcomes. Children between 12 and 15 months were randomly assigned to view "Baby Wordsworth," a DVD highlighting words around the house marketed for children beginning at 12 months of age. Viewings took place in home settings over 6 weeks.…

  18. BABY EMPATHY: INFANT DISTRESS AND PEER PROSOCIAL RESPONSES.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Mitzi-Jane E; Bradley, Ben S; Mcgrath, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an important competence in our social world, a motivator of prosocial behavior, and thought to develop throughout the second year of life. The current study examined infants' responses to naturalistic peer distress to explore markers of empathy and prosocial behavior in young babies. Seventeen 8-month-old infants participated in a repeated measures design using the "babies-in-groups" paradigm, with maternal presence as the independent variable. Significant differences were found between response types: Gaze was the standard response to infant distress, followed by socially directed behaviors and affect, with self-distress rarely occurring. Maternal presence was not found to impact the nature or frequency of babies' responses to peer distress. During distress episodes, babies looked preferentially at the distressed peer, then other mothers, and least to their own mother. Data revealed that infant responses to peer distress resulted in a successful cessation of that distress episode over one third of the time. Case studies are provided to illustrate the quantitative data. The results provided evidence of empathic concern and prosocial behavior in the first year of life, and provoke a challenge to developmental theories of empathy.

  19. Do Mothers Want Professional Carers to Love Their Babies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jools

    2011-01-01

    This article reports an aspect of a life historical study which investigated the part that "love" played in mothers' decision-making about returning to work and placing their babies in day care. The article begins with a brief discussion of the context, including 21st-century policies in England to encourage mothers to return to the workforce…

  20. Bilirubin, copper-porphyrins, and the bronze-baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Antony F

    2011-01-01

    Controlled in vitro spectroscopic measurements reveal that bilirubin does not photosensitize the degradation of copper-porphyrins, as has been proposed for the mechanism of the bronze-baby syndrome, an uncommon side-effect of phototherapy. Calculations also show that copper-porphyrins are unlikely to cause the "bronzing." In conclusion, the copper-porphyrin hypothesis is photochemically implausible.

  1. [Sudden death in new-born babies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Guilhaume, A

    This sudden death of a new-born baby, which had been thriving up to then, is a dramatic but not exceptional event. A systematic search for the etiology must be made, and this should include an autopsy in order that the diagnosis of "sudden and unexplained death" is confirmed only after eliminating all other possible causes. Knowledge of this syndrome has benefited from epidemiological surveys which have defined the previous clinical condition, but none of the many etiollotical hypotheses envisaged can take into account the total number of cases reported. One of the most recent cases developed apnoea during sleep, which could explain some unexpected deaths in new-born babies. This was discovered by polygraphic sleep recordings and confirmed by pathological examinations. These demonstrated indirect signs of chronic hypoxia which could have been related to the sudden death of the baby. Though there does not appear to be any relationship between the apnoea syndrome during sleep and these sudden and unexpected deaths, this hypothesis has opened up a new promising line of research which could help to identify new-born babies at risk from "sudden death", and to propose preventative measures. PMID:224505

  2. B Is for Baby, B Is for Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Jane

    1997-01-01

    Describes an infant and toddler public library program called "Mother Goose Time." It is a language enrichment program that uses rhymes, songs, and books to lay the foundations of listening, learning, and literacy. Activities are planned according to the babies' motor skills--they are divided into two groups, "prewalkers" and "walkers". A list of…

  3. What We Learn about Babies from Engaging with Their Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Vasudevi; Trevarthen, Colwyn

    2004-01-01

    Reddy and Trevarthen explore what we can learn from emotionally engaging with babies. Theirs is a different approach from 20th-century psychology, in which doubt and detachment play a role in discerning other people's feelings and thoughts. Instead, the authors suggest that emotions are the key to psychological engagement. When interacting with an…

  4. AVERT2 (a very early rehabilitation trial, a very effective reproductive trigger): retrospective observational analysis of the number of babies born to trial staff

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Richard I; Lalor, Erin; Ellery, Fiona; Chamberlain, Jan; Van Holsteyn, John; Collier, Janice M; Dewey, Helen M; Parsons, Brooke; Moodie, Marjory; Lennon, Sheila; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Thrift, Amanda G; Churilov, Leonid; Langhorne, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the number of participants needed to recruit per baby born to trial staff during AVERT, a large international trial on acute stroke, and to describe trial management consequences. Design Retrospective observational analysis. Setting 56 acute stroke hospitals in eight countries. Participants 1074 trial physiotherapists, nurses, and other clinicians. Outcome measures Number of babies born during trial recruitment per trial participant recruited. Results With 198 site recruitment years and 2104 patients recruited during AVERT, 120 babies were born to trial staff. Births led to an estimated 10% loss in time to achieve recruitment. Parental leave was linked to six trial site closures. The number of participants needed to recruit per baby born was 17.5 (95% confidence interval 14.7 to 21.0); additional trial costs associated with each birth were estimated at 5736 Australian dollars on average. Conclusion The staff absences registered in AVERT owing to parental leave led to delayed trial recruitment and increased costs, and should be considered by trial investigators when planning research and estimating budgets. However, the celebration of new life became a highlight of the annual AVERT collaborators’ meetings and helped maintain a cohesive collaborative group. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry no 12606000185561. Disclaimer Participation in a rehabilitation trial does not guarantee successful reproductive activity. PMID:26658193

  5. Friends don't let friends eat cookies: effects of restrictive eating norms on consumption among friends.

    PubMed

    Howland, Maryhope; Hunger, Jeffrey M; Mann, Traci

    2012-10-01

    Social norms are thought to be a strong influence over eating, but this hypothesis has only been experimentally tested with groups of strangers, and correlational studies using actual friends lack important controls. We manipulate an eating norm in the laboratory and explore its influence within established friendships. In two studies we randomly assigned groups of three friends to a restrictive norm condition, in which two of the friends were secretly instructed to restrict their intake of appetizing foods, or a control condition, in which the friends were not instructed to restrict their eating. The third friend's consumption was measured while eating with the other two friends and while eating alone. In both studies, participants consumed less food when eating with friends who had been given restricting instructions compared to those who had not been given those instructions. In Study 2, participants who ate with restricting friends also continued to restrict their eating when alone. Experimentally manipulating social norms within established friendships is possible, and these norms can influence consumption in those social groups and carry over into non-social eating situations. These findings may suggest mechanisms through which eating behaviors may spread through social networks, as well as an environmental factor that may be amenable to change.

  6. Synchronous identification of friendly targets

    SciTech Connect

    Telle, John M.; Roger, Stutz A.

    1998-01-01

    A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

  7. Good Agreements Make Good Friends

    PubMed Central

    Han, The Anh; Pereira, Luís Moniz; Santos, Francisco C.; Lenaerts, Tom

    2013-01-01

    When starting a new collaborative endeavor, it pays to establish upfront how strongly your partner commits to the common goal and what compensation can be expected in case the collaboration is violated. Diverse examples in biological and social contexts have demonstrated the pervasiveness of making prior agreements on posterior compensations, suggesting that this behavior could have been shaped by natural selection. Here, we analyze the evolutionary relevance of such a commitment strategy and relate it to the costly punishment strategy, where no prior agreements are made. We show that when the cost of arranging a commitment deal lies within certain limits, substantial levels of cooperation can be achieved. Moreover, these levels are higher than that achieved by simple costly punishment, especially when one insists on sharing the arrangement cost. Not only do we show that good agreements make good friends, agreements based on shared costs result in even better outcomes. PMID:24045873

  8. Hard water softening effect of a baby cleanser

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Russel M; Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Amato, Stephanie M; Capone, Kimberly A; Mack, M Catherine; Telofski, Lorena S; Mays, David A

    2016-01-01

    Background Hard water is associated with atopic dermatitis (eczema). We wanted to determine if a baby cleanser and its individual components altered free ionized calcium (Ca2+) in a simulated hard water baby bath. For these studies, an in vitro determination of free Ca2+ in a simulated hard water baby bath, and an in vivo exploratory study of free Ca2+ absorption into skin from hard water were performed. Methods Free Ca2+ was measured with an ion-sensitive electrode in vitro in hard water (100–500 ppm, Ca2+) before and after addition of the cleanser and/or its components. In an exploratory study, absorption of Ca2+ into skin from hard water was determined in three female participants (aged 21–29 years). Results At an in-use dilution of 1%, the test cleanser reduced free Ca2+ from ~500 ppm to <200 ppm; a 10% in-use dilution bound virtually all free Ca2+. The anionic surfactant component contributed the most to this effect. In the exploratory in vivo study, we measured a reduction of ~15% in free Ca2+ from simulated hard water over 10 minutes. Conclusion Baby cleansers can bind free Ca2+ and reduce the effective water hardness of bath water. Reducing the amount of free Ca2+ in the water will reduce the availability of the ion for binding to the skin. Altering or reducing free Ca2+ concentrations in bath water may be an important parameter in creating the ideal baby bath. PMID:27789967

  9. The 2030 Problem: Caring for Aging Baby Boomers

    PubMed Central

    Knickman, James R; Snell, Emily K

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the coming challenges of caring for large numbers of frail elderly as the Baby Boom generation ages. Study Setting A review of economic and demographic data as well as simulations of projected socioeconomic and demographic patterns in the year 2030 form the basis of a review of the challenges related to caring for seniors that need to be faced by society. Study Design A series of analyses are used to consider the challenges related to caring for elders in the year 2030: (1) measures of macroeconomic burden are developed and analyzed, (2) the literatures on trends in disability, payment approaches for long-term care, healthy aging, and cultural views of aging are analyzed and synthesized, and(3)simulations of future income and assets patterns of the Baby Boom generation are developed. Principal Findings The economic burden of aging in 2030 should be no greater than the economic burden associated with raising large numbers of baby boom children in the 1960s. The real challenges of caring for the elderly in 2030 will involve: (1) making sure society develops payment and insurance systems for long-term care that work better than existing ones, (2) taking advantage of advances in medicine and behavioral health to keep the elderly as healthy and active as possible, (3) changing the way society organizes community services so that care is more accessible, and (4) altering the cultural view of aging to make sure all ages are integrated into the fabric of community life. Conclusions To meet the long-term care needs of Baby Boomers, social and public policy changes must begin soon. Meeting the financial and social service burdens of growing numbers of elders will not be a daunting task if necessary changes are made now rather than when Baby Boomers actually need long-term care. PMID:12236388

  10. Baby-MONITOR: A Composite Indicator of NICU Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kowalkowski, Marc A.; Zupancic, John A. F.; Pietz, Kenneth; Richardson, Peter; Draper, David; Hysong, Sylvia J.; Thomas, Eric J.; Petersen, Laura A.; Gould, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: NICUs vary in the quality of care delivered to very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. NICU performance on 1 measure of quality only modestly predicts performance on others. Composite measurement of quality of care delivery may provide a more comprehensive assessment of quality. The objective of our study was to develop a robust composite indicator of quality of NICU care provided to VLBW infants that accurately discriminates performance among NICUs. METHODS: We developed a composite indicator, Baby-MONITOR, based on 9 measures of quality chosen by a panel of experts. Measures were standardized, equally weighted, and averaged. We used the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative database to perform across-sectional analysis of care given to VLBW infants between 2004 and 2010. Performance on the Baby-MONITOR is not an absolute marker of quality but indicates overall performance relative to that of the other NICUs. We used sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness of the composite indicator, by varying assumptions and methods. RESULTS: Our sample included 9023 VLBW infants in 22 California regional NICUs. We found significant variations within and between NICUs on measured components of the Baby-MONITOR. Risk-adjusted composite scores discriminated performance among this sample of NICUs. Sensitivity analysis that included different approaches to normalization, weighting, and aggregation of individual measures showed the Baby-MONITOR to be robust (r = 0.89–0.99). CONCLUSIONS: The Baby-MONITOR may be a useful tool to comprehensively assess the quality of care delivered by NICUs. PMID:24918221

  11. Old Friends and New Friends: Their Presence at Substance-Use Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiesner, Jeff; Fassetta, Erica

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to test whether the presence of new friends at moments of substance-use initiation differs across substances, and whether individuals tend to initiate substance use, across different substances, either with a new friend or with an old friend. Participants were 419 Italian high school students (41% female). Results showed…

  12. Smart Mom's Baby-Sitting Co-Op Handbook: How We Solved the Baby-Sitter Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Gary

    Noting that a family with young children is under tremendous pressure and that a babysitting cooperative can give parents relief during a vital stage of a family's development, this book provides guidance for mothers of preschool children in starting and maintaining a Smart Mom's Babysitting Cooperative based on the University Place Baby-Sitting…

  13. The Good Friends Volunteer Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Richard

    This evaluation report relates data pertaining to the 1975-76 school year. The Good Friends Volunteer Program was established in 1974. During the 1975-76 school year, over 3,000 volunteers in 110 schools participated in the Good Friends program. Duties included giving individual attention to students; enriching programs in such areas as music,…

  14. Lactation management clinic-positive reinforcement to hospital breastfeeding practices.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, R N; Mondkar, J A; Fernandez, A R; Raghavan, K R

    1994-11-01

    Supportive breastfeeding policies in the hospital constitute the foundation for initiation of successful breastfeeding by mothers, constant reinforcement and support to all lactating mothers is however essential to maintain lactation. The objective, methodology and outcome of the Lactation Management Clinic which constitutes a hospital-based mother support group is described. The study was carried out over a period of 2 1/2 years and 519 mothers had attended this clinic. Analysis of the data revealed that at the time of the 1st visit to the clinic, 65.9% mothers had already started supplementary top feeds and the commonest reason encountered was mother's own assessment of inadequate milk seen in 73.6% mothers. Two-thirds (66.9%) of babies in our study were roomed in right from the first day of life, 75.3% of babies had received colostrum and 67.1% babies had not received any prelacteal feeds and yet faced problems at lactation. Mother and infant evaluation revealed no complications with 86.5% mothers and with 54.5% babies. Local breast problems were detected in 19.3% mothers. Faulty positioning was observed in 47.2% patients. Psychological support to mothers was the most important form of therapy given. Seventy eight per cent mothers practiced exclusive breastfeeding subsequently while 21.2% of mothers were partially successful in lactation. Only 3 mothers had lactation failure.

  15. Friends Don’t Let Friends Eat Cookies: Effects of Restrictive Eating Norms on Consumption Among Friends

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Maryhope; Hunger, Jeffrey; Mann, Traci

    2012-01-01

    Social norms are thought to be a strong influence over eating, but this hypothesis has only been experimentally tested with groups of strangers, and correlational studies using actual friends lack important controls. We manipulate an eating norm in the laboratory and explore its influence within established friendships. In two studies we randomly assigned groups of three friends to a restrictive norm condition, in which two of the friends were secretly instructed to restrict their intake of appetizing foods, or a control condition, in which the friends were not instructed to restrict their eating. The third friend’s consumption was measured while eating with the other two friends and while eating alone. In both studies, participants consumed less food when eating with friends who had been given restricting instructions compared to those who had not been given those instructions. In Study 2, participants who ate with restricting friends also continued to restrict their eating when alone. Experimentally manipulating social norms within established friendships is possible, and these norms can influence consumption in those social groups and carry over into non-social eating situations. These findings may suggest mechanisms through which eating behaviors may spread through social networks, as well as an environmental factor that may be amenable to change. PMID:22771755

  16. 76 FR 37055 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Baby...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Importation of Baby Squash and Baby Courgettes From Zambia AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... plant pests are not introduced into the United States. Allowing baby squash and baby courgettes to...

  17. Infant Arterial Stiffness and Maternal Iron Status in Pregnancy: A UK Birth Cohort (Baby VIP Study)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen A.; Cade, Janet E.; McArdle, Harry J.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hayes, Helen E.; Ciantar, Etienne; Simpson, Nigel A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In animal studies, iron deficiency during pregnancy has been linked to increased offspring cardiovascular risk. No previous population studies have measured arterial stiffness early in life to examine its association with maternal iron status. Objective This study aimed to examine the association between maternal iron status in early pregnancy with infant brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods The Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular Health and Iron in Pregnancy) study is a UK-based birth cohort which recruited 362 women after delivery from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals postnatal wards. Ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester. Infant brachio-femoral PWV was measured during a home visit at 2–6 weeks. Results Iron depletion (ferritin <15 µg/l) was detected in 79 (23%) women in early pregnancy. Infant PWV (mean = 6.7 m/s, SD = 1.3, n = 284) was neither associated with maternal ferritin (adjusted change per 10 µg/l = 0.02, 95% CI: −0.01, 0.1), nor with iron depletion (adjusted change = −0.2, 95% CI: −0.6, 0.2). No evidence of association was observed between maternal serum transferrin receptor level and its ratio to ferritin with infant PWV. Maternal anaemia (<11 g/dl) at <20 weeks’ gestation was associated with a 1.0-m/s increase in infant PWV (adjusted 95% CI: 0.1, 1.9). Conclusion This is the largest study to date which has assessed peripheral PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness in infants. There was no evidence of an association between markers of maternal iron status early in pregnancy and infant PWV. PMID:25790854

  18. Investigating the Relationship between Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) in diabetic mother’s breast milk and the blood serum of their babies

    PubMed Central

    Mohsen, Abdel Hakeem Abdel; Sallam, Salem; Ramzy, Maggie M.; Hamed, Eman Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Since research investigating IGF-1 levels in breast milk are few, the goal of this study was to analyze the IGF-1 levels in the breast milk of diabetic mothers as well as in the serum of their newborn babies and to identify what relationship exists between blood serum and IGF-1 milk levels through patient measurement of mothers and their babies. Methods This case control study was undertaken under the auspices of the Clinic of Neonatology at Al Minia University Pediatric Hospital over May 2012 through May 2013. With a total of 30 diabetic mothers and their babies forming the experimental group and the control group consisting of 15 non-diabetic mothers and their babies. A detailed medical history, anthropometric assessments, as well as the measurement of the baby’s serum IGF-1 and their mother’s breast milk IGF-1 levels were taken from all participants using ELSIA. The resulting data were analyzed via Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16 and measurements of descriptive statistics, t-test, Chi-square test, as well as the Pearson Correlation Coefficient. Results The Infants born to Diabetic Mothers (IDMs) demonstrated significantly greater anthropometric measurement. Both the serum levels and the milk IGF-1 levels as well as all of the physical measurements taken were found to have a positive correlation between the level of IGF-1 in mother’s milk and all of the anthropometric measurements studied with the exception of delivered baby’s length. Conclusion Higher levels of IGF-1 are present in the milk of diabetic mothers and the blood serum of their babies and this characteristic could be used as a prenatal biomarker for macrosomia. PMID:27504171

  19. Bayesian Inference on Predictors of Sex of the Baby

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the sex ratio at birth is a biological constant, being about 106 boys to 100 girls. However couples have always wanted to know and decide in advance the sex of a newborn. For example, a large number of papers appeared connecting biometrical variables, such as length of follicular phase in the woman menstrual cycle or timing of intercourse acts to the sex of new baby. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian model to validate some of these theories by using an independent database. Results show that we could not show an effect of the follicular length on the sex of the baby. We also obtain a slightly larger probability, although not significant, of conceiving a female just after the mucus peak day. PMID:27252938

  20. Bayesian Inference on Predictors of Sex of the Baby.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the sex ratio at birth is a biological constant, being about 106 boys to 100 girls. However couples have always wanted to know and decide in advance the sex of a newborn. For example, a large number of papers appeared connecting biometrical variables, such as length of follicular phase in the woman menstrual cycle or timing of intercourse acts to the sex of new baby. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian model to validate some of these theories by using an independent database. Results show that we could not show an effect of the follicular length on the sex of the baby. We also obtain a slightly larger probability, although not significant, of conceiving a female just after the mucus peak day. PMID:27252938

  1. Anaerobic cultures from preserved tissues of baby mammoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Fisher, Daniel; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 3 oC. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that keeps other bacteria from colonizing a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one month-old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete sample of the species ever recovered. The diversity of novel psychrophilic anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here, we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new psychrophilic strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for characterization of the cultures.

  2. Nutrition, sex, gestational age, and hair growth in babies.

    PubMed

    Berger, H M; King, J; Doughty, S; Wharton, B A

    1978-04-01

    Hair growth measurements are a sensitive indicator of nutrition and we have assessed their value in the perinatal period. The proportion of growing roots and their diameter were studied at birth in 114 babies and repeated 3 weeks later in 29 low birthweight babies. Intrauterine malnutrition resulted in thinner roots but the changes after birth were not related to nutrition and these measurements will not be useful in feeding studies in this period. At birth, gestational age and sex affected the hair root, and it may be important to recognise these differences if the hair root is used in biochemical screening tests. We have used a new simple technique for measuring the root diameter using an image-splitting eye-piece.

  3. Hyperekplexia and stiff-baby syndrome: an identical neurological disorder?

    PubMed

    Cioni, G; Biagioni, E; Bottai, P; Castellacci, A M; Paolicelli, P B

    1993-03-01

    Hyperekplexia (startle disease) is an unusual, familial, neurological disorder characterized by abnormally enhanced startle response, followed in most cases by momentary generalized muscular stiffness. These attacks may cause the patients to fall rigidly, while remaining fully conscious. Startle symptomatology has generally an onset in infancy and is often accompanied, during the first years of life, by rigidity, sleep myoclonus, motor delay, regurgitation and apneic spells, which may cause sudden death. Stiff-baby syndrome is a familial disorder characterized by marked rigidity, with neonatal onset and gradual reduction during infancy, regurgitations, motor delay and attacks of stiffness. We report 4 new cases of hyperekplexia from two different families and another infant with stiff-baby syndrome discussing clinical, electrophysiological and genetic aspects of both neurological disorders in relation to other reported cases. We suggest a continuum between these familial syndromes, which are often misinterpreted as epilepsy or other disorders.

  4. God-mother-baby: what children think they know.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Florian; Perner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    This study tested one hundred and nine 3- to 6-year-old children on a knowledge-ignorance task about knowledge in humans (mother, baby) and God. In their responses, participants not reliably grasping that seeing leads to knowing in humans (pre-representational) were significantly influenced by own knowledge and marginally by question format. Moreover, knowledge was attributed significantly more often to mother than baby and explained by agent-based characteristics. Of participants mastering the task for humans (representational), God was largely conceived as ignorant "man in the sky" by younger and increasingly as "supernatural agent in the sky" by older children. Evidence for egocentrism and for anthropomorphizing God lends support to an anthropomorphism hypothesis. First-time evidence for an agent-based conception of others' knowledge in pre-representational children is presented.

  5. Anaerobic Cultures from Preserved Tissues of Baby Mammoth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 4 C. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that prevents other bacteria from over-dominating a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one-month old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete such specimen ever recovered. The diversity of novel anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for the characterization of cultures.

  6. God-mother-baby: what children think they know.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Florian; Perner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    This study tested one hundred and nine 3- to 6-year-old children on a knowledge-ignorance task about knowledge in humans (mother, baby) and God. In their responses, participants not reliably grasping that seeing leads to knowing in humans (pre-representational) were significantly influenced by own knowledge and marginally by question format. Moreover, knowledge was attributed significantly more often to mother than baby and explained by agent-based characteristics. Of participants mastering the task for humans (representational), God was largely conceived as ignorant "man in the sky" by younger and increasingly as "supernatural agent in the sky" by older children. Evidence for egocentrism and for anthropomorphizing God lends support to an anthropomorphism hypothesis. First-time evidence for an agent-based conception of others' knowledge in pre-representational children is presented. PMID:24350816

  7. Frequency of neonatal hyperglycaemia at Gaafar Ibnauf Children’s Hospital: Clinical aspects and short term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Monera MM

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia has become a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality of the smaller fragile infants surviving the neonatal period. Its risk is inversely related to gestational age, birth weight and baby’s clinical condition. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, some clinical aspects and immediate outcome of hyperglycaemia in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gaafar Ibnauf Children’s Hospital, Khartoum. The study was a prospective, descriptive and hospital-based, conducted during the period of 1st January to 31st December 2014. Eighty-five neonates out of 345 had neonatal hyperglycaemia with a frequency rate of (24.6%). Fifty-two (61.2%) were males (male: female ratio=1.6:1), 61.2% of the babies were in the age group (0—7) days, and 25.9% in age group (8—14) days. Forty-two (49.4%) were preterm, while 43 (50.6%) were term babies. Four (4.7%) of the mothers had diabetes, and 6(7.1%) had hypertension. Neonatal sepsis was a predominant risk factor of hyperglycaemia occurring in 67 babies (78.8%), followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28 (32.9%) babies. Ten babies (11.8%) were diagnosed as acute kidney injury, four babies (4.7%) had hypernatraemic dehydration and seven babies (8.3%) were having hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Out of 85 hyperglycaemic neonates death was reported in 10 babies (11.8%), 75 (88.2%) survived. All cases had transient hyperglycaemia; therefore insulin intervention was not necessary. Currently, at Gaafar Ibnauf Children’s Hospital, specific protocol for management of hyperglycaemia is lacking. Further studies are recommended to assess long term sequels of hyperglycaemia in neonates. PMID:27651553

  8. Frequency of neonatal hyperglycaemia at Gaafar Ibnauf Children’s Hospital: Clinical aspects and short term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Monera MM

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia has become a significant risk factor for morbidity and mortality of the smaller fragile infants surviving the neonatal period. Its risk is inversely related to gestational age, birth weight and baby’s clinical condition. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, some clinical aspects and immediate outcome of hyperglycaemia in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gaafar Ibnauf Children’s Hospital, Khartoum. The study was a prospective, descriptive and hospital-based, conducted during the period of 1st January to 31st December 2014. Eighty-five neonates out of 345 had neonatal hyperglycaemia with a frequency rate of (24.6%). Fifty-two (61.2%) were males (male: female ratio=1.6:1), 61.2% of the babies were in the age group (0—7) days, and 25.9% in age group (8—14) days. Forty-two (49.4%) were preterm, while 43 (50.6%) were term babies. Four (4.7%) of the mothers had diabetes, and 6(7.1%) had hypertension. Neonatal sepsis was a predominant risk factor of hyperglycaemia occurring in 67 babies (78.8%), followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28 (32.9%) babies. Ten babies (11.8%) were diagnosed as acute kidney injury, four babies (4.7%) had hypernatraemic dehydration and seven babies (8.3%) were having hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Out of 85 hyperglycaemic neonates death was reported in 10 babies (11.8%), 75 (88.2%) survived. All cases had transient hyperglycaemia; therefore insulin intervention was not necessary. Currently, at Gaafar Ibnauf Children’s Hospital, specific protocol for management of hyperglycaemia is lacking. Further studies are recommended to assess long term sequels of hyperglycaemia in neonates.

  9. Collodion baby dehydration: the danger of high transepidermal water loss.

    PubMed

    Buyse, L; Graves, C; Marks, R; Wijeyesekera, K; Alfaham, M; Finlay, A Y

    1993-07-01

    We describe transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements in a collodion baby suffering from severe hypernatraemic dehydration and hypothermia, who required intravenous fluid therapy in a special incubator. The TEWL values 4 days after birth were abnormally high compared with normal infants of the same age. The TEWL measurements returned towards normal within the first month, in parallel with the improvement of both the skin signs and the electrolyte and fluid balance.

  10. Ultradian components of the sleep-wake cycle in babies.

    PubMed

    Menna-Barreto, L; Benedito-Silva, A A; Marques, N; de Andrade, M M; Louzada, F

    1993-04-01

    Behavioral states may be analyzed as expressions of underlying cyclic activity involving several physiological systems. The human sleep-wake cycle in the first year of life shows, in addition to the establishment of circadian rhythmicity around the second month, the dynamics of its ultradian components, as can be seen in the more or less gradual decline of the polyphasic pattern. To detect these changes, we have analyzed the sleep-wake cycle of five babies of different ages (3, 4, 9, 11, and 13 months) observed for 5 consecutive days (Monday through Friday), 10 h (08:00-18:00 h) per day at a kindergarten by the first author, and during the night (18:00-08:00 h) by the parents. Behavioral observations were designed for minimizing interference with the babies' habits. Sleep/wake data were arranged in 60-min intervals, and the relative amount of time spent asleep per interval constituted the time series submitted for statistical analysis. The five resulting time series were submitted to spectral analysis for detecting the composition of frequencies contributing to the observed sleep/wake cycle. Several frequencies were thus obtained for each baby in the ultradian and circadian domain, ranging from one cycle in 2.0 h to one cycle in 24 h. The circadian component was the strongest rhythmic influence for all individuals except for the youngest (3-month-old) baby, who showed a semicircadian component as the main frequency in the power spectrum. Three individuals showed ultradian frequencies in the domain of 3-4 h. Differences in the spectra derive from three possible, and probably not exclusive, causes: 1) ontogenetic changes, 2) different masking effects, and 3) individual differences. PMID:8500186

  11. Mucus extravasation phenomenon in newborn babies: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Gatti, A F; Moreti, M M; Cardoso, S V; Loyola, A M

    2001-01-01

    Two rare cases of congenital mucoceles in newborn babies are reported. The patients presented with nodular swellings on their lower lips at birth with no obvious local aetiology. In both cases the mucoceles interfered with normal feeding. The lesions were excised by surgical approach under general anaesthesia and histopathological examination confirmed the lesions to be extravasation-type mucoceles. The article includes a brief discussion of the epidemiology and ethiopathogeny of mucoceles. PMID:11309877

  12. Baby Health Checkup - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... 子供のかかりつけ医の選択 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Choosing a Doctor for Your Baby 아기를 ...

  13. A baby incubator designed for conditions in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Riggs, R J

    1977-01-01

    The prototype is described of a baby incubator, designed to be manufactured and used in Ghana, but of high enough quality to complete directly with imported models. A novel design is used, in which the usual all-round hood, with a sealed control unit underneath it, is replaced by a one-sided configuration, with the control system built into the back. It is much easier to manufacture, but still allows good access and temperature control.

  14. 75 FR 81789 - Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Full-Size Baby Cribs and Non-Full-Size Baby...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... . In the Federal Register of October 22, 2008 (73 FR 62965), the Commission published a notice of... COMMISSION 16 CFR Parts 1219 and 1220 Third Party Testing for Certain Children's Products; Full-Size Baby Cribs and Non-Full-Size Baby Cribs: Requirements for Accreditation of Third Party Conformity...

  15. Development of the e-Baby serious game with regard to the evaluation of oxygenation in preterm babies: contributions of the emotional design.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Góes, Fernanda Dos Santos Nogueira; Seixas, Carlos Alberto; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Rodrigues, Manuel Alves

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to describe the development process of a serious game that enables users to evaluate the respiratory process in a preterm infant based on an emotional design model. The e-Baby serious game was built to feature the simulated environment of an incubator, in which the user performs a clinical evaluation of the respiratory process in a virtual preterm infant. The user learns about the preterm baby's history, chooses the tools for the clinical evaluation, evaluates the baby, and determines whether his/her evaluation is appropriate. The e-Baby game presents phases that contain respiratory process impairments of higher or lower complexity in the virtual preterm baby. Included links give the user the option of recording the entire evaluation procedure and sharing his/her performance on a social network. e-Baby integrates a Clinical Evaluation of the Preterm Baby course in the Moodle virtual environment. This game, which evaluates the respiratory process in preterm infants, could support a more flexible, attractive, and interactive teaching and learning process that includes simulations with features very similar to neonatal unit realities, thus allowing more appropriate training for clinical oxygenation evaluations in at-risk preterm infants. e-Baby allows advanced user-technology-educational interactions because it requires active participation in the process and is emotionally integrated.

  16. Development of the e-Baby serious game with regard to the evaluation of oxygenation in preterm babies: contributions of the emotional design.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Góes, Fernanda Dos Santos Nogueira; Seixas, Carlos Alberto; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Rodrigues, Manuel Alves

    2014-09-01

    The present study aimed to describe the development process of a serious game that enables users to evaluate the respiratory process in a preterm infant based on an emotional design model. The e-Baby serious game was built to feature the simulated environment of an incubator, in which the user performs a clinical evaluation of the respiratory process in a virtual preterm infant. The user learns about the preterm baby's history, chooses the tools for the clinical evaluation, evaluates the baby, and determines whether his/her evaluation is appropriate. The e-Baby game presents phases that contain respiratory process impairments of higher or lower complexity in the virtual preterm baby. Included links give the user the option of recording the entire evaluation procedure and sharing his/her performance on a social network. e-Baby integrates a Clinical Evaluation of the Preterm Baby course in the Moodle virtual environment. This game, which evaluates the respiratory process in preterm infants, could support a more flexible, attractive, and interactive teaching and learning process that includes simulations with features very similar to neonatal unit realities, thus allowing more appropriate training for clinical oxygenation evaluations in at-risk preterm infants. e-Baby allows advanced user-technology-educational interactions because it requires active participation in the process and is emotionally integrated. PMID:25010051

  17. How much wrapping do babies need at night?

    PubMed

    Wigfield, R E; Fleming, P J; Azaz, Y E; Howell, T E; Jacobs, D E; Nadin, P S; McCabe, R; Stewart, A J

    1993-08-01

    In a longitudinal, population based study, overnight temperature recordings were made in the bedrooms of 152 babies aged 3-18 weeks and the insulation provided by their bedclothing was assessed. Outdoor temperatures for the study nights were also available. Parents applied more insulation on colder nights with lower bedroom temperatures than on warmer nights (mean 8.5 tog at 15 degrees C minimum bedroom temperature falling to 4.0 tog at 25 degrees C). For a particular temperature they also applied 2 tog more insulation in winter than in summer. The amounts of bedclothing used in the home were compared with insulation levels predicted to achieve thermo-neutrality over a similar range of environmental temperature from heat balance studies in young infants. They corresponded closely. The average amount of bedclothing chosen for babies in Avon allows them to remain in thermoneutral conditions throughout the night. These values are proposed as broad guidelines for the thermal care of young babies at night.

  18. [The shaken baby syndrome as a kind of domestic abuse].

    PubMed

    Talarowska, Monika; Florkowski, Antoni; Mossakowska, Joanna; Gałecki, Piotr

    2010-07-01

    In the recent decades research on child abuse has grown impressively. Four types of child abuse: physical, psychological (emotional), sexual, and neglect have been clinically observed and defined. In 1972, John Caffey, a pediatric radiologist, published an article on the theory and practice of the abusive shaking of infants. This was followed, in 1974, with a second article on the whiplash shaken baby syndrome (SBS). Shaken baby syndrome, is caused by the violent shaking of a child with or without contact between the child's head and a hard surface. Such contact may result in head trauma, including subdural hematoma, diffuse axonal injury and retinal hemorrhage. The annual estimated rate of inflicted traumatic brain injury is 30 cases per 100,000 children aged 1 year of younger. Shaken baby syndrome often occurs after shaking in response to crying bouts. In 2001, an estimated 903,000 children were victims of SBS. Additionally, 1300 children were fatally injured from SBS the same year. The ability to detect SBS is difficult secondary to under reporting and misdiagnosis. There is no established set of symptoms that indicate SBS.

  19. View southwest toward Eldred Avenue from within Friend's Burial Ground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest toward Eldred Avenue from within Friend's Burial Ground, Benjamin Carr Farm in distance through the trees - Friends' Burial Ground, Eldred & Beacon Avenues, Jamestown, Newport County, RI

  20. "The Friendly Clergy": Characteristics and Referral.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faiver, Christopher M.; O'Brien, Eugene M.; McNally, Christopher J.

    1998-01-01

    Among the recommendations possible in assessment of clients' religious beliefs is that of referral to the "friendly clergy." Delineates guidelines for referral as well as ideal characteristics of that spiritual profession. (Author)

  1. Making friends for hydro: Providing recreational opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    One northeastern U.S. utility has been forming friendly ties with the public, offering recreation amenities at its hydro projects. As a result, the company has a strong base of public support as it enters relicensing.

  2. Environmentally friendly preparation of metal nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter summarizes the “state of the art” in the exploitation of various environmentally-friendly synthesis approaches, reaction precursors and conditions to manufacture metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for a vast variety of purposes.

  3. A Parents' Guide for Well-Baby Care and Minor Hospitalizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luchini, Alice, Ed.

    This manual offers practical guidelines for many of the concerns that parents have about their infants and toddlers. The manual is divided into seven chapters; each is written by an expert in the field of pediatrics, early childhood education, nutrition, or family care. The following areas are covered: (1) newborn and infant care; (2) growth and…

  4. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  5. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols.

  6. Epidural anaesthesia through caudal catheters for inguinal herniotomies in awake ex-premature babies.

    PubMed

    Peutrell, J M; Hughes, D G

    1993-02-01

    Ex-premature babies are at risk of apnoea after surgery. Regional anaesthesia has been used as an alternative to general anaesthesia for some surgical procedures in the belief that it may be safer. However, single dose caudal epidural and subarachnoid anaesthetics have a duration of action which may be insufficient for some operations. The level and duration of anaesthesia can be extended if local anaesthetic is given through an epidural catheter. In addition, the dose needed to provide adequate anaesthesia may be lower because the local anaesthetic is given at an appropriate segmental level. We report our experience of caudal epidural anaesthesia in nine, awake ex-premature babies who were having inguinal herniotomies. The anaesthesia was excellent in six babies. Two babies cried briefly with peritoneal or spermatic cord traction. One other baby needed supplementation with nitrous oxide in oxygen in order to complete the surgery. The majority of babies slept throughout surgery. There were no reported postoperative complications.

  7. Epidural anaesthesia through caudal catheters for inguinal herniotomies in awake ex-premature babies.

    PubMed

    Peutrell, J M; Hughes, D G

    1993-02-01

    Ex-premature babies are at risk of apnoea after surgery. Regional anaesthesia has been used as an alternative to general anaesthesia for some surgical procedures in the belief that it may be safer. However, single dose caudal epidural and subarachnoid anaesthetics have a duration of action which may be insufficient for some operations. The level and duration of anaesthesia can be extended if local anaesthetic is given through an epidural catheter. In addition, the dose needed to provide adequate anaesthesia may be lower because the local anaesthetic is given at an appropriate segmental level. We report our experience of caudal epidural anaesthesia in nine, awake ex-premature babies who were having inguinal herniotomies. The anaesthesia was excellent in six babies. Two babies cried briefly with peritoneal or spermatic cord traction. One other baby needed supplementation with nitrous oxide in oxygen in order to complete the surgery. The majority of babies slept throughout surgery. There were no reported postoperative complications. PMID:8460759

  8. Nutritional screening: a user-friendly tool adapted from Sweden.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steve; Westergren, Albert; Saunders, Julia; Hagell, Peter

    Screening for undernutrition is highly important and may reduce morbidity and mortality. The Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition Form Version II (MEONF-II) is a nutritional screening tool specifically developed for use by nurses. The authors describe the translation, performance and appropriateness of MEONF-II for the UK. Following translation from Swedish to British English, the user-friendliness and appropriateness of the British MEONF-II was tested by 29 registered nurses and final-year student nurses on 266 hospital inpatients. The new British MEONF-II was perceived as highly user-friendly and appropriate. Assessors found MEONF-II to compare favourably with other similar tools in terms of preference, usefulness and helpfulness in providing good nutritional care. Dependency in activities and poorer subjective health were associated with a higher risk of undernutrition. These findings support the appropriateness of the British MEONF-II version and suggest it may act as a user-friendly facilitator for good nutritional nursing care.

  9. Helping small babies survive: an evaluation of facility-based Kangaroo Mother Care implementation progress in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Aliganyira, Patrick; Kerber, Kate; Davy, Karen; Gamache, Nathalie; Sengendo, Namaala Hanifah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prematurity is the leading cause of newborn death in Uganda, accounting for 38% of the nation's 39,000 annual newborn deaths. Kangaroo mother care is a high-impact; cost-effective intervention that has been prioritized in policy in Uganda but implementation has been limited. Methods A standardised, cross-sectional, mixed-method evaluation design was used, employing semi-structured key-informant interviews and observations in 11 health care facilities implementing kangaroo mother care in Uganda. Results The facilities visited scored between 8.28 and 21.72 out of the possible 30 points with a median score of 14.71. Two of the 3 highest scoring hospitals were private, not-for-profit hospitals whereas the second highest scoring hospital was a central teaching hospital. Facilities with KMC services are not equally distributed throughout the country. Only 4 regions (Central 1, Central 2, East-Central and Southwest) plus the City of Kampala were identified as having facilities providing KMC services. Conclusion KMC services are not instituted with consistent levels of quality and are often dependent on private partner support. With increasing attention globally and in country, Uganda is in a unique position to accelerate access to and quality of health services for small babies across the country. PMID:25667699

  10. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  11. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  12. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation. PMID:14753323

  13. Cutaneous tolerance of baby wipes by infants with atopic dermatitis, and comparison of the mildness of baby wipe and water in infant skin.

    PubMed

    Ehretsmann, C; Schaefer, P; Adam, R

    2001-09-01

    To confirm the safety and cutaneous tolerability of a new brand of baby wet wipes, we conducted the following clinical studies: (i) a double-blind in-use study in 102 infants over a period of 2 weeks, to compare skin tolerance of the wipes vs. water and a cleansing material (ii) a chamber scarification test on adults to assess the skin irritation potential of the baby wipe, and (iii) a 4-week clinical in-use study in 60 babies with atopic dermatitis, to confirm safety and skin tolerability in a sensitive skin subpopulation. In the clinical comparison with water and cleansing material, skin conditions were assessed visually for presence and severity of erythema and diaper dermatitis. The overall skin condition was not different in the group using wipes and in the group using only water and a cleansing material, indicating comparable skin mildness for both regimes. The chamber scarification test confirmed that the lotion contained in the wipe has a very low irritation potential, lower than that of a currently marketed baby wipe and comparable to that of water under occlusive patch test conditions. The good skin tolerance of the wipes was supported by the observations of a dermatologist in the clinical study in babies with atopic dermatitis. These data strongly support the suitability of the baby wipes tested in these studies for daily cleansing of the diapered area, even for infants with sensitive skin. These data also provide useful information regarding the comparative skin mildness of baby wipes and water.

  14. The acceptability and feasibility of the Baby Triple P Positive Parenting Programme on a mother and baby unit: Q-methodology with mothers with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Butler, Hannah; Hare, Dougal; Walker, Samantha; Wieck, Angelika; Wittkowski, Anja

    2014-10-01

    New mothers with severe mental illness (SMI) frequently experience significant difficulties in caring for their babies. There are no structured, evidence-based interventions that guide health professionals to help these women improve early parenting. The extensively researched and effective Triple P Positive Parenting Programme has recently been expanded to families with children less than 1 year old, which provides an opportunity to develop the intervention for women with severe postnatal mental illness. This study explored the views of mothers with SMI about the acceptability and feasibility of Baby Triple P (Baby TP) in the setting of a psychiatric Mother and Baby Unit (MBU). An 88-item Q-sort was conducted with a purposive sample of 15 mothers using Q-methodology. Three main factors were identified: 'what we need', 'what we want' and 'we can do it'. A consensus was noted with general agreement about the benefits of Baby TP, and suitability of the MBU environment to accommodate Baby TP. Baby TP was viewed as an acceptable and feasible parenting intervention and deemed positive and non-stigmatising. Mothers requested more staff awareness and knowledge about the programme so that they were supported in learning and generalising skills.

  15. The acceptability and feasibility of the Baby Triple P Positive Parenting Programme on a mother and baby unit: Q-methodology with mothers with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Butler, Hannah; Hare, Dougal; Walker, Samantha; Wieck, Angelika; Wittkowski, Anja

    2014-10-01

    New mothers with severe mental illness (SMI) frequently experience significant difficulties in caring for their babies. There are no structured, evidence-based interventions that guide health professionals to help these women improve early parenting. The extensively researched and effective Triple P Positive Parenting Programme has recently been expanded to families with children less than 1 year old, which provides an opportunity to develop the intervention for women with severe postnatal mental illness. This study explored the views of mothers with SMI about the acceptability and feasibility of Baby Triple P (Baby TP) in the setting of a psychiatric Mother and Baby Unit (MBU). An 88-item Q-sort was conducted with a purposive sample of 15 mothers using Q-methodology. Three main factors were identified: 'what we need', 'what we want' and 'we can do it'. A consensus was noted with general agreement about the benefits of Baby TP, and suitability of the MBU environment to accommodate Baby TP. Baby TP was viewed as an acceptable and feasible parenting intervention and deemed positive and non-stigmatising. Mothers requested more staff awareness and knowledge about the programme so that they were supported in learning and generalising skills. PMID:24827076

  16. How to Make Financial Aid "Freshman-Friendly"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Susan L.; Johnson, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Ultimately, making financial aid "freshman friendly" also makes financial aid "sophomore friendly," "junior friendly," and "senior friendly." Indiana University has in place an Office of Enrollment Management (OEM) model that includes focused financial aid packaging strategies complemented by unique contact services and communication interventions…

  17. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovely, Suzette

    2010-01-01

    In schools around the country, Gen Xers, Millennials, Baby Boomers, and even a Veteran or two are working side by side. While anyone holding a job in this shaky economy is grateful, gratitude does not make generational clashes less difficult. Adding to the mix, many Baby Boomers initially poised for a mass exodus by 2010 are holding on for dear…

  18. Maternal affection moderates friend influence on schoolwork engagement.

    PubMed

    Marion, Donna; Laursen, Brett; Kiuru, Noona; Nurmi, Jari-Erik; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated friend influence over adolescent schoolwork engagement in 160 same-sex friend dyads (94 female dyads and 66 male dyads). Participants were approximately 16 years of age at the outset. Each friend described his or her own schoolwork engagement, school burnout, and perceptions of maternal affection. The results revealed that maternal affection moderated the influence that the higher burnout friend exerted over the subsequent schoolwork engagement of the lower burnout friend. The schoolwork engagement of the friend reporting higher levels of school burnout predicted a decline in the schoolwork engagement of the friend reporting lower school burnout, but only if the latter perceived below-average maternal affection. PMID:24015690

  19. "Friends" of Anglican Cathedrals: Norms and Values. Befriending, Friending or Misnomer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muskett, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Loyal supporters of Anglican cathedrals first subscribed to "Friends" associations in the late 1920s. Yet, in 1937, a journalist in "The Times" portrayed cathedrals as a "queer thing to be a friend of." Drawing on theories of friendship from a range of disciplines, and surveys of what has been proclaimed in the public…

  20. Gender Norms and Institutional Culture: The Family-Friendly versus the Father-Friendly University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Margaret W.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the role that gender norms and expectations about parenting play in establishing the family-friendly versus the father-friendly university. Using interviews with 51 male faculty at three research universities, the article considers how faculty and administrators' actions perpetuate cultures that promote or hinder…