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Sample records for bacillus clausii spores

  1. Safety assesment of Bacillus clausii UBBC07, a spore forming probiotic.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Suvarna G; Jayanthi, N; Saravanan, M; Ratna, M Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics are vital bacteria that colonize the intestine and modify its microflora with benefits for the host. Very few members of the Bacillus group are recognized as safe for use and hence only a few strains are available as commercial preparations for application in humans and animals. Acute and subacute studies in rats were conducted to establish safety of Bacillus clausii ( B. clausii ) UBBC07. In the acute toxicity study, the oral LD50 for B. clausii UBBC07 was found to be >5000 mg/kg (630 billion cfu/kg) body weight. The NOAEL for B. clausii UBBC07 was found to be 1000 (126 billion cfu) mg/kg body weight/day by oral route in the subacute toxicity study. There were no significant differences between control and treated groups in any of the endpoints assessed using an OECD443 or OECD407 protocol. B. clausii UBBC07 was found to be resistant to three antibiotics -clindamycin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol. Analysis of the whole genome sequence of B. clausii UBBC07 revealed that the antibiotic resistance genes are present in chromosomal DNA which is intrinsic and not transferable. Toxin genes were also found to be absent. These results suggest consumption of B. clausii UBBC07 is safe for humans.

  2. Comparative secretome analysis of four isogenic Bacillus clausii probiotic strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The spore-bearing alkaliphilic Bacillus species constitute a large, heterogeneous group of microorganisms, important for their ability to produce enzymes, antibodies and metabolites of potential medical use. Some Bacillus species are currently being used for manufacturing probiotic products consisting of bacterial spores, exhibiting specific features (colonization, immune-stimulation and antimicrobial activity) that can account for their claimed probiotic properties. In the present work a comparative proteomic study was performed aimed at characterizing the secretome of four closely related isogenic O/C, SIN, N/R and T B. clausii strains, already marketed in a pharmaceutical mixture as probiotics. Results Proteomic analyses revealed a high degree of concordance among the four secretomes, although some proteins exhibited considerable variations in their expression level in the four strains. Among these, some proteins with documented activity in the interaction with host cells were identified, such as the glycolytic enzyme enolase, with a putative plasminogen-binding activity, GroEL, a molecular chaperone shown to be able to bind to mucin, and flagellin protein, a structural flagella protein and a putative immunomodulation agent. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, differences in the secretome of the OC, SIN, NR and T B. clausii strains. These differences indicate that specific secretome features characterize each of the four strains despite their genotypic similarity. This could confer to the B. clausii strains specific probiotic functions associated with the differentially expressed proteins and indicate that they can cooperate as probiotics as the secretome components of each strain could contribute to the overall activity of a mixed probiotic preparation. PMID:23816335

  3. Microbiological and molecular characterization of commercially available probiotics containing Bacillus clausii from India and Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Patrone, Vania; Molinari, Paola; Morelli, Lorenzo

    2016-11-21

    Probiotics are actively used for treatment of diarrhoea, respiratory infections, and prevention of infectious gastrointestinal diseases. The efficacy of probiotics is due to strain-specific features and the number of viable cells; however, several reports of deviations from the label in the actual content of strains in probiotic products are a matter of concern. Most of the available data on quality focuses on probiotic products containing lactobacilli and/or bifidobacteria, while very few data are available on spore-forming probiotics. The present study evaluates the label claims for spore count and species identification in five commercial probiotic products marketed in India and Pakistan that claim to contain Bacillus clausii: Tufpro, Ecogro, Enterogermina, Entromax, and Ospor. Bacterial enumeration from three batches was done by microbiological plating methods by two independent operators. Species identification was done using PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, and determination of the total amount of species present in the products was done using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis followed by DNA sequencing of the excised bands. Plate count methods demonstrated poor correlations between quantitative label indications and bacteria recovered from plates for Tufpro, Ecogro, and Ospor. The 16S rRNA analysis performed on bacteria isolated from plate counts showed that only Enterogermina and Ospor contained homogenous B. clausii. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that only Enterogermina had a homogenous B. clausii population while other products had mixed bacterial populations. In conclusion, the current analysis clearly demonstrates that of the five analysed commercial probiotics, only Enterogermina followed the label claims. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of an Alkali- and Halide-Resistant Laccase Expressed in E. coli: CotA from Bacillus clausii

    PubMed Central

    Brander, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jørn D.; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2014-01-01

    The limitations of fungal laccases at higher pH and salt concentrations have intensified the search for new extremophilic bacterial laccases. We report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the bacterial cotA from Bacillus clausii, a supposed alkalophilic ortholog of cotA from B. subtilis. Both laccases were expressed in E. coli strain BL21(DE3) and characterized fully in parallel for strict benchmarking. We report activity on ABTS, SGZ, DMP, caffeic acid, promazine, phenyl hydrazine, tannic acid, and bilirubin at variable pH. Whereas ABTS, promazine, and phenyl hydrazine activities vs. pH were similar, the activity of B. clausii cotA was shifted upwards by ∼0.5–2 pH units for the simple phenolic substrates DMP, SGZ, and caffeic acid. This shift is not due to substrate affinity (KM) but to pH dependence of catalytic turnover: The kcat of B. clausii cotA was 1 s−1 at pH 6 and 5 s−1 at pH 8 in contrast to 6 s−1 at pH 6 and 2 s−1 at pH 8 for of B. subtilis cotA. Overall, kcat/KM was 10-fold higher for B. subtilis cotA at pHopt. While both proteins were heat activated, activation increased with pH and was larger in cotA from B. clausii. NaCl inhibited activity at acidic pH, but not up to 500–700 mM NaCl in alkaline pH, a further advantage of the alkali regime in laccase applications. The B. clausii cotA had ∼20 minutes half-life at 80°C, less than the ∼50 minutes at 80°C for cotA from B. subtilis. While cotA from B. subtilis had optimal stability at pH∼8, the cotA from B. clausii displayed higher combined salt- and alkali-resistance. This resistance is possibly caused by two substitutions (S427Q and V110E) that could repel anions to reduce anion-copper interactions at the expense of catalytic proficiency, a trade-off of potential relevance to laccase optimization. PMID:24915287

  5. Microbiological efficacy of superheated steam. I. Communication: results with spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus and with spore earth.

    PubMed

    Spicher, G; Peters, J; Borchers, U

    1999-02-01

    For the spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus as well as for spore earth (acc. DIN 58,946 Part 4 of August 1982), the dependence of resistance on the superheating of the steam used to kill germs was determined. A material (glass fibre fleece) was used as the germ carrier which does not superheat on contact with steam. The temperature of the saturated steam was 100 degrees C (B. subtilis) and 120 degrees C (B. stearothermophilus and spore earth). The yardstick for the resistance of the spores or bioindicators was the exposure period of the saturated or superheated steam at which 50% of the treated test objects no longer showed any viable test germs. The spores of Bacillus subtilis were far more sensitive to superheating of steam and reacted far more than the spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus and the germs in the spore earth. When superheating by 4 Kelvin the spores of Bacillus subtilis were approximately 2.5 times more resistant than they were to saturated steam. The resistance of Bacillus stearothermophilus and spore earth was only slightly higher up to superheating by 10 Kelvin. The spores of Bacillus subtilis had the highest resistance during superheating by 29 Kelvin; they were 119 times more resistant than they were to saturated steam. The resistance maximum of the spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus was at an superheating by around 22 Kelvin. However, the spores were only 4.1 times more resistant than they were to saturated steam. When using steam to kill germs, we must expect superheated steam. This raises the question whether the spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus, with their weaker reaction to the superheating of steam, are suitable as test germs for sterilisation with steam in all cases.

  6. Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were harvested shortly after release from sporangia, incubated under...Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species Report Title Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were...ribosomal RNA when newly harvested Bacillus subtilis spores are incubated at physiological temperatures, as well as some evidence for transcription in

  7. Environmental Persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Joseph P.; Meyer, Kathryn M.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Choi, Young W.; Rogers, James V.; Riggs, Karen B.; Willenberg, Zachary J.

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of data for how the viability of biological agents may degrade over time in different environments. In this study, experiments were conducted to determine the persistence of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores on outdoor materials with and without exposure to simulated sunlight, using ultraviolet (UV)-A/B radiation. Spores were inoculated onto glass, wood, concrete, and topsoil and recovered after periods of 2, 14, 28, and 56 days. Recovery and inactivation kinetics for the two species were assessed for each surface material and UV exposure condition. Results suggest that with exposure to UV, decay of spore viability for both Bacillus species occurs in two phases, with an initial rapid decay, followed by a slower inactivation period. The exception was with topsoil, in which there was minimal loss of spore viability in soil over 56 days, with or without UV exposure. The greatest loss in viable spore recovery occurred on glass with UV exposure, with nearly a four log10 reduction after just two days. In most cases, B. subtilis had a slower rate of decay than B. anthracis, although less B. subtilis was recovered initially. PMID:26372011

  8. Binding Affinity of Glycoconjugates to BACILLUS Spores and Toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Aveen; Eassa, Souzan; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Early recognition of Bacillus cereus group species is important since they can cause food-borne illnesses and deadly diseases in humans. Glycoconjugates (GCs) are carbohydrates covalently linked to non-sugar moieties including lipids, proteins or other entities. GCs are involved in recognition and signaling processes intrinsic to biochemical functions in cells. They also stimulate cell-cell adhesion and subsequent recognition and activation of receptors. We have demonstrated that GCs are involved in Bacillus cereus spore recognition. In the present study, we have investigated whether GCs possess the ability to bind and recognize B. cereus spores and Bacillus anthracis recombinant single toxins (sTX) and complex toxins (cTX). The affinity of GCs to spores + sTX and spores + cTX toxins was studied in the binding essay. Our results demonstrated that GC9 and GC10 were able to selectively bind to B. cereus spores and B. anthracis toxins. Different binding affinities for GCs were found toward Bacillus cereus spores + sTX and spores + cTX. Dilution of GCs does not impede the recognition and binding. Developed method provides a tool for simultaneous recognition and targeting of spores, bacteria toxins, and/or other entities.

  9. Survival strategies of Bacillus spores in food.

    PubMed

    Stecchini, Mara Lucia; Del Torre, Manuela; Polese, Pierluigi

    2013-11-01

    Control of bacterial spores is one of the major problem in the food preservation. Spores of Bacillus genus are commonly present in different environments, including soil and the gut of insects and animals and, as a result, they can be spread to all kind of foods. Due to their high resistance properties, their complete inactivation in food is often impossible without changing the product characteristics. Surviving spores can germinate and grow out to vegetative cells, with the consequent great risk of food spoilage and food poisoning after consumption. Spores have evolved various mechanisms, including phenotypic variability, to protect themselves from a wide range of damage resulting from food preservation treatments. Even if the phenotypic heterogeneity contributes to increase the chances of survival of Bacillus spore to conventional preservation treatments, in some specific instances, an homogeneous response could be the result of a strategy adopted by the spores to increase resistance to those treatments.

  10. Evaluating novel synthetic compounds active against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores using Live imaging with SporeTrackerX.

    PubMed

    Omardien, Soraya; Ter Beek, Alexander; Vischer, Norbert; Montijn, Roy; Schuren, Frank; Brul, Stanley

    2018-06-14

    An empirical approach was taken to screen a novel synthetic compound library designed to be active against Gram-positive bacteria. We obtained five compounds that were active against spores from the model organism Bacillus subtilis and the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus during our population based experiments. Using single cell live imaging we were able to observe effects of the compounds on spore germination and outgrowth. Difference in sensitivity to the compounds could be observed between B. subtilis and B. cereus using live imaging, with minor difference in the minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of the compounds against the spores. The compounds all delayed the bursting time of germinated spores and affected the generation time of vegetative cells at sub-inhibitory concentrations. At inhibitory concentrations spore outgrowth was prevented. One compound showed an unexpected potential for preventing spore germination at inhibitory concentrations, which merits further investigation. Our study shows the valuable role single cell live imaging can play in the final selection process of antimicrobial compounds.

  11. Bacillus spore-based oral carriers loading curcumin for the therapy of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liang; Meng, Zhan; Zhang, Yuxiao; Hu, Kaikai; Chen, Wuya; Han, Kaibin; Wu, Bao-Yan; You, Rong; Li, Chu-Hua; Jin, Ying; Guan, Yan-Qing

    2018-02-10

    Oral drug delivery has attracted substantial attention due to its advantages over other administration routes. Bacillus spores, as oral probiotic agents, are applied widely. In this paper, a novel Bacillus spore-based oral colon targeted carrier loading curcumin was developed for colon cancer treatment. Curcumin was linked covalently with the outer coat of Bacillus spore and folate, respectively (SPORE-CUR-FA). Bacillus spores are capable of delivering drugs to the colon area through gastric barrier, taking the advantage of its tolerance to the harsh conditions and disintegration of the outer coat of spores after germination in the colon. The drug release in vitro and in vivo of SPORE-CUR-FA was investigated. Results showed that SPORE-CUR-FA had the characteristics of colon-targeted drug release. Pharmacokinetic studies confirmed that Bacillus spore-based carriers could efficiently improve the oral bioavailability of curcumin. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor studies showed that SPORE-CUR-FA had substantial ability for inhibiting colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that this Bacillus spore-based oral drug delivery system has a great potential for the treatment of colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of an aerosol surface inoculation method for bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Don; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb

    2011-03-01

    A method was developed to deposit Bacillus subtilis spores via aerosolization onto various surface materials for biological agent decontamination and detection studies. This new method uses an apparatus coupled with a metered dose inhaler to reproducibly deposit spores onto various surfaces. A metered dose inhaler was loaded with Bacillus subtilis spores, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Five different material surfaces (aluminum, galvanized steel, wood, carpet, and painted wallboard paper) were tested using this spore deposition method. This aerosolization method deposited spores at a concentration of more than 10(7) CFU per coupon (18-mm diameter) with less than a 50% coefficient of variation, showing that the aerosolization method developed in this study can deposit reproducible numbers of spores onto various surface coupons. Scanning electron microscopy was used to probe the spore deposition patterns on test coupons. The deposition patterns observed following aerosol impaction were compared to those of liquid inoculation. A physical difference in the spore deposition patterns was observed to result from the two different methods. The spore deposition method developed in this study will help prepare spore coupons via aerosolization fast and reproducibly for bench top decontamination and detection studies.

  13. Bacillus odysseyi sp. nov., a round-spore-forming bacillus isolated from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron T.; Satomi, Masataka; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2004-01-01

    A round-spore-forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium was isolated from the surface of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and is a Gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped, endospore-forming eubacterium. Ultrathin sections of the spores showed the presence of an exosporium, spore coat, cortex and core. 16S rDNA sequence similarities between this strain, Bacillus fusiformis and Bacillus silvestris were approximately 96% and DNA-DNA reassociation values with these two bacilli were 23 and 17%, respectively. Spores of the novel species were resistant to desiccation, H2O2 and UV and gamma radiation. Of all strains tested, the spores of this strain were the most consistently resistant and survived all of the challenges posed, i.e. exposure to conditions of desiccation (100% survival), H2O2 (26% survival), UV radiation (10% survival at 660 J m(-2)) and gamma radiation (0.4% survival). The name proposed for this novel bacterium is Bacillus odysseyi sp. nov.; the type strain is 34hs-1T (=ATCC PTA-4993T=NRRL B-30641T=NBRC 100172T).

  14. Kinetics of Germination of Bacillus Spores1

    PubMed Central

    Vary, J. C.; Halvorson, H. O.

    1965-01-01

    Vary, J. C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and H. O. Halvorson. Kinetics or germination of Bacillus spores. J. Bacteriol. 89:1340–1347. 1965.—The kinetics of germination of Bacillus cereus strain T spores was accurately described by McCormick. To study the mechanism of germination, it is necessary to correlate the characteristic changes in a population of germinating spores with the behavior of the individual spores in the same population. Two microscopic events are apparent during germination: microlag, the time interval between the addition of l-alanine to heat-activated spores and the beginning of loss in refractility, and microgermination time, the time for the actual change in refractility to occur. The frequency distributions of both events are skewed, and appear to be independent. The effects of l-alanine concentration, heat activation, and temperature of germination on three parameters, microlag, microgermination, and per cent germination, were microscopically studied. The data are discussed in relation to the mechanism of germination, and a correlation between microlag and microgermination times with the constants of McCormick's equation has been suggested. Images PMID:14293008

  15. Germination of Spores of Astrobiologically Relevant Bacillus Species in High-Salinity Environments.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Katja; Julius, Christina; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    In times of increasing space exploration and search for extraterrestrial life, new questions and challenges for planetary protection, aiming to avoid forward contamination of different planets or moons with terrestrial life, are emerging. Spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus species have a high contamination potential due to their spores' extreme resistance, enabling them to withstand space conditions. Spores require liquid water for their conversion into a growing cell (i.e., spore germination and subsequent growth). If present, water on extraterrestrial planets or moons is likely to be closely associated with salts (e.g., in salty oceans or brines), thus constituting high-salinity environments. Spores of Bacillus subtilis can germinate despite very high salt concentrations, although salt stress does exert negative effects on this process. In this study, germination and metabolic reactivation ("outgrowth") of spores of five astrobiologically relevant Bacillus species (B. megaterium, B. pumilus SAFR-032, B. nealsonii, B. mojavensis, and B. vallismortis) in high salinity (≤3.6 M NaCl) were investigated. Spores of different species exhibited different germination and outgrowth capabilities in high salinity, which strongly depended on germination conditions, especially the exact composition of the medium. In this context, a new "universal" germination trigger for Bacillus spores, named KAGE (KCl, L-alanine, D-glucose, ectoine), was identified, which will be very useful for future comparative germination and outgrowth studies on different Bacillus species. Overall, this study yielded interesting new insights on salt stress effects on spore germination and points out the difficulty of predicting the potential of spores to contaminate salty environments on extraterrestrial celestial bodies. Bacillus species-Spores-Germination-High salinity-Salt stress-NaCl-Inhibition. Astrobiology 16, 500-512.

  16. FORMALDEHYDE GAS INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACE MATERIALS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research evaluated the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface material using formaldehyde gas. Spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 hr. Fo...

  17. Gas discharge plasmas are effective in inactivating Bacillus and Clostridium spores.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shawn; Abramzon, Nina; Jackson, James O; Lin, Wei-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life and have been a major threat to public health and food safety. Nonthermal atmospheric gas discharge plasma is a novel sterilization method that leaves no chemical residue. In our study, a helium radio-frequency cold plasma jet was used to examine its sporicidal effect on selected strains of Bacillus and Clostridium. The species tested included Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Clostridium sporogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and Clostridium botulinum type A and type E. The plasmas were effective in inactivating selected Bacillus and Clostridia spores with D values (decimal reduction time) ranging from 2 to 8 min. Among all spores tested, C. botulinum type A and C. sporogenes were significantly more resistant to plasma inactivation than other species. Observations by phase contrast microscopy showed that B. subtilis spores were severely damaged by plasmas and the majority of the treated spores were unable to initiate the germination process. There was no detectable fragmentation of the DNA when the spores were treated for up to 20 min. The release of dipicolinic acid was observed almost immediately after the plasma treatment, indicating the spore envelope damage could occur quickly resulting in dipicolinic acid release and the reduction of spore resistance.

  18. Proteomic profiling and identification of immunodominant spore antigens of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, Vito G; Connolly, Joseph P; Alefantis, Timothy G; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian A; Patra, Guy; Ashton, John M; Whittington, Jessica T; Chafin, Ryan D; Liang, Xudong; Grewal, Paul; Khan, Akbar S; Mujer, Cesar V

    2006-09-01

    Differentially expressed and immunogenic spore proteins of the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis, were identified. Comparative proteomic profiling of their spore proteins distinguished the three species from each other as well as the virulent from the avirulent strains. A total of 458 proteins encoded by 232 open reading frames were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis for all the species. A number of highly expressed proteins, including elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), elongation factor G, 60-kDa chaperonin, enolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, and others exist as charge variants on two-dimensional gels. These charge variants have similar masses but different isoelectric points. The majority of identified proteins have cellular roles associated with energy production, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, posttranslational modifications, and translation. Novel vaccine candidate proteins were identified using B. anthracis polyclonal antisera from humans postinfected with cutaneous anthrax. Fifteen immunoreactive proteins were identified in B. anthracis spores, whereas 7, 14, and 7 immunoreactive proteins were identified for B. cereus and in the virulent and avirulent strains of B. thuringiensis spores, respectively. Some of the immunodominant antigens include charge variants of EF-Tu, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, Delta-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, and a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Alanine racemase and neutral protease were uniquely immunogenic to B. anthracis. Comparative analysis of the spore immunome will be of significance for further nucleic acid- and immuno-based detection systems as well as next-generation vaccine development.

  19. Proteomic Profiling and Identification of Immunodominant Spore Antigens of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis‡

    PubMed Central

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Connolly, Joseph P.; Alefantis, Timothy G.; Walz, Alexander; Quan, Marian A.; Patra, Guy; Ashton, John M.; Whittington, Jessica T.; Chafin, Ryan D.; Liang, Xudong; Grewal, Paul; Khan, Akbar S.; Mujer, Cesar V.

    2006-01-01

    Differentially expressed and immunogenic spore proteins of the Bacillus cereus group of bacteria, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis, were identified. Comparative proteomic profiling of their spore proteins distinguished the three species from each other as well as the virulent from the avirulent strains. A total of 458 proteins encoded by 232 open reading frames were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis for all the species. A number of highly expressed proteins, including elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), elongation factor G, 60-kDa chaperonin, enolase, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, and others exist as charge variants on two-dimensional gels. These charge variants have similar masses but different isoelectric points. The majority of identified proteins have cellular roles associated with energy production, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, posttranslational modifications, and translation. Novel vaccine candidate proteins were identified using B. anthracis polyclonal antisera from humans postinfected with cutaneous anthrax. Fifteen immunoreactive proteins were identified in B. anthracis spores, whereas 7, 14, and 7 immunoreactive proteins were identified for B. cereus and in the virulent and avirulent strains of B. thuringiensis spores, respectively. Some of the immunodominant antigens include charge variants of EF-Tu, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase, Δ-1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, and a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Alanine racemase and neutral protease were uniquely immunogenic to B. anthracis. Comparative analysis of the spore immunome will be of significance for further nucleic acid- and immuno-based detection systems as well as next-generation vaccine development. PMID:16957262

  20. Development of an Aerosol Surface Inoculation Method for Bacillus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Don; Ryan, Shawn P.; Snyder, Emily Gibb

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed to deposit Bacillus subtilis spores via aerosolization onto various surface materials for biological agent decontamination and detection studies. This new method uses an apparatus coupled with a metered dose inhaler to reproducibly deposit spores onto various surfaces. A metered dose inhaler was loaded with Bacillus subtilis spores, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Five different material surfaces (aluminum, galvanized steel, wood, carpet, and painted wallboard paper) were tested using this spore deposition method. This aerosolization method deposited spores at a concentration of more than 107 CFU per coupon (18-mm diameter) with less than a 50% coefficient of variation, showing that the aerosolization method developed in this study can deposit reproducible numbers of spores onto various surface coupons. Scanning electron microscopy was used to probe the spore deposition patterns on test coupons. The deposition patterns observed following aerosol impaction were compared to those of liquid inoculation. A physical difference in the spore deposition patterns was observed to result from the two different methods. The spore deposition method developed in this study will help prepare spore coupons via aerosolization fast and reproducibly for bench top decontamination and detection studies. PMID:21193670

  1. Effects of Mn2+ Levels on the Resistance Properties of Bacillus cereus Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    In contrast, Bacillus subtilis spores with over a 200-fold range of protoplast Mn levels exhibited no significant differences in resistance to... Bacillus subtilis . J. Bacteriol. 189:8458-8466. Coleman WH, Zhang P, Li YQ, Setlow P (2010). Mechanism of killing of spores of Bacillus cereus and...Gaidamakova EK, Matrosova VY, Daly MJ, Setlow P (2011). Effects of levels of Mn and Fe on Bacillus subtilis spore resistance, and effects of Mn 2

  2. Dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) spores and spores of other Bacillus species: implications for biological agent destruction via waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Wood, J P; Lemieux, P; Betancourt, D; Kariher, P; Gatchalian, N G

    2010-07-01

    To obtain needed data on the dry thermal resistance of Bacillus anthracis spores and other Bacillus species for waste incinerator applications. Tests were conducted in a pilot-scale incinerator utilizing biological indicators comprised of spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus atrophaeus and B. anthracis (Sterne) and embedded in building material bundles. Tests were also conducted in a dry heat oven to determine the destruction kinetics for the same species. In the pilot-scale incinerator tests, B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus demonstrated similar thermal sensitivity, but B. anthracis (Sterne) was less thermally resistant than G. stearothermophilus. For the dry heat oven tests conducted at 175°C, the D-values were 0·4, 0·2 and 0·3 min for B. atrophaeus, B. anthracis (Sterne) and G. stearothermophilus, respectively. Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) possesses similar or less dry heat resistance compared to B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus. Previous studies have demonstrated conditions under which bacterial spores may survive in an incinerator environment. The data from this study may assist in the selection of surrogates or indicator micro-organisms to ensure B. anthracis spores embedded in building materials are completely inactivated in an incinerator. © 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology, Journal of Applied Microbiology. No claim to US Government works.

  3. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  4. Endotrophic Calcium, Strontium, and Barium Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus1

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Harold F.; Foster, J. W.

    1966-01-01

    Foerster, Harold F. (The University of Texas, Austin), and J. W. Foster. Endotrophic calcium, strontium, and barium spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus. J. Bacteriol. 91:1333–1345. 1966.—Spores were produced by washed vegetative cells suspended in deionized water supplemented with CaCl2, SrCl2, or BaCl2. Normal, refractile spores were produced in each case; a portion of the barium spores lost refractility and darkened. Thin-section electron micrographs revealed no apparent anatomical differences among the three types of spores. Analyses revealed that the different spore types were enriched specifically in the metal to which they were exposed during sporogenesis. The calcium content of the strontium and the barium spores was very small. From binary equimolar mixtures of the metal salts, endotrophic spores accumulated both metals to nearly the same extent. Viability of the barium spores was considerably less than that of the other two types. Strontium and barium spores were heat-resistant; however, calcium was essential for maximal heat resistance. Significant differences existed in the rates of germination; calcium spores germinated fastest, strontium spores were slower, and barium spores were slowest. Calcium-barium and calcium-strontium spores germinated readily. Endotrophic calcium and strontium spores germinated without the prior heat activation essential for growth spores. Chemical germination of the different metal-type spores with n-dodecylamine took place at the same relative rates as physiological germination. Heat-induced release of dipicolinic acid occurred much faster with barium and strontium spores than with calcium spores. The washed “coat fraction” from disrupted spores contained little of the spore calcium but most of the spore barium. The metal in this fraction was released by dilute acid. The demineralized coats reabsorbed calcium and barium at neutral pH. Images PMID:4956334

  5. Germination of Spores of Astrobiologically Relevant Bacillus Species in High-Salinity Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Katja; Julius, Christina; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    In times of increasing space exploration and search for extraterrestrial life, new questions and challenges for planetary protection, aiming to avoid forward contamination of different planets or moons with terrestrial life, are emerging. Spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus species have a high contamination potential due to their spores' extreme resistance, enabling them to withstand space conditions. Spores require liquid water for their conversion into a growing cell (i.e., spore germination and subsequent growth). If present, water on extraterrestrial planets or moons is likely to be closely associated with salts (e.g., in salty oceans or brines), thus constituting high-salinity environments. Spores of Bacillus subtilis can germinate despite very high salt concentrations, although salt stress does exert negative effects on this process. In this study, germination and metabolic reactivation ("outgrowth") of spores of five astrobiologically relevant Bacillus species (B. megaterium, B. pumilus SAFR-032, B. nealsonii, B. mojavensis, and B. vallismortis) in high salinity (≤3.6 M NaCl) were investigated. Spores of different species exhibited different germination and outgrowth capabilities in high salinity, which strongly depended on germination conditions, especially the exact composition of the medium. In this context, a new "universal" germination trigger for Bacillus spores, named KAGE (KCl, L-alanine, D-glucose, ectoine), was identified, which will be very useful for future comparative germination and outgrowth studies on different Bacillus species. Overall, this study yielded interesting new insights on salt stress effects on spore germination and points out the difficulty of predicting the potential of spores to contaminate salty environments on extraterrestrial celestial bodies.

  6. Measurements of DNA Damage and Repair in Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spores by UV Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    MEASUREMENTS OF DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN BACILLUS ANTHRACIS STERNE SPORES BY UV RADIATION...AFIT-ENP-T-14-S-01 MEASUREMENTS OF DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN BACILLUS ANTHRACIS STERNE SPORES BY UV RADIATION THESIS Presented to the... DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN BACILLUS ANTHRACIS STERNE SPORES BY UV RADIATION Chelsea C. Marcum, BS Approved

  7. Role of mechanical vs. chemical action in the removal of adherent Bacillus spores during CIP procedures.

    PubMed

    Faille, C; Bénézech, T; Blel, W; Ronse, A; Ronse, G; Clarisse, M; Slomianny, C

    2013-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the respective roles of mechanical and chemical effects on the removal of Bacillus spores during cleaning-in-place. This analysis was performed on 12 strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group (B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis) or to less related Bacillus species (Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus subtilis). Adherent spores were subjected to rinsing-in-place (mechanical action) and cleaning-in-place (mechanical and chemical actions) procedures, the latter involving NaOH 0.5% at 60°C. Results revealed that mechanical action alone only removed between 53 and 89% of the attached spores at a shear stress of 500 Pa. This resistance to shear was not related to spore surface properties. Conversely, in the presence of NaOH at a shear stress of 4 Pa, spores were readily detached, with between 80 and 99% of the adherent spores detached during CIP and the chemical action greatly depended on the strain. This finding suggests that chemical action plays the major role during CIP, whose efficacy is significantly governed by the spore surface chemistry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multigeneration Cross-Contamination of Mail with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Jason; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Sabol, Jonathan; Martinez, Kenneth; Shadomy, Sean; Cymet, Tyler; Emanuel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The release of biological agents, including those which could be used in biowarfare or bioterrorism in large urban areas, has been a concern for governments for nearly three decades. Previous incidents from Sverdlosk and the postal anthrax attack of 2001 have raised questions on the mechanism of spread of Bacillus anthracis spores as an aerosol or contaminant. Prior studies have demonstrated that Bacillus atrophaeus is easily transferred through simulated mail handing, but no reports have demonstrated this ability with Bacillus anthracis spores, which have morphological differences that may affect adhesion properties between spore and formite. In this study, equipment developed to simulate interactions across three generations of envelopes subjected to tumbling and mixing was used to evaluate the potential for cross-contamination of B. anthracis spores in simulated mail handling. In these experiments, we found that the potential for cross-contamination through letter tumbling from one generation to the next varied between generations while the presence of a fluidizer had no statistical impact on the transfer of material. Likewise, the presence or absence of a fluidizer had no statistically significant impact on cross-contamination levels or reaerosolization from letter opening. PMID:27123934

  9. Architecture and High-Resolution Structure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus Spore Coat Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plomp, M; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K

    2005-02-18

    We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the native surface topology and ultrastructure of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus spores in water and in air. AFM was able to resolve the nanostructure of the exosporium and three distinctive classes of appendages. Removal of the exosporium exposed either a hexagonal honeycomb layer (B. thuringiensis) or a rodlet outer spore coat layer (B. cereus). Removal of the rodlet structure from B. cereus spores revealed an underlying honeycomb layer similar to that observed with B. thuringiensis spores. The periodicity of the rodlet structure on the outer spore coat of B. cereusmore » was {approx}8 nm, and the length of the rodlets was limited to the cross-patched domain structure of this layer to {approx}200 nm. The lattice constant of the honeycomb structures was {approx}9 nm for both B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores. Both honeycomb structures were composed of multiple, disoriented domains with distinct boundaries. Our results demonstrate that variations in storage and preparation procedures result in architectural changes in individual spore surfaces, which establish AFM as a useful tool for evaluation of preparation and processing ''fingerprints'' of bacterial spores. These results establish that high-resolution AFM has the capacity to reveal species-specific assembly and nanometer scale structure of spore surfaces. These species-specific spore surface structural variations are correlated with sequence divergences in a spore core structural protein SspE.« less

  10. Nano-Mechanical Properties of Heat Inactivated Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Scanner Laser Mirror Cantilever Sample Probe Tip 16 cereus strain 569, and Bacillus globigii var. niger . Zolock determined that there wer...been used to measure the surface elasticities of a variety of microbial organisms including Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus ...66:307-311 (2005). Zhao, Liming, David Schaefer, and Mark R. Marten. “Assessment of Elasticity and Topography of Aspergillus nidulans Spores via

  11. Modeling heat resistance of Bacillus weihenstephanensis and Bacillus licheniformis spores as function of sporulation temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Baril, Eugénie; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier; Leguérinel, Ivan; Postollec, Florence; Boulais, Christophe; Carlin, Frédéric; Mafart, Pierre

    2012-05-01

    Although sporulation environmental factors are known to impact on Bacillus spore heat resistance, they are not integrated into predictive models used to calculate the efficiency of heating processes. This work reports the influence of temperature and pH encountered during sporulation on heat resistance of Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4 and Bacillus licheniformis AD978 spores. A decrease in heat resistance (δ) was observed for spores produced either at low temperature, at high temperature or at acidic pH. Sporulation temperature and pH maximizing the spore heat resistance were identified. Heat sensitivity (z) was not modified whatever the sporulation environmental factors were. A resistance secondary model inspired by the Rosso model was proposed. Sporulation temperatures and pHs minimizing or maximizing the spore heat resistance (T(min(R)), T(opt(R)), T(max(R)), pH(min(R)) and pH(opt(R))) were estimated. The goodness of the model fit was assessed for both studied strains and literature data. The estimation of the sporulation temperature and pH maximizing the spore heat resistance is of great interest to produce spores assessing the spore inactivation in the heating processes applied by the food industry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Production of Cyclodextrins by CGTase from Bacillus clausii Using Different Starches as Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-Prado, H. F.; Carneiro, A. A. J.; Pavezzi, F. C.; Gomes, E.; Boscolo, M.; Franco, C. M. L.; da Silva, R.

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic oligasaccharides composed by d-glucose monomers joined by α-1,4-d glicosidic linkages. The main types of CDs are α-, β- and γ-CDs consisting of cycles of six, seven, and eight glucose monomers, respectively. Their ability to form inclusion complexes is the most important characteristic, allowing their wide industrial application. The physical property of the CD-complexed compound can be altered to improve stability, volatility, solubility, or bio-availability. The cyclomaltodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase, EC 2.4.1.19) is an enzyme capable of converting starch into CD molecules. In this work, the CGTase produced by Bacillus clausii strain E16 was used to produce CD from maltodextrin and different starches (commercial soluble starch, corn, cassava, sweet potato, and waxy corn starches) as substrates. It was observed that the substrate sources influence the kind of CD obtained and that this CGTase displays a β-CGTase action, presenting a better conversion of soluble starch at 1.0%, of which 80% was converted in CDs. The ratio of total CD produced was 0:0.89:0.11 for α/β/γ. It was also observed that root and tuber starches were more accessible to CGTase action than seed starch under the studied conditions.

  13. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  14. Formaldehyde gas inactivation of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J V; Choi, Y W; Richter, W R; Rudnicki, D C; Joseph, D W; Sabourin, C L K; Taylor, M L; Chang, J C S

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using formaldehyde gas. B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to approx. 1100 ppm formaldehyde gas for 10 h. Formaldehyde exposure significantly decreased viable B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. stearothermophilus spores on all test materials. Significant differences were observed when comparing the reduction in viable spores of B. anthracis with B. subtilis (galvanized metal and painted wallboard paper) and G. stearothermophilus (industrial carpet and painted wallboard paper). Formaldehyde gas inactivated>or=50% of the biological indicators and spore strips (approx. 1x10(6) CFU) when analyzed after 1 and 7 days. Formaldehyde gas significantly reduced the number of viable spores on both porous and nonporous materials in which the two surrogates exhibited similar log reductions to that of B. anthracis on most test materials. These results provide new comparative information for the decontamination of B. anthracis spores with surrogates on indoor surfaces using formaldehyde gas.

  15. 14C Analysis of Protein Extracts from Bacillus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Cappucio, Jenny A.; Sarachine Falso, Miranda J.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F14C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F14C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F14C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F14C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their 14C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate 14C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, 14C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. PMID:24814329

  16. 14C Analysis of protein extracts from Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Jenny A; Falso, Miranda J Sarachine; Kashgarian, Michaele; Buchholz, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    Investigators of bioagent incidents or interdicted materials need validated, independent analytical methods that will allow them to distinguish between recently made bioagent samples versus material drawn from the archives of a historical program. Heterotrophic bacteria convert the carbon in their food sources, growth substrate or culture media, into the biomolecules they need. The F(14)C (fraction modern radiocarbon) of a variety of media, Bacillus spores, and separated proteins from Bacillus spores was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS precisely measures F(14)C values of biological materials and has been used to date the synthesis of biomaterials over the bomb pulse era (1955 to present). The F(14)C of Bacillus spores reflects the radiocarbon content of the media in which they were grown. In a survey of commercial media we found that the F(14)C value indicated that carbon sources for the media were alive within about a year of the date of manufacture and generally of terrestrial origin. Hence, bacteria and their products can be dated using their (14)C signature. Bacillus spore samples were generated onsite with defined media and carbon free purification and also obtained from archived material. Using mechanical lysis and a variety of washes with carbon free acids and bases, contaminant carbon was removed from soluble proteins to enable accurate (14)C bomb-pulse dating. Since media is contemporary, (14)C bomb-pulse dating of isolated soluble proteins can be used to distinguish between historical archives of bioagents and those produced from recent media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decontamination assessment of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surfaces using a hydrogen peroxide gas generator.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J V; Sabourin, C L K; Choi, Y W; Richter, W R; Rudnicki, D C; Riggs, K B; Taylor, M L; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Bacillus anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to > or =1000 ppm hydrogen peroxide gas for 20 min. Hydrogen peroxide exposure significantly decreased viable B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. stearothermophilus spores on all test materials except G. stearothermophilus on industrial carpet. Significant differences were observed when comparing the reduction in viable spores of B. anthracis with both surrogates. The effectiveness of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on the growth of biological indicators and spore strips was evaluated in parallel as a qualitative assessment of decontamination. At 1 and 7 days postexposure, decontaminated biological indicators and spore strips exhibited no growth, while the nondecontaminated samples displayed growth. Significant differences in decontamination efficacy of hydrogen peroxide gas on porous and nonporous surfaces were observed when comparing the mean log reduction in B. anthracis spores with B. subtilis and G. stearothermophilus spores. These results provide comparative information for the decontamination of B. anthracis spores with surrogates on indoor surfaces using hydrogen peroxide gas.

  18. Aerosol and Surface Deposition Characteristics of Two Surrogates for Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spores of an acrystalliferous derivative of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, termed Btcry−, are morphologically, aerodynamically, and structurally indistinguishable from Bacillus anthracis spores. Btcry− spores were dispersed in a large, open-ended barn together with spores of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii, a historically used surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Spore suspensions (2 × 1012 CFU each of B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii and Btcry−) were aerosolized in each of five spray events using a backpack misting device incorporating an air blower; a wind of 4.9 to 7.6 m s−1 was also flowing through the barn in the same direction. Filter air samplers were situated throughout the barn to assess the aerosol density of the spores during each release. Trays filled with a surfactant in aqueous buffer were placed on the floor near the filter samplers to assess spore deposition. Spores were also recovered from arrays of solid surfaces (concrete, aluminum, and plywood) that had been laid on the floor and set up as a wall at the end of the barn. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores were found to remain airborne for significantly longer periods, and to be deposited on horizontal surfaces at lower densities, than Btcry− spores, particularly near the spray source. There was a 6-fold-higher deposition of Btcry− spores than of B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores on vertical surfaces relative to the surrounding airborne density. This work is relevant for selecting the best B. anthracis surrogate for the prediction of human exposure, hazard assessment, and hazard management following a malicious release of B. anthracis. IMPORTANCE There is concern that pathogenic bacteria could be maliciously disseminated in the air to cause human infection and disruption of normal life. The threat from spore-forming organisms, such as the causative agent of anthrax, is particularly serious. In order to assess the extent of this risk, it is important to have a

  19. Architecture and assembly of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat.

    PubMed

    Plomp, Marco; Carroll, Alicia Monroe; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus spores are encased in a multilayer, proteinaceous self-assembled coat structure that assists in protecting the bacterial genome from stresses and consists of at least 70 proteins. The elucidation of Bacillus spore coat assembly, architecture, and function is critical to determining mechanisms of spore pathogenesis, environmental resistance, immune response, and physicochemical properties. Recently, genetic, biochemical and microscopy methods have provided new insight into spore coat architecture, assembly, structure and function. However, detailed spore coat architecture and assembly, comprehensive understanding of the proteomic composition of coat layers, and specific roles of coat proteins in coat assembly and their precise localization within the coat remain in question. In this study, atomic force microscopy was used to probe the coat structure of Bacillus subtilis wild type and cotA, cotB, safA, cotH, cotO, cotE, gerE, and cotE gerE spores. This approach provided high-resolution visualization of the various spore coat structures, new insight into the function of specific coat proteins, and enabled the development of a detailed model of spore coat architecture. This model is consistent with a recently reported four-layer coat assembly and further adds several coat layers not reported previously. The coat is organized starting from the outside into an outermost amorphous (crust) layer, a rodlet layer, a honeycomb layer, a fibrous layer, a layer of "nanodot" particles, a multilayer assembly, and finally the undercoat/basement layer. We propose that the assembly of the previously unreported fibrous layer, which we link to the darkly stained outer coat seen by electron microscopy, and the nanodot layer are cotH- and cotE- dependent and cotE-specific respectively. We further propose that the inner coat multilayer structure is crystalline with its apparent two-dimensional (2D) nuclei being the first example of a non-mineral 2D nucleation crystallization

  20. Architecture and Assembly of the Bacillus subtilis Spore Coat

    PubMed Central

    Plomp, Marco; Carroll, Alicia Monroe; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus spores are encased in a multilayer, proteinaceous self-assembled coat structure that assists in protecting the bacterial genome from stresses and consists of at least 70 proteins. The elucidation of Bacillus spore coat assembly, architecture, and function is critical to determining mechanisms of spore pathogenesis, environmental resistance, immune response, and physicochemical properties. Recently, genetic, biochemical and microscopy methods have provided new insight into spore coat architecture, assembly, structure and function. However, detailed spore coat architecture and assembly, comprehensive understanding of the proteomic composition of coat layers, and specific roles of coat proteins in coat assembly and their precise localization within the coat remain in question. In this study, atomic force microscopy was used to probe the coat structure of Bacillus subtilis wild type and cotA, cotB, safA, cotH, cotO, cotE, gerE, and cotE gerE spores. This approach provided high-resolution visualization of the various spore coat structures, new insight into the function of specific coat proteins, and enabled the development of a detailed model of spore coat architecture. This model is consistent with a recently reported four-layer coat assembly and further adds several coat layers not reported previously. The coat is organized starting from the outside into an outermost amorphous (crust) layer, a rodlet layer, a honeycomb layer, a fibrous layer, a layer of “nanodot” particles, a multilayer assembly, and finally the undercoat/basement layer. We propose that the assembly of the previously unreported fibrous layer, which we link to the darkly stained outer coat seen by electron microscopy, and the nanodot layer are cotH- and cotE- dependent and cotE-specific respectively. We further propose that the inner coat multilayer structure is crystalline with its apparent two-dimensional (2D) nuclei being the first example of a non-mineral 2D nucleation crystallization

  1. Recent progress in Bacillus subtilis spore-surface display: concept, progress, and future.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wang, Yunxiang; Yang, Ruijin

    2017-02-01

    With the increased knowledge on spore structure and advances in biotechnology engineering, the newly developed spore-surface display system confers several inherent advantages over other microbial cell-surface display systems including enhanced stability and high safety. Bacillus subtilis is the most commonly used Bacillus species for spore-surface display. The expression of heterologous antigen or protein on the surface of B. subtilis spores has now been practiced for over a decade with noteworthy success. As an update and supplement to other previous reviews, we comprehensively summarize recent studies in the B. subtilis spore-surface display technique. We focus on its benefits as well as the critical factors affecting its display efficiency and offer suggestions for the future success of this field.

  2. Inactivation of Bacillus spores inoculated in milk by Ultra High Pressure Homogenization.

    PubMed

    Amador Espejo, Genaro Gustavo; Hernández-Herrero, M M; Juan, B; Trujillo, A J

    2014-12-01

    Ultra High-Pressure Homogenization treatments at 300 MPa with inlet temperatures (Ti) of 55, 65, 75 and 85 °C were applied to commercial Ultra High Temperature treated whole milk inoculated with Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sporothermodurans, Bacillus coagulans, Geobacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus subtilis spores in order to evaluate the inactivation level achieved. Ultra High-Pressure Homogenization conditions at 300 MPa with Ti = 75 and 85 °C were capable of a spore inactivation of ∼5 log CFU/mL. Furthermore, under these processing conditions, commercial sterility (evaluated as the complete inactivation of the inoculated spores) was obtained in milk, with the exception of G. stearothermophilus and B. subtilis treated at 300 MPa with Ti = 75 °C. The results showed that G. stearothermophilus and B. subtilis have higher resistance to the Ultra High-Pressure Homogenization treatments applied than the other microorganisms inoculated and that a treatment performed at 300 MPa with Ti = 85 °C was necessary to completely inactivate these microorganisms at the spore level inoculated (∼1 × 10(6) CFU/mL). Besides, a change in the resistance of B. licheniformis, B. sporothermodurans, G. stearothermophilus and B. subtilis spores was observed as the inactivation obtained increased remarkably in treatments performed with Ti between 65 and 75 °C. This study provides important evidence of the suitability of UHPH technology for the inactivation of spores in high numbers, leading to the possibility of obtaining commercially sterile milk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of High Pressure on Bacillus licheniformis Spore Germination and Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Borch-Pedersen, Kristina; Mellegård, Hilde; Reineke, Kai; Boysen, Preben; Sevenich, Robert; Lindbäck, Toril

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus and Clostridium species form spores, which pose a challenge to the food industry due to their ubiquitous nature and extreme resistance. Pressurization at <300 MPa triggers spore germination by activating germination receptors (GRs), while pressurization at >300 MPa likely triggers germination by opening dipicolinic acid (DPA) channels present in the inner membrane of the spores. In this work, we expose spores of Bacillus licheniformis, a species associated with food spoilage and occasionally with food poisoning, to high pressure (HP) for holding times of up to 2 h. By using mutant spores lacking one or several GRs, we dissect the roles of the GerA, Ynd, and GerK GRs in moderately HP (mHP; 150 MPa)-induced spore germination. We show that Ynd alone is sufficient for efficient mHP-induced spore germination. GerK also triggers germination with mHP, although at a reduced germination rate compared to that of Ynd. GerA stimulates mHP-induced germination but only in the presence of either the intact GerK or Ynd GR. These results suggests that the effectiveness of the individual GRs in mHP-induced germination differs from their effectiveness in nutrient-induced germination, where GerA plays an essential role. In contrast to Bacillus subtilis spores, treatment with very HP (vHP) of 550 MPa at 37°C did not promote effective germination of B. licheniformis spores. However, treatment with vHP in combination with elevated temperatures (60°C) gave a synergistic effect on spore germination and inactivation. Together, these results provide novel insights into how HP affects B. licheniformis spore germination and inactivation and the role of individual GRs in this process. IMPORTANCE Bacterial spores are inherently resistant to food-processing regimes, such as high-temperature short-time pasteurization, and may therefore compromise food durability and safety. The induction of spore germination facilitates subsequent inactivation by gentler processing conditions

  4. Decontamination of materials contaminated with Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam spores using PES-Solid, a solid source of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Buhr, T L; Wells, C M; Young, A A; Minter, Z A; Johnson, C A; Payne, A N; McPherson, D C

    2013-08-01

    To develop test methods and evaluate survival of Bacillus anthracis Ames, B. anthracis ∆Sterne and B. thuringiensis Al Hakam spores after exposure to PES-Solid (a solid source of peracetic acid), including PES-Solid formulations with bacteriostatic surfactants. Spores (≥ 7 logs) were dried on seven different test materials and treated with three different PES-Solid formulations (or preneutralized controls) at room temperature for 15 min. There was either no spore survival or less than 1 log (<10 spores) of spore survival in 56 of 63 test combinations (strain, formulation and substrate). Less than 2.7 logs (<180 spores) survived in the remaining seven test combinations. The highest spore survival rates were seen on water-dispersible chemical agent resistant coating (CARC-W) and Naval ship topcoat (NTC). Electron microscopy and Coulter analysis showed that all spore structures were intact after spore inactivation with PES-Solid. Three PES-Solid formulations inactivated Bacillus spores that were dried on seven different materials. A test method was developed to show that PES-Solid formulations effectively inactivate Bacillus spores on different materials. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Response surface modeling for hot, humid air decontamination of materials contaminated with Bacillus anthracis ∆Sterne and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam spores

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Response surface methodology using a face-centered cube design was used to describe and predict spore inactivation of Bacillus anthracis ∆Sterne and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam spores after exposure of six spore-contaminated materials to hot, humid air. For each strain/material pair, an attempt was made to fit a first or second order model. All three independent predictor variables (temperature, relative humidity, and time) were significant in the models except that time was not significant for B. thuringiensis Al Hakam on nylon. Modeling was unsuccessful for wiring insulation and wet spores because there was complete spore inactivation in the majority of the experimental space. In cases where a predictive equation could be fit, response surface plots with time set to four days were generated. The survival of highly purified Bacillus spores can be predicted for most materials tested when given the settings for temperature, relative humidity, and time. These predictions were cross-checked with spore inactivation measurements. PMID:24949256

  6. Evaluation of Surface Sampling for Bacillus Spores Using ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report The primary objectives of this project were to evaluate the Aggressive Air Sampling (AAS) method compared to currently used surface sampling methods and to determine if AAS is a viable option for sampling Bacillus anthracis spores.

  7. Lethality of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a commercial fruit and vegetable sanitizer to vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus cereus and spores of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Larry R; Pettigrew, Charles A; Tremblay, Mario E; Roselle, Brian J; Scouten, Alan J

    2004-08-01

    Chlorine, ClO2, and a commercial raw fruit and vegetable sanitizer were evaluated for their effectiveness in killing vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus cereus and spores of Bacillus thuringiensis. The ultimate goal was to use one or both species as a potential surrogate(s) for Bacillus anthracis in studies that focus on determining the efficacy of sanitizers in killing the pathogen on food contact surfaces and foods. Treatment with alkaline (pH 10.5 to 11.0) ClO2 (200 microg/ml) produced by electrochemical technologies reduced populations of a five-strain mixture of vegetative cells and a five-strain mixture of spores of B. cereus by more than 5.4 and more than 6.4 log CFU/ml respectively, within 5 min. This finding compares with respective reductions of 4.5 and 1.8 log CFU/ml resulting from treatment with 200 microg/ml of chlorine. Treatment with a 1.5% acidified (pH 3.0) solution of Fit powder product was less effective, causing 2.5- and 0.4-log CFU/ml reductions in the number of B. cereus cells and spores, respectively. Treatment with alkaline ClO2 (85 microg/ml), acidified (pH 3.4) ClO2 (85 microg/ml), and a mixture of ClO2 (85 microg/ml) and Fit powder product (0.5%) (pH 3.5) caused reductions in vegetative cell/spore populations of more than 5.3/5.6, 5.3/5.7, and 5.3/6.0 log CFU/ml, respectively. Treatment of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores in a medium (3.4 mg/ml of organic and inorganic solids) in which cells had grown and produced spores with an equal volume of alkaline (pH 12.1) ClO2 (400 microg/ml) for 30 min reduced populations by 4.6 and 5.2 log CFU/ml, respectively, indicating high lethality in the presence of materials other than spores that would potentially react with and neutralize the sporicidal activity of ClO2.

  8. Manganese(II)-oxidizing Bacillus spores in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments and plumes.

    PubMed

    Dick, Gregory J; Lee, Yifan E; Tebo, Bradley M

    2006-05-01

    Microbial oxidation and precipitation of manganese at deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important oceanic biogeochemical processes, yet nothing is known about the types of microorganisms or mechanisms involved. Here we report isolation of a number of diverse spore-forming Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus species from Guaymas Basin, a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment in the Gulf of California, where rapid microbially mediated Mn(II) oxidation was previously observed. mnxG multicopper oxidase genes involved in Mn(II) oxidation were amplified from all Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus spores isolated, suggesting that a copper-mediated mechanism of Mn(II) oxidation could be important at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and mnxG genes revealed that while many of the deep-sea Mn(II)-oxidizing Bacillus species are very closely related to previously recognized isolates from coastal sediments, other organisms represent novel strains and clusters. The growth and Mn(II) oxidation properties of these Bacillus species suggest that in hydrothermal sediments they are likely present as spores that are active in oxidizing Mn(II) as it emerges from the seafloor.

  9. Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article This study examines the effectiveness of decontaminating Bacillus globigii spores attached to corroded iron and cement-mortar coupons with free chlorine at two pH levels, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, peracetic acid (PAA) and acidified nitrite, followed by flushing.

  10. Analysis of the Effects of a gerP Mutation on the Germination of Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    REPORT Analysis of the effects of a gerP mutation on the germination of spores of Bacillus subtilis 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF... Bacillus subtilis spores with a gerP mutation triggered spore germination via nutrient germinant receptors (GRs) slowly, although this defect was...gerP, Bacillus subtilis , dipicolinic acid Xuan Y. Butzin, Anthony J. Troiano, William H. Coleman, Keren K. Griffiths, Christopher J. Doona, Florence E

  11. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Soil Matrices with ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report This report documents the results of a laboratory study designed to better understand the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate soil materials contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores.

  12. Rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis spores using a super-paramagnetic lateral-flow immunological detection system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dian-Bing; Tian, Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Yang, Rui-Fu; Wang, Xu-Ying; Wei, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2013-04-15

    There is an urgent need for convenient, sensitive, and specific methods to detect the spores of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, because of the bioterrorism threat posed by this bacterium. In this study, we firstly develop a super-paramagnetic lateral-flow immunological detection system for B. anthracis spores. This system involves the use of a portable magnetic assay reader, super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles, lateral-flow strips and two different monoclonal antibodies directed against B. anthracis spores. This detection system specifically recognises as few as 400 pure B. anthracis spores in 30 min. This system has a linear range of 4×10³-10⁶ CFU ml⁻¹ and reproducible detection limits of 200 spores mg⁻¹ milk powder and 130 spores mg⁻¹ soil for simulated samples. In addition, this approach shows no obvious cross-reaction with other related Bacillus spores, even at high concentrations, and has no significant dependence on the duration of the storage of the immunological strips. Therefore, this super-paramagnetic lateral-flow immunological detection system is a promising tool for the rapid and sensitive detection of Bacillus anthracis spores under field conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Decontamination of fluid milk containing Bacillus spores using commercial household products.

    PubMed

    Black, D G; Taylor, T M; Kerr, H J; Padhi, S; Montville, T J; Davidson, P M

    2008-03-01

    Although commercial sanitizers can inactivate bacterial spores in food processing environments, relatively little data exist as to the decontamination of products and surfaces by consumers using commercial household products. Should a large scale bioterrorism incident occur in which consumer food products were contaminated with a pathogenic sporeformer such as Bacillus anthracis, there may be a need to decontaminate these products before disposal as liquid or solid waste. Studies were conducted to test the efficacy of commercial household products for inactivating spores of Bacillus cereus (used as a surrogate for B. anthracis) in vitro and in fluid milk. Validation of the resistance of the B. cereus spores was confirmed with B. anthracis spores. Fifteen commercial products, designed as either disinfectants or sanitizers or as potential sanitizers, were purchased from retail markets. Products selected had one of the following active compounds: NaOCl, HCl, H2O2, acetic acid, quaternary ammonium compounds, ammonium hydroxide, citric acid, isopropanol, NaOH, or pine oil. Compounds were diluted in water (in vitro) or in 2% fat fluid milk, and spores were exposed for up to 6 h. Products containing hypochlorite were most effective against B. cereus spores. Products containing HCl or H2O2 also reduced significant numbers of spores but at a slower rate. The resistance of spores of surrogate B. cereus strains to chlorine-containing compounds was similar to that of B. anthracis spores. Therefore, several household products on the market may be used to decontaminate fluid milk or similar food products contaminated by spores of B. anthracis.

  14. Improvement of Biological Indicators by Uniformly Distributing Bacillus subtilis Spores in Monolayers To Evaluate Enhanced Spore Decontamination Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Raguse, Marina; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Stapelmann, Katharina; Madela, Kazimierz; Laue, Michael; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Thwaite, Joanne E.; Setlow, Peter; Awakowicz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Novel decontamination technologies, including cold low-pressure plasma and blue light (400 nm), are promising alternatives to conventional surface decontamination methods. However, the standardization of the assessment of such sterilization processes remains to be accomplished. Bacterial endospores of the genera Bacillus and Geobacillus are frequently used as biological indicators (BIs) of sterility. Ensuring standardized and reproducible BIs for reliable testing procedures is a significant problem in industrial settings. In this study, an electrically driven spray deposition device was developed, allowing fast, reproducible, and homogeneous preparation of Bacillus subtilis 168 spore monolayers on glass surfaces. A detailed description of the structural design as well as the operating principle of the spraying device is given. The reproducible formation of spore monolayers of up to 5 × 107 spores per sample was verified by scanning electron microscopy. Surface inactivation studies revealed that monolayered spores were inactivated by UV-C (254 nm), low-pressure argon plasma (500 W, 10 Pa, 100 standard cubic cm per min), and blue light (400 nm) significantly faster than multilayered spores were. We have thus succeeded in the uniform preparation of reproducible, highly concentrated spore monolayers with the potential to generate BIs for a variety of nonpenetrating surface decontamination techniques. PMID:26801572

  15. Spore coat protein of Bacillus subtilis. Structure and precursor synthesis.

    PubMed

    Munoz, L; Sadaie, Y; Doi, R H

    1978-10-10

    The coat protein of Bacillus subtilis spores comprises about 10% of the total dry weight of spores and 25% of the total spore protein. One protein with a molecular weight of 13,000 to 15,000 comprises a major portion of the spore coat. This mature spore coat protein has histidine at its NH2 terminus and is relatively rich in hydrophobic amino acids. Netropsin, and antibiotic which binds to A-T-rich regions of DNA and inhibits sporulation, but not growth, decreased the synthesis of this spore coat protein by 75%. A precursor spore coat protein with a molecular weight of 25,000 is made initially at t1 of sporulation and is converted to the mature spore coat protein with a molecular weight of 13,500 at t2 - t3. These data indicate that the spore coat protein gene is expressed very early in sporulation prior to the modifications of RNA polymerase which have been noted.

  16. Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spores Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Amperometry

    PubMed Central

    Waller, David F.; Hew, Brian E.; Holdaway, Charlie; Jen, Michael; Peckham, Gabriel D.

    2016-01-01

    Portable detection and quantitation methods for Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores in pure culture or in environmental samples are lacking. Here, an amperometric immunoassay has been developed utilizing immunomagnetic separation to capture the spores and remove potential interferents from test samples followed by amperometric measurement on a field-portable instrument. Antibody-conjugated magnetic beads and antibody-conjugated glucose oxidase were used in a sandwich format for the capture and detection of target spores. Glucose oxidase activity of spore pellets was measured indirectly via amperometry by applying a bias voltage after incubation with glucose, horseradish peroxidase, and the electron mediator 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid). Target capture was mediated by polyclonal antisera, whereas monoclonal antibodies were used for signal generation. This strategy maximized sensitivity (500 target spores, 5000 cfu/mL), while also providing a good specificity for Bacillus anthracis spores. Minimal signal deviation occurs in the presence of environmental interferents including soil and modified pH conditions, demonstrating the strengths of immunomagnetic separation. The simultaneous incubation of capture and detection antibodies and rapid substrate development (5 min) result in short sample-to-signal times (less than an hour). With attributes comparable or exceeding that of ELISA and LFDs, amperometry is a low-cost, low-weight, and practical method for detecting anthrax spores in the field. PMID:27999382

  17. Thermal Inactivation of Aerosolized Bacillus subtilis var. niger Spores

    PubMed Central

    Mullican, Charles L.; Buchanan, Lee M.; Hoffman, Robert K.

    1971-01-01

    A hot-air sterilizer capable of exposing airborne microorganisms to elevated temperatures with an almost instantaneous heating time was developed and evaluated. With this apparatus, aerosolized Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores were killed in about 0.02 sec when exposed to temperatures above 260 C. This is about 500 times faster than killing times reported by others. Extrapolation and comparison of data on the time and temperature required to klll B. subtilis var. niger spores on surfaces show that approximately the same killing time is required as is necessary for spores in air, if corrections are made for the heating time of the surface. PMID:5002138

  18. Comparison of hand hygiene procedures for removing Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Teppei; Hayashi, Shunji; Hosoda, Kouichi; Morisawa, Yuji; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming bacterium. B. cereus occasionally causes nosocomial infections, in which hand contamination with the spores plays an important role. Therefore, hand hygiene is the most important practice for controlling nosocomial B. cereus infections. This study aimed to determine the appropriate hand hygiene procedure for removing B. cereus spores. Thirty volunteers' hands were experimentally contaminated with B. cereus spores, after which they performed 6 different hand hygiene procedures. We compared the efficacy of the procedures in removing the spores from hands. The alcohol-based hand-rubbing procedures scarcely removed them. The soap washing procedures reduced the number of spores by more than 2 log10. Extending the washing time increased the spore-removing efficacy of the washing procedures. There was no significant difference in efficacy between the use of plain soap and antiseptic soap. Handwashing with soap is appropriate for removing B. cereus spores from hands. Alcohol-based hand-rubbing is not effective.

  19. Dielectric Study of the Physical State of Electrolytes and Water Within Bacillus cereus Spores

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Edwin L.; Marquis, Robert E.; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1971-01-01

    Dielectric measurements revealed that dormant spores of Bacillus cereus have extremely low conductivities at high frequencies (50 MHz) and so must contain remarkably low concentrations of mobile ions both within the core and in the surrounding integuments. Activation, germination, and outgrowth were all accompanied by increases in conductivity of the cells and their suspending medium, and this result indicated that intracellular electrolytes had become ionized and leaked from the spores. High-frequency dielectric constants of spores were consistent with normal states for cell water. These values increased during successive stages of development from dormant spore to vegetative bacillus, and they could be directly related to increases in cell water content. In all, the results refuted a model of the dormant spore involving freely mobile, ionized electrolytes and supported a model involving electrostatically bound electrolytes. PMID:4998245

  20. Water miscible mono alcohols' effect on the proteolytic performance of Bacillus clausii serine alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Yonca Avci; Kazan, Dilek; Denizci, Aziz Akin; Erarslan, Altan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, our investigations showed that the increasing concentrations of all examined mono alcohols caused a decrease in the Vm, kcat and kcat/Km values of Bacillus clausii GMBE 42 serine alkaline protease for casein hydrolysis. However, the Km value of the enzyme remained almost the same, which was an indicator of non-competitive inhibition. Whereas inhibition by methanol was partial non-competitive, inhibition by the rest of the alcohols tested was simple non-competitive. The inhibition constants (KI) were in the range of 1.32-3.10 M, and the order of the inhibitory effect was 1-propanol>2-propanol>methanol>ethanol. The ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased at increasing concentrations of all alcohols examined, but the ΔG(≠)ES value of the enzyme remained almost the same. The constant Km and ΔG(≠)ES values in the presence and absence of mono alcohols indicated the existence of different binding sites for mono alcohols and casein on enzyme the molecule. The kcat of the enzyme decreased linearly by increasing log P and decreasing dielectric constant (D) values, but the ΔG(≠) and ΔG(≠)E-T values of the enzyme increased by increasing log P and decreasing D values of the reaction medium containing mono alcohols.

  1. Inactivation of chemical and heat-resistant spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus by nitrogen cold atmospheric plasma evokes distinct changes in morphology and integrity of spores.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Xie, Houyu; Esveld, Erik; Abee, Tjakko; Mastwijk, Hennie; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to severe conditions and form a challenge to eradicate from food or food packaging material. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment is receiving more attention as potential sterilization method at relatively mild conditions but the exact mechanism of inactivation is still not fully understood. In this study, the biocidal effect by nitrogen CAP was determined for chemical (hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide), physical (UV) and heat-resistant spores. The three different sporeformers used are Bacillus cereus a food-borne pathogen, and Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus that are used as biological indicators for validation of chemical sterilization and thermal processes, respectively. The different spores showed variation in their degree of inactivation by applied heat, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and UV treatments, whereas similar inactivation results were obtained with the different spores treated with nitrogen CAP. G. stearothermophilus spores displayed high resistance to heat, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, while for UV treatment B. atrophaeus spores are most tolerant. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed distinct morphological changes for nitrogen CAP-treated B. cereus spores including etching effects and the appearance of rough spore surfaces, whereas morphology of spores treated with heat or disinfectants showed no such changes. Moreover, microscopy analysis revealed CAP-exposed B. cereus spores to turn phase grey conceivably because of water influx indicating damage of the spores, a phenomenon that was not observed for non-treated spores. In addition, data are supplied that exclude UV radiation as determinant of antimicrobial activity of nitrogen CAP. Overall, this study shows that nitrogen CAP treatment has a biocidal effect on selected Bacillus and Geobacillus spores associated with alterations in spore surface morphology and loss of spore integrity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. A four-gene operon in Bacillus cereus produces two rare spore-decorating sugars

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zi; Mukherjee, Thiya; Bowler, Kyle; Namdari, Sholeh; Snow, Zachary; Prestridge, Sarah; Carlton, Alexandra; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial glycan structures on cell surfaces are critical for cell-cell recognition and adhesion and in host-pathogen interactions. Accordingly, unraveling the sugar composition of bacterial cell surfaces can shed light on bacterial growth and pathogenesis. Here, we found that two rare sugars with a 3-C-methyl-6-deoxyhexose structure were linked to spore glycans in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10876. Moreover, we identified a four-gene operon in B. cereus ATCC 14579 that encodes proteins with the following sequential enzyme activities as determined by mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR methods: CTP:glucose-1-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, CDP-Glc 4,6-dehydratase, NADH-dependent SAM:C-methyltransferase, and NADPH-dependent CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxyhexose 4-reductase. The last enzyme predominantly yielded CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxygulose (CDP-cereose) and likely generated a 4-epimer CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxyallose (CDP-cillose). Some members of the B. cereus sensu lato group produce CDP-3-C-methyl-6-deoxy sugars for the formation of cereose-containing glycans on spores, whereas others such as Bacillus anthracis do not. Gene knockouts of the Bacillus C-methyltransferase and the 4-reductase confirmed their involvement in the formation of cereose-containing glycan on B. cereus spores. We also found that cereose represented 0.2–1% spore dry weight. Moreover, mutants lacking cereose germinated faster than the wild type, yet the mutants exhibited no changes in sporulation or spore resistance to heat. The findings reported here may provide new insights into the roles of the uncommon 3-C-methyl-6-deoxy sugars in cell-surface recognition and host-pathogen interactions of the genus Bacillus. PMID:28298443

  3. Bacillus spores as building blocks for stimuli-responsive materials and nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ozgur; Chen, Xi

    2014-03-01

    Materials that mechanically respond to external chemical stimuli have applications in a wide range of fields. Inspired by biological systems, stimuli-responsive materials that can oscillate, transport fluid, mimic homeostasis, and undergo complex changes in shape have been previously demonstrated. However, the effectiveness of synthetic stimuli-responsive materials in generating work is limited when compared to mechanical actuators. During studies of bacterial sporulation, we have found that the mechanical response of Bacillus spores to water gradients exhibits an energy density of more than 10 MJ/m3, which is two orders of magnitude higher than synthetic water-responsive materials. We also identified mutations that can approximately double the energy density of the spores, and found that spores can self-assemble into dense, submicron-thick monolayers on substrates such as silicon microcantilevers and elastomer sheets, creating self-assembled actuators that can remotely generate electrical power from an evaporating body of water. The energy conversion mechanism of Bacillus spores may facilitate synthetic stimuli-responsive materials with significantly higher energy densities. We acknowledge support from the U.S. Dept. of Energy Early Career Research Program, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and the Rowland Institute at Harvard.

  4. Requirements for the Development of Bacillus Anthracis Spore Reference Materials Used to Test Detection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jamie L.; Wang, Lili; Morrow, Jayne B.; Cole, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores have been used as biological weapons and the possibility of their further use requires surveillance systems that can accurately and reliably detect their presence in the environment. These systems must collect samples from a variety of matrices, process the samples, and detect the spores. The processing of the sample may include removal of inhibitors, concentration of the target, and extraction of the target in a form suitable for detection. Suitable reference materials will allow the testing of each of these steps to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the detection systems. The development of uniform and well-characterized reference materials will allow the comparison of different devices and technologies as well as assure the continued performance of detection systems. This paper discusses the special requirements of reference materials for Bacillus anthracis spores that could be used for testing detection systems. The detection of Bacillus anthracis spores is based on recognition of specific characteristics (markers) on either the spore surface or in the nucleic acids (DNA). We have reviewed the specific markers and their relevance to characterization of reference materials. We have also included the approach for the characterization of candidate reference materials that we are developing at the NIST laboratories. Additional applications of spore reference materials would include testing sporicidal treatments, techniques for sampling the environment, and remediation of spore-contaminated environments. PMID:27274929

  5. Survival of Bacillus anthracis spores in fruit juices and wine.

    PubMed

    Leishman, Oriana N; Johnson, Miranda J; Labuza, Theodore P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    Foods have been identified as a potential target for bioterrorism due to their essential nature and global distribution. Foods produced in bulk have the potential to have large batches of product intentionally contaminated, which could affect hundreds or thousands of individuals. Bacillus anthracis spores are one potential bioterrorism agent that may survive pasteurization and remain viable throughout the shelf life of fruit juices and cause disease if consumed. This project examined B. anthracis spore survival in orange, apple, and grape juices, as well as wine. Samples of beverages were inoculated with spores of two nonpathogenic B. anthracis strains at approximately 10(6) CFU/ml, and the spore count was determined periodically during storage for 30 days at 4°C. After this time, the counts of survival spores never declined more than 1 log CFU/ml in any of the beverage types. These results indicate that spores can survive, with little to no loss in viability, for at least a month in fruit juices and wine.

  6. Effects of culture conditions on the size, morphology and wet density of spores of Bacillus cereus 569 and Bacillus megaterium QM B1551.

    PubMed

    Xu Zhou, K; Wisnivesky, F; Wilson, D I; Christie, G

    2017-07-01

    The influence of variable culture conditions on the size and wet density of spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus megaterium were examined in this work. Culture temperature and initial pH was shown to have a significant impact on the size of both species, with increasingly alkaline culture media and elevated culture temperatures resulting in spores that were, on average, up to 25% reduced in volume. Increasing concentrations of inorganic salts in sporulation media exerted differing effects on each species; whereas a fivefold increase in the concentration of all salts resulted in only minor differences to the dimensions of B. cereus spores, B. megaterium spores became more elongated, displaying an average increase in volume of almost 30%. Similarly, as the spore elongated to yield aspect ratios larger than 1·4, their shape changed from typical prolate spheroids to cylinders with hemispherical ends. In contrast with previous studies, culture conditions employed in this study exerted no discernible impact on the wet density of B. cereus or B. megaterium spores. Bacterial spores of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium represent nature's most durable cells in terms of their extreme resistance to a variety of deleterious environments. As a result, they are of concern in the food processing, healthcare and other sectors, and are of increasing biotechnological interest. Improved understanding of variance in spore size, morphology and density may aid the development of certain spore-associated applications (e.g. spore surface display) while contributing to active areas of research such as spore adhesion and resistance to heat. © 2017 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Mapping of Proteomic Composition on the Surfaces of Bacillus spores by Atomic Force Microscopy-based Immunolabeling

    SciTech Connect

    Plomp, M; Malkin, A J

    2008-06-02

    Atomic force microscopy provides a unique capability to image high-resolution architecture and structural dynamics of pathogens (e.g. viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores) at near molecular resolution in native conditions. Further development of atomic force microscopy in order to enable the correlation of pathogen protein surface structures with specific gene products is essential to understand the mechanisms of the pathogen life cycle. We have applied an AFM-based immunolabeling technique for the proteomic mapping of macromolecular structures through the visualization of the binding of antibodies, conjugated with nanogold particles, to specific epitopes on Bacillus spore surfaces. This information is generated while simultaneouslymore » acquiring the surface morphology of the pathogen. The immunospecificity of this labeling method was established through the utilization of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that target spore coat and exosporium epitopes of Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis spores.« less

  8. A four-gene operon in Bacillus cereus produces two rare spore-decorating sugars.

    PubMed

    Li, Zi; Mukherjee, Thiya; Bowler, Kyle; Namdari, Sholeh; Snow, Zachary; Prestridge, Sarah; Carlton, Alexandra; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2017-05-05

    Bacterial glycan structures on cell surfaces are critical for cell-cell recognition and adhesion and in host-pathogen interactions. Accordingly, unraveling the sugar composition of bacterial cell surfaces can shed light on bacterial growth and pathogenesis. Here, we found that two rare sugars with a 3- C -methyl-6-deoxyhexose structure were linked to spore glycans in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10876. Moreover, we identified a four-gene operon in B. cereus ATCC 14579 that encodes proteins with the following sequential enzyme activities as determined by mass spectrometry and one- and two-dimensional NMR methods: CTP:glucose-1-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, CDP-Glc 4,6-dehydratase, NADH-dependent SAM: C -methyltransferase, and NADPH-dependent CDP-3- C -methyl-6-deoxyhexose 4-reductase. The last enzyme predominantly yielded CDP-3- C -methyl-6-deoxygulose (CDP-cereose) and likely generated a 4-epimer CDP-3- C -methyl-6-deoxyallose (CDP-cillose). Some members of the B. cereus sensu lato group produce CDP-3- C -methyl-6-deoxy sugars for the formation of cereose-containing glycans on spores, whereas others such as Bacillus anthracis do not. Gene knockouts of the Bacillus C -methyltransferase and the 4-reductase confirmed their involvement in the formation of cereose-containing glycan on B. cereus spores. We also found that cereose represented 0.2-1% spore dry weight. Moreover, mutants lacking cereose germinated faster than the wild type, yet the mutants exhibited no changes in sporulation or spore resistance to heat. The findings reported here may provide new insights into the roles of the uncommon 3- C -methyl-6-deoxy sugars in cell-surface recognition and host-pathogen interactions of the genus Bacillus . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Monitoring of Commitment, Blocking, and Continuation of Nutrient Germination of Individual Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Liang, Jintao; Yi, Xuan; Setlow, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Short exposures of Bacillus spores to nutrient germinants can commit spores to germinate when germinants are removed or their binding to the spores' nutrient germinant receptors (GRs) is inhibited. Bacillus subtilis spores were exposed to germinants for various periods, followed by germinant removal to prevent further commitment. Release of spore dipicolinic acid (DPA) was then measured by differential interference contrast microscopy to monitor germination of multiple individual spores, and spores did not release DPA after 1 to 2 min of germinant exposure until ∼7 min after germinant removal. With longer germinant exposures, percentages of committed spores with times for completion of DPA release (Trelease) greater than the time of germinant removal (Tb) increased, while the time Tlag − Tb, where Tlag represents the time when rapid DPA release began, was decreased but rapid DPA release times (ΔTrelease = Trelease − Tlag) were increased; Factors affecting average Trelease values and the percentages of committed spores were germinant exposure time, germinant concentration, sporulation conditions, and spore heat activation, as previously shown for commitment of spore populations. Surprisingly, germination of spores given a 2nd short germinant exposure 30 to 45 min after a 1st exposure of the same duration was significantly higher than after the 1st exposure, but the number of spores that germinated in the 2nd germinant exposure decreased as the interval between germinant exposures increased up to 12 h. The latter results indicate that spores have some memory, albeit transient, of their previous exposure to nutrient germinants. PMID:24769693

  10. INCIPIENT GERMINATION IN HEAVY SUSPENSIONS OF SPORES OF BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS AT SUBMINIMAL GROWTH TEMPERATURES

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Harold R.; Pallansch, Michael J.

    1963-01-01

    Curran, Harold R. (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C.), and Michael J. Pallansch. Incipient germination in heavy suspensions of spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus at subminimal growth temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 86:911–918. 1963.—By use of spore (plate) counts and permeability to stain, labilization was followed periodically in heavy suspensions of washed Bacillus stearothermophilus 1518 spores incubated at different temperatures. Although vegetative proliferation did not occur below 38 C, incipient germination was rapid down to 20 C and much slower and incomplete at 14 C. Dilution of the suspension materially reduced the degree and rate of labilization. The degree of washing and use of deionized water had no appreciable influence upon early development of the spores. The results are discussed from the point of view of the possible origin and nature of the germination stimulant. Images PMID:14080801

  11. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering of bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, G.; Zito, G.; Pesce, G.; Sasso, A.; Isticato, R.; Ricca, E.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding of the complex interactions of molecules at biological interfaces is a fundamental issue in biochemistry, biotechnology as well as biomedicine. A plethora of biological processes are ruled by the molecular texture of cellular membrane: cellular communications, drug transportations and cellular recognition are just a few examples of such chemically-mediated processes. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) is a novel, Raman-based technique which is ideally suited for this purpose. TERS relies on the combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The basic idea is the use of a metalled tip as a sort of optical nano-antenna, which gives place to SERS effect close to the tip end. Herein, we present the application of TERS to analyze the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores. The choice of this biological systems is related to the fact that a number of reasons support the use of spores as a mucosal delivery system. The remarkable and well-documented resistance of spores to various environmental and toxic effects make them clear potentials as a novel, surface-display system. Our experimental outcomes demonstrate that TERS is able to provide a nano-scale chemical imaging of spore surface. Moreover, we demonstrate that TERS allows differentiation between wilde-type spore and genetically modified strains. These results hold promise for the characterization and optimization of spore surface for drug-delivery applications.

  12. Dynamic predictive model for growth of Bacillus cereus from spores in cooked beans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Kinetic growth data of Bacillus cereus from spores in cooked beans at several isothermal conditions (between 10 to 49C) were collected. Samples were inoculated with approximately 2 log CFU/g of heat-shocked (80C/10 min) spores and stored at isothermal temperatures. B. cereus populations were deter...

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans Predation on Bacillus anthracis: Decontamination of Spore Contaminated Soil with Germinants and Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Schelkle, Bettina; Choi, Young; Baillie, Leslie W; Richter, William; Buyuk, Fatih; Celik, Elif; Wendling, Morgan; Sahin, Mitat; Gallagher, Theresa

    2017-01-01

    Remediation of Bacillus anthracis -contaminated soil is challenging and approaches to reduce overall spore levels in environmentally contaminated soil or after intentional release of the infectious disease agent in a safe, low-cost manner are needed. B. anthracis spores are highly resistant to biocides, but once germinated they become susceptible to traditional biocides or potentially even natural predators such as nematodes in the soil environment. Here, we describe a two-step approach to reducing B. anthracis spore load in soil during laboratory trials, whereby germinants and Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes are applied concurrently. While the application of germinants reduced B. anthracis spore load by up to four logs depending on soil type, the addition of nematodes achieved a further log reduction in spore count. These laboratory based results suggest that the combined use of nematodes and germinants could represent a promising approach for the remediation of B. anthracis spore contaminated soil. Originality-Significance Statement: This study demonstrates for the first time the successful use of environmentally friendly decontamination methods to inactivate Bacillus anthracis spores in soil using natural predators of the bacterium, nematode worms.

  14. Effect of Hyperbaric Carbon Dioxide on Spores and Vegetative Cells of Bacillus stearothermophilus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS DTIC ELECTE JUN131994 D By Chester T. Roskey* Anthony Sikes *Framingham State College Framingham, MA 01701 94-18004...Spores and Vegetative Cells of Bacillus Stearothermophilus 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Chester T. Roskey* & Dr. Anthony Sikes 5 FUNDING NUMBERS PR: TB040...SUBJECT TERMS BACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS THERM0PHILIC BACTERIA THERM0PHILIC SPOILAGE 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 39 16 PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  15. Dual effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes coupled with near-infrared radiation on Bacillus anthracis spores: inactivates spores and stimulates the germination of surviving spores

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacillus anthracis is a pathogen that causes life-threatening disease--anthrax. B. anthracis spores are highly resistant to extreme temperatures and harsh chemicals. Inactivation of B. anthracis spores is important to ensure the environmental safety and public health. The 2001 bioterrorism attack involving anthrax spores has brought acute public attention and triggered extensive research on inactivation of B. anthracis spores. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a class of emerging nanomaterial have been reported as a strong antimicrobial agent. In addition, continuous near infrared (NIR) radiation on SWCNTs induces excessive local heating which can enhance SWCNTs’ antimicrobial effect. In this study, we investigated the effects of SWCNTs coupled with NIR treatment on Bacillus anthracis spores. Results and discussion The results showed that the treatment of 10 μg/mL SWCNTs coupled with 20 min NIR significantly improved the antimicrobial effect by doubling the percentage of viable spore number reduction compared with SWCNTs alone treatment (88% vs. 42%). At the same time, SWCNTs-NIR treatment activated the germination of surviving spores and their dipicolinic acid (DPA) release during germination. The results suggested the dual effect of SWCNTs-NIR treatment on B. anthracis spores: enhanced the sporicidal effect and stimulated the germination of surviving spores. Molecular level examination showed that SWCNTs-NIR increased the expression levels (>2-fold) in 3 out of 6 germination related genes tested in this study, which was correlated to the activated germination and DPA release. SWCNTs-NIR treatment either induced or inhibited the expression of 3 regulatory genes detected in this study. When the NIR treatment time was 5 or 25 min, there were 3 out of 7 virulence related genes that showed significant decrease on expression levels (>2 fold decrease). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated the dual effect of SWCNTs-NIR treatment on

  16. Sporulation environment influences spore properties in Bacillus: evidence and insights on underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bressuire-Isoard, Christelle; Broussolle, Véronique; Carlin, Frédéric

    2018-05-17

    Bacterial spores are resistant to physical and chemical insults, which make them a major concern for public health and for industry. Spores help bacteria to survive extreme environmental conditions that vegetative cells cannot tolerate. Spore resistance and dormancy are important properties for applications in medicine, veterinary health, food safety, crop protection, and other domains. The resistance of bacterial spores results from a protective multilayered structure and from the unique composition of the spore core. The mechanisms of sporulation and germination, the first stage after breaking of dormancy, and organization of spore structure have been extensively studied in Bacillus species. This review aims to illustrate how far the structure, composition and properties of spores are shaped by the environmental conditions in which spores form. We look at the physiological and molecular mechanisms underpinning how sporulation media and environment deeply affect spore yield, spore properties like resistance to wet heat and physical and chemical agents, germination, and further growth. For example, spore core water content decreases as sporulation temperature increases, and resistance to wet heat increases. Controlling the fate of Bacillus spores is pivotal to controlling bacterial risks and process efficiencies in, for example, the food industry, and better control hinges on better understanding how sporulation conditions influence spore properties.

  17. Requirements for the Development of Bacillus Anthracis Spore Reference Materials Used to Test Detection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    the sporangium) contributes the com- plex layers of the spore coats that encase the spore DNA. The mother cell dies and begins to fall apart at the end...spores. Bacillus spores contain a number of coat layers and some species posses an additional outermost layer called the exosporium. BA, B. cereus, and B...exosporium is the outermost layer of the BA spores, it likely contains important protein and carbohydrate markers that are recognized by antibodies

  18. Oral spore-based probiotic supplementation was associated with reduced incidence of post-prandial dietary endotoxin, triglycerides, and disease risk biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Brian K; Henning, Andrea L; Bowman, Erin M; Gary, Melody A; Carbajal, Kimberly M

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine if 30-d of oral spore-based probiotic supplementation could reduce dietary endotoxemia. METHODS Apparently healthy men and women (n = 75) were screened for post-prandial dietary endotoxemia. Subjects whose serum endotoxin concentration increased by at least 5-fold from pre-meal levels at 5-h post-prandial were considered “responders” and were randomized to receive either placebo (rice flour) or a commercial spore-based probiotic supplement [Bacillus indicus (HU36), Bacillus subtilis (HU58), Bacillus coagulans, and Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus clausii] for 30-d. The dietary endotoxemia test was repeated at the conclusion of the supplementation period. Dietary endotoxin (LAL) and triglycerides (enzymatic) were measured using an automated chemistry analyzer. Serum disease risk biomarkers were measured using bead-based multiplex assays (Luminex and Milliplex) as secondary, exploratory measures. RESULTS Data were statistically analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and a P < 0.05. We found that spore-based probiotic supplementation was associated with a 42% reduction in endotoxin (12.9 ± 3.5 vs 6.1 ± 2.6, P = 0.011) and 24% reduction in triglyceride (212 ± 28 vs 138 ± 12, P = 0.004) in the post-prandial period Placebo subjects presented with a 36% increase in endotoxin (10.3 ± 3.4 vs 15.4 ± 4.1, P = 0.011) and 5% decrease in triglycerides (191 ± 24 vs 186 ± 28, P = 0.004) over the same post-prandial period. We also found that spore-based probiotic supplementation was associated with significant post-prandial reductions in IL-12p70 (24.3 ± 2.2 vs 21.5 ± 1.7, P = 0.017) and IL-1β (1.9 ± 0.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.1, P = 0.020). Compared to placebo post supplementation, probiotic subject had less ghrelin (6.8 ± 0.4 vs 8.3 ± 1.1, P = 0.017) compared to placebo subjects. CONCLUSION The key findings of the present study is that oral spore-based probiotic supplementation reduced symptoms indicative of “leaky gut syndrome”. PMID:28868181

  19. Nanoscale Structural and Mechanical Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores Inactivated with Rapid Dry Heating

    PubMed Central

    Felker, Daniel L.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  20. Germinant-enhanced decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and cement-mortar drinking water infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Muhammad, Nur; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W; Hall, John

    2012-04-01

    Germination was evaluated as an enhancement to decontamination methods for removing Bacillus spores from drinking water infrastructure. Germinating spores before chlorinating cement mortar or flushing corroded iron was more effective than chlorinating or flushing alone.

  1. The impact of inducing germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis spores on potential secondary decontamination strategies.

    PubMed

    Omotade, T O; Bernhards, R C; Klimko, C P; Matthews, M E; Hill, A J; Hunter, M S; Webster, W M; Bozue, J A; Welkos, S L; Cote, C K

    2014-12-01

    Decontamination and remediation of a site contaminated by the accidental or intentional release of fully virulent Bacillus anthracis spores are difficult, costly and potentially damaging to the environment. Development of novel decontamination strategies that have minimal environmental impacts remains a high priority. Although ungerminated spores are amongst the most resilient organisms known, once exposed to germinants, the germinating spores, in some cases, become susceptible to antimicrobial environments. We evaluated the concept that once germinated, B. anthracis spores would be less hazardous and significantly easier to remediate than ungerminated dormant spores. Through in vitro germination and sensitivity assays, we demonstrated that upon germination, B. anthracis Ames spores and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam spores (serving as a surrogate for B. anthracis) become susceptible to environmental stressors. The majority of these germinated B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis spores were nonviable after exposure to a defined minimal germination-inducing solution for prolonged periods of time. Additionally, we examined the impact of potential secondary disinfectant strategies including bleach, hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde and artificial UV-A, UV-B and UV-C radiation, employed after a 60-min germination-induction step. Each secondary disinfectant employs a unique mechanism of killing; as a result, germination-induction strategies are better suited for some secondary disinfectants than others. These results provide evidence that the deployment of an optimal combination strategy of germination-induction/secondary disinfection may be a promising aspect of wide-area decontamination following a B. anthracis contamination event. By inducing spores to germinate, our data confirm that the resulting cells exhibit sensitivities that can be leveraged when paired with certain decontamination measures. This increased susceptibility could be exploited to devise more

  2. HtrC Is Involved in Proteolysis of YpeB during Germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Bernhards, Casey B.; Chen, Yan; Toutkoushian, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endospores can remain dormant for decades yet can respond to nutrients, germinate, and resume growth within minutes. An essential step in the germination process is degradation of the spore cortex peptidoglycan wall, and the SleB protein in Bacillus species plays a key role in this process. Stable incorporation of SleB into the spore requires the YpeB protein, and some evidence suggests that the two proteins interact within the dormant spore. Early during germination, YpeB is proteolytically processed to a stable fragment. In this work, the primary sites of YpeB cleavage were identified in Bacillus anthracis, and it was shown that the stable products are comprised of the C-terminal domain of YpeB. Modification of the predominant YpeB cleavage sites reduced proteolysis, but cleavage at other sites still resulted in loss of full-length YpeB. A B. anthracis strain lacking the HtrC protease did not generate the same stable YpeB products. In B. anthracis and Bacillus subtilis htrC mutants, YpeB was partially stabilized during germination but was still degraded at a reduced rate by other, unidentified proteases. Purified HtrC cleaved YpeB to a fragment similar to that observed in vivo, and this cleavage was stimulated by Mn2+ or Ca2+ ions. A lack of HtrC did not stabilize YpeB or SleB during spore formation in the absence of the partner protein, indicating other proteases are involved in their degradation during sporulation. PMID:25384476

  3. Germinant-Enhanced Decontamination of Bacillus Spores Adhered to Iron and Cement-Mortar Drinking Water Infrastructures

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Nur; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W.; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Germination was evaluated as an enhancement to decontamination methods for removing Bacillus spores from drinking water infrastructure. Germinating spores before chlorinating cement mortar or flushing corroded iron was more effective than chlorinating or flushing alone. PMID:22267659

  4. Detection of Bacillus spores using PCR and FTA filters.

    PubMed

    Lampel, Keith A; Dyer, Deanne; Kornegay, Leroy; Orlandi, Palmer A

    2004-05-01

    Emphasis has been placed on developing and implementing rapid detection systems for microbial pathogens. We have explored the utility of expanding FTA filter technology for the preparation of template DNA for PCR from bacterial spores. Isolated spores from several Bacillus spp., B. subtilis, B. cereus, and B. megaterium, were applied to FTA filters, and specific DNA products were amplified by PCR. Spore preparations were examined microscopically to ensure that the presence of vegetative cells, if any, did not yield misleading results. PCR primers SRM86 and SRM87 targeted a conserved region of bacterial rRNA genes, whereas primers Bsub5F and Bsub3R amplified a product from a conserved sequence of the B. subtilis rRNA gene. With the use of the latter set of primers for nested PCR, the sensitivity of the PCR-based assay was increased. Overall, 53 spores could be detected after the first round of PCR, and the sensitivity was increased to five spores by nested PCR. FTA filters are an excellent platform to remove PCR inhibitors and have universal applications for environmental, clinical, and food samples.

  5. Morphological and Chemical Studies of the Spores and Parasporal Bodies of Bacillus laterosporus

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-James, Philip C.; Young, I. Elizabeth

    1958-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus laterosporus were studied to determine the chemical and morphological nature of their basophilic canoe-shaped parasporal bodies. An unusually high phosphorus content of these spores compared to other Bacillus species appeared to be associated with the parasporal body. Preparations of these "canoes" still attached to the spore coats were indeed high in phosphorus, but also in nitrogen. They were free of lipide-soluble and nucleic acid phosphorus and stained for protein. Some 50 per cent of the total nitrogen, but only 6 to 10 per cent of the total P were liberated by extraction with alkali-thioglycollate (pH 11.5) or alkali alone (pH 12.2–12.5). Proteinaceous material was recovered from these alkaline extracts and electron microscopy indicated that there had been a marked loss of "canoe" substance. Extraction with acid, removed some 80 per cent of the phosphorus associated with the "canoes" as orthophosphate. Chromatographic analyses for amino acids indicated some 14 ninhydrin-positive spots in the canoe-coat preparations whereas the whole spores contained at least 16. PMID:13587561

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans Predation on Bacillus anthracis: Decontamination of Spore Contaminated Soil with Germinants and Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Schelkle, Bettina; Choi, Young; Baillie, Leslie W.; Richter, William; Buyuk, Fatih; Celik, Elif; Wendling, Morgan; Sahin, Mitat; Gallagher, Theresa

    2018-01-01

    Remediation of Bacillus anthracis-contaminated soil is challenging and approaches to reduce overall spore levels in environmentally contaminated soil or after intentional release of the infectious disease agent in a safe, low-cost manner are needed. B. anthracis spores are highly resistant to biocides, but once germinated they become susceptible to traditional biocides or potentially even natural predators such as nematodes in the soil environment. Here, we describe a two-step approach to reducing B. anthracis spore load in soil during laboratory trials, whereby germinants and Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes are applied concurrently. While the application of germinants reduced B. anthracis spore load by up to four logs depending on soil type, the addition of nematodes achieved a further log reduction in spore count. These laboratory based results suggest that the combined use of nematodes and germinants could represent a promising approach for the remediation of B. anthracis spore contaminated soil. Originality-Significance Statement: This study demonstrates for the first time the successful use of environmentally friendly decontamination methods to inactivate Bacillus anthracis spores in soil using natural predators of the bacterium, nematode worms. PMID:29379472

  7. An effective iodide formulation for killing Bacillus and Geobacillus spores over a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Kida, N; Mochizuki, Y; Taguchi, F

    2004-01-01

    To develop a sporicidal reagent which shows potent activity against bacterial spores not only at ambient temperatures but also at low temperatures. Suspension tests on spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus were conducted with the reagent based on a previously reported agent (N. Kida, Y. Mochizuki and F. Taguchi, Microbiology and Immunology 2003; 47: 279-283). The modified reagent (tentatively designated as the KMT reagent) was composed of 50 mmol l(-1) EDTA-2Na, 50 mmol l(-1) ferric chloride hexahydrate (FeCl(3).6H(2)O), 50 mmol l(-1) potassium iodide (KI) and 50% ethanol in 0.85% NaCl solution at pH 0.3. The KMT reagent showed significant sporicidal activity against three species of Bacillus and Geobacillus spores over a wide range of temperature. The KMT reagent had many practical advantages, i.e. activity was much less affected by organic substances than was sodium hypochlorite, it did not generate any harmful gas and it was stable for a long period at ambient temperatures. The mechanism(s) of sporicidal activity of the KMT reagent was considered to be based on active iodine species penetrating the spores with enhanced permeability of the spore cortex by a synergistic effect of acid, ethanol and generated active oxygen. The data suggest that the KMT reagent shows potent sporicidal activity over a wide range temperatures and possesses many advantages for practical applications. The results indicate development of a highly applicable sporicidal reagent against Bacillus and Geobacillus spores.

  8. Vulnerability of Bacillus spores and of related genera to physical impaction injury with particular reference to spread-plating.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Sekhar, A C; Mujawar, M M

    2014-11-01

    To examine whether bacterial spores are vulnerable to impaction injury during standard spread-plating or to other modes of physical impaction. Employing heat-challenged spores of Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus and Brevibacillus spp. from day-4 to day-10 nutrient agar (NA) plates in 50% ethanol, plating the spore suspension to the extent of just drying the agar surface on fresh NA (50-60 s; SP-B) was tested in comparison with the spreader-independent approach of spotting-and-tilt-spreading (SATS), or a brief plating (<10 s; SP-A). Spore CFU was significantly reduced with SP-B in different organisms (23-40%) over SATS independent of the spore size. Comparing 4-, 7- and 10-day-old B. pumilus spores, the former two displayed significant CFU reduction in SP-B indicating a spore age-related effect. Continuous plating for 2-5 min showed a reduction in spore CFU in all organisms depending on plating duration. CFU reduction effect with SP-B was less manifest on refrigerated plates where no friction was experienced but acute on prewarmed and surface-dried plates. Spreader movement over agar surface subsequent to the exhaustion of free moisture proved highly detrimental to spores. A simulated plating study by plating the spores over a plastic film till drying showed a significant reduction in spore CFU. DAPI staining and glass bead-vortexing studies confirmed spore disruption through physical impaction. Bacterial spores are vulnerable to injury during spread-plating or with other forms of physical impaction with variable effects on different genotypes independent of the spore size but altered by spore age. Implications during spore CFU estimations employing spread-plating and during spore surveillance, and the recommendation of SATS as an easier and safer alternative for spore CFU enumeration. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Surface display of bacterial tyrosinase on spores of Bacillus subtilis using CotE as an anchor protein.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Abari, Afrouzossadat; Kim, Byung-Gee; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Emtiazi, Giti; Kim, Wooil; Kim, June-Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Tyrosinases, copper-containing monooxygenases, are widely used enzymes for industrial, medical, and environmental applications. We report the first functional surface display of Bacillus megaterium tyrosinase on Bacillus subtilis spores using CotE as an anchor protein. Flow Cytometry was used to verify surface expression of tyrosinase on the purified spores. Moreover, tyrosinase activity of the displayed enzyme on B. subtilis spores was monitored in the presence of L-tyrosine (substrate) and CuSO 4 (inducer). The stability of the spore-displayed tyrosinase was then evaluated after 15 days maintenance of the spores at room temperature, and no significant decrease in the enzyme activity was observed. In addition, the tyrosinase-expressing spores could be repeatedly used with 62% retained enzymatic activity after six times washing with Tris-HCl buffer. This genetically immobilized tyrosinase on the spores would make a new advance in industrial, medical, and environmental applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A Standard Method To Inactivate Bacillus anthracis Spores to Sterility via Gamma Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Christopher K.; Buhr, Tony; Bernhards, Casey B.; Bohmke, Matthew D.; Calm, Alena M.; Esteban-Trexler, Josephine S.; Hunter, Melissa; Katoski, Sarah E.; Kennihan, Neil; Klimko, Christopher P.; Miller, Jeremy A.; Minter, Zachary A.; Pfarr, Jerry W.; Prugh, Amber M.; Quirk, Avery V.; Rivers, Bryan A.; Shea, April A.; Shoe, Jennifer L.; Sickler, Todd M.; Young, Alice A.; Fetterer, David P.; Welkos, Susan L.; McPherson, Derrell; Fountain, Augustus W.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2015, a laboratory of the United States Department of Defense (DoD) inadvertently shipped preparations of gamma-irradiated spores of Bacillus anthracis that contained live spores. In response, a systematic evidence-based method for preparing, concentrating, irradiating, and verifying the inactivation of spore materials was developed. We demonstrate the consistency of spore preparations across multiple biological replicates and show that two different DoD institutions independently obtained comparable dose-inactivation curves for a monodisperse suspension of B. anthracis spores containing 3 × 1010 CFU. Spore preparations from three different institutions and three strain backgrounds yielded similar decimal reduction (D10) values and irradiation doses required to ensure sterility (DSAL) to the point at which the probability of detecting a viable spore is 10−6. Furthermore, spores of a genetically tagged strain of B. anthracis strain Sterne were used to show that high densities of dead spores suppress the recovery of viable spores. Together, we present an integrated method for preparing, irradiating, and verifying the inactivation of spores of B. anthracis for use as standard reagents for testing and evaluating detection and diagnostic devices and techniques. IMPORTANCE The inadvertent shipment by a U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) laboratory of live Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores to U.S. and international destinations revealed the need to standardize inactivation methods for materials derived from biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) and for the development of evidence-based methods to prevent the recurrence of such an event. Following a retrospective analysis of the procedures previously employed to generate inactivated B. anthracis spores, a study was commissioned by the DoD to provide data required to support the production of inactivated spores for the biodefense community. The results of this work are presented in this publication

  11. Enzymatic Manganese(II) Oxidation by Metabolically Dormant Spores of Diverse Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Chris A.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial spores are renowned for their longevity, ubiquity, and resistance to environmental insults, but virtually nothing is known regarding whether these metabolically dormant structures impact their surrounding chemical environments. In the present study, a number of spore-forming bacteria that produce dormant spores which enzymatically oxidize soluble Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(IV) oxides were isolated from coastal marine sediments. The highly charged and reactive surfaces of biogenic metal oxides dramatically influence the oxidation and sorption of both trace metals and organics in the environment. Prior to this study, the only known Mn(II)-oxidizing sporeformer was the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1, an extensively studied bacterium in which Mn(II) oxidation is believed to be catalyzed by a multicopper oxidase, MnxG. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and mnxG sequences obtained from 15 different Mn(II)-oxidizing sporeformers (including SG-1) revealed extensive diversity within the genus Bacillus, with organisms falling into several distinct clusters and lineages. In addition, active Mn(II)-oxidizing proteins of various sizes, as observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels, were recovered from the outer layers of purified dormant spores of the isolates. These are the first active Mn(II)-oxidizing enzymes identified in spores or gram-positive bacteria. Although extremely resistant to denaturation, the activities of these enzymes were inhibited by azide and o-phenanthroline, consistent with the involvement of multicopper oxidases. Overall, these studies suggest that the commonly held view that bacterial spores are merely inactive structures in the environment should be revised. PMID:11823231

  12. Detection of Bacillus spores within 15 minutes by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart; Sengupta, Atanu

    2012-06-01

    Since the distribution of Bacillus anthracis causing spores through the US Postal System, there has been a persistent fear that biological warfare agents (BWAs) will be used by terrorists against our military abroad and our civilians at home. Despite the substantial effort to develop BWA analyzers, they remain either too slow, produce high falsealarm rates, lack sensitivity, or cannot be fielded. Consequently there remains a need for a portable analyzer that can overcome these limitations as expressed at the 2011 Biological Weapons Convention. To meet this need we have been developing a sample system that selectively binds BWAs and produce surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra using portable Raman spectrometers. Here we describe the use of a short peptide ligand functionalized on silver nanoparticles to selectively capture Bacillus cereus spores (a surrogate of B. anthracis) and their subsequent detection by SER spectroscopy. This technique was used to specifically detect B. cereus spores over closely related species like B. subtilis belonging to the same genus within 15 minutes. Sensitivity of the method was demonstrated by detecting 104 B. cereus spores/mL of water. The technology, once developed should prove invaluable for rapid monitoring of BWAs, which will immensely help first responders and emergency personnel in implementing appropriate counter measures.

  13. Trace detection of meglumine and diatrizoate from Bacillus spore samples using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swider, Catherine; Maguire, Kelly; Rickenbach, Michael; Montgomery, Madeline; Ducote, Matthew J; Marhefka, Craig A

    2012-07-01

    Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, letters containing Bacillus anthracis were distributed through the United States postal system killing five people. A complex forensic investigation commenced to identify the perpetrator of these mailings. A novel liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry protocol for the qualitative detection of trace levels of meglumine and diatrizoate in dried spore preparations of B. anthracis was developed. Meglumine and diatrizoate are components of radiographic imaging products that have been used to purify bacterial spores. Two separate chromatographic assays using multiple mass spectrometric analyses were developed for the detection of meglumine and diatrizoate. The assays achieved limits of detection for meglumine and diatrizoate of 1.00 and 10.0 ng/mL, respectively. Bacillus cereus T strain spores were effectively used as a surrogate for B. anthracis spores during method development and validation. This protocol was successfully applied to limited evidentiary B. anthracis spore material, providing probative information to the investigators. 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  14. Decontamination Options for Bacillus anthracis-Contaminated Drinking Water Determined from Spore Surrogate Studies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Raber, Ellen; Burklund, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Five parameters were evaluated with surrogates of Bacillus anthracis spores to determine effective decontamination alternatives for use in a contaminated drinking water supply. The parameters were as follows: (i) type of Bacillus spore surrogate (B. thuringiensis or B. atrophaeus), (ii) spore concentration in suspension (102 and 106 spores/ml), (iii) chemical characteristics of the decontaminant (sodium dichloro-S-triazinetrione dihydrate [Dichlor], hydrogen peroxide, potassium peroxymonosulfate [Oxone], sodium hypochlorite, and VirkonS), (iv) decontaminant concentration (0.01% to 5%), and (v) exposure time to decontaminant (10 min to 1 h). Results from 138 suspension tests with appropriate controls are reported. Hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 5% and Dichlor or sodium hypochlorite at a concentration of 2% were highly effective at spore inactivation regardless of spore type tested, spore exposure time, or spore concentration evaluated. This is the first reported study of Dichlor as an effective decontaminant for B. anthracis spore surrogates. Dichlor's desirable characteristics of high oxidation potential, high level of free chlorine, and a more neutral pH than that of other oxidizers evaluated appear to make it an excellent alternative. All three oxidizers were effective against B. atrophaeus spores in meeting the EPA biocide standard of greater than a 6-log kill after a 10-min exposure time and at lower concentrations than typically reported for biocide use. Solutions of 5% VirkonS and Oxone were less effective as decontaminants than other options evaluated in this study and did not meet the EPA's efficacy standard for a biocide, although they were found to be as effective for concentrations of 102 spores/ml. Differences in methods and procedures reported by other investigators make quantitative comparisons among studies difficult. PMID:20709855

  15. The characterisation of Bacillus spores occurring in the manufacturing of (low acid) canned products.

    PubMed

    Oomes, S J C M; van Zuijlen, A C M; Hehenkamp, J O; Witsenboer, H; van der Vossen, J M B M; Brul, S

    2007-11-30

    Spore-forming bacteria can be a problem in the food industry, especially in the canning industry. Spores present in ingredients or present in the processing environment severely challenge the preservation process since their thermal resistance may be very high. We therefore asked the question which bacterial spore formers are found in a typical soup manufacturing plant, where they originate from and what the thermal resistance of their spores is. To answer these questions molecular techniques for bacterial species and strain identification were used as well as a protocol for the assessment of spore heat stress resistance based on the Kooiman method. The data indicate the existence and physiological cause of the high thermal resistance of spores of many of the occurring species. In particular it shows that ingredients used in soup manufacturing are a rich source of high thermal resistant spores and that sporulation in the presence of ingredients rich in divalent metal ions exerts a strong influence on spore heat resistance. It was also indicated that Bacillus spores may well be able to germinate and resporulate during manufacturing i.e. through growth and sporulation in line. Both these spores and those originating from the ingredients were able to survive certain thermal processing settings. Species identity was confirmed using fatty acid analysis, 16SrRNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridisation. Finally, molecular typing experiments using Ribotyping and AFLP analysis show that strains within the various Bacillus species can be clustered according to the thermal resistance properties of their spores. AFLP performed slightly better than Ribotyping. The data proofed to be useful for the generation of strain specific probes. Protocols to validate these probes in routine identification and innovation aimed at tailor made heat processing in soup manufacturing have been formulated.

  16. 40 CFR 180.1011 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1011 Viable spores of the... characteristics of the parent strain or contamination by other microorganisms. (3) Each lot of spore preparation... production is a Bacillus thuringiensis strain which does not produce β-exotoxin under standard manufacturing...

  17. Storage Effects on Sample Integrity of Environmental Surface Sampling Specimens with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Perry, K. Allison; O’Connell, Heather A.; Rose, Laura J.; Noble-Wang, Judith A.; Arduino, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of packaging, shipping temperatures and storage times on recovery of Bacillus anthracis. Sterne spores from swabs was investigated. Macrofoam swabs were pre-moistened, inoculated with Bacillus anthracis spores, and packaged in primary containment or secondary containment before storage at −15°C, 5°C, 21°C, or 35°C for 0–7 days. Swabs were processed according to validated Centers for Disease Control/Laboratory Response Network culture protocols, and the percent recovery relative to a reference sample (T0) was determined for each variable. No differences were observed in recovery between swabs held at −15° and 5°C, (p ≥ 0.23). These two temperatures provided significantly better recovery than swabs held at 21°C or 35°C (all 7 days pooled, p ≤ 0.04). The percent recovery at 5°C was not significantly different if processed on days 1, 2 or 4, but was significantly lower on day 7 (day 2 vs. 7, 5°C, 102, p=0.03). Secondary containment provided significantly better percent recovery than primary containment, regardless of storage time (5°C data, p ≤ 0.008). The integrity of environmental swab samples containing Bacillus anthracis spores shipped in secondary containment was maintained when stored at −15°C or 5°C and processed within 4 days to yield the optimum percent recovery of spores. PMID:27213119

  18. Storage Effects on Sample Integrity of Environmental Surface Sampling Specimens with Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Perry, K Allison; O'Connell, Heather A; Rose, Laura J; Noble-Wang, Judith A; Arduino, Matthew J

    The effect of packaging, shipping temperatures and storage times on recovery of Bacillus anthracis . Sterne spores from swabs was investigated. Macrofoam swabs were pre-moistened, inoculated with Bacillus anthracis spores, and packaged in primary containment or secondary containment before storage at -15°C, 5°C, 21°C, or 35°C for 0-7 days. Swabs were processed according to validated Centers for Disease Control/Laboratory Response Network culture protocols, and the percent recovery relative to a reference sample (T 0 ) was determined for each variable. No differences were observed in recovery between swabs held at -15° and 5°C, (p ≥ 0.23). These two temperatures provided significantly better recovery than swabs held at 21°C or 35°C (all 7 days pooled, p ≤ 0.04). The percent recovery at 5°C was not significantly different if processed on days 1, 2 or 4, but was significantly lower on day 7 (day 2 vs. 7, 5°C, 10 2 , p=0.03). Secondary containment provided significantly better percent recovery than primary containment, regardless of storage time (5°C data, p ≤ 0.008). The integrity of environmental swab samples containing Bacillus anthracis spores shipped in secondary containment was maintained when stored at -15°C or 5°C and processed within 4 days to yield the optimum percent recovery of spores.

  19. Adhesion of Bacillus spores and Escherichia coli cells to inert surfaces: role of surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Faille, Christine; Jullien, Celine; Fontaine, Francoise; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noelle; Slomianny, Christian; Benezech, Thierry

    2002-08-01

    The ability of bacterial spores and vegetative cells to adhere to inert surfaces was investigated by means of the number of adherent spores (Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis spores) and Escherichia coli cells and their resistance to cleaning or rinsing procedures (adhesion strength). Six materials (glass, stainless steel, polyethylene high density (PEHD), polyamide-6, polyvinyl chloride, and Teflon) were tested. Slight differences in the number of adherent spores (less than 1 log unit) were observed between materials, but a higher number of adherent E. coli cells was found on the hydrophobic materials PEHD and Teflon. Conversely, the resistance of both B. cereus and B. subtilis spores to a cleaning procedure was significantly affected by the material. Hydrophobic materials were harder to clean. The topography parameter derived from the Abbott-Firestone curve, RVK, and, to a lesser extent, the widely used roughness parameters RA (average roughness) and Rz (maximal roughness), were related to the number of adherent cells. Lastly, the soiling level as well as the adhesion strength were shown to depend largely on the microorganism. The number of adhering B. cereus hydrophobic spores and their resistance to a cleaning procedure were found to be 10 times greater than those of the B. subtilis hydrophilic spores. Escherichia coli was loosely bound to all the materials tested, even after 24 h biofilm formation.

  20. High-Level Heat Resistance of Spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus licheniformis Results from the Presence of a spoVA Operon in a Tn1546 Transposon

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, Erwin M.; Koning, Rosella A.; Boekhorst, Jos; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endospore formers can produce spores that are resistant to many food processing conditions, including heat. Some spores may survive heating processes aimed at production of commercially sterile foods. Recently, it was shown that a spoVA operon, designated spoVA2mob, present on a Tn1546 transposon in Bacillus subtilis, leads to profoundly increased wet heat resistance of B. subtilis spores. Such Tn1546 transposon elements including the spoVA2mob operon were also found in several strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus licheniformis, and these strains were shown to produce spores with significantly higher resistances to wet heat than their counterparts lacking this transposon. In this study, the locations and compositions of Tn1546 transposons encompassing the spoVA2mob operons in B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis were analyzed. Introduction of these spoVA2mob operons into B. subtilis 168 (producing spores that are not highly heat resistant) rendered mutant 168 strains that produced high-level heat resistant spores, demonstrating that these elements in B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis are responsible for high level heat resistance of spores. Assessment of growth of the nine strains of each species between 5.2°C and 57.7°C showed some differences between strains, especially at lower temperatures, but all strains were able to grow at 57.7°C. Strains of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis that contain the Tn1546 elements (and produce high-level heat resistant spores) grew at temperatures similar to those of their Tn1546-negative counterparts that produce low-level heat resistant spores. The findings presented in this study allow for detection of B. amyloliquefaciens and B. licheniformis strains that produce highly heat resistant spores in the food chain. PMID:27994575

  1. Test methods and response surface models for hot, humid air decontamination of materials contaminated with dirty spores of Bacillus anthracis ∆Sterne and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam.

    PubMed

    Buhr, T L; Young, A A; Barnette, H K; Minter, Z A; Kennihan, N L; Johnson, C A; Bohmke, M D; DePaola, M; Cora-Laó, M; Page, M A

    2015-11-01

    To develop test methods and evaluate survival of Bacillus anthracis ∆Sterne or Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam on materials contaminated with dirty spore preparations after exposure to hot, humid air using response surface modelling. Spores (>7 log10 ) were mixed with humic acid + spent sporulation medium (organic debris) or kaolin (dirt debris). Spore samples were then dried on five different test materials (wiring insulation, aircraft performance coating, anti-skid, polypropylene, and nylon). Inoculated materials were tested with 19 test combinations of temperature (55, 65, 75°C), relative humidity (70, 80, 90%) and time (1, 2, 3 days). The slowest spore inactivation kinetics was on nylon webbing and/or after addition of organic debris. Hot, humid air effectively decontaminates materials contaminated with dirty Bacillus spore preparations; debris and material interactions create complex decontamination kinetic patterns; and B. thuringiensis Al Hakam is a realistic surrogate for B. anthracis. Response surface models of hot, humid air decontamination were developed which may be used to select decontamination parameters for contamination scenarios including aircraft. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: Quantification of Bacterial Replication within Cadavers, Transmission via Cannibalism, and Inhibition of Spore Germination

    PubMed Central

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P.

    2015-01-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen. PMID:26386058

  3. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Bacillus coagulans spores in tomato juice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Mah, Jae-Hyung; Somavat, Romel; Mohamed, Hussein; Sastry, Sudhir; Tang, Juming

    2012-07-01

    The thermal characteristics of the spores and vegetative cells of three strains of Bacillus coagulans (ATCC 8038, ATCC 7050, and 185A) in tomato juice were evaluated. B. coagulans ATCC 8038 was chosen as the target microorganism for thermal processing of tomato products due to its spores having the highest thermal resistance among the three strains. The thermal inactivation kinetics of B. coagulans ATCC 8038 spores in tomato juice between 95 and 115°C were determined independently in two different laboratories using two different heating setups. The results obtained from both laboratories were in general agreement, with z-values (z-value is defined as the change in temperature required for a 10-fold reduction of the D-value, which is defined as the time required at a certain temperature for a 1-log reduction of the target microorganisms) of 8.3 and 8.7°C, respectively. The z-value of B. coagulans 185A spores in tomato juice (pH 4.3) was found to be 10.2°C. The influence of environmental factors, including cold storage time, pH, and preconditioning, upon the thermal resistance of these bacterial spores is discussed. The results obtained showed that a storage temperature of 4°C was appropriate for maintaining the viability and thermal resistance of B. coagulans ATCC 8038 spores. Acidifying the pH of tomato juice decreased the thermal resistance of these spores. A 1-h exposure at room temperature was considered optimal for preconditioning B. coagulans ATCC 8038 spores in tomato juice.

  4. Observations on the migration of bacillus spores outside a contaminated facility during a decontamination efficacy study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvestri, Erin E.; Perkins, Sarah; Lordo, Robert; Kovacik, William; Nichols, Tonya L.; Bowling, Charlena Yoder; Griffin, Dale W.; Schaefer, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus species spores have the potential to remain viable in the soil for many years. Lasting environmental contamination following a release is a possibility, and planning for site characterization and remediation activities should consider both indoor-to-outdoor spore transport and outdoor soil as potential exposure pathways.

  5. Understanding of the importance of the spore coat structure and pigmentation in the Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to low-pressure plasma sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguse, Marina; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Denis, Benjamin; Stapelmann, Katharina; Eichenberger, Patrick; Driks, Adam; Eaton, Peter; Awakowicz, Peter; Moeller, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    Low-pressure plasmas have been evaluated for their potential in biomedical and defense purposes. The sterilizing effect of plasma can be attributed to several active agents, including (V)UV radiation, charged particles, radical species, neutral and excited atoms and molecules, and the electric field. Spores of Bacillus subtilis were used as a bioindicator and a genetic model system to study the sporicidal effects of low-pressure plasma decontamination. Wild-type spores, spores lacking the major protective coat layers (inner, outer, and crust), pigmentation-deficient spores or spore impaired in encasement (a late step in coat assembly) were systematically tested for their resistance to low-pressure argon, hydrogen, and oxygen plasmas with and without admixtures. We demonstrate that low-pressure plasma discharges of argon and oxygen discharges cause significant physical damage to spore surface structures as visualized by atomic force microscopy. Spore resistance to low-pressure plasma was primarily dependent on the presence of the inner, and outer spore coat layers as well as spore encasement, with minor or less importance of the crust and spore pigmentation, whereas spore inactivation itself was strongly influenced by the gas composition and operational settings.

  6. Increase of content and bioactivity of total phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds through solid state fermentation by Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Rochín-Medina, Jesús J; Ramírez, Karina; Rangel-Peraza, Jesús G; Bustos-Terrones, Yaneth A

    2018-03-01

    Spent coffee grounds are waste material generated during coffee beverage preparation. This by-product disposal causes a negative environmental impact, in addition to the loss of a rich source of nutrients and bioactive compounds. A rotating central composition design was used to determine the optimal conditions for the bioactivity of phenolic compounds obtained after the solid state fermentation of spent coffee grounds by Bacillus clausii . To achieve this, temperature and fermentation time were varied according to the experimental design and the total phenolic and flavonoid content, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity were determined. Surface response methodology showed that optimum bioprocessing conditions were a temperature of 37 °C and a fermentation time of 39 h. Under these conditions, total phenolic and flavonoid contents increased by 36 and 13%, respectively, in fermented extracts as compared to non-fermented. In addition, the antioxidant activity was increased by 15% and higher antimicrobial activity was observed against Gram positive and negative bacteria. These data demonstrated that bioprocessing optimization of spent coffee grounds using the surface response methodology was an important tool to improve phenolic extraction, which could be used as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agents incorporated into different types of food products.

  7. Recovery of Bacillus Spore Contaminants from Rough Surfaces: a Challenge to Space Mission Cleanliness Control▿

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander; Facius, Rainer; Wirth, Reinhard; Wolf, Marco; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Microbial contaminants on spacecraft can threaten the scientific integrity of space missions due to probable interference with life detection experiments. Therefore, space agencies measure the cultivable spore load (“bioburden”) of a spacecraft. A recent study has reported an insufficient recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus spores from Vectran fabric, a typical spacecraft airbag material (A. Probst, R. Facius, R. Wirth, and C. Moissl-Eichinger, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76:5148-5158, 2010). Here, 10 different sampling methods were compared for B. atrophaeus spore recovery from this rough textile, revealing significantly different efficiencies (0.5 to 15.4%). The most efficient method, based on the wipe-rinse technique (foam-spatula protocol; 13.2% efficiency), was then compared to the current European Space Agency (ESA) standard wipe assay in sampling four different kinds of spacecraft-related surfaces. Results indicate that the novel protocol out-performed the standard method with an average efficiency of 41.1% compared to 13.9% for the standard method. Additional experiments were performed by sampling Vectran fabric seeded with seven different spore concentrations and five different Bacillus species (B. atrophaeus, B. anthracis Sterne, B. megaterium, B. thuringiensis, and B. safensis). Among these, B. atrophaeus spores were recovered with the highest (13.2%) efficiency and B. anthracis Sterne spores were recovered with the lowest (0.3%) efficiency. Different inoculation methods of seeding spores on test surfaces (spotting and aerosolization) resulted in different spore recovery efficiencies. The results of this study provide a step forward in understanding the spore distribution on and recovery from rough surfaces. The results presented will contribute relevant knowledge to the fields of astrobiology and B. anthracis research. PMID:21216908

  8. Carvacrol suppresses high pressure high temperature inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed

    Luu-Thi, Hue; Corthouts, Jorinde; Passaris, Ioannis; Grauwet, Tara; Aertsen, Abram; Hendrickx, Marc; Michiels, Chris W

    2015-03-16

    The inactivation of bacterial spores generally proceeds faster and at lower temperatures when heat treatments are conducted under high pressure, and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing is, therefore, receiving an increased interest from food processors. However, the mechanisms of spore inactivation by HPHT treatment are poorly understood, particularly at moderately elevated temperature. In the current work, we studied inactivation of the spores of Bacillus cereus F4430/73 by HPHT treatment for 5 min at 600MPa in the temperature range of 50-100°C, using temperature increments of 5°C. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the natural antimicrobial carvacrol on spore germination and inactivation under these conditions. Spore inactivation by HPHT was less than about 1 log unit at 50 to 70°C, but gradually increased at higher temperatures up to about 5 log units at 100°C. DPA release and loss of spore refractility in the spore population were higher at moderate (≤65°C) than at high (≥70°C) treatment temperatures, and we propose that moderate conditions induced the normal physiological pathway of spore germination resulting in fully hydrated spores, while at higher temperatures this pathway was suppressed and replaced by another mechanism of pressure-induced dipicolinic acid (DPA) release that results only in partial spore rehydration, probably because spore cortex hydrolysis is inhibited. Carvacrol strongly suppressed DPA release and spore rehydration during HPHT treatment at ≤65°C and also partly inhibited DPA release at ≥65°C. Concomitantly, HPHT spore inactivation was reduced by carvacrol at 65-90°C but unaffected at 95-100°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of microbial loading and sporulation temperature on atmospheric plasma inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Shama, G.; Kong, M. G.

    2005-10-01

    Current inactivation studies of Bacillus subtilis spores using atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGD) do not consider two important factors, namely microbial loading at the surface of a substrate and sporulation temperature. Yet these are known to affect significantly microbial resistance to heat and hydrogen peroxide. This letter investigates effects of microbial loading and sporulation temperature on spore resistance to APGD. It is shown that microbial loading can lead to a stacking structure as a protective shield against APGD treatment and that high sporulation temperature increases spore resistance by altering core water content and cross-linked muramic acid content of B. subtilis spores.

  10. Infection of Tribolium castaneum with Bacillus thuringiensis: quantification of bacterial replication within cadavers, transmission via cannibalism, and inhibition of spore germination.

    PubMed

    Milutinović, Barbara; Höfling, Christina; Futo, Momir; Scharsack, Jörn P; Kurtz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Reproduction within a host and transmission to the next host are crucial for the virulence and fitness of pathogens. Nevertheless, basic knowledge about such parameters is often missing from the literature, even for well-studied bacteria, such as Bacillus thuringiensis, an endospore-forming insect pathogen, which infects its hosts via the oral route. To characterize bacterial replication success, we made use of an experimental oral infection system for the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and developed a flow cytometric assay for the quantification of both spore ingestion by the individual beetle larvae and the resulting spore load after bacterial replication and resporulation within cadavers. On average, spore numbers increased 460-fold, showing that Bacillus thuringiensis grows and replicates successfully in insect cadavers. By inoculating cadaver-derived spores and spores from bacterial stock cultures into nutrient medium, we next investigated outgrowth characteristics of vegetative cells and found that cadaver-derived bacteria showed reduced growth compared to bacteria from the stock cultures. Interestingly, this reduced growth was a consequence of inhibited spore germination, probably originating from the host and resulting in reduced host mortality in subsequent infections by cadaver-derived spores. Nevertheless, we further showed that Bacillus thuringiensis transmission was possible via larval cannibalism when no other food was offered. These results contribute to our understanding of the ecology of Bacillus thuringiensis as an insect pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Dry-heat Resistance of Bacillus Subtilis Var. Niger Spores on Mated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simko, G. J.; Devlin, J. D.; Wardle, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores were placed on the surfaces of test coupons manufactured from typical spacecraft materials including stainless steel, magnesium, titanium, and aluminum. These coupons were then juxtaposed at the inoculated surfaces and subjected to test pressures of 0, 1000, 5000, and 10,000 psi. Tests were conducted in ambient, nitrogen, and helium atmospheres. While under the test pressure condition, the spores were exposed to 125 C for intervals of 5, 10, 20, 50, or 80 min. Survivor data were subjected to a linear regression analysis that calculated decimal reduction times.

  12. Cryogenic Irradiation of Bacillus Atrophaeus spores to understand microbial survival on Icy Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerby, C. J.; Noell, A. C.; Hodyss, R. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Ponce, A.

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial Spores are useful indicator organisms for studying the survival of microbes and degradation of biomolecules on the surface of planetary icy bodies. To predict the limits of life's proliferation in space, specifically on icy bodies, it is essential to understand the ability of microbes to withstand photon and particle irradiation at cryogenic temperatures. Bacillus Atrophaeus spores were transferred onto stainless steel coupons by varied processes and subsequently frozen at Europan temperatures (16oK—273oK) in a vacuum at 8.7x10-8 Torr. An argon lamp bombarded the spore-containing coupons with a solar-like radiation spectra for a variety of times, and spores were removed from the coupons and enumerated in culture. To date, (n=43) coupons have been analyzed for spore kill-rates with regards to ice temperature and radiation exposure time. Results will be presented on the effect of cryogenic temperatures in improving radiation resistance of bacterial spores. This works also details methodology improvements by comparing different spore deposition and recovery methods before and after cryogenic irradiation.

  13. Roles of the Bacillus anthracis Spore Protein ExsK in Exosporium Maturation and Germination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    exosporium maturation and assembly and suggest a novel role for the exosporium in germination. During starvation, bacteria of the genus Bacillus...Bacillus subtilis, the outermost struc- ture is a protective layer called the coat, which guards the spore against reactive small molecules, degradative ...analysis. Generation of anti-ExsK antibodies. Recombinant ExsK was generated and purified using the pET expression system (Novagen) according to the

  14. Presenting Influenza A M2e Antigen on Recombinant Spores of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Obuchowski, Michał; Nidzworski, Dawid

    2016-01-01

    Effective vaccination against influenza virus infection is a serious problem mainly due to antigenic variability of the virus. Among many of investigated antigens, the extracellular domain of the M2 protein (M2e) features high homology in all strains of influenza A viruses and antibodies against M2e and is protective in animal models; this makes it a potential candidate for generation of a universal influenza vaccine. However, due to the low immunogenicity of the M2e, formulation of a vaccine based on this antigen requires some modification to induce effective immune responses. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Bacillus subtilis spores as a carrier of the Influenza A M2e antigen in mucosal vaccination. A tandem repeat of 4 consensus sequences coding for human—avian—swine—human M2e (M2eH-A-S-H) peptide was fused to spore coat proteins and stably exposed on the spore surface, as demonstrated by the immunostaining of intact, recombinant spores. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant endospores carrying M2eH-A-S-H elicited specific antibody production without the addition of adjuvants. Bacillus subtilis endospores can serve as influenza antigen carriers. Recombinant spores constructed in this work showed low immunogenicity although were able to induce antibody production. The System of influenza antigen administration presented in this work is attractive mainly due to the omitting time-consuming and cost-intensive immunogen production and purification. Therefore modification should be made to increase the immunogenicity of the presented system. PMID:27902762

  15. Predicting Bacillus coagulans spores inactivation in tomato pulp under nonisothermal heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Morgana; Longhi, Daniel A; Schaffner, Donald W; Aragão, Gláucia M F

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge and understanding of Bacillus coagulans inactivation during a thermal treatment in tomato pulp, as well as the influence of temperature variation during thermal processes are essential for design, calculation, and optimization of the process. The aims of this work were to predict B. coagulans spores inactivation in tomato pulp under varying time-temperature profiles with Gompertz-inspired inactivation model and to validate the model's predictions by comparing the predicted values with experimental data. B. coagulans spores in pH 4.3 tomato pulp at 4 °Brix were sealed in capillary glass tubes and heated in thermostatically controlled circulating oil baths. Seven different nonisothermal profiles in the range from 95 to 105 °C were studied. Predicted inactivation kinetics showed similar behavior to experimentally observed inactivation curves when the samples were exposed to temperatures in the upper range of this study (99 to 105 °C). Profiles that resulted in less accurate predictions were those where the range of temperatures analyzed were comparatively lower (inactivation profiles starting at 95 °C). The link between fail prediction and both lower starting temperature and magnitude of the temperature shift suggests some chemical or biological mechanism at work. Statistical analysis showed that overall model predictions were acceptable, with bias factors from 0.781 to 1.012, and accuracy factors from 1.049 to 1.351, and confirm that the models used were adequate to estimate B. coagulans spores inactivation under fluctuating temperature conditions in the range from 95 to 105 °C. How can we estimate Bacillus coagulans inactivation during sudden temperature shifts in heat processing? This article provides a validated model that can be used to predict B. coagulans under changing temperature conditions. B. coagulans is a spore-forming bacillus that spoils acidified food products. The mathematical model developed here can be used to predict the spoilage

  16. Hot, humid air decontamination of a C-130 aircraft contaminated with spores of two acrystalliferous Bacillus thuringiensis strains, surrogates for Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Buhr, T L; Young, A A; Bensman, M; Minter, Z A; Kennihan, N L; Johnson, C A; Bohmke, M D; Borgers-Klonkowski, E; Osborn, E B; Avila, S D; Theys, A M G; Jackson, P J

    2016-04-01

    To develop test methods and evaluate survival of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki cry(-) HD-1 and B. thuringiensis Al Hakam spores after exposure to hot, humid air inside of a C-130 aircraft. Bacillus thuringiensis spores were either pre-inoculated on 1 × 2 or 2 × 2 cm substrates or aerosolized inside the cargo hold of a C-130 and allowed to dry. Dirty, complex surfaces (10 × 10 cm) swabbed after spore dispersal showed a deposition of 8-10 log10 m(-2) through the entire cargo hold. After hot, humid air decontamination at 75-80°C, 70-90% relative humidity for 7 days, 87 of 98 test swabs covering 0·98 m(2) , showed complete spore inactivation. There was a total of 1·67 log10 live CFU detected in 11 of the test swabs. Spore inactivation in the 98 test swabs was measured at 7·06 log10 m(-2) . Laboratory test methods for hot, humid air decontamination were scaled for a large-scale aircraft field test. The C-130 field test demonstrated that hot, humid air can be successfully used to decontaminate an aircraft. Transition of a new technology from research and development to acquisition at a Technology Readiness Level 7 is unprecedented. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Multifactorial Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spores to High-Energy Proton Radiation: Role of Spore Structural Components and the Homologous Recombination and Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Günther; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The space environment contains high-energy charged particles (e.g., protons, neutrons, electrons, α-particles, heavy ions) emitted by the Sun and galactic sources or trapped in the radiation belts. Protons constitute the majority (87%) of high-energy charged particles. Spores of Bacillus species are one of the model systems used for astro- and radiobiological studies. In this study, spores of different Bacillus subtilis strains were used to study the effects of high energetic proton irradiation on spore survival. Spores of the wild-type B. subtilis strain [mutants deficient in the homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathways and mutants deficient in various spore structural components such as dipicolinic acid (DPA), α/β-type small, acid-soluble spore protein (SASP) formation, spore coats, pigmentation, or spore core water content] were irradiated as air-dried multilayers on spacecraft-qualified aluminum coupons with 218 MeV protons [with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 0.4 keV/μm] to various final doses up to 2500 Gy. Spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to proton radiation than wild-type spores, indicating that both HR and NHEJ DNA repair pathways are needed for spore survival. Spores lacking DPA, α/β-type SASP, or with increased core water content were also significantly more sensitive to proton radiation, whereas the resistance of spores lacking pigmentation or spore coats was essentially identical to that of the wild-type spores. Our results indicate that α/β-type SASP, core water content, and DPA play an important role in spore resistance to high-energy proton irradiation, suggesting their essential function as radioprotectants of the spore interior. Key Words: Bacillus—Spores—DNA repair—Protection—High-energy proton radiation. Astrobiology 12, 1069–1077. PMID:23088412

  18. Germination Requirements of Bacillus macerans Spores

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, L. E.; Thompson, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    2-Phenylacetamide is an effective germinant for spores of five strains of Bacillus macerans, particularly in the presence of fructose. Benzyl penicillin, the phenyl acetamide derivative of penicillin, and phenylacetic acid are also good germinants. l-Asparagine is an excellent germinant for four strains. α-Amino-butyric acid is moderately effective. Pyridoxine, pyridoxal, adenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine are potent germinants for NCA strain 7X1 only. d-Glucose is a powerful germinant for strain B-70 only. d-Fructose and d-ribose strongly potentiate germination induced by other germinants (except l-asparagine) but have only weak activity by themselves. Niacinamide and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide, inactive by themselves, are active in the presence of fructose or ribose. Effects of pH, ion concentration, and temperature are described. PMID:4251279

  19. Rapid concentration of Bacillus and Clostridium spores from large volumes of milk, using continuous flow centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Agoston, Réka; Soni, Kamlesh A; McElhany, Katherine; Cepeda, Martha L; Zuckerman, Udi; Tzipori, Saul; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Pillai, Suresh D

    2009-03-01

    Deliberate or accidental contamination of foods such as milk, soft drinks, and drinking water with infectious agents or toxins is a major concern to health authorities. There is a critical need to develop technologies that can rapidly and efficiently separate and concentrate biothreat agents from food matrices. A key limitation of current centrifugation and filtration technologies is that they are batch processes with extensive hands-on involvement and processing times. The objective of our studies was to evaluate the continuous flow centrifugation (CFC) technique for the rapid separation and concentration of bacterial spores from large volumes of milk. We determined the effectiveness of the CFC technology for concentrating approximately 10(3) bacterial spores in 3.7 liters (1 gal) of whole milk and skim milk, using Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus, and Clostridium sporogenes spores as surrogates for biothreat agents. The spores in the concentrated samples were enumerated by using standard plating techniques. Three independent experiments were performed at 10,000 rpm and 0.7 liters/min flow rate. The mean B. subtilis spore recoveries were 71.3 and 56.5% in skim and whole milk, respectively, and those for B. atrophaeus were 55 and 59.3% in skim and whole milk, respectively. In contrast, mean C. sporogenes spore recoveries were 88.2 and 78.6% in skim and whole milk, respectively. The successful use of CFC to concentrate these bacterial spores from 3.7 liters of milk in 10 min shows promise for rapidly concentrating other spores from large volumes of milk.

  20. VIABILITY OF BACILLUS SUBTILIS SPORES IN ROCKET PROPELLANTS.

    PubMed

    GODDING, R M; LYNCH, V H

    1965-01-01

    The sporicidal activity of components used in liquid and solid rocket propellants was tested by use of spores of Bacillus subtilis dried on powdered glass. Liquid propellant ingredients tested were N(2)O(4), monomethylhydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine. N(2)O(4) was immediately sporicidal; the hydrazines were effective within several days. Solid propellants consisted of ammonium perchlorate in combination with epoxy resin (EPON 828), tris-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phosphine oxide, bis-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phenylphosphine oxide, and three modified polybutadiene polymers. There was no indication of appreciable sporicidal activity of these components.

  1. Viability of Bacillus subtilis Spores in Rocket Propellants

    PubMed Central

    Godding, Rogene M.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1965-01-01

    The sporicidal activity of components used in liquid and solid rocket propellants was tested by use of spores of Bacillus subtilis dried on powdered glass. Liquid propellant ingredients tested were N2O4, monomethylhydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine. N2O4 was immediately sporicidal; the hydrazines were effective within several days. Solid propellants consisted of ammonium perchlorate in combination with epoxy resin (EPON 828), tris-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phosphine oxide, bis-1-(2-methyl) aziridinyl phenylphosphine oxide, and three modified polybutadiene polymers. There was no indication of appreciable sporicidal activity of these components. PMID:14264838

  2. Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores Using Rapid Resistive Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    thermal inactivation research. However, the research conducted to support this thesis utilizes the B.a. Sterne strain which is used in livestock vaccines...methodology conducted for this research including hard surface recovery, thermal inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores, and the rapid resistive heating...to 500°C range but again, many of the thermal inactivation studies were conducted in the 350 to 2000°C range. Sample plots will be discussed in

  3. Bacillus subtilis Spores as Vaccine Adjuvants: Further Insights into the Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Renata Damásio; Batista, Milene Tavares; Luiz, Wilson Barros; Cavalcante, Rafael Ciro Marques; Amorim, Jaime Henrique; Bizerra, Raíza Sales Pereira; Martins, Eduardo Gimenes; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores have received growing attention regarding potential biotechnological applications, including the use as probiotics and in vaccine formulations. B. subtilis spores have also been shown to behave as particulate vaccine adjuvants, promoting the increase of antibody responses after co-administration with antigens either admixed or adsorbed on the spore surface. In this study, we further evaluated the immune modulatory properties of B. subtilis spores using a recombinant HIV gag p24 protein as a model antigen. The adjuvant effects of B. subtilis spores were not affected by the genetic background of the mouse lineage and did not induce significant inflammatory or deleterious effects after parenteral administration. Our results demonstrated that co-administration, but not adsorption to the spore surface, enhanced the immunogenicity of that target antigen after subcutaneous administration to BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Spores promoted activation of antigen presenting cells as demonstrated by the upregulation of MHC and CD40 molecules and enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by murine dendritic cells. In addition, in vivo studies indicated a direct role of the innate immunity on the immunomodulatory properties of B. subtilis spores, as demonstrated by the lack of adjuvant effects on MyD88 and TLR2 knockout mouse strains. PMID:24475289

  4. Assessing the Impact of Germination and Sporulation Conditions on the Adhesion of Bacillus Spores to Glass and Stainless Steel by Fluid Dynamic Gauging

    PubMed Central

    Xu Zhou, Ke; Li, Nan; Christie, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The adhesion of spores of 3 Bacillus species with distinctive morphologies to stainless steel and borosilicate glass was studied using the fluid dynamic gauging technique. Marked differences were observed between different species of spores, and also between spores of the same species prepared under different sporulation conditions. Spores of the food‐borne pathogen B. cereus were demonstrated to be capable of withstanding shear stresses greater than 1500 Pa when adhered to stainless steel, in contrast to spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium, which detached in response to lower shear stress. An extended DLVO model was shown to be capable of predicting the relative differences in spore adhesion between spores of different species and different culture conditions, but did not predict absolute values of force of adhesion well. Applying the model to germinating spores showed a significant reduction in adhesion force shortly after triggering germination, indicating a potential strategy to achieve enhanced removal of spores from surfaces in response to shear stress, such as during cleaning‐in‐place procedures. Practical Application Spore‐forming bacteria are a concern to the food industry because they have the potential to cause food‐borne illness and product spoilage, while being strongly adhesive to processing surfaces and resistant to cleaning‐in‐place procedures. This work is of significance to the food processors and manufacturers because it offers insight to the properties of spore adhesion and identifies a potential strategy to facilitate the removal of spores during cleaning procedures. PMID:29125641

  5. NanoSIMS analysis of Bacillus spores for forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P K; Davisson, M L; Velsko, S P

    2010-02-23

    The threat associated with the potential use of radiological, nuclear, chemical and biological materials in terrorist acts has resulted in new fields of forensic science requiring the application of state-of-the-science analytical techniques. Since the anthrax letter attacks in the United States in the fall of 2001, there has been increased interest in physical and chemical characterization of bacterial spores. While molecular methods are powerful tools for identifying genetic differences, other methods may be able to differentiate genetically identical samples based on physical and chemical properties, as well as provide complimentary information, such as methods of production and approximate date ofmore » production. Microanalysis has the potential to contribute significantly to microbial forensics. Bacillus spores are highly structured, consisting of a core, cortex, coat, and in some species, an exosporium. This structure provides a template for constraining elemental abundance differences at the nanometer scale. The primary controls on the distribution of major elements in spores are likely structural and physiological. For example, P and Ca are known to be abundant in the spore core because that is where P-rich nucleic acids and Cadipicolinic acid are located, respectively. Trace elements are known to bind to the spore coat but the controls on these elements are less well understood. Elemental distributions and abundances may be directly related to spore production, purification and stabilization methodologies, which are of particular interest for forensic investigation. To this end, we are developing a high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry method using a Cameca NanoSIMS 50 to study the distribution and abundance of trace elements in bacterial spores. In this presentation we will review and compare methods for preparing and analyzing samples, as well as review results on the distribution and abundance of elements in bacterial spores. We use Nano

  6. The differential effects of heat-shocking on the viability of spores from Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium sporogenes after treatment with peracetic acid- and glutaraldehyde-based disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    March, Jordon K; Pratt, Michael D; Lowe, Chinn-Woan; Cohen, Marissa N; Satterfield, Benjamin A; Schaalje, Bruce; O'Neill, Kim L; Robison, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated (1) the susceptibility of Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 19659), and Clostridium sporogenes (ATCC 3584) spores to commercially available peracetic acid (PAA)- and glutaraldehyde (GA)-based disinfectants, (2) the effects that heat-shocking spores after treatment with these disinfectants has on spore recovery, and (3) the timing of heat-shocking after disinfectant treatment that promotes the optimal recovery of spores deposited on carriers. Suspension tests were used to obtain inactivation kinetics for the disinfectants against three spore types. The effects of heat-shocking spores after disinfectant treatment were also determined. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate 6-log reduction times for each spore type, disinfectant, and heat treatment combination. Reduction times were compared statistically using the delta method. Carrier tests were performed according to AOAC Official Method 966.04 and a modified version that employed immediate heat-shocking after disinfectant treatment. Carrier test results were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. PAA-based disinfectants had significantly shorter 6-log reduction times than the GA-based disinfectant. Heat-shocking B. anthracis spores after PAA treatment resulted in significantly shorter 6-log reduction times. Conversely, heat-shocking B. subtilis spores after PAA treatment resulted in significantly longer 6-log reduction times. Significant interactions were also observed between spore type, disinfectant, and heat treatment combinations. Immediately heat-shocking spore carriers after disinfectant treatment produced greater spore recovery. Sporicidal activities of disinfectants were not consistent across spore species. The effects of heat-shocking spores after disinfectant treatment were dependent on both disinfectant and spore species. Caution must be used when extrapolating sporicidal data of disinfectants from one spore species to another. Heat

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE TO INTENTIONAL DISSEMINATION OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORES IN THE UNITED STATES--2001

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intentional dissemination of Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores at multiple locations in the United States in the Fall of 2001 resulted not only in several deaths and illnesses (including psychological effects), but likely changed lifestyles and attitudes, and increased the ...

  8. Reagent-free and portable detection of Bacillus anthracis spores using a microfluidic incubator and smartphone microscope.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Janine R; Erikson, Rebecca L; Sheen, Allison M; Ozanich, Richard M; Kelly, Ryan T

    2015-09-21

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and can be contracted by humans and herbivorous mammals by inhalation, ingestion, or cutaneous exposure to bacterial spores. Due to its stability and disease potential, B. anthracis is a recognized biothreat agent and robust detection and viability methods are needed to identify spores from unknown samples. Here we report the use of smartphone-based microscopy (SPM) in combination with a simple microfluidic incubation device (MID) to detect 50 to 5000 B. anthracis Sterne spores in 3 to 5 hours. This technique relies on optical monitoring of the conversion of the ∼1 μm spores to the filamentous vegetative cells that range from tens to hundreds of micrometers in length. This distinguishing filament formation is unique to B. anthracis as compared to other members of the Bacillus cereus group. A unique feature of this approach is that the sample integrity is maintained, and the vegetative biomass can be removed from the chip for secondary molecular analysis such as PCR. Compared with existing chip-based and rapid viability PCR methods, this new approach reduces assay time by almost half, and is highly sensitive, specific, and cost effective.

  9. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 with high temperature.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lei; Xu, Zhenzhen; Wang, Yongtao; Zhao, Feng; Hu, Xiaosong; Liao, Xiaojun

    2015-07-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the inactivation of the Bacillus subtilis spores by high pressure CO2 combined with high temperature (HPCD+HT) and to analyze the clumping effect of the spores on their HPCD+HT resistance. The spores of B. subtilis were subjected to heat at 0.1 MPa and HPCD at 6.5-25 MPa, and 82 °C, 86 °C, and 91 °C for 0-120 min. The spores were effectively inactivated by HPCD+HT, but a protective effect on the spores was also found, which was closely correlated to the pressure, temperature and time. The spores treated by HPCD+HT at 6.5 and 10 MPa exhibited a two-stage inactivation curve of shoulder and log-linear regions whereas the spores at 15-25 MPa exhibited a three-stage inactivation curve of shoulder, log-linear and tailing regions, and these curves were well fitted to the Geeraerd model. Approximately 90% of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA) was released after HPCD+HT and the 90% DPA release time depend on the pressure and temperature. Moreover, the spore clumping in suspensions was examined by dynamic light scattering. The particle size of the spore suspensions increased with the increase of pressure, temperature and time, indicating the spore clumping. 0.1% Tween 80 as a surfactant inhibited the spore clumping and increased the inactivation ratio of the spores by HPCD+HT. These results indicated that the spore clumping enhanced the spores' resistance to HPCD+HT and induced a protective effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying experimental surrogates for Bacillus anthracis spores: a review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a proven biological weapon. In order to study this threat, a number of experimental surrogates have been used over the past 70 years. However, not all surrogates are appropriate for B. anthracis, especially when investigating transport, fate and survival. Although B. atrophaeus has been widely used as a B. anthracis surrogate, the two species do not always behave identically in transport and survival models. Therefore, we devised a scheme to identify a more appropriate surrogate for B. anthracis. Our selection criteria included risk of use (pathogenicity), phylogenetic relationship, morphology and comparative survivability when challenged with biocides. Although our knowledge of certain parameters remains incomplete, especially with regards to comparisons of spore longevity under natural conditions, we found that B. thuringiensis provided the best overall fit as a non-pathogenic surrogate for B. anthracis. Thus, we suggest focusing on this surrogate in future experiments of spore fate and transport modelling. PMID:21092338

  11. Synthesis of acid-soluble spore proteins by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, J M; Chambliss, G H

    1982-12-01

    The major acid-soluble spore proteins (ASSPs) of Bacillus subtilis were detected by immunoprecipitation of radioactively labeled in vitro- and in vivo-synthesized proteins. ASSP synthesis in vivo began 2 h after the initiation of sporulation (t2) and reached its maximum rate at t7. This corresponded to the time of synthesis of mRNA that stimulated the maximum rate of ASSP synthesis in vitro. Under the set of conditions used in these experiments, protease synthesis began near t0, alkaline phosphatase synthesis began at about t2, and refractile spores were first observed between t7 and t8. In vivo- and in vitro-synthesized ASSPs comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Their molecular weights were 4,600 (alpha and beta) and 11,000 (gamma). The average half-life of the ASSP messages was 11 min when either rifampin (10 micrograms/ml) or actinomycin D (1 microgram/ml) was used to inhibit RNA synthesis.

  12. Role of YpeB in Cortex Hydrolysis during Germination of Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Bernhards, Casey B.

    2014-01-01

    The infectious agent of the disease anthrax is the spore of Bacillus anthracis. Bacterial spores are extremely resistant to environmental stresses, which greatly hinders spore decontamination efforts. The spore cortex, a thick layer of modified peptidoglycan, contributes to spore dormancy and resistance by maintaining the low water content of the spore core. The cortex is degraded by germination-specific lytic enzymes (GSLEs) during spore germination, rendering the cells vulnerable to common disinfection techniques. This study investigates the relationship between SleB, a GSLE in B. anthracis, and YpeB, a protein necessary for SleB stability and function. The results indicate that ΔsleB and ΔypeB spores exhibit similar germination phenotypes and that the two proteins have a strict codependency for their incorporation into the dormant spore. In the absence of its partner protein, SleB or YpeB is proteolytically degraded soon after expression during sporulation, rather than escaping the developing spore. The three PepSY domains of YpeB were examined for their roles in the interaction with SleB. YpeB truncation mutants illustrate the necessity of a region beyond the first PepSY domain for SleB stability. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of highly conserved residues within the PepSY domains resulted in germination defects corresponding to reduced levels of both SleB and YpeB in the mutant spores. These results identify residues involved in the stability of both proteins and reiterate their codependent relationship. It is hoped that the study of GSLEs and interacting proteins will lead to the use of GSLEs as targets for efficient activation of spore germination and facilitation of spore cleanup. PMID:25022853

  13. Protozoal Digestion of Coat-Defective Bacillus subtilis Spores Produces “Rinds” Composed of Insoluble Coat Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Alicia Monroe; Plomp, Marco; Malkin, Alexander J.; Setlow, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis spore coat is a multilayer, proteinaceous structure that consists of more than 50 proteins. Located on the surface of the spore, the coat provides resistance to potentially toxic molecules as well as to predation by the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. When coat-defective spores are fed to Tetrahymena, the spores are readily digested. However, a residue termed a “rind” that looks like coat material remains. As observed with a phase-contrast microscope, the rinds are spherical or hemispherical structures that appear to be devoid of internal contents. Atomic force microscopy and chemical analyses showed that (i) the rinds are composed of insoluble protein largely derived from both outer and inner spore coat layers, (ii) the amorphous layer of the outer coat is largely responsible for providing spore resistance to protozoal digestion, and (iii) the rinds and intact spores do not contain significant levels of silicon. PMID:18689521

  14. Rope-producing strains of Bacillus spp. from wheat bread and strategy for their control by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Olimpia; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Moschetti, Giancarlo; Greco, Teresa; Villani, Francesco

    2003-04-01

    Two types of white wheat bread (high- and low-type loaves) were investigated for rope spoilage. Thirty of the 56 breads tested developed rope spoilage within 5 days; the high-type loaves were affected by rope spoilage more than the low-type loaves. Sixty-one Bacillus strains were isolated from ropy breads and were characterized on the basis of their phenotypic and genotypic traits. All of the isolates were identified as Bacillus subtilis by biochemical tests, but molecular assays (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR assay, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, and sequencing of the V3 region of 16S ribosomal DNA) revealed greater Bacillus species variety in ropy breads. In fact, besides strains of B. subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus, and isolates of Bacillus clausii and Bacillus firmus were also identified. All of the ropy Bacillus isolates exhibited amylase activity, whereas only 32.4% of these isolates were able to produce ropiness in bread slices after treatment at 96 degrees C for 10 min. Strains of lactic acid bacteria previously isolated from sourdough were first selected for antirope activity on bread slices and then used as starters for bread-making experiments. Prevention of growth of approximately 10(4) rope-producing B. subtilis G1 spores per cm(2) on bread slices for more than 15 days was observed when heat-treated cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum E5 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides A27 were added. Growth of B. subtilis G1 occurred after 7 days in breads started with Saccharomyces cerevisiae T22, L. plantarum E5, and L. mesenteroides A27.

  15. [Suitability of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus spores as test organism bioindicators for detecting superheating of steam].

    PubMed

    Spicher, G; Peters, J

    1997-02-01

    Biological indicators used to test sterilisation procedures for their efficacy consist of a so-called germ carrier to which the microorganisms used as test organisms adhere. In previous papers we demonstrated that carriers made of filter paper on contact with saturated steam show superheating while carriers made of glass fibre fleece as well as wetted filter paper do not. Using spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus as test organisms we have now investigated whether and to what extent carrier superheating affects the characteristic values (t50%) of these biological indicators. The indicators were exposed to saturated steam at 100 degrees C (B. subtilis) or 120 degrees C (B. stearothermophilus) under three different exposure conditions: 1. dry (i.e. conditioned to 45% relative humidity before introduction into the sterilising chamber), freely accessible; 2. dry with a substratum and a cover of filter card-board; 3. wet (moistened with twice distilled water before introduction into the sterilising chamber), freely accessible. For previously selected exposure periods, the incidence of indicators with surviving test organisms was determined. The reaction pattern of bioindicators with spores of B. stearothermophilus was different from that of bioindicators with spores of B. subtilis. For B. subtilis, the incidence of bioindicators exhibiting surviving test organisms depended on the nature of the carries as well as on the exposure conditions. On filter paper carriers, t50% increased in the order "wet, freely accessible", "dry, freely accessible", "dry, between filter card-board". On dry and wetted glass fibre fleece, resistance was approximately the same; when the indicators were sandwiched between layers of filter card-board, t50% increased. For B. stearothermophilus, t50% was largely dependent on the carrier material alone. The values obtained for filter paper were invariably much lower than those for glass fibre fleece. As the results show, using

  16. Bacillus nealsonii sp. nov., isolated from a spacecraft-assembly facility, whose spores are gamma-radiation resistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Kempf, Michael; Chen, Fei; Satomi, Masataka; Nicholson, Wayne; Kern, Roger

    2003-01-01

    One of the spore-formers isolated from a spacecraft-assembly facility, belonging to the genus Bacillus, is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization studies. It is a Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium that produces endospores. The spores of this novel bacterial species exhibited resistance to UV, gamma-radiation, H2O2 and desiccation. The 18S rDNA sequence analysis revealed a clear affiliation between this strain and members of the low G+C Firmicutes. High 16S rDNA sequence similarity values were found with members of the genus Bacillus and this was supported by fatty acid profiles. The 16S rDNA sequence similarity between strain FO-92T and Bacillus benzoevorans DSM 5391T was very high. However, molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in this genus, but DNA-DNA hybridization data support the proposal of FO-92T as Bacillus nealsonii sp. nov. (type strain is FO-92T =ATCC BAAM-519T =DSM 15077T).

  17. Inactivation of Bacillus spores by the supercritical carbon dioxide micro-bubble method.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; Shimoda, M; Tamaya, K; Yonekura, A; Kawano, T; Osajima, Y

    1997-06-01

    Bacillus spores were effectively inactivated by the supercritical (SC) CO2 micro-bubble method. The micro-bubble SC CO2 treatment of B. cereus, B. subtilis, B. megaterium, B. polymyxa, and B. coagulans at 40 degrees C and 30 MPa for 30 min produced greater reduction (about 3 log cycles of reduction) than a similar treatment without a filter. The SC CO2 treatment of B. polymyxa, B. cereus, and B. subtilis spores at 45 degrees C, 50 degrees C, respectively, and 30 MPa for 60 min resulted in a 6-log cycle reduction of survival. The SC CO2 treatment under the foregoing conditions should offer higher efficiency than that of heat treatment at 100 degrees C for 60 min. In addition, the SC CO2 treatment (30 MPa, 60 degrees C, 30 min) of B. polymyxa and B. cereus spores also produced a 6-log cycle reduction.

  18. Conversion of xylan by recyclable spores of Bacillus subtilis displaying thermophilic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mattossovich, Rosanna; Iacono, Roberta; Cangiano, Giuseppina; Cobucci-Ponzano, Beatrice; Isticato, Rachele; Moracci, Marco; Ricca, Ezio

    2017-11-28

    The Bacillus subtilis spore has long been used to display antigens and enzymes. Spore display can be accomplished by a recombinant and a non-recombinant approach, with the latter proved more efficient than the recombinant one. We used the non-recombinant approach to independently adsorb two thermophilic enzymes, GH10-XA, an endo-1,4-β-xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, and GH3-XT, a β-xylosidase (EC 3.2.1.37) from Thermotoga thermarum. These enzymes catalyze, respectively, the endohydrolysis of (1-4)-β-D-xylosidic linkages of xylans and the hydrolysis of (1-4)-β-D-xylans to remove successive D-xylose residues from the non-reducing termini. We report that both purified enzymes were independently adsorbed on purified spores of B. subtilis. The adsorption was tight and both enzymes retained part of their specific activity. When spores displaying either GH10-XA or GH3-XT were mixed together, xylan was hydrolysed more efficiently than by a mixture of the two free, not spore-adsorbed, enzymes. The high total activity of the spore-bound enzymes is most likely due to a stabilization of the enzymes that, upon adsorption on the spore, remained active at the reaction conditions for longer than the free enzymes. Spore-adsorbed enzymes, collected after the two-step reaction and incubated with fresh substrate, were still active and able to continue xylan degradation. The recycling of the mixed spore-bound enzymes allowed a strong increase of xylan degradation. Our results indicate that the two-step degradation of xylans can be accomplished by mixing spores displaying either one of two required enzymes. The two-step process occurs more efficiently than with the two un-adsorbed, free enzymes and adsorbed spores can be reused for at least one other reaction round. The efficiency of the process, the reusability of the adsorbed enzymes, and the well documented robustness of spores of B. subtilis indicate the spore as a suitable platform to display enzymes

  19. Recurrent isolation of hydrogen peroxide-resistant spores of Bacillus pumilus from a spacecraft assembly facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempf, Michael J.; Chen, Fei; Kern, Roger; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2005-01-01

    While the microbial diversity of a spacecraft assembly facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, CA) was being monitored, H2O2-resistant bacterial strains were repeatedly isolated from various surface locations. H2O2 is a possible sterilant for spacecraft hardware because it is a low-temperature process and compatible with various modern-day spacecraft materials, electronics, and components. Both conventional biochemical testing and molecular analyses identified these strains as Bacillus pumilus. This Bacillus species was found in both unclassified (entrance floors, anteroom, and air-lock) and classified (floors, cabinet tops, and air) locations. Both vegetative cells and spores of several B. pumilus isolates were exposed to 5% liquid H2O2 for 60 min. Spores of each strain exhibited higher resistance than their respective vegetative cells to liquid H2O2. Results indicate that the H2O2 resistance observed in both vegetative cells and spores is strain-specific, as certain B. pumilus strains were two to three times more resistant than a standard Bacillus subtilis dosimetry strain. An example of this trend was observed when the type strain of B. pumilus, ATCC 7061, proved sensitive, whereas several environmental strains exhibited varying degrees of resistance, to H2O2. Repeated isolation of H2O2-resistant strains of B. pumilus in a clean-room is a concern because their persistence might potentially compromise life-detection missions, which have very strict cleanliness and sterility requirements for spacecraft hardware.

  20. Characterization of Wet-Heat Inactivation of Single Spores of Bacillus Species by Dual-Trap Raman Spectroscopy and Elastic Light Scattering▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Kong, Lingbo; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2010-01-01

    Dual-trap laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) and elastic light scattering (ELS) were used to investigate dynamic processes during high-temperature treatment of individual spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, and Bacillus subtilis in water. Major conclusions from these studies included the following. (i) After spores of all three species were added to water at 80 to 90°C, the level of the 1:1 complex of Ca2+ and dipicolinic acid (CaDPA; ∼25% of the dry weight of the spore core) in individual spores remained relatively constant during a highly variable lag time (Tlag), and then CaDPA was released within 1 to 2 min. (ii) The Tlag values prior to rapid CaDPA release and thus the times for wet-heat killing of individual spores of all three species were very heterogeneous. (iii) The heterogeneity in kinetics of wet-heat killing of individual spores was not due to differences in the microscopic physical environments during heat treatment. (iv) During the wet-heat treatment of spores of all three species, spore protein denaturation largely but not completely accompanied rapid CaDPA release, as some changes in protein structure preceded rapid CaDPA release. (v) Changes in the ELS from individual spores of all three species were strongly correlated with the release of CaDPA. The ELS intensities of B. cereus and B. megaterium spores decreased gradually and reached minima at T1 when ∼80% of spore CaDPA was released, then increased rapidly until T2 when full CaDPA release was complete, and then remained nearly constant. The ELS intensity of B. subtilis spores showed similar features, although the intensity changed minimally, if at all, prior to T1. (vi) Carotenoids in B. megaterium spores' inner membranes exhibited two changes during heat treatment. First, the carotenoid's two Raman bands at 1,155 and 1,516 cm−1 decreased rapidly to a low value and to zero, respectively, well before Tlag, and then the residual 1,155-cm−1 band disappeared, in parallel

  1. Disinfection methods for spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, B. anthracis, Clostridium tetani, C. botulinum and C. difficile.

    PubMed

    Oie, Shigeharu; Obayashi, Akiko; Yamasaki, Hirofumi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Motohide; Kawamoto, Keiko; Makino, Sou-ichi

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate disinfection methods for environments contaminated with bioterrorism-associated microorganism (Bacillus anthracis), we performed the following experiments. First, the sporicidal effects of sodium hypochlorite on spores of five bacterial species were evaluated. Bacillus atrophaeus was the most resistant to hypochlorite, followed in order by B. anthracis, Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium difficile. Subsequently, using B. atrophaeus spores that were the most resistant to hypochlorite, the sporicidal effects of hypochlorite at lower pH by adding vinegar were evaluated. Hypochlorite containing vinegar had far more marked sporicidal effects than hypochlorite alone. Cleaning with 0.5% (5000 ppm) hypochlorite containing vinegar inactivated B. atrophaeus spores attached to vinyl chloride and plywood plates within 15 s, while that not containing vinegar did not inactivate spores attached to cement or plywood plates even after 1 h. Therefore, the surfaces of cement or plywood plates were covered with gauze soaked in 0.5% hypochlorite containing vinegar, and the sporicidal effects were evaluated. B. atrophaeus spores attached to plywood plates were not inactivated even after 6 h, but those attached to cement plates were inactivated within 5 min. On the other hand, covering the surfaces of plywood plates with gauze soaked in 0.3% peracetic acid and gauze soaked in 2% glutaral inactivated B. atrophaeus spores within 5 min and 6 h, respectively. These results suggest that hypochlorite containing vinegar is effective for disinfecting vinyl chloride, tile, and cement plates contaminated with B. anthracis, and peracetic acid is effective for disinfecting plywood plates contaminated with such microorganism.

  2. Simple, Inexpensive, and Rapid Way to Produce Bacillus subtilis Spores for the Guthrie Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Martha L.; Clark, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Esculin agar has been found to be a simple, inexpensive, rapid, and reliable means to promote production of spores of inhibitor-sensitive clones of Bacillus subtilis strains ATCC 6051 and 6633 for use in the Guthrie bioassay screening tests for genetic metabolic disorders. Images PMID:6790564

  3. The differential effects of heat-shocking on the viability of spores from Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium sporogenes after treatment with peracetic acid- and glutaraldehyde-based disinfectants.

    PubMed

    March, Jordon K; Pratt, Michael D; Lowe, Chinn-Woan; Cohen, Marissa N; Satterfield, Benjamin A; Schaalje, Bruce; O'Neill, Kim L; Robison, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated (1) the susceptibility of Bacillus anthracis (Ames strain), Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 19659), and Clostridium sporogenes (ATCC 3584) spores to commercially available peracetic acid (PAA)- and glutaraldehyde (GA)-based disinfectants, (2) the effects that heat-shocking spores after treatment with these disinfectants has on spore recovery, and (3) the timing of heat-shocking after disinfectant treatment that promotes the optimal recovery of spores deposited on carriers. Suspension tests were used to obtain inactivation kinetics for the disinfectants against three spore types. The effects of heat-shocking spores after disinfectant treatment were also determined. Generalized linear mixed models were used to estimate 6-log reduction times for each spore type, disinfectant, and heat treatment combination. Reduction times were compared statistically using the delta method. Carrier tests were performed according to AOAC Official Method 966.04 and a modified version that employed immediate heat-shocking after disinfectant treatment. Carrier test results were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. PAA-based disinfectants had significantly shorter 6-log reduction times than the GA-based disinfectant. Heat-shocking B. anthracis spores after PAA treatment resulted in significantly shorter 6-log reduction times. Conversely, heat-shocking B. subtilis spores after PAA treatment resulted in significantly longer 6-log reduction times. Significant interactions were also observed between spore type, disinfectant, and heat treatment combinations. Immediately heat-shocking spore carriers after disinfectant treatment produced greater spore recovery. Sporicidal activities of disinfectants were not consistent across spore species. The effects of heat-shocking spores after disinfectant treatment were dependent on both disinfectant and spore species. Caution must be used when extrapolating sporicidal data of disinfectants from one spore species to another. Heat

  4. SporeWeb: an interactive journey through the complete sporulation cycle of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Eijlander, Robyn T; de Jong, Anne; Krawczyk, Antonina O; Holsappel, Siger; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial spores are a continuous problem for both food-based and health-related industries. Decades of scientific research dedicated towards understanding molecular and gene regulatory aspects of sporulation, spore germination and spore properties have resulted in a wealth of data and information. To facilitate obtaining a complete overview as well as new insights concerning this complex and tightly regulated process, we have developed a database-driven knowledge platform called SporeWeb (http://sporeweb.molgenrug.nl) that focuses on gene regulatory networks during sporulation in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Dynamic features allow the user to navigate through all stages of sporulation with review-like descriptions, schematic overviews on transcriptional regulation and detailed information on all regulators and the genes under their control. The Web site supports data acquisition on sporulation genes and their expression, regulon network interactions and direct links to other knowledge platforms or relevant literature. The information found on SporeWeb (including figures and tables) can and will be updated as new information becomes available in the literature. In this way, SporeWeb offers a novel, convenient and timely reference, an information source and a data acquisition tool that will aid in the general understanding of the dynamics of the complete sporulation cycle.

  5. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis spores with sodium hypochlorite, sodium dichloroisocyanurate and chloramine-T.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, S F; Arthur, M

    1992-02-01

    Solutions of chlorine-releasing agents (CRAs) show varying activity against Bacillus subtilis spores; sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) shows higher activity than sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) which is more active than chloramine-T. Investigations with coat- and cortex-extracted spores indicate that resistance to CRAs depends not only on the spore coat but also the cortex. Whereas extraction of alkali-soluble coat protein increased sensitivity to NaOCl and NaDCC, degradation of coat and cortex material was required to achieve significant activity with chloramine-T. NaOCl (in the presence and absence of NaOH) and NaDCC (in the presence of NaOH only) produced degradation of spore coat and cortex material which may be related to their rapid sporicidal action at low concentrations under these conditions. By contrast, chloramine-T produced no degradation of cortex peptidoglycan and was only effective against normal and alkali-treated spores at high concentrations, requiring extraction of peptidoglycan with urea/dithiothreitol/sodium lauryl sulphate (UDS) or UDS/lysozyme to achieve significant activity at low concentrations. Results suggest that the sporicidal action of CRAs is associated with spore coat and cortex degradation causing rehydration of the protoplast allowing diffusion to the site of action on the underlying protoplast.

  6. The coat morphogenetic protein SpoVID is necessary for spore encasement in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Katherine H; Isidro, Anabela L; Domingues, Lia; Eskandarian, Haig A; McKenney, Peter T; Drew, Kevin; Grabowski, Paul; Chua, Ming-Hsiu; Barry, Samantha N; Guan, Michelle; Bonneau, Richard; Henriques, Adriano O; Eichenberger, Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Endospores formed by Bacillus subtilis are encased in a tough protein shell known as the coat, which consists of at least 70 different proteins. We investigated the process of spore coat morphogenesis using a library of 40 coat proteins fused to green fluorescent protein and demonstrate that two successive steps can be distinguished in coat assembly. The first step, initial localization of proteins to the spore surface, is dependent on the coat morphogenetic proteins SpoIVA and SpoVM. The second step, spore encasement, requires a third protein, SpoVID. We show that in spoVID mutant cells, most coat proteins assembled into a cap at one side of the developing spore but failed to migrate around and encase it. We also found that SpoIVA directly interacts with SpoVID. A domain analysis revealed that the N-terminus of SpoVID is required for encasement and is a structural homologue of a virion protein, whereas the C-terminus is necessary for the interaction with SpoIVA. Thus, SpoVM, SpoIVA and SpoVID are recruited to the spore surface in a concerted manner and form a tripartite machine that drives coat formation and spore encasement.

  7. The coat morphogenetic protein SpoVID is necessary for spore encasement in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Katherine H.; Isidro, Anabela L.; Domingues, Lia; Eskandarian, Haig A.; McKenney, Peter T.; Drew, Kevin; Grabowski, Paul; Chua, Ming-Hsiu; Barry, Samantha N.; Guan, Michelle; Bonneau, Richard; Henriques, Adriano O.; Eichenberger, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Endospores formed by Bacillus subtilis are encased in a tough protein shell known as the coat, which consists of at least 70 different proteins. We investigated the process of spore coat morphogenesis using a library of 40 coat proteins fused to GFP and demonstrate that two successive steps can be distinguished in coat assembly. The first step, initial localization of proteins to the spore surface, is dependent on the coat morphogenetic proteins SpoIVA and SpoVM. The second step, spore encasement, requires a third protein, SpoVID. We show that in spoVID mutant cells, most coat proteins assembled into a cap at one side of the developing spore but failed to migrate around and encase it. We also found that SpoIVA directly interacts with SpoVID. A domain analysis revealed that the N-terminus of SpoVID is required for encasement and is a structural homolog of a virion protein, whereas the C-terminus is necessary for the interaction with SpoIVA. Thus, SpoVM, SpoIVA and SpoVID are recruited to the spore surface in a concerted manner and form a tripartite machine that drives coat formation and spore encasement. PMID:19775244

  8. The sps Gene Products Affect the Germination, Hydrophobicity, and Protein Adsorption of Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Cangiano, Giuseppina; Sirec, Teja; Panarella, Cristina; Isticato, Rachele; Baccigalupi, Loredana; De Felice, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    The multilayered surface of the Bacillus subtilis spore is composed of proteins and glycans. While over 70 different proteins have been identified as surface components, carbohydrates associated with the spore surface have not been characterized in detail yet. Bioinformatic data suggest that the 11 products of the sps operon are involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides present on the spore surface, but an experimental validation is available only for the four distal genes of the operon. Here, we report a transcriptional analysis of the sps operon and a functional study performed by constructing and analyzing two null mutants lacking either all or only the promoter-proximal gene of the operon. Our results show that both sps mutant spores apparently have normal coat and crust but have a small germination defect and are more hydrophobic than wild-type spores. We also show that spores lacking all Sps proteins are highly adhesive and form extensive clumps. In addition, sps mutant spores have an increased efficiency in adsorbing a heterologous enzyme, suggesting that hydrophobic force is a major determinant of spore adsorption and indicating that a deep understanding of the surface properties of the spore is essential for its full development as a surface display platform. PMID:25239894

  9. Spore coat protein synthesis in cell-free systems from sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Munoz, L E; Sadaie, Y; Doi, R H

    1978-09-01

    Cell-free systems for protein synthesis were prepared from Bacillus subtilis 168 cells at several stages of sporulation. Immunological methods were used to determine whether spore coat protein could be synthesized in the cell-free systems prepared from sporulating cells. Spore coat protein synthesis first occurred in extracts from stage t2 cells. The proportion of spore coat protein to total proteins synthesized in the cell-free systems was 2.4 and 3.9% at stages t2 and t4, respectively. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis patterns of immunoprecipitates from the cell-free systems showed the complete synthesis of an apparent spore coat protein precursor (molecular weight, 25,000). A polypeptide of this weight was previously identified in studies in vivo (L.E. Munoz, Y. Sadaie, and R.H. Doi, J. Biol. Chem., in press). The synthesis in vitro of polysome-associated nascent spore coat polypeptides with varying molecular weights up to 23,000 was also detected. These results indicate that the spore coat protein may be synthesized as a precursor protein. The removal of proteases in the crude extracts by treatment with hemoglobin-Sepharose affinity techniques may be preventing the conversion of the large 25,000-dalton precursor to the 12,500-dalton mature spore coat protein.

  10. Spore prevalence and toxigenicity of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis isolates from U.S. retail spices.

    PubMed

    Hariram, Upasana; Labbé, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    Recent incidents of foodborne illness associated with spices as the vehicle of transmission prompted this examination of U.S. retail spices with regard to Bacillus cereus. This study focused on the levels of aerobic-mesophilic spore-forming bacteria and B cereus spores associated with 247 retail spices purchased from five states in the United States. Samples contained a wide range of aerobic-mesophilic bacterial spore counts (< 200 to 8.3 × 10(7) CFU/g), with 19.1% of samples at levels above 10(5) CFU/g. For examples, paprika, allspice, peppercorns, and mixed spices had high levels of aerobic spores (> 10(7) CFU/g). Using a novel chromogenic agar, B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores were isolated from 77 (31%) and 11 (4%) samples, respectively. Levels of B. cereus were <3 to 1,600 MPN/g. Eighty-eight percent of B. cereus isolates and 91% of B. thuringiensis isolates possessed at least one type of enterotoxin gene: HBL (hemolysin BL) or nonhemolytic enterotoxin (NHE). None of the 88 isolates obtained in this study possessed the emetic toxin gene (ces). Using commercially available immunological toxin detection kits, the toxigenicity of the isolates was confirmed. The NHE enterotoxin was expressed in 98% of B. cereus and 91% of B. thuringiensis isolates that possessed the responsible gene. HBL enterotoxin was detected in 87% of B. cereus and 100% of B. thuringiensis PCR-positive isolates. Fifty-two percent of B. cereus and 54% of B. thuringiensis isolates produced both enterotoxins. Ninety-seven percent of B. cereus isolates grew at 12°C, although only two isolates grew well at 9°C. The ability of these spice isolates to form spores, produce diarrheal toxins, and grow at moderately abusive temperatures makes retail spices an important potential vehicle for foodborne illness caused by B. cereus strains, in particular those that produce diarrheal toxins.

  11. Most Probable Number Rapid Viability PCR Method to Detect Viable Spores of Bacillus anthracis in Swab Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, S E; Kane, S R; Murphy, G A

    2008-05-30

    This note presents a comparison of Most-Probable-Number Rapid Viability (MPN-RV) PCR and traditional culture methods for the quantification of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores in macrofoam swabs generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for a multi-center validation study aimed at testing environmental swab processing methods for recovery, detection, and quantification of viable B. anthracis spores from surfaces. Results show that spore numbers provided by the MPN RV-PCR method were in statistical agreement with the CDC conventional culture method for all three levels of spores tested (10{sup 4}, 10{sup 2}, and 10 spores) even in the presence ofmore » dirt. In addition to detecting low levels of spores in environmental conditions, the MPN RV-PCR method is specific, and compatible with automated high-throughput sample processing and analysis protocols.« less

  12. Monitoring the Wet-Heat Inactivation Dynamics of Single Spores of Bacillus Species by Using Raman Tweezers, Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy, and Nucleic Acid Dye Fluorescence Microscopy▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Kong, Lingbo; Wang, Guiwen; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic processes during wet-heat treatment of individual spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, and Bacillus subtilis at 80 to 90°C were investigated using dual-trap Raman spectroscopy, differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, and nucleic acid stain (SYTO 16) fluorescence microscopy. During spore wet-heat treatment, while the spores' 1:1 chelate of Ca2+ with dipicolinic acid (CaDPA) was released rapidly at a highly variable time Tlag, the levels of spore nucleic acids remained nearly unchanged, and the Tlag times for individual spores from the same preparation were increased somewhat as spore levels of CaDPA increased. The brightness of the spores' DIC image decreased by ∼50% in parallel with CaDPA release, and there was no spore cortex hydrolysis observed. The lateral diameters of the spores' DIC image and SYTO 16 fluorescence image also decreased in parallel with CaDPA release. The SYTO 16 fluorescence intensity began to increase during wet-heat treatment at a time before Tlag and reached maximum at a time slightly later than Trelease. However, the fluorescence intensities of wet-heat-inactivated spores were ∼15-fold lower than those of nutrient-germinated spores, and this low SYTO 16 fluorescence intensity may be due in part to the low permeability of the dormant spores' inner membranes to SYTO 16 and in part to nucleic acid denaturation during the wet-heat treatment. PMID:21602365

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Spore-Forming Probiotic Strain Bacillus coagulans Unique IS-2

    PubMed Central

    Upadrasta, Aditya; Pitta, Swetha

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans Unique IS-2 is a potential spore-forming probiotic that is commercially available on the market. The draft genome sequence presented here provides deep insight into the beneficial features of this strain for its safe use as a probiotic for various human and animal health applications. PMID:27103709

  14. Multigeneration Cross Contamination of Mail with Bacillus Species Spores by Tumbling ▿

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Jason; Clark, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Martinez, Kenneth; Gardner, Warren; Shadomy, Sean; Hornsby-Myers, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, envelopes loaded with Bacillus anthracis spores were mailed to Senators Daschle and Leahy as well as to the New York Post and NBC News buildings. Additional letters may have been mailed to other news agencies because there was confirmed anthrax infection of employees at these locations. These events heightened the awareness of the lack of understanding of the mechanism(s) by which objects contaminated with a biological agent might spread disease. This understanding is crucial for the estimation of the potential for exposure to ensure the appropriate response in the event of future attacks. In this study, equipment to simulate interactions between envelopes and procedures to analyze the spread of spores from a “payload” envelope (i.e., loaded internally with a powdered spore preparation) onto neighboring envelopes were developed. Another process to determine whether an aerosol could be generated by opening contaminated envelopes was developed. Subsequent generations of contaminated envelopes originating from a single payload envelope showed a consistent two-log decrease in the number of spores transferred from one generation to the next. Opening a tertiary contaminated envelope resulted in an aerosol containing 103 B. anthracis spores. We developed a procedure for sampling contaminated letters by a nondestructive method aimed at providing information useful for consequence management while preserving the integrity of objects contaminated during the incident and preserving evidence for law enforcement agencies. PMID:20511424

  15. Rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powder samples by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Dybwad, Marius; van der Laaken, Anton L; Blatny, Janet Martha; Paauw, Armand

    2013-09-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powders is important to mitigate the safety risks and economic burdens associated with such incidents. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a rapid and reliable laboratory-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis method for identifying B. anthracis spores in suspicious powder samples. A reference library containing 22 different Bacillus sp. strains or hoax materials was constructed and coupled with a novel classification algorithm and standardized processing protocol for various powder samples. The method's limit of B. anthracis detection was determined to be 2.5 × 10(6) spores, equivalent to a 55-μg sample size of the crudest B. anthracis-containing powder discovered during the 2001 Amerithrax incidents. The end-to-end analysis method was able to successfully discriminate among samples containing B. anthracis spores, closely related Bacillus sp. spores, and commonly encountered hoax materials. No false-positive or -negative classifications of B. anthracis spores were observed, even when the analysis method was challenged with a wide range of other bacterial agents. The robustness of the method was demonstrated by analyzing samples (i) at an external facility using a different MALDI-TOF MS instrument, (ii) using an untrained operator, and (iii) using mixtures of Bacillus sp. spores and hoax materials. Taken together, the observed performance of the analysis method developed demonstrates its potential applicability as a rapid, specific, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective laboratory-based analysis tool for resolving incidents involving suspicious powders in less than 30 min.

  16. Rapid Identification of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Suspicious Powder Samples by Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    PubMed Central

    van der Laaken, Anton L.; Blatny, Janet Martha; Paauw, Armand

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable identification of Bacillus anthracis spores in suspicious powders is important to mitigate the safety risks and economic burdens associated with such incidents. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a rapid and reliable laboratory-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis method for identifying B. anthracis spores in suspicious powder samples. A reference library containing 22 different Bacillus sp. strains or hoax materials was constructed and coupled with a novel classification algorithm and standardized processing protocol for various powder samples. The method's limit of B. anthracis detection was determined to be 2.5 × 106 spores, equivalent to a 55-μg sample size of the crudest B. anthracis-containing powder discovered during the 2001 Amerithrax incidents. The end-to-end analysis method was able to successfully discriminate among samples containing B. anthracis spores, closely related Bacillus sp. spores, and commonly encountered hoax materials. No false-positive or -negative classifications of B. anthracis spores were observed, even when the analysis method was challenged with a wide range of other bacterial agents. The robustness of the method was demonstrated by analyzing samples (i) at an external facility using a different MALDI-TOF MS instrument, (ii) using an untrained operator, and (iii) using mixtures of Bacillus sp. spores and hoax materials. Taken together, the observed performance of the analysis method developed demonstrates its potential applicability as a rapid, specific, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective laboratory-based analysis tool for resolving incidents involving suspicious powders in less than 30 min. PMID:23811517

  17. The immunological characteristics and probiotic function of recombinant Bacillus subtilis spore expressing Clonorchis sinensis cysteine protease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zeli; Shang, Mei; Chen, Tingjin; Ren, Pengli; Sun, Hengchang; Qu, Hongling; Lin, Zhipeng; Zhou, Lina; Yu, Jinyun; Jiang, Hongye; Zhou, Xinyi; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Xu, Jin; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-12-19

    Clonorchiasis, a food-borne zoonosis, is caused by Clonorchis sinensis. The intestinal tract and bile ducts are crucial places for C. sinensis metacercariae to develop into adult worms. The endospore of Bacillus subtilis is an ideal oral immunization vehicle for delivery of heterologous antigens to intestine. Cysteine protease of C. sinensis (CsCP) is an endogenous key component in the excystment of metacercariae and other physiological or pathological processes. We constructed a fusion gene of CotC (a coat protein)-CsCP and obtained B. subtilis spores with recombinant plasmid of pEB03-CotC-CsCP (B.s-CotC-CsCP). CotC-CsCP expressed on spores' surface was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Immunological characteristics of recombinant spore coat protein were evaluated in a mouse model. The levels of CsCP-specific antibodies were detected by ELISA. Effects of recombinant spores on mouse intestine were evaluated by histological staining. The activities of biochemical enzymes in serum were assayed by microplate. Liver sections of infected mice were evaluated by Ishak score after Masson's trichrome. The B.s-CotC-CsCP spores displayed CsCP on their coat. Specific IgG and isotypes were significantly induced by coat proteins of B.s-CotC-CsCP spores after subcutaneous immunization. IgA levels in intestinal mucus and bile of B.s-CotC-CsCP orally treated mice significantly increased. Additionally, more IgA-secreting cells were observed in enteraden and lamina propria regions of the mouse jejunum, and an increased amount of acidic mucins in intestines were also observed. There were no significant differences in enzyme levels of serum among groups. No inflammatory injury was observed in the intestinal tissues of each group. The degree of liver fibrosis was significantly reduced after oral immunization with B.s-CotC-CsCP spores. Bacillus subtilis spores maintained the original excellent immunogenicity of CsCP expressed on their surface. Both local and systemic

  18. Pilot-scale crossflow-microfiltration and pasturization to remove spores of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) from milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    HTST pasteurization of milk is generally ineffective against spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis (BA) but is lethal to its vegetative cells. Crossflow microfiltration (MF), using ceramic membranes with a pore diameter of 1.4 um, has been shown to physically remove somatic cells, vegeta...

  19. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis spore inactivation by and resistance to supercritical CO2 plus peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Blatt, K M S; Fey, J P; Setlow, P

    2016-01-01

    Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2 -PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2 -PAA are truly dead. Spores of wild-type B. subtilis and isogenic mutants lacking spore protective proteins were treated with scCO2 -PAA in liquid or dry at 35°C. Wild-type wet spores (aqueous suspension) were more susceptible than dry spores. Treated spores were examined for viability (and were truly dead), dipicolinic acid (DPA), mutations, permeability to nucleic acid stains, germination under different conditions, energy metabolism and outgrowth. ScCO2 -PAA-inactivated spores retained DPA, and survivors had no notable DNA damage. However, DPA was released from inactivated spores at a normally innocuous temperature (85°C), and colony formation from treated spores was salt sensitive. The inactivated spores germinated but did not outgrow, and these germinated spores had altered plasma membrane permeability and defective energy metabolism. Wet or dry coat-defective spores had increased scCO2 -PAA sensitivity, and dry spores but not wet spores lacking DNA protective proteins were more scCO2 -PAA sensitive. These findings suggest that scCO2 -PAA inactivates spores by damaging spores' inner membrane. The spore coat provided scCO2 -PAA resistance for both wet and dry spores. DNA protective proteins provided scCO2 -PAA resistance only for dry spores. These results provide information on mechanisms of spore inactivation of and resistance to scCO2 -PAA, an agent with increasing use in sterilization applications. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Bacillus subtilis spore survival and expression of germination-induced bioluminescence after prolonged incubation under simulated Mars atmospheric pressure and composition: implications for planetary protection and lithopanspermia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial endospores in the genus Bacillus are considered good models for studying interplanetary transfer of microbes by natural or human processes. Although spore survival during transfer itself has been the subject of considerable study, the fate of spores in extraterrestrial environments has received less attention. In this report we subjected spores of a strain of Bacillus subtilis, containing luciferase resulting from expression of an sspB-luxAB gene fusion, to simulated martian atmospheric pressure (7-18 mbar) and composition (100% CO(2)) for up to 19 days in a Mars simulation chamber. We report here that survival was similar between spores exposed to Earth conditions and spores exposed up to 19 days to simulated martian conditions. However, germination-induced bioluminescence was lower in spores exposed to simulated martian atmosphere, which suggests sublethal impairment of some endogenous spore germination processes.

  1. Two distinct groups within the Bacillus subtilis group display significantly different spore heat resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Erwin M; Zwietering, Marcel H; Kuipers, Oscar P; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J

    2015-02-01

    The survival of bacterial spores after heat treatment and the subsequent germination and outgrowth in a food product can lead to spoilage of the food product and economical losses. Prediction of time-temperature conditions that lead to sufficient inactivation requires access to detailed spore thermal inactivation kinetics of relevant model strains. In this study, the thermal inactivation kinetics of spores of fourteen strains belonging to the Bacillus subtilis group were determined in detail, using both batch heating in capillary tubes and continuous flow heating in a micro heater. The inactivation data were fitted using a log linear model. Based on the spore heat resistance data, two distinct groups (p < 0.001) within the B. subtilis group could be identified. One group of strains had spores with an average D120 °C of 0.33 s, while the spores of the other group displayed significantly higher heat resistances, with an average D120 °C of 45.7 s. When comparing spore inactivation data obtained using batch- and continuous flow heating, the z-values were significantly different, hence extrapolation from one system to the other was not justified. This study clearly shows that heat resistances of spores from different strains in the B. subtilis group can vary greatly. Strains can be separated into two groups, to which different spore heat inactivation kinetics apply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Fe(VI) (FeO4(2-)) and ozone in inactivating Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Makky, Essam A; Park, Gui-Su; Choi, Ik-Won; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Hyunook

    2011-05-01

    The protozoan parasites such as Cryptosporidiumparvum and Giardialamblia have been recognized as a frequent cause of recent waterborne disease outbreaks because of their strong resistance against chlorine disinfection. In this study, ozone and Fe(VI) (i.e., FeO(4)(2-)) were compared in terms of inactivation efficiency for Bacillus subtilis spores which are commonly utilized as an indicator of protozoan pathogens. Both oxidants highly depended on water pH and temperature in the spore inactivation. Since redox potential of Fe(VI) is almost the same as that of ozone, spore inactivation efficiency of Fe(VI) was expected to be similar with that of ozone. However, it was found that ozone was definitely superior over Fe(VI): at pH 7 and 20°C, ozone with the product of concentration×contact time (C¯T) of 10mgL(-1)min inactivate the spores more than 99.9% within 10min, while Fe(VI) with C¯T of 30mgL(-1) min could inactivate 90% spores. The large difference between ozone and Fe(VI) in spore inactivation was attributed mainly to Fe(III) produced from Fe(VI) decomposition at the spore coat layer which might coagulate spores and make it difficult for free Fe(VI) to attack live spores. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of vacuum filter sock surface sample collection method for Bacillus spores from porous and non-porous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gary S; Betty, Rita G; Brockmann, John E; Lucero, Daniel A; Souza, Caroline A; Walsh, Kathryn S; Boucher, Raymond M; Tezak, Matthew S; Wilson, Mollye C

    2007-07-01

    Vacuum filter socks were evaluated for recovery efficiency of powdered Bacillus atrophaeus spores from two non-porous surfaces, stainless steel and painted wallboard and two porous surfaces, carpet and bare concrete. Two surface coupons were positioned side-by-side and seeded with aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores. One of the surfaces, a stainless steel reference coupon, was sized to fit into a sample vial for direct spore removal, while the other surface, a sample surface coupon, was sized for a vacuum collection application. Deposited spore material was directly removed from the reference coupon surface and cultured for enumeration of colony forming units (CFU), while deposited spore material was collected from the sample coupon using the vacuum filter sock method, extracted by sonication and cultured for enumeration. Recovery efficiency, which is a measure of overall transfer effectiveness from the surface to culture, was calculated as the number of CFU enumerated from the filter sock sample per unit area relative to the number of CFU enumerated from the co-located reference coupon per unit area. The observed mean filter sock recovery efficiency from stainless steel was 0.29 (SD = 0.14, n = 36), from painted wallboard was 0.25 (SD = 0.15, n = 36), from carpet was 0.28 (SD = 0.13, n = 40) and from bare concrete was 0.19 (SD = 0.14, n = 44). Vacuum filter sock recovery quantitative limits of detection were estimated at 105 CFU m(-2) from stainless steel and carpet, 120 CFU m(-2) from painted wallboard and 160 CFU m(-2) from bare concrete. The method recovery efficiency and limits of detection established in this work provide useful guidance for the planning of incident response environmental sampling for biological agents such as Bacillus anthracis.

  4. Mechanism of Bacillus subtilis Spore Inactivation by and Resistance to Supercritical CO2 plus Peracetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, Barbara; Korza, George; Blatt, Kelly M.S.; Fey, Julien P.; Setlow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aims Determine how supercritical CO2 (scCO2) plus peracetic acid (PAA) inactivates Bacillus subtilis spores, factors important in spore resistance to scCO2-PAA, and if spores inactivated by scCO2-PAA are truly dead. Methods and Results Spores of wild-type B. subtilis and isogenic mutants lacking spore protective proteins were treated with scCO2-PAA in liquid or dry at 35°C. Wild-type wet spores (aqueous suspension) were more susceptible than dry spores. Treated spores were examined for viability (and were truly dead), dipicolinic acid (DPA), mutations, permeability to nucleic acid stains, germination under different conditions, energy metabolism and outgrowth. ScCO2-PAA-inactivated spores retained DPA, and survivors had no notable DNA damage. However, DPA was released from inactivated spores at a normally innocuous temperature (85°C), and colony formation from treated spores was salt sensitive. The inactivated spores germinated but did not outgrow, and these germinated spores had altered plasma membrane permeability and defective energy metabolism. Wet or dry coat-defective spores had increased scCO2-PAA sensitivity, and dry spores but not wet spores lacking DNA protective proteins were more scCO2-PAA sensitive. Conclusions These findings suggest that scCO2-PAA inactivates spores by damaging spores’ inner membrane. The spore coat provided scCO2-PAA resistance for both wet and dry spores. DNA protective proteins provided scCO2-PAA resistance only for dry spores. Significance and Impact of Study These results provide information on mechanisms of spore inactivation of and resistance to scCO2-PAA, an agent with increasing use in sterilization applications. PMID:26535794

  5. 40 CFR 180.1011 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authentic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner conforming to the morphological and biochemical... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection or injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1011 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authentic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner conforming to the morphological and biochemical... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection or injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1011 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authentic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner conforming to the morphological and biochemical... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection or injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1011 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authentic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner conforming to the morphological and biochemical... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection or injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  9. Influence of food matrix on outgrowth heterogeneity of heat damaged Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; den Besten, Heidy M W; Sha, Na; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2015-05-18

    Spoilage of heat treated foods can be caused by the presence of surviving spore-formers. It is virtually impossible to prevent contamination at the primary production level as spores are ubiquitous present in the environment and can contaminate raw products. As a result spore inactivation treatments are widely used by food producing industries to reduce the microbial spore loads. However consumers prefer mildly processed products that have less impact on its quality and this trend steers industry towards milder preservation treatments. Such treatments may result in damaged instead of inactivated spores, and these spores may germinate, repair, and grow out, possibly leading to quality and safety issues. The ability to repair and grow out is influenced by the properties of the food matrix. In the current communication we studied the outgrowth from heat damaged Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores on Anopore membrane, which allowed following outgrowth heterogeneity of individual spores on broccoli and rice-based media as well as standard and mildly acidified (pH 5.5) meat-based BHI. Rice, broccoli and BHI pH 5.5 media resulted in delayed outgrowth from untreated spores, and increased heterogeneity compared to BHI pH 7.4, with the most pronounced effect in rice media. Exposure to wet heat for 1 min at 95 °C caused 2 log inactivation and approximately 95% of the spores in the surviving fraction were damaged resulting in substantial delay in outgrowth based on the time required to reach a maximum microcolony size of 256 cells. The delay was most pronounced for heat-treated spores on broccoli medium followed by spores on rice media (both untreated and treated). Interestingly, the increase in outgrowth heterogeneity of heat treated spores on BHI pH 7.4 was more pronounced than on rice, broccoli and BHI pH 5.5 conceivably reflecting that conditions in BHI pH 7.4 better support spore damage repair. This study compares the effects of three main factors, namely heat treatment, p

  10. Two complementary approaches to quantify variability in heat resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Berendsen, Erwin M; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; Straatsma, Han; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2017-07-17

    Realistic prediction of microbial inactivation in food requires quantitative information on variability introduced by the microorganisms. Bacillus subtilis forms heat resistant spores and in this study the impact of strain variability on spore heat resistance was quantified using 20 strains. In addition, experimental variability was quantified by using technical replicates per heat treatment experiment, and reproduction variability was quantified by using two biologically independent spore crops for each strain that were heat treated on different days. The fourth-decimal reduction times and z-values were estimated by a one-step and two-step model fitting procedure. Grouping of the 20 B. subtilis strains into two statistically distinguishable groups could be confirmed based on their spore heat resistance. The reproduction variability was higher than experimental variability, but both variabilities were much lower than strain variability. The model fitting approach did not significantly affect the quantification of variability. Remarkably, when strain variability in spore heat resistance was quantified using only the strains producing low-level heat resistant spores, then this strain variability was comparable with the previously reported strain variability in heat resistance of vegetative cells of Listeria monocytogenes, although in a totally other temperature range. Strains that produced spores with high-level heat resistance showed similar temperature range for growth as strains that produced low-level heat resistance. Strain variability affected heat resistance of spores most, and therefore integration of this variability factor in modelling of spore heat resistance will make predictions more realistic. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Test method development to evaluate hot, humid air decontamination of materials contaminated with Bacillus anthracis ∆Sterne and B. thuringiensis Al Hakam spores.

    PubMed

    Buhr, T L; Young, A A; Minter, Z A; Wells, C M; McPherson, D C; Hooban, C L; Johnson, C A; Prokop, E J; Crigler, J R

    2012-11-01

    To develop test methods and evaluate the survival of Bacillus anthracis ∆Sterne and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam spores after exposure to hot, humid air. Spores (>7 logs) of both strains were dried on six different test materials. Response surface methodology was employed to identify the limits of spore survival at optimal test combinations of temperature (60, 68, 77°C), relative humidity (60, 75, 90%) and time (1, 4, 7 days). No spores survived the harshest test run (77°C, 90% r.h., 7 days), while > 6·5 logs of spores survived the mildest test run (60°C, 60% r.h., 1 day). Spores of both strains inoculated on nylon webbing and polypropylene had greater survival rates at 68°C, 75% r.h., 4 days than spores on other materials. Electron microscopy showed no obvious physical damage to spores using hot, humid air, which contrasted with pH-adjusted bleach decontamination. Test methods were developed to show that hot, humid air effectively inactivates B. anthracis ∆Sterne and B. thuringiensis Al Hakam spores with similar kinetics. Hot, humid air is a potential alternative to conventional chemical decontamination. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Processing protocol for soil samples potentially contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores [HS7.52.02 - 514

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvestri, Erin E.; Griffin, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes the processing steps for 45 g and 9 g soil samples potentially contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. The protocol is designed to separate and concentrate the spores from bulk soil down to a pellet that can be used for further analysis. Soil extraction solution and mechanical shaking are used to disrupt soil particle aggregates and to aid in the separation of spores from soil particles. Soil samples are washed twice with soil extraction solution to maximize recovery. Differential centrifugation is used to separate spores from the majority of the soil material. The 45 g protocol has been demonstrated by two laboratories using both loamy and sandy soil types. There were no significant differences overall between the two laboratories for either soil type, suggesting that the processing protocol would be robust enough to use at multiple laboratories while achieving comparable recoveries. The 45 g protocol has demonstrated a matrix limit of detection at 14 spores/gram of soil for loamy and sandy soils.

  13. Fluorimetric Detection of a Bacillus stearothermophilus Spore-Bound Enzyme, α-d-Glucosidase, for Rapid Indication of Flash Sterilization Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vesley, Donald; Langholz, Ann C.; Rohlfing, Stephen R.; Foltz, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A biological indicator based on fluorimetric detection within 60 min of a Bacillus stearothermophilus spore-bound enzyme, α-d-glucosidase, has been developed. Results indicate that the enzyme survived slightly longer than spores observed after 24 h of incubation. The new system shows promise for evaluating flash sterilization cycles within 60 min compared with conventional 24-h systems. PMID:16348654

  14. Influence of Spore Moisture Content on the Dry-Heat Resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger

    PubMed Central

    Angelotti, Robert; Maryanski, James H.; Butler, Thomas F.; Peeler, James T.; Campbell, Jeptha E.

    1968-01-01

    The dry-heat resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores located in or on various materials was determined as D and z values in the range of 105 through 160 C. The systems tested included spores located on steel and paper strips, spores located between stainless-steel washers mated together under 150 inch-lb and 12 inch-lb of torque, and spores encapsulated in methylmethacrylate and epoxy plastics. D values for a given temperature varied with the test system. High D values were observed for the systems in which spores were encapsulated or under heavy torque, whereas lower D values were observed for the steel and paper strip systems and the lightly torqued system. Similar z values were obtained for the plastic and steel strip systems (zD = 21 C), but an unusually low z for spores on paper (zD = 12.9 C) and an unusually high z for spores on steel washers mated at 150 inch-lb of torque (zD = 32 C) were observed. The effect of spore moisture content on the D value of spores encapsulated in water-impermeable plastic was determined, and maximal resistance was observed for spores with a water activity (aw) of 0.2 to 0.4. Significantly decreased D values were observed for spores with moisture contents below aw 0.2 or above aw 0.4. The data indicate that the important factors to be considered when measuring the dry heat resistance of spores are (i) the initial moisture content of the spore, (ii) the rate of spore desiccation during heating, (iii) the water retention capacity of the material in or on which spores are located, and (iv) the relative humidity of the system at the test temperature. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:4968962

  15. Influence of spore moisture content on the dry-heat resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger.

    PubMed

    Angelotti, R; Maryanski, J H; Butler, T F; Peeler, J T; Campbell, J E

    1968-05-01

    The dry-heat resistance of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores located in or on various materials was determined as D and z values in the range of 105 through 160 C. The systems tested included spores located on steel and paper strips, spores located between stainless-steel washers mated together under 150 inch-lb and 12 inch-lb of torque, and spores encapsulated in methylmethacrylate and epoxy plastics. D values for a given temperature varied with the test system. High D values were observed for the systems in which spores were encapsulated or under heavy torque, whereas lower D values were observed for the steel and paper strip systems and the lightly torqued system. Similar z values were obtained for the plastic and steel strip systems (z(D) = 21 C), but an unusually low z for spores on paper (z(D) = 12.9 C) and an unusually high z for spores on steel washers mated at 150 inch-lb of torque (z(D) = 32 C) were observed. The effect of spore moisture content on the D value of spores encapsulated in water-impermeable plastic was determined, and maximal resistance was observed for spores with a water activity (a(w)) of 0.2 to 0.4. Significantly decreased D values were observed for spores with moisture contents below a(w) 0.2 or above a(w) 0.4. The data indicate that the important factors to be considered when measuring the dry heat resistance of spores are (i) the initial moisture content of the spore, (ii) the rate of spore desiccation during heating, (iii) the water retention capacity of the material in or on which spores are located, and (iv) the relative humidity of the system at the test temperature.

  16. Combined pressure-thermal inactivation kinetics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in egg patty mince.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S; Ahn, J; Balasubramaniam, V M; Yousef, A E

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is a potential surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in validation studies involving bacterial spore inactivation by pressure-assisted thermal processing. Spores of B. amyloliquefaciens Fad 82 were inoculated into egg patty mince (approximately 1.4 x 10(8) spores per g), and the product was treated with combinations of pressure (0.1 to 700 MPa) and heat (95 to 121 degrees C) in a custom-made high-pressure kinetic tester. The values for the inactivation kinetic parameter (D), temperature coefficient (zT), and pressure coefficient (zP) were determined with a linear model. Inactivation parameters from the nonlinear Weibull model also were estimated. An increase in process pressure decreased the D-value at 95, 105, and 110 degrees C; however, at 121 degrees C the contribution of pressure to spore lethality was less pronounced. The zP-value increased from 170 MPa at 95 degrees C to 332 MPa at 121 degrees C, suggesting that B. amyloliquefaciens spores became less sensitive to pressure changes at higher temperatures. Similarly, the zT-value increased from 8.2 degrees C at 0.1 MPa to 26.8 degrees C at 700 MPa, indicating that at elevated pressures, the spores were less sensitive to changes in temperature. The nonlinear Weibull model parameter b increased with increasing pressure or temperature and was inversely related to the D-value. Pressure-assisted thermal processing is a potential alternative to thermal processing for producing shelf-stable egg products.

  17. Graphical Procedure for Comparing Thermal Death of Bacillus stearothermophilus Spores in Saturated and Superheated Steam

    PubMed Central

    Shull, James J.; Ernst, Robert R.

    1962-01-01

    The thermal death curve of dried spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus in saturated steam was characterized by three phases: (i) a sharp initial rise in viable count; (ii) a low rate of death which gradually increased; and (iii) logarithmic death at maximal rate. The first phase was a reflection of inadequate heat activation of the spore population. The second and third phases represented the characteristic thermal death curve of the spores in saturated steam. A jacketed steam sterilizer, equipped with a system for initial evacuation of the chamber, was examined for superheat during normal operation. Measurements of spore inactivation and temperature revealed superheat in surface layers of fabrics being processed in steam at 121 C. The high temperature of the fabric surfaces was attributed to absorption of excess heat energy from superheated steam. The superheated steam was produced at the beginning of the normal sterilizing cycle by transfer of heat from the steam-heated jacket to saturated steam entering the vessel. PMID:13988774

  18. Deposition of Bacillus subtilis spores using an airbrush-spray or spots to study surface decontamination by pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Levy, Caroline; Bornard, Isabelle; Carlin, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    Microbial contamination on surfaces of food processing equipment is a major concern in industries. A new method to inoculate a single-cell layer (monolayer) of microorganisms onto polystyrene was developed, using a deposition with an airbrush. A homogeneous dispersion of Bacillus subtilis DSM 402 spores sprayed on the surface was observed using both plate count and scanning electron microscopy. No clusters were found, even with high spore concentrations (10(7) spores/inoculated surface). A monolayer of microorganisms was also obtained after deposition of 10 μL droplets containing 3×10(4) spores/spot on polystyrene disks, but not with a higher spore concentration. Pulsed light (PL) applied to monolayers of B. subtilis spores allowed log reductions higher than 6. As a consequence of clusters formation in spots of 10 μL containing more than 3×10(5) spores, log reductions obtained by PL were significantly lower. The comparative advantages of spot and spray depositions were discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Soybean Casein Digest Agar Lot on Number of Bacillus stearothermophilus Spores Recovered †

    PubMed Central

    Pflug, I. J.; Smith, Geraldine M.; Christensen, Ronald

    1981-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that Bacillus stearothermophilus spores are affected by various environmental factors that influence the performance of the spores as biological indicators. One environmental factor is the recovery medium. The effect of different lots of commercial soybean casein digest agar on the number of colony-forming units per plate was examined in two series of experiments: (i) several lots of medium from two manufacturers were compared in single experiments, and (ii) paired media experiments with four lots of medium were carried out and yielded three-point survivor curves. The results demonstrate that commercial soybean casein digest agar is variable on a lot-to-lot basis. The variation was lowest when recovering unheated or minimally heated spores and increased greatly with the severity of heating. PMID:16345822

  20. Effect of medium components and culture conditions in Bacillus subtilis EA-CB0575 spore production.

    PubMed

    Posada-Uribe, Luisa F; Romero-Tabarez, Magally; Villegas-Escobar, Valeska

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores have important biotechnological applications; however, achieving both, high spore cell densities and sporulation efficiencies in fermentation, is poorly reported. In this study, medium components and culture conditions were optimized with different statistical methods to increase spore production of the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria B. subtilis EA-CB0575. Key medium components were determined with Plackett-Burman (PB) design, and the optimum concentration levels of two components (glucose, MgSO4·7H2O) were optimized with a full factorial and central composite design, achieving 1.37 × 10(9) CFU/mL of spore cell density and 93.5 % of sporulation efficiency in shake flask. The optimized medium was used to determine the effect of culture conditions on spore production at bioreactor level, finding that maintaining pH control did not affect significantly spore production, while the interaction of agitation and aeration rates had a significant effect on spore cell density. The overall optimization generated a 17.2-fold increase in spore cell density (8.78 × 10(9) CFU/mL) and 1.9-fold increase in sporulation efficiency (94.2 %) compared to that of PB design. These results indicate the potential of B. subtilis EA-CB0575 to produce both, high spore cell densities and sporulation efficiencies, with very low nutrient requirements and short incubation period which can represent savings of process production.

  1. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiations on Bacillus subtilis spores and T-7 bacteriophage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spizizen, J.; Isherwood, J. E.; Taylor, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis HA 101 and the DNA polymerase I-defective mutant HA 101 (59)F were exposed to selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet light and space vacuum during the return of Apollo 16. In addition, coliphage T-7 suspensions were exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation as part of the Microbial Response to Space Environment Experiment. Optical filters were employed to provide different energy levels at wavelengths 254 nm and 280 nm. Dose-response curves for lethal and mutagenic effects were compared with ground-based data. A close parallel was observed between the results of solar radiation and ground tests with spores of the two strains. However, significantly greater inactivation of T-7 bacteriophage was observed after exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation.

  2. Dry Heat Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis var. niger Spores as a Function of Relative Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Brannen, J. P.; Garst, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    Dry heat sterilization of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores at 105 C is enhanced in the relative humidity range 0.03 to 0.2%. D-values of 115 and 125 C are predicted by a kinetic model with parameters set from 105 C data. These predictions are compared to observations. Images PMID:4625341

  3. Effect of calcium in assay medium on D value of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Shintani, H; Itoh, J; Kamogawa, T; Kajihara, Y

    2000-12-01

    The D value of commercial biological indicator spore strips using Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 was increased by higher calcium concentrations in assay media. The calcium concentration in assay media varied among the manufacturers. The calcium concentration in assay media is an important factor to consider to minimize the variation of D value.

  4. Unlocking the Sporicidal Potential of Ethanol: Induced Sporicidal Activity of Ethanol against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus Spores under Altered Physical and Chemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Sunkesula, Venkata C. K.; C., Thriveen Sankar; Setlow, Peter; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to their efficacy and convenience, alcohol-based hand sanitizers have been widely adopted as the primary method of hand hygiene in healthcare settings. However, alcohols lack activity against bacterial spores produced by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis. We hypothesized that sporicidal activity could be induced in alcohols through alteration of physical or chemical conditions that have been shown to degrade or allow penetration of spore coats. Principal Findings Acidification, alkalinization, and heating of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity against C. difficile, and to a lesser extent Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus subtilis. The sporicidal activity of acidified ethanol was enhanced by increasing ionic strength and mild elevations in temperature. On skin, sporicidal ethanol formulations were as effective as soap and water hand washing in reducing levels of C. difficile spores. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that novel ethanol-based sporicidal hand hygiene formulations can be developed through alteration of physical and chemical conditions. PMID:26177038

  5. Evaluation of a Stochastic Inactivation Model for Heat-Activated Spores of Bacillus spp. ▿

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Maria G.; Normand, Mark D.; Eisenberg, Murray; Peleg, Micha

    2010-01-01

    Heat activates the dormant spores of certain Bacillus spp., which is reflected in the “activation shoulder” in their survival curves. At the same time, heat also inactivates the already active and just activated spores, as well as those still dormant. A stochastic model based on progressively changing probabilities of activation and inactivation can describe this phenomenon. The model is presented in a fully probabilistic discrete form for individual and small groups of spores and as a semicontinuous deterministic model for large spore populations. The same underlying algorithm applies to both isothermal and dynamic heat treatments. Its construction does not require the assumption of the activation and inactivation kinetics or knowledge of their biophysical and biochemical mechanisms. A simplified version of the semicontinuous model was used to simulate survival curves with the activation shoulder that are reminiscent of experimental curves reported in the literature. The model is not intended to replace current models to predict dynamic inactivation but only to offer a conceptual alternative to their interpretation. Nevertheless, by linking the survival curve's shape to probabilities of events at the individual spore level, the model explains, and can be used to simulate, the irregular activation and survival patterns of individual and small groups of spores, which might be involved in food poisoning and spoilage. PMID:20453137

  6. Biological indicators for steam sterilization: characterization of a rapid biological indicator utilizing Bacillus stearothermophilus spore-associated alpha-glucosidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Albert, H; Davies, D J; Woodson, L P; Soper, C J

    1998-11-01

    The alpha-glucosidase enzyme was isolated from vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus, ATCC 7953. Spore-associated enzyme had a molecular weight of approximately 92,700, a temperature optimum of 60 degrees C, and a pH optimum of 7.0-7.5. The enzyme in crude aqueous spore extract was stable for 30 min up to a temperature of 65 degrees C, above which the enzyme was rapidly denatured. The optimal pH for stability of the enzyme was approximately 7.2. The alpha-glucosidase in crude vegetative cell extract had similar characteristics to the spore-associated enzyme but its molecular weight was 86,700. The vegetative cell and spore-associated enzymes were cross-reactive. The enzymes are postulated to derive from a single gene product, which undergoes modification to produce the spore-associated form. The location of alpha-glucosidase in the spore coats (outside the spore protoplast) is consistent with the location of most enzymes involved in activation, germination and outgrowth.

  7. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores during Laboratory-Scale Composting of Feedlot Cattle Manure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shanwei; Harvey, Amanda; Barbieri, Ruth; Reuter, Tim; Stanford, Kim; Amoako, Kingsley K.; Selinger, Leonard B.; McAllister, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax outbreaks in livestock have social, economic and health implications, altering farmer’s livelihoods, impacting trade and posing a zoonotic risk. Our study investigated the survival of Bacillus thuringiensis and B. anthracis spores sporulated at 15, 20, or 37°C, over 33 days of composting. Spores (∼7.5 log10 CFU g-1) were mixed with manure and composted in laboratory scale composters. After 15 days, the compost was mixed and returned to the composter for a second cycle. Temperatures peaked at 71°C on day 2 and remained ≥55°C for an average of 7 days in the first cycle, but did not exceed 55°C in the second. For B. thuringiensis, spores generated at 15 and 21°C exhibited reduced (P < 0.05) viability of 2.7 and 2.6 log10 CFU g-1 respectively, as compared to a 0.6 log10 CFU g-1 reduction for those generated at 37°C. For B. anthracis, sporulation temperature did not impact spore survival as there was a 2.5, 2.2, and 2.8 log10 CFU g-1 reduction after composting for spores generated at 15, 21, and 37°C, respectively. For both species, spore viability declined more rapidly (P < 0.05) in the first as compared to the second composting cycle. Our findings suggest that the duration of thermophilic exposure (≥55°C) is the main factor influencing survival of B. anthracis spores in compost. As sporulation temperature did not influence survival of B. anthracis, composting may lower the viability of spores associated with carcasses infected with B. anthracis over a range of sporulation temperatures. PMID:27303388

  8. A Cumulative Spore Killing Approach: Synergistic Sporicidal Activity of Dilute Peracetic Acid and Ethanol at Low pH Against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus subtilis Spores.

    PubMed

    Nerandzic, Michelle M; Sankar C, Thriveen; Setlow, Peter; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the primary method of hand hygiene in healthcare settings, but they lack activity against bacterial spores produced by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis. We previously demonstrated that acidification of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity, resulting in ethanol formulations with pH 1.5-2 that were as effective as soap and water washing in reducing levels of C difficile spores on hands. We hypothesized that the addition of dilute peracetic acid (PAA) to acidified ethanol would enhance sporicidal activity while allowing elevation of the pH to a level likely to be well tolerated on skin (ie, >3). Methods.  We tested the efficacy of acidified ethanol solutions alone or in combination with PAA against C difficile and Bacillus subtilis spores in vitro and against nontoxigenic C difficile spores on hands of volunteers. Results.  Acidification of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity against C difficile and to a lesser extent B subtilis. The addition of dilute PAA to acidified ethanol resulted in synergistic enhancement of sporicidal activity in a dose-dependent fashion in vitro. On hands, the addition of 1200-2000 ppm PAA enhanced the effectiveness of acidified ethanol formulations, resulting in formulations with pH >3 that were as effective as soap and water washing. Conclusions.  Acidification and the addition of dilute PAA induced rapid sporicidal activity in ethanol. Our findings suggest that it may be feasible to develop effective sporicidal ethanol formulations that are safe and tolerable on skin.

  9. A Cumulative Spore Killing Approach: Synergistic Sporicidal Activity of Dilute Peracetic Acid and Ethanol at Low pH Against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Sankar C, Thriveen; Setlow, Peter; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the primary method of hand hygiene in healthcare settings, but they lack activity against bacterial spores produced by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis. We previously demonstrated that acidification of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity, resulting in ethanol formulations with pH 1.5–2 that were as effective as soap and water washing in reducing levels of C difficile spores on hands. We hypothesized that the addition of dilute peracetic acid (PAA) to acidified ethanol would enhance sporicidal activity while allowing elevation of the pH to a level likely to be well tolerated on skin (ie, >3). Methods. We tested the efficacy of acidified ethanol solutions alone or in combination with PAA against C difficile and Bacillus subtilis spores in vitro and against nontoxigenic C difficile spores on hands of volunteers. Results. Acidification of ethanol induced rapid sporicidal activity against C difficile and to a lesser extent B subtilis. The addition of dilute PAA to acidified ethanol resulted in synergistic enhancement of sporicidal activity in a dose-dependent fashion in vitro. On hands, the addition of 1200–2000 ppm PAA enhanced the effectiveness of acidified ethanol formulations, resulting in formulations with pH >3 that were as effective as soap and water washing. Conclusions. Acidification and the addition of dilute PAA induced rapid sporicidal activity in ethanol. Our findings suggest that it may be feasible to develop effective sporicidal ethanol formulations that are safe and tolerable on skin. PMID:26885539

  10. Effect of Calcium in Assay Medium on D Value of Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 Spores

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Koichi; Shintani, Hideharu; Itoh, Junpei; Kamogawa, Takuji; Kajihara, Yousei

    2000-01-01

    The D value of commercial biological indicator spore strips using Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 was increased by higher calcium concentrations in assay media. The calcium concentration in assay media varied among the manufacturers. The calcium concentration in assay media is an important factor to consider to minimize the variation of D value. PMID:11097939

  11. Evaluation of sampling methods for Bacillus spore-contaminated HVAC filters

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, M. Worth; Rose, Laura J.; Tufts, Jenia; Morse, Stephen; Clayton, Matt; Touati, Abderrahmane; Griffin-Gatchalian, Nicole; Slone, Christina; McSweeney, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare an extraction-based sampling method to two vacuum-based sampling methods (vacuum sock and 37 mm cassette filter) with regards to their ability to recover Bacillus atrophaeus spores (surrogate for Bacillus anthracis) from pleated heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) filters that are typically found in commercial and residential buildings. Electrostatic and mechanical HVAC filters were tested, both without and after loading with dust to 50% of their total holding capacity. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA across material types, presence or absence of dust, and sampling device. The extraction method gave higher relative recoveries than the two vacuum methods evaluated (p ≤ 0.001). On average, recoveries obtained by the vacuum methods were about 30% of those achieved by the extraction method. Relative recoveries between the two vacuum methods were not significantly different (p > 0.05). Although extraction methods yielded higher recoveries than vacuum methods, either HVAC filter sampling approach may provide a rapid and inexpensive mechanism for understanding the extent of contamination following a wide-area biological release incident. PMID:24184312

  12. [Mechanism of metabolic and ionic germination of "Bacillus licheniformis" spores treated with hydrogen peroxide (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cerf, O

    1977-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus licheniformis 109-2A0 lost their refractility and absorbancy at 640 nm in the presence of metabolizable molecules (L-alanine). The same occurred with spores treated with 4.4 mol/1 hydrogen peroxide, pH 2.0, at 65 degrees C, even after 5 min of treatment. In addition, these transformations could be promoted after 2 min of treatment by inorganic ions (KI). This possibility occurs following a kinetics of activation. Thermodynamic parameters showed this activation to be combined with a molecular re-organization. Loss of refractility or absorbancy, induced by L-ala or KI, was inhibited by inhibitors of membrane functions or of L-alanine dehydrogenase, enzyme of which a noticeable activity was demonstrated in treated spores. Only 10% of spore calcium leaked during the treatment. Therefore loss of refractility or absorbancy caused by molecules metabolizable or not seemed to correspond to a physiological germination. The first even of the metabolic, as well as or the ionic germination could well be a modification of the spore membrane proton-motive force.

  13. Involvement of Superoxide Dismutase in Spore Coat Assembly in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Adriano O.; Melsen, Lawrence R.; Moran, Charles P.

    1998-01-01

    Endospores of Bacillus subtilis are enclosed in a proteinaceous coat which can be differentiated into a thick, striated outer layer and a thinner, lamellar inner layer. We found that the N-terminal sequence of a 25-kDa protein present in a preparation of spore coat proteins matched that of the Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD) encoded by the sodA locus. sodA is transcribed throughout the growth and sporulation of a wild-type strain and is responsible for the SOD activity detected in total cell extracts prepared from B. subtilis. Disruption of the sodA locus produced a mutant that lacked any detectable SOD activity during vegetative growth and sporulation. The sodA mutant was not impaired in the ability to form heat- or lysozyme-resistant spores. However, examination of the coat layers of sodA mutant spores revealed increased extractability of the tyrosine-rich outer coat protein CotG. We showed that this condition was not accompanied by augmented transcription of the cotG gene in sporulating cells of the sodA mutant. We conclude that SodA is required for the assembly of CotG into the insoluble matrix of the spore and suggest that CotG is covalently cross-linked into the insoluble matrix by an oxidative reaction dependent on SodA. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that the inner coat formed by a sodA mutant was incomplete. Moreover, the outer coat lacked the characteristic striated appearance of wild-type spores, a pattern that was accentuated in a cotG mutant. These observations suggest that the SodA-dependent formation of the insoluble matrix containing CotG is largely responsible for the striated appearance of this coat layer. PMID:9573176

  14. Bacillus subtilis spores on artificial meteorites survive hypervelocity atmospheric entry: implications for Lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Link, Lindsey; Melosh, H Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2005-12-01

    An important but untested aspect of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microbes situated on or within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through Earth's atmosphere. The use of high-altitude sounding rockets to test this notion was explored. Granite samples permeated with spores of Bacillus subtilis strain WN511 were attached to the exterior telemetry module of a sounding rocket and launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico into space, reaching maximum atmospheric entry velocity of 1.2 km/s. Maximum recorded temperature during the flight was measured at 145 degrees C. The surfaces of the post-flight granite samples were swabbed and tested for recovery and survival of WN511 spores, using genetic markers and the unique DNA fingerprint of WN511 as recovery criteria. Spore survivors were isolated at high frequency, ranging from 1.2% to 4.4% compared with ground controls, from all surfaces except the forward-facing surface. Sporulation-defective mutants were noted among the spaceflight survivors at high frequency (4%). These experiments constitute the first report of spore survival to hypervelocity atmospheric transit, and indicate that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of bacteria-laden artificial meteorites.

  15. Bacillus subtilis Spores on Artificial Meteorites Survive Hypervelocity Atmospheric Entry: Implications for Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Link, Lindsey; Melosh, H. Jay; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2005-12-01

    An important but untested aspect of the lithopanspermia hypothesis is that microbes situated on or within meteorites could survive hypervelocity entry from space through Earth's atmosphere. The use of high-altitude sounding rockets to test this notion was explored. Granite samples permeated with spores of Bacillus subtilis strain WN511 were attached to the exterior telemetry module of a sounding rocket and launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico into space, reaching maximum atmospheric entry velocity of 1.2 km/s. Maximum recorded temperature during the flight was measured at 145°C. The surfaces of the post-flight granite samples were swabbed and tested for recovery and survival of WN511 spores, using genetic markers and the unique DNA fingerprint of WN511 as recovery criteria. Spore survivors were isolated at high frequency, ranging from 1.2% to 4.4% compared with ground controls, from all surfaces except the forward-facing surface. Sporulation-defective mutants were noted among the spaceflight survivors at high frequency (4%). These experiments constitute the first report of spore survival to hypervelocity atmospheric transit, and indicate that sounding rocket flights can be used to model the high-speed atmospheric entry of bacteria-laden artificial meteorites.

  16. Investigation of spore coat display of Bacillus subtilis β-galactosidase for developing of whole cell biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, Setareh; Hinc, Krzysztof; Iwanicki, Adam; Obuchowski, Michal; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2013-03-01

    The production of highly efficient, recyclable and cost-effective enzymes is one of the most important goals in industrial biotechnology. Bacterial spores are highly resistant to harsh environmental conditions, easy to produce and are suitable for manipulation of genetic materials. These features make them a very efficient tool for biotechnology. Here, we show the use bacterial spores for presentation of functional enzyme. Spore coat display was used to produce a biocatalyst, which expresses β-galactiosidase (LacA). This enzyme is commonly used to produce lactose-free milk for lactose intolerant individuals. The lacA gene from Bacillus subtilis strain 168 was expressed on the surface of B. subtilis RH101(ΔcotC) spores using CotC as protein carrier. Presence of LacA protein is verified by western blotting. Results of β-galactiosidase assay show that the expressed enzyme retained its activity in condition of freezing and drying, as well as after recovery from the reaction's mixture.

  17. Reagent-free and portable detection of Bacillus anthracis spores using a microfluidic incubator and smartphone microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, Janine R.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Sheen, Allison M.

    Rapid, cost-effective bacterial detection systems are needed to respond to potential biothreat events. Here we report the use of smartphone-based microscopy in combination with a simple microfluidic incubation device to detect 5000 Bacillus anthracis spores in 3 hours. This field-deployable approach is compatible with real-time PCR for secondary confirmation.

  18. Avirulent Bacillus anthracis Strain with Molecular Assay Targets as Surrogate for Irradiation-Inactivated Virulent Spores.

    PubMed

    Plaut, Roger D; Staab, Andrea B; Munson, Mark A; Gebhardt, Joan S; Klimko, Christopher P; Quirk, Avery V; Cote, Christopher K; Buhr, Tony L; Rossmaier, Rebecca D; Bernhards, Robert C; Love, Courtney E; Berk, Kimberly L; Abshire, Teresa G; Rozak, David A; Beck, Linda C; Stibitz, Scott; Goodwin, Bruce G; Smith, Michael A; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2018-04-01

    The revelation in May 2015 of the shipment of γ irradiation-inactivated wild-type Bacillus anthracis spore preparations containing a small number of live spores raised concern about the safety and security of these materials. The finding also raised doubts about the validity of the protocols and procedures used to prepare them. Such inactivated reference materials were used as positive controls in assays to detect suspected B. anthracis in samples because live agent cannot be shipped for use in field settings, in improvement of currently deployed detection methods or development of new methods, or for quality assurance and training activities. Hence, risk-mitigated B. anthracis strains are needed to fulfill these requirements. We constructed a genetically inactivated or attenuated strain containing relevant molecular assay targets and tested to compare assay performance using this strain to the historical data obtained using irradiation-inactivated virulent spores.

  19. Atmospheric Pressure-Thermal Desorption (AP-TD)/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Analysis of Bacillus Spores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A technique is described where an atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD) device and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry are coupled and used for the rapid analysis of Bacillus spores in complex matrices. The resulting AP-TD/ESI-MS technique combines the generation of volatile co...

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    SciTech Connect

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathingmore » conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.« less

  1. Different small, acid-soluble proteins of the alpha/beta type have interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, J M; Setlow, P

    1987-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis strains which carry deletion mutations in one gene (sspA) or two genes (sspA and sspB) which code for major alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) are known to be much more sensitive to heat and UV radiation than wild-type spores. This heat- and UV-sensitive phenotype was cured completely or in part by introduction into these mutant strains of one or more copies of the sspA or sspB genes themselves; multiple copies of the B. subtilis sspD gene, which codes for a minor alpha/beta-type SASP; or multiple copies of the SASP-C gene, which codes for a major alpha/beta-type SASP of Bacillus megaterium. These findings suggest that alpha/beta-type SASP play interchangeable roles in the heat and UV radiation resistance of bacterial spores. Images PMID:3112127

  2. Killing of Bacillus Megaterium Spores by X-rays at the Phosphorus K-edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Frigo, Sean P.; Ehret, Charles F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study continues a progression of experiments on the radiation-induced killing of bacterial spores that began at the Argonne National Laboratory in 1957. A series of aliquots of Bacillus megaterium spores were prepared onto polycarbonate filters and irradiated with photons of 2159 eV compared to 2140 eV energy on the 2-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Flux density was approximately 10(exp 18) photons/sec/sq mm. The phosphorous K-edge absorption spectrum in these spores was determined to peak at 2159 eV, wheras 2140 eV was determined to be outside that absorption spectrum. Spores on filters were irradiated at ambient conditions, and were either immediately plated for colony formation after irradiation, or were held for postirradiation exposure to oxygen prior to plating. Slopes of survival curves from the four conditions of irradiation, i.e., two photon energies each comparing immediate plating vs postirradiation holding, were used for quantitative determination of differences in rates of spore killing over a range of radiation doses. It was found that spores irradiated at the phosphorus K-edge were killed 20% more efficiently than when irradiated with 2140 eV photons, and this was true for both immediate plating and postirradiation holding in air. Postirradiation holding in air increased killing efficiency by about 12% for both photon energies compared to plating immediately after irradiation. The increase of killing efficiency with postirradiation holding is less than expected from earlier experiments using relatively low-flux X-rays, and raises the possibility of dose-mitigation by radical-radical recombination in the case of high-flux X-rays from the synchrotron.

  3. Killing of Bacillus Megaterium Spores by X-Rays at the Phosphorus K-Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Frigo, Sean P.; Ehret, Charles F.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study continues a progression of experiments on the radiation-induced killing of bacterial spores that began at the Argonne National Laboratory in 1957. A series of aliquots of Bacillus megaterium spores were prepared onto polycarbonate filters and irradiated with photons of 2159 eV compared to 2140 eV energy on the 2-IDB beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. Flux density was approximately 10 photons/sec/mm . The phosphorous K-edge absorption spectrum in these spores was determined to peak at 2159 eV, wheras 2140 eV was determined to be outside that absorption spectrum. Spores on filters were irradiated at ambient conditions, and were either immediately plated for colony formation after irradiation, or were held for postirradiation exposure to oxygen prior to plating. Slopes of survival curves from the four conditions of irradiation, i.e., two photon energies each comparing immediate plating vs postirradiation holding, were used for quantitative determination of differences in rates of spore killing over a range of radiation doses. It was found that spores irradiated at the phosphorus K-edge were killed 20% more efficiently than when irradiated with 2140eV photons, and this was true for both immediate plating and postirradiation holding in air. Postirradiation holding in air increased killing efficiency by about 12% for both photon energies compared to plating immediately after irradiation. The increase of killing efficiency with postirradiation holding is less than expected from earlier experiments using relatively low-flux X-rays, and raises the possibility of dose-mitigation by radical-radical recombination in the case of high-flux X-rays from the synchrotron.

  4. Spore cells from BPA degrading bacteria Bacillus sp. GZB displaying high laccase activity and stability for BPA degradation.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranjit; Li, Guiying; Mai, Bixian; An, Taicheng

    2018-06-04

    Laccase has been applied extensively as a biocatalyst to remove different organic pollutants. This study characterized a spore-laccase from the bisphenol A (BPA)-degrading strain Bacillus sp. GZB. The spore-laccase was encoded with 513 amino acids, containing spore coat protein A (CotA). It showed optimal activity at 70 °C and pH = 7.2 in presence of 2, 6-dimethoxyphenol. At 60 °C, optimal activity was also seen at pH = 3.0 and pH = 6.8 with 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) and syringaldazine, respectively. The spore-laccase was stable at high temperature, at acidic to alkaline pH values, and in the presence of different organic solvents. Spore-laccase activity was increased by introducing Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ , and Na + , but was strongly inhibited by Fe 2+ , Ag + , l-cysteine, dithiothreitol, and NaN 3 . The cotA gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3); the purified protein was estimated as having a molecular weight of ~63 kDa. Different synthetic dyes and BPA were effectively decolorized or degraded both by the spore laccase and recombinant laccase. When BPA oxidation was catalyzed using laccase, there was an initial formation of phenoxy radicals and further oxidation or CC bond cleavage of the radicals produced different organic acids. Detailed reaction pathways were developed based on nine identified intermediates. The acute toxicity decreased gradually during BPA degradation by laccase. This study is the first report about a genus of Bacillus that can produce a highly active and stable laccase to degrade BPA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA to Lethal Ionizing Radiation Damage Relies Primarily on Spore Core Components and DNA Repair, with Minor Effects of Oxygen Radical Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Raguse, Marina; Reitz, Günther; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Li, Zuofeng; Klein, Stuart; Setlow, Peter; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of various core components, including α/β/γ-type small acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP), dipicolinic acid (DPA), core water content, and DNA repair by apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), in Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to different types of ionizing radiation including X rays, protons, and high-energy charged iron ions have been studied. Spores deficient in DNA repair by NHEJ or AP endonucleases, the oxidative stress response, or protection by major α/β-type SASP, DPA, and decreased core water content were significantly more sensitive to ionizing radiation than wild-type spores, with highest sensitivity to high-energy-charged iron ions. DNA repair via NHEJ and AP endonucleases appears to be the most important mechanism for spore resistance to ionizing radiation, whereas oxygen radical detoxification via the MrgA-mediated oxidative stress response or KatX catalase activity plays only a very minor role. Synergistic radioprotective effects of α/β-type but not γ-type SASP were also identified, indicating that α/β-type SASP's binding to spore DNA is important in preventing DNA damage due to reactive oxygen species generated by ionizing radiation. PMID:24123749

  6. 40 CFR 180.1076 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus popilliae; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... popilliae conforming to the morphological and biochemical characteristics of Bacillus popilliae as described... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection of injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1076 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus popilliae; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... popilliae conforming to the morphological and biochemical characteristics of Bacillus popilliae as described... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection of injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1076 - Viable spores of the microorganism Bacillus popilliae; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... popilliae conforming to the morphological and biochemical characteristics of Bacillus popilliae as described... million spores into each of five laboratory test mice weighing 17 grams to 23 grams. Such test shall show no evidence of infection of injury in the test animals when observed for 7 days following injection...

  9. Genotoxic action of sunlight upon Bacillus subtilis spores: monitoring studies at Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Munakata, N

    1989-12-01

    Samples of Bacillus subtilis spores dried on membrane filter were exposed to natural sunlight from solar-noon time at Tokyo. The survival and mutation induction of wild-type (UVR) and repair-deficient (UVS) spores were determined on 66 occasions since 1979. Two of the values were considered to be useful in monitoring solar UV intensity; the inverse of the time (in minutes) of exposure to kill 63% of the UVS spores ("sporocidal index") and the induced mutation frequency at 60 minutes of exposure of the UVR spores ("mutagenic index"). Both values were varied greatly due to time of a year, weather and other conditions. Estimates of year-round changes under clear skies were obtained by connecting the maximum values attained in these years. In these curves, there are more than 7-fold differences in the genotoxicity between winter and summer months, with major increases observed in early spring and decreases through autumn. Using a series of UV cut-off filters, the wavelengths most effective for the sporocidal actions were estimated to be in the range of 308-325 nm, shorter wavelengths being effective when the genotoxicity was higher. Sunburn meter of Robertson-Berger type seems to respond to slightly longer wavelength components of the solar spectrum. However, a reasonable correlation was obtained between the reading of the meter and the sporocidal index.

  10. Human antibodies against spores of the genus Bacillus: a model study for detection of and protection against anthrax and the bioterrorist threat.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Wirsching, Peter; Janda, Kim D

    2002-04-16

    A naive, human single-chain Fv (scFv) phage-display library was used in bio-panning against live, native spores of Bacillus subtilis IFO 3336 suspended in solution. A direct in vitro panning and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based selection afforded a panel of nine scFv-phage clones of which two, 5B and 7E, were chosen for further study. These two clones differed in their relative specificity and affinity for spores of B. subtilis IFO 3336 vs. a panel of spores from 11 other Bacillus species/strains. A variety of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay protocols indicated these scFv-phage clones recognized different spore epitopes. Notably, some spore epitopes markedly changed between the free and microtiter-plate immobilized state as revealed by antibody-phage binding. An additional library selection procedure also was examined by constructing a Fab chain-shuffled sublibrary from the nine positive clones and by using a subtractive panning strategy to remove crossreactivity with B. licheniformis 5A24. The Fab-phage clone 52 was improved compared with 5B and was comparable to 7E in binding B. subtilis IFO 3336 vs. B. licheniformis 5A24, yet showed a distinctive crossreactivity pattern with other spores. We also developed a method to directly detect individual spores by using fluorescently labeled antibody-phage. Finally, a variety of "powders" that might be used in deploying spores of B. anthracis were examined for antibody-phage binding. The strategies described provide a foundation to discover human antibodies specific for native spores of B. anthracis that can be developed as diagnostic and therapeutic reagents.

  11. Evaluation of sampling methods for Bacillus spore-contaminated HVAC filters.

    PubMed

    Calfee, M Worth; Rose, Laura J; Tufts, Jenia; Morse, Stephen; Clayton, Matt; Touati, Abderrahmane; Griffin-Gatchalian, Nicole; Slone, Christina; McSweeney, Neal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare an extraction-based sampling method to two vacuum-based sampling methods (vacuum sock and 37mm cassette filter) with regards to their ability to recover Bacillus atrophaeus spores (surrogate for Bacillus anthracis) from pleated heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) filters that are typically found in commercial and residential buildings. Electrostatic and mechanical HVAC filters were tested, both without and after loading with dust to 50% of their total holding capacity. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA across material types, presence or absence of dust, and sampling device. The extraction method gave higher relative recoveries than the two vacuum methods evaluated (p≤0.001). On average, recoveries obtained by the vacuum methods were about 30% of those achieved by the extraction method. Relative recoveries between the two vacuum methods were not significantly different (p>0.05). Although extraction methods yielded higher recoveries than vacuum methods, either HVAC filter sampling approach may provide a rapid and inexpensive mechanism for understanding the extent of contamination following a wide-area biological release incident. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 10(4) spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites.

  13. The Use of Germinants to Potentiate the Sensitivity of Bacillus anthracis Spores to Peracetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ozgur; Buyuk, Fatih; Pottage, Tom; Crook, Ant; Hawkey, Suzanna; Cooper, Callum; Bennett, Allan; Sahin, Mitat; Baillie, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Elimination of Bacillus anthracis spores from the environment is a difficult and costly process due in part to the toxicity of current sporicidal agents. For this reason we investigated the ability of the spore germinants L-alanine (100 mM) and inosine (5 mM) to reduce the concentration of peracetic acid (PAA) required to inactivate B. anthracis spores. While L-alanine significantly enhanced (p = 0.0085) the bactericidal activity of 500 ppm PAA the same was not true for inosine suggesting some form of negative interaction. In contrast the germinant combination proved most effective at 100 ppm PAA (p = 0.0009). To determine if we could achieve similar results in soil we treated soil collected from the burial site of an anthrax infected animal which had been supplemented with spores of the Sterne strain of B. anthracis to increase the level of contamination to 104 spores/g. Treatment with germinants followed 1 h later by 5000 ppm PAA eliminated all of the spores. In contrast direct treatment of the animal burial site using this approach delivered using a back pack sprayer had no detectable effect on the level of B. anthracis contamination or on total culturable bacterial numbers over the course of the experiment. It did trigger a significant, but temporary, reduction (p < 0.0001) in the total spore count suggesting that germination had been triggered under real world conditions. In conclusion, we have shown that the application of germinants increase the sensitivity of bacterial spores to PAA. While the results of the single field trial were inconclusive, the study highlighted the potential of this approach and the challenges faced when attempting to perform real world studies on B. anthracis spores contaminated sites. PMID:26858699

  14. Laboratory Investigations on the Survival of Bacillus subtilis Spores in Deliquescent Salt Mars Analog Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, Danielle L.; Gough, Raina V.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Spry, James A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2017-10-01

    Observed features such as recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water may exist on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars today. The presence of this liquid water, likely in the form of a brine, has important implications for the present-day water cycle, habitability, and planetary protection policies. It is possible that this water is formed, at least partially, by deliquescence of salts, a process during which hygroscopic salts absorb water vapor from the atmosphere and form a saturated liquid brine. We performed laboratory experiments to examine the ability of Bacillus subtilis (B-168) spores, alone or mixed with calcium perchlorate salt (Ca(ClO4)2), to form liquid water via deliquescence under Mars-relevant conditions. Spore survival after exposure to these conditions was examined. An environmental chamber was used to expose the samples to temperature and relative humidity (RH) values similar to those found on Mars, and Raman microscopy was used to identify the phases of water and salt that were present and to confirm the presence of spores. We found that B-168 spores did not condense any detectable water vapor on their own during the diurnal cycle, even at 100% RH. However, when spores were mixed with perchlorate salt, the entire sample deliquesced at low RH values, immersing the spores in a brine solution during the majority of the simulated martian temperature and humidity cycle. After exposure to the simulated diurnal cycles and, in some cases, perchlorate brine, the impact of each environmental scenario on spore survival was estimated by standard plate assay. We found that, if there are deliquescent salts in contact with spores, there is a mechanism for the spores to acquire liquid water starting with only atmospheric water vapor as the H2O source. Also, neither crystalline nor liquid Ca(ClO4)2 is sporicidal despite the low water activity.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    SciTech Connect

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditionsmore » using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.« less

  16. Evaluation of peracetic acid fog for the inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spore surrogates in a large decontamination chamber.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Calfee, Michael Worth; Clayton, Matthew; Griffin-Gatchalian, Nicole; Touati, Abderrahmane; Egler, Kim

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sporicidal (inactivation of bacterial spores) effectiveness and operation of a fogging device utilizing peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (PAA). Experiments were conducted in a pilot-scale 24 m(3) stainless steel chamber using either biological indicators (BIs) or bacterial spores deposited onto surfaces via aerosolization. Wipe sampling was used to recover aerosol-deposited spores from chamber surfaces and coupon materials before and after fogging to assess decontamination efficacy. Temperature, relative humidity, and hydrogen peroxide vapor levels were measured during testing to characterize the fog environment. The fog completely inactivated all BIs in a test using a 60 mL solution of PAA (22% hydrogen peroxide/4.5% peracetic acid). In tests using aerosol-deposited bacterial spores, the majority of the post-fogging spore levels per sample were less than 1 log colony forming units, with a number of samples having no detectable spores. In terms of decontamination efficacy, a 4.78 log reduction of viable spores was achieved on wood and stainless steel. Fogging of PAA solutions shows potential as a relatively easy to use decontamination technology in the event of contamination with Bacillus anthracis or other spore-forming infectious disease agents, although additional research is needed to enhance sporicidal efficacy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Use of fatty acid methyl ester profiles for discrimination of Bacillus cereus T-strain spores grown on different media.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Chu, Vivian; Brown, TeeCie; Simmons, Terrie L; Swan, Brandon K; Bannan, Jason; Robertson, James M

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if cellular fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling could be used to distinguish among spore samples from a single species (Bacillus cereus T strain) that were prepared on 10 different medium formulations. To analyze profile differences and identify FAME biomarkers diagnostic for the chemical constituents in each sporulation medium, a variety of statistical techniques were used, including nonmetric multidimensional scaling (nMDS), analysis of similarities (ANOSIM), and discriminant function analysis (DFA). The results showed that one FAME biomarker, oleic acid (18:1 omega9c), was exclusively associated with spores grown on Columbia agar supplemented with sheep blood and was indicative of blood supplements that were present in the sporulation medium. For spores grown in other formulations, multivariate comparisons across several FAME biomarkers were required to discern profile differences. Clustering patterns in nMDS plots and R values from ANOSIM revealed that dissimilarities among FAME profiles were most pronounced when spores grown with disparate sources of complex additives or protein supplements were compared (R > 0.8), although other factors also contributed to FAME differences. DFA indicated that differentiation could be maximized with a targeted subset of FAME variables, and the relative contributions of branched FAME biomarkers to group dissimilarities changed when different media were compared. When taken together, these analyses indicate that B. cereus spore samples grown in different media can be resolved with FAME profiling and that this may be a useful technique for providing intelligence about the production methods of Bacillus organisms in a forensic investigation.

  18. Use of Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Profiles for Discrimination of Bacillus cereus T-Strain Spores Grown on Different Media▿

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Chu, Vivian; Brown, TeeCie; Simmons, Terrie L.; Swan, Brandon K.; Bannan, Jason; Robertson, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if cellular fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling could be used to distinguish among spore samples from a single species (Bacillus cereus T strain) that were prepared on 10 different medium formulations. To analyze profile differences and identify FAME biomarkers diagnostic for the chemical constituents in each sporulation medium, a variety of statistical techniques were used, including nonmetric multidimensional scaling (nMDS), analysis of similarities (ANOSIM), and discriminant function analysis (DFA). The results showed that one FAME biomarker, oleic acid (18:1 ω9c), was exclusively associated with spores grown on Columbia agar supplemented with sheep blood and was indicative of blood supplements that were present in the sporulation medium. For spores grown in other formulations, multivariate comparisons across several FAME biomarkers were required to discern profile differences. Clustering patterns in nMDS plots and R values from ANOSIM revealed that dissimilarities among FAME profiles were most pronounced when spores grown with disparate sources of complex additives or protein supplements were compared (R > 0.8), although other factors also contributed to FAME differences. DFA indicated that differentiation could be maximized with a targeted subset of FAME variables, and the relative contributions of branched FAME biomarkers to group dissimilarities changed when different media were compared. When taken together, these analyses indicate that B. cereus spore samples grown in different media can be resolved with FAME profiling and that this may be a useful technique for providing intelligence about the production methods of Bacillus organisms in a forensic investigation. PMID:20097814

  19. Mechanism of the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside by germinating and outgrowing spores of Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Setlow, B; Cabrera-Martinez, R-M; Setlow, P

    2004-01-01

    To determine the mechanism of the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (beta-MUG) by germinating and outgrowing spores of Bacillus species. Spores of B. atrophaeus (formerly B. subtilis var. niger, Fritze and Pukall 2001) are used as biological indicators of the efficacy of ethylene oxide sterilization by measurement of beta-MUG hydrolysis during spore germination and outgrowth. It was previously shown that beta-MUG is hydrolysed to 4-methylumbelliferone (MU) during the germination and outgrowth of B. atrophaeus spores (Chandrapati and Woodson 2003), and this was also the case with spores of B. subtilis 168. Germination of spores of either B. atrophaeus or B. subtilis with chloramphenicol reduced beta-MUG hydrolysis by almost 99%, indicating that proteins needed for rapid beta-MUG hydrolysis are synthesized during spore outgrowth. However, the residual beta-MUG hydrolysis during spore germination with chloramphenicol indicated that dormant spores contain low levels of proteins needed for beta-MUG uptake and hydrolysis. With B. subtilis 168 spores that lacked several general proteins of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for sugar uptake, beta-MUG hydrolysis during spore germination and outgrowth was decreased >99.9%. This indicated that beta-MUG is taken up by the PTS, resulting in the intracellular accumulation of the phosphorylated form of beta-MUG, beta-MUG-6-phosphate (beta-MUG-P). This was further demonstrated by the lack of detectable glucosidase activity on beta-MUG in dormant, germinated and outgrowing spore extracts, while phosphoglucosidase active on beta-MUG-P was readily detected. Dormant B. subtilis 168 spores had low levels of at least four phosphoglucosidases active on beta-MUG-P: BglA, BglH, BglC (originally called YckE) and BglD (originally called YdhP). These enzymes were also detected in spores germinating and outgrowing with beta-MUG, but levels of BglH were the highest, as this enzyme's synthesis was induced ca 100-fold

  20. Detection of Bacillus anthracis spores by super-paramagnetic lateral-flow immunoassays based on "Road Closure".

    PubMed

    Wang, Dian-Bing; Tian, Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Xu-Ying; Fleming, Joy; Bi, Li-Jun; Yang, Rui-Fu; Zhang, Xian-En

    2015-05-15

    Detection of Bacillus anthracis in the field, whether as a natural infection or as a biothreat remains challenging. Here we have developed a new lateral-flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) for B. anthracis spore detection based on the fact that conjugates of B. anthracis spores and super-paramagnetic particles labeled with antibodies will block the pores of chromatographic strips and form retention lines on the strips, instead of the conventionally reported test lines and control lines in classic LFIA. As a result, this new LFIA can simultaneously realize optical, magnetic and naked-eye detection by analyzing signals from the retention lines. As few as 500-700 pure B. anthracis spores can be recognized with CV values less than 8.31% within 5 min of chromatography and a total time of 20 min. For powdery sample tests, this LFIA can endure interference from 25% (w/v) milk, 10% (w/v) baking soda and 10% (w/v) starch without any sample pre-treatment, and has a corresponding detection limit of 6×10(4) spores/g milk powder, 2×10(5) spores/g starch and 5×10(5) spores/g baking soda. Compared with existing methods, this new approach is very competitive in terms of sensitivity, specificity, cost and ease of operation. This proof-of-concept study can also be extended for detection of many other large-sized analytes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunization of Mice with Formalin-Inactivated Spores from Avirulent Bacillus cereus Strains Provides Significant Protection from Challenge with Bacillus anthracis Ames

    PubMed Central

    Vergis, James M.; Cote, Christopher K.; Bozue, Joel; Alem, Farhang; Ventura, Christy L.; Welkos, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores are the infectious form of the organism for humans and animals. However, the approved human vaccine in the United States is derived from a vegetative culture filtrate of a toxigenic, nonencapsulated B. anthracis strain that primarily contains protective antigen (PA). Immunization of mice with purified spore proteins and formalin-inactivated spores (FIS) from a nonencapsulated, nontoxigenic B. anthracis strain confers protection against B. anthracis challenge when PA is also administered. To investigate the capacity of the spore particle to act as a vaccine without PA, we immunized mice subcutaneously with FIS from nontoxigenic, nonencapsulated B. cereus strain G9241 pBCXO1−/pBC210− (dcG9241), dcG9241 ΔbclA, or 569-UM20 or with exosporium isolated from dcG9241. FIS vaccination provided significant protection of mice from intraperitoneal or intranasal challenge with spores of the virulent B. anthracis Ames or Ames ΔbclA strain. Immunization with dcG9241 ΔbclA FIS, which are devoid of the immunodominant spore protein BclA, provided greater protection from challenge with either Ames strain than did immunization with FIS from BclA-producing strains. In addition, we used prechallenge immune antisera to probe a panel of recombinant B. anthracis Sterne spore proteins to identify novel immunogenic vaccine candidates. The antisera were variably reactive with BclA and with 10 other proteins, four of which were previously tested as vaccine candidates. Overall our data show that immunization with FIS from nontoxigenic, nonencapsulated B. cereus strains provides moderate to high levels of protection of mice from B. anthracis Ames challenge and that neither PA nor BclA is required for this protection. PMID:23114705

  2. Human cell exposure assays of Bacillus thuringiensis commercial insecticides: production of Bacillus cereus-like cytolytic effects from outgrowth of spores.

    PubMed Central

    Tayabali, A F; Seligy, V L

    2000-01-01

    Most contemporary bioinsecticides are derived from scaled-up cultures of Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies israelensis (Bti) and kurstaki (Btk), whose particulate fractions contain mostly B. thuringiensis spores (> 10(12)/L) and proteinaceous aggregates, including crystal-like parasporal inclusion bodies (PIB). Based on concerns over relatedness to B. cereus-group pathogens, we conducted extensive testing of B. thuringiensis (BT) products and their subfractions using seven human cell types. The Bti/Btk products generated nonspecific cytotoxicities involving loss in bioreduction, cell rounding, blebbing and detachment, degradation of immunodetectable proteins, and cytolysis. Their threshold dose (Dt approximately equal.5 times 10(-14)% BT product/target cell) equated to a single spore and a target cell half-life (tLD(50)) of approximately 16 hr. At Dts > 10(4), the tLD(50) rapidly shifted to < 4 hr; with antibiotic present, no component, including PIB-related [delta]-endotoxins, was cytolytic up to an equivalent of approximately 10(9 )Dt. The cytolytic agent(s) within the Bti/Btk-vegetative cell exoprotein (VCP) pool is an early spore outgrowth product identical to that of B. cereus and acting possibly by arresting protein synthesis. No cytolytic effects were seen with VCP from B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. These data, including recent epidemiologic work indicate that spore-containing BT products have an inherent capacity to lyse human cells in free and interactive forms and may also act as immune sensitizers. To critically impact at the whole body level, the exposure outcome would have to be an uncontrolled infection arising from intake of Btk/Bti spores. For humans, such a condition would be rare, arising possibly in equally rare exposure scenarios involving large doses of spores and individuals with weak or impaired microbe-clearance capacities and/or immune response systems. PMID:11049810

  3. Proteins YlaJ and YhcN contribute to the efficiency of spore germination in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christian L; Moir, Anne

    2017-04-01

    The YlaJ and YhcN spore lipoproteins of Bacillus subtilis contain a common domain, and are of unknown function. Homologues of YlaJ or YhcN are widespread in Bacilli and are also encoded in those Clostridia that use cortex lytic enzymes SleB and CwlJ for cortex hydrolysis during germination. In B. subtilis, we report that single and double mutants lacking YlaJ and/or YhcN show a reduced rate of spore germination in L-alanine, with a delay in loss of heat resistance, release of dipicolinic acid and OD fall. If B. subtilis spores lack the cortex lytic enzyme CwlJ, spore cortex degradation and subsequent outgrowth to form colonies is strictly dependent on the other cortex lytic enzyme SleB, allowing a test of SleB function; in a cwlJ mutant background, the combined loss of both ylaJ and yhcN genes resulted in a spore population in which only 20% of spores germinated and outgrew to form colonies, suggesting that SleB activity is compromised. YlaJ and YhcN have a role in germination that is not yet well defined, but these proteins are likely to contribute, directly or indirectly, to early events in germination, including effective SleB function. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Resistance of Spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger on Kapton and Teflon Film to High Temperature and Dry Heat

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, Mary K.; Smith, Frederick W.

    1968-01-01

    To determine parameters that would assure sterility of a sealed seam of film for application in “split-seam entry,” spores of Bacillus subtilis var. niger were sprayed onto pieces of Kapton and Teflon film. Short-time, high-temperature (200 to 270 C) exposures were made with film pieces between aluminum blocks in a hot-air oven, and the D and z values were determined after subculture of surviving spores. The use of Kapton film allowed the study of high temperatures, since it is not heat sealable and could be used to make thin packages for heat treatment. Spores on Teflon were dry-heat treated in a package designed to simulate an actual seam to be sealed. The z values of 29.1 C (52.4 F) for spores on Kapton and 139 C (250.4 F) for spores on Teflon were calculated. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:4973071

  5. Anthrax Spores under a microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Anthrax spores are inactive forms of Bacillus anthracis. They can survive for decades inside a spore's tough protective coating; they become active when inhaled by humans. A result of NASA- and industry-sponsored research to develop small greenhouses for space research is the unique AiroCide TiO2 system that kills anthrax spores and other pathogens.

  6. Characterization of the yrbA Gene of Bacillus subtilis, Involved in Resistance and Germination of Spores

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Hiromu; Kodama, Takeko; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Watabe, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    Insertional inactivation of the yrbA gene of Bacillus subtilis reduced the resistance of the mutant spores to lysozyme. The yrbA mutant spores lost their optical density at the same rate as the wild-type spores upon incubation with l-alanine but became only phase gray and did not swell. The response of the mutant spores to a combination of asparagine, glucose, fructose, and KCl was also extremely poor; in this medium yrbA spores exhibited only a small loss in optical density and gave a mixture of phase-bright, -gray, and -dark spores. Northern blot analysis of yrbA transcripts in various sig mutants indicated that yrbA was transcribed by RNA polymerase with ςE beginning at 2 h after the start of sporulation. The yrbA promoter was localized by primer extension analysis, and the sequences of the −35 (TCATAAC) and −10 (CATATGT) regions were similar to the consensus sequences of genes recognized by ςE. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of proteins solubilized from intact yrbA mutant spores showed an alteration in the protein profile, as 31- and 36-kDa proteins, identified as YrbA and CotG, respectively, were absent, along with some other minor changes. Electron microscopic examination of yrbA spores revealed changes in the spore coat, including a reduction in the density and thickness of the outer layer and the appearance of an inner coat layer-like structure around the outside of the coat. This abnormal coat structure was also observed on the outside of the developing forespores of the yrbA mutant. These results suggest that YrbA is involved in assembly of some coat proteins which have roles in both spore lysozyme resistance and germination. PMID:10438771

  7. Survival of Bacillus pumilus spores for a prolonged period of time in real space conditions.

    PubMed

    Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J

    2012-05-01

    To prevent forward contamination and maintain the scientific integrity of future life-detection missions, it is important to characterize and attempt to eliminate terrestrial microorganisms associated with exploratory spacecraft and landing vehicles. Among the organisms isolated from spacecraft-associated surfaces, spores of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 exhibited unusually high resistance to decontamination techniques such as UV radiation and peroxide treatment. Subsequently, B. pumilus SAFR-032 was flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and exposed to a variety of space conditions via the European Technology Exposure Facility (EuTEF). After 18 months of exposure in the EXPOSE facility of the European Space Agency (ESA) on EuTEF under dark space conditions, SAFR-032 spores showed 10-40% survivability, whereas a survival rate of 85-100% was observed when these spores were kept aboard the ISS under dark simulated martian atmospheric conditions. In contrast, when UV (>110 nm) was applied on SAFR-032 spores for the same time period and under the same conditions used in EXPOSE, a ∼7-log reduction in viability was observed. A parallel experiment was conducted on Earth with identical samples under simulated space conditions. Spores exposed to ground simulations showed less of a reduction in viability when compared with the "real space" exposed spores (∼3-log reduction in viability for "UV-Mars," and ∼4-log reduction in viability for "UV-Space"). A comparative proteomics analysis indicated that proteins conferring resistant traits (superoxide dismutase) were present in higher concentration in space-exposed spores when compared to controls. Also, the first-generation cells and spores derived from space-exposed samples exhibited elevated UVC resistance when compared with their ground control counterparts. The data generated are important for calculating the probability and mechanisms of microbial survival in space conditions and assessing microbial contaminants

  8. Developmentally-Regulated Excision of the SPβ Prophage Reconstitutes a Gene Required for Spore Envelope Maturation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kimihiro; Kawano, Yuta; Iwamoto, Keito; Arai, Kenji; Maruyama, Yuki; Eichenberger, Patrick; Sato, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Temperate phages infect bacteria by injecting their DNA into bacterial cells, where it becomes incorporated into the host genome as a prophage. In the genome of Bacillus subtilis 168, an active prophage, SPβ, is inserted into a polysaccharide synthesis gene, spsM. Here, we show that a rearrangement occurs during sporulation to reconstitute a functional composite spsM gene by precise excision of SPβ from the chromosome. SPβ excision requires a putative site-specific recombinase, SprA, and an accessory protein, SprB. A minimized SPβ, where all the SPβ genes were deleted, except sprA and sprB, retained the SPβ excision activity during sporulation, demonstrating that sprA and sprB are necessary and sufficient for the excision. While expression of sprA was observed during vegetative growth, sprB was induced during sporulation and upon mitomycin C treatment, which triggers the phage lytic cycle. We also demonstrated that overexpression of sprB (but not of sprA) resulted in SPβ prophage excision without triggering the lytic cycle. These results suggest that sprB is the factor that controls the timing of phage excision. Furthermore, we provide evidence that spsM is essential for the addition of polysaccharides to the spore envelope. The presence of polysaccharides on the spore surface renders the spore hydrophilic in water. This property may be beneficial in allowing spores to disperse in natural environments via water flow. A similar rearrangement occurs in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, where a SPβ-like element is excised during sporulation to reconstitute a polysaccharide synthesis gene, suggesting that this type of gene rearrangement is common in spore-forming bacteria because it can be spread by phage infection. PMID:25299644

  9. Bacillus anthracis spore movement does not require a carrier cell and is not affected by lethal toxin in human lung models.

    PubMed

    Booth, J Leland; Duggan, Elizabeth S; Patel, Vineet I; Langer, Marybeth; Wu, Wenxin; Braun, Armin; Coggeshall, K Mark; Metcalf, Jordan P

    2016-10-01

    The lung is the entry site for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form of the disease. Spores escape from the alveolus to regional lymph nodes, germinate and enter the circulatory system to cause disease. The roles of carrier cells and the effects of B. anthracis toxins in this process are unclear. We used a human lung organ culture model to measure spore uptake by antigen presenting cells (APC) and alveolar epithelial cells (AEC), spore partitioning between these cells, and the effects of B. anthracis lethal toxin and protective antigen. We repeated the study in a human A549 alveolar epithelial cell model. Most spores remained unassociated with cells, but the majority of cell-associated spores were in AEC, not in APC. Spore movement was not dependent on internalization, although the location of internalized spores changed in both cell types. Spores also internalized in a non-uniform pattern. Toxins affected neither transit of the spores nor the partitioning of spores into AEC and APC. Our results support a model of spore escape from the alveolus that involves spore clustering with transient passage through intact AEC. However, subsequent transport of spores by APC from the lung to the lymph nodes may occur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Destruction of Bacillus cereus spores in a thick soy bean paste (doenjang) by continuous ohmic heating with five sequential electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ryang, J H; Kim, N H; Lee, B S; Kim, C T; Rhee, M S

    2016-07-01

    This study selected spores from Bacillus cereus FSP-2 strain (the isolate from a commercial doenjang processing line) as the test strain which showed significantly higher thermal resistance (P < 0·05) than B. cereus reference strain (ATCC 27348). The spores in doenjang were subjected to ohmic heating (OH) at 95, 105, 115 and 125°C for 30, 60 or 90 s using a five sequential electrode system (electrical field: 26·7 V cm(-1) ; alternating current frequency: 25 kHz). OH at 105°C for 30-90 s reduced the B. cereus spore count in doenjang samples to <4 log CFU g(-1) . Since OH treatment at 115 and 125°C caused a perceivable colour change in the product (>1·5 National Bureau of Standards units), treatment at 105°C for 60 s was selected and applied on a large scale (500 kg of product). Reliable and reproducible destruction of B. cereus spores occurred; the reductions achieved (to < 4 log CFU g(-1) ) met the Korean national standards. Scanning electron microscopy revealed microstructural alterations in the spores (shrinkage and a distorted outer spore coat). OH is an effective method for destroying B. cereus spores to ensure the microbiological quality and safety of a thick, highly viscous sauce. This study shows that an ohmic heating (OH) using a five sequential electrode system can effectively destroy highly heat-resistant Bacillus cereus spores which have been frequently found in a commercial doenjang processing line without perceivable quality change in the product. In addition, it may demonstrate high potential of the unique OH system used in this study that will further contribute to ensure microbiological quality and safety of crude sauces containing high levels of electrolyte other than doenjang as well. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Novel Strategies for Enhanced Removal of Persistent Bacillus anthracis Surrogates and Clostridium difficile Spores from Skin

    PubMed Central

    Nerandzic, Michelle M.; Rackaityte, Elze; Jury, Lucy A.; Eckart, Kevin; Donskey, Curtis J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Removing spores of Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis from skin is challenging because they are resistant to commonly used antimicrobials and soap and water washing provides only modest efficacy. We hypothesized that hygiene interventions incorporating a sporicidal electrochemically generated hypochlorous acid solution (Vashe®) would reduce the burden of spores on skin. Methods Hands of volunteers were inoculated with non-toxigenic C. difficile spores or B. anthracis spore surrogates to assess the effectiveness of Vashe solution for reducing spores on skin. Reduction in spores was compared for Vashe hygiene interventions versus soap and water (control). To determine the effectiveness of Vashe solution for removal of C. difficile spores from the skin of patients with C. difficile infection (CDI), reductions in levels of spores on skin were compared for soap and water versus Vashe bed baths. Results Spore removal from hands was enhanced with Vashe soak (>2.5 log10 reduction) versus soap and water wash or soak (~2.0 log10 reduction; P <0.05) and Vashe wipes versus alcohol wipes (P <0.01). A combined approach of soap and water wash followed by soaking in Vashe removed >3.5 log10 spores from hands (P <0.01 compared to washing or soaking alone). Bed baths using soap and water (N =26 patients) did not reduce the percentage of positive skin cultures for CDI patients (64% before versus 57% after bathing; P =0.5), whereas bathing with Vashe solution (N =21 patients) significantly reduced skin contamination (54% before versus 8% after bathing; P =0.0001). Vashe was well-tolerated with no evidence of adverse effects on skin. Conclusions Vashe was safe and effective for reducing the burden of B. anthracis surrogates and C. difficile spores on hands. Bed baths with Vashe were effective for reducing C. difficile on skin. These findings suggest a novel strategy to reduce the burden of spores on skin. PMID:23844234

  12. Evaluating Composite Sampling Methods of Bacillus Spores at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Becky M.; Amidan, Brett G.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2016-01-01

    Restoring all facility operations after the 2001 Amerithrax attacks took years to complete, highlighting the need to reduce remediation time. Some of the most time intensive tasks were environmental sampling and sample analyses. Composite sampling allows disparate samples to be combined, with only a single analysis needed, making it a promising method to reduce response times. We developed a statistical experimental design to test three different composite sampling methods: 1) single medium single pass composite (SM-SPC): a single cellulose sponge samples multiple coupons with a single pass across each coupon; 2) single medium multi-pass composite: a single cellulose sponge samples multiple coupons with multiple passes across each coupon (SM-MPC); and 3) multi-medium post-sample composite (MM-MPC): a single cellulose sponge samples a single surface, and then multiple sponges are combined during sample extraction. Five spore concentrations of Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura spores were tested; concentrations ranged from 5 to 100 CFU/coupon (0.00775 to 0.155 CFU/cm2). Study variables included four clean surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, ceramic tile, and painted dry wallboard) and three grime coated/dirty materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile). Analysis of variance for the clean study showed two significant factors: composite method (p< 0.0001) and coupon material (p = 0.0006). Recovery efficiency (RE) was higher overall using the MM-MPC method compared to the SM-SPC and SM-MPC methods. RE with the MM-MPC method for concentrations tested (10 to 100 CFU/coupon) was similar for ceramic tile, dry wall, and stainless steel for clean materials. RE was lowest for vinyl tile with both composite methods. Statistical tests for the dirty study showed RE was significantly higher for vinyl and stainless steel materials, but lower for ceramic tile. These results suggest post-sample compositing can be used to reduce sample analysis time when

  13. Evaluating Composite Sampling Methods of Bacillus Spores at Low Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hess, Becky M; Amidan, Brett G; Anderson, Kevin K; Hutchison, Janine R

    2016-01-01

    Restoring all facility operations after the 2001 Amerithrax attacks took years to complete, highlighting the need to reduce remediation time. Some of the most time intensive tasks were environmental sampling and sample analyses. Composite sampling allows disparate samples to be combined, with only a single analysis needed, making it a promising method to reduce response times. We developed a statistical experimental design to test three different composite sampling methods: 1) single medium single pass composite (SM-SPC): a single cellulose sponge samples multiple coupons with a single pass across each coupon; 2) single medium multi-pass composite: a single cellulose sponge samples multiple coupons with multiple passes across each coupon (SM-MPC); and 3) multi-medium post-sample composite (MM-MPC): a single cellulose sponge samples a single surface, and then multiple sponges are combined during sample extraction. Five spore concentrations of Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura spores were tested; concentrations ranged from 5 to 100 CFU/coupon (0.00775 to 0.155 CFU/cm2). Study variables included four clean surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, ceramic tile, and painted dry wallboard) and three grime coated/dirty materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile). Analysis of variance for the clean study showed two significant factors: composite method (p< 0.0001) and coupon material (p = 0.0006). Recovery efficiency (RE) was higher overall using the MM-MPC method compared to the SM-SPC and SM-MPC methods. RE with the MM-MPC method for concentrations tested (10 to 100 CFU/coupon) was similar for ceramic tile, dry wall, and stainless steel for clean materials. RE was lowest for vinyl tile with both composite methods. Statistical tests for the dirty study showed RE was significantly higher for vinyl and stainless steel materials, but lower for ceramic tile. These results suggest post-sample compositing can be used to reduce sample analysis time when

  14. Evaluating Composite Sampling Methods of Bacillus spores at Low Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Becky M.; Amidan, Brett G.; Anderson, Kevin K.

    Restoring facility operations after the 2001 Amerithrax attacks took over three months to complete, highlighting the need to reduce remediation time. The most time intensive tasks were environmental sampling and sample analyses. Composite sampling allows disparate samples to be combined, with only a single analysis needed, making it a promising method to reduce response times. We developed a statistical experimental design to test three different composite sampling methods: 1) single medium single pass composite: a single cellulose sponge samples multiple coupons; 2) single medium multi-pass composite: a single cellulose sponge is used to sample multiple coupons; and 3) multi-medium post-samplemore » composite: a single cellulose sponge samples a single surface, and then multiple sponges are combined during sample extraction. Five spore concentrations of Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura spores were tested; concentrations ranged from 5 to 100 CFU/coupon (0.00775 to 0.155CFU/cm2, respectively). Study variables included four clean surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, ceramic tile, and painted wallboard) and three grime coated/dirty materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile). Analysis of variance for the clean study showed two significant factors: composite method (p-value < 0.0001) and coupon material (p-value = 0.0008). Recovery efficiency (RE) was higher overall using the post-sample composite (PSC) method compared to single medium composite from both clean and grime coated materials. RE with the PSC method for concentrations tested (10 to 100 CFU/coupon) was similar for ceramic tile, painted wall board, and stainless steel for clean materials. RE was lowest for vinyl tile with both composite methods. Statistical tests for the dirty study showed RE was significantly higher for vinyl and stainless steel materials, but significantly lower for ceramic tile. These results suggest post-sample compositing can be used to reduce sample analysis time

  15. Sporulation boundaries and spore formation kinetics of Bacillus spp. as a function of temperature, pH and a(w).

    PubMed

    Baril, Eugénie; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier; El Jabri, Mohammed; Leguerinel, Ivan; Postollec, Florence; Boulais, Christophe; Carlin, Frédéric; Mafart, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Sporulation niches in the food chain are considered as a source of hazard and are not clearly identified. Determining the sporulation environmental boundaries could contribute to identify potential sporulation niches. Spore formation was determined in a Sporulation Mineral Buffer. The effect of incubation temperature, pH and water activity on time to one spore per mL, maximum sporulation rate and final spore concentration was investigated for a Bacillus weihenstephanensis and a Bacillus licheniformis strain. Sporulation boundaries of B. weihenstephanensis and of B. licheniformis were similar to, or included within, the range of temperatures, pH and water activities supporting growth. For instance, sporulation boundaries of B. weihenstephanensis were evaluated at 5°C, 35°C, pH 5.2 and a(w) 0.960 while growth boundaries were observed at 5°C, 37°C, pH 4.9 and a(w) 0.950. Optimum spore formation was determined at 30°C pH 7.2 for B. weihenstephanensis and at 45°C pH 7.2 for B. licheniformis. Lower temperatures and pH delayed the sporulation process. For instance, the time to one spore per mL was tenfold longer when sporulation occurred at 10°C and 20°C, for each strain respectively, than at optimum sporulation temperature. The relative effect of temperature and pH on sporulation rates and on growth rates is similar. This work suggests that the influence of environmental factors on the quantitative changes in sporulation boundaries and rates was similar to their influence on changes in growth rate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Soya bean tempe extracts show antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus cells and spores.

    PubMed

    Roubos-van den Hil, P J; Dalmas, E; Nout, M J R; Abee, T

    2010-07-01

    Tempe, a Rhizopus ssp.-fermented soya bean food product, was investigated for bacteriostatic and/or bactericidal effects against cells and spores of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Tempe extract showed a high antibacterial activity against B. cereus ATCC 14579 based on optical density and viable count measurements. This growth inhibition was manifested by a 4 log CFU ml(-1) reduction, within the first 15 min of exposure. Tempe extracts also rapidly inactivated B. cereus spores upon germination. Viability and membrane permeability assessments using fluorescence probes showed rapid inactivation and permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane confirming the bactericidal mode of action. Cooked beans and Rhizopus grown on different media did not show antibacterial activity, indicating the unique association of the antibacterial activity with tempe. Subsequent characterization of the antibacterial activity revealed that heat treatment and protease addition nullified the bactericidal effect, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the bioactive compound. During fermentation of soya beans with Rhizopus, compounds are released with extensive antibacterial activity against B. cereus cells and spores. The results show the potential of producing natural antibacterial compounds that could be used as ingredients in food preservation and pathogen control. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Optimization of a sample processing protocol for recovery of Bacillus anthracis spores from soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvestri, Erin E.; Feldhake, David; Griffin, Dale; Lisle, John T.; Nichols, Tonya L.; Shah, Sanjiv; Pemberton, A; Schaefer III, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    Following a release of Bacillus anthracis spores into the environment, there is a potential for lasting environmental contamination in soils. There is a need for detection protocols for B. anthracis in environmental matrices. However, identification of B. anthracis within a soil is a difficult task. Processing soil samples helps to remove debris, chemical components, and biological impurities that can interfere with microbiological detection. This study aimed to optimize a previously used indirect processing protocol, which included a series of washing and centrifugation steps. Optimization of the protocol included: identifying an ideal extraction diluent, variation in the number of wash steps, variation in the initial centrifugation speed, sonication and shaking mechanisms. The optimized protocol was demonstrated at two laboratories in order to evaluate the recovery of spores from loamy and sandy soils. The new protocol demonstrated an improved limit of detection for loamy and sandy soils over the non-optimized protocol with an approximate matrix limit of detection at 14 spores/g of soil. There were no significant differences overall between the two laboratories for either soil type, suggesting that the processing protocol will be robust enough to use at multiple laboratories while achieving comparable recoveries.

  18. Expression and display of UreA of Helicobacter acinonychis on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Hinc, Krzysztof; Isticato, Rachele; Dembek, Marcin; Karczewska, Joanna; Iwanicki, Adam; Peszyńska-Sularz, Grazyna; De Felice, Maurilio; Obuchowski, Michał; Ricca, Ezio

    2010-01-18

    The bacterial endospore (spore) has recently been proposed as a new surface display system. Antigens and enzymes have been successfully exposed on the surface layers of the Bacillus subtilis spore, but only in a few cases the efficiency of expression and the effective surface display and have been determined. We used this heterologous expression system to produce the A subunit of the urease of the animal pathogen Helicobater acinonychis. Ureases are multi-subunit enzymes with a central role in the virulence of various bacterial pathogens and necessary for colonization of the gastric mucosa by the human pathogen H. pylori. The urease subunit UreA has been recognized as a major antigen, able to induce high levels of protection against challenge infections. We expressed UreA from H. acinonychis on the B. subtilis spore coat by using three different spore coat proteins as carriers and compared the efficiency of surface expression and surface display obtained with the three carriers. A combination of western-, dot-blot and immunofluorescence microscopy allowed us to conclude that, when fused to CotB, UreA is displayed on the spore surface (ca. 1 x 10(3) recombinant molecules per spore), whereas when fused to CotC, although most efficiently expressed (7-15 x 10(3) recombinant molecules per spore) and located in the coat layer, it is not displayed on the surface. Experiments with CotG gave results similar to those with CotC, but the CotG-UreA recombinant protein appeared to be partially processed. UreA was efficiently expressed on the spore coat of B. subtilis when fused to CotB, CotC or CotG. Of these three coat proteins CotC allows the highest efficiency of expression, whereas CotB is the most appropriate for the display of heterologous proteins on the spore surface.

  19. In vitro and in vivo analyses of the Bacillus anthracis spore cortex lytic protein SleL

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Emily A.; Sherry, Nora

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial endospore is the most resilient biological structure known. Multiple protective integument layers shield the spore core and promote spore dehydration and dormancy. Dormancy is broken when a spore germinates and becomes a metabolically active vegetative cell. Germination requires the breakdown of a modified layer of peptidoglycan (PG) known as the spore cortex. This study reports in vitro and in vivo analyses of the Bacillus anthracis SleL protein. SleL is a spore cortex lytic enzyme composed of three conserved domains: two N-terminal LysM domains and a C-terminal glycosyl hydrolase family 18 domain. Derivatives of SleL containing both, one or no LysM domains were purified and characterized. SleL is incapable of digesting intact cortical PG of either decoated spores or purified spore sacculi. However, SleL derivatives can hydrolyse fragmented PG substrates containing muramic-δ-lactam recognition determinants. The muropeptides that result from SleL hydrolysis are the products of N-acetylglucosaminidase activity. These muropeptide products are small and readily released from the cortex matrix. Loss of the LysM domain(s) decreases both PG binding and hydrolysis activity but these domains do not appear to determine specificity for muramic-δ-lactam. When the SleL derivatives are expressed in vivo, those proteins lacking one or both LysM domains do not associate with the spore. Instead, these proteins remain in the mother cell and are apparently degraded. SleL with both LysM domains localizes to the coat or cortex of the endospore. The information revealed by elucidating the role of SleL and its domains in B. anthracis sporulation and germination is important in designing new spore decontamination methods. By exploiting germination-specific lytic enzymes, eradication techniques may be greatly simplified. PMID:22343356

  20. Laboratory Investigations on the Survival of Bacillus subtilis Spores in Deliquescent Salt Mars Analog Environments.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Danielle L; Gough, Raina V; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J; Spry, James A; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2017-10-01

    Observed features such as recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water may exist on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars today. The presence of this liquid water, likely in the form of a brine, has important implications for the present-day water cycle, habitability, and planetary protection policies. It is possible that this water is formed, at least partially, by deliquescence of salts, a process during which hygroscopic salts absorb water vapor from the atmosphere and form a saturated liquid brine. We performed laboratory experiments to examine the ability of Bacillus subtilis (B-168) spores, alone or mixed with calcium perchlorate salt (Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 ), to form liquid water via deliquescence under Mars-relevant conditions. Spore survival after exposure to these conditions was examined. An environmental chamber was used to expose the samples to temperature and relative humidity (RH) values similar to those found on Mars, and Raman microscopy was used to identify the phases of water and salt that were present and to confirm the presence of spores. We found that B-168 spores did not condense any detectable water vapor on their own during the diurnal cycle, even at 100% RH. However, when spores were mixed with perchlorate salt, the entire sample deliquesced at low RH values, immersing the spores in a brine solution during the majority of the simulated martian temperature and humidity cycle. After exposure to the simulated diurnal cycles and, in some cases, perchlorate brine, the impact of each environmental scenario on spore survival was estimated by standard plate assay. We found that, if there are deliquescent salts in contact with spores, there is a mechanism for the spores to acquire liquid water starting with only atmospheric water vapor as the H 2 O source. Also, neither crystalline nor liquid Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 is sporicidal despite the low water activity. Key Words: Raman microscopy-Mars-Planetary protection-Salts-Water activity. Astrobiology 17, 997-1008.

  1. Effects of space vacuum and solar ultraviolet irradiation (254 nanometers) on the colony forming ability of Bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.; Horneck, G.; Wollenhaupt, H.

    1973-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores are highly resistant to harsh environments. Therefore, in the Apollo 16 Microbial Response to Space Environment Experiment (M191), these spores were exposed to space vacuum or solar ultraviolet irradiation, or both, to estimate the change of survival for terrestrial organisms in space. The survival of the spores was determined in terms of colony-forming ability. Comparison of the flight results with results of simulation experiments on earth applying high vacuum or ultraviolet irradiation, or both, revealed no remarkable difference. Simultaneous exposure to both these space factors resulted in a synergistic effect (that is, an ultraviolet supersensitivity). Therefore, the change of survival in space is assumed to depend on the degree of protection against solar ultraviolet irradiation.

  2. Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) inactivation of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and milk

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Peng; Georget, Erika S.; Aganovic, Kemal; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultra high pressure homogenization (UHPH) opens up new areas for dynamic high pressure assisted thermal sterilization of liquids. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens spores are resistant to high isostatic pressure and temperature and were suggested as potential surrogate for high pressure thermal sterilization validation. B. amyloliquefaciens spores suspended in PBS buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0), low fat milk (1.5%, pH 6.7), and whole milk (3.5%, pH 6.7) at initial concentration of ~106 CFU/mL were subjected to UHPH treatments at 200, 300, and 350 MPa with an inlet temperature at ~80°C. Thermal inactivation kinetics of B. amyloliquefaciens spores in PBS and milk were assessed with thin wall glass capillaries and modeled using first-order and Weibull models. The residence time during UHPH treatments was estimated to determine the contribution of temperature to spore inactivation by UHPH. No sublethal injury was detected after UHPH treatments using sodium chloride as selective component in the nutrient agar medium. The inactivation profiles of spores in PBS buffer and milk were compared and fat provided no clear protective effect for spores against treatments. Treatment at 200 MPa with valve temperatures lower than 125°C caused no reduction of spores. A reduction of 3.5 log10CFU/mL of B. amyloliquefaciens spores was achieved by treatment at 350 MPa with a valve temperature higher than 150°C. The modeled thermal inactivation and observed inactivation during UHPH treatments suggest that temperature could be the main lethal effect driving inactivation. PMID:26236296

  3. Role of DNA protection and repair in resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to ultrahigh shock pressures simulating hypervelocity impacts.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda; Rabbow, Elke; Reitz, Günther; Meyer, Cornelia; Hornemann, Ulrich; Stöffler, Dieter

    2008-11-01

    Impact-induced ejections of rocks from planetary surfaces are frequent events in the early history of the terrestrial planets and have been considered as a possible first step in the potential interplanetary transfer of microorganisms. Spores of Bacillus subtilis were used as a model system to study the effects of a simulated impact-caused ejection on rock-colonizing microorganisms using a high-explosive plane wave setup. Embedded in different types of rock material, spores were subjected to extremely high shock pressures (5 to 50 GPa) lasting for fractions of microseconds to seconds. Nearly exponential pressure response curves were obtained for spore survival and linear dependency for the induction of sporulation-defective mutants. Spores of strains defective in major small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) (alpha/beta-type SASP) that largely protect the spore DNA and spores of strains deficient in nonhomologous-end-joining DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to the applied shock pressure than were wild-type spores. These results indicate that DNA may be the sensitive target of spores exposed to ultrahigh shock pressures. To assess the nature of the critical physical parameter responsible for spore inactivation by ultrahigh shock pressures, the resulting peak temperature was varied by lowering the preshock temperature, changing the rock composition and porosity, or increasing the water content of the samples. Increased peak temperatures led to increased spore inactivation and reduced mutation rates. The data suggested that besides the potential mechanical stress exerted by the shock pressure, the accompanying high peak temperatures were a critical stress parameter that spores had to cope with.

  4. Survival and germinability of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated Mars solar radiation: implications for life detection and planetary protection.

    PubMed

    Tauscher, Courtney; Schuerger, Andrew C; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial spores have been considered as microbial life that could survive interplanetary transport by natural impact processes or human spaceflight activity. Deposition of terrestrial microbes or their biosignature molecules onto the surface of Mars could negatively impact life detection experiments and planetary protection measures. Simulated Mars solar radiation, particularly the ultraviolet component, has been shown to reduce spore viability, but its effect on spore germination and resulting production of biosignature molecules has not been explored. We examined the survival and germinability of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated martian conditions that include solar radiation. Spores of B. subtilis that contain luciferase resulting from expression of an sspB-luxAB gene fusion were deposited on aluminum coupons to simulate deposition on spacecraft surfaces and exposed to simulated Mars atmosphere and solar radiation. The equivalent of 42 min of simulated Mars solar radiation exposure reduced spore viability by nearly 3 logs, while germination-induced bioluminescence, a measure of germination metabolism, was reduced by less than 1 log. The data indicate that spores can retain the potential to initiate germination-associated metabolic processes and produce biological signature molecules after being rendered nonviable by exposure to Mars solar radiation.

  5. Antimicrobial effects of gold/copper sulphide (Gold/Copper monosulfide) core/shell nanoparticles on Bacillus anthracis spores and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addae, Ebenezer

    Bacillus anthracis is a gram positive, rod shaped and spore forming bacteria. It causes anthrax, a deadly human and animal disease that can kill its victims in three days. The spores of B. anthracis can survive extreme environmental conditions for decades and germinate when exposed to proper conditions. Due to its potential as a bio-weapon, effective disinfectants that pose less harm to the environment and animals are urgently needed. Metal nanoparticles have the potential of killing microbial cells and spores. We present here the effect of Gold/Copper Sulphide core/shell (Au/CuS) nanoparticles on B. anthracis cells and spores. The results indicated that the continuous presence of 0.83 microM during the spore growth in nutrient medium completely inhibited spore outgrowth. Au/CuS nanoparticles at concentration of 4.15 μM completely inactivated B. anthracis cells (x 107) after 30 min of pre-treatment in any of the three buffers including water, PBS, and nutrient broth. However, the same and even higher concentrations of nanoparticles produce no significant spore (x 105) killing after 24 h of pre-treatment. SEM imaging, EDS analysis, and DNA extrusion experiments revealed that nanoparticles damaged the cell membrane causing DNA and cytosolic content efflux and eventually cell death. The study demonstrated the strong antimicrobial activity of Au/CuS nanoparticles to B. anthracis cells and revealed that Au/CuS NPs showed more effective inactivation effect against the cells than they did against the spores.

  6. Evaluation of DNA extraction methods for Bacillus anthracis spores isolated from spiked food samples.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M C; Shields, M J; Hahn, K R; Janzen, T W; Goji, N; Amoako, K K

    2013-07-01

    Nine commercial DNA extraction kits were evaluated for the isolation of DNA from 10-fold serial dilutions of Bacillus anthracis spores using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The three kits determined by qPCR to yield the most sensitive and consistent detection (Epicenter MasterPure Gram Positive; MoBio PowerFood; ABI PrepSeq) were subsequently tested for their ability to isolate DNA from trace amounts of B. anthracis spores (approx. 6·5 × 10(1) and 1·3 × 10(2)  CFU in 25 ml or 50 g of food sample) spiked into complex food samples including apple juice, ham, whole milk and bagged salad and recovered with immunomagnetic separation (IMS). The MasterPure kit effectively and consistently isolated DNA from low amounts of B. anthracis spores captured from food samples. Detection was achieved from apple juice, ham, whole milk and bagged salad from as few as 65 ± 14, 68 ± 8, 66 ± 4 and 52 ± 16 CFU, respectively, and IMS samples were demonstrated to be free of PCR inhibitors. Detection of B. anthracis spores isolated from food by IMS differs substantially between commercial DNA extraction kits; however, sensitive results can be obtained with the MasterPure Gram Positive kit. The extraction protocol identified herein combined with IMS is novel for B. anthracis and allows detection of low levels of B. anthracis spores from contaminated food samples. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada [2013]. Reproduced with the permission of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

  7. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringe, J. W.; Létant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.; Levie, H. W.; Kuhl, A. L.; Murphy, G. A.; Alves, S. W.; Vandersall, K. S.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemical code. Temperatures in the range of 2300-2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly the full 4 ms pressure observation time. After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. Results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%-1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide and aluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. These results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.

  8. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    DOE PAGES

    Tringe, J. W.; Letant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.; ...

    2013-12-17

    We found that energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemicalcode. Temperatures in the range of 2300–2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly themore » full 4 ms pressure observation time. After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. These results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%–1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide andaluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. Our results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.« less

  9. Biological indicators for low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization: the effect of defined media on sporulation, growth index and formaldehyde resistance of spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus strains.

    PubMed

    Wright, A M; Hoxey, E V; Soper, C J; Davies, D J

    1995-10-01

    Preliminary screening was carried out on spores of 29 strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus to determine their potential as biological indicator organisms for low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization. Each strain was sporulated on four chemically defined media. Fourteen strains produced satisfactory sporulation on one or more of the media but there was considerable variation in the extent of sporulation. The growth index of the spores, which was dependent on both the strain of organism and the sporulation medium, ranged from 1% to 90%. The spores were appraised on the basis of their resistance to inactivation by 0.5% w/v formaldehyde in aqueous solution at 70 degrees C. The survivor curves obtained could be characterized into five types on the basis of the shape of the curve. Only five strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus produced spores with the characteristics of high resistance, linear semi-logarithmic survivor curve and high growth index that would be required of a potential biological indicator organism.

  10. Influence of temperature and organic load on chemical disinfection of Geobacillus steareothermophilus spores, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jiewen; Chan, Maria; Brooks, Brian W.; Rohonczy, Liz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of temperature and organic load on the effectiveness of domestic bleach (DB), Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF), and Virkon in inactivating Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores, which are a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores. The spores were suspended in light or heavy organic preparations and the suspension was applied to stainless steel carrier disks. The dried spore inoculum was covered with the disinfectants and the disks were then incubated at various temperatures. At −20°C, the 3 disinfectants caused less than a 2.0 log10 reduction of spores in both organic preparations during a 24-h test period. At 4°C, the DB caused a 4.4 log10 reduction of spores in light organic preparations within 2 h, which was about 3 log10 higher than what was achieved with SDF or Virkon. In heavy organic preparations, after 24 h at 4°C the SDF had reduced the spore count by 4.5 log10, which was about 2 log10 higher than for DB or Virkon. In general, the disinfectants were most effective at 23°C but a 24-h contact time was required for SDF and Virkon to reduce spore counts in both organic preparations by at least 5.5 log10. Comparable disinfecting activity with DB only occurred with the light organic load. In summary, at temperatures as low as 4°C, DB was the most effective disinfectant, inactivating spores within 2 h on surfaces with a light organic load, whereas SDF produced the greatest reduction of spores within 24 h on surfaces with a heavy organic load. PMID:24082400

  11. Regulation and Characterization of a Newly Deduced Cell Wall Hydrolase Gene (cwlJ) Which Affects Germination of Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shu; Yamane, Kunio; Sekiguchi, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    The predicted amino acid sequence of Bacillus subtilis ycbQ (renamed cwlJ) exhibits high similarity to those of the deduced C-terminal catalytic domain of SleBs, the specific cortex-hydrolyzing enzyme of B. cereus and the deduced one of B. subtilis. We constructed a cwlJ::lacZ fusion in the B. subtilis chromosome. The β-galactosidase activity and results of Northern hybridization and primer extension analyses of the cwlJ gene indicated that it is transcribed by EςE RNA polymerase. cwlJ-deficient spores responded to both l-alanine and AGFK, the A580 values of spore suspensions decreased more slowly than in the case of the wild-type strain, and the mutant spores released less dipicolinic acid than did those of the wild-type strain during germination. However, the mutant spores released only slightly less hexosamine than did the wild-type spores. In contrast, B. subtilis sleB spores did not release hexosamine at a significant level. While cwlJ and sleB spores were able to germinate, CJSB (cwlJ sleB) spores could not germinate but exhibited initial germination reactions, e.g., partial decrease in A580 and slow release of dipicolinic acid. CJSB spores became slightly gray after 6 h in the germinant, but their refractility was much greater than that of sleB mutant spores. The roles of the sleB and cwlJ mutations in germination and spore maturation are also discussed. PMID:9515903

  12. Rugged Single Domain Antibody Detection Elements for Bacillus anthracis Spores and Vegetative Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walper, Scott A.; Anderson, George P.; Brozozog Lee, P. Audrey; Glaven, Richard H.; Liu, Jinny L.; Bernstein, Rachel D.; Zabetakis, Dan; Johnson, Linwood; Czarnecki, Jill M.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2012-01-01

    Significant efforts to develop both laboratory and field-based detection assays for an array of potential biological threats started well before the anthrax attacks of 2001 and have continued with renewed urgency following. While numerous assays and methods have been explored that are suitable for laboratory utilization, detection in the field is often complicated by requirements for functionality in austere environments, where limited cold-chain facilities exist. In an effort to overcome these assay limitations for Bacillus anthracis, one of the most recognizable threats, a series of single domain antibodies (sdAbs) were isolated from a phage display library prepared from immunized llamas. Characterization of target specificity, affinity, and thermal stability was conducted for six sdAb families isolated from rounds of selection against the bacterial spore. The protein target for all six sdAb families was determined to be the S-layer protein EA1, which is present in both vegetative cells and bacterial spores. All of the sdAbs examined exhibited a high degree of specificity for the target bacterium and its spore, with affinities in the nanomolar range, and the ability to refold into functional antigen-binding molecules following several rounds of thermal denaturation and refolding. This research demonstrates the capabilities of these sdAbs and their potential for integration into current and developing assays and biosensors. PMID:22412927

  13. Strong and consistently synergistic inactivation of spores of spoilage-associated Bacillus and Geobacillus spp. by high pressure and heat compared with inactivation by heat alone.

    PubMed

    Olivier, S A; Bull, M K; Stone, G; van Diepenbeek, R J; Kormelink, F; Jacops, L; Chapman, B

    2011-04-01

    The inactivation of spores of four low-acid food spoilage organisms by high pressure thermal (HPT) and thermal-only processing was compared on the basis of equivalent thermal lethality calculated at a reference temperature of 121.1°C (F(z)(121.1)(°)(C, 0.1 MPa or 600 MPa)) and characterized as synergistic, not different or protective. In addition, the relative resistances of spores of the different spoilage microorganisms to HPT processing were compared. Processing was performed and inactivation was compared in both laboratory and pilot scale systems and in model (diluted) and actual food products. Where statistical comparisons could be made, at least 4 times and up to around 190 times more inactivation (log(10) reduction/minute at F(T)(z)(121.1)(°)(C)) of spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus sporothermodurans, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus was achieved using HPT, indicating a strong synergistic effect of high pressure and heat. Bacillus coagulans spores were also synergistically inactivated in diluted and undiluted Bolognese sauce but were protected by pressure against thermal inactivation in undiluted cream sauce. Irrespective of the response characterization, B. coagulans and B. sporothermodurans were identified as the most HPT-resistant isolates in the pilot scale and laboratory scale studies, respectively, and G. stearothermophilus as the least in both studies and all products. This is the first study to comprehensively quantitatively characterize the responses of a range of spores of spoilage microorganisms as synergistic (or otherwise) using an integrated thermal-lethality approach (F(T)(z)). The use of the F(T)(z) approach is ultimately important for the translation of commercial minimum microbiologically safe and stable thermal processes to HPT processes.

  14. Artificial and Solar UV Radiation Induces Strand Breaks and Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers in Bacillus subtilis Spore DNA

    PubMed Central

    Slieman, Tony A.; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2000-01-01

    The loss of stratospheric ozone and the accompanying increase in solar UV flux have led to concerns regarding decreases in global microbial productivity. Central to understanding this process is determining the types and amounts of DNA damage in microbes caused by solar UV irradiation. While UV irradiation of dormant Bacillus subtilis endospores results mainly in formation of the “spore photoproduct” 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, genetic evidence indicates that an additional DNA photoproduct(s) may be formed in spores exposed to solar UV-B and UV-A radiation (Y. Xue and W. L. Nicholson, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2221–2227, 1996). We examined the occurrence of double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in spore DNA under several UV irradiation conditions by using enzymatic probes and neutral or alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA from spores irradiated with artificial 254-nm UV-C radiation accumulated single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, while DNA from spores exposed to artificial UV-B radiation (wavelengths, 290 to 310 nm) accumulated only cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. DNA from spores exposed to full-spectrum sunlight (UV-B and UV-A radiation) accumulated single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, whereas DNA from spores exposed to sunlight from which the UV-B component had been removed with a filter (“UV-A sunlight”) accumulated only single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks. Apurinic-apyrimidinic sites were not detected in spore DNA under any of the irradiation conditions used. Our data indicate that there is a complex spectrum of UV photoproducts in DNA of bacterial spores exposed to solar UV irradiation in the environment. PMID:10618224

  15. Inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores by High-Pressure Carbon Dioxide Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Taisuke; Furukawa, Soichi; Hirata, Junichi; Koyama, Tetsuya; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure CO2 treatment has been studied as a promising method for inactivating bacterial spores. In the present study, we compared this method with other sterilization techniques, including heat and pressure treatment. Spores of Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were subjected to CO2 treatment at 30 MPa and 35°C, to high-hydrostatic-pressure treatment at 200 MPa and 65°C, or to heat treatment at 0.1 MPa and 85°C. All of the bacterial spores except the G. stearothermophilus spores were easily inactivated by the heat treatment. The highly heat- and pressure-resistant spores of G. stearothermophilus were not the most resistant to CO2 treatment. We also investigated the influence of temperature on CO2 inactivation of G. stearothermophilus. Treatment with CO2 and 30 MPa of pressure at 95°C for 120 min resulted in 5-log-order spore inactivation, whereas heat treatment at 95°C for 120 min and high-hydrostatic-pressure treatment at 30 MPa and 95°C for 120 min had little effect. The activation energy required for CO2 treatment of G. stearothermophilus spores was lower than the activation energy for heat or pressure treatment. Although heat was not necessary for inactivationby CO2 treatment of G. stearothermophilus spores, CO2 treatment at 95°C was more effective than treatment at 95°C alone. PMID:14660357

  16. Inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores by high-pressure carbon dioxide treatment.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Taisuke; Furukawa, Soichi; Hirata, Junichi; Koyama, Tetsuya; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2003-12-01

    High-pressure CO2 treatment has been studied as a promising method for inactivating bacterial spores. In the present study, we compared this method with other sterilization techniques, including heat and pressure treatment. Spores of Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were subjected to CO2 treatment at 30 MPa and 35 degrees C, to high-hydrostatic-pressure treatment at 200 MPa and 65 degrees C, or to heat treatment at 0.1 MPa and 85 degrees C. All of the bacterial spores except the G. stearothermophilus spores were easily inactivated by the heat treatment. The highly heat- and pressure-resistant spores of G. stearothermophilus were not the most resistant to CO2 treatment. We also investigated the influence of temperature on CO2 inactivation of G. stearothermophilus. Treatment with CO2 and 30 MPa of pressure at 95 degrees C for 120 min resulted in 5-log-order spore inactivation, whereas heat treatment at 95 degrees C for 120 min and high-hydrostatic-pressure treatment at 30 MPa and 95 degrees C for 120 min had little effect. The activation energy required for CO2 treatment of G. stearothermophilus spores was lower than the activation energy for heat or pressure treatment. Although heat was not necessary for inactivationby CO2 treatment of G. stearothermophilus spores, CO2 treatment at 95 degrees C was more effective than treatment at 95 degrees C alone.

  17. Characterization of lipoteichoic acid structures from three probiotic Bacillus strains: involvement of D-alanine in their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Villéger, Romain; Saad, Naima; Grenier, Karine; Falourd, Xavier; Foucat, Loïc; Urdaci, Maria C; Bressollier, Philippe; Ouk, Tan-Sothea

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics represent a potential strategy to influence the host's immune system thereby modulating immune response. Lipoteichoic Acid (LTA) is a major immune-stimulating component of Gram-positive cell envelopes. This amphiphilic polymer, anchored in the cytoplasmic membrane by means of its glycolipid component, typically consists of a poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain with D-alanine and/or glycosyl substitutions. LTA is known to stimulate macrophages in vitro, leading to secretion of inflammatory mediators such as Nitric Oxide (NO). This study investigates the structure-activity relationship of purified LTA from three probiotic Bacillus strains (Bacillus cereus CH, Bacillus subtilis CU1 and Bacillus clausii O/C). LTAs were extracted from bacterial cultures and purified. Chemical modification by means of hydrolysis at pH 8.5 was performed to remove D-alanine. The molecular structure of native and modified LTAs was determined by (1)H NMR and GC-MS, and their inflammatory potential investigated by measuring NO production by RAW 264.7 macrophages. Structural analysis revealed several differences between the newly characterized LTAs, mainly relating to their D-alanylation rates and poly (glycerol-phosphate) chain length. We observed induction of NO production by LTAs from B. subtilis and B. clausii, whereas weaker NO production was observed with B. cereus. LTA dealanylation abrogated NO production independently of the glycolipid component, suggesting that immunomodulatory potential depends on D-alanine substitutions. D-alanine may control the spatial configuration of LTAs and their recognition by cell receptors. Knowledge of molecular mechanisms behind the immunomodulatory abilities of probiotics is essential to optimize their use.

  18. Isolation of rpoB mutations causing rifampicin resistance in Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to simulated Martian surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Amy E; Schuerger, Andrew C; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2008-12-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial spores are considered prime candidates for Earth-to-Mars transport by natural processes and human spaceflight activities. Previous studies have shown that exposure of Bacillus subtilis spores to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) characteristic of space both increased the spontaneous mutation rate and altered the spectrum of mutation in various marker genes; but, to date, mutagenesis studies have not been performed on spores exposed to milder low pressures encountered in the martian environment. Mutations to rifampicin-resistance (Rif(R)) were isolated in B. subtilis spores exposed to simulated martian atmosphere (99.9% CO(2), 710 Pa) for 21 days in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) and compared to parallel Earth controls. Exposure in the MSC reduced spore viability by approximately 67% compared to Earth controls, but this decrease was not statistically significant (P = 0.3321). The frequency of mutation to Rif(R) was also not significantly increased in the MSC compared to Earth-exposed spores (P = 0.479). Forty-two and 51 Rif(R) mutant spores were isolated from the MSC- and Earth-exposed controls, respectively. Nucleotide sequencing located the Rif(R) mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase at residue V135F of the N-cluster and at residues Q469K/L, H482D/P/R/Y, and S487L in Cluster I. No mutations were found in rpoB Clusters II or III. Two new alleles, Q469L and H482D, previously unreported in B. subtilis rpoB, were isolated from spores exposed in the MSC; otherwise, only slight differences were observed in the spectra of spontaneous Rif(R) mutations from spores exposed to Earth vs. the MSC. However, both spectra are distinctly different from Rif(R) mutations previously reported arising from B. subtilis spores exposed to simulated space vacuum.

  19. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J. W.; Létant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.

    2013-12-21

    Energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemical code. Temperatures in the range of 2300–2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly the full 4 ms pressure observation time.more » After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. Results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%–1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide and aluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. These results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.« less

  20. Investigating the Detrimental Effects of Low Pressure Plasma Sterilization on the Survival of Bacillus subtilis Spores Using Live Cell Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Felix M; Raguse, Marina; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Madela, Kazimierz; Awakowicz, Peter; Laue, Michael; Stapelmann, Katharina; Moeller, Ralf

    2017-11-30

    Plasma sterilization is a promising alternative to conventional sterilization methods for industrial, clinical, and spaceflight purposes. Low pressure plasma (LPP) discharges contain a broad spectrum of active species, which lead to rapid microbial inactivation. To study the efficiency and mechanisms of sterilization by LPP, we use spores of the test organism Bacillus subtilis because of their extraordinary resistance against conventional sterilization procedures. We describe the production of B. subtilis spore monolayers, the sterilization process by low pressure plasma in a double inductively coupled plasma reactor, the characterization of spore morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the analysis of germination and outgrowth of spores by live cell microscopy. A major target of plasma species is genomic material (DNA) and repair of plasma-induced DNA lesions upon spore revival is crucial for survival of the organism. Here, we study the germination capacity of spores and the role of DNA repair during spore germination and outgrowth after treatment with LPP by tracking fluorescently-labelled DNA repair proteins (RecA) with time-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy. Treated and untreated spore monolayers are activated for germination and visualized with an inverted confocal live cell microscope over time to follow the reaction of individual spores. Our observations reveal that the fraction of germinating and outgrowing spores is dependent on the duration of LPP-treatment reaching a minimum after 120 s. RecA-YFP (yellow fluorescence protein) fluorescence was detected only in few spores and developed in all outgrowing cells with a slight elevation in LPP-treated spores. Moreover, some of the vegetative bacteria derived from LPP-treated spores showed an increase in cytoplasm and tended to lyse. The described methods for analysis of individual spores could be exemplary for the study of other aspects of spore germination and outgrowth.

  1. Isolation of the Paenibacillus phoenicis, a Spore-Forming Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benardini, James N.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Osman, Shariff; Satomi, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    A microorganism was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Paenibacillus and represents a novel species. Bacillus spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Spores of Bacillus species are of particular concern to planetary protection due to the extreme resistance of some members of the genus to space environmental conditions such as UV and gamma radiation, vacuum, oxidation, and temperature fluctuation. These resistive spore phenotypes have enhanced potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, of terrestrial microbes on another solar body. Due to decreased nutrient conditions within spacecraft assembly facility clean rooms, the vegetative cells of Bacillus species and other spore-forming Paenibacillus species are induced to sporulate, thereby enhancing their survivability of bioreduction

  2. Effect of thymol in heating and recovery media on the isothermal and non-isothermal heat resistance of Bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Maria-Dolores; Conesa, Raquel; Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-06-01

    Members of the genus Bacillus include important food-borne pathogen and spoilage microorganisms for food industry. Essential oils are natural products extracted from herbs and spices, which can be used as natural preservatives in many foods because of their antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic properties. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of the addition of different concentrations of thymol to the heating and recovery media on the thermal resistance of spores of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis at different temperatures. While the heat resistance was hardly reduced when thymol was present in the heating medium, the effect in the recovery medium was greater, reducing the D100 °C values down to one third for B. subtilis and B. cereus when 0.5 mM thymol was added. This effect was dose dependent and was also observed at other heating temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacillus Endospores Isolated from Granite: Close Molecular Relationships to Globally Distributed Bacillus spp. from Endolithic and Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to catalog spore-forming bacterial populations in environments conducive to interplanetary transfer by natural impacts or by human spaceflight activities, spores of Bacillus spp. were isolated and characterized from the interior of near-subsurface granite rock collected from the Santa Catalina Mountains, AZ. Granite was found to contain ∼500 cultivable Bacillus spores and ∼104 total cultivable bacteria per gram. Many of the Bacillus isolates produced a previously unreported diffusible blue fluorescent compound. Two strains of eight tested exhibited increased spore UV resistance relative to a standard Bacillus subtilis UV biodosimetry strain. Fifty-six isolates were identified by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) and 16S rRNA gene analysis as most closely related to B. megaterium (15 isolates), B. simplex (23 isolates), B. drentensis (6 isolates), B. niacini (7 isolates), and, likely, a new species related to B. barbaricus (5 isolates). Granite isolates were very closely related to a limited number of Bacillus spp. previously found to inhabit (i) globally distributed endolithic sites such as biodeteriorated murals, stone tombs, underground caverns, and rock concretions and (ii) extreme environments such as Antarctic soils, deep sea floor sediments, and spacecraft assembly facilities. Thus, it appears that the occurrence of Bacillus spp. in endolithic or extreme environments is not accidental but that these environments create unique niches excluding most Bacillus spp. but to which a limited number of Bacillus spp. are specifically adapted. PMID:16597992

  4. Survivability of bare, individual Bacillus subtilis spores to high-velocity surface impact: Implications for microbial transfer through space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Brandon L.; Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory experiments show that endospores of Bacillus subtilis survive impact against a solid surface at velocities as high as 299 ±28 m/s. During impact, spores experience and survive accelerations of at least 1010 m/s2. The spores were introduced into a vacuum chamber using an electrospray source and accelerated to a narrow velocity distribution by entrainment in a differentially pumped gas flow. Different velocity ranges were studied by modifying the gas flow parameters. The spores were electrically charged, allowing direct measurement of the velocity of each spore as it passed through an image charge detector prior to surface impact. Spores impacted a glass surface and were collected for subsequent analysis by culturing. Most spores survived impact at all measured velocities. These experiments differ fundamentally from other studies that show either shock or impact survivability of bacteria embedded within or on the surface of a projectile. Bacteria in the present experiments undergo a single interaction with a solid surface at the full impact velocity, in the absence of any other effects such as cushioning due to microbe agglomerations, deceleration due to air or vapor, or transfer of impact shock through solid or liquid media. During these full-velocity impact events, the spores experience extremely high decelerations. This study is the first reported instance of accelerations of this magnitude experienced during a bacteria impact event. These results are discussed in the context of potential transfer of viable microbes in space and other scenarios involving surface impacts at high velocities.

  5. Persistence and Decontamination of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii Spores on Corroded Iron in a Model Drinking Water System▿

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Rice, Eugene W.; Bishop, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    Persistence of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores on corroded iron coupons in drinking water was studied using a biofilm annular reactor. Spores were inoculated at 106 CFU/ml in the dechlorinated reactor bulk water. The dechlorination allowed for observation of the effects of hydraulic shear and biofilm sloughing on persistence. Approximately 50% of the spores initially adhered to the corroded iron surface were not detected after 1 month. Addition of a stable 10 mg/liter free chlorine residual after 1 month led to a 2-log10 reduction of adhered B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii, but levels on the coupons quickly stabilized thereafter. Increasing the free chlorine concentration to 25 or 70 mg/liter had no additional effect on inactivation. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores injected in the presence of a typical distribution system chlorine residual (∼0.75 mg/liter) resulted in a steady reduction of adhered B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii over 1 month, but levels on the coupons eventually stabilized. Adding elevated chlorine levels (10, 25, and 70 mg/liter) after 1 month had no effect on the rate of inactivation. Decontamination with elevated free chlorine levels immediately after spore injection resulted in a 3-log10 reduction within 2 weeks, but the rate of inactivation leveled off afterward. This indicates that free chlorine did not reach portions of the corroded iron surface where B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores had adhered. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores are capable of persisting for an extended time in the presence of high levels of free chlorine. PMID:17308186

  6. A procedure for estimating Bacillus cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples - A potential exploration technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watterson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of bacterial spores of the Bacillus cereus group in soils and stream sediments appears to be a sensitive indicator of several types of concealed mineral deposits, including vein-type gold deposits. The B. cereus assay is rapid, inexpensive, and inherently reproducible. The test, currently under investigation for its potential in mineral exploration, is recommended for use on a research basis. Among the aerobic spore-forming bacilli, only B. cereus and closely related strains produce an opaque zone in egg-yolk emulsion agar. This characteristic, also known as the Nagler of lecitho-vitellin reaction, has long been used to rapidly indentify and estimate presumptive B. cereus. The test is here adapted to permit rapid estimation of B. cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples. Relative standard deviation was 10.3% on counts obtained from two 40-replicate pour-plate determinations. As many as 40 samples per day can be processed. Enough procedural detail is included to permit investigation of the test in conventional geochemical laboratories using standard microbiological safety precautions. ?? 1985.

  7. Label-Free Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spore Uptake in Macrophage Cells Using Analytical Optical Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Colin G; Hart, Sean; Leski, Tomasz A; Terray, Alex; Lu, Qin

    2017-10-03

    Understanding the interaction between macrophage cells and Bacillus anthracis spores is of significant importance with respect to both anthrax disease progression, spore detection for biodefense, as well as understanding cell clearance in general. While most detection systems rely on specific molecules, such as nucleic acids or proteins and fluorescent labels to identify the target(s) of interest, label-free methods probe changes in intrinsic properties, such as size, refractive index, and morphology, for correlation with a particular biological event. Optical chromatography is a label free technique that uses the balance between optical and fluidic drag forces within a microfluidic channel to determine the optical force on cells or particles. Here we show an increase in the optical force experienced by RAW264.7 macrophage cells upon the uptake of both microparticles and B. anthracis Sterne 34F2 spores. In the case of spores, the exposure was detected in as little as 1 h without the use of antibodies or fluorescent labels of any kind. An increase in the optical force was also seen in macrophage cells treated with cytochalasin D, both with and without a subsequent exposure to spores, indicating that a portion of the increase in the optical force arises independent of phagocytosis. These results demonstrate the capability of optical chromatography to detect subtle biological differences in a rapid and sensitive manner and suggest future potential in a range of applications, including the detection of biological threat agents for biodefense and pathogens for the prevention of sepsis and other diseases.

  8. Spectroscopy and viability of Bacillus subtilis spores after ultraviolet irradiation: implications for the detection of potential bacterial life on Europa.

    PubMed

    Noell, Aaron C; Ely, Tucker; Bolser, Diana K; Darrach, Halley; Hodyss, Robert; Johnson, Paul V; Hein, Jeffrey D; Ponce, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    One of the most habitable environments in the Solar System outside of Earth may exist underneath the ice on Europa. In the near future, our best chance to look for chemical signatures of a habitable environment (or life itself) will likely be at the inhospitable icy surface. Therefore, it is important to understand the ability of organic signatures of life and life itself to persist under simulated europan surface conditions. Toward that end, this work examined the UV photolysis of Bacillus subtilis spores and their chemical marker dipicolinic acid (DPA) at temperatures and pressures relevant to Europa. In addition, inactivation curves for the spores at 100 K, 100 K covered in one micron of ice, and 298 K were measured to determine the probability for spore survival at the surface. Fourier transform infrared spectra of irradiated DPA showed a loss of carboxyl groups to CO2 as expected but unexpectedly showed significant opening of the heterocyclic ring, even for wavelengths>200 nm. Both DPA and B. subtilis spores showed identical unknown spectral bands of photoproducts after irradiation, further highlighting the importance of DPA in the photochemistry of spores. Spore survival was enhanced at 100 K by ∼5× relative to 298 K, but 99.9% of spores were still inactivated after the equivalent of ∼25 h of exposure on the europan surface.

  9. Impacts of sporulation temperature, exposure to compost matrix and temperature on survival of Bacillus cereus spores during livestock mortality composting.

    PubMed

    Stanford, K; Reuter, T; Gilroyed, B H; McAllister, T A

    2015-04-01

    To investigate impact of sporulation and compost temperatures on feasibility of composting for disposal of carcasses contaminated with Bacillus anthracis. Two strains of B. cereus, 805 and 1391, were sporulated at either 20 or 37°C (Sporulation temperature, ST) and 7 Log10 CFU g(-1) spores added to autoclaved manure in nylon bags (pore size 50 μm) or in sealed vials. Vials and nylon bags were embedded into compost in either a sawdust or manure matrix each containing 16 bovine mortalities (average weight 617 ± 33 kg), retrieved from compost at intervals over 217 days and survival of B. cereus spores assessed. A ST of 20°C decreased spore survival by 1·4 log10 CFU g(-1) (P < 0·05) compared to a 37°C ST. Spore survival was strain dependent. Compost temperatures >55°C reduced spore survival (P < 0·05) and more frequently occurred in the sawdust matrix. Sporulation and compost temperatures were key factors influencing survival of B. cereus spores in mortality compost. Composting may be most appropriate for the disposal of carcasses infected with B. anthracis at ambient temperatures ≤20°C under thermophillic composting conditions (>55°C). © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. The combined effect of pasteurization intensity, water activity, pH and incubation temperature on the survival and outgrowth of spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus pumilus in artificial media and food products.

    PubMed

    Samapundo, S; Heyndrickx, M; Xhaferi, R; de Baenst, I; Devlieghere, F

    2014-07-02

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the combined effects of pasteurization intensity (no heat treatment and 10 min at 70, 80 and 90 °C), water activity (aw) (0.960-0.990), pH (5.5-7.0) and storage temperature (7 and 10 °C) on the survival and outgrowth of psychrotolerant spores of Bacillus cereus FF119b and Bacillus pumilus FF128a. The experiments were performed in both artificial media and a validation was performed on real food products (cream, béchamel sauce and mixed vegetable soup). It was determined that in general, heat treatments of 10 min at 70 °C or 80 °C activated the spores of both B. cereus FF119b and B. pumilus FF128a, resulting in faster outgrowth compared to native (non-heat treated) spores. A pasteurization treatment of 10 min at 90 °C generally resulted in the longest lag periods before outgrowth of both isolates. Some of the spores were inactivated by this heat treatment, with more inactivation being observed the lower the pH value of the heating medium. Despite this, it was also observed that under some conditions the remaining (surviving) spores were actually activated as their outgrowth took place after a shorter period of time compared to native non-heated spores. While the response of B. cereus FF119b to the pasteurization intensity in cream and béchamel sauce was similar to the trends observed in the artificial media at 10 °C, in difference, outgrowth was only observed at 7 °C in both products when the spores had been heated for 10 min at 80 °C. Moreover, no inactivation was observed in cream or béchamel sauce when the spores were heated for 10 min at 90 °C in these two products. This was attributed to the protective effect of fat in the cream and the ingredients in the béchamel sauce. The study provides some insight into the potential microbial (stability and safety) consequences of the current trend towards milder heat treatments which is being pursued in the food industry. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Reaerosolization of Fluidized Spores in Ventilation Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Krauter, Paula; Biermann, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    This project examined dry, fluidized spore reaerosolization in a heating, ventilating, and air conditioning duct system. Experiments using spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, a nonpathogenic surrogate for Bacillus anthracis, were conducted to delineate the extent of spore reaerosolization behavior under normal indoor airflow conditions. Short-term (five air-volume exchanges), long-term (up to 21,000 air-volume exchanges), and cycled (on-off) reaerosolization tests were conducted using two common duct materials. Spores were released into the test apparatus in turbulent airflow (Reynolds number, 26,000). After the initial pulse of spores (approximately 1010 to 1011 viable spores) was released, high-efficiency particulate air filters were added to the air intake. Airflow was again used to perturb the spores that had previously deposited onto the duct. Resuspension rates on both steel and plastic duct materials were between 10−3 and 10−5 per second, which decreased to 10 times less than initial rates within 30 min. Pulsed flow caused an initial spike in spore resuspension concentration that rapidly decreased. The resuspension rates were greater than those predicted by resuspension models for contamination in the environment, a result attributed to surface roughness differences. There was no difference between spore reaerosolization from metal and that from plastic duct surfaces over 5 hours of constant airflow. The spores that deposited onto the duct remained a persistent source of contamination over a period of several hours. PMID:17293522

  12. Protection of farm goats by combinations of recombinant peptides and formalin inactivated spores from a lethal Bacillus anthracis challenge under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Susanne M; Buyuk, Fatih; Celebi, Ozgur; Demiraslan, Hayati; Doganay, Mehmet; Sahin, Mitat; Moehring, Jens; Ndumnego, Okechukwu C; Otlu, Salih; van Heerden, Henriette; Beyer, Wolfgang

    2017-07-12

    Bacillus (B.) anthracis, the causal agent of anthrax, is effectively controlled by the Sterne live spore vaccine (34F2) in animals. However, live spore vaccines are not suitable for simultaneous vaccination and antibiotic treatment of animals being at risk of infection in an outbreak situation. Non-living vaccines could close this gap. In this study a combination of recombinant protective antigen and recombinant Bacillus collagen-like antigen (rBclA) with or without formalin inactivated spores (FIS), targeted at raising an immune response against both the toxins and the spore of B. anthracis, was tested for immunogenicity and protectiveness in goats. Two groups of goats received from local farmers of the Kars region of Turkey were immunized thrice in three weeks intervals and challenged together with non-vaccinated controls with virulent B. anthracis, four weeks after last immunization. In spite of low or none measurable toxin neutralizing antibodies and a surprisingly low immune response to the rBclA, 80% of the goats receiving the complete vaccine were protected against a lethal challenge. Moreover, the course of antibody responses indicates that a two-step vaccination schedule could be sufficient for protection. The combination of recombinant protein antigens and FIS induces a protective immune response in goats. The non-living nature of this vaccine would allow for a concomitant antibiotic treatment and vaccination procedure. Further studies should clarify how this vaccine candidate performs in a post infection scenario controlled by antibiotics.

  13. Strong and Consistently Synergistic Inactivation of Spores of Spoilage-Associated Bacillus and Geobacillus spp. by High Pressure and Heat Compared with Inactivation by Heat Alone ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, S. A.; Bull, M. K.; Stone, G.; van Diepenbeek, R. J.; Kormelink, F.; Jacops, L.; Chapman, B.

    2011-01-01

    The inactivation of spores of four low-acid food spoilage organisms by high pressure thermal (HPT) and thermal-only processing was compared on the basis of equivalent thermal lethality calculated at a reference temperature of 121.1°C (Fz121.1°C, 0.1 MPa or 600 MPa) and characterized as synergistic, not different or protective. In addition, the relative resistances of spores of the different spoilage microorganisms to HPT processing were compared. Processing was performed and inactivation was compared in both laboratory and pilot scale systems and in model (diluted) and actual food products. Where statistical comparisons could be made, at least 4 times and up to around 190 times more inactivation (log10 reduction/minute at FTz121.1°C) of spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus sporothermodurans, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus was achieved using HPT, indicating a strong synergistic effect of high pressure and heat. Bacillus coagulans spores were also synergistically inactivated in diluted and undiluted Bolognese sauce but were protected by pressure against thermal inactivation in undiluted cream sauce. Irrespective of the response characterization, B. coagulans and B. sporothermodurans were identified as the most HPT-resistant isolates in the pilot scale and laboratory scale studies, respectively, and G. stearothermophilus as the least in both studies and all products. This is the first study to comprehensively quantitatively characterize the responses of a range of spores of spoilage microorganisms as synergistic (or otherwise) using an integrated thermal-lethality approach (FTz). The use of the FTz approach is ultimately important for the translation of commercial minimum microbiologically safe and stable thermal processes to HPT processes. PMID:21278265

  14. [Survival of Bacillus anthracis spores in various tannery baths].

    PubMed

    Mendrycka, M; Mierzejewski, J

    2000-01-01

    The influence of tannery baths: liming, deliming, bating, pickling, tanning, retannage on the survival and on the germination dynamism of B. anthracis spores (Sterne strain) was investigated. The periods and the conditions of this influence were established according to technological process of cow hide tannage. Practically after every bath some part of the spores remained vital. The most effective killing of spores occurred after pickling, liming and deliming. Inversely, the most viable spores remained after bating and retannage process. The lack of correlation that was observed between survival and germination of spores after retannage bath can be explained by different mechanism of spores germination inhibition and their killing.

  15. Testing Nucleoside Analogues as Inhibitors of Bacillus anthracis Spore Germination In Vitro and in Macrophage Cell Culture ▿

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Zadkiel; Lee, Kyungae; Abel-Santos, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiological agent of anthrax, has a dormant stage in its life cycle known as the endospore. When conditions become favorable, spores germinate and transform into vegetative bacteria. In inhalational anthrax, the most fatal manifestation of the disease, spores enter the organism through the respiratory tract and germinate in phagosomes of alveolar macrophages. Germinated cells can then produce toxins and establish infection. Thus, germination is a crucial step for the initiation of pathogenesis. B. anthracis spore germination is activated by a wide variety of amino acids and purine nucleosides. Inosine and l-alanine are the two most potent nutrient germinants in vitro. Recent studies have shown that germination can be hindered by isomers or structural analogues of germinants. 6-Thioguanosine (6-TG), a guanosine analogue, is able to inhibit germination and prevent B. anthracis toxin-mediated necrosis in murine macrophages. In this study, we screened 46 different nucleoside analogues as activators or inhibitors of B. anthracis spore germination in vitro. These compounds were also tested for their ability to protect the macrophage cell line J774a.1 from B. anthracis cytotoxicity. Structure-activity relationship analysis of activators and inhibitors clarified the binding mechanisms of nucleosides to B. anthracis spores. In contrast, no structure-activity relationships were apparent for compounds that protected macrophages from B. anthracis-mediated killing. However, multiple inhibitors additively protected macrophages from B. anthracis. PMID:20921305

  16. Evaluation of rayon swab surface sample collection method for Bacillus spores from nonporous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, G S; Betty, R G; Brockmann, J E; Lucero, D A; Souza, C A; Walsh, K S; Boucher, R M; Tezak, M S; Wilson, M C; Rudolph, T; Lindquist, H D A; Martinez, K F

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended swab surface sample collection method for recovery efficiency and limit of detection for powdered Bacillus spores from nonporous surfaces. Stainless steel and painted wallboard surface coupons were seeded with dry aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores and surface concentrations determined. The observed mean rayon swab recovery efficiency from stainless steel was 0.41 with a standard deviation (SD) of +/-0.17 and for painted wallboard was 0.41 with an SD of +/-0.23. Evaluation of a sonication extraction method for the rayon swabs produced a mean extraction efficiency of 0.76 with an SD of +/-0.12. Swab recovery quantitative limits of detection were estimated at 25 colony forming units (CFU) per sample area for both stainless steel and painted wallboard. The swab sample collection method may be appropriate for small area sampling (10 -25 cm2) with a high agent concentration, but has limited value for large surface areas with a low agent concentration. The results of this study provide information necessary for the interpretation of swab environmental sample collection data, that is, positive swab samples are indicative of high surface concentrations and may imply a potential for exposure, whereas negative swab samples do not assure that organisms are absent from the surfaces sampled and may not assure the absence of the potential for exposure. It is critical from a public health perspective that the information obtained is accurate and reproducible. The consequence of an inappropriate public health response founded on information gathered using an ineffective or unreliable sample collection method has the potential for undesired social and economic impact.

  17. Evaluation of a Wipe Surface Sample Method for Collection of Bacillus Spores from Nonporous Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gary S.; Betty, Rita G.; Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Souza, Caroline A.; Walsh, Kathryn S.; Boucher, Raymond M.; Tezak, Mathew; Wilson, Mollye C.; Rudolph, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Polyester-rayon blend wipes were evaluated for efficiency of extraction and recovery of powdered Bacillus atrophaeus spores from stainless steel and painted wallboard surfaces. Method limits of detection were also estimated for both surfaces. The observed mean efficiency of polyester-rayon blend wipe recovery from stainless steel was 0.35 with a standard deviation of ±0.12, and for painted wallboard it was 0.29 with a standard deviation of ±0.15. Evaluation of a sonication extraction method for the polyester-rayon blend wipes produced a mean extraction efficiency of 0.93 with a standard deviation of ±0.09. Wipe recovery quantitative limits of detection were estimated at 90 CFU per unit of stainless steel sample area and 105 CFU per unit of painted wallboard sample area. The method recovery efficiency and limits of detection established in this work provide useful guidance for the planning of incident response environmental sampling following the release of a biological agent such as Bacillus anthracis. PMID:17122390

  18. Evaluation of a wipe surface sample method for collection of Bacillus spores from nonporous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gary S; Betty, Rita G; Brockmann, John E; Lucero, Daniel A; Souza, Caroline A; Walsh, Kathryn S; Boucher, Raymond M; Tezak, Mathew; Wilson, Mollye C; Rudolph, Todd

    2007-02-01

    Polyester-rayon blend wipes were evaluated for efficiency of extraction and recovery of powdered Bacillus atrophaeus spores from stainless steel and painted wallboard surfaces. Method limits of detection were also estimated for both surfaces. The observed mean efficiency of polyester-rayon blend wipe recovery from stainless steel was 0.35 with a standard deviation of +/-0.12, and for painted wallboard it was 0.29 with a standard deviation of +/-0.15. Evaluation of a sonication extraction method for the polyester-rayon blend wipes produced a mean extraction efficiency of 0.93 with a standard deviation of +/-0.09. Wipe recovery quantitative limits of detection were estimated at 90 CFU per unit of stainless steel sample area and 105 CFU per unit of painted wallboard sample area. The method recovery efficiency and limits of detection established in this work provide useful guidance for the planning of incident response environmental sampling following the release of a biological agent such as Bacillus anthracis.

  19. Bacillus subtilis spore with surface display of paramyosin from Clonorchis sinensis potentializes a promising oral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hengchang; Lin, Zhipeng; Zhao, Lu; Chen, Tingjin; Shang, Mei; Jiang, Hongye; Tang, Zeli; Zhou, Xinyi; Shi, Mengchen; Zhou, Lina; Ren, Pengli; Qu, Honglin; Lin, Jinsi; Li, Xuerong; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2018-03-07

    Clonorchiasis caused by Clonorchis sinensis has become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Effective prevention strategies are urgently needed to control this food-borne infectious disease. Previous studies indicated that paramyosin of C. sinensis (CsPmy) is a potential vaccine candidate. We constructed a recombinant plasmid of PEB03-CotC-CsPmy, transformed it into Bacillus subtilis WB600 strain (B.s-CotC-CsPmy), and confirmed CsPmy expression on the spore surface by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay. The immune response and protective efficacy of the recombinant spore were investigated in BALB/c mice after intragastrical or intraperitoneal immunization. Additionally, biochemical enzyme activities in sera, the intestinal histopathology and gut microflora of spore-treated mice were investigated. CsPmy was successfully expressed on the spore surface and the fusion protein on the spore surface with thermostability. Specific IgG in sera and intestinal mucus were increased after intraperitoneal and intragastrical immunization. The sIgA level in intestinal mucus, feces and bile of B.s-CotC-CsPmy orally treated mice were also significantly raised. Furthermore, numerous IgA-secreting cells were detected in intestinal mucosa of intragastrically immunized mice. No inflammatory injury was observed in the intestinal tissues and there was no significant difference in levels of enzyme-indicated liver function among the groups. Additionally, the diversity and abundance of gut microbiota were not changed after oral immunization. Intragastric and intraperitoneal immunization of B.s-CotC-CsPmy spores in mice resulted in egg reduction rates of 48.3 and 51.2% after challenge infection, respectively. Liver fibrosis degree in B.s-CotC-CsPmy spores treated groups was also significantly reduced. CsPmy expressed on the spore surface maintained its immunogenicity. Both intragastrical and intraperitoneal immunization with B.s-CotC-CsPmy spores induced systemic and

  20. Selection and optimization of Bacillus atrophaeus inoculum medium and its effect on spore yield and thermal resistance.

    PubMed

    Sella, Sandra Regina B R; Dlugokenski, Regina Elizabete F; Guizelini, Belquis P; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Medeiros, Adriane B P; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2008-12-01

    Bacillus atrophaeus's spores are used as biological indicators to monitor sterilization processes and as a Bacillus anthracis surrogate in the development and validation of biosafety methods. The regular use of biological indicators to evaluate the efficiency of sterilization processes is a legal requirement for health services. However, its high cost hinders its widespread use. Aiming at developing a cost-effective inoculum medium, soybean molasses and nutrient-supplemented vinasse were evaluated for their effectiveness in solid-state fermentation (SSF). In biomass production, the results demonstrated that all tested compositions favor growth by providing the nutritional demands of the microorganism. Optimum casein peptone and soybean molasses concentration (1.0%, 2.5%, or 4.0%) was determined by a 2((2-0)) factorial experimental design. The results have showed a positive influence of peptone on biomass production. In order to define peptone final concentration (4.0% or 6.0%), a 2(2) factorial experimental design was used. An optimized medium containing 4.0% soybean molasses and 4.0% casein peptone was similar in performance to a synthetic control medium (tryptone soy broth) in dry-heat thermal-resistant spore production by SSF. An experiment performed under optimum SSF conditions resulted in 1.9 x 10(10) CFU g(-1) dry matter with D (160 degrees C) = 5.2 +/- 0.2 min.

  1. Development of size-selective sampling of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores from simulated building air intake mixtures for analysis via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gibb-Snyder, Emily; Gullett, Brian; Ryan, Shawn; Oudejans, Lukas; Touati, Abderrahmane

    2006-08-01

    Size-selective sampling of Bacillus anthracis surrogate spores from realistic, common aerosol mixtures was developed for analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). A two-stage impactor was found to be the preferential sampling technique for LIBS analysis because it was able to concentrate the spores in the mixtures while decreasing the collection of potentially interfering aerosols. Three common spore/aerosol scenarios were evaluated, diesel truck exhaust (to simulate a truck running outside of a building air intake), urban outdoor aerosol (to simulate common building air), and finally a protein aerosol (to simulate either an agent mixture (ricin/anthrax) or a contaminated anthrax sample). Two statistical methods, linear correlation and principal component analysis, were assessed for differentiation of surrogate spore spectra from other common aerosols. Criteria for determining percentages of false positives and false negatives via correlation analysis were evaluated. A single laser shot analysis of approximately 4 percent of the spores in a mixture of 0.75 m(3) urban outdoor air doped with approximately 1.1 x 10(5) spores resulted in a 0.04 proportion of false negatives. For that same sample volume of urban air without spores, the proportion of false positives was 0.08.

  2. Addition of ethanol to supercritical carbon dioxide enhances the inactivation of bacterial spores in the biofilm of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyong Seok; Choi, Hee Jung; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-09-02

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was used to inactivate Bacillus cereus spores inside biofilms, which were grown on stainless steel. SC-CO2 treatment was tested using various conditions, such as pressure treatment (10-30 MPa), temperature (35-60°C), and time (10-120 min). B. cereus vegetative cells in the biofilm were completely inactivated by treatment with SC-CO2 at 10 MPa and at 35°C for 5 min. However, SC-CO2 alone did not inactivate spores in biofilm even after the treatment time was extended to 120 min. When ethanol was used as a cosolvent with SC-CO2 in the SC-CO2 treatment using only 2-10 ml of ethanol in 100ml of SC-CO2 vessel for 60-90 min of treatment time at 10 MPa and 60°C, B. cereus spores in the biofilm were found to be completely inactivated in the colony-forming test. We also assessed the viability of SC-CO2-treated bacterial spores and vegetative cells in the biofilm by staining with SYTO 9 and propidium iodide. The membrane integrity of the vegetative cells was completely lost, while the integrity of the membrane was still maintained in most spores. However, when SC-CO2 along with ethanol was used, both vegetative cells and spores lost their membrane integrity, indicating that the use of ethanol as a cosolvent with SC-CO2 is efficient in inactivating the bacterial spores in the biofilm. © 2013.

  3. Control of bacillus cereus spore germination and outgrowth in cooked rice during chilling by nonorganic and organic appled, orange, and potato peel powders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The inhibition of Bacillus cereus spore germination and outgrowth in cooked rice by nine fruit and vegetable peel powders prepared from store-bought conventional (nonorganic) and organic apples, oranges, and potatoes was investigated. The powders were mixed into rice at 10% (wt/wt) along with heat ...

  4. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Sporulation Temperature Reveals a Requirement for CotE in the Assembly of both the Coat and Exosporium Layers of Bacillus cereus Spores.

    PubMed

    Bressuire-Isoard, Christelle; Bornard, Isabelle; Henriques, Adriano O; Carlin, Frédéric; Broussolle, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus spore surface layers consist of a coat surrounded by an exosporium. We investigated the interplay between the sporulation temperature and the CotE morphogenetic protein in the assembly of the surface layers of B. cereus ATCC 14579 spores and on the resulting spore properties. The cotE deletion affects the coat and exosporium composition of the spores formed both at the suboptimal temperature of 20°C and at the optimal growth temperature of 37°C. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that ΔcotE spores had a fragmented and detached exosporium when formed at 37°C. However, when produced at 20°C, ΔcotE spores showed defects in both coat and exosporium attachment and were susceptible to lysozyme and mutanolysin. Thus, CotE has a role in the assembly of both the coat and exosporium, which is more important during sporulation at 20°C. CotE was more represented in extracts from spores formed at 20°C than at 37°C, suggesting that increased synthesis of the protein is required to maintain proper assembly of spore surface layers at the former temperature. ΔcotE spores formed at either sporulation temperature were impaired in inosine-triggered germination and resistance to UV-C and H2O2 and were less hydrophobic than wild-type (WT) spores but had a higher resistance to wet heat. While underscoring the role of CotE in the assembly of B. cereus spore surface layers, our study also suggests a contribution of the protein to functional properties of additional spore structures. Moreover, it also suggests a complex relationship between the function of a spore morphogenetic protein and environmental factors such as the temperature during spore formation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Terahertz vibrational signature of bacterial spores arising from nanostructure decorated endospore surface.

    PubMed

    Datta, Debopam; Stroscio, Michael A; Dutta, Mitra; Zhang, Weidong; Brown, Elliott R

    2018-05-03

    This theoretical effort is the first to explore the possible hypothesis that terahertz optical activity of Bacillus spores arises from normal vibrational modes of spore coat subcomponents in the terahertz frequency range. Bacterial strains like Bacillus and Clostridium form spores with a hardened coating made of peptidoglycan to protect its genetic material in harsh conditions. In recent years, electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy has revealed that bacterial spore surfaces are decorated with nanocylinders and honeycomb nanostructures. In this article, a simple elastic continuum model is used to describe the vibration of these nanocylinders mainly in Bacillus subtilis, which also leads to the conclusion that the terahertz signature of these spores arises from the vibration of these nanostructures. Three vibrating modes: radial/longitudinal, torsional and flexural, have been identified and discussed for the nanocylinders. The effect of bound water, which shifts the vibration frequency, is also discussed. The peptidoglycan molecule consists of polar and charged amino acids; hence, the sporal surface local vibrations interact strongly with the terahertz radiation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Pilot-scale crossflow-microfiltration and pasteurization to remove spores of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) from milk.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Datta, N; Porto-Fett, A; Call, J E; Luchansky, J B; Renye, J; Tunick, M

    2011-09-01

    High-temperature, short-time pasteurization of milk is ineffective against spore-forming bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis (BA), but is lethal to its vegetative cells. Crossflow microfiltration (MF) using ceramic membranes with a pore size of 1.4 μm has been shown to reject most microorganisms from skim milk; and, in combination with pasteurization, has been shown to extend its shelf life. The objectives of this study were to evaluate MF for its efficiency in removing spores of the attenuated Sterne strain of BA from milk; to evaluate the combined efficiency of MF using a 0.8-μm ceramic membrane, followed by pasteurization (72°C, 18.6s); and to monitor any residual BA in the permeates when stored at temperatures of 4, 10, and 25°C for up to 28 d. In each trial, 95 L of raw skim milk was inoculated with about 6.5 log(10) BA spores/mL of milk. It was then microfiltered in total recycle mode at 50°C using ceramic membranes with pore sizes of either 0.8 μm or 1.4 μm, at crossflow velocity of 6.2 m/s and transmembrane pressure of 127.6 kPa, conditions selected to exploit the selectivity of the membrane. Microfiltration using the 0.8-μm membrane removed 5.91±0.05 log(10) BA spores/mL of milk and the 1.4-μm membrane removed 4.50±0.35 log(10) BA spores/mL of milk. The 0.8-μm membrane showed efficient removal of the native microflora and both membranes showed near complete transmission of the casein proteins. Spore germination was evident in the permeates obtained at 10, 30, and 120 min of MF time (0.8-μm membrane) but when stored at 4 or 10°C, spore levels were decreased to below detection levels (≤0.3 log(10) spores/mL) by d 7 or 3 of storage, respectively. Permeates stored at 25°C showed coagulation and were not evaluated further. Pasteurization of the permeate samples immediately after MF resulted in additional spore germination that was related to the length of MF time. Pasteurized permeates obtained at 10 min of MF and stored at 4 or 10°C showed no

  8. Evaluation of various cleaning methods to remove bacillus spores from spacecraft hardware materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm x 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 x 10(3) cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  9. Evaluation of Various Cleaning Methods to Remove Bacillus Spores from Spacecraft Hardware Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-09-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm × 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 × 103 cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  10. Evaluation of various cleaning methods to remove bacillus spores from spacecraft hardware materials.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chung, Shirley; Allton, Judith; Kern, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the biological cleaning effectiveness, defined in terms of the ability to remove bacterial spores, of a number of methods used to clean hardware surfaces. Aluminum (Al 6061) and titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) were chosen for the study as they were deemed the two materials most likely to be used in spacecraft extraterrestrial sampler construction. Metal coupons (1 cm x 2.5 cm) were precleaned and inoculated with 5.8 x 10(3) cultivable Bacillus subtilis spores, which are commonly found on spacecraft surfaces and in the assembly environments. The inoculated coupons were subsequently cleaned using: (1) 70% isopropyl alcohol wipe; (2) water wipe; (3) multiple-solvent flight-hardware cleaning procedures used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); (4) Johnson Space Center-developed ultrapure water rinse; and (5) a commercial, semi-aqueous, multiple-solvent (SAMS) cleaning process. The biological cleaning effectiveness was measured by agar plate assay, sterility test (growing in liquid media), and epifluorescent microscopy. None of the cleaning protocols tested completely removed viable spores from the surface of the aluminum. In contrast, titanium was capable of being cleaned to sterility by two methods, the JPL standard and the commercial SAMS cleaning process. Further investigation showed that the passivation step employed in the JPL standard method is an effective surface sterilant on both metals but not compatible with aluminum. It is recommended that titanium (Ti 6Al-4V) be considered superior to aluminum (Al 6061) for use in spacecraft sampling hardware, both for its potential to be cleaned to sterilization and for its ability to withstand the most effective cleaning protocols.

  11. Next-Generation Bacillus anthracis Live Attenuated Spore Vaccine Based on the htrA- (High Temperature Requirement A) Sterne Strain

    PubMed Central

    Chitlaru, Theodor; Israeli, Ma’ayan; Bar-Haim, Erez; Elia, Uri; Rotem, Shahar; Ehrlich, Sharon; Cohen, Ofer; Shafferman, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a lethal disease caused by the gram-positive spore-producing bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Live attenuated vaccines, such as the nonencapsulated Sterne strain, do not meet the safety standards mandated for human use in the Western world and are approved for veterinary purposes only. Here we demonstrate that disrupting the htrA gene, encoding the chaperone/protease HtrA (High Temperature Requirement A), in the virulent Bacillus anthracis Vollum strain results in significant virulence attenuation in guinea pigs, rabbits and mice, underlying the universality of the attenuated phenotype associated with htrA knockout. Accordingly, htrA disruption was implemented for the development of a Sterne-derived safe live vaccine compatible with human use. The novel B. anthracis SterneΔhtrA strain secretes functional anthrax toxins but is 10–104-fold less virulent than the Sterne vaccine strain depending on animal model (mice, guinea pigs, or rabbits). In spite of this attenuation, double or even single immunization with SterneΔhtrA spores elicits immune responses which target toxaemia and bacteremia resulting in protection from subcutaneous or respiratory lethal challenge with a virulent strain in guinea pigs and rabbits. The efficacy of the immune-protective response in guinea pigs was maintained for at least 50 weeks after a single immunization. PMID:26732659

  12. Impedance Measurements Could Accelerate Phage-Based Identification of Bacillus anthracis and Other Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    The Bacillus-inoculated NSM agar plates were incubated at 35°C for at least 48 h until Gram stains revealed the presence of > 90% Bacillus spores in...longer visible in Gram stained samples. Finally, centrifugation was used to remove soluble debris from the preparation and spore concentrations were...minutes post treatment. Gram Stains . Gram stains were used to track the emergence of vegetative Bacillus cells from spores. In this assay, bacterial

  13. Spores of two probiotic Bacillus species enhance cellular immunity in BALB/C mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Li; Huang, Qin; Fu, Aikun; Wu, YanPing; Li, Yali; Xu, Xiaogang; Huang, Yi; Yu, Dongyou; Li, Weifen

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies found that Bacillus subtilis BS02 and B. subtilis subsp. natto BS04 isolated in our laboratory could activate the immune response of murine macrophages in vitro. This study aims to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with Bacillus species spores on the systemic cellular immune response in BALB/C mice. Results showed that both B. subtilis BS02 and B. subtilis natto BS04 enhanced the phagocytic function of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and the cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells. In addition, B. subtilis BS02 could increase the respiratory burst activity of blood phagocytes. Furthermore, B. subtilis BS02 and B. subtilis natto BS04 increased the percentage of gamma-interferon-producing CD4 + cells and CD8 + T-cells, but only BS04 increased the percentage of CD3 + cells and CD3 +  CD4 + cells in splenocytes. However, there were no effects on other subsets of splenic lymphocytes and mitogen-induced splenic lymphocyte proliferation. All data suggested that oral administration of B. subtilis BS02 or B. subtilis natto BS04 could significantly enhance cellular immunity in BALB/C mice by increasing phagocytic activity of MPS and cytotoxic activity of NK cells in a strain-specific manner.

  14. Protection of Penaeus monodon against white spot syndrome by continuous oral administration of a low concentration of Bacillus subtilis spores expressing the VP28 antigen.

    PubMed

    Pham, K-C; Tran, H T T; Van Doan, C; Le, P H; Van Nguyen, A T; Nguyen, H A; Hong, H A; Cutting, S M; Phan, T-N

    2017-03-01

    In this study, Bacillus subtilis spores expressing a chimeric protein, CotB-VP28, were used as a probiotic vaccine to protect black tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Oral administration of pellets coated with CotB-VP28 spores (at ≥1 × 10 9  CFU per g pellet) to shrimps induced immune-relating phenoloxydase activity (PO) in shrimps after 14 days of feeding (prior challenge) and at day 3 post challenge (1·26 and 1·70 fold increase respectively). A 75% protection rate was obtained by continuous feeding of the spore-coated pellets at ≥1 × 10 9  CFU per g for 14 days prior to WSSV challenge and during all the postchallenge period. Even when the amount of CotB-VP28 spores in feed pellets was reduced down to ≥5 × 10 7  CFU per g and ≥1 × 10 6  CFU per g, relatively high protection rates of 70 and 67·5%, respectively, were still obtained. By contrast, feeding pellets without spores (untreated group) and with naked spores (PY79 group) at ≥1 × 10 9  CFU per g could not protect shrimps against WSSV. These data suggest that supplementation of CotB-VP28 spores at low dose of ≥1 × 10 6  CFU per g could be effective as a prophylactic treatment of WSS for black tiger shrimps. This study reports the protective efficacy of Bacillus subtilis CotB-VP28 spores on black tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) against white spot syndrome virus infection. Oral administration of pellets coated with CotB-VP28 spores (≥1 × 10 9  CFU per g) conferred 75% protection after white spot syndrome virus challenge. Even after reducing CotB-VP28 spores in feed pellets to ≥1 × 10 6  CFU per g, 67·5% protections was still obtained. These data indicate that supplementation of CotB-VP28 spores at a low dose of ≥1 × 10 6  CFU per g could be effective in prophylaxis against white spot syndrome in black tiger shrimps. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Analysis of Isoaccepting Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Species of Bacillus subtilis: Chromatographic Differences Between Transfer Ribonucleic Acids from Spores and Cells in Exponential Growth

    PubMed Central

    Vold, Barbara S.

    1973-01-01

    Differences between the transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) of spores and exponentially growing cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 were compared by co-chromatography on reversed-phase column RPC-5. This system gave excellent resolution of isoaccepting species in 1 to 2 hr using a 200-ml gradient. Two methods were used to extract spore tRNAs, a procedure using a Braun homogenizer and a pretreatment with dithiothreitol followed by lysis with lysozyme. Where changes were observed, column elution profiles of spore tRNAs were independent of the extraction method used. Three kinds of changes between the profiles of vegetative cell tRNA and spore tRNA were observed: (i) no change; phe-, val-, ala-, asp-, ileu-, pro-, met-, fmet-, and his-tRNAs, (ii) a change in the ratio of existing peaks; gly-, tyr-, leu-, ser-, thr-, aspn-, and arg-tRNAs, and (iii) the appearance or disappearance of unique peaks; lys-, glu-, and trp-tRNAs. PMID:4632322

  16. Monitoring Rates and Heterogeneity of High-Pressure Germination of Bacillus Spores by Phase-Contrast Microscopy of Individual Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    wild-type spores but ~15-fold higher deltaTrelease values; v ) germination kinetics of wild-type spores given a ? 30 sec 140 MPa HP pulse followed by...15-fold longer than those for wild-type spores, but the two types of spores exhibited similar average Tlag values; and ( v ) the germination of wild-type...committed spores, as it does for nutrient-committed spores (14)? ( v ) Can these HP-com- mitted spores be isolated under conditions that do not allow

  17. Fighting Ebola with novel spore decontamination technologies for the military.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Kustin, Kenneth; Olinger, Gene G; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J; Leighton, Terrance

    2015-01-01

    Recently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF), the World Health Organization (WHO), Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs), a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned). The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2) produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC) and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC's novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established non-thermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers, using an array of Bacillus

  18. Fighting Ebola with novel spore decontamination technologies for the military

    PubMed Central

    Doona, Christopher J.; Feeherry, Florence E.; Kustin, Kenneth; Olinger, Gene G.; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J.; Leighton, Terrance

    2015-01-01

    Recently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF), the World Health Organization (WHO), Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs), a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned). The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2) produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC) and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC’s novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established non-thermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers, using an array of Bacillus

  19. A Spore Coat Protein, CotS, of Bacillus subtilis Is Synthesized under the Regulation of ςK and GerE during Development and Is Located in the Inner Coat Layer of Spores

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Hiromu; Chikahiro, Yukari; Kodama, Takeko; Koide, Hidekatsu; Kozuka, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Kunio; Watabe, Kazuhito

    1998-01-01

    The spore coat of Bacillus subtilis has a unique morphology and consists of polypeptides of different sizes, whose synthesis and assembly are precisely regulated by a cascade of transcription factors and regulatory proteins. We examined the factors that regulate cotS gene expression and CotS assembly into the coat layer of B. subtilis by Northern blot and Western blot analysis. Transcription of cotS mRNA was not detected in sporulating cells of ςK and gerE mutants by Northern blot analysis. By Western blot analysis using anti-CotS antibody, CotS was first detected in protein samples solubilized from wild-type cells at 5 h after the start of sporulation. CotS was not detected in the vegetative cells and spores of a gerE mutant or in the spores of mutants deficient in ςE, ςF, ςG, or ςK. CotS was detected in the sporangium but not in the spores of a cotE mutant. The sequence of the promoter region of cotS was similar to the consensus sequences for binding of ςK and GerE. These results demonstrate that ςK and GerE are required for cotS expression and that CotE is essential for the assembly of CotS in the coat. Immunoelectron microscopic observation using anti-CotS antibody revealed that CotS is located within the spore coat, in particular in the inner coats of dormant spores. PMID:9603889

  20. Comprehensive Laboratory Evaluation of a Highly Specific Lateral Flow Assay for the Presumptive Identification of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Suspicious White Powders and Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Jason G.; Prentice, Kristin W.; DePalma, Lindsay; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Chivukula, Sruti; Chapman, Carol; Bell, Melissa; Datta, Shomik; Singh, Ajay; Hoffmaster, Alex; Sarwar, Jawad; Parameswaran, Nishanth; Joshi, Mrinmayi; Thirunavkkarasu, Nagarajan; Krishnan, Viswanathan; Morse, Stephen; Avila, Julie R.; Sharma, Shashi; Estacio, Peter L.; Stanker, Larry; Hodge, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive, multiphase laboratory evaluation of the Anthrax BioThreat Alert® test strip, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFA) for the rapid detection of Bacillus anthracis spores. The study, conducted at 2 sites, evaluated this assay for the detection of spores from the Ames and Sterne strains of B. anthracis, as well as those from an additional 22 strains. Phylogenetic near neighbors, environmental background organisms, white powders, and environmental samples were also tested. The Anthrax LFA demonstrated a limit of detection of about 106 spores/mL (ca. 1.5 × 105 spores/assay). In this study, overall sensitivity of the LFA was 99.3%, and the specificity was 98.6%. The results indicated that the specificity, sensitivity, limit of detection, dynamic range, and repeatability of the assay support its use in the field for the purpose of qualitatively evaluating suspicious white powders and environmental samples for the presumptive presence of B. anthracis spores. PMID:27661796

  1. Decontamination of Streptococci biofilms and Bacillus cereus spores on plastic surfaces with DC and pulsed corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval'ová, Zuzana; Tarabová, Kataŕna; Hensel, Karol; Machala, Zdenko

    2013-02-01

    Cold air plasmas of DC and pulsed corona discharges: positive streamers and negative Trichel pulses were used for bio-decontamination of Streptococci biofilm and Bacillus cereus spores on polypropylene plastic surfaces. The reduction of bacterial population (evaluated as log10) in the biofilm on plastic surfaces treated by DC corona reached 2.4 logs with 10 min treatment time and 3.3 logs with 2 min treatment time with water spraying. The enhancement of plasma biocidal effects on the biofilm by electro-spraying of water through a hollow needle high-voltage electrode was investigated. No significant polarity effect was found with DC corona. Pulsed corona was demonstrated slightly more bactericidal for spores, especially in the negative polarity where the bacterial population reduction reached up to 2.2 logs at 10 min exposure time. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  2. Roles of Macrophages and Neutrophils in the Early Host Response to Bacillus anthracis Spores in a Mouse Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Christopher K.; Van Rooijen, Nico; Welkos, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    The development of new approaches to combat anthrax requires that the pathogenesis and host response to Bacillus anthracis spores be better understood. We investigated the roles that macrophages and neutrophils play in the progression of infection by B. anthracis in a mouse model. Mice were treated with a macrophage depletion agent (liposome-encapsulated clodronate) or with a neutrophil depletion agent (cyclophosphamide or the rat anti-mouse granulocyte monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5), and the animals were then infected intraperitoneally or by aerosol challenge with fully virulent, ungerminated B. anthracis strain Ames spores. The macrophage-depleted mice were significantly more susceptible to the ensuing infection than the saline-pretreated mice, whereas the differences observed between the neutropenic mice and the saline-pretreated controls were generally not significant. We also found that augmenting peritoneal neutrophil populations before spore challenge did not increase resistance of the mice to infection. In addition, the bacterial load in macrophage-depleted mice was significantly greater and appeared significantly sooner than that observed with the saline-pretreated mice. However, the bacterial load in the neutropenic mice was comparable to that of the saline-pretreated mice. These data suggest that, in our model, neutrophils play a relatively minor role in the early host response to spores, whereas macrophages play a more dominant role in early host defenses against infection by B. anthracis spores. PMID:16369003

  3. The Conserved Spore Coat Protein SpoVM Is Largely Dispensable in Clostridium difficile Spore Formation.

    PubMed

    Ribis, John W; Ravichandran, Priyanka; Putnam, Emily E; Pishdadian, Keyan; Shen, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    The spore-forming bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated infections in the United States. In order for this obligate anaerobe to transmit infection, it must form metabolically dormant spores prior to exiting the host. A key step during this process is the assembly of a protective, multilayered proteinaceous coat around the spore. Coat assembly depends on coat morphogenetic proteins recruiting distinct subsets of coat proteins to the developing spore. While 10 coat morphogenetic proteins have been identified in Bacillus subtilis , only two of these morphogenetic proteins have homologs in the Clostridia : SpoIVA and SpoVM. C. difficile SpoIVA is critical for proper coat assembly and functional spore formation, but the requirement for SpoVM during this process was unknown. Here, we show that SpoVM is largely dispensable for C. difficile spore formation, in contrast with B. subtilis . Loss of C. difficile SpoVM resulted in modest decreases (~3-fold) in heat- and chloroform-resistant spore formation, while morphological defects such as coat detachment from the forespore and abnormal cortex thickness were observed in ~30% of spoVM mutant cells. Biochemical analyses revealed that C. difficile SpoIVA and SpoVM directly interact, similarly to their B. subtilis counterparts. However, in contrast with B. subtilis , C. difficile SpoVM was not essential for SpoIVA to encase the forespore. Since C. difficile coat morphogenesis requires SpoIVA-interacting protein L (SipL), which is conserved exclusively in the Clostridia , but not the more broadly conserved SpoVM, our results reveal another key difference between C. difficile and B. subtilis spore assembly pathways. IMPORTANCE The spore-forming obligate anaerobe Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrheal disease in the United States. When C. difficile spores are ingested by susceptible individuals, they germinate within the gut and

  4. Transcriptomic responses of germinating Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to 1.5 years of space and simulated martian conditions on the EXPOSE-E experiment PROTECT.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda

    2012-05-01

    Because of their ubiquity and resistance to spacecraft decontamination, bacterial spores are considered likely potential forward contaminants on robotic missions to Mars. Thus, it is important to understand their global responses to long-term exposure to space or martian environments. As part of the PROTECT experiment, spores of B. subtilis 168 were exposed to real space conditions and to simulated martian conditions for 559 days in low-Earth orbit mounted on the EXPOSE-E exposure platform outside the European Columbus module on the International Space Station. Upon return, spores were germinated, total RNA extracted, fluorescently labeled, and used to probe a custom Bacillus subtilis microarray to identify genes preferentially activated or repressed relative to ground control spores. Increased transcript levels were detected for a number of stress-related regulons responding to DNA damage (SOS response, SPβ prophage induction), protein damage (CtsR/Clp system), oxidative stress (PerR regulon), and cell envelope stress (SigV regulon). Spores exposed to space demonstrated a much broader and more severe stress response than spores exposed to simulated martian conditions. The results are discussed in the context of planetary protection for a hypothetical journey of potential forward contaminant spores from Earth to Mars and their subsequent residence on Mars.

  5. Science hub spore data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Data set includes UV dose, and Bacillus pumilus spore plate counts in colony forming unitsThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Boczek , L., E. Rhodes , J. Cashdollar, J. Ryu, J. Popovici , J. Hoelle , M. Sivaganesan , S. Hayes , M. Rodgers , and H. Ryu. Applicability of UV resistant Bacillus pumilus endospores as a human adenovirus surrogate for evaluating the effectiveness of virus inactivation in low-pressure UV treatment systems. JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 122: 43-49, (2016).

  6. Comparative analysis of immune effects in mice model: Clonorchis sinensis cysteine protease generated from recombinant Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanshuai; Tang, Zeli; Shang, Mei; Zhao, Lu; Zhou, Lina; Kong, Xiangzhan; Lin, Zhipeng; Sun, Hengchang; Chen, Tingjin; Xu, Jin; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-07-01

    Clonorchiasis remains a nonnegligible public health problem in endemic areas. Cysteine protease of Clonorchis sinensis (CsCP) plays indispensable roles in the parasitic physiology and pathology, and has been exploited as a promising drug and vaccine candidate. In recent years, development of spore-based vaccines against multiple pathogens has attracted many investigators' interest. In previous studies, the recombinant Escherichia coli (BL21) and Bacillus subtilis spores expressing CsCP have been successfully constructed, respectively. In this study, the immune effects of CsCP protein purified from recombinant BL21 (rCsCP) and B. subtilis spores presenting CsCP (B.s-CsCP) in Balb/c mice model were conducted with comparative analysis. Levels of specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were significantly increased in sera from both rCsCP and B.s-CsCP intraperitoneally immunized mice. Additionally, recombinant spores expressing abundant fusion CsCP (0.03125 pg/spore) could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of CsCP with significantly higher levels of IgG and isotypes. Compared with rCsCP alone, intraperitoneal administration of mice with spores expressing CsCP achieved a better effect of fighting against C. sinensis infection by slowing down the process of fibrosis. Our results demonstrated that a combination of Th1/Th2 immune responses could be elicited by rCsCP, while spores displaying CsCP prominently induced Th1-biased specific immune responses, and the complex cytokine network maybe mediates protective immune responses against C. sinensis. This work further confirmed that the usage of B. subtilis spores displaying CsCP is an effective way to against C. sinensis.

  7. Culturability of Bacillus spores on aerosol collection filters exposed to airborne combustion products of Al, Mg, and B·Ti.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Atin; Yermakov, Michael; Indugula, Reshmi; Reponen, Tiina; Driks, Adam; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of bioweapon facilities due to explosion or fire could aerosolize highly pathogenic microorganisms. The post-event air quality assessment is conducted through air sampling. A bioaerosol sample (often collected on a filter for further culture-based analysis) also contains combustion products, which may influence the microbial culturability and, thus, impact the outcome. We have examined the interaction between spores deposited on collection filters using two simulants of Bacillus anthracis [B. thuringiensis (Bt) and B. atrophaeus (referred to as BG)] and incoming combustion products of Al as well as Mg and B·Ti (common ingredient of metalized explosives). Spores extracted from Teflon, polycarbonate, mixed cellulose ester (MCE), and gelatin filters (most common filter media for bioaerosol sampling), which were exposed to combustion products during a short-term sampling, were analyzed by cultivation. Surprisingly, we observed that aluminum combustion products enhanced the culturability of Bt (but not BG) spores on Teflon filters increasing the culturable count by more than an order of magnitude. Testing polycarbonate and MCE filter materials also revealed a moderate increase of culturability although gelatin did not. No effect was observed with either of the two species interacting on either filter media with products originated by combustion of Mg and B·Ti. Sample contamination, spore agglomeration, effect of a filter material on the spore survival, changes in the spore wall ultrastructure and germination, as well as other factors were explored to interpret the findings. The study raises a question about the reliability of certain filter materials for collecting airborne bio-threat agents in combustion environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Probiotics L. acidophilus and B. clausii Modulate Gut Microbiota in Th1- and Th2-Biased Mice to Ameliorate Salmonella Typhimurium-Induced Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Biswaranjan; Guha, Dipanjan; Naik, Aman Kumar; Banerjee, Arka; Tambat, Subodh; Chawla, Saurabh; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Aich, Palok

    2018-06-16

    Gut microbiota play important role in maintaining health. Probiotics are believed to augment it further. We aimed at comparing effects of probiotics, Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) and Bacillus clausii (BC) (a) on the gut microbiota abundance and diversity and (b) their contributions to control intestinal dysbiosis and inflammation in Th1- and Th2-biased mice following Salmonella infection. We report how could gut microbiota and the differential immune bias (Th1 or Th2) of the host regulate host responses when challenged with Salmonella typhimurium in the presence and absence of either of the probiotics. LA was found to be effective in ameliorating the microbial dysbiosis and inflammation caused by Salmonella infection, in Th1 (C57BL/6) and Th2 (BALB/c)-biased mouse. BC was able to ameliorate Salmonella-induced dysbiosis and inflammation in Th2 but not in Th1-biased mouse. These results may support probiotics LA as a treatment option in the case of Salmonella infection.

  9. Integration of Membrane Distillation with solar photo-Fenton for purification of water contaminated with Bacillus sp. and Clostridium sp. spores.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Aguirre, A; Polo-López, M I; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Zaragoza, G

    2017-10-01

    Although Membrane Distillation (MD) has been extensively studied for desalination, it has other applications like removing all kinds of solutes from water and concentrating non-volatile substances. MD offers the possibility of producing a clean stream while concentrating valuable compounds from waste streams towards their recovery, or emerging contaminants and pathogens present in wastewater in order to facilitate their chemical elimination. This paper analyses the elimination of bacterial spores from contaminated water with MD and the role of MD in the subsequent treatment of the concentrate with photo-Fenton process. The experiments were performed at Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) using a plate and frame bench module with a Permeate Gap Membrane Distillation (PGMD) configuration. Tests were done for two different kinds of spores in two different water matrixes: distilled water with 3.5wt% of sea salts contaminated with spores of Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) and wastewater after a secondary treatment and still contaminated with Clostridium sp. spores. An analysis of the permeate was performed in all cases to determine its purity, as well as the concentrated stream and its further treatment in order to assess the benefits of using MD. Results showed a permeate free of spores in all the cases, demonstrating the viability of MD to treat biological contaminated wastewater for further use in agriculture. Moreover, the results obtained after treating the concentrate with photo-Fenton showed a shorter treatment time for the reduction of the spore concentration in the water than that when only photo-Fenton was used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A microfluidic device for real-time monitoring of Bacillus subtilis bacterial spores during germination based on non-specific physicochemical interactions on the nanoscale level.

    PubMed

    Zabrocka, L; Langer, K; Michalski, A; Kocik, J; Langer, J J

    2015-01-07

    A microfluidic device for studies on the germination of bacterial spores (e.g. Bacillus subtilis) based on non-specific interactions on the nanoscale is presented. A decrease in the population of spores during germination followed by the appearance of transition forms and an increase in the number of vegetative cells can be registered directly and simultaneously by using the microfluidic device, which is equipped with a conductive polymer layer (polyaniline) in the form of a nano-network. The lab-on-a-chip-type device, operating in a continuous flow regime, allows monitoring of germination of bacterial spores and analysis of the process in detail. The procedure is fast and accurate enough for quantitative real-time monitoring of the main steps of germination, including final transformation of the spores into vegetative cells. All of this is done without the use of biomarkers or any bio-specific materials, such as enzymes, antibodies and aptamers, and is simply based on an analysis of physicochemical interactions on the nanoscale level.

  11. Comparative analysis of the immunologic response induced by the Sterne 34F2 live spore Bacillus anthracis vaccine in a ruminant model.

    PubMed

    Ndumnego, Okechukwu C; Köhler, Susanne M; Crafford, Jannie; van Heerden, Henriette; Beyer, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The Sterne 34F2 live spore vaccine (SLSV) developed in 1937 is the most widely used veterinary vaccine against anthrax. However, literature on the immunogenicity of this vaccine in a target ruminant host is scarce. In this study, we evaluated the humoral response to the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (rPA), a recombinant bacillus collagen-like protein of anthracis (rBclA), formaldehyde inactivated spores (FIS) prepared from strain 34F2 and a vegetative antigen formulation prepared from a capsule and toxin deficient strain (CDC 1014) in Boer goats. The toxin neutralizing ability of induced antibodies was evaluated using an in vitro toxin neutralization assay. The protection afforded by the vaccine was also assessed in vaccinates. Anti-rPA, anti-FIS and lethal toxin neutralizing titres were superior after booster vaccinations, compared to single vaccinations. Qualitative analysis of humoral responses to rPA, rBclA and FIS antigens revealed a preponderance of anti-FIS IgG titres following either single or double vaccinations with the SLSV. Antibodies against FIS and rPA both increased by 350 and 300-fold following revaccinations respectively. There was no response to rBclA following vaccinations with the SLSV. Toxin neutralizing titres increased by 80-fold after single vaccination and 700-fold following a double vaccination. Lethal challenge studies in naïve goats indicated a minimum infective dose of 36 B. anthracis spores. Single and double vaccination with the SLSV protected 4/5 and 3/3 of goats challenged with>800 spores respectively. An early booster vaccination following the first immunization is suggested in order to achieve a robust immunity. Results from this study indicate that this crucial second vaccination can be administered as early as 3 months after the initial vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibiting Inosine Hydrolase and Alanine Racemase to Enhance the Germination of Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spores: Potential Spore Decontamination Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    animal waste an~ decompositiOn DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED PR-15-306 Anthrax...influx of water. Ungerminated spore Germination Germinated spore Spore hydratation ~ Non-refractile spore Refractile spore • Fluorescence

  13. Effective Thermal Inactivation of the Spores of Bacillus cereus Biofilms Using Microwave.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyong Seok; Yang, Jungwoo; Choi, Hee Jung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2017-07-28

    Microwave sterilization was performed to inactivate the spores of biofilms of Bacillus cereus involved in foodborne illness. The sterilization conditions, such as the amount of water and the operating temperature and treatment time, were optimized using statistical analysis based on 15 runs of experimental results designed by the Box-Behnken method. Statistical analysis showed that the optimal conditions for the inactivation of B. cereus biofilms were 14 ml of water, 108°C of temperature, and 15 min of treatment time. Interestingly, response surface plots showed that the amount of water is the most important factor for microwave sterilization under the present conditions. Complete inactivation by microwaves was achieved in 5 min, and the inactivation efficiency by microwave was obviously higher than that by conventional steam autoclave. Finally, confocal laser scanning microscopy images showed that the principal effect of microwave treatment was cell membrane disruption. Thus, this study can contribute to the development of a process to control food-associated pathogens.

  14. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescencemore » detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.« less

  15. Sporulation of Bacillus spp. within biofilms: a potential source of contamination in food processing environments.

    PubMed

    Faille, C; Bénézech, T; Midelet-Bourdin, G; Lequette, Y; Clarisse, M; Ronse, G; Ronse, A; Slomianny, C

    2014-06-01

    Bacillus strains are often isolated from biofilms in the food industries. Previous works have demonstrated that sporulation could occur in biofilms, suggesting that biofilms would be a significant source of food contamination with spores. In this study, we investigated the properties of mono-species and mixed Bacillus biofilms and the ability of Bacillus strains to sporulate inside biofilms. Bacillus strains were able to form mono-species biofilms on stainless steel coupons, with up to 90% spores after a 48 h-incubation. These spores were highly resistant to cleaning but were easily transferred to agar, mimicking the cross-contamination of food, thereby suggesting that biofilms would be of particular concern due to a potential for Bacillus spore food contamination. This hypothesis was strengthened by the fact that Bacillus strains were able to form mixed biofilms with resident strains and that sporulation still occurred easily in these complex structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Resistance of Bacillus Endospores to Extreme Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Environments

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Munakata, Nobuo; Horneck, Gerda; Melosh, Henry J.; Setlow, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Endospores of Bacillus spp., especially Bacillus subtilis, have served as experimental models for exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the incredible longevity of spores and their resistance to environmental insults. In this review we summarize the molecular laboratory model of spore resistance mechanisms and attempt to use the model as a basis for exploration of the resistance of spores to environmental extremes both on Earth and during postulated interplanetary transfer through space as a result of natural impact processes. PMID:10974126

  17. Scanning Surface Potential Microscopy of Spore Adhesion on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ida; Chung, Eunhyea; Kweon, Hyojin

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of spores of Bacillus anthracis - the cause of anthrax and a likely biological threat - to solid surfaces is an important consideration in cleanup after an accidental or deliberate release. However, because of safety concerns, directly studying B. anthracis spores with advanced instrumentation is problematic. As a first step, we are examining the electrostatic potential of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), which is a closely related species that is often used as a simulant to study B. anthracis. Scanning surface potential microscopy (SSPM), also known as Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), was used to investigate the influence of relativemore » humidity (RH) on the surface electrostatic potential of Bt that had adhered to silica, mica, or gold substrates. AFM/SSPM side-by-side images were obtained separately in air, at various values of RH, after an aqueous droplet with spores was applied on each surface and allowed to dry before measurements. In the SSPM images, a negative potential on the surface of the spores was observed compared with that of the substrates. The surface potential decreased as the humidity increased. Spores were unable to adhere to a surface with an extremely negative potential, such as mica.« less

  18. Glycoconjugates as Mediators of Nitric Oxide Production upon Exposure to Bacterial Spores by Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiani, Mohamed; Soderberg, Lee; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Phagocytes generate nitric oxide (NO) in large quantities to combat bacteria. The spore-producing Gram-positive organisms of Bacillus cereus family are causative agents from mild to a life threatening infection in humans and domestic animals. Our group have shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) activate macrophages and enhance killing of Bacillus spores. In this investigation, we will explore the effect of different GCs structures on NO production. The objective of this study is to study effects of GCs 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 on NO release upon exposure to B. cereus and Bacillus anthracis spores by macrophages. Our results demonstrated that GCs activated macrophages and increased NO production using studied GCs ligands compared to macrophage only (p<0.001). GC2 and GC8 were able to further increase NO production in macrophages compared to the B. anthracis spores treated macrophages (p<0.001). Our finding suggests that GCs could be used as potential mediators of NO production in macrophages to fight B. anthracis and other pathogens.

  19. The Conserved Spore Coat Protein SpoVM Is Largely Dispensable in Clostridium difficile Spore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ribis, John W.; Ravichandran, Priyanka; Putnam, Emily E.; Pishdadian, Keyan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spore-forming bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated infections in the United States. In order for this obligate anaerobe to transmit infection, it must form metabolically dormant spores prior to exiting the host. A key step during this process is the assembly of a protective, multilayered proteinaceous coat around the spore. Coat assembly depends on coat morphogenetic proteins recruiting distinct subsets of coat proteins to the developing spore. While 10 coat morphogenetic proteins have been identified in Bacillus subtilis, only two of these morphogenetic proteins have homologs in the Clostridia: SpoIVA and SpoVM. C. difficile SpoIVA is critical for proper coat assembly and functional spore formation, but the requirement for SpoVM during this process was unknown. Here, we show that SpoVM is largely dispensable for C. difficile spore formation, in contrast with B. subtilis. Loss of C. difficile SpoVM resulted in modest decreases (~3-fold) in heat- and chloroform-resistant spore formation, while morphological defects such as coat detachment from the forespore and abnormal cortex thickness were observed in ~30% of spoVM mutant cells. Biochemical analyses revealed that C. difficile SpoIVA and SpoVM directly interact, similarly to their B. subtilis counterparts. However, in contrast with B. subtilis, C. difficile SpoVM was not essential for SpoIVA to encase the forespore. Since C. difficile coat morphogenesis requires SpoIVA-interacting protein L (SipL), which is conserved exclusively in the Clostridia, but not the more broadly conserved SpoVM, our results reveal another key difference between C. difficile and B. subtilis spore assembly pathways. IMPORTANCE The spore-forming obligate anaerobe Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrheal disease in the United States. When C. difficile spores are ingested by susceptible individuals, they germinate within the gut and

  20. Acid and bile tolerance of spore-forming lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hyronimus, B; Le Marrec, C; Sassi, A H; Deschamps, A

    2000-11-01

    Criteria for screening probiotics such as bile tolerance and resistance to acids were studied with 13 spore-forming lactic acid producing bacteria. Different strains of Sporolactobacillus, Bacillus laevolacticus, Bacillus racemilacticus and Bacillus coagulans grown in MRS broth were subjected to low pH conditions (2, 2.5 and 3) and increasing bile concentrations. Among these microorganisms, Bacillus laevolacticus DSM 6475 and all Sporolactobacillus strains tested except Sporolactobacillus racemicus IAM 12395, were resistant to pH 3. Only Bacillus racemilacticus and Bacillus coagulans strains were tolerant to bile concentrations over 0.3% (w/v).

  1. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Stratilo, Chad W.; Crichton, Melissa K. F.; Sawyer, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin), compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in human skin keratinocyte primary cultures. The chlorine dioxide decontaminant was similarly effective to sodium hypochlorite in reducing spore numbers of Bacillus anthracis Ames in liquid suspension after a 10 minute exposure. After five minutes, the chlorine dioxide product was significantly more efficacious. Decontamination of isolated swine skin contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Sterne with the chlorine dioxide product resulted in no viable spores sampled. The toxicity of the chlorine dioxide decontaminant was up to two orders of magnitude less than that of sodium hypochlorite in human skin keratinocyte cultures. In summary, the chlorine dioxide based decontaminant efficiently killed Bacillus anthracis spores in liquid suspension, as well as on isolated swine skin, and was less toxic than sodium hypochlorite in cultures of human skin keratinocytes. PMID:26394165

  2. The resistance of Bacillus atrophaeus spores to the bactericidal activity of peracetic acid is influenced by both the nature of the solid substrates and the mode of contamination.

    PubMed

    Grand, I; Bellon-Fontaine, M-N; Herry, J-M; Hilaire, D; Moriconi, F-X; Naïtali, M

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of the mode of contamination in relation with the nature of solid substrates on the resistance of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus -selected as surrogates of Bacillus anthracis- to a disinfectant, peracetic acid. Six materials confronted in urban and military environments were selected for their different structural and physicochemical properties. In parallel, two modes of contamination were examined, i.e. deposition and immersion. Deposition was used to simulate contamination by an aerosol and immersion by an extended contact with liquids. A pronounced difference in the biocontamination levels and spatial organization of spores was observed depending on the mode of contamination and the nature of the solid substrate considered, with consequences on decontamination. Contamination by immersion led to lower efficiency of peracetic acid decontamination than contamination by deposition. Infiltration of spores into porous materials after immersion is one reason. In contrast, the deposition mode aggregates cells at the surface of materials, explaining the similar disinfecting behaviour of porous and nonporous substrates when considering this inoculation route. The inoculation route was shown to be as influential a parameter as material characteristics (porosity and wettability) for decontamination efficacy. These results provide comparative information for the decontamination of B. atrophaeus spores in function of the mode of contamination and the nature of solid substrates. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to French government works.

  3. Heat resistance of Bacillus cereus spores: effects of milk constituents and stabilizing additives.

    PubMed

    Mazas, M; López, M; Martínez, S; Bernardo, A; Martin, R

    1999-04-01

    Heat resistance of Bacillus cereus spores (ATCC 7004, 4342, and 9818) heated in different types of milk (skim, whole, and concentrated skim milk), skim milk containing stabilizing additives (sodium citrate, monopotassium phosphate, or disodium phosphate, 0.1%), and cream was investigated. Thermal resistance experiments were performed at temperatures within the range of 92 to 115 degrees C under continuous monitoring of pH. For strain 4342 no significant differences (P < 0.05) in D values were detected in any case. For strains 7004 and 9818 higher D values of about 20% were obtained in whole and concentrated skim milk than those calculated in skim milk. From all stabilizing additives tested, only sodium citrate and sodium phosphate increased the heat resistance for strain 9818. However, when the menstruum pH was measured at the treatment temperature, different pH values were found between the heating media. The differences in heat resistance observed could be due to a pH effect rather than to the difference in the substrates in which spores were heated. In contrast, when cream (fat content 20%) was used, lower D values were obtained, especially for strains 7004 and 9818. z values were not significantly modified by the milk composition, with an average z value of 7.95+/-0.20 degrees C for strain 7004, 7.88+/-0.10 degrees C for strain 4342, and 9.13+/-0.16 degrees C for strain 9818.

  4. Impact of spores on the comparative efficacies of five antibiotics for treatment of Bacillus anthracis in an in vitro hollow fiber pharmacodynamic model.

    PubMed

    Louie, Arnold; VanScoy, Brian D; Brown, David L; Kulawy, Robert W; Heine, Henry S; Drusano, George L

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, is an agent of bioterrorism. The most effective antimicrobial therapy for B. anthracis infections is unknown. An in vitro pharmacodynamic model of B. anthracis was used to compare the efficacies of simulated clinically prescribed regimens of moxifloxacin, linezolid, and meropenem with the "gold standards," doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Treatment outcomes for isogenic spore-forming and non-spore-forming strains of B. anthracis were compared. Against spore-forming B. anthracis, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and meropenem reduced the B. anthracis population by 4 log(10) CFU/ml over 10 days. Doxycycline reduced the population of this B. anthracis strain by 5 log(10) CFU/ml (analysis of variance [ANOVA] P = 0.01 versus other drugs). Against an isogenic non-spore-forming strain, meropenem killed the vegetative B. anthracis the fastest, followed by moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin and then doxycycline. Linezolid offered the lowest bacterial kill rate. Heat shock studies using the spore-producing B. anthracis strain showed that with moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem therapies the total population was mostly spores, while the population was primarily vegetative bacteria with linezolid and doxycycline therapies. Spores have a profound impact on the rate and extent of killing of B. anthracis. Against spore-forming B. anthracis, the five antibiotics killed the total (spore and vegetative) bacterial population at similar rates (within 1 log(10) CFU/ml of each other). However, bactericidal antibiotics killed vegetative B. anthracis faster than bacteriostatic drugs. Since only vegetative-phase B. anthracis produces the toxins that may kill the infected host, the rate and mechanism of killing of an antibiotic may determine its overall in vivo efficacy. Further studies are needed to examine this important observation.

  5. An Effective Method of Preparing Sections of Bacillus polymyxa Sporangia and Spores for Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Holbert, Pauline E.

    1960-01-01

    Bacillus polymyxa sporangia and spores were prepared for examination in the electron microscope by methods whose critical features were apparently: judicious use of vacuum, to encourage complete penetration of the embedding medium; the use of epoxy resins as embedding media; and cutting of the thin sections with a diamond knife. Electron micrographs of material prepared in this manner exhibit undeformed sporangial sections. Some of the structures revealed have been shown before, though perhaps less distinctly; other structures are revealed here for the first time. While this single study does not pretend to elucidate all the complexities of sporulation in bacteria, these and similar images should make this possible, and some mention of the preparatory techniques that lead to them seems advisable at this time. PMID:14402552

  6. Spore-forming organisms in platelet concentrates: a challenge in transfusion bacterial safety.

    PubMed

    Störmer, M; Vollmer, T; Kleesiek, K; Dreier, J

    2008-12-01

    Bacterial detection and pathogen reduction are widely used methods of minimizing the risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection. But, bacterial spores are highly resistant to chemical and physical agents. In this study, we assessed the bacterial proliferation of spore-forming organisms seeded into platelet concentrates (PCs) to demonstrate that spores can enter the vegetative state in PCs during storage. In the in vitro study, PCs were inoculated with 1-10 spores mL(-1)of Bacillus cereus (n = 1), Bacillus subtilis (n = 2) and Clostridium sporogenes (n = 2). Sampling was performed during 6-day aerobic storage at 22 degrees C. The presence of bacteria was assessed by plating culture, automated culture and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Spores of the C. sporogenes do not enter the vegetative phase under PC storage conditions, whereas B. subtilis and B. cereus showed growth in the PC and could be detected using RT-PCR and automated culture. Depending on the species and inoculums, bacterial spores may enter the vegetative phase during PC storage and can be detected by bacterial detection methods.

  7. Detection of Agar, by Analysis of Sugar Markers, Associated with Bacillus Anthracis Spores, After Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Colburn, Heather A.; Fox, Alvin

    2008-08-01

    Detection of small quantities of agar associated with spores of Bacillus anthracis could provide key information regarding its source or growth characteristics. Agar, widely used in growth of bacteria on solid surfaces, consists primarily of repeating polysaccharide units of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AGal) and galactose (Gal) with sulfated and O-methylated galactoses present as minor constituents. Two variants of the alditol acetate procedure were evaluated for detection of potential agar markers associated with spores. The first method employed a reductive hydrolysis step, to stabilize labile anhydrogalactose, by converting to anhydrogalactitol. The second eliminated the reductive hydrolysis step simplifying the procedure. Anhydrogalactitol, derived frommore » agar, was detected using both derivatization methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. However, challenges with artefactual background (reductive hydrolysis) or marker destruction (hydrolysis) lead to the search for alternative sugar markers. A minor agar component, 6-O-methyl galactose (6-O-M gal), was readily detected in agar-grown but not broth-grown bacteria. Detection was optimized by the use of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). With appropriate choice of sugar marker and analytical procedure, detection of sugar markers for agar has considerable potential in microbial forensics.« less

  8. Response surface methodology as a tool for modeling and optimization of Bacillus subtilis spores inactivation by UV/ nano-Fe0 process for safe water production.

    PubMed

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Matin, Atiyeh Rajabi; Ahmadi, Ehsan; Sabeti, Zahra; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Aslani, Hassan; Nabizadeh, Ramin

    2018-04-01

    One of the most important aspects of environmental issues is the demand for clean and safe water. Meanwhile, disinfection process is one of the most important steps in safe water production. The present study aims at estimating the performance of UV, nano Zero-Valent Iron particles (nZVI, nano-Fe 0 ), and UV treatment with the addition of nZVI (combined process) for Bacillus subtilis spores inactivation. Effects of different factors on inactivation including contact time, initial nZVI concentration, UV irradiance and various aerations conditions were investigated. Response surface methodology, based on a five-level, two variable central composite design, was used to optimize target microorganism reduction and the experimental parameters. The results indicated that the disinfection time had the greatest positive impact on disinfection ability among the different selected independent variables. According to the results, it can be concluded that microbial reduction by UV alone was more effective than nZVI while the combined UV/nZVI process demonstrated the maximum log reduction. The optimum reduction of about 4 logs was observed at 491 mg/L of nZVI and 60 min of contact time when spores were exposed to UV radiation under deaerated condition. Therefore, UV/nZVI process can be suggested as a reliable method for Bacillus subtilis spores inactivation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Plasma Assisted Decontamination of Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Spencer P

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy and mechanism of killing bacterial spores by a plasma torch is studied. Bacterial-spore (Bacillus cereus) suspension is inoculated onto glass/paper slide-coupons and desiccated into dry samples, and inoculated into well-microplate as wet sample. The exposure distance of all samples is 4 cm from the nozzle of the torch. In the experiment, paper slide-coupon is inserted inside an envelope. The kill times on spores in three types of samples are measured to be about 3, 9, and 24 seconds. The changes in the morphology and shape of still viable spores in treated wet samples are recorded by scanning electron and atomic force microscopes. The loss of appendages and exosporium in the structure and squashed/flattened cell shape are observed. The emission spectroscopy of the torch indicates that the plasma effluent carries abundant reactive atomic oxygen, which is responsible for the destruction of spores. PMID:19662115

  10. Inactivation of individual Bacillus subtilis spores in dependence on their distance to single cosmic heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Reitz, G; Schafer, M

    1994-10-01

    For radiobiological experiments in space, designed to investigate biological effects of the heavy ions of the cosmic radiation field, a mandatory requirement is the possibility to spatially correlate the observed biological response of individual test organisms to the passage of single heavy ions. Among several undertakings towards this goal, the BIOSTACK experiments in the Apollo missions achieved the highest precision and therefore the most detailed information on this question. Spores of Bacillus subtilis as a highly radiation resistant and microscopically small test organism yielded these quantitative results. This paper will focus on experimental and procedural details, which must be included for an interpretation and a discussion of these findings in comparison to control experiments with accelerated heavy ions.

  11. Effect of oral administration of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9 strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Lopamudra; Gandhi, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of oral administration of two Bacillus strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model. Materials and Methods: An in vivo experiment was conducted for 49-day period on 36 adult male albino Wister rats divided equally into to four groups. After 7-day adaptation period, one group (T1) was fed on sterile skim milk along with basal diet for the next 28 days. Second (T2) and (T3) groups received spore biomass of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9, respectively, suspended in sterilized skim milk at 8-9 log colony-forming units/ml plus basal diet for 28 days, while control group (T4) was supplied with clean water along with basal diet. There was a 14-day post-treatment period. A total of 288 fecal samples (8 fecal collections per rat) were collected at every 7-day interval starting from 0 to 49 days and subjected to the enumeration of the counts of coliforms and lactobacilli and Bacillus spores using respective agar media. In vitro acid and bile tolerance tests on both the strains were performed. Results: The rats those (T2 and T3) received either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 spore along with non-fermented skim milk showed decrease (p<0.01) in fecal coliform counts and increase (p<0.05) in both fecal lactobacilli and Bacillus spore counts as compared to the control group (T4) and the group fed only skim milk (T1). In vitro study indicated that both the strains were found to survive at pH 2.0 and 3.0 even up to 3 h and tolerate bile up to 2.0% concentration even after 12 h of exposure. Conclusions: This study revealed that oral administration of either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 strains might be useful in reducing coliform counts accompanied by concurrent increase in lactobacilli counts in the intestinal flora in rats. PMID:27536040

  12. Effect of oral administration of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9 strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Lopamudra; Gandhi, D N

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effect of oral administration of two Bacillus strains on fecal coliforms, Lactobacillus and Bacillus spp. in rat animal model. An in vivo experiment was conducted for 49-day period on 36 adult male albino Wister rats divided equally into to four groups. After 7-day adaptation period, one group (T1) was fed on sterile skim milk along with basal diet for the next 28 days. Second (T2) and (T3) groups received spore biomass of Bacillus coagulans B37 and Bacillus pumilus B9, respectively, suspended in sterilized skim milk at 8-9 log colony-forming units/ml plus basal diet for 28 days, while control group (T4) was supplied with clean water along with basal diet. There was a 14-day post-treatment period. A total of 288 fecal samples (8 fecal collections per rat) were collected at every 7-day interval starting from 0 to 49 days and subjected to the enumeration of the counts of coliforms and lactobacilli and Bacillus spores using respective agar media. In vitro acid and bile tolerance tests on both the strains were performed. The rats those (T2 and T3) received either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 spore along with non-fermented skim milk showed decrease (p<0.01) in fecal coliform counts and increase (p<0.05) in both fecal lactobacilli and Bacillus spore counts as compared to the control group (T4) and the group fed only skim milk (T1). In vitro study indicated that both the strains were found to survive at pH 2.0 and 3.0 even up to 3 h and tolerate bile up to 2.0% concentration even after 12 h of exposure. This study revealed that oral administration of either B. coagulans B37 or B. pumilus B9 strains might be useful in reducing coliform counts accompanied by concurrent increase in lactobacilli counts in the intestinal flora in rats.

  13. Effects of processing parameters on the inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores on red pepper (Capsicum annum L.) flakes by microwave-combined cold plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Dong-Un; Min, Sea C

    2017-12-18

    The efficacy of microwave-combined cold plasma treatment (MCPT) for inactivating Bacillus cereus spores contaminating red pepper (Capsicum annum L.) flakes was investigated. The effects of red pepper drying method, particle size, and water activity (a w ) were also evaluated at two levels of microwave power (1700 and 2500W/cm 2 ). The inactivation effect of MCPT was higher at higher microwave power. Spore reduction was more effective with vacuum-dried red pepper than far-infrared-dried flakes. A significantly higher level of spore reduction was observed with the red pepper sample with a smaller surface to volume ratio when one surface (exterior surface) was inoculated (p<0.05). Spore reduction by MCPT at high microwave power increased from 1.7 to 2.6logspores/cm 2 when the a w of flake increased from 0.4 to 0.9 (p<0.05). MCPT did not change the color of red pepper flakes. MCPT demonstrated potential as a microbial decontaminating technology for red pepper flakes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative sensitivity to UV-B radiation of two Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies and other Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Myasnik, M; Manasherob, R; Ben-Dov, E; Zaritsky, A; Margalith, Y; Barak, Z

    2001-08-01

    Susceptibility of Bacillus thuringiensis spores and toxins to the UV-B range (280--330 nm) of the solar spectrum reaching Earth's surface may be responsible for its inactivation and low persistence in nature. Spores of the mosquito larvicidal B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis were significantly more resistant to UV-B than spores of the lepidopteran-active subsp. kurstaki. Spores of subsp. israelensis were as resistant to UV-B as spores of B. subtilis and more resistant than spores of the closely related B. cereus and another mosquito larvicidal species B. sphaericus. Sensitivity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores to UV-B radiation depended upon their culture age; 24-h cultures, approaching maximal larvicidal activity, were still sensitive. Maximal resistance to UV-B was achieved only at 48 h.

  15. Modeling Radiation Effectiveness for Inactivation of Bacillus Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    are the exosporium, the spore coat, the outer membrane, the cortex, the germ cell wall, the inner membrane, and the core. These are illustrated in...small amounts of carbohydrates and lipids. The 6 coat acts as the spore’s first line of defense against some chemical infiltration such as lytic enzymes...the spore as water makes up 48-57 percent of the cortex [2]. Immediately interior to the cortex is the germ cell wall which is also a peptidoglycan

  16. Dynamic Predictive Model for Growth of Bacillus cereus from Spores in Cooked Beans.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Mishra, Abhinav; Pradhan, Abani K

    2018-02-01

    Kinetic growth data for Bacillus cereus grown from spores were collected in cooked beans under several isothermal conditions (10 to 49°C). Samples were inoculated with approximately 2 log CFU/g heat-shocked (80°C for 10 min) spores and stored at isothermal temperatures. B. cereus populations were determined at appropriate intervals by plating on mannitol-egg yolk-polymyxin agar and incubating at 30°C for 24 h. Data were fitted into Baranyi, Huang, modified Gompertz, and three-phase linear primary growth models. All four models were fitted to the experimental growth data collected at 13 to 46°C. Performances of these models were evaluated based on accuracy and bias factors, the coefficient of determination ( R 2 ), and the root mean square error. Based on these criteria, the Baranyi model best described the growth data, followed by the Huang, modified Gompertz, and three-phase linear models. The maximum growth rates of each primary model were fitted as a function of temperature using the modified Ratkowsky model. The high R 2 values (0.95 to 0.98) indicate that the modified Ratkowsky model can be used to describe the effect of temperature on the growth rates for all four primary models. The acceptable prediction zone (APZ) approach also was used for validation of the model with observed data collected during single and two-step dynamic cooling temperature protocols. When the predictions using the Baranyi model were compared with the observed data using the APZ analysis, all 24 observations for the exponential single rate cooling were within the APZ, which was set between -0.5 and 1 log CFU/g; 26 of 28 predictions for the two-step cooling profiles also were within the APZ limits. The developed dynamic model can be used to predict potential B. cereus growth from spores in beans under various temperature conditions or during extended chilling of cooked beans.

  17. Sterilization Resistance of Bacterial Spores Explained with Water Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony W; Zachariah, Malcolm M; Middaugh, Amy N; Garimella, Ravindranath; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rice, Charles V

    2015-11-05

    Bacterial spores can survive for long periods without nutrients and in harsh environmental conditions. This survival is influenced by the structure of the spore, the presence of protective compounds, and water retention. These compounds, and the physical state of water in particular, allow some species of bacterial spores to survive sterilization schemes with hydrogen peroxide and UV light. The chemical nature of the spore core and its water has been a subject of some contention and the chemical environment of the water impacts resistance paradigms. Either the spore has a glassy core, where water is immobilized along with other core components, or the core is gel-like with mobile water diffusion. These properties affect the movement of peroxide and radical species, and hence resistance. Deuterium solid-state NMR experiments are useful for examining the nature of the water inside the spore. Previous work in our lab with spores of Bacillus subtilis indicate that, for spores, the core water is in a more immobilized state than expected for the gel-like core theory, suggesting a glassy core environment. Here, we report deuterium solid-state NMR observations of the water within UV- and peroxide-resistant spores from Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032. Variable-temperature NMR experiments indicate no change in the line shape after heating to 50 °C, but an overall decrease in signal after heating to 100 °C. These results show glass-like core dynamics within B. pumilus SAFR-032 that may be the potential source of its known UV-resistance properties. The observed NMR traits can be attributed to the presence of an exosporium containing additional labile deuterons that can aid in the deactivation of sterilizing agents.

  18. Architecture and Assembly of the Bacillus subtilis Spore Coat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    with chromosomal DNA was as described [32]. Table 1. 8. subtifis strains used in this study. Stra in Genotype Phenotype• PS832 wild type PS3394...of the morphology of fully hydrated and air dried spores demonstrate that surface ridges on dehydrated spores mostly disappear or decrease in size

  19. Impact of Spores on the Comparative Efficacies of Five Antibiotics for Treatment of Bacillus anthracis in an In Vitro Hollow Fiber Pharmacodynamic Model

    PubMed Central

    VanScoy, Brian D.; Brown, David L.; Kulawy, Robert W.; Heine, Henry S.; Drusano, George L.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, is an agent of bioterrorism. The most effective antimicrobial therapy for B. anthracis infections is unknown. An in vitro pharmacodynamic model of B. anthracis was used to compare the efficacies of simulated clinically prescribed regimens of moxifloxacin, linezolid, and meropenem with the “gold standards,” doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Treatment outcomes for isogenic spore-forming and non-spore-forming strains of B. anthracis were compared. Against spore-forming B. anthracis, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and meropenem reduced the B. anthracis population by 4 log10 CFU/ml over 10 days. Doxycycline reduced the population of this B. anthracis strain by 5 log10 CFU/ml (analysis of variance [ANOVA] P = 0.01 versus other drugs). Against an isogenic non-spore-forming strain, meropenem killed the vegetative B. anthracis the fastest, followed by moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin and then doxycycline. Linezolid offered the lowest bacterial kill rate. Heat shock studies using the spore-producing B. anthracis strain showed that with moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem therapies the total population was mostly spores, while the population was primarily vegetative bacteria with linezolid and doxycycline therapies. Spores have a profound impact on the rate and extent of killing of B. anthracis. Against spore-forming B. anthracis, the five antibiotics killed the total (spore and vegetative) bacterial population at similar rates (within 1 log10 CFU/ml of each other). However, bactericidal antibiotics killed vegetative B. anthracis faster than bacteriostatic drugs. Since only vegetative-phase B. anthracis produces the toxins that may kill the infected host, the rate and mechanism of killing of an antibiotic may determine its overall in vivo efficacy. Further studies are needed to examine this important observation. PMID:22155821

  20. Safety assessment of the use of Bacillus-based cleaning products.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ninna W; Evans, Matthew R; Sedivy, John; Testman, Robert; Acedo, Kimon; Paone, Domenic; Long, David; Osimitz, Thomas G

    2018-06-01

    Non-pathogenic Bacillus species used in cleaning products produce the appropriate enzymes to degrade stains and soils. However, there is little scientific data regarding the human exposure by inhalation of Bacillus spores during or after use of microbial-based cleaning products. Herein, air samples were collected at various locations in a ventilated, carpeted, residential room to determine the air concentration of viable bacteria and spores during and after the application of microbial-based carpet cleaning products containing Bacillus spores. The influence of human activities and vacuuming was investigated. Bioaerosol levels associated with use and post-application activities of whole room carpet treatments were elevated during post-application activity, but quickly returned to the indoor background range. Use of trigger spray spot applications generated aerosolized spores in the immediate vicinity, however, their use pattern and the generation of mostly non-respirable particles suggest minimal risks for pulmonary exposure from their use. The aerosol counts associated with use of these microbial-based cleaners were below the recommendation for safe exposure levels to non-pathogenic and non-toxigenic microorganisms except during application of the spot cleaner. The data presented suggest that carpet cleaning products, containing non-pathogenic Bacillus spores present a low potential for inhalation exposure and consequently minimal risk of adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal Inactivation Characteristics of Bacillus subtilis Spores at Ultrahigh Temperatures1

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. L.; Busta, F. F.; Speck, M. L.

    1965-01-01

    The thermal inactivation characteristics of Bacillus subtilis A spores suspended in skim milk with the use of large-scale ultrahigh temperature (UHT) processing equipment were investigated in terms of survival as measured with two plating media. Data on survival immediately after UHT treatments were recorded in temperature-survivor curves, time-survivor curves, and decimal reduction time (DRT) curves. The temperature-survivor curves emphasized that inactivation is accelerated more by increases in the treatment temperature than by increases in the exposure time. Time-survivor curves and DRT curves were not linear. Generally, exceedingly concave time-survivor curves were observed with the standard plating medium; however, only slightly concave curves were observed when CaCl2 and sodium dipicolinate were added to the medium. For a given UHT sample, larger D values were obtained by use of the medium with the added CaCl2 and sodium dipicolinate. The DRT curves of all data were concave and appeared to have two discrete slopes (zD values). The zD values observed in the upper UHT range (above 260 F; 127 C) were twice those observed at lower test temperatures. PMID:4956036

  2. Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Structural Studies Suggest that the Germination Protease, GPR, in Spores of Bacillus Species Is an Atypical Aspartic Acid Protease

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Thomas M.; Setlow, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Germination protease (GPR) initiates the degradation of small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) during germination of spores of Bacillus and Clostridium species. The GPR amino acid sequence is not homologous to members of the major protease families, and previous work has not identified residues involved in GPR catalysis. The current work has focused on identifying catalytically essential amino acids by mutagenesis of Bacillus megaterium gpr. A residue was selected for alteration if it (i) was conserved among spore-forming bacteria, (ii) was a potential nucleophile, and (iii) had not been ruled out as inessential for catalysis. GPR variants were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the active form (P41) was assayed for activity against SASP and the zymogen form (P46) was assayed for the ability to autoprocess to P41. Variants inactive against SASP and unable to autoprocess were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and multiangle laser light scattering to determine whether the variant's inactivity was due to loss of secondary or quaternary structure, respectively. Variation of D127 and D193, but no other residues, resulted in inactive P46 and P41, while variants of each form were well structured and tetrameric, suggesting that D127 and D193 are essential for activity and autoprocessing. Mapping these two aspartate residues and a highly conserved lysine onto the B. megaterium P46 crystal structure revealed a striking similarity to the catalytic residues and propeptide lysine of aspartic acid proteases. These data indicate that GPR is an atypical aspartic acid protease. PMID:16199582

  3. Mechanisms of Resistance in Microbial Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-20

    solids (and water) content by immersion refractometry . Heat-activated spores of Bacillus stearotherrnophilus were found to be separable into two...incrC· ment of bacterial cells, enabling determination of their solids content by immersion refractometry . The results agreed well with values for

  4. Disinfection of Vegetative Cells of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Disinfection of Bacillus anthracis spores in drinking water is well documented in peer-reviewed literature (Adcock et al., 2004... Disinfection kinetics of vegetative cells of Bacillus anthracis in water with free available chlorine ([FAC] 2 mg/L) and monochloramine ([MC] 2 mg/L) were...anthracis. Bacillus anthracis cells Drinking water Chlorine demand-free (CDF

  5. Spore populations among bulk tank raw milk and dairy powders are significantly different.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel A; Kent, David J; Watterson, Matthew J; Boor, Kathryn J; Martin, Nicole H; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To accommodate stringent spore limits mandated for the export of dairy powders, a more thorough understanding of the spore species present will be necessary to develop prospective strategies to identify and reduce sources (i.e., raw materials or in-plant) of contamination. We characterized 1,523 spore isolates obtained from bulk tank raw milk (n=33 farms) and samples collected from 4 different dairy powder-processing plants producing acid whey, nonfat dry milk, sweet whey, or whey protein concentrate 80. The spores isolated comprised 12 genera, at least 44 species, and 216 rpoB allelic types. Bacillus and Geobacillus represented the most commonly isolated spore genera (approximately 68.9 and 12.1%, respectively, of all spore isolates). Whereas Bacillus licheniformis was isolated from samples collected from all plants and farms, Geobacillus spp. were isolated from samples from 3 out of 4 plants and just 1 out of 33 farms. We found significant differences between the spore population isolated from bulk tank raw milk and those isolated from dairy powder plant samples, except samples from the plant producing acid whey. A comparison of spore species isolated from raw materials and finished powders showed that although certain species, such as B. licheniformis, were found in both raw and finished product samples, other species, such as Geobacillus spp. and Anoxybacillus spp., were more frequently isolated from finished powders. Importantly, we found that 8 out of 12 genera were isolated from at least 2 different spore count methods, suggesting that some spore count methods may provide redundant information if used in parallel. Together, our results suggest that (1) Bacillus and Geobacillus are the predominant spore contaminants in a variety of dairy powders, implying that future research efforts targeted at elucidating approaches to reduce levels of spores in dairy powders should focus on controlling levels of spore isolates from these genera; and (2) the spore

  6. Formation of Protoplasts from Resting Spores

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-James, Philip C.

    1971-01-01

    Coat-stripped spores suspended in hypertonic solutions and supplied with two essential cations can be converted into viable protoplasts by lysozyme digestion of both cortex and germ cell wall. Calcium ions are necessary to prevent membrane rupture, and magnesium ions are necessary for changes indicative of hydration of the core, particularily the nuclear mass. Since remnant spore coat covered such protoplasts of Bacillus subtilis and the germ cell wall of B. cereus spores is not lysozyme digestible, coatless spores of B. megaterium KM were more useful for these studies. Lysozyme digestion in cation-free environment produced a peculiar semi-refractile spore core free of a cortex but prone to rapid hydration and lytic changes on the addition of cations. Strontium could replace Ca2+ but Mn2+ could not replace Mg2+ in these digestions. When added to the spores, dipicolinic acid and other chelates appeared to compete with the membrane for the calcium needed for stabilization during lysozyme conversion to protoplasts. It is argued that calcium could function to stabilize the inner membrane anionic groups over the anhydrous dipicolinic acid-containing core of resting spores. Images PMID:4995380

  7. Effect of incubation temperature and pH on the recovery of Bacillus weihenstephanensis spores after exposure to a peracetic acid-based disinfectant or to pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Trunet, C; Mtimet, N; Mathot, A-G; Postollec, F; Leguérinel, I; Couvert, O; Carlin, F; Coroller, L

    2018-04-12

    The recovery at a range of incubation temperatures and pH of spores of Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4 exposed to a peracetic acid-based disinfectant (PABD) or to pulsed light was estimated. Spores of B. weihenstephanensis were produced at 30 °C and pH 7.00, at 30 °C and pH 5.50, or at 12 °C and pH 7.00. The spores were treated with a commercial peracetic acid-based disinfectant at 80 mg·mL -1 for 0 to 200 min at 18 °C or by pulsed light at fluences ranging between 0.4 and 2.3 J·cm -2 for pulsed light treatment. After each treatment, the spores were incubated on nutrient agar at 12 °C, 30 °C or 37 °C, or at pH 5.10, 6.00 or 7.40. Incubation temperature during recovery had a significant impact only near the recovery limits, beyond which surviving spores previously exposed to a PABD or to pulsed light were not able to form colonies. In contrast, a decrease in pH of the recovery nutrient agar had a progressive impact on the ability of spores to form colonies. The time to first log reduction after PABD treatment was 29.5 ± 0.7 min with recovery at pH 7.40, and was tremendously shortened 5.1 ± 0.2 min with recovery at pH 5.10. Concerning the fluence necessary for the first log reduction, it was 1.5 times higher when the spores were recovered at pH 6.00 compared to a recovery at pH 5.10. The impact of recovery temperature and pH can be described with a mathematical model using cardinal temperature and pH as parameters. These effects of temperature and pH on recovery of Bacillus weihenstephanensis spores exposed to a disinfectant combining peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, or pulsed light are similar, although these treatments are of different natures. Sporulation temperature or pH did not impact resistance to the peracetic acid-based disinfectant or pulsed light. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and cement-mortar drinking water infrastructure in a model system using disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Jeffrey G; Meiners, Greg; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W; Hall, John

    2017-02-01

    Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to common drinking water infrastructure surfaces was evaluated using a variety of disinfectants. Corroded iron and cement-mortar lined iron represented the infrastructure surfaces, and were conditioned in a 23 m long, 15 cm diameter (75 ft long, 6 in diameter) pilot-scale drinking water distribution pipe system. Decontamination was evaluated using increased water velocity (flushing) alone at 0.5 m s -1 (1.7 ft s -1 ), as well as free chlorine (5 and 25 mg L -1 ), monochloramine (25 mg L -1 ), chlorine dioxide (5 and 25 mg L -1 ), ozone (2.0 mg L -1 ), peracetic acid 25 mg L -1 ) and acidified nitrite (0.1 mol L -1 at pH 2 and 3), all followed by flushing at 0.3 m s -1 (1 ft s -1 ). Flushing alone reduced the adhered spores by 0.5 and 2.0 log 10 from iron and cement-mortar, respectively. Log 10 reduction on corroded iron pipe wall coupons ranged from 1.0 to 2.9 at respective chlorine dioxide concentrations of 5 and 25 mg L -1 , although spores were undetectable on the iron surface during disinfection at 25 mg L -1 . Acidified nitrite (pH 2, 0.1 mol L -1 ) yielded no detectable spores on the iron surface during the flushing phase after disinfection. Chlorine dioxide was the best performing disinfectant with >3.0 log 10 removal from cement-mortar at 5 and 25 mg L -1 . The data show that free chlorine, monochloramine, ozone and chlorine dioxide followed by flushing can reduce adhered spores by > 3.0 log 10 on cement-mortar. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Sterilization of Bacillus pumilus spores using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide containing various modifier solutions.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Edison; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Wai, Chien M; Lang, Qingyong; Crawford, Ronald L

    2009-03-01

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO(2)) with small amounts of chemical modifier(s) provides a very effective sterilization technique that should be useful for destroying microorganism on heat-sensitive devices such as instruments flown on planetary-bound spacecraft. Under a moderate temperature (50 degrees C) and pressure (100 atm), spores of Bacillus pumilus strains ATCC 7061 and SAFR 032 can be effectively inactivated/eliminated from metal surfaces and small electronic devices in only 45 min using optimized modifier concentrations. Modifiers explored in this study included hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), tert-butyl hydroperoxide, formic acid, and Triton X-100. During sterilization procedure the modifiers were continuously added to SF-CO(2) in either methanol or water at controlled concentrations. The lowest effective concentrations were established for each modifier. Complete elimination of both types of B. pumilus endospores occurred with an optimal modifier addition of either or 10% methanol containing 12% H(2)O(2) or 12% tert-butyl hydroperoxide in SF-CO(2), or a mixture of 6% H(2)O(2) and 6% tert-butyl hydroperoxide. Using water as the carrier of SF-CO(2) modifier, the complete elimination of spores viability of both B. pumilus strains occurred with an addition of either 3.3% water containing 3% H(2)O(2), or 3.3% water containing 10% methanol and 0.5% formic acid, or 3.3% water containing 10% methanol, 1% formic acid and 2% H(2)O(2).

  10. Photometric immersion refractometry of bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, P; Beaman, T C; Corner, T R; Greenamyre, J T; Tisa, L S

    1982-01-01

    Photometric immersion refractometry was used to determine the average apparent refractive index (n) of five types of dormant Bacillus spores representing a 600-fold range in moist-heat resistance determined as a D100 value. The n of a spore type increased as the molecular size of various immersion solutes decreased. For comparison of the spore types, the n of the entire spore and of the isolated integument was determined by use of bovine serum albumin, which is excluded from permeating into them. The n of the sporoplast (the structures bounded by the outer pericortex membrane) was determined by use of glucose, which was shown to permeate into the spore only as deeply as the pericortex membrane. Among the various spore types, an exponential increase in the heat resistance correlated with the n of the entire spore and of the sporoplast, but not of the isolated perisporoplast integument. Correlation of the n with the solids content of the entire spore provided a method of experimentally obtaining the refractive index increment (dn/dc), which was constant for the various spore types and enables the calculation of solids and water content from an n. Altogether, the results showed that the total water content is distributed unequally within the dormant spore, with less water in the sporoplast than in the perisporoplast integument, and that the sporoplast becomes more refractile and therefore more dehydrated as the heat resistance becomes greater among the various spore types. PMID:6802796

  11. Kinetics of Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger Spores and Staphylococcus albus on Paper by Chlorine Dioxide Gas in an Enclosed Space

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Jinhui; Hao, Limei; Yi, Ying; Zhang, Zongxing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spore and Staphylococcus albus are typical biological indicators for the inactivation of airborne pathogens. The present study characterized and compared the behaviors of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus in regard to inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas under different gas concentrations and relative humidity (RH) conditions. The inactivation kinetics under different ClO2 gas concentrations (1 to 5 mg/liter) were determined by first-order and Weibull models. A new model (the Weibull-H model) was established to reveal the inactivation tendency and kinetics for ClO2 gas under different RH conditions (30 to 90%). The results showed that both the gas concentration and RH were significantly (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with the inactivation of the two chosen indicators. There was a rapid improvement in the inactivation efficiency under high RH (>70%). Compared with the first-order model, the Weibull and Weibull-H models demonstrated a better fit for the experimental data, indicating nonlinear inactivation behaviors of the vegetative bacteria and spores following exposure to ClO2 gas. The times to achieve a six-log reduction of B. subtilis subsp. niger spore and S. albus were calculated based on the established models. Clarifying the kinetics of inactivation of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus by ClO2 gas will allow the development of ClO2 gas treatments that provide an effective disinfection method. IMPORTANCE Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a novel and effective fumigation agent with strong oxidization ability and a broad biocidal spectrum. The antimicrobial efficacy of ClO2 gas has been evaluated in many previous studies. However, there are presently no published models that can be used to describe the kinetics of inactivation of airborne pathogens by ClO2 gas under different gas concentrations and RH conditions. The first-order and Weibull (Weibull-H) models established in this study can

  12. Kinetics of Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger Spores and Staphylococcus albus on Paper by Chlorine Dioxide Gas in an Enclosed Space.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Jinhui; Qi, Jiancheng; Hao, Limei; Yi, Ying; Zhang, Zongxing

    2016-05-15

    Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spore and Staphylococcus albus are typical biological indicators for the inactivation of airborne pathogens. The present study characterized and compared the behaviors of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus in regard to inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas under different gas concentrations and relative humidity (RH) conditions. The inactivation kinetics under different ClO2 gas concentrations (1 to 5 mg/liter) were determined by first-order and Weibull models. A new model (the Weibull-H model) was established to reveal the inactivation tendency and kinetics for ClO2 gas under different RH conditions (30 to 90%). The results showed that both the gas concentration and RH were significantly (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with the inactivation of the two chosen indicators. There was a rapid improvement in the inactivation efficiency under high RH (>70%). Compared with the first-order model, the Weibull and Weibull-H models demonstrated a better fit for the experimental data, indicating nonlinear inactivation behaviors of the vegetative bacteria and spores following exposure to ClO2 gas. The times to achieve a six-log reduction of B. subtilis subsp. niger spore and S. albus were calculated based on the established models. Clarifying the kinetics of inactivation of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus by ClO2 gas will allow the development of ClO2 gas treatments that provide an effective disinfection method. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a novel and effective fumigation agent with strong oxidization ability and a broad biocidal spectrum. The antimicrobial efficacy of ClO2 gas has been evaluated in many previous studies. However, there are presently no published models that can be used to describe the kinetics of inactivation of airborne pathogens by ClO2 gas under different gas concentrations and RH conditions. The first-order and Weibull (Weibull-H) models established in this study can characterize and

  13. [Sporocidic activity of sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid alone or combined against free or fixed spores or on biofilm].

    PubMed

    Samrakandi, M M; Roques, C; Michel, G

    1994-05-01

    In order to assess the sporocidal activity of chlorine and peracetic acid (PAA), alone and in combination, against a spored biofilm, the biofilms of two species (Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Bacillus megaterium ATCC 8245) were formed on inert support (tygon). A sporulation kinetic of these bacteria in biofilm was established. Sporocidal properties of chlorine and PAA were compared against free spores, spores fixed by drying and spores in biofilm. The combination of these two products was also tested. Minimal sporocidal concentrations (MSC) of the two products towards free spores were determined (contact time 5 mn). The efficacy of these MSC were evaluated in terms of contact time on adhered spores and on spores in biofilm. Chlorine and PAA exhibited an excellent sporocidal activity. The combination of PAA and chlorine, tested by checkerboard micromethod, was found to be synergistic in case of free or adhered spores. The spored biofilm showed a high resistance. The combination of these two products revealed then only an additive effect.

  14. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores by a combination of biocides and heating under high-temperature short-time pasteurization conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sa; Labuza, Theodore P; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-06-01

    The milk supply is considered a primary route for a bioterrorism attack with Bacillus anthracis spores because typical high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization conditions cannot inactivate spores. In the event of intentional contamination, an effective method to inactivate the spores in milk under HTST processing conditions is needed. This study was undertaken to identify combinations and concentrations of biocides that can inactivate B. anthracis spores at temperatures in the HTST range in less than 1 min. Hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium hypochlorite (SH), and peroxyacetic acid (PA) were evaluated for their efficacy in inactivating spores of strains 7702, ANR-1, and 9131 in milk at 72, 80, and 85 degrees C using a sealed capillary tube technique. Strains ANR-1 and 9131 were more resistant to all of the biocide treatments than strain 7702. Addition of 1,260 ppm SH to milk reduced the number of viable spores of each strain by 6 log CFU/ml in less than 90 and 60 s at 72 and 80 degrees C, respectively. After neutralization, 1,260 ppm SH reduced the time necessary to inactivate 6 log CFU/ml (TTI6-log) at 80 degrees C to less than 20 s. Treatment of milk with 7,000 ppm HP resulted in a similar level of inactivation in 60 s. Combined treatment with 1,260 ppm SH and 1,800 ppm HP inactivated spores of all strains in less than 20 s at 80 degrees C. Mixing 15 ppm PA with milk containing 1,260 ppm SH resulted in TTI6-log of 25 and 12 s at 72 and 80 degrees C, respectively. TTI6-log of less than 20 s were also achieved at 80 degrees C by using two combinations of biocides: 250 ppm SH, 700 ppm HP, and 150 ppm PA; and 420 ppm SH (pH 7), 1,100 ppm HP, and 15 ppm PA. These results indicated that different combinations of biocides could consistently result in 6-log reductions in the number of B. anthracis spores in less than 1 min at temperatures in the HTST range. This information could be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies which could be

  15. Identifying and Inactivating Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcombe, David; Dekas, Anne; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-01-01

    Problems associated with, and new strategies for, inactivating resistant organisms like Bacillus canaveralius (found at Kennedy Space Center during a survey of three NASA cleanrooms) have been defined. Identifying the particular component of the spore that allows its heightened resistance can guide the development of sterilization procedures that are targeted to the specific molecules responsible for resistance, while avoiding using unduly harsh methods that jeopardize equipment. The key element of spore resistance is a multilayered protein shell that encases the spore called the spore coat. The coat of the best-studied spore-forming microbe, B. subtilis, consists of at least 45 proteins, most of which are poorly characterized. Several protective roles for the coat are well characterized including resistance to desiccation, large toxic molecules, ortho-phthalaldehyde, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. One important long-term specific goal is an improved sterilization procedure that will enable NASA to meet planetary protection requirements without a terminal heat sterilization step. This would support the implementation of planetary protection policies for life-detection missions. Typically, hospitals and government agencies use biological indicators to ensure the quality control of sterilization processes. The spores of B. canaveralius that are more resistant to osmotic stress would serve as a better biological indicator for potential survival than those in use currently.

  16. False-negative rate, limit of detection and recovery efficiency performance of a validated macrofoam-swab sampling method for low surface concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne and Bacillus atrophaeus spores

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G. F.; Deatherage Kaiser, B. L.; Amidan, B. G.

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in × 2 in) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest formore » vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS and 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS and 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG; values increased as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent article.« less

  17. Inhibition of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Interleukin 8 in Human Adenocarcinoma Cell Line HT-29 by Spore Probiotics: B. coagulans and B. subtilis (natto).

    PubMed

    Azimirad, Masoumeh; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Naji, Tahereh

    2017-03-01

    Probiotics are used as a treatment for different intestinal disorders. They confer health benefits by different ways. This study was aimed to investigate immunomodulatory effect of Bacillus probiotic spores on the production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin 8 (IL-8) in HT-29 intestinal epithelial cells. Differentiated intestinal epithelial cell line was used as a model for the study of colonization of purified spores (Bacillus subtilis (natto) and B. coagulans) and their anti-inflammatory effects. MTT assay and trypan blue staining were used for the detection of optimal concentration of the purified spores and LPS. Pre-treatment assay was done by treatment of the cells with the purified spores for 2 h, followed by challenges with LPS for 3 and 18 h. Post-treatment assay was done by initial treatment of the cells with LPS for 18 h, followed by the spores for 3 and 6 h. Levels of IL-8 secretion and its mRNA expression were measured by ELISA and relative Q real-time PCR. Our results showed similar rates of adherence to intestinal epithelial cells by the spore probiotics, while displaying no cytotoxic effect. In the pre-treatment assay, a significant decrease in IL-8, at both protein and mRNA levels, was measured for B. coagulans spores after the addition of LPS, which was higher than those observed for Bacillus subtilis (natto) spores. In the post-treatment assay, while Bacillus subtilis (but not B. coagulans) diminished the LPS-stimulated IL-8 levels after 3 h of incubation, the inhibitory effect was not constant. In conclusion, ability of Bacillus spore probiotics for adherence to intestinal epithelial cell and their anti-inflammatory effects, through interference with LPS/IL-8 signaling, was shown in this study. Further studies are needed to characterize responsible bacterial compounds associated with these effects.

  18. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES II.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Philipp; Black, S. H.

    1961-01-01

    Gerhardt, Philipp (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and S. H. Black. Permeability of bacterial spores. II. Molecular variables affecting solute permeation. J. Bacteriol. 82:750–760. 1961.—More than 100 compounds were tested for their uptake by dormant spores of a bacillus. The extent of penetration was found to be dependent on at least three molecular properties: (i) The dissociation of electrolytes usually resulted in high or low uptake predictable from their charge. (ii) Lipid insolubility restricted permeation of small molecules. (iii) The molecular weight of unsubstituted glycol and sugar polymers exponentially limited penetration to eventual exclusion at mol wt above 160,000. The results were plotted as a generalized curve, calculations from which permitted an interpretation that the effective spore surface contains pores varying in diameter from 10 to 200 A. PMID:13897940

  19. Bacillus Endospores - an ideal exobiological Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, R.; Horneck, G.

    Exobiology investigations have one overall goal -- finding the answer to the question if Earth is the only possible place in our universe where life was created. For tackling this question a good approach is to use a simple and ubiquitous system like bacteria as used in BIOPAN and EXPOSE. Many of these microorganisms have the ability to form metabolic inactive continuous forms such as Bacillus endospores. These spores are highly resistant against a variety of environmental stresses, such as toxic chemical agents, desiccation, high and low pressure, high doses of ionising and UV radiation and temperature extremes such as heat or permafrost. They are ubiquitous, inhabit soils and rocks and are easily disseminated by wind and water. Therefore they are suitable test systems for studying several questions of astrobiology, such as the theory of Panspermia, planetary protection issues in connection with missions to Mars or Europa, or chances for life on past or present Mars. The strategies Bacillus sp. endospores have developed to survive harsh conditions include a desiccated spore core, an altered conformation of their DNA (A-form), high concentration of small acid-soluble proteins (SASPs) stabilising the DNA, dipicolinic acid (DPA) for stabilisation and protective spore coating layers. We have investigated the role of endogenous and exogenous pigments in the UV-resistance of Bacillus endospores by using spores of different degree and kind of pigmentation, i.e. white, grey or red spores (DSMZ culture collection). The spectral ranges of UV radiation represented those of the early or present UV radiation climate of Earth or Mars. It was found, that endogenous carotenoids, identified by spectrophotometrical analysis from a spore extract as well as in-situ by Raman spectroscopy, efficiently protect against UV-A radiation, whereas melanin was also protective against UV-C radiation. From these studied follows, that highly pigmented spores might survive even in an intense UV

  20. Temporal regulation and forespore-specific expression of the spore photoproduct lyase gene by sigma-G RNA polymerase during Bacillus subtilis sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza-Reyes, M; Gutiérrez-Corona, F; Nicholson, W L

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial spores are highly resistant to killing by UV radiation and exhibit unique DNA photochemistry. UV irradiation of spore DNA results in formation of spore photoproduct (SP), the thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine. Repair of SP occurs during germination of Bacillus subtilis spores by two distinct routes, either by the general nucleotide excision repair (uvr) pathway or by a novel SP-specific monomerization reaction mediated by the enzyme SP lyase, which is encoded by the spl gene. Repair of SP occurs early in spore germination and is independent of de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that the SP repair enzymes are synthesized during sporulation and are packaged in the dormant spore. To test this hypothesis, the expression of a translational spl-lacZ fusion integrated at the spl locus was monitored during B. subtilis growth and sporulation. beta-Galactosidase expression from the spl-lacZ fusion was silent during vegetative growth and was not DNA damage inducible, but it was activated at morphological stage III of sporulation specifically in the forespore compartment, coincident with activation of expression of the stage III marker enzyme glucose dehydrogenase. Expression of the spl-lacZ fusion was shown to be dependent upon the sporulation-specific RNA polymerase containing the sigma-G factor (E sigma G), as spl-lacZ expression was abolished in a mutant harboring a deletion in the sigG gene and restored by expression of the sigG gene in trans. Primer extension analysis of spl mRNA revealed a major extension product initiating upstream from a small open reading frame of unknown function which precedes spl, and it revealed two other shorter minor extension products. All three extension products were present in higher quantities during sporulation and after sigG induction. The three putative transcripts are all preceded by sequences which share homology with the consensus sigma-G factor-type promoter sequence, but in vitro transcription by purified

  1. Aqueous extracts of a Mars analogue regolith that mimics the Phoenix landing site do not inhibit spore germination or growth of model spacecraft contaminants Bacillus subtilis 168 and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; McCoy, Lashelle E.; Kerney, Krystal R.; Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2012-08-01

    Because Mars is a primary target for life detection and habitability assessment missions, its exploration is also by necessity a Planetary Protection issue. The recent finding of significant levels of perchlorate (ClO4-) in regolith sampled from the Phoenix landing site raises the question of its potential biotoxicity to putative indigenous martian life, microbial forward contaminants from Earth, or future human visitors. To address this issue, an analogue regolith was constructed based on regolith chemistry data from the Phoenix landing site. A Mars Aqueous Regolith Extract (MARE) was prepared from the Phoenix analogue regolith and analyzed by ion chromatography. The MARE contained (mg/L) the cations Na+ (1411 ± 181), Mg2+ (1051 ± 160), Ca2+ (832 ± 125), and K+ (261 ± 29), and the anions SO42-(5911±993), ClO4-(5316±1767), Cl(171±25) and F- (2.0 ± 0.4). Nitrogen-containing species NO3-(773±113) and NO2-(6.9±2.3) were also present as a result of regolith preparation procedures, but their relevance to Mars is at present unknown. The MARE was tested for potential toxic effects on two model spacecraft contaminants, the spore-forming bacteria Bacillus subtilis strain 168 and Bacillus pumilus strain SAFR-032. In B. subtilis, spore germination and initial vegetative growth (up to ˜5 h) was not inhibited in a rich complex medium prepared with the MARE, but growth after 5 h was significantly suppressed in medium prepared using the MARE. Both B. subtilis and B. pumilus exhibited significantly higher rates of spore germination and growth in the MARE vs. DW with no additions (likely due to endogenous spore nutrients), but germination and growth was further stimulated by addition of glucose and a combination of buffered inorganic salts (K2HPO4, KH2PO4, (NH4)2SO4, and MgSO4). The data indicate that the aqueous environment in the regolith from the Phoenix landing site containing high levels of perchlorate does not pose a significant barrier to growth of putative

  2. Immune response induced by oral delivery of Bacillus subtilis spores expressing enolase of Clonorchis sinensis in grass carps (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongye; Chen, Tingjin; Sun, Hengchang; Tang, Zeli; Yu, Jinyun; Lin, Zhipeng; Ren, Pengli; Zhou, Xinyi; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater fish containing infective metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensisis (C.sinensis), remains a common public health problem. New effective prevention strategies are still urgent to control this food-borne infectious disease. The previous studies suggested Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) spores was an ideal vaccines delivery system, and the C.sinensis enolase (CsENO) was a potential vaccine candidate against clonorchiasis. In the current study, we detected CsENO-specific IgM levels by ELISA in sera, intestinal mucus and skin mucus in grass carps (Ctenopharyngodon idella) through oral administration with B. subtilis spores surface expressing CsENO. In addition, immune-related genes expression was also measured by qRT-PCR. Grass carps orally treated with B. subtilis spores or normal forages were used as controls. The results of ELISA manifested that specific IgM levels of grass carps in CsENO group in sera, intestine mucus and skin mucus almost significantly increased from week 4 post the first oral administration when compared to the two control groups. The levels of specific IgM reached its peak in intestine mucus firstly, then in sera, and last in skin mucus. qRT-PCR results showed that 5 immune-related genes expression had different degree of rising trend in CsENO group when compared to the two control groups. Our study demonstrated that orally administrated with B. subtilis spores expressing CsENO induced innate and adaptive immunity, systemic and local mucosal immunity, and humoral and cellular immunity. Our work may pave the way to clarify the exact mechanisms of protective efficacy elicited by B. subtilis spores expressing CsENO and provide new ideas for vaccine development against C. sinensis infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Germination and amplification of anthrax spores by soil-dwelling amoebas.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rafik; Hoffman, Paul S; Glomski, Ian J

    2012-11-01

    While anthrax is typically associated with bioterrorism, in many parts of the world the anthrax bacillus (Bacillus anthracis) is endemic in soils, where it causes sporadic disease in livestock. These soils are typically rich in organic matter and calcium that promote survival of resilient B. anthracis spores. Outbreaks of anthrax tend to occur in warm weather following rains that are believed to concentrate spores in low-lying areas where runoff collects. It has been concluded that elevated spore concentrations are not the result of vegetative growth as B. anthracis competes poorly against indigenous bacteria. Here, we test an alternative hypothesis in which amoebas, common in moist soils and pools of standing water, serve as amplifiers of B. anthracis spores by enabling germination and intracellular multiplication. Under simulated environmental conditions, we show that B. anthracis germinates and multiplies within Acanthamoeba castellanii. The growth kinetics of a fully virulent B. anthracis Ames strain (containing both the pX01 and pX02 virulence plasmids) and vaccine strain Sterne (containing only pX01) inoculated as spores in coculture with A. castellanii showed a nearly 50-fold increase in spore numbers after 72 h. In contrast, the plasmidless strain 9131 showed little growth, demonstrating that plasmid pX01 is essential for growth within A. castellanii. Electron and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy revealed that spores germinate within amoebal phagosomes, vegetative bacilli undergo multiplication, and, following demise of the amoebas, bacilli sporulate in the extracellular milieu. This analysis supports our hypothesis that amoebas contribute to the persistence and amplification of B. anthracis in natural environments.

  4. Laser induced disruption of bacterial spores on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Oliver; Murray, Kirk; Wilkinson, Alan-Shaun; Cox, Timothy; Manz, Andreas

    2005-04-01

    We report on the development of a laser based spore disruption method. Bacillus globigii spores were mixed with a laser light absorbing matrix and co-crystallized into 200-microm-wide and 20-microm-deep nanovials formed in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) target plate. Surface tension effects were exploited to effect up to 125-fold spore enrichment. When the target zones were illuminated at atmospheric pressure with pulsed UV-laser light at fluences below 20 mJ cm(-2) a change in spore morphology was observed within seconds. Post illumination PCR analysis suggests the release of endogenous DNA indicative of spore disruption. For laser fluences above 20 mJ cm(-2), desorption of spores and fragments was also observed even without a matrix being employed. Desorbed material was collected in a PDMS flowcell attached to the target plate during laser illumination. This opens up a route towards the direct extraction of released DNA in an integrated spore disruption-PCR amplification microchip device.

  5. Cleaning and Disinfection of Bacillus cereus Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Deal, Amanda; Klein, Dan; Lopolito, Paul; Schwarz, John Spencer

    2016-01-01

    Methodology has been evolving for the testing of disinfectants against bacterial single-species biofilms, as the difficulty of biofilm remediation continues to gain much-needed attention. Bacterial single-species biofilm contamination presents a real risk to good manufacturing practice-regulated industries. However, mixed-species biofilms and biofilms containing bacterial spores remain an even greater challenge for cleaning and disinfection. Among spore-forming microorganisms frequently encountered in pharmaceutical manufacturing areas, the spores of Bacillus cereus are often determined to be the hardest to disinfect and eradicate. One of the reasons for the low degree of susceptibility to disinfection is the ability of these spores to be encapsulated within an exopolysachharide biofilm matrix. In this series of experiments, we evaluated the disinfectant susceptibility of B. cereus biofilms relative to disassociated B. cereus spores and biofilm from a non-spore-forming species. Further, we assessed the impact that pre-cleaning has on increasing that susceptibility. Methodology has been evolving for the testing of disinfectants against bacterial single-species biofilms, as the difficulty of biofilm remediation continues to gain much-needed attention. Bacterial single-species biofilm contamination presents a real risk to good manufacturing practice-regulated industries. However, mixed-species biofilms and biofilms containing bacterial spores remain an even greater challenge for cleaning and disinfection. Among spore-forming microorganisms frequently encountered in pharmaceutical manufacturing areas, the spores of Bacillus cereus are often determined to be the hardest to disinfect and eradicate. One of the reasons for the low degree of susceptibility to disinfection is the ability of these spores to be encapsulated within an exopolysachharide biofilm matrix. In this series of experiments, we evaluated the disinfectant susceptibility of B. cereus biofilms relative to

  6. Large-Scale Purification, Characterization, and Spore Outgrowth Inhibitory Effect of Thurincin H, a Bacteriocin Produced by Bacillus thuringiensis SF361.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoyan; Manns, David C; Guron, Giselle K; Churey, John J; Worobo, Randy W

    2014-06-01

    Large-scale purification of the highly hydrophobic bacteriocin thurincin H was accomplished via a novel and simple two-step method: ammonia sulfate precipitation and C18 solid-phase extraction. The inhibition spectrum and stability of thurincin H as well as its antagonistic activity against Bacillus cereus F4552 spores were further characterized. In the purification method, secreted proteins contained in the supernatant of a 40 h incubated culture of B. thuringiensis SF361 were precipitated by 68 % ammonia sulfate and purified by reverse-phase chromatography, with a yield of 18.53 mg/l of pure thurincin H. Silver-stained SDS-PAGE, high-performance liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed the high purity of the prepared sample. Thurincin H exhibited a broad antimicrobial activity against 22 tested bacterial strains among six different genera including Bacillus, Carnobacterium, Geobacillus, Enterococcus, Listeria, and Staphylococcus. There was no detectable activity against any of the selected yeast or fungi. The bacteriocin activity was stable for 30 min at 50 °C and decreased to undetectable levels within 10 min at temperatures above 80 °C. Thurincin H is also stable from pH 2-7 for at least 24 h at room temperature. Thurincin H is germicidal against B. cereus spores in brain heart infusion broth, but not in Tris-NaCl buffer. The efficient purification method enables the large-scale production of pure thurincin H. The broad inhibitory spectrum of this bacteriocin may be of interest as a potential natural biopreservative in the food industry, particularly in post-processed and ready-to-eat food.

  7. The Bacillus subtilis yaaH Gene Is Transcribed by SigE RNA Polymerase during Sporulation, and Its Product Is Involved in Germination of Spores

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Takeko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Asai, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Ogasawara, Naotake; Watabe, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    The expression of 21 novel genes located in the region from dnaA to abrB of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome was analyzed. One of the genes, yaaH, had a predicted promoter sequence conserved among SigE-dependent genes. Northern blot analysis revealed that yaaH mRNA was first detected from 2 h after the cessation of logarithmic growth (T2) of sporulation in wild-type cells and in spoIIIG (SigG−) and spoIVCB (SigK−) mutants but not in spoIIAC (SigF−) and spoIIGAB (SigE−) mutants. The transcription start point was determined by primer extension analysis; the −10 and −35 regions are very similar to the consensus sequences recognized by SigE-containing RNA polymerase. A YaaH-His tag fusion encoded by a plasmid with a predicted promoter for the yaaH gene was produced from T2 of sporulation in a B. subtilis transformant and extracted from mature spores, indicating that the yaaH gene product is a spore protein. Inactivation of the yaaH gene by insertion of an erythromycin resistance gene did not affect vegetative growth or spore resistance to heat, chloroform, and lysozyme. The germination of yaaH mutant spores in a mixture of l-asparagine, d-glucose, d-fructose, and potassium chloride was almost the same as that of wild-type spores, but the mutant spores were defective in l-alanine-stimulated germination. These results suggest that yaaH is a novel gene encoding a spore protein produced in the mother cell compartment from T2 of sporulation and that it is required for the l-alanine-stimulated germination pathway. PMID:10419957

  8. Utilization of Low-Pressure Plasma to Inactivate Bacterial Spores on Stainless Steel Screws

    PubMed Central

    Stapelmann, Katharina; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Raguse, Marina; Awakowicz, Peter; Reitz, Günther

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A special focus area of planetary protection is the monitoring, control, and reduction of microbial contaminations that are detected on spacecraft components and hardware during and after assembly. In this study, wild-type spores of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 (a persistent spacecraft assembly facility isolate) and the laboratory model organism B. subtilis 168 were used to study the effects of low-pressure plasma, with hydrogen alone and in combination with oxygen and evaporated hydrogen peroxide as a process gas, on spore survival, which was determined by a colony formation assay. Spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 and B. subtilis 168 were deposited with an aseptic technique onto the surface of stainless steel screws to simulate a spore-contaminated spacecraft hardware component, and were subsequently exposed to different plasmas and hydrogen peroxide conditions in a very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma reactor (VHF-CCP) to reduce the spore burden. Spores of the spacecraft isolate B. pumilus SAFR-032 were significantly more resistant to plasma treatment than spores of B. subtilis 168. The use of low-pressure plasma with an additional treatment of evaporated hydrogen peroxide also led to an enhanced spore inactivation that surpassed either single treatment when applied alone, which indicates the potential application of this method as a fast and suitable way to reduce spore-contaminated spacecraft hardware components for planetary protection purposes. Key Words: Bacillus spores—Contamination—Spacecraft hardware—Plasma sterilization—Planetary protection. Astrobiology 13, 597–606. PMID:23768085

  9. Kinetics of Germination of Individual Spores of Geobacillus stearothermophilus as Measured by Raman Spectroscopy and Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tingting; Dong, Zhiyang; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2013-01-01

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus is a gram-positive, thermophilic bacterium, spores of which are very heat resistant. Raman spectroscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy were used to monitor the kinetics of germination of individual spores of G. stearothermophilus at different temperatures, and major conclusions from this work were as follows. 1) The CaDPA level of individual G. stearothermophilus spores was similar to that of Bacillus spores. However, the Raman spectra of protein amide bands suggested there are differences in protein structure in spores of G. stearothermophilus and Bacillus species. 2) During nutrient germination of G. stearothermophilus spores, CaDPA was released beginning after a lag time (T lag) between addition of nutrient germinants and initiation of CaDPA release. CaDPA release was complete at T release, and ΔT release (T release – T lag) was 1–2 min. 3) Activation by heat or sodium nitrite was essential for efficient nutrient germination of G. stearothermophilus spores, primarily by decreasing T lag values. 4) Values of T lag and T release were heterogeneous among individual spores, but ΔT release values were relatively constant. 5) Temperature had major effects on nutrient germination of G. stearothermophilus spores, as at temperatures below 65°C, average T lag values increased significantly. 6) G. stearothermophilus spore germination with exogenous CaDPA or dodecylamine was fastest at 65°C, with longer Tlag values at lower temperatures. 7) Decoating of G. stearothermophilus spores slowed nutrient germination slightly and CaDPA germination significantly, but increased dodecylamine germination markedly. These results indicate that the dynamics and heterogeneity of the germination of individual G. stearothermophilus spores are generally similar to that of Bacillus species. PMID:24058645

  10. Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki to Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhioua, Elyes; Heyer, Klaus; Browning, M.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    1999-01-01

    Pathogenicity of the entomopathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki de Barjac & Lemille was tested against the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say. Engorged larvae dipped in a solution of 108 spores per ml showed 96% mortality, 3 wk post-infection. The LC50 value for engorged larvae (concentration required to kill 50% of ticks) was 107 spores/ml. Bacillus thuringiensis shows considerable potential as a microbial control agent for the management of Ixodes scapularis.

  11. Morphogenesis of the Bacillus anthracis Spore

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    product and plasmid pEO-3 (53) with BamHI and HindIII and ligated the resulting DNA fragments to build pRG23. We passaged pRG23 through E. coli GM1684...to remove debris. The removal of the exosporium was confirmed by elec- tron microscopy (data not shown). Antibody production . To produce a...O. Henriques, and S. M. Cutting (ed.), Bacterial spore formers: probiotics and emerging applications. Horizon Bioscience, Norfolk, United Kingdom

  12. Factors affecting UV/H2O2 inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongji; Zhang, Yiqing; Zhou, Lingling; Tan, Chaoqun

    2014-05-05

    This study aims at estimating the performance of the Bacillus atrophaeus spores inactivation by the UV treatment with addition of H2O2. The effect of factors affecting the inactivation was investigated, including initial H2O2 dose, UV irradiance, initial cell density, initial solution pH and various inorganic anions. Under the experimental conditions, the B. atrophaeus spores inactivation followed both the modified Hom Model and the Chick's Model. The results revealed that the H2O2 played dual roles in the reactions, while the optimum reduction of 5.88lg was received at 0.5mM H2O2 for 10min. The inactivation effect was affected by the UV irradiance, while better inactivation effect was achieved at higher irradiance. An increase in the initial cell density slowed down the inactivation process. A slight acid condition at pH 5 was considered as the optimal pH value. The inactivation effect within 10min followed the order of pH 5>pH 7>pH 9>pH 3>pH 11. The effects of three added inorganic anions were investigated and compared, including sulfate (SO4(2)(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)) and carbonate (CO3(2)(-)). The sequence of inactivation effect within 10min followed the order of control group>SO4(2)(-)>NO3(-)>CO3(2)(-). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Judge, J.

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores bymore » soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.« less

  14. Characteristics of the association between the marine copepod, Gastrodelphys clausii, and its fanworm host Bispira volutacornis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Róisín; Keegan, Brendan F.

    2006-03-01

    Characteristics of the association of the marine copepod Gastrodelphys clausii with its fanworm host Bispira volutacornis were investigated from October 1997 to August 1999. Of the 982 hosts examined, 22.6% were infected, with male copepods outnumbering females. Prevalence varied between 3 and 90% during the study period and showed a seasonal pattern with a summer and late autumn/winter peak. Hosts were observed to harbour both single and multiple infections. The aggregation of parasites within the host population was overdispersed, displaying a characteristically clumped pattern. G. clausii reaches adulthood in males at ca. 800 μm in length, with recorded total lengths extending to 1,875 μm. Females at maturity were recorded to be ca. 1,000 μm, with a maximum total length of 3,250 μm recorded for an ovigerous female. Copepods were mobile within the branchial crown and showed no statistical preference for branchial crowns of different sizes. A positional pattern, however, was observed with juvenile copepods observed to occupy radioles further from the prostomium, as the branchial crown increases the number of radioles in each spiral. Contrary to this, the majority of female copepods were located attached to the radioles closest to the prostomium irrespective of crown size.

  15. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores by a Combination of Biocides and Heating under High-Temperature Short-Time Pasteurization Conditions ▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sa; Labuza, Theodore P.; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The milk supply is considered a primary route for a bioterrorism attack with Bacillus anthracis spores because typical high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization conditions cannot inactivate spores. In the event of intentional contamination, an effective method to inactivate the spores in milk under HTST processing conditions is needed. This study was undertaken to identify combinations and concentrations of biocides that can inactivate B. anthracis spores at temperatures in the HTST range in less than 1 min. Hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium hypochlorite (SH), and peroxyacetic acid (PA) were evaluated for their efficacy in inactivating spores of strains 7702, ANR-1, and 9131 in milk at 72, 80, and 85°C using a sealed capillary tube technique. Strains ANR-1 and 9131 were more resistant to all of the biocide treatments than strain 7702. Addition of 1,260 ppm SH to milk reduced the number of viable spores of each strain by 6 log CFU/ml in less than 90 and 60 s at 72 and 80°C, respectively. After neutralization, 1,260 ppm SH reduced the time necessary to inactivate 6 log CFU/ml (TTI6-log) at 80°C to less than 20 s. Treatment of milk with 7,000 ppm HP resulted in a similar level of inactivation in 60 s. Combined treatment with 1,260 ppm SH and 1,800 ppm HP inactivated spores of all strains in less than 20 s at 80°C. Mixing 15 ppm PA with milk containing 1,260 ppm SH resulted in TTI6-log of 25 and 12 s at 72 and 80°C, respectively. TTI6-log of less than 20 s were also achieved at 80°C by using two combinations of biocides: 250 ppm SH, 700 ppm HP, and 150 ppm PA; and 420 ppm SH (pH 7), 1,100 ppm HP, and 15 ppm PA. These results indicated that different combinations of biocides could consistently result in 6-log reductions in the number of B. anthracis spores in less than 1 min at temperatures in the HTST range. This information could be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies which could be used in HTST milk plants to process

  16. Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores to decontaminate subway railcar and related materials via the fogging of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide sporicidal liquids.

    PubMed

    Richter, William R; Wood, Joseph P; Wendling, Morgan Q S; Rogers, James V

    2018-01-15

    The inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on subway and used subway railcar materials was evaluated using fogged peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (PAA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). A total of 21 separate decontamination tests were conducted using bacterial spores of both B. anthracis Ames (B.a.) and Bacillus atrophaeus (B.g.) inoculated onto several types of materials. Tests were conducted using commercial off-the-shelf fogging equipment filled with either PAA or H 2 O 2 to fumigate a ∼15 cubic meter chamber under uncontrolled ambient relative humidity and controlled temperature (10 or 20 °C) from 8 to 168 h. For the present study, no conditions were found that resulted in complete inactivation of either B.a. Ames or B.g. on all test materials. Approximately 41% and 38% of the decontamination efficacies for B.a. and B.g., respectively, exhibited ≥6 log 10 reduction (LR); efficacy depended greatly on the material. When testing at 10 °C, the mean LR was consistently lower for both B.a. and B.g. as compared to 20 °C. Based on the statistical comparison of the LR results, B.g. exhibited equivalent or greater resistance than B.a. for approximately 92% of the time across all 21 tests. The efficacy data suggest that B.g. may be a suitable surrogate for B.a. Ames when assessing the decontamination efficacy of fogged PAA or H 2 O 2 . Moreover, the results of this testing indicate that in the event of B.a. spore release into a subway system, the fogging of PAA or H 2 O 2 represents a decontamination option for consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Germination and inactivation of Bacillus coagulans and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores by high hydrostatic pressure treatment in buffer and tomato sauce.

    PubMed

    Vercammen, Anne; Vivijs, Bram; Lurquin, Ine; Michiels, Chris W

    2012-01-16

    Acidothermophilic bacteria like Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Bacillus coagulans can cause spoilage of heat-processed acidic foods because they form spores with very high heat resistance and can grow at low pH. The objective of this work was to study the germination and inactivation of A. acidoterrestris and B. coagulans spores by high hydrostatic pressure (HP) treatment at temperatures up to 60°C and both at low and neutral pH. In a first experiment, spores suspended in buffers at pH 4.0, 5.0 and 7.0 were processed for 10min at different pressures (100-800MPa) at 40°C. None of these treatments caused any significant inactivation, except perhaps at 800MPa in pH 4.0 buffer where close to 1 log inactivation of B. coagulans was observed. Spore germination up to about 2 log was observed for both bacteria but occurred mainly in a low pressure window (100-300MPa) for A. acidoterrestris and only in a high pressure window (600-800MPa) for B. coagulans. In addition, low pH suppressed germination in A. acidoterrestris, but stimulated it in B. coagulans. In a second series of experiments, spores were treated in tomato sauce of pH 4.2 and 5.0 at 100 - 800MPa at 25, 40 and 60°C for 10min. At 40°C, results for B. coagulans were similar as in buffer. For A. acidoterrestris, germination levels in tomato sauce were generally higher than in buffer, and showed little difference at low and high pressure. Remarkably, the pH dependence of A. acidoterrestris spore germination was reversed in tomato sauce, with more germination at the lowest pH. Furthermore, HP treatments in the pH 4.2 sauce caused between 1 and 1.5 log inactivation of A. acidoterrestris. Germination of spores in the high pressure window was strongly temperature dependent, whereas germination of A. acidoterrestris in the low pressure window showed little temperature dependence. When HP treatment was conducted at 60°C, most of the germinated spores were also inactivated. For the pH 4.2 tomato sauce, this

  18. Assessment of Bacterial Spores in Solid Materials: Curriculum Improvements Partnership Award for the Integration of Research (CIPAIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavallee, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This summer, we quantified the release, by cryogenic grinding at liquid nitrogen temperatures, of microbes present in 4 different spacecraft solids: epoxy 9309, epoxy 9394, epoxy 9396, and a silicone coating. Three different samples of each material were prepared: aseptically prepared solid material, powdered material inoculated with a known spore count of Bacillus atrophaeus, and solid material artificially embedded with a known spore count of Bacillus atrophaeus. Samples were cryogenically ground as needed, and the powders were directly cultured to determine the number of microbial survivors per gram of material. Recovery rates were found to be highly material-dependent, varying from 0.2 to 50% for inoculated material surfaces and 0.002 to 0.5% for embedded spores. A study of the spore survival rate versus total grinding time was also performed, with results indicating that longer grinding time decreases recovery rates of viable spores.

  19. The Molecular Timeline of a Reviving Bacterial Spore

    PubMed Central

    Sinai, Lior; Rosenberg, Alex; Smith, Yoav; Segev, Einat; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2015-01-01

    Summary The bacterial spore can rapidly convert from a dormant to a fully active cell. Here we study this remarkable cellular transition in Bacillus subtilis and reveal the identity of the newly synthesized proteins throughout spore revival. Our analysis uncovers a highly ordered developmental program that correlates with the spore morphological changes and reveals the spatial and temporal molecular events fundamental to reconstruct a cell. As opposed to current knowledge, we found that translation takes place during the earliest revival event, termed germination, a process hitherto considered to occur without the need for any macromolecule synthesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that translation is required for execution of germination and relies on the bona fide translational factors RpmE and Tig. Our study sheds light on the spore revival process and on the vital building blocks underlying cellular awakening, thereby paving the way for designing new antimicrobial agents to eradicate spore-forming pathogens. PMID:25661487

  20. Transcriptional Profiling of Murine Organ Genes in Response to Infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames Spores

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Scott T.; Yeager, Linsey A.; Lawrence, William S.; Ponce, Cindy; Galindo, Cristi L.; Garner, Harold R.; Baze, Wallace B.; Suarez, Giovanni; Peterson, Johnny W.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the gram positive, spore-forming etiological agent of anthrax, an affliction studied because of its importance as a potential bioweapon. Although in vitro transcriptional responses of macrophages to either spore or anthrax toxins have been previously reported, little is known regarding the impact of infection on gene expression in host tissues. We infected Swiss-Webster mice intranasally with 5 LD50 of B. anthracis virulent Ames spores and observed the global transcriptional profiles of various tissues over a 48 hr time period. RNA was extracted from spleen, lung, and heart tissues of infected and control mice and examined by Affymetrix GeneChip analysis. Approximately 580 host genes were significantly over or under expressed among the lung, spleen, and heart tissues at 8 hr and 48 hr time points. Expression of genes encoding for surfactant and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presentation was diminished during the early phase of infection in lungs. By 48 hr, a significant number of genes were modulated in the heart, including up-regulation of calcium-binding related gene expression, and down-regulation of multiple genes related to cell adhesion, formation of the extracellular matrix, and the cell cytoskeleton. Interestingly, the spleen 8 hr post-infection showed striking increases in the expression of genes that encode hydrolytic enzymes, and these levels remained elevated throughout infection. Further, genes involving antigen presentation and interferon responses were down-regulated in the spleen at 8 hr. In late stages of infection, splenic genes related to the inflammatory response were up-regulated. This study is the first to describe the in vivo global transcriptional response of multiple organs during inhalational anthrax. Although numerous genes related to the host immunological response and certain protection mechanisms were up-regulated in these organs, a vast list of genes important for fully developing and maintaining this

  1. Rapid filtration separation-based sample preparation method for Bacillus spores in powdery and environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Sandra; Boissinot, Maurice; Charlebois, Isabelle; Fauvel, Chantal M; Shi, Lu-E; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Paquin, Amélie T; Bastien, Martine; Stewart, Gale; Leblanc, Eric; Sato, Sachiko; Bergeron, Michel G

    2012-03-01

    Authorities frequently need to analyze suspicious powders and other samples for biothreat agents in order to assess environmental safety. Numerous nucleic acid detection technologies have been developed to detect and identify biowarfare agents in a timely fashion. The extraction of microbial nucleic acids from a wide variety of powdery and environmental samples to obtain a quality level adequate for these technologies still remains a technical challenge. We aimed to develop a rapid and versatile method of separating bacteria from these samples and then extracting their microbial DNA. Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii was used as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. We studied the effects of a broad variety of powdery and environmental samples on PCR detection and the steps required to alleviate their interference. With a benchmark DNA extraction procedure, 17 of the 23 samples investigated interfered with bacterial lysis and/or PCR-based detection. Therefore, we developed the dual-filter method for applied recovery of microbial particles from environmental and powdery samples (DARE). The DARE procedure allows the separation of bacteria from contaminating matrices that interfere with PCR detection. This procedure required only 2 min, while the DNA extraction process lasted 7 min, for a total of <10 min. This sample preparation procedure allowed the recovery of cleaned bacterial spores and relieved detection interference caused by a wide variety of samples. Our procedure was easily completed in a laboratory facility and is amenable to field application and automation.

  2. Rapid Filtration Separation-Based Sample Preparation Method for Bacillus Spores in Powdery and Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Isabel, Sandra; Boissinot, Maurice; Charlebois, Isabelle; Fauvel, Chantal M.; Shi, Lu-E; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Paquin, Amélie T.; Bastien, Martine; Stewart, Gale; Leblanc, Éric; Sato, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    Authorities frequently need to analyze suspicious powders and other samples for biothreat agents in order to assess environmental safety. Numerous nucleic acid detection technologies have been developed to detect and identify biowarfare agents in a timely fashion. The extraction of microbial nucleic acids from a wide variety of powdery and environmental samples to obtain a quality level adequate for these technologies still remains a technical challenge. We aimed to develop a rapid and versatile method of separating bacteria from these samples and then extracting their microbial DNA. Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii was used as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. We studied the effects of a broad variety of powdery and environmental samples on PCR detection and the steps required to alleviate their interference. With a benchmark DNA extraction procedure, 17 of the 23 samples investigated interfered with bacterial lysis and/or PCR-based detection. Therefore, we developed the dual-filter method for applied recovery of microbial particles from environmental and powdery samples (DARE). The DARE procedure allows the separation of bacteria from contaminating matrices that interfere with PCR detection. This procedure required only 2 min, while the DNA extraction process lasted 7 min, for a total of <10 min. This sample preparation procedure allowed the recovery of cleaned bacterial spores and relieved detection interference caused by a wide variety of samples. Our procedure was easily completed in a laboratory facility and is amenable to field application and automation. PMID:22210204

  3. UV-Resistant Non-Spore-Forming Bacteria From Spacecraft-Assembly Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-01-01

    Four species of non-spore-forming bacteria collected from clean-room surfaces in spacecraft-assembly facilities could survive doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation that would suffice to kill most known cultivable bacterial species. In a previous study, high UV resistance was found in spores of the SAFR-032 strain of Bacillus pumilus, as reported in "Ultraviolet- Resistant Bacterial Spores," NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 9 (September 2007), page 94. These studies are parts of a continuing effort to understand the survival of hardy species of bacteria under harsh conditions, and develop means of sterilizing spacecraft to prevent biocontamination of Mars that could in turn interfere with future life detection missions. The four species investigated were Arthrobacter sp. KSC_Ak2i, Microbacterium schleiferi LMA_AkK1, Brevundimonas diminuta KSC_Ak3a, and Sphingomonas trueperi JSC_Ak7-3. In the study, cells of these species were mixed into Atacama Desert soil (to elucidate the shadowing effect of soil particles) and the resulting mixtures were tested both in solution and in a desiccated state under simulated Martian atmospheric and UV conditions. The UV-survival indices of Arthrobacter sp. and Microbacterium schleiferi were found to be comparable to those of Bacillus pumilus spores.

  4. Surface display of Clonorchis sinensis enolase on Bacillus subtilis spores potentializes an oral vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Wenjun; Tian, Yanli; Mao, Qiang; Lv, Xiaoli; Shang, Mei; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing; Huang, Yan

    2014-03-10

    Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) infections remain the common public health problem in freshwater fish consumption areas. New effective prevention strategies are still the urgent challenges to control this kind of foodborne infectious disease. The biochemical importance and biological relevance render C. sinensis enolase (Csenolase) as a potential vaccine candidate. In the present study, we constructed Escherichia coli/Bacillus subtilis shuttle genetic engineering system and investigated the potential of Csenolase as an oral vaccine candidate for C. sinensis prevention in different immunization routes. Our results showed that, compared with control groups, both recombinant Csenolase protein and nucleic acid could induce a mixed IgG1/IgG2a immune response when administrated subcutaneously (P<0.001), intraperitoneally (P<0.01) and intramuscularly (P<0.001) with worm reduction rate of 56.29%, 15.38% and 37.42%, respectively. More importantly, Csenolase could be successfully expressed as a fusion protein (55kDa) on B. subtilis spore indicated by immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays. Killed spores triggered reactive Th1/Th2 immune response and exhibited protective efficacy against C. sinensis infection. Csenolase derived oral vaccine conferred worm reduction rate and egg reduction rate at 60.07% (P<0.001) and 80.67% (P<0.001), respectively. The shuttle genetic engineering system facilitated the development of oral vaccine with B. subtilis stably overexpressing target protein. Comparably vaccinal trails with Csenolase in different immunization routes potentialize Csenolase an oral vaccine candidate in C. sinensis prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis and Lysinibacillus sphaericus Spores in Urban Catch Basins after Simultaneous Application against Mosquito Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Valeria; Lehner, Angelika; Lüthy, Peter; Tonolla, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) and Lysinibacillus sphaericus (Lsph) are extensively used in mosquito control programs. These biocides are the active ingredients of a commercial larvicide. Quantitative data on the fate of both Bti and Lsph applied together for the control of mosquitoes in urban drainage structures such as catch basins are lacking. We evaluated the dynamics and persistence of Bti and Lsph spores released through their concomitant application in urban catch basins in southern Switzerland. Detection and quantification of spores over time in water and sludge samples from catch basins were carried out using quantitative real-time PCR targeting both cry4A and cry4B toxin genes for Bti and the binA gene for Lsph. After treatment, Bti and Lsph spores attained concentrations of 3.76 (±0.08) and 4.13 (±0.09) log ml−1 in water, then decreased progressively over time, reaching baseline values. For both Bti and Lsph, spore levels in the order of 105 g−1 were observed in the bottom sludge two days after the treatment and remained constant for the whole test period (275 days). Indigenous Lsph strains were isolated from previously untreated catch basins. A selection of those was genotyped using pulsed field gel electrophoresis of SmaI-digested chromosomal DNA, revealing that a subset of isolates were members of the clonal population of strain 2362. No safety issues related to the use of this biopesticide in the environment have been observed during this study, because no significant increase in the number of spores was seen during the long observation period. The isolation of native Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains belonging to the same clonal population as strain 2362 from catch basins never treated with Lsph-based products indicates that the use of a combination of Bti and Lsph for the control of mosquitoes does not introduce non-indigenous microorganisms in this area. PMID:23390547

  6. Oral delivery of Bacillus subtilis spore expressing enolase of Clonorchis sinensis in rat model: induce systemic and local mucosal immune responses and has no side effect on liver function.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinyun; Chen, Tingjin; Xie, Zhizhi; Liang, Pei; Qu, Honglin; Shang, Mei; Mao, Qiang; Ning, Dan; Tang, Zeli; Shi, Mengchen; Zhou, Lina; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2015-07-01

    Caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater fish containing infective metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensis, human clonorchiasis remains a major public health problem in China. In previous study, we had expressed enolase from C. sinensis (CsENO) on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore and the recombinant spore induced a pronounced protection in terms of reduced worm burden and eggs per gram feces, suggesting B. subtilis spore as an ideal vehicle for antigen delivery by oral treatment and CsENO as a promising vaccine candidate against clonorchiasis. In the current study, we detected CsENO-specific IgG and IgA levels both in serum and in intestinal mucus from rats orally administrated with B. subtilis spore surface expressing CsENO by ELISA. Lysozyme levels in serum and in intestinal mucus were analyzed too. In addition, IgA-secreting cells in intestine epithelium of the rats were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The intestinal villi lengths of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were also measured. Rats orally treated with B. subtilis spore or normal saline were used as controls. Our results showed that, compared with the control groups, oral administration of B. subtilis spore expressing CsENO induced both systemic and local mucosal immune response. The recombinant spores also enhanced non-specific immune response in rats. The spores had no side effect on liver function. Moreover, it might facilitate food utilization and digestion of the rats. Our work will pave the way to clarify the involved mechanisms of protective efficacy elicited by B. subtilis spore expressing CsENO and encourage us to carry out more assessment trails of the oral treated spore to develop vaccine against clonorchiasis.

  7. Bacillus odysseyi isolate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    La Duc, Myron Thomas (Inventor); Venkateswaran, Kasthuri (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to discovery and isolation of a biologically pure culture of a Bacillus odysseyi isolate with high adherence and sterilization resistant properties. B. odysseyi is a round spore forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and the type strain is 34hs-1.sup.T (=ATCC PTA-4993.sup.T=NRRL B-30641.sup.T=NBRC 100172.sup.T). The GenBank accession number for the 16S rDNA sequence of strain 34hs-1.sup.T is AF526913.

  8. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Methyl Bromide in the Decontamination of Building and Interior Materials Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wendling, Morgan; Richter, William; Lastivka, Andrew; Mickelsen, Leroy

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the conditions required for the effective inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on materials by using methyl bromide (MeBr) gas. Another objective was to obtain comparative decontamination efficacy data with three avirulent microorganisms to assess their potential for use as surrogates for B. anthracis Ames. Decontamination tests were conducted with spores of B. anthracis Ames and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, B. anthracis NNR1Δ1, and B. anthracis Sterne inoculated onto six different materials. Experimental variables included temperature, relative humidity (RH), MeBr concentration, and contact time. MeBr was found to be an effective decontaminant under a number of conditions. This study highlights the important role that RH has when fumigation is performed with MeBr. There were no tests in which a ≥6-log10 reduction (LR) of B. anthracis Ames was achieved on all materials when fumigation was done at 45% RH. At 75% RH, an increase in the temperature, the MeBr concentration, or contact time generally improved the efficacy of fumigation with MeBr. This study provides new information for the effective use of MeBr at temperatures and RH levels lower than those that have been recommended previously. The study also provides data to assist with the selection of an avirulent surrogate for B. anthracis Ames spores when additional tests with MeBr are conducted. PMID:26801580

  9. Cortex content of asporogenous mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Imae, Y; Strominger, J L

    1976-01-01

    A method for the measurement of muramic lactam, which is specifically located in the cortical peptidoglycan of bacterial spores, was developed as a quantitative assay method for spore cortex content. During sporulation of Bacillus subtilis 168, muramic lactam (i.e., spore cortex) began to appear at state IV of sporulation and continued to increase over most of the late stages of sporulation. Spore cortex contents of various spo mutants of B. subitils were surveyed. Cortex was not detected in mutants in which sporulation was blocked earlier than stage II sporulation. Spores of spo IV mutant had about 40% of the cortex content of the wild-type spores. One spo III mutant had a low amount of cortex, but four others had none. PMID:1262319

  10. Evaluation of Surface Sampling for Bacillus Spores Using ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article In this study, commercially-available domestic cleaning robots were evaluated for spore surface sampling efficiency on common indoor surfaces. The current study determined the sampling efficiency of each robot, without modifying the sensors, algorithms, or logics set by the manufacturers.

  11. Inactivation of Bacillus Anthracis Spores Using Carbon Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-30

    S1793984412300129 Marquita Lilly, Liju Yang, Kamal Aferchich. Effect of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Bacillus Anthracis Cell Growth, Sporulation ...addition,  SWNTs  treatment  did  not  induce  sporulation  of B. anthracis.  [Aferichich, et al. 2012]. 2)  SWNTs  in  combination with oxidizing agents...8. Kamal Aferchich, Marquita Lilly, Liju Yang*. 2012. Effect of Single‐walled Carbon Nanotubes on  Bacillus Anthracis Cell Growth,  Sporulation , and

  12. Validation of a Nylon-Flocked-Swab Protocol for Efficient Recovery of Bacterial Spores from Smooth and Rough Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander; Facius, Rainer; Wirth, Reinhard; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2010-01-01

    In order to meet planetary-protection requirements, culturable bacterial spore loads are measured representatively for the total microbial contamination of spacecraft. However, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) cotton swab protocols for spore load determination have not changed for decades. To determine whether a more efficient alternative was available, a novel swab was evaluated for recovery of different Bacillus atrophaeus spore concentrations on stainless steel and other surfaces. Two protocols for the nylon-flocked swab (NFS) were validated and compared to the present NASA standard protocol. The results indicate that the novel swab protocols recover 3- to 4-fold more (45.4% and 49.0% recovery efficiency) B. atrophaeus spores than the NASA standard method (13.2%). Moreover, the nylon-flocked-swab protocols were superior in recovery efficiency for spores of seven different Bacillus species, including Bacillus anthracis Sterne (recovery efficiency, 20%). The recovery efficiencies for B. atrophaeus spores from different surfaces showed a variation from 5.9 to 62.0%, depending on the roughness of the surface analyzed. Direct inoculation of the swab resulted in a recovery rate of about 80%, consistent with the results of scanning electron micrographs that allowed detailed comparisons of the two swab types. The results of this investigation will significantly contribute to the cleanliness control of future life detection missions and will provide significant improvement in detection of B. anthracis contamination for law enforcement and security efforts. PMID:20543054

  13. Near-infrared surface-enhanced-Raman-scattering (SERS) mediated detection of single optically trapped bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Troy A.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Gillespie, James B.

    2003-08-01

    A novel methodology has been developed for the investigation of bacterial spores. Specifically, this method has been used to probe the spore coat composition of two different Bacillus stearothermophilus variants. This technique may be useful in many applications; most notably, development of novel detection schemes toward potentially harmful bacteria. This method would also be useful as an ancillary environmental monitoring system where sterility is of importance (i.e., food preparation areas as well as invasive and minimally invasive medical applications). This unique detection scheme is based on the near-infrared (NIR) Surface-Enhanced-Raman-Scattering (SERS) from single, optically trapped, bacterial spores. The SERS spectra of bacterial spores in aqueous media have been measured using SERS substrates based on ~60-nm diameter gold colloids bound to 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane derivatized glass. The light from a 787-nm laser diode was used to trap/manipulate as well as simultaneously excite the SERS of an individual bacterial spore. The collected SERS spectra were examined for uniqueness and the applicability of this technique for the strain discrimination of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. Comparison of normal Raman and SERS spectra reveal not only an enhancement of the normal Raman spectral features but also the appearance of spectral features absent in the normal Raman spectrum.

  14. Near-infrared Surface-Enhanced-Raman-Scattering (SERS) mediated discrimination of single optically trapped bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Troy A.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Gillespie, James B.

    2004-03-01

    A novel methodology has been developed for the investigation of bacterial spores. Specifically, this method has been used to probe the spore coat composition of two different Bacillus stearothermophilus variants. This technique may be useful in many applications; most notably, development of novel detection schemes toward potentially harmful bacteria. This method would also be useful as an ancillary environmental monitoring system where sterility is of importance (i.e., food preparation areas as well as invasive and minimally invasive medical applications). This unique detection scheme is based on the near-infrared (NIR) Surface-Enhanced-Raman- Scattering (SERS) from single, optically trapped, bacterial spores. The SERS spectra of bacterial spores in aqueous media have been measured using SERS substrates based on ~60-nm diameter gold colloids bound to 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane derivatized glass. The light from a 787-nm laser diode was used to trap/manipulate as well as simultaneously excite the SERS of an individual bacterial spore. The collected SERS spectra were examined for uniqueness and the applicability of this technique for the strain discrimination of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. Comparison of normal Raman and SERS spectra reveal not only an enhancement of the normal Raman spectral features but also the appearance of spectral features absent in the normal Raman spectrum.

  15. Memory of Germinant Stimuli in Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwei; Faeder, James R.; Setlow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial spores, despite being metabolically dormant, possess the remarkable capacity to detect nutrients and other molecules in their environment through a biochemical sensory apparatus that can trigger spore germination, allowing the return to vegetative growth within minutes of exposure of germinants. We demonstrate here that bacterial spores of multiple species retain memory of transient exposures to germinant stimuli that can result in altered responses to subsequent exposure. The magnitude and decay of these memory effects depend on the pulse duration as well as on the separation time, incubation temperature, and pH values between the pulses. Spores of Bacillus species germinate in response to nutrients that interact with germinant receptors (GRs) in the spore’s inner membrane, with different nutrient types acting on different receptors. In our experiments, B. subtilis spores display memory when the first and second germinant pulses target different receptors, suggesting that some components of spore memory are downstream of GRs. Furthermore, nonnutrient germinants, which do not require GRs, exhibit memory either alone or in combination with nutrient germinants, and memory of nonnutrient stimulation is found to be more persistent than that induced by GR-dependent stimuli. Spores of B. cereus and Clostridium difficile also exhibit germination memory, suggesting that memory may be a general property of bacterial spores. These observations along with experiments involving strains with mutations in various germination proteins suggest a model in which memory is stored primarily in the metastable states of SpoVA proteins, which comprise a channel for release of dipicolinic acid, a major early event in spore germination. PMID:26604257

  16. Detecting invisible bacillus spores on surfaces using a portable surface-enhanced Raman analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Inscore, Frank; Sperry, Jay F.

    2006-10-01

    Since the distribution of anthrax causing spores through the U.S. Postal System in the autumn of 2001, numerous methods have been developed to detect spores with the goal of minimizing casualties. During and following an attack it is also important to detect spores on surfaces, to assess extent of an attack, to quantify risk of infection by contact, as well as to evaluate post-attack clean-up. To perform useful measurements, analyzers and/or methods must be capable of detecting as few as 10 spores/cm2, in under 5-minutes, with little or no sample preparation or false-positive responses, using a portable device. In an effort to develop such a device, we have been investigating the ability of surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect dipicolinic acid (DPA) as a chemical signature of bacilli spores. In 2003 we employed SERS to measure DPA extracted from a 10,000 spores per μL sample using hot dodecylamine. Although the entire measurement was performed in 2 minutes, the need to heat the dodecylamine limits field portability of the method. Here we describe the use of a room temperature digesting agent in combination with SERS to detect 220 spores collected from a surface in a 1 μL sample within 3 minutes.

  17. Direct Identification of a Bacterial Manganese(II) Oxidase, the Multicopper Oxidase MnxG, from Spores of Several Different Marine Bacillus Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Gregory J.; Torpey, Justin W.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2008-01-01

    Microorganisms catalyze the formation of naturally occurring Mn oxides, but little is known about the biochemical mechanisms of this important biogeochemical process. We used tandem mass spectrometry to directly analyze the Mn(II)-oxidizing enzyme from marine Bacillus spores, identified as an Mn oxide band with an in-gel activity assay. Nine distinct peptides recovered from the Mn oxide band of two Bacillus species were unique to the multicopper oxidase MnxG, and one peptide was from the small hydrophobic protein MnxF. No other proteins were detected in the Mn oxide band, indicating that MnxG (or a MnxF/G complex) directly catalyzes biogenic Mn oxide formation. The Mn(II) oxidase was partially purified and found to be resistant to many proteases and active even at high concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Comparative analysis of the genes involved in Mn(II) oxidation from three diverse Bacillus species revealed a complement of conserved Cu-binding regions not present in well-characterized multicopper oxidases. Our results provide the first direct identification of a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation and suggest that MnxG catalyzes two sequential one-electron oxidations from Mn(II) to Mn(III) and from Mn(III) to Mn(IV), a novel type of reaction for a multicopper oxidase. PMID:18165363

  18. Survival of foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes) and Bacillus cereus spores in fermented alcoholic beverages (beer and refined rice wine).

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Kim, N H; Lee, S H; Hwang, I G; Rhee, M S

    2014-03-01

    Only limited information is available on the microbiological safety of fermented alcoholic beverages because it is still a common belief that such beverages do not provide a favorable environment for bacterial growth and survival. Thus, in this study, we examined the survival of major foodborne pathogens and spores in fermented alcoholic beverages. Foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) and B. cereus spores (initial population, 3 to 4 log CFU/ml) were inoculated separately into three types of beer and refined rice wine, which were then stored at 5 and 22°C. Bacterial counts were assayed periodically for up to 28 days. Vegetative B. cereus counts decreased rapidly, whereas B. cereus spore counts remained constant (P > 0.05) for a long period of time in all beverages. Vegetative B. cereus cells formed spores in beer at 5 and 22°C, and the spores survived for long periods. Among vegetative cells, E. coli O157:H7 had the highest survival (only 1.49 to 1.56 log reduction during 28 days in beer at 5°C). Beer and refined rice wine supported microbial survival from several days to several weeks. Our results appear to contradict the common belief that pathogens cannot survive in alcoholic beverages. Long-term survival of pathogens (especially B. cereus and E. coli O157:H7) in beer and refined rice wine should be taken into consideration by the manufacturers of these beverages. This study provides basic information that should help further research into microbial survival in alcoholic beverages and increase the microbiological safety regulation of fermented alcoholic beverages.

  19. In Vitro Assessment of Marine Bacillus for Use as Livestock Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Maria Luz; O’Sullivan, Laurie; Tan, Shiau Pin; McLoughlin, Peter; Hughes, Helen; Gutierrez, Montserrat; Lane, Jonathan A.; Hickey, Rita M.; Lawlor, Peadar G.; Gardiner, Gillian E.

    2014-01-01

    Six antimicrobial-producing seaweed-derived Bacillus strains were evaluated in vitro as animal probiotics, in comparison to two Bacillus from an EU-authorized animal probiotic product. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated on solid media against porcine Salmonella and E. coli. The marine isolates were most active against the latter, had better activity than the commercial probiotics and Bacillus pumilus WIT 588 also reduced E. coli counts in broth. All of the marine Bacillus tolerated physiological concentrations of bile, with some as tolerant as one of the probiotics. Spore counts for all isolates remained almost constant during incubation in simulated gastric and ileum juices. All of the marine Bacillus grew anaerobically and the spores of all except one isolate germinated under anaerobic conditions. All were sensitive to a panel of antibiotics and none harbored Bacillus enterotoxin genes but all, except B. pumilus WIT 588, showed some degree of β-hemolysis. However, trypan blue dye exclusion and xCELLigence assays demonstrated a lack of toxicity in comparison to two pathogens; in fact, the commercial probiotics appeared more cytotoxic than the majority of the marine Bacillus. Overall, some of the marine-derived Bacillus, in particular B. pumilus WIT 588, demonstrate potential for use as livestock probiotics. PMID:24796302

  20. New insights in the bacterial spore resistance to extreme terrestrial and extraterrestrial factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Ralf; Horneck, Gerda; Reitz, Guenther

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, Bacillus endospores are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. The extremely high resistance of bacterial endospores to environmental stress factors has intrigued researchers since long time and many characteristic spore features, especially those involved in the protection of spore DNA, have already been uncovered. The disclosure of the complete genomic sequence of Bacillus subtilis 168, one of the often used astrobiological model system, and the rapid development of tran-scriptional microarray techniques have opened new opportunities of gaining further insights in the enigma of spore resistance. Spores of B. subtilis were exposed to various extreme ter-restrial and extraterrestrial stressors to reach a better understanding of the DNA protection and repair strategies, which them to cope with the induced DNA damage. Following physical stress factors of environmental importance -either on Earth or in space -were selected for this thesis: (i) mono-and polychromatic UV radiation, (ii) ionizing radiation, (iii) exposure to ultrahigh vacuum; and (iv) high shock pressures simulating meteorite impacts. To reach a most comprehensive understanding of spore resistance to those harsh terrestrial or simulated extraterrestrial conditions, a standardized experimental protocol of the preparation and ana-lyzing methods was established including the determination of the following spore responses: (i) survival, (ii) induced mutations, (iii) DNA damage, (iv) role of different repair pathways by use of a set of repair deficient mutants, and (v) transcriptional responses during spore germi-nation by use of genome-wide transcriptome analyses and confirmation by RT-PCR. From this comprehensive set of data on spore resistance to a variety of environmental stress parameters a model of a "built-in" transcriptional program of bacterial spores in response to DNA damaging treatments to ensure DNA restoration

  1. Anthrax vaccine antigen-adjuvant formulations completely protect New Zealand white rabbits against challenge with Bacillus anthracis Ames strain spores.

    PubMed

    Peachman, Kristina K; Li, Qin; Matyas, Gary R; Shivachandra, Sathish B; Lovchik, Julie; Lyons, Rick C; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Venigalla B; Rao, Mangala

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to develop an improved anthrax vaccine that shows high potency, five different anthrax protective antigen (PA)-adjuvant vaccine formulations that were previously found to be efficacious in a nonhuman primate model were evaluated for their efficacy in a rabbit pulmonary challenge model using Bacillus anthracis Ames strain spores. The vaccine formulations include PA adsorbed to Alhydrogel, PA encapsulated in liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A, stable liposomal PA oil-in-water emulsion, PA displayed on bacteriophage T4 by the intramuscular route, and PA mixed with Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin administered by the needle-free transcutaneous route. Three of the vaccine formulations administered by the intramuscular or the transcutaneous route as a three-dose regimen induced 100% protection in the rabbit model. One of the formulations, liposomal PA, also induced significantly higher lethal toxin neutralizing antibodies than PA-Alhydrogel. Even 5 months after the second immunization of a two-dose regimen, rabbits vaccinated with liposomal PA were 100% protected from lethal challenge with Ames strain spores. In summary, the needle-free skin delivery and liposomal formulation that were found to be effective in two different animal model systems appear to be promising candidates for next-generation anthrax vaccine development.

  2. Bacillus horneckiae sp. nov., isolated from a spacecraft-assembly clean room.

    PubMed

    Vaishampayan, Parag; Probst, Alexander; Krishnamurthi, Srinivasan; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Osman, Shariff; McDowall, Alasdair; Ruckmani, Arunachalam; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2010-05-01

    Five Gram-stain-positive, motile, aerobic strains were isolated from a clean room of the Kennedy Space Center where the Phoenix spacecraft was assembled. All strains are rod-shaped, spore-forming bacteria, whose spores were resistant to UV radiation up to 1000 J m(-2). The spores were subterminally positioned and produced an external layer. A polyphasic taxonomic study including traditional biochemical tests, fatty acid analysis, cell-wall typing, lipid analyses, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization studies was performed to characterize these novel strains. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and lipid analyses convincingly grouped these novel strains within the genus Bacillus as a cluster separate from already described species. The similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequences among the novel strains was >99 %, but the similarity was only about 97 % with their nearest neighbours Bacillus pocheonensis, Bacillus firmus and Bacillus bataviensis. DNA-DNA hybridization dissociation values were <24 % to the closest related type strains. The novel strains had a G+C content 35.6+/-0.5 mol% and could liquefy gelatin but did not utilize or produce acids from any of the carbon substrates tested. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(15 : 0) and the cell-wall diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic results, it is concluded that these strains represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus horneckiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1P01SC(T) (=NRRL B-59162(T) =MTCC 9535(T)).

  3. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Indu; Sharma, Shailza; Ramya, T N C; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions.

  4. Evaluating the Sporicidal Activity of Disinfectants against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Spores by Using the Improved Methods Based on ASTM E2197-11

    PubMed Central

    Uwamahoro, Marie Christine; Massicotte, Richard; Hurtubise, Yves; Gagné-Bourque, François; Mafu, Akier Assanta; Yahia, L’Hocine

    2018-01-01

    Spore-forming pathogenic bacteria, such as Clostridium difficile, are associated with nosocomial infection, leading to the increased use of sporicidal disinfectants, which impacts socioeconomic costs. However, C. difficile can be prevented using microorganisms such as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, a prophylactic agent that has been proven to be effective against it in recent tests or it can be controlled by sporicidal disinfectants. These disinfectants against spores should be evaluated according to a known and recommended standard. Unfortunately, some newly manufactured disinfectants like Bioxy products have not yet been tested. ASTM E2197-11 is a standard test that uses stainless steel disks (1 cm in diameter) as carriers, and the performance of the test formulation is calculated by comparing the number of viable test organisms to that on the control carriers. Surface tests are preferable for evaluating disinfectants with sporicidal effects on hard surfaces. This study applies improved methods, based on the ASTM E2197-11 standard, for evaluating and comparing the sporicidal efficacies of several disinfectants against spores of C. difficile and B. amyloliquefaciens, which are used as the test organisms. With the improved method, all spores were recovered through vortexing and membrane filtration. The results show that chlorine-based products are effective in 5 min and Bioxy products at 5% w/v are effective in 10 min. Although Bioxy products may take longer to prove their effectiveness, their non-harmful effects to hospital surfaces and people have been well established in the literature. PMID:29459891

  5. Evaluating the Sporicidal Activity of Disinfectants against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Spores by Using the Improved Methods Based on ASTM E2197-11.

    PubMed

    Uwamahoro, Marie Christine; Massicotte, Richard; Hurtubise, Yves; Gagné-Bourque, François; Mafu, Akier Assanta; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2018-01-01

    Spore-forming pathogenic bacteria, such as Clostridium difficile , are associated with nosocomial infection, leading to the increased use of sporicidal disinfectants, which impacts socioeconomic costs. However, C. difficile can be prevented using microorganisms such as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens , a prophylactic agent that has been proven to be effective against it in recent tests or it can be controlled by sporicidal disinfectants. These disinfectants against spores should be evaluated according to a known and recommended standard. Unfortunately, some newly manufactured disinfectants like Bioxy products have not yet been tested. ASTM E2197-11 is a standard test that uses stainless steel disks (1 cm in diameter) as carriers, and the performance of the test formulation is calculated by comparing the number of viable test organisms to that on the control carriers. Surface tests are preferable for evaluating disinfectants with sporicidal effects on hard surfaces. This study applies improved methods, based on the ASTM E2197-11 standard, for evaluating and comparing the sporicidal efficacies of several disinfectants against spores of C. difficile and B. amyloliquefaciens , which are used as the test organisms. With the improved method, all spores were recovered through vortexing and membrane filtration. The results show that chlorine-based products are effective in 5 min and Bioxy products at 5% w/v are effective in 10 min. Although Bioxy products may take longer to prove their effectiveness, their non-harmful effects to hospital surfaces and people have been well established in the literature.

  6. CotA of Bacillus subtilis Is a Copper-Dependent Laccase

    PubMed Central

    Hullo, Marie-Françoise; Moszer, Ivan; Danchin, Antoine; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The spore coat protein CotA of Bacillus subtilis displays similarities with multicopper oxidases, including manganese oxidases and laccases. B. subtilis is able to oxidize manganese, but neither CotA nor other sporulation proteins are involved. We demonstrate that CotA is a laccase. Syringaldazine, a specific substrate of laccases, reacted with wild-type spores but not with ΔcotA spores. CotA may participate in the biosynthesis of the brown spore pigment, which appears to be a melanin-like product and to protect against UV light. PMID:11514528

  7. Studies on Sporulation Optimization and Chracterization of Bacillus subtilis Spore Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    in the other two media. Finally, heat and bleach resistance were recommended in place of acid res istance as indicators of spore hardiness. 1S...sporicidal chemicals (e .g., hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide/per-acetic, and chlorine dioxide gas ), are strongly recommended as spore quality...effected by exposure to one or more sporicidal chemicals (e.g., hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide/pre-acetic, chlorine dioxide gas ), are strongly recommended

  8. Influence of oxygen in atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet on sterilization of Bacillus atrophaeous spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jin-Pyo; Uhm, Han S.; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2007-09-01

    A nonequilibrium Ar /O2 plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure was carried out in a coaxial cylindrical reactor with a stepped electrode configuration powered by a 13.56MHz rf power supplier. The argon glow discharge with high electron density produces oxygen reactive species in large quantities. Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as free from toxic biological warfare agents. The decimal reduction time (D values) of the Ar /O2 plasma jet at an exposure distance of 0.5-1.5cm ranges from 5 to 57s. An actinometric comparison of the sterilization data shows that atomic oxygen radicals play a significant role in plasma sterilization. When observed under a scanning electron microscope, the average size of the spores appears to be greatly reduced due to chemical reactions with the oxygen radicals.

  9. Environmental microbiology as related to planetary quarantine. [water activity and temperature effects on bacterial spore survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pflug, I. J.

    1972-01-01

    The survival of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores suspended in solutions of sucrose and glycerol at calculated water activities and varying temperatures was studied. The overall results indicated that as the water activity of the liquid decreased from .99 to .85, the heat resistance of the spores increased. The nature of the substance controlling the water activity, and the history of the spores prior to treatment also had an affect on their heat resistance.

  10. Using thermal inactivation kinetics to calculate the probability of extreme spore longevity: implications for paleomicrobiology and lithopanspermia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Wayne L

    2003-12-01

    Thermal inactivation kinetics with extrapolation were used to model the survival probabilities of spores of various Bacillus species over time periods of millions of years at the historical ambient temperatures (25-40 degrees C) encountered within the 250 million-year-old Salado formation, from which the putative ancient spore-forming bacterium Salibacillus marismortui strain 2-9-3 was recovered. The model indicated extremely low-to-moderate survival probabilities for spores of mesophiles. but surprisingly high survival probabilities for thermophilic spores. The significance of the results are discussed in terms of the survival probabilities of (i) terrestrial spores in ancient geologic samples and (ii) spores transported between planets within impact ejecta.

  11. Using Thermal Inactivation Kinetics to Calculate the Probability of Extreme Spore Longevity: Implications for Paleomicrobiology and Lithopanspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2003-12-01

    Thermal inactivation kinetics with extrapolation were used to model the survival probabilities of spores of various Bacillus species over time periods of millions of years at the historical ambient temperatures (25-40 °) encountered within the 250 million-year-old Salado formation, from which the putative ancient spore-forming bacterium Salibacillus marismortui strain 2-9-3 was recovered. The model indicated extremely low-to-moderate survival probabilities for spores of mesophiles, but surprisingly high survival probabilities for thermophilic spores. The significance of the results are discussed in terms of the survival probabilities of (i) terrestrial spores in ancient geologic samples and (ii) spores transported between planets within impact ejecta.

  12. REVERSIBLE ACTIVATION FOR GERMINATION AND SUBSEQUENT CHANGES IN BACTERIAL SPORES1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W. H.; Ordal, Z. John

    1963-01-01

    Lee, W. H. (University of Illinois, Urbana) and Z. John Ordal. Reversible activation for germination and subsequent changes in bacterial spores. J. Bacteriol. 85:207–217. 1963.—It was possible to isolate refractile spores of Bacillus megaterium, from a calcium dipicolinate germination solution, that were activated and would germinate spontaneously in distilled water. Some of the characteristics of the initial phases of bacterial spore germination were determined by studying these unstable activated spores. Activated spores of B. megaterium were resistant to stains and possessed a heat resistance intermediate between that of dormant and of germinated spores. The spontaneous germination of activated spores was inhibited by copper, iron, silver, or mercury salts, saturated o-phenanthroline, or solutions having a low pH value, but not by many common inhibitors. These inhibitions could be partially or completely reversed by the addition of sodium dipicolinate. The activated spores could be deactivated and made similar to dormant spores by treatment with acid. Analyses of the exudates from the variously treated spore suspensions revealed that whatever inhibited the germination of activated spores also inhibited the release of spore material. The composition of the germination exudates was different than that of extracts of dormant spores. Although heavy suspensions of activated spores gradually became swollen and dark when suspended in solutions of o-phenanthroline or at pH 4, the materials released resembled those found in extracts of dormant spores rather than those of normal germination exudates. Images PMID:16561987

  13. Surface Sampling of Spores in Dry-Deposition Aerosols▿

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Jason M.; Collett, Patricia J.; Valdes, Erica R.; Skowronski, Evan W.; Pellar, Gregory J.; Emanuel, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to reliably and reproducibly sample surfaces contaminated with a biological agent is a critical step in measuring the extent of contamination and determining if decontamination steps have been successful. The recovery operations following the 2001 attacks with Bacillus anthracis spores were complicated by the fact that no standard sample collection format or decontamination procedures were established. Recovery efficiencies traditionally have been calculated based upon biological agents which were applied to test surfaces in a liquid format and then allowed to dry prior to sampling tests, which may not be best suited for a real-world event with aerosolized biological agents. In order to ascertain if differences existed between air-dried liquid deposition and biological spores which were allowed to settle on a surface in a dried format, a study was undertaken to determine if differences existed in surface sampling recovery efficiencies for four representative surfaces. Studies were then undertaken to compare sampling efficiencies between liquid spore deposition and aerosolized spores which were allowed to gradually settle under gravity on four different test coupon types. Tests with both types of deposition compared efficiencies of four unique swabbing materials applied to four surfaces with various surface properties. Our studies demonstrate that recovery of liquid-deposited spores differs significantly from recovery of dry aerosol-deposited spores in most instances. Whether the recovery of liquid-deposited spores is overexaggerated or underrepresented with respect to that of aerosol-deposited spores depends upon the surface material being tested. PMID:18997021

  14. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Several spore-forming strains of Bacillus are marketed as probiotics due to their ability to survive harsh gastrointestinal conditions and confer health benefits to the host. We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The taxonomic position of both organisms was established with a maximum-likelihood tree based on twenty six housekeeping proteins. Analysis of all probiotic strains of Bacillus and Lactobacillus reveal that the essential sporulation proteins are conserved in all Bacillus probiotic strains while they are absent in Lactobacillus spp. We identified various antibiotic resistance, stress-related, and adhesion-related domains in these organisms, which likely provide support in exerting probiotic action by enabling adhesion to host epithelial cells and survival during antibiotic treatment and harsh conditions. PMID:27258038

  15. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. a...Applied and Environmental Microbiology, (08 2011): 0. doi: 10.1128/ AEM .05031-11 11/13/2011 21.00 J. Liu, J. R. Faeder, P. Setlow, X. Yi. Synergism...individual spores was measured by fluorescence emission , while changes in spore refractility and the level of CaDPA were monitored by phase contrast

  16. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity and Hematotoxicity of the Recombinant Spore-Crystal Complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually. PMID:25268978

  17. Inactivation kinetics of spores of Bacillus cereus strains treated by a peracetic acid-based disinfectant at different concentrations and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sudhaus, Nadine; Pina-Pérez, Maria Consuelo; Martínez, Antonio; Klein, Günter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a commercial peracetic acid-based disinfectant against spores of Bacillus cereus, to identify the most influential factor for the final number of microorganisms after different disinfection procedures, and to evaluate the nature of the inactivation kinetics. The spores of four different strains of B. cereus (DSM 318, 4312, 4313, and 4384) were treated with five different disinfectant concentrations (0.25%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% [w/v]) at three different temperatures (10°C, 15°C, and 20°C) with or without protein load. A higher temperature and PES 15/23 concentration resulted in a higher inactivation. Inactivation of B. cereus strain 4312 was around 2 log₁₀ cycles at 10°C and around 7 log₁₀ at 20°C (conc=1% [w/v] PAA; t=60 min; without protein). The protein load at higher concentrations did not significantly reduce the efficacy of the disinfectant (p>0.05). This article indicates the applicability of the Weibull model to fit the B. cereus disinfectant survival curves. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to carry out a sensitivity analysis, which revealed the most influential factors affecting the final number of microorganisms after the disinfection process.

  18. Bacterial spore survival after exposure to HZE particle bombardment -implication for the lithopanspermia hypothesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Ralf; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Kitamura, H.; Reitz, Guenther

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, bacterial spores (mainly spores of Bacillus subtilis) are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. More re-cently, spores of B. subtilis have been applied for experimental research on the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of life. Since its first postulation by Arrhenius in 1903, the pansper-mia hypothesis has been revisited many-times, e.g. after the discovery of several lunar and Martian meteorites on Earth [1,2]. These information provided intriguing evidence that rocks may naturally be transferred between the terrestrial planets. The scenario of panspermia, now termed "lithopanspermia" involves three basic hypothetical steps: (i) the escape process, i.e. removal to space of biological material, which has survived being lifted from the surface to high altitudes; (ii) interim state in space, i.e., survival of the biological material over time scales comparable with interplanetary or interstellar passage; (iii) the entry process, i.e. nondestruc-tive deposition of the biological material on another planet [2]. In our research, spores of B. subtilis were used to study the effects of galactic cosmic radiation on spore survival and induced mutations. On an interplanetary journey, outside a protective magnetic field, spore-containing rocks would be exposed to bombardment by high-energy charged particle radiation from galac-tic sources and from the sun. Air-dried spore layers on three different host materials (i.e., non-porous igneous rocks (gabbro), quartz, and spacecraft analog material (aluminum)) were irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (Helium and Iron) with a LET (linear energy transfer) ˆ of 2 and 200 keV/Am, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at the National In-stitute of Radiological Sciences, (NIRS), Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project 20B463 "Characterization of heavy ion-induced damage in Bacillus subtilis spores and their global

  19. Prevalence of Vibrio cholerae in Coastal Alternative Supplies of Drinking Water and Association with Bacillus-Like Spore Formers.

    PubMed

    Shishir, Md Asaduzzaman; Mamun, Md Al; Mian, Md Mahmuduzzaman; Ferdous, Umme Tamanna; Akter, Noor Jahan; Suravi, Rajia Sultana; Datta, Suvamoy; Kabir, Md Ehsanul

    2018-01-01

    The scarcity of hygienic drinking water is a normal phenomenon in the coastal areas of Bangladesh due to the high salinity of ground water. The inhabitants of this locality, therefore, live on alternative supplies of water including rain-fed pond water, and rainwater with persistent complex microbial interactions therein, often contaminated with life-threatening pathogens. Hence, this study was aimed at analyzing the prevalence of Vibrio cholerae ( Vc ) in the alternative drinking waters of Mathbaria, a coastal subdistrict neighboring the Bay of Bengal, the efficacy of pond sand filter (PSF) and the co-association among Bacillus -like spore formers (Sf) and Vc . Vc presumably entrapped into the membrane filter was enriched in alkaline peptone water medium and was isolated on selective thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose and taurocholate-tellurite-gelatin agar media. They were finally identified by immunochromatographic one step rapid test and serology test. A total of 26% Vc positive samples were obtained out of 100 [ponds-48, household (HH)-29, and PSFs-23] where 13% cases were pathogenic ( Vc O1) and 13% were non-pathogenic ( Vc non-O1/non-O139). The distribution of Vc as observed was 33, 26, and 13.8% in waters derived from pond surface, PSF, and HH reservoirs, respectively, and for pathogenic type, it was 62.5%, 50%, and nil, respectively. Although none of the samples was identified with pathogenic Vc O139, the statistics represents a significant and augmentative risk of cholera outbreak in the focused area. The antibiotic sensitivity pattern in this study resembled the trend observed during last few years for Vc . The PSF demonstrated its inability to remove Vc from any of the samples and in addition, the filter itself was evidenced to be the source of pathogens and spores in further contamination and transmission. The development of biofilm in the PSF could be hypothesized as the reservoir in contaminating pathogen-free water samples. From the test of

  20. Prevalence of Vibrio cholerae in Coastal Alternative Supplies of Drinking Water and Association with Bacillus-Like Spore Formers

    PubMed Central

    Shishir, Md. Asaduzzaman; Mamun, Md. Al; Mian, Md. Mahmuduzzaman; Ferdous, Umme Tamanna; Akter, Noor Jahan; Suravi, Rajia Sultana; Datta, Suvamoy; Kabir, Md. Ehsanul

    2018-01-01

    The scarcity of hygienic drinking water is a normal phenomenon in the coastal areas of Bangladesh due to the high salinity of ground water. The inhabitants of this locality, therefore, live on alternative supplies of water including rain-fed pond water, and rainwater with persistent complex microbial interactions therein, often contaminated with life-threatening pathogens. Hence, this study was aimed at analyzing the prevalence of Vibrio cholerae (Vc) in the alternative drinking waters of Mathbaria, a coastal subdistrict neighboring the Bay of Bengal, the efficacy of pond sand filter (PSF) and the co-association among Bacillus-like spore formers (Sf) and Vc. Vc presumably entrapped into the membrane filter was enriched in alkaline peptone water medium and was isolated on selective thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose and taurocholate-tellurite-gelatin agar media. They were finally identified by immunochromatographic one step rapid test and serology test. A total of 26% Vc positive samples were obtained out of 100 [ponds—48, household (HH)—29, and PSFs—23] where 13% cases were pathogenic (Vc O1) and 13% were non-pathogenic (Vc non-O1/non-O139). The distribution of Vc as observed was 33, 26, and 13.8% in waters derived from pond surface, PSF, and HH reservoirs, respectively, and for pathogenic type, it was 62.5%, 50%, and nil, respectively. Although none of the samples was identified with pathogenic Vc O139, the statistics represents a significant and augmentative risk of cholera outbreak in the focused area. The antibiotic sensitivity pattern in this study resembled the trend observed during last few years for Vc. The PSF demonstrated its inability to remove Vc from any of the samples and in addition, the filter itself was evidenced to be the source of pathogens and spores in further contamination and transmission. The development of biofilm in the PSF could be hypothesized as the reservoir in contaminating pathogen-free water samples. From the test of

  1. Protocol for Detection of Bacillus anthracis in Environmental Samples

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This pProtocol Method describes proceduresintended for the analyses of swabs, wipes, Sponge-Sticks, vacuum socks and filters, air filters, drinking water, and decontamination waste water for Bacillus anthracis spores.

  2. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and notmore » in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.« less

  3. Permeability of bacterial spores. IV. Water content, uptake, and distribution.

    PubMed

    BLACK, S H; GERHARDT, P

    1962-05-01

    Black, S. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and Philipp Gerhardt. Permeability of bacterial spores. IV. Water content, uptake, and distribution. J. Bacteriol. 83:960-967. 1962.-Dormant and germinated spores of Bacillus cereus strain terminalis were examined for water properties. Respectively, they exhibited a mean density of 1.28 and 1.11 g/ml, a water content of 64.8 and 73.0%, and a total water uptake of 66.6 and 75.6%, based on spore weight, or 86.0 and 83.9%, based on spore volume. The results confirmed a previous report that internal and external water are in virtually complete equilibrium, but refuted a prevailing hypothesis that heat resistance is attributable to a dry core. A model of spore ultrastructure that evolved from the cumulative results pictures a moist, dense, heteroporous core. A new hypothesis is formulated as an explanation for thermostability in spores and possibly in other instances; it postulates the occurrence of an insolubly gelled core with cross-linking between macromolecules through stable but reversible bonds so as to form a high-polymer matrix with entrapped free water.

  4. Evaluating the Transport of Bacillus subtilis Spores as a Potential Surrogate for Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Kim, Hyunjung; Headd, Brendan; Torkzaban, Saeed

    2016-02-02

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recommended the use of aerobic spores as an indicator for Cryptosporidium oocysts when determining groundwater under the direct influence of surface water. Surface properties, interaction energies, transport, retention, and release behavior of B. subtilis spores were measured over a range of physicochemical conditions, and compared with reported information for C. parvum oocysts. Interaction energy calculations predicted a much larger energy barrier and a shallower secondary minimum for spores than oocysts when the solution ionic strength (IS) equaled 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, and no energy barrier when the IS = 100 mM. Spores and oocysts exhibited similar trends of increasing retention with IS and decreasing Darcy water velocity (qw), and the predicted setback distance to achieve a six log removal was always larger for spores than oocysts. However, low levels of observed spore and oocyst release significantly influenced the predicted setback distance, especially when the fraction of reversibly retained microbes (Frev) was high. An estimate for Frev was obtained from large release pulses of spore and oocyst when the IS was reduced to deionized water. The value of Frev always increased with qw, whereas an opposition trend for Frev with IS was observed for spores (decreasing) and oocysts (increasing).

  5. Influence of oxygen in atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet on sterilization of Bacillus atrophaeous spores

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jin-Pyo; Uhm, Han S.; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2007-09-15

    A nonequilibrium Ar/O{sub 2} plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure was carried out in a coaxial cylindrical reactor with a stepped electrode configuration powered by a 13.56 MHz rf power supplier. The argon glow discharge with high electron density produces oxygen reactive species in large quantities. Argon plasma jets penetrate deep into ambient air and create a path for oxygen radicals to sterilize microbes. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores indicates that an argon-oxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby demonstrating its capability to clean surfaces and its usefulness for reinstating contaminated equipment as freemore » from toxic biological warfare agents. The decimal reduction time (D values) of the Ar/O{sub 2} plasma jet at an exposure distance of 0.5-1.5 cm ranges from 5 to 57 s. An actinometric comparison of the sterilization data shows that atomic oxygen radicals play a significant role in plasma sterilization. When observed under a scanning electron microscope, the average size of the spores appears to be greatly reduced due to chemical reactions with the oxygen radicals.« less

  6. The Bacillus subtilis yabG Gene Is Transcribed by SigK RNA Polymerase during Sporulation, and yabG Mutant Spores Have Altered Coat Protein Composition

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Hiromu; Kodama, Takeko; Imamura, Atsuo; Asai, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Ogasawara, Naotake; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2000-01-01

    The expression of six novel genes located in the region from abrB to spoVC of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome was analyzed, and one of the genes, yabG, had a predicted promoter sequence conserved among SigK-dependent genes. Northern blot analysis revealed that yabG mRNA was first detected from 4 h after the cessation of logarithmic growth (T4) in wild-type cells and in a gerE36 (GerE−) mutant but not in spoIIAC (SigF−), spoIIGAB (SigE−), spoIIIG (SigG−), and spoIVCB (SigK−) mutants. The transcription start point was determined by primer extension analysis; the −10 and −35 regions are very similar to the consensus sequences recognized by SigK-containing RNA polymerase. Inactivation of the yabG gene by insertion of an erythromycin resistance gene did not affect vegetative growth or spore resistance to heat, chloroform, and lysozyme. The germination of yabG spores in l-alanine and in a mixture of l-asparagine, d-glucose, d-fructose, and potassium chloride was also the same as that of wild-type spores. On the other hand, the protein preparation from yabG spores included 15-, 18-, 21-, 23-, 31-, 45-, and 55-kDa polypeptides which were low in or not extracted from wild-type spores under the same conditions. We determined their N-terminal amino acid sequence and found that these polypeptides were CotT, YeeK, YxeE, CotF, YrbA (31 and 45 kDa), and SpoIVA, respectively. The fluorescence of YabG-green fluorescent protein fusion produced in sporulating cells was detectable in the forespores but not in the mother cell compartment under fluorescence microscopy. These results indicate that yabG encodes a sporulation-specific protein which is involved in coat protein composition in B. subtilis. PMID:10714992

  7. Immobilized bacterial spores for use as bioindicators in the validation of thermal sterilization processes.

    PubMed

    Serp, D; von Stockar, U; Marison, I W

    2002-07-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051 and Bacillus stearothermophilus NCTC 10003 were immobilized in monodisperse alginate beads (diameter, 550 microm +/- 5%), and the capacity of the immobilized bioindicators to provide accurate and reliable F-values for sterilization processes was studied. The resistance of the beads to abrasion and heat was strong enough to ensure total retention of the bioindicators in the beads in a sterilization cycle. D- and z-values for free spores were identical to those for immobilized spores, which shows that immobilization does not modify the thermal resistance of the bioindicators. A D(100 degrees C) value of 1.5 min was found for free and immobilized B. subtilis spores heated in demineralized water, skimmed milk, and milk containing 4% fat, suggesting that a lipid concentration as low as 4% does not alter the thermal resistance of B. subtilis spores. Providing that the pH range is kept between 3.4 to 10 and that sufficiently low concentrations of Ca2+ competitors or complexants are present in the medium, immobilized bioindicators may serve as an efficient, accurate, and reliable tool with which to validate the efficiency of any sterilization process. The environmental factors (pH, media composition) affecting the thermoresistance of native contaminants are intrinsically reflected in the F-value, allowing for a sharper adjustment of the sterilization process. Immobilized spores of B. stearothermophilus were successfully used to validate a resonance and interference microwave system that is believed to offer a convenient alternative for the sterilization of temperature-sensitive products and medical wastes.

  8. Identification of Bacillus Strains for Biological Control of Catfish Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Chao; Carrias, Abel; Williams, Malachi A.; Capps, Nancy; Dan, Bui C. T.; Newton, Joseph C.; Kloepper, Joseph W.; Ooi, Ei L.; Browdy, Craig L.; Terhune, Jeffery S.; Liles, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus strains isolated from soil or channel catfish intestine were screened for their antagonism against Edwardsiella ictaluri and Aeromonas hydrophila, the causative agents of enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC) and motile aeromonad septicaemia (MAS), respectively. Twenty one strains were selected and their antagonistic activity against other aquatic pathogens was also tested. Each of the top 21 strains expressed antagonistic activity against multiple aquatic bacterial pathogens including Edwardsiella tarda, Streptococcus iniae, Yersinia ruckeri, Flavobacterium columnare, and/or the oomycete Saprolegnia ferax. Survival of the 21 Bacillus strains in the intestine of catfish was determined as Bacillus CFU/g of intestinal tissue of catfish after feeding Bacillus spore-supplemented feed for seven days followed by normal feed for three days. Five Bacillus strains that showed good antimicrobial activity and intestinal survival were incorporated into feed in spore form at a dose of 8×107 CFU/g and fed to channel catfish for 14 days before they were challenged by E. ictaluri in replicate. Two Bacillus subtilis strains conferred significant benefit in reducing catfish mortality (P<0.05). A similar challenge experiment conducted in Vietnam with four of the five Bacillus strains also showed protective effects against E. ictaluri in striped catfish. Safety of the four strains exhibiting the strongest biological control in vivo was also investigated in terms of whether the strains contain plasmids or express resistance to clinically important antibiotics. The Bacillus strains identified from this study have good potential to mediate disease control as probiotic feed additives for catfish aquaculture. PMID:23029244

  9. Bacillus As Potential Probiotics: Status, Concerns, and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Elshaghabee, Fouad M. F.; Rokana, Namita; Gulhane, Rohini D.; Sharma, Chetan; Panwar, Harsh

    2017-01-01

    Spore-forming bacilli are being explored for the production and preservation of food for many centuries. The inherent ability of production of large number of secretory proteins, enzymes, antimicrobial compounds, vitamins, and carotenoids specifies the importance of bacilli in food chain. Additionally, Bacillus spp. are gaining interest in human health related functional food research coupled with their enhanced tolerance and survivability under hostile environment of gastrointestinal tract. Besides, bacilli are more stable during processing and storage of food and pharmaceutical preparations, making them more suitable candidate for health promoting formulations. Further, Bacillus strains also possess biotherapeutic potential which is connected with their ability to interact with the internal milieu of the host by producing variety of antimicrobial peptides and small extracellular effector molecules. Nonetheless, with proposed scientific evidences, commercial probiotic supplements, and functional foods comprising of Bacillus spp. had not gained much credential in general population, since the debate over probiotic vs pathogen tag of Bacillus in the research and production terrains is confusing consumers. Hence, it’s important to clearly understand the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of selective beneficial Bacillus spp. and their substantiation with those having GRAS status, to reach a consensus over the same. This review highlights the probiotic candidature of spore forming Bacillus spp. and presents an overview of the proposed health benefits, including application in food and pharmaceutical industry. Moreover, the growing need to evaluate the safety of individual Bacillus strains as well as species on a case by case basis and necessity of more profound analysis for the selection and identification of Bacillus probiotic candidates are also taken into consideration. PMID:28848511

  10. Classification of Bacillus beneficial substances related to plants, humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Mongkolthanaruk, Wiyada

    2012-12-01

    Genus Bacillus is a spore-forming bacterium that has unique properties in cell differentiation, allowing the forming of spores in stress conditions and activated in the vegetative cell, with suitable environments occurring during the life cycle acting as a trigger. Their habitat is mainly in soil; thus, many species of Bacillus are associated with plants as well as rhizosphere bacteria and endophytic bacteria. Signal transduction is the principal mechanism of interactions, both within the cell community and with the external environment, which provides the subsequent functions or properties for the cell. The antimicrobial compounds of Bacillus sp. are potentially useful products, which have been used in agriculture for the inhibition of phytopathogens, for the stimulation of plant growth, and in the food industry as probiotics. There are two systems for the synthesis of these substances: nonribosomal synthesis of cyclic lipopeptides (NRPS) and polyketides (PKS). For each group, the structures, properties, and genes of the main products are described. The different compounds described and the way in which they co-exist exhibit the relationship of Bacillus substances to plants, humans, and animals.

  11. Modeling of Bacillus spores: Inactivation and Outgrowth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    there has to be a suitable amount of repair enzymes viable to accomplish this. 34 Let ( )r eE t be the enzyme concentration for the spore population...was drawn from a Gaussian fitness distribution with mean, 0E and variance, 0 2 E , 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 ( 0 0 ) 2 ( , 1 ) , , 2 0. E E E E E E f e EE ...time progresses, the evolution of the distribution of ( )r eE t will approach the kill threshold. Since 0E is a random variable, ( )r eE t is also a

  12. Systematic Evaluation of Aggressive Air Sampling for Bacillus ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report The primary objectives of this project were to evaluate the Aggressive Air Sampling (AAS) method compared to currently used surface sampling methods and to determine if AAS is a viable option for sampling Bacillus anthracis spores.

  13. The solar UV environment and bacterial spore UV resistance: considerations for Earth-to-Mars transport by natural processes and human spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Schuerger, Andrew C; Setlow, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The environment in space and on planets such as Mars can be lethal to microorganisms because of the high vacuum and high solar radiation flux, in particular UV radiation, in such environments. Spores of various Bacillus species are among the organisms most resistant to the lethal effects of high vacuum and UV radiation, and as a consequence are of major concern for planetary contamination via unmanned spacecraft or even natural processes. This review focuses on the spores of various Bacillus species: (i) their mechanisms of UV resistance; (ii) their survival in unmanned spacecraft, space flight and simulated space flight and Martian conditions; (iii) the UV flux in space and on Mars; (iv) factors affecting spore survival in such high UV flux environments.

  14. Spore Heat Activation Requirements and Germination Responses Correlate with Sequences of Germinant Receptors and with the Presence of a Specific spoVA2mob Operon in Foodborne Strains of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Antonina O; de Jong, Anne; Omony, Jimmy; Holsappel, Siger; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Eijlander, Robyn T

    2017-04-01

    Spore heat resistance, germination, and outgrowth are problematic bacterial properties compromising food safety and quality. Large interstrain variation in these properties makes prediction and control of spore behavior challenging. High-level heat resistance and slow germination of spores of some natural Bacillus subtilis isolates, encountered in foods, have been attributed to the occurrence of the spoVA 2mob operon carried on the Tn 1546 transposon. In this study, we further investigate the correlation between the presence of this operon in high-level-heat-resistant spores and their germination efficiencies before and after exposure to various sublethal heat treatments (heat activation, or HA), which are known to significantly improve spore responses to nutrient germinants. We show that high-level-heat-resistant spores harboring spoVA 2mob required higher HA temperatures for efficient germination than spores lacking spoVA 2mob The optimal spore HA requirements additionally depended on the nutrients used to trigger germination, l-alanine (l-Ala), or a mixture of l-asparagine, d-glucose, d-fructose, and K + (AGFK). The distinct HA requirements of these two spore germination pathways are likely related to differences in properties of specific germinant receptors. Moreover, spores that germinated inefficiently in AGFK contained specific changes in sequences of the GerB and GerK germinant receptors, which are involved in this germination response. In contrast, no relation was found between transcription levels of main germination genes and spore germination phenotypes. The findings presented in this study have great implications for practices in the food industry, where heat treatments are commonly used to inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microbes, including bacterial spore formers. IMPORTANCE This study describes a strong variation in spore germination capacities and requirements for a heat activation treatment, i.e., an exposure to sublethal heat that increases

  15. Spore Heat Activation Requirements and Germination Responses Correlate with Sequences of Germinant Receptors and with the Presence of a Specific spoVA2mob Operon in Foodborne Strains of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Antonina O.; de Jong, Anne; Omony, Jimmy; Holsappel, Siger; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H. J.; Eijlander, Robyn T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spore heat resistance, germination, and outgrowth are problematic bacterial properties compromising food safety and quality. Large interstrain variation in these properties makes prediction and control of spore behavior challenging. High-level heat resistance and slow germination of spores of some natural Bacillus subtilis isolates, encountered in foods, have been attributed to the occurrence of the spoVA2mob operon carried on the Tn1546 transposon. In this study, we further investigate the correlation between the presence of this operon in high-level-heat-resistant spores and their germination efficiencies before and after exposure to various sublethal heat treatments (heat activation, or HA), which are known to significantly improve spore responses to nutrient germinants. We show that high-level-heat-resistant spores harboring spoVA2mob required higher HA temperatures for efficient germination than spores lacking spoVA2mob. The optimal spore HA requirements additionally depended on the nutrients used to trigger germination, l-alanine (l-Ala), or a mixture of l-asparagine, d-glucose, d-fructose, and K+ (AGFK). The distinct HA requirements of these two spore germination pathways are likely related to differences in properties of specific germinant receptors. Moreover, spores that germinated inefficiently in AGFK contained specific changes in sequences of the GerB and GerK germinant receptors, which are involved in this germination response. In contrast, no relation was found between transcription levels of main germination genes and spore germination phenotypes. The findings presented in this study have great implications for practices in the food industry, where heat treatments are commonly used to inactivate pathogenic and spoilage microbes, including bacterial spore formers. IMPORTANCE This study describes a strong variation in spore germination capacities and requirements for a heat activation treatment, i.e., an exposure to sublethal heat that

  16. Micro-Etched Platforms for Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus Anthracis and Bacillus Thuringiensis Spores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    slips was first coated with a detergent wash. Commercially available Ivory soap shavings were diluted with sterile Millipore® water in a...environments. This removed controllable variability between the Bacillus species and increased the confidence in continued use of such surrogacy

  17. Decontamination Efficacy of Three Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Sporicidal Disinfectants on Medium-Sized Panels Contaminated with Surrogate Spores of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Sabol, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a wide area release and contamination of a biological agent in an outdoor environment and to building exteriors, decontamination is likely to consume the Nation’s remediation capacity, requiring years to cleanup, and leading to incalculable economic losses. This is in part due to scant body of efficacy data on surface areas larger than those studied in a typical laboratory (5×10-cm), resulting in low confidence for operational considerations in sampling and quantitative measurements of prospective technologies recruited in effective cleanup and restoration response. In addition to well-documented fumigation-based cleanup efforts, agencies responsible for mitigation of contaminated sites are exploring alternative methods for decontamination including combinations of disposal of contaminated items, source reduction by vacuuming, mechanical scrubbing, and low-technology alternatives such as pH-adjusted bleach pressure wash. If proven effective, a pressure wash-based removal of Bacillus anthracis spores from building surfaces with readily available equipment will significantly increase the readiness of Federal agencies to meet the daunting challenge of restoration and cleanup effort following a wide-area biological release. In this inter-agency study, the efficacy of commercial-of-the-shelf sporicidal disinfectants applied using backpack sprayers was evaluated in decontamination of spores on the surfaces of medium-sized (∼1.2 m2) panels of steel, pressure-treated (PT) lumber, and brick veneer. Of the three disinfectants, pH-amended bleach, Peridox, and CASCAD evaluated; CASCAD was found to be the most effective in decontamination of spores from all three panel surface types. PMID:24940605

  18. Combined pressure-thermal inactivation effect on spores in lu-wei beef--a traditional Chinese meat product.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-S; Li, B-S; Du, J-Z; Zeng, Q-X

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the inactivation effect and kinetics of Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores suspend