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Sample records for backfill materials investigated

  1. Some characteristics of potential backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    A backfill material is one of the multiple barriers that may be involved in the disposal of nuclear waste. Such backfill should be a desiccant with the hydrous product having acceptable stability; it should sorb any released radioisotopes, and it should reseal any breached site. The backfill must also have acceptable thermal conductivity. This report presents data on the rate of hydration and the nature of the product of reaction of some candidate backfill materials with water and with brine. Thermal conductivity data is reported for both the reactants and the products. Granular MgO at 150/sup 0/C completely hydrates in less than 10 hours. At 60/sup 0/C and 20/sup 0/C, such extensive hydration requires about 100 and 1000 hours, respectively. The product of the reaction is stable to more than 300/sup 0/C. A doped discalcium silicate was less reactive and the product contains less water of crystallization than the MgO. The reaction product of dicalcium silicate is cementous, but it has low thermal stability. Bentonite readily reacts with water and expands. The reaction product has the properties of vermiculite, which indicates that magnesium ions have diffused into the bentonite structure and are not simply adsorbed on the surface. If bentonite is emplaced in a saline environment, the properties of vermiculite, the reaction product, should also be considered. The thermal conductivity of MgO, discalcium silicate, and bentonite is primarily dependent on the porosity of the sample. A slight increase in thermal conductivity was found with increased temperature, in contrast to most rocks. If the conductive data for the different materials is equated to the same porosity, MgO has the superior thermal conductivity compared to bentonite or discalcium silicate.

  2. TRIAXIAL AND SHEAR TESTING OF SELECTED BACKFILL MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    2000-08-07

    The Subsurface Performance Testing Section is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various backfill materials. Triaxial and shear tests were conducted on select backfill materials. The specific materials tested were: crushed tuff, overton sand, 4- 10 silica sand, 1/4'' dolostone/marble, and limestone. The objective of this report is to provide an estimated value for Poisson's ratio, determine internal friction angle, and stress-strain modulus of the backfill materials that were tested. These basic parameters are necessary for the selection of a backfill material to be included in the repository. This report transmits the results in both hardcopy and electronic formats plus describes the methodology and interpretation of the results. No conclusions will be drawn about the test results, as this will be the purview of other reports. The scope of this report is to use the triaxial and shear testing information and calculate, the internal friction angle, stress-strain modulus, and provide an estimate of Poisson's ratio (Sowers 1979, p. 199) of the selected backfill materials. Standard laboratory procedures, mentioned in Section 2 of this report, were used.

  3. A novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu

    2012-04-30

    In this paper, a systematic study was conducted to investigate a novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash. The coal refuse and fly ash had different properties under various thermal activation temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 350 °C, 550 °C, 750 °C and 950 °C). It is known that a thermal activation temperature ranging from 20 °C to 950 °C significantly increases the flowability and pozzolanic properties of the coal refuse; however, the flowability of fly ash decreases when the activation temperature is higher than 550 °C because of a severe agglomeration phenomenon on its surface. An optimal design for this backfill material was determined to include an activated portion composed of 5% coal refuse at 750 °C and 15% fly ash at 20 °C. This combination yields the best performance with excellent flowability, a high compressive strength and a low bleeding rate. The microanalysis results corresponded well with the performance tests at different activation conditions. In the coal refuse, kaolinite peaks began to decrease because of their transformation into metakaolin at 550 °C. Chlorite peaks disappeared at 750 °C. Muscovite peaks decreased at 750 °C and disappeared at 950 °C. During this process, muscovite 2M(1) gradually dehydroxylated to muscovite HT. Furthermore, this paper examined the environmental acceptance and economic feasibility of this technology and found that this silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash not only meets EPA requirements but also has several advantages in industry feasibility when compared with hydraulic backfill, rock backfill and paste backfill.

  4. Physical response of backfill materials to mineralogical changes in a basalt environment. [Sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Backfill materials surrounding waste canisters in a high-level nuclear waste repository are capable of ensuring very slow flow of groundwater past the canisters, and thereby increase the safety of the repository. However, in the design of a repository it will be necessary to allow for possible changes in the backfill. In this experimental program, changes in permeability, swelling behavior, and plastic behavior of the backfill at the temperatures, pressures, and radiation levels expected in a repository are investigated. The emphasis is on investigation of relevant phenomena and evaluation of experimental procedures for use in licensing procedures. The permeability of a slightly compacted sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite, with a dry bulk density of 1.59 g/cm/sup 3/, was determined to be 0.9 x 10/sup -18/ m/sup 2/ in liquid water at 25 and 200/sup 0/C, respectively. This is sufficiently low to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of proposed materials. In practice, fractures in the host rock may form short circuits around the backfill, so an even lower flow rate is probable. However, alteration by any of several mechanisms is expected to change the properties of the backfill. Crushed basalt plus bentonite is a leading candidate backfill for a basalt repository. Experiments show that basalt reacts with groundwater vapor or with liquid groundwater producing smectites, zeolites, silica, and other products that may be either beneficial or detrimental to the long-term performance of the backfill. Concentration of groundwater salts in the backfill by evaporation would cause immediate, but possibly reversible, reduction of the swelling abaility of bentonite. Moreover, under some circumstances, gamma radiolysis of moist air in the backfill could produce up to 0.5 mole of nitric acid or ammonia per liter of pore space. 27 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Effects of rocks and backfill materials on waste glass leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, K.; Sasaki, N.; Kashihara, H.; Yamamoto, M.

    1986-12-31

    Extensive studies have been made on the interactions between a waste glass and repository materials under static conditions. One of the PNC reference glasses was leached in the solution prepared from water in contact with crushed granite, tuff, diabase and backfill materials such as bentonite and zeolite. The leachant solutions except for some bentonite solutions reduced the glass leach rate compared with that measured in distilled water. The extent of the reduction was a function of silicon concentration in solution. The bentonite solutions enhanced the glass dissolution rate by a factor of 2 to 3 at low bentonite/water ratios but the effect was found to be less important at high bentonite/water ratios and in the long-term experiment. Addition of granite and zeolite to the bentonite solutions decreased the leach rate below the value measured in distilled water.

  6. Groundwater flow evaluation through backfilling materials of a surface coal mining site of Northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Ojeda, C.; Martínez-Morales, M.; Ortíz-Flores, G.

    2013-05-01

    Surface coal mining at the Allende-Piedras Negras aquifer system requires the complete dewatering and removal of the aquifer. The aquifer contains several geologic layers of variable hydraulic conductivity. Backfilling material is composed of a mixture of permeable and impermeable layers and it was initially considered as impermeable. Exploratory drillings, pumping tests and a geophysical survey were performed in the backfilling materials and the surrounding unaltered materials in order to evaluate the natural groundwater flow modification due to the mining activities. Results of geophysical survey evidenced a saturated water table within the back filling material which was verified by exploratory drilling. Pumping tests showed that unaltered materials have a mean hydraulic conductivity of 34.5 m/day while the backfilling of 5.3 m/day. Although the mining activities reduce the hydraulic conductivity by almost an order of magnitude, it was corroborated the existence of a groundwater flow through the backfilling materials.

  7. Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

  8. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  9. Permeability, swelling, and radionuclide-retardation properties of candidate backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Bray, L.A.; Hodges, F.N.; Wheelwright, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    A backfill placed between a nuclear waste canister and the host geology of a nuclear waste repository can impede the migration of water through the waste package and retard the movement of radionuclides into the geologic formation. Hydraulic conductivities and swelling pressures are being determined as functions of the density of the compacted backfill, temperature, radiation dose, hydraulic head and the chemical composition of the permeating fluid. Bentonite clays and bentonite/sand mixtures have received initial emphasis. Sodium bentonite and calcium bentonite samples compacted to a dry density of 2.1 q/cm/sup 3/ had hydraulic conductivities in the range of 10/sup -12/ to 10/sup -13/ cm/s. In addition, batch distribution ratios (R/sub d/) for Sr, Cs, Am, Np, I, U and Tc have been measured for a number of candidate backfill materials. Both initial permeability and sorption studies have used a synthetic basaltic ground water.

  10. Sorption of cesium and strontium from concentrated brines by backfill barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, C D

    1981-03-01

    The sorption of radionuclides from potentially intruding groundwater at a nuclear waste repository is a major chemical function of backfill barriers. In this study, various materials (including clays, zeolites and an inorganic ion exchanger) were screened for the sorption of the fission products cesium and strontium in concentrated brines. Representative brines A and B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt were used. Sorption properties were quantified using empirical distribution coefficients, k/sub d/. Of the materials examined, sodium titanate had the highest k/sub d/ for the sorption of Sr(II) in both brine A (k/sub d/ = 125 ml/g) and brine B(k/sub d/ = 500 to 600 ml/g). A mordenite-type zeolite was the most effective getter for Cs(I) in brine A (k/sub d = 27 ml/g), while illite yielded the highest k/sub d/ for Cs(I) in brine B (k/sub d/ = 115 ml/g). The relative merit of these k/sub d/ values is evaluated in terms of calculated estimates of breakthrough times for a backfill barrier containing the getter. Results show that a backfill mixture containing these getters is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Sr(II) and Cs(I), although further study (especially for the sorption of cesium from brine A) is recommended. Initial mechanistic studies revealed competing ion effects which would support an ion exchange mechanism. K/sub d/'s were constant over a Sr(II) concentration range of 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -5/ M and a Cs(I) concentration range of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ M, supporting the choice of a linear sorption isotherm as a model for the results. Constant batch composition was shown to be attained within one week.

  11. Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

    2003-10-01

    A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron

  12. Effect of incinerator bottom-ash composition on the mechanical behavior of backfill material.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Weng, Meng-Chia; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2012-12-30

    This study explores the influence of the chemical composition (SiO(2), CaO, Fe(2)O(3), and Al(2)O(3)) of incinerator bottom ash on its friction angle. Direct shear tests were performed to measure the strength of bottom ash with two distinctly different compositions. Then, an empirical equation was regressed to determine the correlation between each composition and the friction angle. The experimental results showed that the main constituent material of the incinerator bottom ash from general municipal wastes is SiO(2), and the friction angle is 48.04°-52.66°. The bottom ash from incineration plants treating both municipal wastes and general industrial wastes has a high content of iron-aluminum oxides, and its friction angle is 44.60°-52.52°. According to the multivariate regression analysis result, the friction angle of bottom ash of any composition is influenced mainly by the Fe(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3) contents. This study used the friction angle of the bottom ash from four different incineration plants to validate the empirical equation, and found that the error between actual friction angles and the predicted values was -1.36% to 5.34%. Therefore, the regressed empirical equation in this study can be employed in engineering applications to preliminarily identify the backfill quality of incinerator bottom ash. PMID:23084273

  13. Composite backfill materials for radioactive waste isolation by deep burial in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    Bentonite and hectorite were found to sorb Pu(IV) and Am(III) from concentrated brines with distribution coefficients K/sub d/ > 3000 ml/g. The permeability of bentonite to brine was less than 1 microdarcy at a confining pressure of 18 MPa, the expected lithostatic pressure at the 800 m level in a salt repository. Getters for sorption of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ (K/sub d/ approx. 300 ml/g), I/sup -/ (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 30 ml/g), Cs (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 30 ml/g) and Sr (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to approx. 100 ml/g) from brines were identified. Their sorption properties are presented. Thermal conductivity results (>0.5 W/mK) and evidence for bentonite stability in brines at hydrothermal conditions are also given. It is shown by calculated estimates that a 3-ft-thick mixture of bentonite with other getter materials could retain Pu, Am, and TcO/sub 4//sup -/ for >10/sup 4/ years and I/sup -/ for > 10/sup 3/ years. Another tailored mixture could retain Cs for approx. 600 years, Sr for approx. 700 years, TcO/sub 4/ for approx. 4000 years and I/sup -/ for approx. 400 years. The backfill can offer a significant contribution to the isolation capability of a waste package system.

  14. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are economic solutions for both, domestic heating energy supply, as well as underground thermal energy storage (UTES). Over the past decades the technology developed to complex, advanced and highly efficient systems. For an efficient operation of the most common type of UTES, borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems, it is necessary to design the system for a wide range of carrier fluid temperatures. During heat extraction, a cooled carrier fluid is heated up by geothermal energy. This collected thermal energy is energetically used by the heat pump. Thereby the carrier fluid temperature must have a lower temperature than the surrounding underground in order to collect heat energy. The steeper the thermal gradient, the more energy is transferred to the carrier fluid. The heat injection case works vice versa. For fast and sufficient heat extraction, even over long periods of heating (winter), it might become necessary to run the BHE with fluid temperatures below 0°C. As the heat pump runs periodically, a cyclic freezing of the pore water and corresponding ice-lens growth in the nearfield of the BHE pipes becomes possible. These so called freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) are a critical state for the backfill material, as the sealing effect eventually decreases. From a hydrogeological point of view the vertical sealing of the BHE needs to be secured at any time (e.g. VDI 4640-2, Draft 2015). The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the BHE is influenced not only by the permeability of the grouting material itself, but by the contact area between BHE pipes and grout. In order to assess the sealing capacity of grouting materials a laboratory testing procedure was developed that measures the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the system BHE pipe and grout. The key features of the procedure are: • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity after simulation of freeze-thaw-cycle

  15. Uptake Mechanisms of Eu(III) on Hydroxyapatite: A Potential Permeable Reactive Barrier Backfill Material for Trapping Trivalent Minor Actinides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zheng, Tao; Yang, Shitong; Zhang, Linjuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-04-01

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique has attracted an increasing level of attention for the in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. In this study, the macroscopic uptake behaviors and microscopic speciation of Eu(III) on hydroxyapatite (HAP) were investigated by a combination of theoretical modeling, batch experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) fitting, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The underlying removal mechanisms were identified to further assess the application potential of HAP as an effective PRB backfill material. The macroscopic analysis revealed that nearly all dissolved Eu(III) in solution was removed at pH 6.5 within an extremely short reaction time of 5 min. In addition, the thermodynamic calculations, desorption experiments, and PXRD and XAS analyses definitely confirmed the formation of the EuPO4·H2O(s) phase during the process of uptake of dissolved Eu(III) by HAP via the dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A detailed comparison of the present experimental findings and related HAP-metal systems suggests that the relative contribution of precipitation to the total Eu(III) removal increases as the P:Eu ratio decreases. The dosage of HAP-based PRB for the remediation of groundwater polluted by Eu(III) and analogous trivalent actinides [e.g., Am(III) and Cm(III)] should be strictly controlled depending on the dissolved Eu(III) concentration to obtain an optimal P:M (M represents Eu, Am, or Cm) ratio and treatment efficiency.

  16. Uptake Mechanisms of Eu(III) on Hydroxyapatite: A Potential Permeable Reactive Barrier Backfill Material for Trapping Trivalent Minor Actinides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zheng, Tao; Yang, Shitong; Zhang, Linjuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-04-01

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique has attracted an increasing level of attention for the in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. In this study, the macroscopic uptake behaviors and microscopic speciation of Eu(III) on hydroxyapatite (HAP) were investigated by a combination of theoretical modeling, batch experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) fitting, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The underlying removal mechanisms were identified to further assess the application potential of HAP as an effective PRB backfill material. The macroscopic analysis revealed that nearly all dissolved Eu(III) in solution was removed at pH 6.5 within an extremely short reaction time of 5 min. In addition, the thermodynamic calculations, desorption experiments, and PXRD and XAS analyses definitely confirmed the formation of the EuPO4·H2O(s) phase during the process of uptake of dissolved Eu(III) by HAP via the dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A detailed comparison of the present experimental findings and related HAP-metal systems suggests that the relative contribution of precipitation to the total Eu(III) removal increases as the P:Eu ratio decreases. The dosage of HAP-based PRB for the remediation of groundwater polluted by Eu(III) and analogous trivalent actinides [e.g., Am(III) and Cm(III)] should be strictly controlled depending on the dissolved Eu(III) concentration to obtain an optimal P:M (M represents Eu, Am, or Cm) ratio and treatment efficiency. PMID:26965642

  17. Application of Paste Backfill in Underground Coal Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masniyom, M.; Drebenstedt, C.

    2009-04-01

    Coal fires are known from different coalfields worldwide. China, India, USA, Australia, Indonesia and South Africa are the main countries affected by coal fires. The fires is thermally intensive and cause numerous sinkholes, large-scale subsidence, air pollution, global warming, loss of mining productivity and increasing safety risk. The Wuda Inner Mongolia coalfield has been selected as a possible test area for paste backfill. The traditional methods, executed by fire fighting teams, by covering the coalfire areas with soil, blasting burning coal outcrops and injecting water in the subsurface fire pockets are continuously improved and extended. Initiatives to introduce modern techniques, such as backfill placement at fracture and borehole, to cool down the burning coal and cut off the air supply. This study is to investigate backfill materials and techniques suited for underground coal fires. Laboratory tests were carried out on physical, chemical and mechanical properties of different backfill materials and mixtures thereof. Special attention was paid to materials generated as by-products and other cheaply available materials e.g. fly ash from power plants. There is a good chance that one of the different material mixtures investigated can be used as a technically and economically viable backfill for underground coal fires.

  18. The evaluation of a metered mixer for RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle backfill operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardell, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    Metered mixing specifically for the RSRM backfill operation was investigated. Projected advantages were the elimination of waste RTV silicone produced in the operation and the elimination of entrapped air during the mix. Although metered mixing proved to be a viable method for mixing the Dow Corning DC 90-0006 rubber with its catalyst, applying the technology to the RSRM backfill operation has several disadvantages that are decisive. Use of a metered mixer would increase the amount of material that was being scraped for each backfill and increase the amount of time required to clean up the equipment after each operation. Therefore, use of metered static mixers is not recommended for use in the RSRM nozzle backfill operations. Because metered mixers proved to have significant disadvantages other methods of mixing and dispensing the RTV during the backfill operation are being investigated, and will be reported in a separate document.

  19. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  20. Vadose water flow around a backfilled drift located in tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Mondy, L.A.; Baker, B.L.; Eaton, R.R.

    1985-07-01

    Through the technique of computer simulation, the authors investigate the flow characteristics of groundwater from surface influx into a host medium of unsaturated tuff. The study is designed to assess the potential influence of backfilled drifts on the groundwater flow past vertically emplaced waste canisters in a prospective nuclear waste repository. Numerical modeling with the code SAGUARO is used to determine the magnitude and direction of flow in the vicinity of a waste package below a drift backfilled with various materials. Sand and clay represent potential backfill materials which are significantly different in hydrologic properties. Results indicate that clay in a drift reduces the flow immediately adjacent to the waste package to 91 to 96% of the natural flow. Sand in the same drift acts as an extremely effective barrier to flow; however, below the drift at the waste package level, the groundwater flow is 81% to 92% of the natural volumetric flow. Therefore, backfilling a drift does not provide a significant reduction of flow in the vicinity of a vertically emplaced waste package. The effect of the drift on flow extends only slightly over a drift length below and a drift width to the side of the backfilled region. This study is part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations.

  1. Backfill barriers: the use of engineered barriers based on geologic materials to assure isolation of radioactive wastes in a repository. [Nickel-iron alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.; Cook, N.G.W.

    1981-06-01

    A preliminary assessment is made to show that canisters fabricated of nickel-iron alloys, and surrounded by a suitable backfill, may produce an engineered barrier where the canister material is thermodynamically stable with respect to its environment. As similar conditions exist in nature, the performance of such systems as barriers to isolate radionuclides can be predicted over very long periods, of the order of 10/sup 6/ years.

  2. SEEPAGE/BACKFILL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2000-04-14

    As directed by written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a sub-model of seepage/backfill interactions is developed and presented in this document to support the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Physical and Chemical Environment Model. The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift. In this analysis, a conceptual model is developed to provide PAO a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The development plan calls for a sub-model that evaluates the effect on water chemistry of chemical reactions between water that enters the drift and backfill materials in the drift. The development plan specifically requests an evaluation of the following important chemical reaction processes: dissolution-precipitation, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction. The development plan also requests the evaluation of the effects of varying seepage and drainage fluxes, varying temperature, and varying evaporation and condensation fluxes. Many of these effects are evaluated in a separate Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Precipitates Salts Analysis AMR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000), so the results of that AMR are referenced throughout this AMR.

  3. Implementation of paste backfill mining technology in Chinese coal mines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qingliang; Chen, Jianhang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  4. Implementation of paste backfill mining technology in Chinese coal mines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qingliang; Chen, Jianhang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application.

  5. Implementation of Paste Backfill Mining Technology in Chinese Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qingliang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  6. Laboratory determination of migration of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures as buffer/backfill material for high-level waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lang; Zhang, Huyuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ming

    2013-12-01

    For the safety assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the migration of Eu(III) through compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was measured under expected repository conditions. Under the evaluated conditions, advection and dispersion is the dominant migration mechanism. The role of sorption on the retardation of migration was also evaluated. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were K=2.07×10(-10)-5.23×10(-10)cm/s, The sorption and diffusion of Eu(III) were examined using a flexible wall permeameter for a solute concentration of 2.0×10(-5)mol/l. The effective diffusion coefficients and apparent diffusion coefficients of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were in the range of 1.62×10(-12)-4.87×10(-12)m(2)/s, 1.44×10(-14)-9.41×10(-14)m(2)/s, respectively, which has a very important significance to forecast the relationship between migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material and time and provide a reference for the design of buffer/backfill material for HLW disposal in China.

  7. A Historical Review of WIPP Backfill Development

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, L.H.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Molecke, M.A.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-15

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. It's introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  8. Investigating Encrypted Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Niall; Gladyshev, Pavel; Kechadi, Tahar; Carthy, Joe

    When encrypted material is discovered during a digital investigation and the investigator cannot decrypt the material then s/he is faced with the problem of how to determine the evidential value of the material. This research is proposing a methodology of extracting probative value from the encrypted file of a hybrid cryptosystem. The methodology also incorporates a technique for locating the original plaintext file. Since child pornography (KP) images and terrorist related information (TI) are transmitted in encrypted format the digital investigator must ask the question Cui Bono? - who benefits or who is the recipient? By doing this the scope of the digital investigation can be extended to reveal the intended recipient.

  9. Recycling facility solves backfill dumping problem

    SciTech Connect

    Grosner, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Southern Connecticut Gas Co., in its Bridgeport Division, began recycling its backfill material approximately one year ago by utilizing a facility operated by an outside contractor. The process of recycling backfill material was initiated when suitable sites for dumping materials were unavailable or scarce in the greater Bridgeport area. A department objective was initiated two years ago to research various alternatives to this growing problem. One alternative was to purchase some low cost, unbuildable land and use it for dumping spoils, but this approach proved to be unsuccessful as the availability of such a parcel of land was nonexistent in Fairfield County. Pursuing this alternative would involve considerable research since access to a major highway as a prerequisite for purchase. In this area most communities require approval by conservation boards, the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, the Planning and Zoning Commissions and in some cases the chief governing body of the community. Another alternative was to seek parcels of land where permission might be obtained from the owners to deposit unsuitable backfill material. Even when permission was received from a reliable property owner, the site had to be carefully assessed. There was little success with this short- term stop gap alternative. A third solution was to find an outside contractor who had the facilities to accept all the unsuitable backfill material including asphalt, concrete and rocks. Fortunately a recycling facility was found that was interested in accepting the backfill. Originally the facility was processing material from reconstructed state highway road and bridge jobs but began expansion operations to accommodate the additional material.

  10. Wormhole Formation in RSRM Nozzle Joint Backfill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J.

    2000-01-01

    The RSRM nozzle uses a barrier of RTV rubber upstream of the nozzle O-ring seals. Post flight inspection of the RSRM nozzle continues to reveal occurrence of "wormholes" into the RTV backfill. The term "wormholes", sometimes called "gas paths", indicates a gas flow path not caused by pre-existing voids, but by a little-understood internal failure mode of the material during motor operation. Fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the RSRM nozzle joints during motor operation, nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the RTV backfill material, identification of the conditions that predispose the RTV to form wormholes, and screening of candidate replacement materials is being pursued by a joint effort between Thiokol Propulsion, NASA, and the Army Propulsion & Structures Directorate at Redstone Arsenal. The performance of the RTV backfill in the joint is controlled by the joint environment. Joint movement, which applies a tension and shear load on the material, coupled with the introduction of high pressure gas in combination create an environment that exceeds the capability of the material to withstand the wormhole effect. Little data exists to evaluate why the material fails under the modeled joint conditions, so an effort to characterize and evaluate the material under these conditions was undertaken. Viscoelastic property data from characterization testing will anchor structural analysis models. Data over a range of temperatures, environmental pressures, and strain rates was used to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model to predict material performance, develop criteria for replacement materials, and quantify material properties influencing wormhole growth. Three joint simulation analogs were developed to analyze and validate joint thermal barrier (backfill) material performance. Two exploratory tests focus on detection of wormhole failure under specific motor operating conditions. A "validation" test system provides data to "validate" computer models and

  11. Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

  12. Investigations of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, G. M.; Fvwaraye, A. O.; Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The investigations were directed at determining the radiation history and surface chronology of lunar materials using the etched particle track technique. The major lunar materials studied are the igneous rocks and double core from Apollo 12, the breccia and soil samples from Apollo 14, and the core samples from Luna 16. In the course of this work two new and potentially important observations were made: (1) Cosmic ray-induced spallation-recoil tracks were identified. The density of such tracks, when compared with the density of tracks induced by a known flux of accelerator protons, yields the time of exposure of a sample within the top meter or two of moon's surface. (2) Natural, fine scale plastic deformation was found to have fragmented pre-existing charged particle tracks, allowing the dating of the mechanical event causing the deformation.

  13. Closure of the Brewer Gold Mine by pit backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Lupo, J.F.; Bronson, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Brewer Gold Mine, located in north-central South Carolina, is implementing an innovative reclamation plan that includes backfilling the main Brewer open pit with mine waste. The primary goals of the closure are to reduce acid rock drainage and minimize or eliminate long-term operation and maintenance requirements by restoring the site property to approximate pre-mining topography. The plan calls for consolidation of approximately 200 acres of waste into approximately 20 hectares (50 acres). Much of the material to be backfilled into the pit, including spent heap leach material and waste rock, has acid-generating potential. Therefore, the backfill design integrated geochemical properties of the backfill materials with expected post-closure conditions. A prime consideration was the final position of the water table. Since mining at the site started in the early 1800`s, no records exist of the original groundwater levels. Therefore, the design incorporates a large anoxic limestone drain to control the final groundwater level. Additional amendments are to be placed in targeted areas of the backfill to maximize their utilization. A low-permeability cap system that includes a GEOSYNTHETIC clay liner has been designed to limit infiltration into the backfill.

  14. Centrifuge modeling of radioactive waste migration through backfill in a near surface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Investigations on the performance of backfill barrier in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) for radioactive wastes are important to ensure the long term safety of such disposal option. Favorable condition to delay migration of radionuclides from disposed waste to far fields is diffusion process. However, advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism plays an important role due to changes in backfill over a period of time. In order to understand these mechanisms, detailed laboratory experiments are usually conducted for developing mathematical models to assess the behaviour of backfill. However, these experiments are time consuming and suffer with the limitations due to material complexity. Also, there are constraints associated with validation of theoretical predictions due to intricacy of boundary conditions as well as the time scale is quite different as compared to the time required for completion of the processes in the field. Keeping in view these aspects, centrifuge modeling technique has been adopted by various researchers to model and understand various geo-environment problems in order to provide a link between the real life situation termed as the 'Prototype' and its model, which is exposed to a higher gravitational field. An attempt has been made in this paper to investigate the feasibility of this technique to model advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism of radionuclides through saturated Bentonite-Sand (B:S) backfill. Various stages of centrifuge modeling are highlighted. Column tests were conducted in the centrifuge to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of B:S mixture under prototype NSDF stress conditions. Results showed that steady state hydraulic conductivity under saturated conditions was 2.86 10{sup -11} m/sec. Studies indicate the feasibility of centrifuge modeling technique and usefulness to model advective diffusion of radionuclides through B:S backfill. (authors)

  15. Modeling the effect of backfills on U-tube ground coil performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.; O`Neal, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    This paper is concerned with developing a discretized analytical model to investigate the effect of backfills on the performance of a vertical U-tube ground heat exchanger. This work builds on the previous development of (1) an approximate analytical solution for a cylindrical heat source in a nonhomogeneous medium, (2) an equivalent-diameter expression for vertical U-tubes, and (3) a fully implicit finite difference technique for the temperature distribution within a U-tube ground heat exchanger. A small-scale U-tube test facility was set up to experimentally validate the system model of the U-tube heat exchanger buried in a nonhomogeneous medium. Two types of backfill materials, bentonite/masonry sand and bentonite/copper powder, were used in the setup. The predictions in the water temperature drop across the U-tube were within 0.5 C (0.9 F) of the experimental data for both tests.

  16. Geochemical alteration of backfill FY98 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T; Knauss, K; Rosenberg, N; Viani, B

    1998-09-30

    The Yucca Mountain Project is considering some type of backfill, possibly emplaced as a capillary barrier, for inclusion in the Engineering Barrier System (EBS) at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site. The performance of capillary barriers in isothermal, low- temperature, environments has been studied extensively (e.g., Ho and Webb, 1998; OZdenburg and Pruess, 1993; Ross, 1990). The performance of capillary barriers in an non-isothermal, high temperature environment, such as during the thermal pulse phase of a nuclear waste repository, has received much less attention. One concern is that the backfill materials may be altered from that of the as-placed material by the hydrothermal regime imposed by the emplacement of waste in the repository, changing hydrologic properties in a way that degrades the performance of the EBS system. This report is a status report on our efforts to address this concern. The work was initiated by SCR #98-76-041 and was authorized to begin at LLNL in summer 1998. This report is organized as follows. In the first part, we discuss our understanding of the relevant issues of backfill performance based on thermal hydrology. We focus here on changes to hydrologic properties, but we recognize that changes to thermal, mechanical and chemical (e.g., sorptive) properties are also important. Our primary interest is in addressing concerns over possible changes in the magnitude of key hydrologic properties (i.e., porosity, permeability, and moisture retention characteristics) that could significantly affect the design performance of backfill in the EBS. We report on what we know from previous work about geochemical alteration of backfill material, focusing primarily on crushed tuff. In the second part of this report, we present our progress on geochemical studies on backfill materials. These include sub-boiling, two-phase column experiments, batch experiments at above boiling temperatures and associated numerical modeling.

  17. A historical review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant backfill development

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; BRUSH,LAURENCE H.

    2000-06-05

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. Its introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  18. Tribochemical investigation of microelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Milind Sudhakar

    To achieve efficient planarization with reduced device dimensions in integrated circuits, a better understanding of the physics, chemistry, and the complex interplay involved in chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is needed. The CMP process takes place at the interface of the pad and wafer in the presence of the fluid slurry medium. The hardness of Cu is significantly less than the slurry abrasive particles which are usually alumina or silica. It has been accepted that a surface layer can protect the Cu surface from scratching during CMP. Four competing mechanisms in materials removal have been reported: the chemical dissolution of Cu, the mechanical removal through slurry abrasives, the formation of thin layer of Cu oxide and the sweeping surface material by slurry flow. Despite the previous investigation of Cu removal, the electrochemical properties of Cu surface layer is yet to be understood. The motivation of this research was to understand the fundamental aspects of removal mechanisms in terms of electrochemical interactions, chemical dissolution, mechanical wear, and factors affecting planarization. Since one of the major requirements in CMP is to have a high surface finish, i.e., low surface roughness, optimization of the surface finish in reference to various parameters was emphasized. Three approaches were used in this research: in situ measurement of material removal, exploration of the electropotential activation and passivation at the copper surface and modeling of the synergistic electrochemical-mechanical interactions on the copper surface. In this research, copper polishing experiments were conducted using a table top tribometer. A potentiostat was coupled with this tribometer. This combination enabled the evaluation of important variables such as applied pressure, polishing speed, slurry chemistry, pH, materials, and applied DC potential. Experiments were designed to understand the combined and individual effect of electrochemical interactions

  19. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  20. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  1. Repair and restoration of paved surfaces. Phase 2: Backfilling of craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, V. C.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of Phase II of REREPS (repair and restoration of paved surfaces) is to evaluate previously developed techniques and materials and to conduct necessary studies to determine the most beneficial backfill material. The study is to include new materials and innovative methodology to the greatest practicable extent. Compaction requirements are to be analyzed by comparison with existing requirements as modified by REREPS results to date. Specific compaction requirements include a quantification of compaction requirements versus depth below the load as well as subgrade compaction versus pavement strength and stiffness. Another specific requirement is to study the applicability of the sand grid support concept. In addition, other new methods and materials will be reviewed, developed, and/or introduced, as appropriate. This study constitutes partial completion of these objectives. An investigation research effort has been made to review the status of REREPS development to data.

  2. Status of Research on Magnesium Oxide Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BYNUM,R. VANN; WANG,YIFENG; KELLY,JOHN W.; ANDERSON,HOWARD; NOWAK,E. JAMES

    2000-07-31

    For the WIPP, chemical and physical characteristics of MgO suggest it to be the most beneficial backfill choice, particularly because it has the ability to buffer the aqueous chemical conditions to control actinide volubility. In the current experimental program, the authors are developing a technical basis for taking credit for the complete set of attributes of MgO in geochemical, hydrogeological, and geomechanical technical areas, resulting in an improved conceptual model for the WIPP such as the following. Water uptake by MgO will delay the development of mobile actinides and gas generation by microbes and corrosion. Reduced gas generation will reduce or even eliminate spallings releases. As MgO hydrates, it swells, reducing porosity and permeability, which will inhibit gas flow in the repository, in turn reducing spallings releases. Hydration will also result in a self-sealing mechanism by which water uptake and swelling of MgO adjacent to a groundwater seep cuts off further seepage. Reaction with some groundwaters will produce cementitious materials, which will help to cement waste particles or produce a cohesive solid mass. Larger particles are less likely to be entrained in a spallings release. If sufficient water eventually accumulates in a repository to support microbial gas generation, magnesium carbonate cements will form; also producing good cohesion and strength.

  3. Mass transfer and transport of radionuclides through backfill in a geologic nuclear waster repository

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chulhyung.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical models for the mass transfer and transport of radionuclides through waste package backfill material are developed and their numerical illustrations are demonstrated. These models can aid in the performance assessment of the waste package in nuclear waste repositories. The following analyses are considered to study the performance of the backfill barrier in a geologic nuclear waste repository. (1) The analysis for time and space dependent mass transfer and mass transport of a radioactive decay chain for a congruent release with the matrix species is studied. Non-recursive analytical solutions are derived for a semi-infinite medium and a finite medium. The theory is illustrated with the important decay chain {sup 234}U {yields} {sup 230}Th {yields} {sup 226}Ra. (2) The time and space dependent mass transport for high solubility nuclides, such as iodine or cesium, is analyzed. The approximate solution that is valid for all times is developed, and validated by comparison with an asymptotic solution and the solution obtained by the numerical inversion of a Laplace transform covering the entire time span. From this model one can determine the thickness of the backfill to satisfy a prescribed release rate limit for high soluble radionuclides. (3) The analysis of the transient radionuclide migration through the backfill into a fracture intersecting the waste form is developed. The nuclides are advected by water flowing in the fracture. The numerical illustrations show that the species transport for the short half-life nuclide can be stopped effectively within the backfill, but the backfill can no longer retard the migration for stable nuclides or long half-life nuclides after some initial time period. (4) The steady state mass transfer from a cylindrical waste form with flow through the backfill layer is examined.

  4. Backfilling with guarantees granted upon job submission.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bunde, David P.; Lindsay, Alexander M.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Galloway-Carson, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present scheduling algorithms that simultaneously support guaranteed starting times and favor jobs with system desired traits. To achieve the first of these goals, our algorithms keep a profile with potential starting times for every unfinished job and never move these starting times later, just as in Conservative Backfilling. To achieve the second, they exploit previously unrecognized flexibility in the handling of holes opened in this profile when jobs finish early. We find that, with one choice of job selection function, our algorithms can consistently yield a lower average waiting time than Conservative Backfilling while still providing a guaranteed start time to each job as it arrives. In fact, in most cases, the algorithms give a lower average waiting time than the more aggressive EASY backfilling algorithm, which does not provide guaranteed start times. Alternately, with a different choice of job selection function, our algorithms can focus the benefit on the widest submitted jobs, the reason for the existence of parallel systems. In this case, these jobs experience significantly lower waiting time than Conservative Backfilling with minimal impact on other jobs.

  5. Radial diffusion of radiocaesium and radioiodide through cementitious backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M.; Hinchliff, J.; Drury, D.; Evans, N. D. M.; Williams, S.; Read, D.

    The function of the backfill material in a geological disposal facility (GDF) is to chemically condition the environment of the near field and thereby chemically retard the transport of the radionuclides present in the waste. This function of the backfill material is usually referred to as chemical containment. Diffusion experiments are being carried out over periods up to four years to assess the diffusion of Cs, Ni, Eu, Th, U and I (as I-) through Nirex Reference Vault Backfill (NRVB). The method uses cylinders of NRVB (40 mm diameter, 40-45 mm height) which can be doped via a central well with the radionuclides of interest. Diffusion occurs radially into a surrounding solution already pre-equilibrated with the cement. This paper shows the results obtained during the first two years for experiments undertaken using 137Cs and 125I- tracers with and without carrier. Comparison is made to tritiated water under identical experimental conditions. Breakthrough of Cs and I- occurred within the first week of the experiments, reaching steady state in the surrounding solution after 20-50 days. The maximum concentrations expected from the original inventories based on a simple dilution calculation have not been reached, indicating that retention in the matrix has occurred; ranging from 10% to 40% for Cs, and up to 50% for I-. Corresponding experiments using a solution containing cellulose degradation products (CDP) showed an increased diffusion for both Cs and I. Migration profiles have been obtained and the relative retention of each radionuclide has been confirmed using digital autoradiography. The results indicate that, for both isotopes, migration occurs through the cement matrix rather than through microfissures. However, whereas Cs is homogeneously distributed within the blocks, there is evidence of zones of preferential I- accumulation even where concentrations in solution have reached steady state. Transport modelling using GoldSim has replicated experimental

  6. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR BACKFILL EMPLACEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) backfill emplacement system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  7. Investigating Material Approximations in Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Steven A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2011-01-01

    During the design process, the configuration of space vehicles and habitats changes frequently and the merits of design changes must be evaluated. Methods for rapidly assessing astronaut exposure are therefore required. Typically, approximations are made to simplify the geometry and speed up the evaluation of each design. In this work, the error associated with two common approximations used to simplify space radiation vehicle analyses, scaling into equivalent materials and material reordering, are investigated. Over thirty materials commonly found in spacesuits, vehicles, and human bodies are considered. Each material is placed in a material group (aluminum, polyethylene, or tissue), and the error associated with scaling and reordering was quantified for each material. Of the scaling methods investigated, range scaling is shown to be the superior method, especially for shields less than 30 g/cm2 exposed to a solar particle event. More complicated, realistic slabs are examined to quantify the separate and combined effects of using equivalent materials and reordering. The error associated with material reordering is shown to be at least comparable to, if not greater than, the error associated with range scaling. In general, scaling and reordering errors were found to grow with the difference between the average nuclear charge of the actual material and average nuclear charge of the equivalent material. Based on this result, a different set of equivalent materials (titanium, aluminum, and tissue) are substituted for the commonly used aluminum, polyethylene, and tissue. The realistic cases are scaled and reordered using the new equivalent materials, and the reduced error is shown.

  8. Glassy materials investigated for nuclear reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, E. D.

    1968-01-01

    Studies determine the feasibility of preparing fuel-bearing glasses and glasses bearing neutron-absorbing materials for use as crystalline fuel and control rods for reactors. Properties investigated were devitrification resistance, urania solubility, and density.

  9. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.; Groves, Oliver J.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  10. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

    1984-06-27

    An apparatus and method as described for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  11. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  12. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  13. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  14. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  15. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  16. 30 CFR 816.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 816.107... ACTIVITIES § 816.107 Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. (a) Surface mining activities on steep slopes... section except where mining is conducted on flat or gently rolling terrain with an occasional steep...

  17. 30 CFR 817.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 817.107 Section 817.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... ACTIVITIES § 817.107 Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. (a) Underground mining activities on steep...

  18. 30 CFR 817.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 817.107 Section 817.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... ACTIVITIES § 817.107 Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. (a) Underground mining activities on steep...

  19. 30 CFR 816.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 816.107... ACTIVITIES § 816.107 Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. (a) Surface mining activities on steep slopes... section except where mining is conducted on flat or gently rolling terrain with an occasional steep...

  20. LDEF materials special investigation group's data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, John W.; Funk, Joan G.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of and contained a wide array of materials, representing the largest collection of materials flown for space exposure and returned for ground-based analyses to date. The results and implications of the data from these materials are the foundation on which future space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been tasked with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the space user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. The format and content of the data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task are discussed. The hardware and software requirements for each of the three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases.

  1. Investigative study of holographic recording materials development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The potential of certain cis-trans isomers and doped LiNbO3 for the holographic read/write/erase memory application was investigated. The cis-trans work involved the photochemical investigation of a number of potential materials as well as specific molecular engineering efforts on alpha-methyl stilbene and its derivatives. These efforts resulted in an increase in the change in index of refraction, and thereby, in potential recording utility, of an order of magnitude. The work on LiNbO3 was directed toward a preliminary investigation of the dynamics of the writing process. Several samples and a variety of writing conditions were investigated. An unexpected and as yet unexplained improvement in material behavior with continued recycling was observed. In addition, some effort was devoted to an analysis of the physical conditions under which several current theories of the optical damage process are valid.

  2. Dedicated heterogeneous node scheduling including backfill scheduling

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Robert R.; Eckert, Philip D.; Hommes, Gregg

    2006-07-25

    A method and system for job backfill scheduling dedicated heterogeneous nodes in a multi-node computing environment. Heterogeneous nodes are grouped into homogeneous node sub-pools. For each sub-pool, a free node schedule (FNS) is created so that the number of to chart the free nodes over time. For each prioritized job, using the FNS of sub-pools having nodes useable by a particular job, to determine the earliest time range (ETR) capable of running the job. Once determined for a particular job, scheduling the job to run in that ETR. If the ETR determined for a lower priority job (LPJ) has a start time earlier than a higher priority job (HPJ), then the LPJ is scheduled in that ETR if it would not disturb the anticipated start times of any HPJ previously scheduled for a future time. Thus, efficient utilization and throughput of such computing environments may be increased by utilizing resources otherwise remaining idle.

  3. A methodology to assess the radionuclide migration parameters through bentonite-sand backfill in a short experimental duration

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Bentonite-Sand Backfill is a part of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) widely used in a Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) to delay migration of radionuclides from the disposed nuclear waste in a geo environment. Laboratory migration experiments have been conducted to understand the advection/diffusion mechanisms of various radionuclides through backfill and to evaluate their migration rates in order to assess the performance of EBS. Migration through backfill is an extremely slow process and the experiments are time consuming. Also, these experiments have limitations to simulate the field stress conditions. Various researchers have experienced the advantages of centrifuge modeling technique to model contaminant transport problems of geo-environment. However, no such studies have been carried out adopting this technique to model the behaviour of bentonite-sand mixture as backfill in NSDF. An attempt has been made in the present study to investigate the validity of this technique to carry out such studies. Significance of geotechnical centrifuge modeling to simulate the prototype radionuclide migration mechanisms through backfill is highlighted. This paper presents the dimensional analysis of various scale factors to construct a physical model for centrifuge tests to monitor online the migration phenomena of radionuclides through bentonite-sand mixture. Studies reveal the feasibility of the technique to evaluate the migration parameters in a short experimental duration. Such studies help in improving EBS design and assessing the long-term performance of EBS in NSDF. (authors)

  4. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  5. Backfill hydrologic characteristics in a Tennessee area surface coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    The hydrological characteristics of backfill in a Tennessee area surface coal mine provide useful information concerning the aqueous environment in a recovering water table within a reclaimed surface mine. Chemical analysis of water samples provide a measure of reclamation activities.

  6. Implementation of chemical controls through a backfill system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bynum, R.V.; Stockman, C.; Wang, Yifeng; Peterson, A.; Krumhansl, J.; Nowak, J.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Cotton, J.; Patchet, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    A backfill system has been designed for the WIPP which will control the chemical environment of the post-closure repository to a domain where the actinide solubility is within its lowest region. The actinide solubility is highly dependent on the chemical species which constitute the fluid, the resulting pH of the fluid, and oxidation state of the actinide which is stable under the specific conditions. The implementation of magnesium oxide (MgO) as the backfill material not only controls the pH of the expected fluids but also effectively removes the carbonate from the system, which has a significant impact for actinide solubility. The selection process, emplacement system, design, and confirmatory experimental results are presented.

  7. DUSCOBS - a depleted-uranium silicate backfill for transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Pope, R.B.; Ashline, R.C.; DeHart, M.D.; Childs, K.W.; Tang, J.S.

    1995-11-30

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside storage, transport, and repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill all void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (1) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (2) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. In addition, the DUSCOBS improves the integrity of the package by acting as a packing material and ensures criticality control for the package during SNF storage and transport. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments.

  8. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  9. Mechanic of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment are Mark Lankton (Program Manager at University Colorado at Boulder), Susan Batiste (research assistance, UCB), and Stein Sture (principal investigator). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  10. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  11. Materials investigation of STS-3 parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Main parachute, No. 2 of SRB A-12 on STS-3, sustained damage during deployment or initial inflation that resulted in its collapse and failure to sustain load. During an investigation of the materials from this parachute, optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were conducted. This examination identified stains and abrasions on vent lines that appear to have been a result of friction contact with its flotation bag lanyard. Mechanical testing of the vent band indicated a reduction in strength of 37 percent obviously due to structural overload, heat, and ocean water exposure. It is concluded from this and other available data that entanglement of parachutes No. 1 and No. 2 during deployment caused adequate structural damage to main parachute No. 2 to render it unable to carry load.

  12. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  13. Machanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  14. Investigation of daily covering material for biocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendere, R.; Smigins, R.; Medne, O.; Berzina-Cimdina, L.; Rugele, K.

    2014-02-01

    Bioreactor landfilling, with the acceptance of landfill Directive 1999/31/EC has lost its actuality in European Union; at the same time, this method can still be used for acceleration of biowaste degradation and biogas production. One of the possibilities to reduce the disposal of biowaste is to use biocells for its anaerobic pre-treatment before landfilling. The daily filling up of such a cell requires isolation of the main volume to limit gas emissions, reduce smells, etc. Bioprocesses that are of the utmost importance for biocell treatment are often not taken into account in selection of materials to be used as daily landfill covers. Based on physical, chemical and biological methods the investigations have been carried out into different covering materials offered in the market, with identification of parameters that are the most important for daily covering the biocells. It is found that the materials fitted best this purpose should be of biological origin and consist of small bio-particles with large surface, without the inhibitors of anaerobic processes such as sulphuric compounds. Bioreaktoru pielietošana atkritumu uzglabāšanas sfērā, sakarā ar Direktīvas 1999/31/EC pieņemšanu, ir zaudējusi savu aktualitāti, taču šī metode vēl joprojām var tikt izmantota bioatkritumu noārdīšanai un biogāzes ražošanai. Viena no iespējām kā samazināt bioatkritumu izvietošanu ir biošūnu izmantošana bioatkritumu anaerobai pirmsapstrādei pirms to noglabāšanas. Šūnas piepildīšana ikdienā prasa nepieciešamību izolēt lielāko tās daļu, lai samazinātu gāzes emisiju, smakas, utt. Materiāli, kas ikdienā tiek izmantoti atkritumu pārklāšanai, nepietiekami ietekmē bioprocesus, kas pamatā ir galvenais biošūnas izmantošanas mērķis. Šajā sakarā ir veikta dažādu tirdzniecībā pieejamu pārklājuma materiālu izpēte, pielietojot virkni fizikālo, ķīmisko un bioloģisko metožu, un nosakot svarīgākos parametrus, kas ir b

  15. Numerical Modelling of Soil Arching in a Shallow Backfill Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, Waldemar St.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the application of the finite element method into the modelling of soil arching. The phenomenon plays fundamental role in soil-shell flexible structures behaviour. To evaluate the influence of arching on a pressure reduction, a plain strain trapdoor under a shallow layer of backfill was simulated. The Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition and the nonassociated flow rule were used for the soil model. The research examines the impact of the internal friction angle and the influence of the backfill layer thickness on the value of soil arching. The carried out analyses indicate that the reduction of pressures acting on a structure depends on the value of the internal friction angle, which confirms the earlier research. For a shallow backfill layer however, the reduction is only a local phenomenon and can influence only a part of the structure.

  16. Investigation of nanoscale magnetic materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rench, David William

    A host of fundamentally and technologically intriguing phenomena can be observed in ferromagnetic systems, ranging from Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) to spin structures that approximate the non-zero entropy state of water ice. In this dissertation, we consider systems of self-assembled MnAs nanoclusters in a doped GaAs matrix, a magnetically-doped topological insulator material, and magnetotransport devices constructed as artificial spin ices. We performed magnetic, structural, and electronic measurements in each of the projects herein to discover unique materials properties that range from new phase diagrams to electronic structure breaking and intriguing electrical characteristics that seem to defy the symmetry of the system that manifests them. We first explore the impact of co-doping a GaAs semiconductor matrix with magnetic and non-magnetic dopant ions (Mn and Be, respectively) and forcing phase separation to occur during the sample growth stage. The result of this phase-separated co-doped growth was the identification of two distinct materials classes: Type I materials, in which the phase separation produces ferromagnetic zinc blende (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters with a narrow distribution of small diameters within a weakly Be-doped GaAs matrix, and Type II materials, in which an abrupt mixing of large NiAs-type MnAs nanoclusters and the small (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters occurs. These two states are shown to also have accessible intermediate states in the case of a doped substrate and buffer layer. Magnetic measurements are performed to determine the dynamics of the unmixed Type I and the mixed Type II materials. Structural characteristization is done at the nanoscale in a variety of instruments to precisely determine the likely growth dynamics during sample synthesis and the resultant structures. The materials are found to be superparamagnetic with 10 K (Type I) and approximately 313 K (Type II) blocking temperatures with a strong dependence on Mn content during growth

  17. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOEpatents

    Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.M.

    1980-05-30

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50 to 70% by weight of quartz, 10 to 30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1 to 10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1 to 10% by weight of attapulgite.

  18. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOEpatents

    Beall, Gary W.; Allard, Bert M.

    1982-01-01

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50-70% by weight of quartz, 10-30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1-10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1-10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1-10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1-10% by weight of attapulgite.

  19. The solubility of nickel and its migration through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility for nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Holt, J D; Taylor, S E; Read, D

    2016-08-15

    This work describes the solubility of nickel under the alkaline conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious repository for intermediate level nuclear waste. The measured solubility of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solution is similar to values obtained in water equilibrated with a bespoke cementitious backfill material, on the order of 5×10(-7)M. Solubility in 0.02M NaOH is one order of magnitude lower. For all solutions, the solubility limiting phase is Ni(OH)2; powder X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy indicate that differences in crystallinity are the likely cause of the lower solubility observed in NaOH. The presence of cellulose degradation products causes an increase in the solubility of Ni by approximately one order of magnitude. The organic compounds significantly increase the rate of Ni transport under advective conditions and show measurable diffusive transport through intact monoliths of the cementitious backfill material.

  20. Spectroscopic Investigations of Amorphous Complex Dielectric Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muhammad

    1989-03-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A discussion of general properties of three systems of dielectric films i.e. MoO_3 and the mixed oxide systems MoO_3/In _2O_3 and MoO_3/SiO is presented. Composition, film thickness, substrate deposition temperature and annealing, all have a substantial effect on the structure and various properties of the films. General properties of these three systems of dielectric films include analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, U.V/VIS and infra-red spectroscopy including the Fourier transform technique, electrical properties both D.C and A.C at both low and high fields, and electron paramagnetic resonance. A comprehensive comparison of all the results is carried out in a correlated manner and some new ideas are presented on an established semiconducting/dielectric material. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  1. Multicomponent Nanomaterials with Complex Networked Architectures from Orthogonal Degradation and Binary Metal Backfilling in ABC Triblock Terpolymers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etching and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer–inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures. PMID:25836760

  2. Initial investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel model filler materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.; Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Various filler materials are being investigated for applicability to cryogenic wind tunnel models. The filler materials will be used to fill surface grooves, holes and flaws. The severe test environment of cryogenic models precludes usage of filler materials used on conventional wind tunnel models. Coefficients of thermal expansion, finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability of several candidate filler materials were examined. Promising filler materials are identified.

  3. Investigation of electrode materials for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcand, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    A number of amalgam electrode systems were investigated for possible use as high rate anodes and cathodes. The systems examined include: lithium, sodium, and potassium in Group 1, magnesium, calcium, and barium in Group 2, aluminum in Group 3, lead in Group 4, copper in Group 1b, and zinc and cadmium in Group 2b. The K(Hg) and Na(Hg) anodes in 10 VF and 15 VF (an unambiguous expression of concentration that indicates the number of formula weights of solute dissolved in a liter of solution) hydroxide solutions have proven satisfactory; some of these have produced current densities of more than 8 A/sq cm. None of the amalgam cathodes have approached this performance although the TI(Hg) has delivered 1 A/sq cm. Se(Hg) and Te(Hg) cathodes have given very stable discharges. Zn(Hg) and Cd(Hg) electrodes did not show good high rate characteristics, 200 to 300 mA/sq cm being about the maximum current densities obtainable. Both anodes are charged through a two-step process in which M(Hg) is first formed electrochemically and subsequently reduces Zn(II or Cd(II) to form the corresponding amalgam. The second step is extremely rapid for zinc and very slow for cadmium.

  4. Field Verification of Structural Performance of Thermoplastic Pipe Under Deep Backfill Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargand, S.

    2002-05-01

    This report provides information regarding the structural performance of thermoplastic pipes under relatively deep soil cover conditions. The eighteen (12 HDPE, 6 PVC) thermoplastic pipes, with diameter ranging from 30 to 60 in., were instrumented with sensors, embedded with granular backfill in shallow trenches, and subjected to 20-ft or 40-ft high soil fill for about 10 months. Their installation plans involved two types of backfill soil, three relative compactions, and varying bedding thickness to study the effects of these installation parameters on the pipe performance. Once the field performance of each test pipe was presented and discussed, comparative cross examinations of the entire field data were made to identify the effects of various installation parameters on the pipe deformations/deflections and soil pressure against pipe. A comprehensive set of soil testing was performed in the laboratory to characterize each of the three soil types that existed in the field. Results from the shear strength tests were analyzed further to obtain hyperbolic model parameter values for these soils. Three analytical methods (modified Iowa formula, elastic solutions, and finite element) were applied to evaluate their abilities to predict the field performance of the thermoplastic pipes under relatively deep soil cover. In their applications, material properties measured in the laboratory were utilized as much as possible.

  5. Initial Investigation of Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Model Filler Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Filler materials are used for surface flaws, instrumentation grooves, and fastener holes in wind tunnel models. More stringent surface quality requirements and the more demanding test environment encountered by cryogenic wind tunnels eliminate filler materials such as polyester resins, plaster, and waxes used on conventional wind tunnel models. To provide a material data base for cryogenic models, various filler materials are investigated. Surface quality requirements and test temperature extremes require matching of coefficients of thermal expansion or interfacing materials. Microstrain versus temperature curves are generated for several candidate filler materials for comparison with cryogenically acceptable materials. Matches have been achieved for aluminum alloys and austenitic steels. Simulated model surfaces are filled with candidate filler materials to determine finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability when subjected to cryogenic cycling. Filler material systems are identified which meet requirements for usage with aluminum model components.

  6. Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill samples from the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, R.B.; Reddy, K.J.; Vance, G.F.; Fadlelmawla, A.A.; Blaylock, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill aquifers were investigated. Backfill and ground-water samples were collected at coal mines in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Backfill was generally dominated by aluminum (14,400 to 49,000 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram)), iron (3,330 to 23,200 mg/kg), and potassium (7,950 to 18,000 mg/kg). Backfill saturated-paste selenium concentrations ranged from 1 to 156 mg/kg (microsiemens per kilogram). Ground-water total selenium concentrations ranged from 3 to 125 mg/L. Dissolved organic carbon in all ground-water samples was dominated by hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids (38 to 84 percent). Selenite sorption/desorption experiments were conducted using background solutions of distilled-deionized water, 0.1 molar calcium chloride, and isolated hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids. Selenite sorption was larger when 0.1 molar calcium chloride was used. The addition of hydrophilic acid decreased selenite sorption more than the addition of hydrophobic acids. Geochemical modelling was used to predict the solid phases controlling dissolved selenium concentrations and to evaluate the effects of dissolved organic carbon on selenium solubility. Results suggested that 55 to 90 percent of selenium in backfill precipitation/dissolution extracts was dominated by magnesium selenate ion pairs. Dissolved organic carbon had little effect on selenium speciation. A redox chamber was constructed to control Eh and pH in water and backfill-core sample suspensions. The response of selenite and selenate in water samples to redox conditions did not follow thermodynamic predictions. Reduction of selenate in water samples did not occur at any of the redox levels tested.

  7. Aluminum ion implantation under backfilling oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausner, R. M.; Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.

    1996-06-01

    High dose ion implantation ( F ≥ 2 × 10 18 ions/cm 2) of 40 keV Al ions into stainless steel (AISI 321) under increased partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen compounds ( P ≥ 1 × 10 -8 hPa O 2, CO 2, N 2O) leads to the formation of a homogenous Al film on the sample surface due to a reduced self-sputtering yield of Al. The depth distribution of the implanted aluminum and the thickness of the Al film grown up on the sample were measured using the resonant nuclear reaction 27Al(p, γ) 28Si at 992 keV and by the (α, α) elastic backscattering at 3.05 MeV. The concentrations of the low- Z impurity oxygen and carbon were determined with the extremely strong resonances of the (α, α) elastic scattering under backward angles at 7.6 MeV for 16O and at 5.75 MeV for 12C. Furthermore the properties of the formed Al film were investigated by SEM, surface profile and microhardness measurements. The self-sputtering yield of Al was measured under normal vacuum conditions and under increased O 2 partial pressure, and the results were compared with the data obtained from calculations using the computer code T-DYN.

  8. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  9. Investigation of the fire endurance of borated polyethylene shielding material

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, K.L.

    1988-06-17

    We conducted nine experiments to investigate the fire endurance of a borated polyethylene shielding material to be used in the Engineering Demonstration System. Several chemistry tests were also done. The shielding material was found to melt at 93.5/degree/C, decompose at 230/degree/C, and ignite at 350/degree/C. Five fire tests were done in a realistic configuration and four tests in a pessimistic configuration. The material easily passed all nine tests. In each case, the shielding material never reached ignition temperature and was found acceptable in this proposed application. 7 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.106 Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas. (a) Remining... opertions where the volume of all reasonably available spoil is demonstrated in writing to the...

  11. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.106 Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas. (a) Remining... operations where the volume of all reasonably available spoil is demonstrated in writing to the...

  12. Water migration through compacted bentonite backfills for containment of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H.; Hodges, F.N.; Kuhn, W.L.; Myers, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    Tests carried out with compacted sodium and calcium bentonites at room temperature indicate that bentonite backfills will effectively control water movement near a high-level nuclear waste package. Saturation tests indicate that water will rapidly diffuse into a dry bentonite backfill, reaching saturation in times on the order of tens of years. The apparent diffusion coefficient for sodium bentonite (about5 wt% initial water content) compacted to 2.1 g/cm/sup 3/ is 1.7 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//sec. However, the hydraulic conductivities of saturated bentonites are low, ranging from approximately 10/sup -11/ cm/sec to 10/sup -13/ cm/sec over a density range of 1.5 g/cm/sup 3/ to 2.2 g/cm/sup 3/. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonites are at least several orders of magnitude lower than those of candidate-host silicate rocks, indicating that most flowing groundwater contacting a bentonite backfill would be diverted around the backfill rather than flowing through it. In addition, because of the very low hydraulic conductivities of bentonite backfills, the rate of chemical transport between the containerized waste and the surrounding host rock will be effectively controlled by diffusion through the backfill. The formation of a diffusion barrier by the backfill will significantly reduce the long-term rate of radionuclide release from the waste package, an advantage distinct from the delay in release resulting from the sorptive properties of a bentonite backfill.

  13. Chemical modeling of backfill composed of quartz sand, lime and an Fe-phase

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, A.; Glassley, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The area adjacent to the waste package is an important component of the engineered barrier system in a high level radioactive waste repository. The combination of lime, quartz sand, and a phase containing reduced iron is investigated whether it can achieve reduction of oxygen in the waste emplacement drift (thereby reducin corrosion rates) and increase the pH. The simulations conducted to date have examined the following backfill options: Fe metal only, Fe metal and lime, and iron metal/lime/quartz sand in equal volume ratios. Each option was simulated under two environments: limited and unlimited air exchange with the atmosphere. Results suggest that the most important variable during the process of chemical conditioning is the amount of air exchange that occurs in the emplacement drift. The desired chemical conditioing (both oxidation potential and pH) will be far less effective in an emplacement that experiences an unlimited exchange of air with the atmosphere.

  14. Laboratory study on the use of tire shreds and rubber-sand in backfills and reinforced soil applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, A.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

    1996-12-20

    Millions of scrap tires are discarded annually in the United States, the bulk of which are currently landfilled or stockpiled. This consumes valuable landfill space, or, if improperly disposed, creates a fire hazard and provides a prolific breeding ground for rates and mosquitoes. The use of tire shreds as lightweight fill material can sharply reduce the tire disposal problem. The present study, based on laboratory testing and numerical modeling, examines the feasibility of incorporating tire shreds and rubber-sand mixtures as lightweight geomaterial in embankments and backfills.

  15. Investigation of Shielding Material in Radioactive Waste Management - 13009

    SciTech Connect

    OSMANLIOGLU, Ahmet Erdal

    2013-07-01

    In this study, various waste packages have been prepared by using different materials. Experimental work has been performed on radiation shielding for gamma and neutron radiation. Various materials were evaluated (e.g. concrete, boron, etc.) related to different application areas in radioactive waste management. Effects of addition boric compound mixtures on shielding properties of concrete have been investigated for neutron radiation. The effect of the mixture addition on the shielding properties of concrete was investigated. The results show that negative effects of boric compounds on the strength of concrete decreasing by increasing boric amounts. Shielding efficiency of prepared mixture added concrete up to 80% better than ordinary concretes for neutron radiation. The attenuation was determined theoretically by calculation and practically by using neutron dose rate measurements. In addition of dose rate measurements, strength tests were applied on test shielding materials. (authors)

  16. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369] PMID:27099236

  17. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369].

  18. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  19. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-14

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. The third major topic was Non Consumable Anode (Data Base, Candidate Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented. 162 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Systematic investigation of silylation materials for recovery use of low-k material plasma damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Tadahiro; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Shiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Nakamura, Tomoji

    2015-07-01

    We systematically investigated the recovery ability of some silylation materials for a plasma-damaged porous silica low-k material. In order to evaluate recovery ability, the permittivity and leakage current were measured. The recovery ability is listed in ascending order as ethoxy group, disilazane group, and dimethylamino group, and materials with SiH-(CH3)2 showed a better recovery ability than those with Si-(CH3)3. Recovery mechanisms were also analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal desorption spectrometer (TDS). Clear differences in the silylation abilities were observed in the silylation rate as well as the amount of silylation. We focused on trimethylsilyldimethylamine (TMSDMA) and tetramethyldisilazane (TMDS) as the recovery material of vapor phase and both materials showed good recovery characteristics. TMSDMA showed rapid recovery because of its higher vapor pressure. TMDS effectively reduced the amount of absorbed water.

  1. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  2. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  3. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  4. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  5. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  6. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which is compatible with the approved postmining land use and which provides adequate drainage and long-term...

  7. Laser vibrometry for investigation of tympanic membrane implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnert, Thomas; Kuster, Manfred; Vogel, Uwe; Hofmann, Gert; Huettenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    1996-12-01

    The human tympanic membrane has reasonably good sound sensing properties. A destroyed tympanic membrane due to middle ear diseases or traumata may be repaired by different types of grafts. Middle ear surgery mostly uses autologous temporal fascia, cartilage, or cartilage perichondrium transplants. We have investigated the acoustical and mechanical properties of these materials and compared them with human tympanic membrane by constructing an ear canal model completed by an artificial tympanic membrane. Circular stretched human fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage preparations were exposed to static pressures up to 4 kPa and white noise sound pressure levels of 70 dB. The vibrational amplitudes and displacements due to static pressure of the graft material were measured by laser Doppler vibrometry and compared. The thin materials temporal fascia and perichondrium show similar amplitude frequency responses compared to the tympanic membrane for dynamic excitation. The displacement of these materials at static pressures above 4 kPA yields a higher compliance than tympanic membrane. The acoustical and mechanical properties of cartilage transplants change with the thickness of the slices. However, the thinner the cartilage slice combined with lower stability, the more similar is the frequency response with the intact tympanic membrane. The vibration amplitudes decrease more and more for layer thicknesses above 500 micrometers. Cartilage acts as an excellent transplant material which provides a better prognosis than different materials in cases of ventilation disorders with long-term middle ear pressure changes. Large cartilage slice transplants should not exceed layer thicknesses of 500 micrometer in order to prevent drawbacks to the transfer characteristics of the tympanic membrane.

  8. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  9. Investigation of non-uniform materials under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchennikov, Vladimir; Korobeynikov, Igor; Morozova, Natalia; Shchennikov, Vsevolod, Jr.; Voronin, Vladimir; Berger, Ivan; Laboratory of electronic properties of matter at high pressures Team; Laboratory of neutron investigation of matter Team; Laboratory of micromechanics Team

    2013-06-01

    The approach is considered of the investigation of non-uniform (NU) materials at high pressure (P). Under P a material may become NU due to phase transition (PT). At topological insulators the properties may include the contributions both of the bulk states as well as of the surface ones as at NU material etc.. The approach is based on the model of multi-phase system with ordered phase inclusions of variably configuration (A) and concentration (C), and the experimental data are presented for: i) the substances near PT, ii) some ceramics, iii) the certain natural minerals. Si, ZnX, PbX, SmX (X - Te, Se, S), GaP, iron ores, and (WC)xCo1-x hard alloys etc. have been investigated under P up to 30 GPa. It was shown that the model allows to describe resistance (R) and thermoelectric power (S), etc. in the vicinity of PT. For hard alloys WC-Co the elastic modulus has been fitted using the model, and A has been estimated to be distinguished from the simple isotropic case. In the iron ores the A and the C of various components (Fe, FeyOx, MgO,Mg2SiO4, etc.) has been estimated due to the using of the new approach based on the different depth of penetration of X-ray and neutron radiation, and also on different dependences of S, R on C, A.

  10. Investigation on recent quartz-like materials for SAW applications.

    PubMed

    Da Cunha, M P; De Azevedo Fagundes, S

    1999-01-01

    Recent progress in growing and characterizing quartz-like materials of the trigonal system class 32 has been reported by several groups. The promising perspective for bulk acoustic wave frequency control applications indicates the potentiality of employing these materials for SAW applications as well. This paper reports results of investigations focused on SAW orientations of langasite (LGS), gallium phosphate (GaPO(4)), and langanite (LGN), both singly and doubly rotated cuts. Among the characteristics explored, major attention is paid to the temperature coefficient of delay (TCD), the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K(2)), and the power flow angle (PFA). Contour graphs are plotted based on our calculated results and show the regions in space in which low TCD and high K(2 ) can be obtained; they also exhibit the associated PFA and phase velocity characteristics. The influence of different sets of material constants is addressed. The spatial investigation performed shows that there are promising orientation regions in these materials at which zero or reduced TCD (<10 ppm/ degrees C) and PFA are obtained. Additional attractive characteristics for SAW applications have been observed: values of K(2) a few times higher than the K(2) of quartz ST-X, thus finding applications in larger bandwidth devices; variation of the TCD with respect to temperature, which is comparable to the variation found for quartz ST-X and less than that for zero TCD Li (2)B(4)O(7) cuts like 45 degrees X-Z and (0 degrees 78 degrees 90 degrees ); and phase velocity values circa 13 to 26% smaller than the phase velocity of quartz ST-X thus allowing a reduction in size for intermediate frequency device applications. PMID:18244357

  11. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  12. FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill ? Unconsolidated to Consolidated.

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-28

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two-phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in other realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Models for waste release scenarios in salt back-fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and validate. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potential usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mechanics, using sieved run-of-mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (~900 psi) and temperatures to 90°C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone “FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill – Unconsolidated to Consolidated”. Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time-dependent consolidation, or creep, to various degrees. Creep volume strain-time relations obey simple log-time behavior through the range of porosities (~50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as expected. Mercury porosimetry

  13. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  15. Molecular-dynamics investigation of the desensitization of detonable material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Betsy M.; Mattson, William; Trevino, Samuel F.

    1998-05-01

    A molecular-dynamics investigation of the effects of a diluent on the detonation of a model crystalline explosive is presented. The diluent, a heavy material that cannot exothermally react with any species of the system, is inserted into the crystalline explosive in two ways. The first series of simulations investigates the attenuation of the energy of a detonation wave in a pure explosive after it encounters a small layer of crystalline diluent that has been inserted into the lattice of the pure explosive. After the shock wave has traversed the diluent layer, it reenters the pure explosive. Unsupported detonation is not reestablished unless the energy of the detonation wave exceeds a threshold value. The second series of simulations investigates detonation of solid solutions of different concentrations of the explosive and diluent. For both types of simulations, the key to reestablishing or reaching unsupported detonation is the attainment of a critical number density behind the shock front. Once this critical density is reached, the explosive molecules make a transition to an atomic phase. This is the first step in the reaction mechanism that leads to the heat release that sustains the detonation. The reactive fragments formed from the atomization of the heteronuclear reactants subsequently combine with new partners, with homonuclear product formation exothermally favored. The results of detonation of the explosive-diluent crystals are consistent with those presented in an earlier study on detonation of pure explosive [B. M. Rice, W. Mattson, J. Grosh, and S. F. Trevino, Phys. Rev. E 53, 611 (1996)].

  16. Investigation of composite materials using SLM-based phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2013-07-01

    We present a robust method to inspect a typical composite material constructed of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). It is based on optical surface contouring using the spatial light modulator (SLM)-based phase retrieval technique. The method utilizes multiple intensity observations of the wave field, diffracted by the investigated object, captured at different planes along the optical axis to recover the phase information across the object plane. The SLM-based system allows for the recording of the required consecutive intensity measurements in various propagation states across a common recording plane. This overcomes the mechanical shifting of a camera sensor required within the capturing process. In contrast to existing phase retrieval approaches, the measuring time is considerably reduced, since the switching time of the SLM is less than 50 ms. This enables nondestructive testing under thermal load. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the approach can be used to assess structural properties of technical components made from CFRP.

  17. Isotopic, Chemical and Mineralogical Investigation's of Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    During the grant period we have concentrated on the following main topics: 1. Enstatite meteorites and original heterogeneity of Mn-53 distribution in the solar nebula. We have completed our studies of the enstatite chondrites. 2. Processes of planetary differentiation. We have completed our study of silicate clasts from the mesosiderite Vaca Muerta and found that the global Mn/Cr fractionation event that established mantle source reservoirs on the parent body of the Vaca Muerta silicate clasts occurred approx. 2 Ma after a similar event on the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) parent body. 3. Carbonaceous chondrites. Much effort has been devoted during the last three years to the investigation of this important class of meteorites. 4. Early solar system timescales. Based on the studies of the Mn-53 - Cr-53 isotope system in various meteorites and using results obtained with other isotope chronometers we constructed an absolute time-scale for events in the early solar system. 5.Unusual meteorites. We have studied the anomalous pallasite Eagle Station. 6. The chromium isotopic composition as a tracer for extraterrestrial material on Earth. Based on the observed difference in the Cr-53/Cr-52 ratios between Earth and the other solar system objects we developed a method for detecting cosmic materials on Earth using the Cr-53/Cr-52 ratio as a tracer.

  18. Investigating the Size Dependent Material Properties of Nanoceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Bushra B.

    Nanoceria is widely being investigated for applications as support materials for fuel cell catalysts, free radical scavengers, and as chemical and mechanical abrasives due to its high antioxidant capacity and its oxygen buffering capacity. This antioxidant or oxygen buffering capacity has been reported to be highly size dependent and related to its redox properties. However, the quantification of this antioxidant capacity has not been well defined or understood and has been often been carried out using colorimetric assays which do not directly correlate to ceria nanoparticle properties. Fabrication rules for developing materials with optimal antioxidant/oxygen buffering capacities are not yet defined and one of the limitations has been the challenge of obtaining quantitative measurements of the antioxidant properties. In this work, we create our own library of ceria nanoparticles of various size distributions by two synthesis methods: sol-gel peroxo and thermal decomposition/calcination and annealing in open atmosphere at three different temperatures. The synthesis methods and conditions produce characteristic sizes and morphologies of ceria nanoparticles. Qualitative and quantitative approaches are used for characterization and to predict reactivity. Qualitative approaches include Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements and Raman analysis while quantitative approaches include a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) Rietveld analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure crystallite sizes, lattice parameters, oxygen site occupancies, and the relative abundance of Ce(III) ions in a nanoceria sample. These methods are discussed in detail in addition to their limitations and challenges. These methods are used to predict nanocrystalline or bulk-like behavior of ceria nanoparticles. The investigation of the material properties is also extended to test the redox properties of ceria

  19. MIAMI: Microscope and ion accelerator for materials investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Hinks, J. A.; Berg, J. A. van den; Donnelly, S. E.

    2011-03-15

    A transmission electron microscope (TEM) with in situ ion irradiation has been built at the University of Salford, U.K. The system consists of a Colutron G-2 ion source connected to a JEOL JEM-2000FX TEM via an in-house designed and constructed ion beam transport system. The ion source can deliver ion energies from 0.5 to 10 keV for singly charged ions and can be floated up to 100 kV to allow acceleration to higher energies. Ion species from H to Xe can be produced for the full range of energies allowing the investigation of implantation with light ions such as helium as well as the effects of displacing irradiation with heavy inert or self-ions. The ability to implant light ions at energies low enough such that they come to rest within the thickness of a TEM sample and to also irradiate with heavier species at energies sufficient to cause large numbers of atomic displacements makes this facility ideally suited to the study of materials for use in nuclear environments. TEM allows the internal microstructure of a sample to be imaged at the nanoscale. By irradiating in situ it is possible to observe the dynamic evolution of radiation damage which can occur during irradiation as a result of competing processes within the system being studied. Furthermore, experimental variables such as temperature can be controlled and maintained throughout both irradiation and observation. This combination of capabilities enables an understanding of the underlying atomistic processes to be gained and thus gives invaluable insights into the fundamental physics governing the response of materials to irradiation. Details of the design and specifications of the MIAMI facility are given along with examples of initial experimental results in silicon and silicon carbide.

  20. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  1. Physical and Chemical Investigations of Selected Buckminsterfullerene-Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, John West

    Studies of materials based on the molecule C _{60} have been performed in three complementary areas; namely, the reaction and passivation of aluminum with C_{60}, nanometer-scale materials engineering utilizing C _{60}, and the critical magnetic fields of superconducting rm K_3C _{60}. The majority of the C _{60} powder used in the investigations was produced in-house. Steps of the process for generating C_{60} from graphitic carbon are given. Fullerene-containing soot was generated in a modified plasma-arc reactor. Fullerenes were separated from soot using Soxhlet extraction. Lastly, C _{60} was separated from the other fullerenes using liquid chromatography. Experiments on the reaction of C_ {60} with aluminum were done on aluminum foils in ultra-high vacuum using Auger spectroscopy, temperature -programmed desorption, photoluminescence, and soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Strong bonding between C _{60} and aluminum is reported. Results show that when multilayer C_{60} is evaporated onto clean aluminum, all molecules except the monolayer in contact with the aluminum desorb when the sample is heated to 578 K. Photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that electrons transfer from C _{60} to the aluminum at the interface. Additionally, the data may reveal that C_{60} molecules diffuse intact into the aluminum bulk when heating to the aluminum surface melting temperature occurs. The ease of preparing monolayer C_ {60} coverage on a surface by multilayer C_{60} evaporation followed by sublimation of all molecules but those in direct surface contact was examined for the preparation of multilayer and binding structures. The viability of the technique was not definitive. However, Fe/C_{60 }/Fe trilayers may show antiferromagnetic coupling and hence giant magnetoresistance at room temperature. Further, the use of C_{60} to bond metals to semiconductors is related. To resolve superconducting properties, an examination of rm K_3C_{60} was initiated. Most of

  2. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  3. Strata behavior at fully-mechanized coal mining and solid backfilling face.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Chen, Zhiwei; Quan, Kai; Mei, Xiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Taking Ping Dingshan Coal Mine Group 12 as an example, this paper explains the system layout, key equipment and backfilling technology in detail. It probes into the characteristic of rock strata movement behavior and surface deformation above the gob area through in-site measurement method. The results show that as the overburden strata are effectively supported by the backfill body in mined out areas, there were no evident phenomena as first weighting or periodic weighting during mining process. Besides, influencing scope of advanced support pressure and the strata behavior degree were much smaller than that of the traditional methods of caving mining. Since overburden strata had been well supported by backfill body, it shows the posture of sinking slowly, only resulting in bending zone and minor fracture zone. PMID:27652184

  4. The advantages of a salt/bentonite backfill for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.; Novak, C.F. ); Jercinovic, M. )

    1991-04-01

    A 70/30 wt% salt/bentonite mixture is shown to be preferable to pure crushed salt as backfill for disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report discusses several selection criteria used to arrive at this conclusion: the need for low permeability and porosity after closure, chemical stability with the surroundings, adequate strength to avoid shear erosion from human intrusion, ease of emplacement, and sorption potential for brine and radionuclides. Both salt and salt/bentonite are expected to consolidate to a final state of impermeability (i.e., {le} 10{sup {minus}18}m{sup 2}) adequate for satisfying federal nuclear regulations. Any advantage of the salt/bentonite mixture is dependent upon bentonite's potential for sorbing brine and radionuclides. Estimates suggest that bentonite's sorption potential for water in brine is much less than for pure water. While no credit is presently taken for brine sorption in salt/bentonite backfill, the possibility that some amount of inflowing brine would be chemically bound is considered likely. Bentonite may also sorb much of the plutonium, americium, and neptunium within the disposal room inventory. Sorption would be effective only if a major portion of the backfill is in contact with radioactive brine. Brine flow from the waste out through highly localized channels in the backfill would negate sorption effectiveness. Although the sorption potentials of bentonite for both brine and radionuclides are not ideal, they are distinctly beneficial. Furthermore, no detrimental aspects of adding bentonite to the salt as a backfill have been identified. These two observations are the major reasons for selecting salt/bentonite as a backfill within the WIPP. 39 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Investigation of Insulator and Semiconductor Optical Materials for Photonic Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jeffrey Edward

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation will focus on the characterization of two photonic materials; (1) the potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) family of crystals used for optical harmonic generation and (2) the two general forms of nanoscale silicon --"porous silicon" and isolated silicon nanocrystals that shows fascinating luminescent properties. Four main topics concerning the porous/nanocrystalline silicon research will be presented. First, a distinct difference in the optical properties is found between porous silicon (on silicon wafers) and isolated silicon nanocrystals taken directly from porous silicon wafers. Second, the luminescence of the smallest nanocrystals is found to extend much further into the blue (400-450 nm) end of the spectrum than the common porous silicon luminescence. Third, the photoluminescence decay dynamics of the nanocrystalline system are found not only to be significantly different from the porous silicon system but also aid in elucidating the luminescence mechanism in both systems. Forth, the luminescence of the nanocrystals as a function of the input intensity point to a unique saturation effect and a coupling between the red and blue luminescence. The investigations of KDP and its isomorphs found and characterized a new class of transient electronic defects generated with ultraviolet photons. At room temperatures, the defect forms within 1.6 +/- 0.4 ps after UV two-photon excitation, decays nonexponentially in ~10-20 s, and absorbs from the UV to the near IR. The absorption spectra consist of two broad absorbing transitions centered at ~ 545 nm and ~410 nm. The 545 nm transition is unpolarized while the 410 nm transition is slightly polarized. The defect is identified as a HPO _sp{4}{-} radical and discussion of the formation and decay mechanisms based on intrabond and interbond protonic transport within the hydrogen bond network is presented. These results plus critical examination of defects studies of x-irradiated KDP, KD^*P, and ADP at low

  6. Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2004-09-01

    Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a

  7. An Investigation on Teaching Materials Used in Social Studies Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Halil Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the teaching materials employed during social studies lessons on the basis of certain variables. Specifically, the researcher tried to find out whether teachers' gender, service length, having a personal computer, receiving an in-service training regarding the use of teaching materials, having an interest on…

  8. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  9. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers...

  10. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers...

  11. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers...

  12. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Laboratory investigations and... THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.340 Laboratory investigations and... procedures applicable to the performance of investigations and tests at Corps of Engineers...

  13. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  14. UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

    2002-06-01

    This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to

  15. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  16. Colloids in the mortar backfill of a cementitious repository for radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Wieland, E; Spieler, P

    2001-01-01

    Colloids are present in groundwater aquifers and water-permeable engineered barrier systems and may facilitate the migration of radionuclides. A highly permeable mortar is foreseen to be used as backfill for the engineered barrier of the Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation and, due to its high porosity, for colloid mobility. Colloid concentration measurements were carried out using an in-situ liquid particle counting system. The in-house developed counting system with three commercially available sensors allowed the detection of single particles and colloids at low concentrations in the size range 50-5000 nm. The counting system was tested using suspensions prepared from certified size standards. The concentrations of colloids with size range 50-1000 nm were measured in cement pore water, which was collected from a column filled with a highly permeable backfill mortar. The chemical composition of the pore water corresponded to a Ca(OH)2-controlled cement system. Colloid concentrations in the backfill pore water were found to be typically lower than approximately 0.1 ppm. The specific (geometric) surface areas of the colloid populations were in the range 240 m2 g(-1) to 770 m2 g(-1). The low colloid inventories observed in this study can be explained by the high ionic strength and Ca concentrations of the cement pore water. These conditions are favourable for colloid-colloid and colloid-backfill interactions and unfavourable for colloid-enhanced nuclide transport.

  17. Physics of Granular Materials: Investigations in Support of Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.

    2002-01-01

    This publication list is submitted as a summary of the work conducted under Cooperative Agreement 1120. The goal of the 1120 research was to study granular materials within a planetary, astrophysical, and astrobiological context. This involved research on the physical, mechanical and electrostatic properties of granular systems, as well as the examination of these materials with atomic force microscopy and x-ray analysis. Instruments for analyzing said materials in planetary environments were developed, including the MECA (Mars Environment Compatibility Assessment) experiment for the MSP '01 lander, the ECHOS/MATADOR experiment for the MSP '03 lander, an ISRU experiment for the '03 lander, and MiniLEAP technology. Flight experiments for microgravity (Space Station and Shuttle) have also been developed for the study of granular materials. As expressed in the publications, work on 1120 encompassed laboratory research, theoretical modeling, field experiments, and flight experiments: a series of successful new models were developed for understanding the behavior of triboelectrostatically charged granular masses, and 4 separate instruments were selected for space flight. No inventions or patents were generated by the research under this Agreement.

  18. Investigation of the reactivity of organic materials in liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D.; Irwin, K.; Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.; Stringham, R.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of impact-ignition sensitivity and studies of the relative reactivity of t-butoxy and t-butyl peroxy radicals toward a variety of organic compounds reveal improved methods of selection of materials for safe use in a liquid oxygen environment.

  19. Looking at, Engaging More: Approaches for Investigating Material Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Bolin, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Objects of material culture are not always those items most commonly explored in the art classroom, and are, instead, the frequently overlooked things in people's everyday world. They are the items people collect in their homes, carry with them in backpacks, purses, and pockets, and stow on shelves in the back of closets--often the things they…

  20. Financial Institutions Investigated. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Elaine

    This document provides teaching guidelines and student material for a unit intended for use in high school business, consumer, or home economics programs. Time allotment is from four to six hours of classroom time. The objective of this capsule is to help students understand the basic functions of and services provided by three types of financial…

  1. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    PubMed

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  2. Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals in energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Darcie; Jilek, Brook Anton; Kohl, Ian Thomas; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of a two year early career LDRD project, which has focused on the development of ultrafast diagnostics to measure temperature, pressure and chemical change during the shock initiation of energetic materials. We compare two single-shot versions of femtosecond rotational CARS to measure nitrogen temperature: chirped-probe-pulse and ps/fs hybrid CARS thermometry. The applicability of measurements to the combustion of energetic materials will be discussed. We have also demonstrated laser shock and particle velocity measurements in thin film explosives using stretched femtosecond laser pulses. We will discuss preliminary results from Al and PETN thin films. Agreement between our results and previous work will be discussed.

  3. New polymeric materials for photonic applications: Preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Anca; Albu, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose two types of polymeric materials synthesized by us suitable to interact by assembling with DNA in order to obtain new NLO biomaterials. The first polymer is a methacrylic chromophore with azobenzene groups and carbazolyl sequences known for their carrying principles while the second one is a copolymer of the methacrylic chromophore with a N-substituted amide. The N-substituted amide is N-acryloyl morpholine already used in biological application and also because is compatible with DNA. Spectral characterization of these materials showed charge transfer interactions depending on the solvent. The results obtained indicate that these new polymeric/copolymeric chromophores could interact with DNA in order to obtain biomaterials for photonic applications.

  4. Investigation of composite materials property requirements for sonic fatigue research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, H. V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental techniques for determining the extensional and bending stiffness characteristics for symmetric laminates are presented. Vibrational test techniques for determining the dynamic modulus and material damping are also discussed. Partial extensional stiffness results intially indicate that the laminate theory used for predicting stiffness is accurate. It is clearly shown that the laminate theory can only be as accurate as the physical characteristics describing the lamina, which may vary significantly. It is recommended that all of the stiffness characteristics in both extension and bending be experimentally determined to fully verify the laminate theory. Dynamic modulus should be experimentally evaluated to determine if static data adequately predicts dynamic behavior. Material damping should also be ascertained because laminate damping is an order of magnitude greater than found in common metals and can significantly effect the displacement response of composite panels.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less

  6. Investigation of the mechanical properties of ceramic breeder materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienst, W.; Zimmermann, H.

    1988-07-01

    In order to characterize ceramic breeder materials for fusion reactors, mechanical properties were measured on Li 2SiO 3, Li 4SiO 4, and also on some LiAlO 2 samples for comparison. Literature data on thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of all breeder materials considered were compiled to compare their presumable sensitivity to thermal stresses. The highest level of thermal shock resistance is predicted for LiAlO 2, and the lowest level for Li 4SiO 4. Thermal shock tests, made by dipping pellets into a hot metal melt, confined the relation for LiAlO 2 and Li 4SiO 4. Young's modulus was determined by ultrasound velocity measurement, and fracture strength was measured on pellet samples under compression. The scatter in compressive strength is exceptionally large, partly due to various grain size, and does not suggest a definite ranking of the different breeder materials. Compressive creep tests were made at temperatures of 750-950°C for about 100 h each. An extrapolated creep rate of 10 -6/h was used to estimate a conservative temperature limit of total microstructure stability.

  7. Roofing Materials Assessment: Investigation of Five Metals in Runoff from Roofing Materials.

    PubMed

    Winters, Nancy; Granuke, Kyle; McCall, Melissa

    2015-09-01

    To assess the contribution of five toxic metals from new roofing materials to stormwater, runoff was collected from 14 types of roofing materials and controls during 20 rain events and analyzed for metals. Many of the new roofing materials evaluated did not show elevated metals concentrations in the runoff. Runoff from several other roofing materials was significantly higher than the controls for arsenic, copper, and zinc. Notably, treated wood shakes released arsenic and copper, copper roofing released copper, PVC roofing released arsenic, and Zincalume® and EPDM roofing released zinc. For the runoff from some of the roofing materials, metals concentrations decreased significantly over an approximately one-year period of aging. Metals concentrations in runoff were demonstrated to depend on a number of factors, such as roofing materials, age of the materials, and climatic conditions. Thus, application of runoff concentrations from roofing materials to estimate basin-wide releases should be undertaken cautiously. PMID:26961477

  8. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of the compensatoin effect in ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vanina, E.A.; Kostyukov, N.S.

    1995-09-01

    The objective in this paper was to investigate by means of infrared spectroscopy samples of M-23 electrical porcelain ceramic after irradiation in a BOR-60 reactor with a neutron fluence of 6.5 x 10(exp 21)/square centimeter and isothermal annealing at 700 C and 1000 C for 10 hours. The work was performed on an IKS-29 spectrophotometer using samples in the form of a suspension in vasoline oil and pressed tablets with Potassium Bromide. The investigations were performed after the irradiated samples were allowed to stand for 7 years. It was found that partial amorphization of the quartz occurred.

  9. A Step Forward: Investigating Expertise in Materials Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Keith; Kim, Mija; Ya-Fang, Liu; Nava, Andrea; Perkins, Dawn; Smith, Anne Margaret; Soler-Canela, Oscar; Lu, Wang

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the textbook evaluation techniques of novice and experienced teachers, which was conducted by the Language Teaching Expertise Research Group (or LATEX) within Lancaster University's Department of Linguistics and English Language. Three ELT teachers were chosen to evaluate the student and teacher…

  10. Investigations into distribution of lidocaine in human autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Reinhard; Arenz, Norman; Zeitz, Sten Gunnar; Pietsch, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    With screening methods in the legal medicine drugs were often detected in autopsy material. In this study the antiarrhythmic and the local anesthetic drug lidocaine could be proved in fifty-one cases and determined in different autopsy materials. For the first time the comparison of so many distribution patterns of lidocaine in human compartments was possible. A liquid-liquid extraction procedure, a standard addition method and LC/MS/MS were used for analytics. The measured concentrations in blood were in the therapeutic range or lower. The time between lidocaine application and death was given in twenty-nine cases. These data were very helpful to estimate and interpret the distribution process of lidocaine between application and death. This time exerted a crucial influence on the distribution of lidocaine in the compartments. Most of the intravenous applicated lidocaine was found in heart blood after a very short time of distribution. Afterwards the highest concentrations were measured in brain. Later the highest concentration was found in the kidney samples or in urine. If the time between lidocaine application and death is known, the results of this study can be used to deepen the knowledge of its pharmacokinetics. If this time is unknown, the circumstances and the causes of death can be better explained.

  11. [Investigation of fibrous cultural materials by infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi-yun; Du, Yi-ping; Shen, Mei-hua; Zhang, Wen-qing; Zhou, Xin-guang; Fang, Shu-ying; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Cultural fibrous material includes both important categories, i. e. textile and paper, consisting of precious cultural materials in museum, such as costume, painting, and manuscript. In recent years more and more connoisseur and conservator's concerns are, through nondestructive method, the authenticity and the ageing identification of these cultural relics especially made from fragile materials. In this research, we used attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy to identify five traditional textile fibers, alongside cotton, linen, wool, mulberry silk and tussah silk, and another five paper fibers alongside straw, wheat straw, long qisong, Chinese alpine rush and mulberry bar, which are commonly used for making Chinese traditional xuan paper. The research result showed that the animal fiber (wool, mulberry silk and tussah silk) and plant fiber (cotton and linen) were easier to be distinguished by comparing the peaks at 3 280 cm-1 belonging to NH stretching vibration and a serious peaks related to amide I to amide III. In the spectrum of wool, the peak at 1 076 cm-1 was assigned to the S-O stretching vibration absorption of cystine in wool structure and can be used to tell wool from silk. The spectrum of mulberry silk and tussah silk seems somewhat difficult to be identified, as well as the spectrum of cotton and linen. Five rural paper fibers all have obvious characteristic peaks at 3 330, 2 900 cm-1 which are related to OH and CH stretching vibration. In the fingerprint wavenumber range of 1 600 - 800 cm, the similar peaks also appeared at 1 370, 1 320 cm-1 and 1 162, 1 050 cm-1, both group peaks respectively are related to CH and CO vibration in the structure of cellulose and hemicellulose in paper fibers. Although there is more similarity of the infrared spectroscopy of these 5 paper fibers, some tiny difference in absorbance also can be found at 3 300 cm-1 and in the fingerprint range at 1 332, 1 203, and 1 050 cm-1 which are related to C-O-C vibration

  12. Investigation and development of new materials for electrochemical energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovskaya, Anna

    Performance of next generation electrochemical energy conversion devices relies on optimization of both ion selective membranes that retain conductivity at elevated temperatures, and electrode materials active and stable in corrosive environment. The work presented focuses on (1) improving energy conversion in fuel cells by designing novel ion conductive membrane materials optimized by an original optical high-throughput screening technique and (2) development of new stable mixed transition metal sulfide electrocatalysts for industrial bromine recovery. A functionalized fullerene derivative was used to fabricate mechanically strong, flexible organic-inorganic membranes via cooperative sol-gel synthesis. Amorphous materials with nanometer range wormlike structures were obtained. The dependence of conductivity on the concentration of triflic acid was quantitatively described by percolation theory. Fullerene derivatives with arbitrarily attached chains increased disorder of the structure, but before the wormlike network collapsed conductivity 40 times higher than that of the sample with no fullerenes was recorded. This enhancement was attributed to the additional inter-channel connections for proton transport facilitated by the fullerene derivatives. Optimization of the structure by an optical high-throughput screening made possible proton conductivity of 3.2x10-3 S/cm at 130°C and 5% humidity conditions. A series of doped Ru, Fe, Mo, W sulfide catalysts was synthesized, and their hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction activity in HBr were studied as a function of dopant. RuS2 compounds showed the highest rates of hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions in HBr. Among all dopants, Co was the most active for hydrogen evolution reaction with overpotentials 100 mV lower than that of Pt at current density of 80 mA/cm2 in 0.5 M HBr. Oxygen reduction activity of RuS2 catalysts was found to change consistently as a function of periodic position of a dopant. Cr, Mn

  13. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high-temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  14. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power System (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  15. Microbeam Investigations of Presolar and Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.

    2005-01-01

    This grant provided three years of funding for my Cosmochemistry research program at Arizona State University. This research resulted in 11 peer-reviewed papers in six Journals and 35 abstracts to 11 Conferences and Workshops (see list below). My original proposal listed three main areas of research: 1) Studies of presolar grains; 2) Studies of short-lived radionuclides and; 3) Investigations of nebular processes and the origin of chondritic components.

  16. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  17. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Anlage, Steven

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  18. Investigation of optical nonlinearities, conductivity and magnetism in organometallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sita, Lawrence R.

    1990-01-01

    Substantial progress was made in several key areas of the proposed research. With regard to the production of new materials via the organometallic doping of polydiacetylenes with diorganostannylenes, the steric and electronic factors which govern the reactivity of stannylenes towards alkynes are elucidated. New classes of cyclic organostannane compounds were produced which include the first examples of stanna cyclopropenes and 1,2-distanna cyclobut-3-enes. Derivatives of the latter ring system were found to be both air and moisture stable which allows them to be used as important synthetic precursors to new cyclic systems containing tin. Oxidation of a 1,2-distanna cyclobutene with iodine was achieved to produce an air and moisture stable tin-centered cationic species. Future work is being performed to produce monomers for ring-open polymerization via olefin metathesis which contain the 1,2-distannacyclobutene moiety. Upon oxidative doping, new ionic polymers maybe formed. Finally ab initio molecular orbital calculations were performed on the metallacyclopropenes of silicon, germanium, and tin and this information supports the model of reactivity and stability that was formulated for alkynes and stannylenes.

  19. Preliminary investigations into UHCRE thermal control materials (A0178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levadou, Francois; Froggatt, Mike; Rott, Martin; Schneider, Eberhard

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the initial work that was done in the ESTEC Materials and Processes Division to evaluate the effect of space environment on the thermal blankets of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Nuclei Experiments (UHCRE) is presented. The topics covered include: (1) a preliminary survey of the perforations of the two-thirds of the thermal blanket returned to ESTEC; (2) thermo-optical properties and thickness recessions of three samples cut from each of the third center parts of the 16 thermal blankets were measured and effects of environments (sun illumination and atomic oxygen fluences); (3) contamination was analyzed on trays, external blanket and internal aluminized Kapton foil by IR technique and scanning electron microscopy SEM/EDX examination; (4) the pattern of contamination on the Al Kapton foils was observed, sketched, and related to atomic oxygen flow; and (5) the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) yaw angle misorientation was evaluated from the contaminated areas visible on some of the trays. In addition, impacts of micrometeoroids and space debris were experimentally simulated on spare flight thermal blankets. Relations between penetration/perforation hole characteristics and projectile parameters were established.

  20. Investigation on low velocity impact resistance of SMA composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dianyin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Rongqiao; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2016-04-01

    A method to improve low velocity impact resistance of aeroengine composite casing using shape memory alloy's properties of shape memory(SM) and super-elasticity(SE) is proposed in this study. Firstly, a numerical modeling of SMA reinforced composite laminate under low velocity impact load with impact velocity of 10 m/s is established based on its constitutive model implemented by the VUMAT subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS. Secondly, the responses of SMA composite laminate including stress and deflection distributions were achieved through transient analysis under low velocity impact load. Numerical results show that both peak stress and deflection values of SMA composite laminate are less than that without SMA, which proves that embedding SMA into the composite structure can effectively improve the low velocity impact performance of composite structure. Finally, the influence of SM and SE on low velocity impact resistance is quantitatively investigated. The values of peak stress and deflection of SMA composite based on SM property decrease by 18.28% and 9.43% respectively, compared with those without SMA, instead of 12.87% and 5.19% based on SE. In conclusion, this proposed model described the impact damage of SMA composite structure and turned to be a more beneficial method to enhance the impact resistance by utilizing SM effect.

  1. Magnetic responses to traffic related contamination recorded by backfills: A case study from Tongling City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, M. M.; Hu, S. Y.; Lin, H.; Cao, L. W.; Wang, L. S.

    2014-08-01

    With the development of urbanization and industrialization, traffic is creating a serious contamination problem. Conventional methods for contamination testing are generally expensive and time-consuming, while magnetic methods have been suggested to be an economic and non-destructive alternative. In this study, we measured magnetic properties and heavy metal contents in backfills along an urban road side in China, in situ on surface and on samples in vertical sections. Magnetic results and SEM images show the dominance of coarse magnetite, supposed to origin from human activities. Furthermore, there is an obvious decreasing trend of magnetic susceptibility (χ) and several heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb) with increasing distance from the road edge, symmetrically at both road sides, indicating that this is a typical traffic-related contamination signal. The detailed distribution patterns of χ and heavy metals exhibit slight variations in the surface data, probably due to the local topography and surface runoff due to rainfall. In vertical soil cores magnetic parameters show significant positive relationships (r = 0.88-0.99) with concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Fe). Our results suggest that backfills unaffected by the traffic contamination signal and characterized by low χ value can be chosen for contamination monitoring. Despite the complex nature of backfills and the possibility of contamination prior to their transportation to the site, they are especially important for areas where undisturbed soil is not available.

  2. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1998-11-03

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

  3. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  4. Development of a quantitative accelerated sulphate attack test for mine backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnorhokian, Shahe

    Mining operations produce large amounts of tailings that are either disposed of in surface impoundments or used in the production of backfill to be placed underground. Their mineralogy is determined by the local geology, and it is not uncommon to come across tailings with a relatively high sulphide mineral content, including pyrite and pyrrhotite. Sulphides oxidize in the presence of oxygen and water to produce sulphate and acidity. In the concrete industry, sulphate is known to produce detrimental effects by reacting with the cement paste to produce the minerals ettringite and gypsum. Because mine backfill uses tailings and binders---including cement---it is therefore prone to sulphate attack where the required conditions are met. Currently, laboratory tests on mine backfill mostly measure mechanical properties such as strength parameters, and the study of the chemical aspects is restricted to the impact of tailings on the environment. The potential of sulphate attack in mine backfill has not been studied at length, and no tests are conducted on binders used in backfill for their resistance to attack. Current ASTM guidelines for sulphate attack tests have been deemed inadequate by several authors due to their measurement of only expansion as an indicator of attack. Furthermore, the tests take too long to perform or are restricted to cement mortars only, and not to mixed binders that include pozzolans. Based on these, an accelerated test for sulphate attack was developed in this work through modifying and compiling procedures that had been suggested by different authors. Small cubes of two different binders were fully immersed in daily-monitored sodium sulphate and sulphuric acid solutions for a total of 28 days, after 7 days of accelerated curing at 50°C. In addition, four binders were partially immersed in the same solutions for 8 days for an accelerated attack process. The two procedures were conducted in tandem with leach tests using a mixed solution of

  5. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Published reports and material... CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD PRODUCTION OF RECORDS IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 1612.3 Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands...

  6. The numerical investigation of the material behavior of high strength sheet materials in incremental forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Ossama Mamdouh; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter; Weiss, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Springback is an inevitable phenomenon in sheet metal forming and has been found to reduce with an increasing number of forming steps. In this study the effect of incremental forming on springback is analyzed for DP780 steel. The cyclic hardening characteristics of the DP780 steel are determined by fitting the experimental moment curvature data of a cyclic pure bending test using Abaqus Standard. The change in elastic modulus with pre-strain is also considered in the material model. Using the developed material model a V- die forming process is numerically analyzed for single and multiple-step forming, and the effect on springback determined. The numerical results show that there is a reduction in springback with an increasing number of forming steps, and that this may be due to the plastic strain accumulated in the blank during the sequential loading steps in the bending region. A very good agreement has been achieved between the simulation and the experimental results. The present study seems to offer an effective approach to increase the accuracy of the springback prediction and provide a greater insight into the nature of the springback in the incremental forming process.

  7. Investigation of the electrical properties of some dental composite restorative materials before and after laser exposure.

    PubMed

    ElKestawy, M A; Saafan, S A; Shehata, M M; Saafan, A M

    2006-10-01

    Some electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity, ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent of nine commercial types of dental composite restorative materials, have been investigated before and after laser exposure for 3s to study the effect of a probable laser exposure during some surgeries on the electrical properties of these materials. No piezoelectric effect has been found in these materials before and after laser exposure. The materials were found to be good insulators (very poorly conducting materials). The temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent have not shown significant changes in values after laser exposure.

  8. [Application of tiered approach to assess the impact of backfilling remediated soil on groundwater].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mao-Sheng; Jiang, Lin; Yao, Jue-Jun; Fan, Yan-Ling; Xia, Tian-Xiang; Li, Ting-Ting; Tian, Mei-Ying

    2013-03-01

    The tiered approach for assessing the impact of backfilling treated contaminated soil on groundwater was presented in details with a case study. The soil was contaminated by 1,2-dicholorenthane and 9 other organic pollutants and had been remediated before backfilling to meet the pre-set remediation goals based on health risk assessment. The results from tiered I assessment indicate that the concentrations of 8 contaminants in the leachate of the backfilling soil layer would exceed the assessment standards probably leading to groundwater contamination. However, the results from tiered II assessment, in which the adsorption and retardation of vadose zone soil was taken into account and the concentrations of pollutants reaching the groundwater table were predicated, reveal that only the concentrations of 6 contaminants would exceed the assessment standards. Further, taking the dilution and mixing of the groundwater into consideration, tiered III assessment was adopted and the results reveal that only 4 contaminants were beyond the standards. Finally, tiered IV assessment, aiming at predicting the concentration at the target well downstream, was carried out by considering the retardation of contaminants in saturated layer, and the results indicate only 1 pollutant was above the assessment standard. Therefore, it can be seen that the predicted concentrations of the target pollutants at advanced assessment levels will be closer to those at the target drinking water well and the amount of contaminants whose initially-set remediation goals need to be modified will decrease correspondingly, indicating the reduction in pollution prevention cost, although more efforts should be made and more field data should be collected to implement the advance assessment level.

  9. Venus Atmospheric Maneuverable Platform (VAMP) — Stowage/Deployment Concepts and Materials Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolisay, L. B.; Barnes, N. C.; Sokol, D. H.; Lee, G. J.; Polidan, R. S.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses the continued development of the Northrop Grumman/L'GARDE team's long-lived, maneuverable platform to explore the Venus upper atmosphere. It focuses on vehicle stowage and deployment concepts, and materials investigation.

  10. Total scattering investigation of materials for clean energy applications: the importance of the local structure.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-04-21

    In this Perspective article we give an account of the application of total scattering methods and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to the investigation of materials for clean energy applications such as materials for solid oxide fuel cells and lithium batteries, in order to show the power of this technique in providing new insights into the structure-property correlation in this class of materials. PMID:21403941

  11. Total scattering investigation of materials for clean energy applications: the importance of the local structure.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-04-21

    In this Perspective article we give an account of the application of total scattering methods and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to the investigation of materials for clean energy applications such as materials for solid oxide fuel cells and lithium batteries, in order to show the power of this technique in providing new insights into the structure-property correlation in this class of materials.

  12. An Investigation of Teacher Expectancies of Instructional Materials. Research Report #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogatz, Boris E.

    This study investigated the possibility that a teacher's preconceived idea of the worth of an instructional material would affect the academic achievement of the students with whom the material was used. Twenty-four classes of educable retarded children were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Groups I and II were experimenta; group III was…

  13. Vocabulary Recycling in Children's Authentic Reading Materials: A Corpus-Based Investigation of Narrow Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Dee

    2008-01-01

    Fourteen collections of children's reading materials were used to investigate the claim that collections of authentic texts with a common theme, or written by one author, afford readers with more repeated exposures to new words than unrelated materials. The collections, distinguished by relative thematic tightness, authorship (1 vs. 4 authors),…

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  15. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D.; Tuck, Chris J.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-02-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting.

  16. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting.

    PubMed

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D; Tuck, Chris J; Christie, Steven D R; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting. PMID:26868530

  17. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting

    PubMed Central

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D.; Tuck, Chris J.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting. PMID:26868530

  18. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting.

    PubMed

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D; Tuck, Chris J; Christie, Steven D R; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-02-12

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting.

  19. Investigation on the Equivalent Material Property of Carbon Reinforced Aluminum Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seung-Ho; Ku, Tae-Wan; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Song, Woo-Jin

    Fiber metal laminates as one of new hybrid materials with the bonded structure of thin metal sheets and fiber/epoxy layers have been developed for the last three decades. These kinds of materials can provide the characteristics of the excellent fatigue, impact and damage tolerance with a relatively low density. Because metal sheets and fiber/epoxy layers are bonded each other, the bonding between two materials is critical. In this study, the bonding strength is investigated experimentally with respect to surface roughness of metal sheets. The equivalent material properties of carbon reinforced aluminum laminates as the input data in the numerical simulation are also investigated and compared with the experimental result. The application of the equivalent material property to the numerical simulation can provide the high degree of efficiency in the build-up of the finite element model and the numerical simulation.

  20. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  1. Assessment of arsenic immobilization in synthetically prepared cemented paste backfill specimens.

    PubMed

    Coussy, Samuel; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Blanc, Denise; Moszkowicz, Pierre; Bussière, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Mine tailings coming from the exploitation of sulphide and/or gold deposits can contain significant amounts of arsenic (As), highly soluble in conditions of weathering. Open mine voids backfilling techniques are now widely practiced by modern mining companies to manage the tailings. The most common one is called cemented paste backfill (CPB), and consists of tailings mixed with low amounts of hydraulic binders (3-5%) and a high proportion of water (typically 25%). The CPB is transported through a pipe network, to be placed in the mine openings. CPB provides storage benefits and underground support during mining operations. Moreover, this technique could also enhance contaminant stabilization, by fixing the contaminants in the binder matrix. CPB composites artificially spiked with As were synthesized in laboratory, using two types of hydraulic binders: a Portland cement, and a mix of fly ash and Portland cement. After curing duration of 66 days, the CPB samples were subjected to several leaching tests in various experimental conditions in order to better understand and then predict the As geochemical behaviour within CPBs. The assessment of the As release indicates that this element is better stabilized in Portland cement-based matrices rather than fly ash-based matrices. The As mobility differs in these two matrices, mainly because of the different As-bearing minerals formed during hydration processes. However, the total As depletion does not exceed 5% at the end of the most aggressive leaching test, indicating that As is well immobilized in the two types of CPB. PMID:22054566

  2. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  3. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  4. 75 FR 15741 - Applied Materials; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Applied Materials; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, an investigation was initiated in response...

  5. Experimental investigations and numerical simulations of notch effect in cellular plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsavina, L.; Linul, E.; Voiconi, T.; Negru, R.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular plastics are light weight structures with many applications in civil, aeronautical, automotive and mechanical engineering. Properties of cellular materials depend on the properties of the solid material, on the shape and dimensions of the cellular structure and on the relative density of the cellular material. Most of cellular plastic materials are crushing in compression and have a brittle behavior in tension. The effect of notches represents an important issue in such materials, taking into account that for packing applications for example, notches/holes should be introduced in the cellular material. This paper investigates the effect of notches in compression for three different densities 100, 145 and 300 kg/m3 polyurethane (PUR) foams. Experimental investigations were performed on rectangular blocks of 100×100×25 mm with 16, 28 and 40 mm central holes. The mechanism of damage was monitored with an IR camera FLIR A40M. Purpose of the numerical simulations was to calibrate a material model, based on compression test for un-notched specimens using the CRUSHABLE FOAM models implemented in ABAQUS SIMULIA. Then the material models were used to simulate the experimental tests on notched blocks. Good agreement was obtained for the load - displacement curves obtained experimentally and from simulation. Also the plastic deformation patterns observed experimentally by IR thermograpghy were obtained numerically using the CRUSHABLE FOAM material model.

  6. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  7. [Investigation of superconductivity and magnetism in d and f-electron materials

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Emphasis has been on high {Tc} cuprate susperconductors, along with some experiments on heavy fermion materials. Approach involved the preparation of novel materials, including high {Tc} oxide and rare earth and uranium intermetallic compounds in polycrystals and single crystals, and the investigation of transport, thermal, and magnetic properties of these materials down to 50 mK, in magnetic fields up to 10 tesla, and pressures up to 160 kbar. Other measurements, such as neutron scattering, {mu}SR, and photoemission, are carried out at national facilities.

  8. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat-Plate Solar Array project is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations included studies of aging and degradation of candidate encapsulation materials, continued identification of primers for durable bonding of module interfaces, continued evaluation of soil resistant treatments for the sunlit surface of the module and testing of corrosion protective coatings for use low cost mild steel substrates.

  9. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  10. Investigation on F/M material aspects of IRT-Sofia NCT channel.

    PubMed

    Mitev, M; Belousov, S; Ilieva, K

    2014-06-01

    The filter/moderator area of IRT-Sofia BNCT channel was investigated in this study in order to find a higher radiation resistant material as a suitable substitution for the Teflon(®). Two options - Al2O3 and graphite - were investigated. The results show, that both graphite and the Al2O3 can be successfully used as a filter/moderator material at IRT-Sofia. Initial evaluation of the in-phantom performance of the IRT-Sofia BNCT channel was made and merits similar to the best existing ones were found. PMID:24359789

  11. Multifunctional and Stable Monolayers on Carbon: A Simple and Reliable Method for Backfilling Sparse Layers Grafted from Protected Aryldiazonium Ions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lita; Gunby, Nathaniel R; Crittenden, Deborah L; Downard, Alison J

    2016-03-22

    A new strategy for preparation of robust multifunctional low nanometer thickness monolayers on carbon substrates is presented. Beginning with protected aryldiazonium salts, sparse monolayers of ethynyl-, amino-, and carboxy-terminated tethers are covalently anchored to the surface. The layers are then backfilled with a second modifier via the nucleophilic addition of an amine derivative to the surface. Through use of electroactive moieties coupled to the tethers, and an electroactive amine for backfilling, electrochemical measurements reveal that backfilling approximately doubles the surface concentration of the monolayer. Cyclic voltammetry of solution-based redox probes at the modified surfaces is consistent with the expected blocking properties at various stages of surface preparation. Fractional surface coverages of the layers are estimated using electrochemically determined surface concentrations of modifiers and computationally derived modifier footprints. Assuming free rotation of the coupled ferrocenyl or nitrophenyl groups leads to physically unreasonable fractional surface coverages, indicating that these larger modifiers must be rotationally restricted. Using a conformationally constrained model produces lower bound estimates of the total fractional surface coverage close to 0.4, with tether-only coverages close to 0.2. The backfilled tether layers constitute practical platforms for controlled construction of complex interfaces with many potential applications including sensing, molecular electronics, and catalysis.

  12. Chemistry and performance of blended cements and backfills for use in radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Duerden, S.; Glasser, F.P.; Goldthorpe, K.; Pedersen, J.; Stronach, S.A.; Quillin, K.; Ross, D.; Tyrer, M.

    1997-12-31

    The ability of NaCl and MgSO{sub 4} to impair the performance of Portland cement, blended cements containing slag and fly ash and of a permeable backfill have been measured. Performance is determined by decrease in pH, changes in mineralogy and loss of physical coherence. Experiments have been made at 25, 55 and 85 C and extensively backed up by chemical models of cement performance. NaCl, up to 1.5M, has a comparatively slight impact on performance but MgSO{sub 4} rapidly and almost quantitatively reacts, lowering system pH`s to <10, conditioned by mixtures of Mg(OH){sub 2} and magnesium silicates with gypsum.

  13. Investigations of the electrical breakdown properties of insulator materials used in high voltage vacuum diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Carlson, R.L.; Melton, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    The Injector for the proposed Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos utilizes a monolithic insulator deployed in a radial configuration. The 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick insulator with embedded grading rings separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. Although much work has been done by the pulse power community in studying surface flash-over of insulating materials used in both axial and radial configurations, dendrite growth at the roots of grading rings embedded in materials suitable for very large insulators is less well characterized. Degradation of several acrylic insulators has been observed in the form of dendrites growing at the roots of the grading rings for large numbers (100`s) of pulses on the prototype DARHT Injector and other machines using similar radial geometries. In a few cases, these dendrites have led to catastrophic bulk breakdown of the acrylic between two grading rings making the insulator a costly loss. Insulating materials under investigation are acrylic (Lucite), epoxy (Furane), and cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite); each of these materials has its own particular mechanical and electrical merits. All of these materials have been cast and machined into the required large size for the Injector. Test methods and the results of investigations into the breakdown strength of various interface geometries and the susceptibility of these materials to dendrite growth are reported.

  14. The employment of a high density plasma jet for the investigation of thermal protection materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezelis, R.; Grigaitiene, V.; Levinskas, R.; Brinkiene, K.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the results of tests of thermal protection materials (TPM) at conditions that simulate the atmospheric re-entry of space vehicles, tested by means of a high velocity and enthalpy air plasma jet generated with a dc plasma torch. Such a high velocity and enthalpy air plasma jet allows us to investigate TPM by simulating heat flux values varying with time in accordance with real re-entry altitudes and trajectories. The main research interests include the measurements of plasma flow temperature and heat flux for the testing of materials used for thermal protection systems of space vehicles. The test results of investigations of light composite thermal protective system material and graphite are presented.

  15. Investigating the Application of Needs Analysis on EAP Business Administration Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Saifalislam Abdalla Hajahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate the application of needs analysis in developing EAP materials for business administration students in two Sudanese universities. The subjects are 2 head departments of English language. To collect data, the researcher uses interview and content analysis. The study adopts the descriptive approach. The data of…

  16. [Investigations on secondary emission of metallic implant materials Ti and Ta following radiation].

    PubMed

    Laass, M; Lange, K P; Thierfelder, C; Hegewald, H; Kirsch, A

    1991-01-01

    Two implant materials, titanium and tantalum, were investigated for their electron emission in response to therapeutic tumor irradiation and were compared, in this context, to a substance equivalent to bone. The reaction of titanium was found to be similar to that of bone, whereas substantive increase in radiation was caused by tantalum which, consequently, should be removed from the radiation field.

  17. A Study of the Qualities Teachers Recommend in STS Issues Investigation and Action Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A.; Wiesenmayer, Randall L.

    This study was part of a project to develop science and technology (STS) issue investigation and action materials with the potential for use across science and social studies classes at the secondary level. Special emphasis was given to learning teachers' perspectives on the development of a unit on the impact of pesticides on society. Seven areas…

  18. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules were investigated. The following areas were explored: (1) soil resistant surface treatment; (2) corrosion protecting coatings from mild steel substrates; (3) primers for bonding module interfaces; and (4) RS/4 accelerated aging of candidate encapsulation compounds

  20. Investigating the Chemical Safety of Household Products. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Phil J.

    This document provides teaching guidelines and student material for a unit intended for use in high school science or consumer programs. Time allotment is from four to six hours of classroom time. The objective of this capsule is to investigate the chemical safety of household products by teaching students how to form a hypothesis through the…

  1. Investigation of the friction and surface degradation of innovative chondroplasty materials against articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Northwood, E; Fisher, J; Kowalski, R

    2007-04-01

    Understanding the wear of the biomaterial-cartilage interface is vital for the development of innovative chondroplasty. The aim of this study was to investigate a number of biphasic materials as potential chondroplasty biomaterials. Simple geometry friction and wear studies were conducted using bovine articular cartilage pins loaded against a range of single-phase and biphasic materials. The frictions of each biomaterial was compared within simple and protein-containing lubricants. Longer-term continuous sliding tests within a protein containing lubricant were also conducted at various loading conditions to evaluate the friction and degradation for each surface. All single-phase materials showed a steady rise in friction, which was dependent on the loss of interstitial fluid load support from the opposing cartilage pin. All biphasic materials demonstrated a marked reduction in friction when compared with the single-phase materials. It is postulated that the biphasic nature of each material allowed an element of fluid load support to be maintained by fluid rehydration and expulsion. In the longer-term study, significant differences in the articular cartilage pin (surface damage) between the positive control (stainless steel) and the negative control (articular cartilage) was found. The potential biphasic chondroplasty materials produced a reduction in articular cartilage pin damage when compared with the single-phase materials. The changes in surface topography of the cartilage pin were associated with increased levels of friction achieved during the continuous wear test. The study illustrated the importance of the biphasic properties of potential chondroplasty materials, and future work will focus on the optimization of biphasic properties as well as long-term durability, such that materials will more closely mimic the biotribology of natural articular cartilage.

  2. Preliminary Investigation of Zircaloy-4 as a Research Reactor Cladding Material

    SciTech Connect

    Brian K Castle

    2012-05-01

    As part of a scoping study for the ATR fuel conversion project, an initial comparison of the material properties of Zircaloy-4 and Aluminum-6061 (T6 and O-temper) is performed to provide a preliminary evaluation of Zircaloy-4 for possible inclusion as a candidate cladding material for ATR fuel elements. The current fuel design for the ATR uses Aluminum 6061 (T6 and O temper) as a cladding and structural material in the fuel element and to date, no fuel failures have been reported. Based on this successful and longstanding operating history, Zircaloy-4 properties will be evaluated against the material properties for aluminum-6061. The preliminary investigation will focus on a comparison of density, oxidation rates, water chemistry requirements, mechanical properties, thermal properties, and neutronic properties.

  3. Investigation of Kevlar fabric based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported in detail. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar based materials are compared with conventional, Dacron reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed and quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided. The investigation shows that single ply laminates of Kevlar and plastic films offer significant strength to weight improvements, are less permeable than two ply coated materials, but have a lower flex life.

  4. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  5. Investigation of acoustic emission and surface treatment to improve tool materials and metal forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Deming

    Silicon nitride and WC-Co cermet tools are used for metal forming processes including extrusion and drawing. These materials are used to make tool dies which are exposed to deformation caused by friction and wear. Surface treatments such as ion implantation, laser blazing and coating have been found to improve surface properties, to optimize tribological behavior between the metal and die, as well as to extend service life of the tool dies. Early detection and continuous monitoring processes by non destructive testing (NDT) methods are needed in order to ensure the functionality of the wear process and extend the tool service life. Acoustic emission is one of the promising NDT methods for this application. The surface treatment chosen for this investigation was ion implantation. Three types of wear resistant materials with and without surface treatment were selected for this project; silicon nitride and two tungsten carbides (6% Cobalt and 10% Cobalt). This investigation was conducted using a pin-on-disk device for wear/friction tests of the selected materials with lubrication and/or without lubrication against both a stainless steel disk and an aluminum disk. The acoustic emissions generated during the experiments were recorded and analyzed. The results of this investigation showed that the ion implantation improved the tribological properties of the materials and reduced acoustic emission and coefficient of friction. A linear relationship between the average amplitude of the acoustic emission and the coefficient of friction of the tested materials was found. The investigation demonstrated that the acoustic emission method could be used to monitor the wear/friction processes.

  6. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Zakaria bin; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A.; Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  7. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating corium crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Presented is an analysis of the results of the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten corium initially at 3080/sup 0/K was directed downward upon a stainless steel plate. The experiments are a continuation of a program of reactor material tests investigating LWR severe accident phenomena. Objective of the present analysis is to determine the existence or nonexistence of a corium crust during impingement from comparison of the measured heatup of the plate (as measured by thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the steel surface) with model calculations assuming alternately the presence and absence of a stable crust during impingement.

  8. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  9. Laboratory investigation into the contribution of contaminants to ground water from equipment materials used in sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P. Evan; Sklarew, Deborah S.

    2004-07-31

    Benzene contamination was detected in water samples from the Ogallala aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. DOE assembled a Technical Assistance Team to evaluate the source of benzene. One of the team's recommendations was to assess whether the sampling equipment material could be a source of benzene and other volatile organic compounds. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory tests indicated that the equipment material did, in fact, contribute volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds to the groundwater samples. Specifically, three materials were identified as contributing contaminants to water samples. The nylon-11 tubing used contributed benzene and the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA), the urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed toluene and trace amounts of NBSA, while the sampling port "spacer" material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests are below the concentrations measured in actual groundwater samples, the equipment material was found to contribute organics to the test water rendering the results reported for the groundwater samples highly suspect.

  10. Investigation of a novel polymer foam material for air coupled ultrasonic transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayan, L.; Weide, J. M. Vander; Declercq, N. F.; Berthelot, Y.

    This experimental study aims at investigating the use of porous polymer foam piezoelectrets as a potential transducer material for air coupled ultrasonic applications. When a voltage is applied, these materials exhibit a phenomenon similar to the inverse piezoelectric effect. The defining features of the piezo-like polymer foam are small, elliptically shaped and electrically polarized voids located inside the polymers. The sensitivity is related to the effective piezoelectric coupling coefficient d33 which is much higher than in traditional piezoelectric materials. The d33 values of the cellular polypropylene foams were estimated using a laser vibrometer at different input voltages for a continuous wave excitation. It was observed that the effective d33 coefficient strongly depends on the volume fraction of electrically charged voids in the material as the material compliance decreases with increased material voids. The change in acoustic impedance across the surface of the sample was measured with a high-resolution ultrasonic scanning system. Finally, these foams were used as prototype transducers for the transmit-receive mode in air; practical limitations imposed by acoustic attenuation in air were assessed.

  11. An investigation on the effects of phase change material on material components used for high temperature thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeil; Singh, Dileep; Zhao, Weihuan; Yua, Wenhua; France, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants with advanced power cycle require high temperature phase change materials (PCMs), Graphite foams with high thermal conductivity to enhance the poor thermal conductivity of PCMs. Brazing of the graphite foams to the structural metals of the LHTES system could be a method to assemble the system and a method to protect the structural metals from the molten salts. In the present study, the LHTES prototype capsules using MgCl2-graphite foam composites were assembled by brazing and welding, and tested to investigate the corrosion attack of the PCM salt on the BNi-4 braze. The microstructural analysis showed that the BNi-4 braze alloy can be used not only for the joining of structure alloy to graphite foams but also for the protecting of structure alloy from the corrosion by PCM.

  12. Micro-scale investigation on the quasi-static behavior of granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia

    Granular material exhibits complex responses when subjected to various external loading. Fundamental mechanisms have not been well established so far, including that about the critical state, one of the most important concepts in the modern soil mechanics. With the recognition that granular material is discrete in nature, the basic understanding can only be obtained from the particle scale. The complexity in granular material behavior lies in the fact that the macroscopic behavior of granular material is determined by not only the interactions operating at contacts, but also how the particles become arranged in space to form an internal structure. This research is aimed to microscopically investigate the influence of the internal structure and the fundamental mechanism about the critical state. In view of the extensive laboratory test data already available in the literature, a numerical simulation method, DEM, is employed as the tool to conduct particle-scale investigations. The contact model for two in-contact circular disks is derived theoretically from the elasticity theory, and the result is a linear contact model with constant stiffness and lateral sliding. Based on the contact model, a systematic series of numerical tests has been implemented, and the results can successfully reproduce the main characteristics in the behavior of natural granular material, under various loading conditions. The macro-micro relationship is the link between the investigations at the two worlds. The key point is to describe the internal structure with the two dual cell systems, a particle cell system and a void cell system. Based on these two systems, the stress and strain in a uniform field are equivalently expressed in terms of the contact forces/relative displacements, and the micro-geometrical variables. With the microstructural definition of the stress tensor, the stress state of granular material is studied microscopically. The stress-fabric-force relation is derived, based

  13. Infrared microscopic investigation of skin biopsies after application of implant material for correction of aesthetic deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Seifert, L.; Kuckuk, R.; Lenzen, C.

    2003-06-01

    Different implant materials are currently applied for correction of inborn and acquired aesthetic deficiencies of the human skin. Several commercial products are used as dermal fillers for aesthetic facial surgery, which contain bovine collagen and cross-linked substances, or hyaluronic acid derivatives, both also in combination with polymethylmethacrylate or co-polymerisates of methacrylate derivatives. Gels containing polylactate or dimethylpolysiloxane were also available. Infrared spectra of such products are presented after dry film preparation. Infrared microscopy using attenuated total reflection was employed to identify previously applied dermal filler products in excised tissue without embedding the sample in a matrix material such as paraffin as needed for microtoming. Several tissue spots guided by inspecting the different color grades were found with increased single implant component concentrations, as supported by the dominating spectral features and difference spectroscopy. The chemistry within dermal biopsies after material implantation can be uniquely investigated based on their infrared spectra.

  14. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  15. A finite element model investigation of ultrasonic array performance for inspecting polycrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pamel, A.; Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Brett, C. R.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructural noise has long hindered ultrasonic NDE of polycrystalline materials. In recent years however, arrays have enabled new possibilities to advance ultrasonic inspection of these materials. A Finite Element (FE) model is used to explore the different phenomena caused by grain scattering which may hinder detection of defects by an array. These include multiple scattering and beam deviation due to anisotropy; two aspects of the physics which are often required to be ignored in analytical models due to theoretical assumptions or computational limitations. We rely on a GPU based FE solver, Pogo, to provide fast computation and thereby enable parametric studies. The impact on array detection performance when varying center-frequency and aperture size is investigated. Preliminary results show that there exists an optimum for both the array aperture and frequency for inspection of these materials.

  16. Investigation on Painting Materials in "Madonna col Bambino e S. Giovannino" by Botticelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, D.; Lottici, P. P.; Casoli, A.; Ferrari, M.; Lottini, S.; Cauzzi, D.

    A study on the painting materials (pigments and binders) of the famous painting "Madonna col Bambino e S. Giovannino" by Sandro Botticelli, located in the Museo Civico of Piacenza (Italy), was performed before a recent restoration. The painting materials were investigated by the analysis of five millimetric samples taken in damaged regions. The pigments were determined using the micro-Raman spectroscopy, with the 632.8nm line of a He-Ne laser. Despite the strong fluorescence background, the nature of the ground layer (gypsum and anhydrite) and of most pigments (i.e. goethite, lapis lazuli, white lead) was determined. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) was used to determine the organic binder media, and in particular proteinaceous and lipid materials. Egg and animal glue were found, while no siccative oils were detected.

  17. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  18. EBIC/TEM investigations of defects in solar silicon ribbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ast, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the defect structure of edge defined film growth (EFG) material, web dentritic ribbons (WEB), and ribbon to ribbon recrystallized material (RTR). The most common defects in all these materials are coherent first order twin boundaries. These coherent twins can be very thin, a few atomic layers. Bundles of the twins which contain odd numbers of twins will in optical images appear as a seemingly single first twin boundary. First-order coherent twin boundaries are not electrically active, except at locations where they contain intrinsic (grain boundary) dislocations. These dislocations take up small deviations from the ideal twin relation and play the same role in twin boundaries as conventional and play the some role in twin boundaries as conventional edge and screw dislocations in small angle tilt and twist boundaries.

  19. Investigations of chemical erosion of carbon materials in hydrogen and deuterium low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, P.; Fantz, U.; Balden, M.

    2005-03-01

    Investigations on chemical erosion of pure and carbide-doped graphite materials were carried out in inductively coupled RF plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or a mixture of both in helium. For extrapolations of erosion yields to future fusion devices the relevant particle fluxes have to be known precisely. This was done by several diagnostic techniques. In particular the ion fluxes are determined by an energy mass analyzer. An isotope effect of the ion composition is measured resulting in an enhanced erosion of graphite in deuterium plasmas. Since in fusion plasmas a mixture of deuterium and tritium will interact with the surface, a mixture of hydrogen and deuterium on graphite was investigated as well. In order to reduce erosion yields doping of carbon is under discussion. Therefore, fluence dependent erosion yields of several W-, Ti-, V- and Zr-doped graphite materials are measured and compared with pure graphite.

  20. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  1. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  2. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  3. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Umesh P

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs.

  4. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Umesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs. PMID:25295049

  5. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  6. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-30

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  7. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalgund, Megha; Zunjarrao, Suraj; Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.

    2015-03-01

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT's capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage & understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  8. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Navalgund, Megha Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.; Zunjarrao, Suraj

    2015-03-31

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT’s capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage and understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  9. Relevance of the choice of diagnostic methods to investigate laser damage resistance in optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, Jean-Yves; Wagner, Frank; Gallais, Laurent; Commandré, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Laser induced damage in optical material in nanosecond regime is widely attributed to local precursors in range of nanometer to micrometer size. The damage precursors nature strongly depends on materials (coatings, non linear crystals, substrates,..), breakdown location (bulk, surface, interface) and irradiation parameters (wavelength, pulse duration...). The weakness of knowledge on parameters as sizes, densities and natures of precursors, let think that the choice of the diagnostic method which reveals laser damage has to be adapted to each situation of irradiation. Concerning the LIDT determination, destructive methods are usually involved: we can cite full size test using the "real" final configuration of irradiation, raster scan method using a focused laser beam allowing laboratory test and statistic approach allowing study with different beam sizes in order to probe the material homogeneity in terms of precursors. This multi-scale approaches give relevant information on material properties regarding high power laser irradiation. In order to investigate the laser damage initiation mechanisms, it appears necessary to involve non-destructive diagnostics. These diagnostics permit to highlight modifications linked to precursors before material breakdown. The main difficulty here is the local character of the diagnostic added to the low density of initiating center. A multi-scale approach is thus also well adapted to the non-destructive case. Interest of diagnostics as local fluorescence and photothermal deflexion both correlated with LIDT results will be discussed. To illustrate the purpose, examples on non linear crystals and coatings will be shown.

  10. Relevance of the choice of diagnostic methods to investigate laser damage resistance in optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, Jean-Yves; Wagner, Frank; Gallais, Laurent; Commandré, Mireille

    2011-11-01

    Laser induced damage in optical material in nanosecond regime is widely attributed to local precursors in range of nanometer to micrometer size. The damage precursors nature strongly depends on materials (coatings, non linear crystals, substrates,..), breakdown location (bulk, surface, interface) and irradiation parameters (wavelength, pulse duration...). The weakness of knowledge on parameters as sizes, densities and natures of precursors, let think that the choice of the diagnostic method which reveals laser damage has to be adapted to each situation of irradiation. Concerning the LIDT determination, destructive methods are usually involved: we can cite full size test using the "real" final configuration of irradiation, raster scan method using a focused laser beam allowing laboratory test and statistic approach allowing study with different beam sizes in order to probe the material homogeneity in terms of precursors. This multi-scale approaches give relevant information on material properties regarding high power laser irradiation. In order to investigate the laser damage initiation mechanisms, it appears necessary to involve non-destructive diagnostics. These diagnostics permit to highlight modifications linked to precursors before material breakdown. The main difficulty here is the local character of the diagnostic added to the low density of initiating center. A multi-scale approach is thus also well adapted to the non-destructive case. Interest of diagnostics as local fluorescence and photothermal deflexion both correlated with LIDT results will be discussed. To illustrate the purpose, examples on non linear crystals and coatings will be shown.

  11. Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

    2004-08-30

    Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

  12. Investigation of the Higher Harmonic Lamb Wave Generation in Hyperelastic Isotropic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauter, Natalie; Lammering, Rolf

    Micro-structural damages, such as micro-cracks and voids, give locally rise to stresses and may initiate subsequent failure of structural components. Therefore, the development of methods for the detection of microstructural damage and the observation of their growth is an important and ongoing area of research, especially for thin-walled structures. The proposed method for the detection is based on the nonlinearity caused by the micro-structural damages. Lamb waves are generated which induce simultaneously higher harmonic modes due the inherent nonlinearity. For detailed investigations, numerical simulations are essential. In this work, the nonlinearity is modeled by the material law, which is based on the Neo- Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material models. In contrast to previous studies, which used third order elastic coefficients, these hyperelastic material models are widely accepted, frequently used, and implemented in commonly available FEM software. In the numerical investigations, Lamb waves are generated in a thin-walled aluminum plate with windowed sine burst signals. Due to the nonlinearity in the material law, the waves are not only observed at the excitation frequency, but also at higher harmonic frequencies. Excitation at especially selected frequencies evoke the cumulative effect, and thus gives rise to the amplitudes of the higher harmonics. Comparing the S1-S2 and S2-S4 mode pairs clearly show the higher sensitivity of the latter to the material nonlinearity. This matches with previous published experimental results. Finally, it is shown that the results obtained agree qualitatively well with numerical analyses, in which the micro-structural damages are modeled directly by a respective finite element discretization.

  13. A preliminary investigation of materialism and impulsiveness as predictors of technological addictions among young adults.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James A; Pirog, Stephen F

    2013-03-01

    Background and aims The primary objective of the present research is to investigate the drivers of technological addiction in college students - heavy users of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). The study places cell phone and instant messaging addiction in the broader context of consumption pathologies, investigating the influence of materialism and impulsiveness on these two technologies. Clearly, cell phones serve more than just a utilitarian purpose. Cell phones are used in public and play a vital role in the lives of young adults. The accessibility of new technologies, like cell phones, which have the advantages of portability and an ever increasing array of functions, makes their over-use increasingly likely. Methods College undergraduates (N = 191) from two U.S. universities completed a paper and pencil survey instrument during class. The questionnaire took approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and contained scales that measured materialism, impulsiveness, and mobile phone and instant messaging addiction. Results Factor analysis supported the discriminant validity of Ehrenberg, Juckes, White and Walsh's (2008) Mobile Phone and Instant Messaging Addictive Tendencies Scale. The path model indicates that both materialism and impulsiveness impact the two addictive tendencies, and that materialism's direct impact on these addictions has a noticeably larger effect on cell phone use than instant messaging. Conclusions The present study finds that materialism and impulsiveness drive both a dependence on cell phones and instant messaging. As Griffiths (2012) rightly warns, however, researchers must be aware that one's addiction may not simply be to the cell phone, but to a particular activity or function of the cell phone. The emergence of multi-function smart phones requires that research must dig beneath the technology being used to the activities that draw the user to the particular technology.

  14. Investigation on the application of steel slag-fly ash-phosphogypsum solidified material as road base material.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiguo; Zhou, Mingkai; Ma, Wei; Hu, Jinqiang; Cai, Zhi

    2009-05-15

    The aim of the present work is to prepare a new type of steel slag-fly ash-phosphogypsum solidified material totally composed with solid wastes to be utilized as road base material. The mix formula of this material was optimized, the solidified material with optimal mix formula (fly ash/steel slag=1:1, phosphogypsum dosage=2.5%) results in highest strength. The strength development, resilience modulus and splitting strength of this material were studied comparing with some typical road base materials, the 28- and 360-day strength of this material can reach 8MPa and 12MPa, respectively, its resilience modulus reaches 1987MPa and splitting strength reaches 0.82MPa, it has higher early strength than lime-fly ash and lime-soil road base material, its long-term strength is much higher than cement stabilized granular materials, the solidified material has best water stability among those road base materials, it can be engineered as road base material with competitive properties. The strength formation mechanism of this solidified material is discussed also.

  15. Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Gates, Robert O.; Riley, Brian J.

    2014-09-01

    G-Demption, LLC has requested that PPNL provide design input for a “pseudo-glassification” process associated with their proposed technology for generating gamma irradiation stations from used nuclear fuel. The irradiation design currently consists of an aluminum enclosure designed to allow for proper encapsulation of and heat flow from a used fuel rod while minimally impacting the streaming of gamma rays from the fuel. In order to make their design more robust, G-Demption is investigating the benefits of backfilling this aluminum enclosure with a setting material once the used fuel rod is properly placed. This process has been initially referred to as “pseudo-glassification”, and strives not to impact heat transport or gamma streaming from the used fuel rod while providing increased fuel rod protection and fission gas retention. PNNL has compiled an internal material evaluation and discussion for the “pseudo-glassification” process in this report.

  16. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  17. Forensic engineering: applying materials and mechanics principles to the investigation of product failures.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, S V; Fitzpatrick, M E

    2007-06-01

    Forensic engineering is the application of engineering principles or techniques to the investigation of materials, products, structures or components that fail or do not perform as intended. In particular, forensic engineering can involve providing solutions to forensic problems by the application of engineering science. A criminal aspect may be involved in the investigation but often the problems are related to negligence, breach of contract, or providing information needed in the redesign of a product to eliminate future failures. Forensic engineering may include the investigation of the physical causes of accidents or other sources of claims and litigation (for example, patent disputes). It involves the preparation of technical engineering reports, and may require giving testimony and providing advice to assist in the resolution of disputes affecting life or property.This paper reviews the principal methods available for the analysis of failed components and then gives examples of different component failure modes through selected case studies.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENCE OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES WITHIN CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G

    2008-06-04

    During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles, (Stegobium paniceum (L.) Coleoptera: Anobiidae), were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. Initial indications were that the beetles were feeding on the Celotex{trademark} assemblies within the package. Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is used in numerous radioactive material packages serving as both a thermal insulator and an impact absorber for both normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident conditions. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-63) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex{trademark}. The Savannah River National Laboratory is conducting the investigation with entomological expertise provided by Clemson University. The two empty 9975 shipping packages were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory in the fall of 2007. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation.

  19. Ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes for in vivo analysis with high stability and low polarized potential.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Peipei; Yu, Ping; Wang, Kai; Hao, Jie; Fei, Junjie; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-11-01

    The development of stable and reproducible methods for in vivo electrochemical monitoring of neurochemicals is of great physiological importance. In this study, we demonstrate ferricyanide-filled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) of high stability and low polarized potential for in vivo electrochemical analysis. We first studied the voltammetric behavior of cylindrical CFEs by using a model system consisting of two separated cells each containing potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) or potassium ferrocyanide (K4Fe(CN)6). We observed that E1/2 values of the system were dependent on the ratio of the lengths of the cylindrical CFEs and of the concentrations of the redox species on both poles. Based on this property, we prepared the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs, and found that this kind of electrode exhibits a more stable current response and a lower polarized potential than the CFEs backfilled with KCl or Ru(NH3)6Cl3. Animal experiments with the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs demonstrate that this kind of electrode could be used for in vivo monitoring of neurochemical release with a high stability under some physiological conditions. PMID:26378690

  20. Ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes for in vivo analysis with high stability and low polarized potential.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Peipei; Yu, Ping; Wang, Kai; Hao, Jie; Fei, Junjie; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-11-01

    The development of stable and reproducible methods for in vivo electrochemical monitoring of neurochemicals is of great physiological importance. In this study, we demonstrate ferricyanide-filled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) of high stability and low polarized potential for in vivo electrochemical analysis. We first studied the voltammetric behavior of cylindrical CFEs by using a model system consisting of two separated cells each containing potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) or potassium ferrocyanide (K4Fe(CN)6). We observed that E1/2 values of the system were dependent on the ratio of the lengths of the cylindrical CFEs and of the concentrations of the redox species on both poles. Based on this property, we prepared the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs, and found that this kind of electrode exhibits a more stable current response and a lower polarized potential than the CFEs backfilled with KCl or Ru(NH3)6Cl3. Animal experiments with the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs demonstrate that this kind of electrode could be used for in vivo monitoring of neurochemical release with a high stability under some physiological conditions.

  1. Experimental investigation of Rayleigh Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Aaron Alan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2010-11-01

    The interface of an elastic-plastic plate accelerated by a fluid of lower density is Rayleigh Taylor (RT) unstable, the growth being mitigated by the mechanical strength of the plate. The instability is observed when metal plates are accelerated by high explosives, in explosive welding, and in volcanic island formation due to the strength of the inner crust. In contrast to the classical case involving Newtonian fluids, RT instability in accelerated solids is not well understood. The difficulties for constructing a theory for the linear growth phase in solids is essentially due to the character of elastic-plastic constitutive properties which has a nonlinear dependence on the magnitude of the rate of deformation. Experimental investigation of the phenomena is difficult due to the exceedingly small time scales (in high energy density experiments) and large measurement uncertainties of material properties. We performed experiments on our Two-Wheel facility to study the linear stage of the incompressible RT instability in elastic-plastic materials (yogurt) whose properties were well characterized. Rotation of the wheels imparted a constant centrifugal acceleration on the material interface that was cut with a small sinusoidal ripple. The controlled initial conditions and precise acceleration amplitudes are levied to investigate transition from elastic to plastic deformation and allow accurate and detailed measurements of flow properties.

  2. Utilization of water-reducing admixtures in cemented paste backfill of sulphide-rich mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    This study presents the effect of three different water-reducing admixtures (WRAs) on the rheological and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples. A 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa and the maintenance of the stability (i.e. > or = 0.7 MPa) over 360 days of curing were desired as the design criteria. Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland composite cement (PCC) were used as binders at 5 wt.% dose. WRAs were initially tested to determine the dosage of a WRA for a required consistency of 7'' for CPB mixtures. A total of 192 CPB samples were then prepared using WRAs. The utilization of WRAs enhanced the flow characteristics of the CPB mixture and allowed to achieve the same consistency at a lower water-to-cement ratio. For OPC, the addition of WRAs appeared to improve the both short- and long-term performance of CPB samples. However, only polycarboxylate-based superplasticiser produced the desired 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa when PCC was used as the binder. These findings suggest that WRAs can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich tailings to improve the strength and stability in short and long terms allowing to reduce binder costs in a CPB plant. PMID:20382473

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost-effective and long life solar modules. Of the $18 (1948 $) per square meter allocated for the encapsulation components approximately 50% of the cost ($9/sq m) may be taken by the load bearing component. Due to the proportionally high cost of this element, lower costing materials were investigated. Wood based products were found to be the lowest costing structural materials for module construction, however, they require protection from rainwater and humidity in order to acquire dimensional stability. The cost of a wood product based substrate must, therefore, include raw material costs plus the cost of additional processing to impart hygroscopic inertness. This protection is provided by a two step, or split process in which a flexible laminate containing the cell string is prepared, first in a vacuum process and then adhesively attached with a back cover film to the hardboard in a subsequent step.

  4. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulevoy, T. V.; Chalykh, B. B.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kropachev, G. N.; Ziiatdinova, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  5. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Z; Mayer, K; Bonamici, C E; Hubert, A; Hutcheon, I; Kinman, W; Kristo, M; Pointurier, F; Spencer, K; Stanley, F; Steiner, R; Tandon, L; Williams, R

    2015-08-01

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the (230)Th/(234)U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory procedures used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations.

  6. Theoretical investigation of Chevrel phase materials for cathodes accommodating Ca2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeu, Manuel; Hossain, Md Sazzad; Wang, Zi; Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Bevan, Kirk H.; Zaghib, Karim

    2016-02-01

    The Chevrel phase compounds Mo6X8 (X = S, Se, Te) are theoretically studied by ab initio methods as potential candidates for battery cathode materials. The voltage profiles are calculated for the cases of various alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) serving as guest intercalation ions. The Ca ions are shown to offer the practically significant voltage of ∼1.0-1.25 V, with S substitution giving the highest voltage over Se and Te. We further demonstrate that doubling the capacity of such a battery would also be possible by incorporating a second Ca ion near the Mo6X8 cluster. The electronic properties of this material are investigated, revealing that the entire Mo6 cluster behaves as a redox center. Finally, the ion diffusion barriers are calculated, showing comparable values to existing battery materials. This work demonstrates that the Chevrel phase may be useful as a cathode material for intercalating divalent ions, and also offers insights into possible tuning of cathode properties by judicious selection of the constituents.

  7. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives.

  8. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-01-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  9. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2014-09-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  10. Radiative property investigation. [digital computer programs for determining bidirectional reflectance of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed formulation of radiative heat transfer problems involving the use of bidirectional reflectance is discussed. Except for very simple systems this formulation is very intricate. For this reason and the fact that bidirectional data are scarce, such a formulation is not in common use. However, with the development of the digital computer there have been numerical methods developed for detailed radiative investigations using the bidirectional reflectance. Since computations using bidirectional reflectance are coming into use for spacecraft radiative studies, it is necessary to have reflectance data on the materials involved. Materials that are frequently studied are coatings which are used in controlling the thermal environment of spacecrafts. This study is primarily concerned with the bidirectional reflectance of zinc oxide which is one constituent commonly used for coatings.

  11. Investigating the effectiveness of economically sustainable carrier material complexes for marine oil remediation.

    PubMed

    Simons, Keryn L; Ansar, Alfiya; Kadali, Krishna; Bueti, Angelo; Adetutu, Eric M; Ball, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    The application of bioremediation to marine oil spills is limited due to dilution of either nutrients or hydrocarbonoclastic organisms. This study investigated the effectiveness of three unique natural carrier materials (mussel shells, coir peat and mussel shell/agar complex) which allowed nutrients, hydrocarbonoclastic organisms and oil to be in contact, facilitating remediation. TPH analysis after 30 d showed that mussel shells exhibited the greatest capacity to degrade oil with a 55% reduction (123.3 mg l(-1) from 276 mg l(-1)) followed by mussel shell/agar complex (49%) and coir peat (36%). Both the mussel shells and mussel shell/agar complex carriers were significantly different to the control (P=0.008 and P=0.002, respectively). DGGE based cluster analysis of the seawater microbial community showed groupings based on time rather than carriers. This study demonstrated that inexpensive, accessible waste materials used as carriers of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria led to significant degradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in seawater.

  12. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns.

  13. Preliminary investigation of cement materials in the Taif area, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of possible sources of cement rock in the Taft area was made during the latter part of August 1968. Adequate deposits of limestone, clay, quartz conglomerate and sandstone, and pisolitic iron ore, yet no gypsum, were located to support a Cement plant should it prove feasible to establish one in this area. These materials, made up mostly of Tertiary and later sediments, crop out in isolated, inconspicuous low hills in a north- trending belt, 10 to 15 kilometers wide, lying about 90 kilometers to-the east of At Taft. The belt extends for more than 90 kilometers from the vicinity of Jabal 'An in the south to the crushed rock pits at Radwan and beyond in the north. The area is readily accessible either from the Talf-Riyadh highway or from the Taif-Bishah road presently under construction. The limestone, which is quite pure and dense in some localities but dolomitic, argillaceous, and cherty in others, occurs in a variety of colors and would make suitable decorative building stone. The volcanic rocks of the Harrat Hadan, lying directly to the east of the limestone belt, include volcanic ash beds some of which may have been altered to bentonitlc clays. Others may have been lithified and might be suitable for light-weight aggregate. These possibilities remain to be investigated. Precambrian metamorphic rocks lying directly to the south and southeast of Taif were also investigated as possible cement rock sources, but no suitable material was found here.

  14. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning.

    PubMed

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials.

  15. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. PMID:25716572

  16. Experimental and analytical investigations of granular materials: Shear flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Hojin

    1989-12-01

    Granular materials flowing down an inclined chute were studied experimentally and analytically. Characteristics of convective heat transfer to granular flows were also investigated experimentally and numerically. Experiments on continuous, steady flows of granular materials in an inclined chute were conducted with the objectives of understanding the characteristics of chute flows and of acquiring information on the rheological behavior of granular material flow. Existing constitutive equations and governing equations were used to solve for fully developed chute flows of granular materials, and thus the boundary value problem was formulated with two parameters (the coefficient of restitution between particles, and the chute inclination) and three boundary values at the chute base wall (the values of solid fraction, granular temperature, and mean velocity at the wall). The boundary value problem was numerically solved by the shooting method. These analytical results were also compared with the present experimental values and with the computer simulations by other investigators in their literature. Experiments on heat transfer to granular flows over a flat heating plate were conducted with three sizes of glass beads, polystyrene beads, and mustard seeds. A modification on the existing model for the convective heat transfer was made using the effective Nusselt number and the effective Peclet number, which include the effects of solid fraction variations. The slightly modified model could describe the heat transfer characteristics of both fast and slow flows (supercritical and subcritical). A numerical analysis of the transfer to granular flows was also performed. The results were compared with the present experimental data, and reasonable agreement was found in the comparison.

  17. Synthesis and investigation of novel cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Monica

    Environmental pollution and eventual depletion of fossil fuels and lithium has increased the need for research towards alternative electrical energy storage systems. In this context, research in sodium ion batteries (NIBs) has become more prevalent since the price in lithium has increased due to its demand and reserve location. Sodium is an abundant resource that is low cost, and safe; plus its chemical properties are similar to that of Li which makes the transition into using Na chemistry for ion battery systems feasible. In this study, we report the effects of processing conditions on the electrochemical properties of Na-ion batteries made of the NaCrO2 cathode. NaCrO2 is synthesized via solid state reactions. The as-synthesized powder is then subjected to high-energy ball milling under different conditions which reduces particle size drastically and causes significant degradation of the specific capacity for NaCrO2. X-ray diffraction reveals that lattice distortion has taken place during high-energy ball milling and in turn affects the electrochemical performance of the cathode material. This study shows that a balance between reducing particle size and maintaining the layered structure is essential to obtain high specific capacity for the NaCrO2 cathode. In light of the requirements for grid scale energy storage: ultra-long cycle life (> 20,000 cycles and calendar life of 15 to 20 years), high round trip efficiency (> 90%), low cost, sufficient power capability, and safety; the need for a suitable cathode materials with excellent capacity retention such as Na2MnFe(CN)6 and K2MnFe(CN)6 will be investigated. Prussian blue (A[FeIIIFeII (CN)6]•xH2O, A=Na+ or K+ ) and its analogues have been investigated as an alkali ion host for use as a cathode material. Their structure (FCC) provides large ionic channels along the direction enabling facile insertion and extraction of alkali ions. This material is also capable of more than one Na ion insertion per unit formula

  18. Experimental Investigation of Material Flows Within FSWs Using 3D Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Timothy A. White; Karen S. Miller; Denis E. Clark; Herschel B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    There exists significant prior work using tracers or pre-placed hardened markers within friction stir welding (FSWing) to experimentally explore material flow within the FSW process. Our experiments replaced markers with a thin sheet of copper foil placed between the 6061 aluminum lap and butt joints that were then welded. The absorption characteristics of x-rays for copper and aluminum are significantly different allowing for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as x-ray computed tomography (CT) to be used to demonstrate the material movement within the weldment on a much larger scale than previously shown. 3D CT reconstruction of the copper components of the weldment allows for a unique view into the final turbulent state of the welding process as process parameters are varied. The x-ray CT data of a section of the weld region was collected using a cone-beam x-ray imaging system developed at the INL. Six-hundred projections were collected over 360-degrees using a 160-kVp Bremsstrahlung x-ray generator (25-micrometer focal spot) and amorphoussilicon x-ray detector. The region of the object that was imaged was about 3cm tall and 1.5cm x 1cm in cross section, and was imaged at a magnification of about 3.6x. The data were reconstructed on a 0.5x0.5x0.5 mm3 voxel grid. After reconstruction, the aluminum and copper could be easily discriminated using a gray level threshold allowing visualization of the copper components. Fractal analysis of the tomographic reconstructed material topology is investigated as a means to quantify macro level material flow based on process parameters. The results of multi-pass FSWs show increased refinement of the copper trace material. Implications of these techniques for quantifying process flow are discussed.

  19. Raman spectroscopic investigation of thorium dioxide-uranium dioxide (ThO₂-UO₂) fuel materials.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rekha; Bhagat, R K; Salke, Nilesh P; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic investigations were carried out on proposed nuclear fuel thorium dioxide-uranium dioxide (ThO2-UO2) solid solutions and simulated fuels based on ThO2-UO2. Raman spectra of ThO2-UO2 solid solutions exhibited two-mode behavior in the entire composition range. Variations in mode frequencies and relative intensities of Raman modes enabled estimation of composition, defects, and oxygen stoichiometry in these compounds that are essential for their application. The present study shows that Raman spectroscopy is a simple, promising analytical tool for nondestructive characterization of this important class of nuclear fuel materials.

  20. Investigation and characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth during fatigue loading of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Yeung, P.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    An investigative program is presented in an attempt to add to the current understanding of constraint effects on the response of composite materials under cyclic loading. The objectives were: (1) to use existing data and to develop additional data in order to establish an understanding and quantitative description of flaw growth in unidirectional lamina under cyclic loading at different load direction to fiber direction angles; (2) to establish a similar understanding and description of flaw growth in lamina which are embedded in laminates between other unflawed lamina; (3) to determine the nature of the influence of constraint on flaw growth by quantitatively comparing the results of the tests; and (4) to develop a model and philosophy of constraints effects based on our investigative results.

  1. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  2. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials, written reports, answers...

  3. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials and tangible things the...

  4. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials, written reports, answers...

  5. Dielectric engineered symmetric underlap double gate tunnel FET (DGTFET): An investigation towards variation of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjunarao; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pradhan, K. P.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, an underlap silicon n-channel Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (n-TFET) i.e., symmetric single-k spacer (SSS) Double Gate N-TFET (DGTFET) is proposed to improve the performance of the device by using different spacer materials. A detailed investigation has been made on the proposed device characteristics with the help of extensive 2-D TCAD simulations. It is demonstrated that an optimized underlap length is chosen for a significant on-state current (Ion) without deteriorating the off-state current (Ioff) and sub-threshold swing (SS). The proposed model with different spacer materials has been extensively analyzed by using transfer characteristics, output characteristics, and analog/RF characteristics. The structure is optimized based on the comparison among various performance metrics like Ion, Ioff, SS, on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), threshold (or) cut-off frequency (fT), and intrinsic delay with considering different spacer materials like SiO2 (k = 3.9), Si3N4 (k = 7.5), and HfO2 (k = 25).

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Schraven, Arthur; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-07-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material has been made. Particular attention was paid to the phenomenon of acoustic streaming of the liquid in the porous material due to the damping of the acoustic waves. The experiments were performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. A microphone was used to measure the damping of the waves in the porous material and also temperature and pressure measurements in the flowing liquid inside the cores were carried out. To model the acoustic streaming effect Darcy's law was extended with a source term representing the momentum transfer from the acoustic waves to the liquid. The model predictions for the pressure distribution inside the core under acoustic streaming conditions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Investigation of new material combinations for hard x-ray telescope designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. P.; Madsen, K. K.; Christensen, F. E.

    2006-06-01

    The materials chosen for depth graded multilayer designs for hard x-ray telescopes (10 keV to 80 keV) have until now been focusing on W/Si, W/SiC, Pt/C, and Pt/SiC. These material combinations have been chosen because of good stability over time and low interface roughness, However both W and Pt have absorption edges in the interesting energy range from 70 - 80 keV. If looking at the optical constants Cu and Ni would be good alternative high-Z candidates since the k-absorption edges in Cu and Ni is below 10 keV. We have investigated both of these materials as the reflecting layer in combination with SiC as the spacer layer and give the performance in terms of roughness, minimum obtainable d-spacing and stability over time as deposited in our planar magnetron sputtering facility. Likewise we review the same properties of WC/SiC coatings which we have previously developed and which allow for very small d-spacings. The combination of WC/SiC or the well established W/SiC with the above mentioned Cu and Ni-containing multilayers in the same stack allows for novel telescope designs operating up to and above 100 keV without the absorption edge structure.

  8. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate.

  9. Optoelectronic properties of Fe impurities in delafossite oxide materials. A high-throughput investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haycock, Barry; Lewis, James P.

    2014-03-01

    A group of materials that shows promise in optoelectronic applications is the family of oxide materials (delafossites), of the form ABO2, where the A site is a monovalent cation (e . g . , Cu, Ag, or Au) and the B site is a trivalent cation (e . g ., Ga, Y, Al, or In). The bandgap of some delafossites can be tailored for specific purposes, such as in photocatalysis applications, with B-site doping. We report on our recent investigations of the properties of CuGaO2, CuInO2, CuAlO2 and NaInO2 and predict the relative disorder of Fe impurities by comparing crystallographic metrics resulting from Fe doping. We performed approximately 10K calculations, in parallel on the Titan platform (Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility), of possible Fe-impurity permutations to determine the most-likely configurations of Fe impurities relative to each another. Our computational approach allows us to study large supercells, consisting of 432 atoms, which enable us to examine the properties of these materials in increments of 1% for the B-site doping of Fe. We will present results from our energetically-preferred supercells and discuss further applications of our techniques applied for characterization of new reconstructions via derived metrics.

  10. Investigation of real materials with strong electronic correlations by the LDA+DMFT method.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V I; Lukoyanov, A V

    2014-02-01

    Materials with strong electronic correlations are at the cutting edge of experimental and theoretical studies, capturing the attention of researchers for a great variety of interesting phenomena: metal-insulator, phase and magnetic spin transitions, `heavy fermion' systems, interplay between magnetic order and superconductivity, appearance and disappearance of local magnetic moments, and transport property anomalies. It is clear that the richness of physical phenomena for these compounds is a result of partially filled 3d, 4f or 5f electron shells with local magnetic moments preserved in the solid state. Strong interactions of d and f electrons with each other and with itinerant electronic states of the material are responsible for its anomalous properties. Electronic structure calculations for strongly correlated materials should explicitly take into account Coulombic interactions between d or f electrons. Recent advances in this field are related to the development of the LDA+DMFT method, which combines local density approximation (LDA) with dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) to account for electronic correlation effects. In recent years, LDA+DMFT has allowed the successful treatment not only of simple systems but also of complicated real compounds. Nowadays, the LDA+DMFT method is the state-of-the-art tool for investigating correlated metals and insulators, spin and metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in transition-metal compounds in paramagnetic and magnetically ordered phases.

  11. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. PMID:27131216

  12. Numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of heated natural composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Mohammed, F. Abbas; Hashim, R.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work numerical investigation was carried out for laminar natural convection heat transfer from natural composite material (NCM). Three types of natural materials such as seed dates, egg shells, and feathers are mixed separately with polyester resin. Natural materials are added with different volume fraction (10%, 20%, and 30%) are heated with different heat flux (1078W/m2, 928W/m2, 750W/m2, 608W/m2, and 457W/m2) at (vertical, inclined, and horizontal) position. Continuity and Navier-Stocks equations are solved numerically in three dimensions using ANSYS FLUENT package 12.1 software commercial program. Numerical results showed the temperature distribution was affected for all types at volume fraction 30% and heat flux is 1078 W/m2, for different position. So, shows that the plumes and temperature behavior are affected by the air and the distance from heat source. Numerical results showed acceptable agreement with the experimental previous results.

  13. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  14. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    PubMed Central

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; Mcleod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface. PMID:26098413

  15. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  16. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of high-purity niobium materials: Oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Nand, Mangla; Jha, S. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present investigations of the presence of oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons in high-purity (residual resistivity ratio, ˜300) niobium (Nb) materials used in fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle accelerators. Raman spectroscopy of Nb materials (as-received from the vendor as well as after surface chemical- and thermal processing) revealed numerous peaks, which evidently show the presence of oxides (550 cm-1), hydrides (1277 and 1385 cm-1: ˜80 K temperature), and groups of hydrocarbons (1096, 2330, 2710, 2830, 2868, and 3080 cm-1). The present work provides direct spectroscopic evidence of hydrides in the electropolished Nb materials typically used in SRF cavities. Raman spectroscopy thus can provide vital information about the near-surface chemical species in niobium materials and will help in identifying the cause for the performance degradation of SRF cavities. Furthermore, photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the Nb samples to complement the Raman spectroscopy study. This study reveals the presence of C and O in the Nb samples. Core level spectra of Nb (doublet 3d5/2 and 3d3/2) show peaks near 206.6 and 209.4 eV, which can be attributed to the Nb5+ oxidation state. The core level spectra of C 1 s of the samples are dominated by graphitic carbon (binding energy, 284.6 eV), while the spectra of O 1 s are asymmetrically peaked near binding energy of ˜529 eV, and that indicates the presence of metal-oxide Nb2O5. The valence-band spectra of the Nb samples are dominated by a broad peak similar to O 2p states, but after sputtering (for 10 min) a peak appears at ˜1 eV, which is a feature of the elemental Nb atom.

  17. The high throughput investigation of polyphenolic couplers in biodegradable packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochhead, Robert Y.; Haynes, Camille T.; Jones, Stephen R.; Smith, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    Our goal is to select and develop stimuli-responsive interfacial coupling materials for nanocomposites that will enhance substrate mechanical properties during use but cause triggered disintegration when exposed to the appropriate aqueous environment. The study could potentially provide the scientific underpinning for the development of an interfacially interacting nanocomposite alloy capable of enhanced biodegradation in the aqueous environment. In the first stage of this study it was shown that quaternary ammonium polymers adsorbed on the faces of the montmorillonite platelets, non-ionic polyacrylamides adsorbed on the faces and edges by hydrogen bonding, and anionic polyelectrolytes, carboxylates and sulfonates, did not adsorb at all on the montmorillonite [R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, An investigative study of polymer adsorption to smectite clay: polyelectrolytes and sodium montmorillonite, in: R. Krishnamoorti, R. Vaia (Eds.), Polymer Nanocomposites, American Chemical Society, 2002; R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, C. Haynes, Interaction of hydrophilic polymers with smectite clays, Polymer Materials Science and Engineering, vol. 85, American Chemical Society, 2001, p. 419]. The objective of the second part of the study was to examine model polymers in order to guide research aimed at designing coupling polymers that would cause exfoliation of the clay. Based upon the earlier study, polyvinylamine was chosen as the model on the basis that it is a simple polymer with primary amine groups and the polymer charge density could be modified by simply changing the system pH. The aim of this research was to determine the conditions under which polyvinylamine, and selected derivatives of this polymer, would penetrate the galleries of the stacked montmorillonite platelets. The knowledge gained could be applied to predict systems that would facilitate intercalation or exfoliation of sodium montmorillonite. The investigative approach of the third stage was to

  18. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  19. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  20. Investigating Students' Ideas About X-rays While Developing Teaching Materials for a Medical Physics Course

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, Spartak; Zollman, Dean

    2007-01-30

    The goal of the Modern Miracle Medical Machines project is to promote pre-med students' interest in physics by using the context of contemporary medical imaging. The X-ray medical imaging learning module will be a central part of this effort. To investigate students' transfer of learning in this context we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. In the latter interview, some of the proposed learning materials were used. The students brought to our discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models which often are not always internally consistent or coherent.

  1. Reference waste forms and packing material for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-30

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, Calif., has been given the task of designing and verifying the performance of waste packages for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. NNWSI is studying the suitability of the tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site, for the potential construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository. This report gives a summary description of the three waste forms for which LLNL is designing waste packages: spent fuel, either as intact assemblies or as consolidated fuel pins, reprocessed commercial high-level waste in the form of borosilicate glass, and reprocessed defense high-level waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility in Aiken, S.C. Reference packing material for use with the alternative waste package design for spent fuel is also described. 14 references, 8 figures, 20 tables.

  2. Structural and multi-scale rheophysical investigation of diphasic magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Roger, Stéphane; Sang, Yan Yip Cheung; Bee, Agnès; Perzynski, Régine; Di Meglio, Jean Marc; Ponton, Alain

    2015-08-01

    We present a structural and a multi-scale rheophysical investigation of magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers, namely aqueous solutions of sodium alginate incorporating magnetic maghemite nanoparticles, functionalized with adsorbed negative citrate ions. The large alginate ionic strength impacts the structure and the rheology of these nanocomposites in zero magnetic field. In given physico-chemical conditions, the system is fluid and homogeneous on macroscopic scales while it is diphasic on microscopic ones, containing micro-droplets coming from the demixion of the system. These micro-droplets are liquid and deformable under magnetic field. Their under-field elongation and their zero-field relaxation are directly observed by optical microscopy to determine their interfacial tension, their magnetic susceptibility and their internal viscosity. A structural analysis of the solutions of alginate chains and of the phase-separated mixtures of alginate and nanoparticles by Small Angle Scattering completes the local description of the system. PMID:26264396

  3. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  4. Investigation of a Cermet Gas-turbine-blade Material of Titanium Carbide Infiltrated with Hastalloy C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Charles A

    1955-01-01

    A cermet composition was investigated as a potential material for gas-turbine blades. Blades of HS-21 alloy were also operated in the engine simultaneously to provide a basis of comparison. The cermet blades survived as long as approximately 312-1/2 hours at about 1500 degrees F with an average midspan centrifugal stress of approximately 11,500 psi. The alloy blade midspan stress was about 15,300 psi. Because of extensive damage to both types of blade due to external causes, a reliable comparison of operating lives could not be made. The cermet blades tended to fail in the airfoil rather than in the base, although the base was the usual location of failure in a prior study of cold-pressed and sintered cermets of other compositions with the same blade shape.

  5. Investigations on bactericidal properties of molybdenum-tungsten oxides combinatorial thin film material libraries.

    PubMed

    Mardare, Cezarina Cela; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2014-11-10

    A combinatorial thin film material library from the molybdenum-tungsten refractory metals oxides system was prepared by thermal coevaporation, and its structural and morphological properties were investigated after a multiple step heat treatment. A mixture of crystalline and amorphous oxides and suboxides was obtained, as well as surface structuring caused by the enrichment of molybdenum oxides in large grains. It was found that the oxide phases and the surface morphology change as a function of the compositional gradient. Tests of the library antimicrobial activity against E. coli were performed and the antimicrobial activity was proven in some defined compositional ranges. A mechanism for explaining the observed activity is proposed, involving a collective contribution from (i) increased local acidity due to the enrichment in large grains of molybdenum oxides with different stoichiometry and (ii) the release of free radicals from the W18O49 phase under visible light.

  6. Recovery of high-grade barite from waste pond materials. Report of investigations/1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, W.E.; Sullivan, G.V.

    1982-06-01

    The Bureau of Mines studied the potential for recovering marketable barite concentrates that meet oil well drilling-mud specifications from barite waste pond materials. The samples, which were obtained from Georgia, Nevada, Missouri, and Illinois, varied widely in character, particle size, and barite content. The samples were treated with sodium silicate and sodium cetyl-stearyl sulfate and then floated. The flotation flow sheet was modified to reject barren coarse and/or slime fractions from some of the samples, and one feed sample had to be scrubbed prior to flotation to remove residual flotation reagents. The cleaned concentrates had BaSO4 contents ranging from 95.0 to 96.9 percent, while recovering 81.2 to 95.9 percent of the barite in the feed. The specific gravity of each concentrate exceeded the specification of 4.2. The removal of the flotation reagents from the flotation concentrate was not investigated.

  7. Investigation of Electron Transfer-Based Photonic and Electro-Optic Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Abbott, Edwin H; Dickensheets, David; Donovan, Richard P; Hobbs, J D; Spangler, Lee; McGuirl, Michele A; Spangler, Charles; Rebane, Aleksander; Rosenburg, Edward; Schmidt, V H; Singel, David J

    2008-03-28

    Montana's state program began its sixth year in 2006. The project's research cluster focused on physical, chemical, and biological materials that exhibit unique electron-transfer properties. Our investigators have filed several patents and have also have established five spin-off businesses (3 MSU, 2 UM) and a research center (MT Tech). In addition, this project involved faculty and students at three campuses (MSU, UM, MT Tech) and has a number of under-represented students, including 10 women and 5 Native Americans. In 2006, there was an added emphasis on exporting seminars and speakers via the Internet from UM to Chief Dull Knife Community College, as well as work with the MT Department of Commerce to better educate our faculty regarding establishing small businesses, licensing and patent issues, and SBIR program opportunities.

  8. Structural and multi-scale rheophysical investigation of diphasic magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Roger, Stéphane; Sang, Yan Yip Cheung; Bee, Agnès; Perzynski, Régine; Di Meglio, Jean Marc; Ponton, Alain

    2015-08-01

    We present a structural and a multi-scale rheophysical investigation of magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers, namely aqueous solutions of sodium alginate incorporating magnetic maghemite nanoparticles, functionalized with adsorbed negative citrate ions. The large alginate ionic strength impacts the structure and the rheology of these nanocomposites in zero magnetic field. In given physico-chemical conditions, the system is fluid and homogeneous on macroscopic scales while it is diphasic on microscopic ones, containing micro-droplets coming from the demixion of the system. These micro-droplets are liquid and deformable under magnetic field. Their under-field elongation and their zero-field relaxation are directly observed by optical microscopy to determine their interfacial tension, their magnetic susceptibility and their internal viscosity. A structural analysis of the solutions of alginate chains and of the phase-separated mixtures of alginate and nanoparticles by Small Angle Scattering completes the local description of the system.

  9. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  10. Investigation of thermal distortion and control of spacecraft based on shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Du, Xingwen; Tan, Huifeng

    2009-07-01

    Gossamer space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space thermal environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna under space thermal environments. To maintain the required accuracy of the reflector under orbital temperature changes, the Gossamer space structures will utilize an active control system, consisting of boundary control actuators and an electrostatic figure control system with a real time closed loop feedback. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with photogrammetric measurement technique and Bragg fiber grating (FBG) sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing small amplitude distortion of Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna based on the active components made of shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) material. Then, simulations are finished by NASTRAN finite element software with active effect which is considered to be deformation applied on the analytical model. The amplitude of distortion is obtained by the simulations. Both the experimental and numerical solution show that the amplitude of accuracy are developed which proves the feasibility of shape control using shape memory materials and this investigation explores the feasibility of utilizing an active cable based control system of shape memory materials to reduce global distortion due to thermal loading. It is found that through proper assemble of cable lengths and attachment points, significant thermal distortion reduction is achieved. Specifically, radial distortion due to on-orbit thermal loading .

  11. Interactions between Antibiotics and Graphene-Based Materials in Water: A Comparative Experimental and Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuntong; Shen, Jiachun; Zhuo, Ning; Tian, Ziqi; Xu, Peiran; Yang, Zhen; Yang, Weiben

    2016-09-14

    Complex interactions between antibiotics and graphene-based materials determine both the adsorption performance of graphene-based materials and the transport behaviors of antibiotics in water. In this work, such interactions were investigated through adsorption experiments, instrumental analyses and theoretical DFT calculations. Three typical antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) and tetracycline (TC)) and different graphene-based materials (divided into two groups: graphene oxides-based ones (GOs) and reduced GOs (RGOs)) were employed. Optimal adsorption pHs for NOR, SDZ, and TC are 6.2, 4.0, and 4.0, respectively. At corresponding optimal pHs, NOR favored RGOs (adsorption capability: ∼50 mg/g) while SDZ preferred GOs (∼17 mg/g); All adsorbents exhibited similar uptake of TC (∼70 mg/g). Similar amounts of edge carboxyls of both GOs and RGOs wielded electrostatic attraction with NOR and TC, but not with SDZ. According to DFT-calculated most-stable-conformations of antibiotics-adsorbents complexes, the intrinsic distinction between GOs and RGOs was the different amounts of sp(2) and sp(3) hybridization regions: π-π electron donor-acceptor effect of antibiotic-sp(2)/sp(3) and H-bonds of antibiotic-sp(3) coexisted. Binding energy (BE) of the former was larger for NOR; the latter interaction was stronger for SDZ; two species of TC at the optimal pH, i.e., TC(+) and TC(0), possessed larger BE with sp(3) and sp(2) regions, respectively. PMID:27548426

  12. Preparation and in vitro investigation of chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite composite used as bone substitute materials.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhang; Yubao, Li; Aiping, Yang; Xuelin, Peng; Xuejiang, Wang; Xiang, Zhang

    2005-03-01

    Chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite composites with different weight ratios were prepared through a co-precipitation method using Ca(OH)(2), H(3)PO(4) and chitosan as starting materials. The properties of these composites were characterized by means of TEM, IR, XRD, burn-out test and universal matertial test machine. Additionally, in vitro tests were also conducted to investigate the biodegradability and bioactivity of the composite. The results showed that the HA synthesized here was poorly crystalline carbonated nanometer crystals and dispersed uniformly in chitosan phase and there is no phase-separation between the two phases. Because of the interactions between chitosan and n-HA, the mechanical properties of these composites were improved, and the maximum value of the compressive strength was measured about 120 MPa corresponding to the chitosan/n-HA composite with a weight ratio of 30/70. The specimens made of 30/70 chitosan/n-HA composite exhibit high biodegradability and bioactivity when being immersed in SBF solutions. The composite is appropriate to being used as scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering. (c) Springer Science + Business Media, Inc.

  13. An investigation of the influence of acoustic waves on the liquid flow through a porous material.

    PubMed

    Poesio, Pietro; Ooms, Gijs; Barake, Sander; van der Bas, Fred

    2002-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made of the influence of high-frequency acoustic waves on the flow of a liquid through a porous material. The experiments have been performed on Berea sandstone cores. Two acoustic horns were used with frequencies of 20 and 40 kHz, and with maximum power output of 2 and 0.7 kW, respectively. Also, a temperature measurement of the flowing liquid inside the core was made. A high external pressure was applied in order to avoid cavitation. The acoustic waves were found to produce a significant effect on the pressure gradient at constant liquid flow rate through the core samples. During the application of acoustic waves the pressure gradient inside the core decreases. This effect turned out to be due to the decrease of the liquid viscosity caused by an increase in liquid temperature as a result of the acoustic energy dissipation inside the porous material. Also, a theoretical model has been developed to calculate the dissipation effect on the viscosity and on the pressure gradient. The model predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Investigation of Thunniform Swimming Using Material Testing, Biomimetic Robotics and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Saraiya, Vishaal; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lewis, Gregory; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    Thunniform swimming is well recognized as an efficient method for high-speed long-distance underwater travelers such as tuna. Previous research has shown that tuna relies on contraction and relaxation of red muscle to generate angular motion of its large, crescent-shaped caudal fin through its peduncle. However, few researchers conduct deep investigation of material properties of tuna caudal fin and peduncle. This research project is composed of two parts, first of which is determining mechanical properties of components such as spine joints, tendons, fin rays and cartilage, from which the biomechanics of tuna tail can be better understood. The second part is building a robotic system mimicking a real tuna tail based on previously retrieved information, and testing the system inside a flow tank. With the help of PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), fluid-structure interaction of the biomimetic fin is visualized and data such as swimming speed and power consumption are retrieved through the robotic system. The final outcome should explain how the material properties of tuna tail affect fluid dynamics of thunniform swimming. This project is supported by Office of Naval Research (ONRBAA13-022).

  15. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-04-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  16. Investigation of the effects of acid deposition on materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakuma, R.; Mansfeld, F.; Henry, R.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the project was to determine damage functions which relate the atmospheric corrosion losses to the concentration of the pollutants which are routinely monitored. The materials investigated in the study were chosen based on the economic importance and included galvanized steel, nickel, aluminum, two types of flat latex exterior housepaint, nylon fabric, polyethylene and concrete. Atmospheric data were provided by ARB's air monitoring network at the three test sites in Southern California. The results from the field sites have been supported by laboratory tests in which corrosion damage was determined. The samples were exposed to SO2, NO2, or O3 and the combinations and to HNO3 aerosol of two different concentrations and flow rates. Corrosion rates determined by weight loss for galvanized steel, nickel, aluminum and latex paint containing some carbonate extender were higher in the summer than in the winter despite the fact that moisture and primary pollutant levels are higher in the winter. The corrosion rates for galvanized steel which has served as a benchmark material in most atmospheric exposure tests were very low and similar to rates which are usually observed at clean, rural areas. Damage functions were determined by regression of the corrosion rates against the explanatory variables which in the study were O3, NO2, T60, O3xT60, NO2xT60 and O3xNO2 averaged over the exposure T60 is the time for which the RH exceeded 60%.

  17. Dynamic acousto-elastic test using continuous probe wave and transient vibration to investigate material nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Eiras, J N; Vu, Q A; Lott, M; Payá, J; Garnier, V; Payan, C

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the dynamic acousto-elastic effect of a continuous high frequency wave for investigating the material nonlinearity upon transient vibration. The approach is demonstrated on a concrete sample measuring 15×15×60cm(3). Two ultrasonic transducers (emitter and receiver) are placed at its middle span. A continuous high frequency wave of 500kHz propagates through the material and is modulated with a hammer blow. The position of the hammer blow on the sample is configured to promote the first bending mode of vibration. The use of a continuous wave allows discrete time extraction of the nonlinear behavior by a short-time Fourier transform approach, through the simultaneous comparison of a reference non-modulated signal and an impact-modulated signal. The hammer blow results in phase shifts and variations of signal amplitude between reference and perturbed signals, which are driven by the resonant frequency of the sample. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the relaxation mechanisms (modulus and attenuation recovery) is conducted to untangle the coupled fast and slow hysteretic effects. PMID:27018754

  18. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  19. Investigating Fracture Behaviors of Polymer and Polymeric Composite Materials Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Agastra, Pancasatya; Mandell, John; Bertelsen, Williams D.; LaFrance, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbine blades are usually fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) materials, which are subject to complex loading conditions during service. The reliability of the blades thus depends on the mechanical behaviors of the FRP under various loading conditions. Specifically, the fracture behavior of FRP is of great importance to both the scientific research community and the wind industry. In the current project, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) to study the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading. For the SNTT test method, round-rod specimens with V-grooved spiral lines are subjected to pure torsion. Depending on the pitch angle of the spiral lines, pure Mode I, pure Mode III, or mixed Mode I/Mode III loading conditions can be simulated. A three dimensional finite element analysis is then used to evaluate the fracture toughness and energy release rate of SNTT specimens. In the current study, both epoxy and fiberglass reinforced epoxy materials are investigated using the SNTT technique. This paper will discuss the fracture behaviors of mode I and mixed mode samples, with or without fatigue precrack. In addition, results from fractographic study and finite element analysis will be presented and discussed in detail.

  20. Material specific lateralization of medial temporal lobe function: An fMRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Marshall A; Hornberger, Michael; Piguet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The theory of material specific lateralization of memory function posits that left and right MTL regions are asymmetrically involved in mnemonic processing of verbal and nonverbal material respectively. Lesion and functional imaging (fMRI) studies provide robust evidence for a left MTL asymmetry in the verbal memory domain. Evidence for a right MTL/nonverbal asymmetry is not as robust. A handful of fMRI studies have investigated this issue but have generally utilised nonverbal stimuli which are amenable to semantic elaboration. This fMRI study aimed to investigate the neural correlates of recognition memory processing in 20 healthy young adults (mean age = 26 years) for verbal stimuli and nonverbal stimuli that were specifically designed to minimize verbalisation. Analyses revealed that the neural correlates of recognition memory processing for verbal and nonverbal stimuli were differentiable and asymmetrically recruited the left and right MTL respectively. The right perirhinal cortex and hippocampus were preferentially involved in successful recognition memory of items devoid of semantic information. In contrast, the left anterior hippocampus was preferentially involved in successful recognition memory of stimuli which contained semantic meaning. These results suggest that the left MTL is preferentially involved in mnemonic processing of verbal/semantic information. In contrast, the right MTL is preferentially involved in visual/non-semantic mnemonic processing. We propose that during development, the left MTL becomes specialised for verbal mnemonic processing due to its proximity with left lateralised cortical language processing areas while visual/non-semantic mnemonic processing gets 'crowded out' to become predominantly, but not completely, the domain of the right MTL.

  1. Experimental studies of seal materials for potential use in a Los Medanos-type bedded salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.

    1981-09-01

    This investigation is composed of the following three tasks: (1) materials selection and factors affecting longevity of seal materials; (2) experimental seal materials for shaft, tunnel, and room backfill incorporating rock from the Los Medanos area; and (3) effects of the curing environment on properties of seal materials. Cement-based materials have been studied as candidates for backfilling and sealing boreholes, shafts, tunnels, and rooms in potential repository environments, particularly in bedded salt. In these studies, potential seal materials were selected and subjected to preliminary tests. Then, geochemical factors which control longevity of repository-sealing materials were investigated. The subjects of investigations included: factors controlling the attainment of equilibrium, with time, of the plug components; and the rate of approach of the plug-component subsystem to a state of equilibrium within the total system. The effect of these factors upon changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radwaste species are being determined. High values were obtained for compressive strengths of some concretes (> 35 MPa); these samples also had very low permeabilities to brine (10/sup -7/ or 10/sup -8/ darcy). Highest strengths were obtained from samples cast with dolostone and anhydrite aggregate. Apparently, a strong bond generally was formed between the grout and the various rocks, evidenced by breakage through aggregate particles in tests of compressive strength. An expansive grout mixture containing salt was evaluated in five curing conditions, including: solutions saturated with CaSO/sub 4/, and Ca(OH)/sub 2/; deionized water; naturally occurring brine; and humid air, all at 38/sup 0/C. Expansion due to extensive growth of ettringite occurred in the first three of these five environments.

  2. Excess foundry sand characterization and experimental investigation in controlled low-strength material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, An

    The objective of this dissertation is to provide support with technical data for the reuse of excess foundry sand. The dissertation addresses two topics: a statistical sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry waste streams, and a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM). The survival analysis statistical technique is developed for processing censored characterization data with significant confidence. Using this methodology, supported by abundant characterization datasets, foundry waste streams are characterized in full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry waste streams are evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of reuse marketplace of foundry waste streams. Excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands are investigated through laboratory experiments. Technical data regarding physical characteristics of excess foundry sands, design, behavior, performance and environmental impact of fresh and hardened CLSM are presented in details. Wide span of parameters are analyzed to evaluate the qualification of integrating excess foundry sands into CLSM.

  3. Investigation of plasma-organic materials interaction in aqueous solution with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, K.; Miyazaki, A.; Setsuhara, Y.

    2014-06-01

    An investigation was carried out into the interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma with an organic material in an aqueous solution. The degradation of methylene blue (MB) by plasma exposure through the gas/liquid interface was studied. In the optical emission spectrum of the plasma, in addition to strong He emission lines, emissions due to O and OH radicals formed by dissociation of water were present. The change in the absorbance of a MB aqueous solution during plasma exposure was measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The absorption peak intensity decreased with plasma exposure time and complete decolorization occurred after 10 min. Since plasma exposure was found to decrease the pH of water, the effect of changes in pH on MB degradation in the absence of a plasma was investigated using solutions with different pH values. However, varying the pH was found to have no influence on MB degradation. The results indicated that MB degradation occurred due to interactions between MB and radicals across the plasma/liquid interface.

  4. Investigation of the Crystal Growth of Dielectric Materials by the Bridgman Technique Using Vibrational Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.; Zharikov, Evgenii

    2002-01-01

    The principal goal of this ground-based program, which started on February 1, 1998 and concluded on April 30, 2002, was to investigate the influence of low frequency vibrations on the fluid flow and quality of dielectric oxide crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. This experimental program was a collaborative effort between Stanford University and the General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, and included a strong emphasis on both physical modeling and the growth of some technologically important materials. Additionally it was carried out initially in collaboration with the theoretical and numerical investigations of A.Fedoseyev and I.Alexander (ongoing in another NASA sponsored program). This latter program involved a study of vibro-convective buoyancy-driven flows in cylindrical configurations with the expectation of being able to use vibrational flows to control buoyancy driven fluid transport to off-set the effect of "g-jitter" during microgravity Bridgman crystal growth. These two programs taken together, were designed to lead to a new parametric control variable which can be used to either suppress or control convection, and thereby heat and mass transport during Bridgman crystal growth. It was expected to be effective in either a terrestrial or space environment.

  5. Material Modeling of Space Shuttle Leading Edge and External Tank Materials For Use in the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Melis, Matthew; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Upon the commencement of the analytical effort to characterize the impact dynamics and damage of the Space Shuttle Columbia leading edge due to External Tank insulating foam, the necessity of creating analytical descriptions of these materials became evident. To that end, material models were developed of the leading edge thermal protection system, Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC), and a low density polyurethane foam, BX-250. Challenges in modeling the RCC include its extreme brittleness, the differing behavior in compression and tension, and the anisotropic fabric layup. These effects were successfully included in LS-DYNA Material Model 58, *MAT_LAMINATED_ COMPOSITE_ FABRIC. The differing compression and tension behavior was modeled using the available damage parameters. Each fabric layer was given an integration point in the shell element, and was allowed to fail independently. Comparisons were made to static test data and coupon ballistic impact tests before being utilized in the full scale analysis. The foam's properties were typical of elastic automotive foams; and LS-DYNA Material Model 83, *MAT_FU_CHANG_FOAM, was successfully used to model its behavior. Material parameters defined included strain rate dependent stress-strain curves for both loading and un-loading, and for both compression and tension. This model was formulated with static test data and strain rate dependent test data, and was compared to ballistic impact tests on load-cell instrumented aluminum plates. These models were subsequently utilized in analysis of the Shuttle leading edge full scale ballistic impact tests, and are currently being used in the Return to Flight Space Shuttle re-certification effort.

  6. Pressurized grout remote backfilling at AML sites near Beulah and Zap, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.J.; Dodd, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Division of the North Dakota Public Service Commission (PSC) is charged with the reclamation of hazardous abandoned mine sites in North Dakota. Several underground lignite coalmines were operated near the cities of Beulah and Zap, North Dakota, from the early 1900's until about 1955. Coal seams in this area were relatively thick and the overburden generally shallow. As these mines have deteriorated with time, deep collapse features, or sinkholes, have surfaced in many areas. These features are very dangerous, especially when they occur at or near residential and commercial areas and public roads. In the past five years, sinkholes have surfaced beneath a commercial building (boat dealership, lounge, and gas station) and beneath a nearby occupied mobile home north of Beulah. sinkholes have also surfaced near KHOL Radio Station in Beulah and in the right of way of a public road south of Zap. The AML Division has conducted several emergency sinkhole-filling projects in these areas. In 1995--97, the AML Division conducted exploratory drilling which confirmed the presence of collapsing underground mines at these sites. The remediation of these sites around Beulah/Zap will take place over several years and involve three or more separate contracts due to budget considerations. In 1997, the AML Division began reclamation at these sties utilizing pressurized grout remote backfilling. In this technique, a cementitious grout is pumped through cased drill holes directly into the mine cavities to fill them and thereby stabilize the surface from collapse. The successful contractor for Phase One of the project was The Concrete Doctor, Inc. (TCDI). This paper will concentrate on Phase One of this work performed from June through September 1997. This project is especially interesting because grout was pumped through holes drilled inside the occupied commercial building. Grout was also pumped through angled holes that intercepted mined workings directly

  7. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

  8. An investigation of the shear bond strength of compomer restorative material to enamel and dentine.

    PubMed

    Gray, G B; Kataria, V; McManus, S; Jagger, D C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of one step adhesives on the shear bond strength of a compomer restorative material to both enamel and dentine. Human extracted teeth were used for the study. Ten samples were prepared for both enamel and dentine specimens for each of the five groups: Tooth, no etch, Prime and Bond NT (P+B NT); tooth, Non-Rinse Conditioner (NRC), P+B NT; tooth, NRC, Prime and Bond 2.1 (P+B 2.1); tooth, etch, P+B NT; tooth, etch, P+B 2.1. The specimens were subjected to bond testing. The shear bond strength was measured using an Inston 1193 testing machine using a cross head speed of 1 mm/minute. The specimens were tested to destruction. The results show that for the enamel specimens the highest bond strength was recorded for those specimens subjected to Etch, P+B 2.1 (22.1 MPa) and Etch P+B NT (20.0 MPa). The groups of specimens which did not undergo etching had very low bond strengths ranging from 11.4 MPa for NRC, P+B 2.1, 8.5 MPa for NRC P+B NT to 6.9 MPa for P+B NT. For the dentine specimens, for all of the groups, the shear bond strengths were low. Those groups subjected to etching produced the highest values of 7.9 MPa for NRC P+B 2.1 with the lowest value of 6.1 MPa for NRC P+B NT. These bond strengths were significantly lower than those achieved for bonding to enamel. Prime and Bond NT and Prime and Bond 2.1, used in conjunction with acid etching, produce satisfactory bond strengths of compomer restorative material to enamel. Bond strengths to dentine were low.

  9. State Variables in Granular Materials: an Investigation of Volume and Stress Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James Graham

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of granular materials near the transition between solid-like and fluid-like behavior. We aim to understand the collective dynamics in dense driven systems, the role of geometry in the volume fluctuations, and the equilibration of granular temperatures. The experiments are conducted using two-dimensional materials composed of a single layer of disks which are supported by a thin layer of air. In driven granular systems, particle dynamics have commonly been quantified by the diffusion, even though this measure discards information about collective particle motion known to be important in dense systems. We draw inspiration from fluid mixing, and utilize the braid entropy, which provides a direct topological measure of the entanglement of particle trajectories and has been used to quantify mixing. We find that as the density or pressure increases, the dynamics slow and the braiding factor exhibits intermittency signifying a loss of chaos in the trajectories on the experimental timescale. In the same system, we experimentally measure the local volume fraction distribution, which we find to be independent of the boundary condition and the inter-particle friction coefficient. We extend the granocentric model to account for randomness in particle separations, which are important in dynamic systems. This model is in quantitative agreement with experimentally-measured local volume fraction distributions, indicating that geometry plays a central role in determining the magnitude of local volume fluctuations. Finally, we test whether the zeroth law (temperature-equilibration) of several ensemble-based granular temperatures is satisfied by two granular systems in contact. We calculate the compactivity and angoricity which are the temperature-like quantities associated with the volume and stress ensembles; we observe the compactivity does not satisfy the zeroth law test, while the angoricity does equilibrate between the two systems.

  10. An investigation of oxide composite anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    This thesis is aimed to develop high-capacity, inexpensive, long cycle life and environmentally benign anode for lithium-ion batteries. With those goals in mind, a novel oxide alloy composite materials MO-Sn xCoyCz (MO=GeO2, SnO2, SiO and SiO2) have been proposed and investigated. Mechanical alloying method has been used to synthesize oxide alloy composite anode material. The MO-SnxCo yCz composite has the potential to combine the advantageous properties of both Sn-Co-C (long cycle life) and MO (high capacity) and, thereby, improve the overall electrochemical performance. The as-milled materials were studied by BET, laser particle analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), pair distribution function (PDF), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Evaluating from electrochemical performance, tap density, and cost, GeO2 and SiO are the most promising candidates alloyed with Sn-Co-C system. The GeO 2 composite anode shows a reversible capacity over 800 mAh/g with good capacity retention. Furthermore, the 1st cycle coulombic efficiency has been improved up to 80%. Compared with GeO2, SiO has an advantage on the price. A series of composite anode materials of xSiO * (1-x)SnxCoyC z were studied by electrochemical method. The composition of 50 wt.%SiO-50 wt.%Sn30Co30C40 shows the best electrochemical performance. Two different milling methods (ultra high-energy milling and SPEX milling) were employed to prepare the samples. Ultra high-energy milling sample exhibited superior electrochemical performance. Stabilized lithium metallic powder technique is employed on this anode to improve the first cycle coulombic efficiency. Full-cell configuration (Li1.2Ni 0.15Co0.10Mn0.55O2 vs. 50 wt.%SiO-50 wt.% Sn30Co30C40) has been cycled over 200 cycles successfully. The SiO-SnxFeyC z (x : y: z molar ratio) composite has been milled in different compositions. Metallic iron was employed instead of cobalt, which cuts the cost significantly but does not

  11. The investigation of molecular mixing and segregation in opv materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochester, Christopher W.

    With the growing energy demand and the threat of global warming caused by our excessive use of fossil fuels, it is imperative that we search for and develop alternative ways to generate energy. Using photovoltaic technologies to produce energy is a good way to supplement our current energy supplies. The problem with conventional PV technology is that it is too expensive to compete with cheap fossil fuels. Polymer solar cells have the potential to be a much cheaper alternative to conventional PV technology, as they can easily be manufactured using simple roll-to-roll printing methods, are light-weight, and are flexible. Polymer solar cells consist of layered organic materials that are deposited using solution deposition methods. The organic layers often consist of mixtures of organic molecules, that may be composed of polymer and small molecules. The behavior of these organic materials are not always predictable as they have been found to often diffuse, causing material segregation and mixing within layers and at interfaces. These processes are measured and observed using a combination of experimental techniques. P3HT/PCBM bilayer samples were fabricated by spin coating PCBM dissolved in CH2Cl 2 onto P3HT films. We show using steady-state spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and current-voltage measurements that substantial mixing occurs between the P3HT and PCBM during the PCBM deposition. We conclude that the PCBM mixes with amorphous P3HT and does not disrupt the existing crystalline domains. A PCBM loading of 25-30 wt% into the P3HT layer was determined, which explains why reported photovoltaic performances of these solution processed bilayer structures are comparable to that of bulk-heterojunctions. The use of F4-TCNQ as a molecular dopant for the polymeric hole transport layer, S-P3MEET, for use in organic photovoltaic devices was investigated. It is shown that F4-TCNQ effectively oxidized the S-P3MEET polymer, and that even for low doping concentrations

  12. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmikko, Arto; Humphrey, Maris

    2014-07-10

    The goal of this grant was the development of a new type of scanning acoustic microscope for nanometer resolution ultrasound imaging, based on ultrafast optoacoustics (>GHz). In the microscope, subpicosecond laser pulses was used to generate and detect very high frequency ultrasound with nanometer wavelengths. We report here on the outcome of the 3-year DOE/BES grant which involved the design, multifaceted construction, and proof-of-concept demonstration of an instrument that can be used for quantitative imaging of nanoscale material features – including features that may be buried so as to be inaccessible to conventional lightwave or electron microscopies. The research program has produced a prototype scanning optoacoustic microscope which, in combination with advanced computational modeling, is a system-level new technology (two patents issues) which offer novel means for precision metrology of material nanostructures, particularly those that are of contemporary interest to the frontline micro- and optoelectronics device industry. For accomplishing the ambitious technical goals, the research roadmap was designed and implemented in two phases. In Phase I, we constructed a “non-focusing” optoacoustic microscope instrument (“POAM”), with nanometer vertical (z-) resolution, while limited to approximately 10 micrometer scale lateral recolution. The Phase I version of the instrument which was guided by extensive acoustic and optical numerical modeling of the basic underlying acoustic and optical physics, featured nanometer scale close loop positioning between the optoacoustic transducer element and a nanostructured material sample under investigation. In phase II, we implemented and demonstrated a scanning version of the instrument (“SOAM”) where incident acoustic energy is focused, and scanned on lateral (x-y) spatial scale in the 100 nm range as per the goals of the project. In so doing we developed advanced numerical simulations to provide

  13. Investigating the stability of cathode materials for rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqing

    Lithium ion batteries are widely used in portable electronic devices and electric vehicles. However, safety is one of the most important issues for the Li-ion batteries' use. Some cathode materials, such as LiCoO 2, are thermally unstable in the charged state. Upon decomposition these cathode materials release O2, which could react with organic electrolyte, leading to a thermal runaway. Thus understanding the stability of the cathode materials is critical to the safety of lithium ion batteries. Olivine-type LiMnPO4 is a promising cathode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high energy density. We have revealed the critical role of carbon in the stability and thermal behaviour of olivine MnPO 4 obtained by chemical delithiation of LiMnPO4. (Li)MnPO 4 samples with various particle sizes and carbon contents were studied. Carbon-free LiMnPO4 obtained by solid state synthesis in O 2 becomes amorphous upon delithiation. Small amounts of carbon (0.3 wt.%) help to stabilize the olivine structure, so that completely delithiated crystalline olivine MnPO4 can be obtained. Larger amount of carbon (2 wt.%) prevents full delithiation. Heating in air, O2, or N 2 results in structural disorder (< 300 °C), formation of an intermediate sarcopside Mn3(PO4)2 phase (350 -- 450 °C), and complete decomposition to Mn2P2O 7 on extended heating at 400 °C. Carbon protects MnPO4 from reacting with environmental water, which is detrimental to its structural stability. We not only studied the crystalline olivine MnPO4, but also investigated the amorphous products obtained from carbon-free LiMnPO 4. We have revealed the Mn dissolution phenomenon during chemical delithiation of LiMnPO4, which causes the amorphization of olivine MnPO 4. Properties of crystalline-MnPO4 obtained from carbon-coated LiMnPO4 and of amorphous product resulting from the delithiation of pure LiMnPO4 were studied and compared. The P-rich amorphous phases in the latter are considered to be MnHP2O7 and MnH2P

  14. Investigating the Structure-Property Relationships of Aqueous Self-Assembled Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, Daniel Vincent

    The components of all living organisms are formed through aqueous self-assembly of organic and inorganic materials through physical interactions including hydrophobic, electrostatic, and hydrogen bonding. In this dissertation, these physical interactions were exploited to develop nanostructured materials for a range of applications. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) self-assemble into varying structures depending on the physical interactions of the peptides and tails. PA aggregation was investigated by cryo-TEM to provide insight on the effects of varying parameters, including the number and length of the lipid tails as well as the number, length, charge, hydrophobicity, and the hydrogen bonding ability of the peptides. It was determined that cylindrical micelles are most commonly formed, and that specific criteria must be met in order to form spherical micelles, nanoribbons, vesicles or less ordered aggregates. Controlling the aggregated structure is necessary for many applications---particularly in therapeutics. Additionally, two-headed PAs were designed to act as a catalyst and template for biomimetic mineralization to control the formation of inorganic nanomaterials. Finally, injectable hydrogels made from ABA triblock copolymers were synthesized with the A blocks being functionalized with either guanidinium or sulfonate groups. These oppositely charged polyelectrolyte endblocks formed complex coacervate domains, which served as physical crosslinks in the hydrogel network. The mechanical properties, the network structure, the nature of the coacervate domain and the kinetics of hydrogel formation were investigated as a function of polymer concentration, salt concentration, pH and stoichiometry with rheometry, SAXS and SANS. It was shown that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels was highly dependent on the structural organization of the coacervate domains and that the properties could be tuned with polymer and salt concentration. Polymer and salt concentration were

  15. INVESTIGATION OF CONTACT VACUUMING FOR REMEDIATION OF FUNGALLY CONTAMINATED DUCT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental fungi become a potential Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) problem when adequate moisture and nutrients are present in building materials. Because of their potential to rapidly spread contamination throughout a building, ventilation system materials are of particular signifi...

  16. A test and instrumentation system for the investigation of degradation of electrical insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    The basic test methods of aging and deterioration mechanisms of electrical insulating materials are discussed. A comprehensive test system developed to study the degradation process is described. This system is completely checked, and calibrated with a few insulating material samples.

  17. Ultrastructural Heterogeneity of Carbonaceous Material in Ancient Cherts: Investigating Biosignature Origin and Preservation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuangao; Engdahl, Anders; Zhu, Shixing; Vajda, Vivi; McLoughlin, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Opaline silica deposits on Mars may be good target sites where organic biosignatures could be preserved. Potential analogues on Earth are provided by ancient cherts containing carbonaceous material (CM) permineralized by silica. In this study, we investigated the ultrastructure and chemical characteristics of CM in the Rhynie chert (c. 410 Ma, UK), Bitter Springs Formation (c. 820 Ma, Australia), and Wumishan Formation (c. 1485 Ma, China). Raman spectroscopy indicates that the CM has experienced advanced diagenesis or low-grade metamorphism at peak metamorphic temperatures of 150-350°C. Raman mapping and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy were used to document subcellular-scale variation in the CM of fossilized plants, fungi, prokaryotes, and carbonaceous stromatolites. In the Rhynie chert, ultrastructural variation in the CM was found within individual fossils, while in coccoidal and filamentous microfossils of the Bitter Springs and formless CM of the Wumishan stromatolites ultrastructural variation was found between, not within, different microfossils. This heterogeneity cannot be explained by secondary geological processes but supports diverse carbonaceous precursors that experienced differential graphitization. Micro-FTIR analysis found that CM with lower structural order contains more straight carbon chains (has a lower R3/2 branching index) and that the structural order of eukaryotic CM is more heterogeneous than prokaryotic CM. This study demonstrates how Raman spectroscopy combined with micro-FTIR can be used to investigate the origin and preservation of silica-permineralized organics. This approach has good capability for furthering our understanding of CM preserved in Precambrian cherts, and potential biosignatures in siliceous deposits on Mars.

  18. Ultrastructural Heterogeneity of Carbonaceous Material in Ancient Cherts: Investigating Biosignature Origin and Preservation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuangao; Engdahl, Anders; Zhu, Shixing; Vajda, Vivi; McLoughlin, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Opaline silica deposits on Mars may be good target sites where organic biosignatures could be preserved. Potential analogues on Earth are provided by ancient cherts containing carbonaceous material (CM) permineralized by silica. In this study, we investigated the ultrastructure and chemical characteristics of CM in the Rhynie chert (c. 410 Ma, UK), Bitter Springs Formation (c. 820 Ma, Australia), and Wumishan Formation (c. 1485 Ma, China). Raman spectroscopy indicates that the CM has experienced advanced diagenesis or low-grade metamorphism at peak metamorphic temperatures of 150-350°C. Raman mapping and micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy were used to document subcellular-scale variation in the CM of fossilized plants, fungi, prokaryotes, and carbonaceous stromatolites. In the Rhynie chert, ultrastructural variation in the CM was found within individual fossils, while in coccoidal and filamentous microfossils of the Bitter Springs and formless CM of the Wumishan stromatolites ultrastructural variation was found between, not within, different microfossils. This heterogeneity cannot be explained by secondary geological processes but supports diverse carbonaceous precursors that experienced differential graphitization. Micro-FTIR analysis found that CM with lower structural order contains more straight carbon chains (has a lower R3/2 branching index) and that the structural order of eukaryotic CM is more heterogeneous than prokaryotic CM. This study demonstrates how Raman spectroscopy combined with micro-FTIR can be used to investigate the origin and preservation of silica-permineralized organics. This approach has good capability for furthering our understanding of CM preserved in Precambrian cherts, and potential biosignatures in siliceous deposits on Mars. PMID:26496525

  19. An Investigation of North Dakota's Special Education Commerical Curriculum Material: No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Drew; Hartman, Donna

    Questionnaires completed by 126 instructors of handicapped students in North Dakota were analyzed to examine the use of curriculum materials in special education. Teachers were asked to list at least 10 curriculum materials presently used by the students. Of the 536 materials named, 255 were classified through the use of the Annehurst Curriculum…

  20. Electrochemical investigations of advanced materials for microelectronic and energy storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonetilleke, Pubudu Chaminda

    A broad range of electrochemical techniques are employed in this work to study a selected set of advanced materials for applications in microelectronics and energy storage devices. The primary motivation of this study has been to explore the capabilities of certain modern electrochemical techniques in a number of emerging areas of material processing and characterization. The work includes both aqueous and non-aqueous systems, with applications in two rather general areas of technology, namely microelectronics and energy storage. The sub-systems selected for investigation are: (i) Electrochemical mechanical and chemical mechanical planarization (ECMP and CMP, respectively), (ii) Carbon nanotubes in combination with room temperature ionic liquids (ILs), and (iii) Cathode materials for high-performance Li ion batteries. The first group of systems represents an important building block in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. The second and third groups of systems are relevant for new energy storage technologies, and have generated immense interests in recent years. A common feature of these different systems is that they all are associated with complex surface reactions that dictate the performance of the devices based on them. Fundamental understanding of these reactions is crucial to further development and expansion of their associated technologies. It is the complex mechanistic details of these surface reactions that we address using a judicious combination of a number of state of the art electrochemical techniques. The main electrochemical techniques used in this work include: (i) Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and slow scan cyclic voltammetry (SSCV, a special case of CV); (ii) Galvanostatic (or current-controlled) measurements; (iii) Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), based on two different methodologies, namely, Fourier transform EIS (FT-EIS, capable of studying fast reaction kinetics in a time-resolved mode), and EIS using frequency response

  1. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  2. Sheetflow Effects and Canal Backfilling on Sediment Source and Transport in Everglades Freshwater Marshes: Analysis of Molecular Organic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, P.; He, D.; Saunders, C.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Jara, B.; Jaffe, R.

    2014-12-01

    Historic freshwater sheetflow in the Florida Everglades distributed sediment to form a ridge-and-slough landscape. However, drainage along with reduction and obstruction of flow has resulted in degradation of this ridged topography. The DECOMP Physical Model is a landscape-scale project aiming to reestablish natural sheetflow to the central and southern Everglades by redesigning barriers to flow. To validate proof of concept that increased flow will rebuild ridge-slough microtopography, biomarker proxies were established for ridge and slough organic matter sources. In addition, partial and complete canal backfill options were assessed via sediment trap accumulation in each backfill treatment area. Flocculent matter (floc) and sediment samples were collected, solvent extracted, chromatographically separated, and analyzed on a GC/MS using internal standard for quantification. Four molecular organic biomarkers were evaluated: the aquatic proxy (Paq), highly-branched isoprenoids (C20 HBI), kaurenes and botyrococcenes. Paq, an aquatic proxy of mid to long-chain n-alkanes, was shown to clearly differentiate between ridge-derived and slough-derived organic matter with Paq values increasing along ridge-to-slough transects. Kaurenes indicated presence of ridge-derived organic matter while C20 HBI and botyrococcenes were indicative of periphyton-derived organic matter which is commonly more abundant in sloughs. Biomarker distributions during both low (present day) and high (managed) water flow through the DECOMP experimental parcel were determined and discussed comparatively.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE RELEASE FROM INTACT STRUCTURES BACKFILLED WITH CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, T.

    2004-09-30

    This calculation determines the release of residual radioactivity (including H-3, C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137), from subsurface structures filled with concrete debris at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station. Analyses were performed to assess the rate of release from the source of contamination and the resulting dose in the groundwater pathway. Two mechanisms were considered, diffusive release from the concrete structures (walls and floors) that remain intact and sorption onto concrete backfill placed within these structures. RESRAD was used to calculate the predicted maximum dose assuming a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on the intact structures. To the extent possible, the same assumptions in the soil DCGL calculations performed for Yankee Atomic were used in the calculation. However, modifications to some input parameter values were needed to represent the geometry of the subsurface facilities, flow through these facilities, and releases from the backfill and intact structures. Input parameters specific to these calculations included the leach rate, disposal geometry, pumping rate, porosity and bulk density. The dose results for a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on intact structures showed that Sr-90 had the highest dose (3.67E-02 mrem/yr).

  4. Investigation of Methods for Selectively Reinforcing Aluminum and Aluminum-Lithium Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Alexa, Joel A.; Messick, Peter L.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that selective reinforcement offers the potential to significantly improve the performance of metallic structures for aerospace applications. Applying high-strength, high-stiffness fibers to the high-stress regions of aluminum-based structures can increase the structural load-carrying capability and inhibit fatigue crack initiation and growth. This paper discusses an investigation into potential methods for applying reinforcing fibers onto the surface of aluminum and aluminum-lithium plate. Commercially-available alumina-fiber reinforced aluminum alloy tapes were used as the reinforcing material. Vacuum hot pressing was used to bond the reinforcing tape to aluminum alloy 2219 and aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 base plates. Static and cyclic three-point bend testing and metallurgical analysis were used to evaluate the enhancement of mechanical performance and the integrity of the bond between the tape and the base plate. The tests demonstrated an increase in specific bending stiffness. In addition, no issues with debonding of the reinforcing tape from the base plate during bend testing were observed. The increase in specific stiffness indicates that selectively-reinforced structures could be designed with the same performance capabilities as a conventional unreinforced structure but with lower mass.

  5. Investigation on slot-die coating of hybrid material structure for OLED lightings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Young; Shin, Dong-Kyun; Park, Jongwoon

    2016-08-01

    With an attempt to fabricate large-area OLED lighting panels, we investigate slot-die coating of a small molecule (SM) hole transport layer (HTL). It is observed that SM HTL films formed by spin coating exhibit pinhole-like surface, whereas the films by slot-die coating show micro-sized hillocks due to agglomeration. As the plate temperature of the slot coater is increased, smaller hillocks appear more densely. To tackle it, a small amount of a polymer HTL is added into the SM HTL (Hybrid HTL). By the aid of entangled polymer chains, small molecules are prohibited from migrating and thus agglomerations disappear. The peak-to-peak roughness of the slot-coated hybrid HTL films is measured to be about 11.5 nm, which is slightly higher than that (~7 nm) of the polymer HTL film, but much lower than that (~1071 nm) of the SM HTL film. Similar results are also observed in spin-coated films. It is also addressed that OLED with the hybrid HTL shows higher luminous efficacy, compared to OLED with the SM HTL or the polymer HTL. We have further demonstrated that the dissolution problem occurring between two stacked layers with different solvents during slot-die coating can be suppressed to a great extent using such a combination of materials in hybrid structure.

  6. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; CERN RD-48 ROSE Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers ({ge} 100 micrometers) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects (interstitial and vacancies), possibly by as-grown defects, in epitaxial layers. The ``sinking`` process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  7. Investigation on Rubber-Modified Polybenzoxazine Composites for Lubricating Material Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubsilp, Chanchira; Taewattana, Rapiphan; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Rimdusit, Sarawut

    2015-10-01

    Effects of liquid amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) on the properties of bisphenol-A/aniline-based polybenzoxazine (PBA-a) composites were investigated. Liquid ATBN decreased gel time and lowered curing temperature of the benzoxazine resin (BA-a). The PBA-a/ATBN-based self-lubricating composites resulted in substantial enhancement regarding their tribological, mechanical, and thermal properties. The inclusion of the ATBN at 5% by weight was found decreasing the friction coefficient and improved wear resistance of the PBA-a/ATBN composites. Flexural modulus and glass transition temperature of the PBA-a composite samples added the ATBN was constant within the range of 1-5% by weight. A plausible wear mechanism of the composites is proposed based on their worn surface morphologies. Based on the findings in this work, it seems that the obtained PBA-a/ATBN self-lubricating composites would have high potential to be used for bearing materials where low friction coefficient, high wear resistance, and modulus with good thermal property are required.

  8. Microfluidic encapsulation for self-healing material and investigation of its impacts on composite performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Ryan J.

    controllable fabrication of uniform diameters with CV in the range 6-10 and the solution processing allows for control of catalyst content. The microfibers exhibit several advantageous characteristics such as uniform catalyst loading, sub-micron catalyst particle size, and amorphous catalyst structure. As a result, the fibers enable faster gelation times during polymerization of dicyclopentadiene. The microfluidic solution spinning process enables dramatically improved catalyst utilization in self-healing epoxy composites. As compared with their traditionally spherical analogue, the microfibers speed the rate of healing by 25% and increase the overall healed strength by 75%. The impacts of particle size distribution on healing performance and the use of fibrous particles are then investigated theoretically through development of two separate analytical models. Both models relate known composite design parameters such as the weight fraction and dimensions of the particles to the respective healing agent delivery modes for solid and liquid phase healing agent. These are the number of particles exposed on a crack surface and the mass of healing agent released into the damage volume. These models provide a theoretical frame work for the controlled design and optimization of composite healing performance through development of novel encapsulation processes. Throughout this work, evaluation of composite properties and healing performance was experimentally performed using a tapered double cantilever beam specimen. Quantification of such composite performance metrics requires careful calibration of this fracture specimen to determine geometry dependent parameters used for calculations. A method is developed here, for this purpose, using finite element analysis of 3D specimen models and through experimental calibration. The development of this method helps to elucidate the influence of side grooving on the parameters and to align the method of evaluating self-healing material

  9. Experimental investigation of pressure responsive 'smart' materials found in the natural world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, George W.

    The unique ability to sense environmental stimuli and respond appropriately in a controlled and reversible fashion is a distinguishing characteristic of a novel class of materials collectively known as 'smart,' 'adaptive,' or 'responsive' materials. This seemingly 'smart' behavior is, thus, controlled by internal 'feedback loops' generated by the interconnectivity of various system elements which enables them to operate cooperatively and exhibit more complex behaviors as a collective. This thesis investigates, experimentally, three natural systems found in both the biological and non-biological domains which exhibit responsive or adaptive behaviors in the presence of external mechanical pressures by exploiting uniquely different chemical and physical principles. The first system focuses on articular cartilage, an example of an adaptive material which utilizes its distinctive hierachical, multi-scale structure in order to adjust and change its physical and lubricating properties to suit the specific needs under a broad range of normal and shear stresses. A compression cell designed to fit inside an NMR spectrometer was used to investigate the in situ mechanical strain response, structural changes to the internal pore structure, and the diffusion and flow of interstitial water in full thickness cartilage samples as it was deforming dynamically under a constant compressive load (pressure). We distinguish between the hydrostatic pressure acting on the interstitial fluid and the pore pressure acting on the cartilage fibril network. Our results show that properties related to the pore matrix microstructure such as diffusion and hydraulic conductivity are strongly influenced by the hydrostatic pressure in the interstitial fluid of the dynamically deforming cartilage which differ significantly from the properties measured under static i.e. equilibrium loading conditions (when the hydrostatic pressure has relaxed back to zero). The magnitude of the hydrostatic fluid

  10. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  11. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  12. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  13. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  14. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... For information regarding the types of documents routinely issued by the Board, see 49 CFR part 801... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's...

  15. Investigation on thermo-mechanical instability of porous low dielectric constant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Emil Hyunbae

    This study investigates the structural stability of porous low dielectric constant materials (PLK) under thermal and mechanical load and the influence of contributing factors including porosity as intrinsic factor and plasma damage and moisture absorption as extrinsic factors on thermo-mechanical instability of PLK in advanced Cu/PLK interconnects. For this purpose, a ball indentation creep test technique was developed to examine the thermal and mechanical instability of PLK at relevant load and temperature conditions in the interconnect structure. Our exploration with the ball indentation creep test found that PLK films plastically deforms with time, indicating that viscoplastic deformation does occur under relevant conditions of PLK processing. On the basis of the results that the increase of the indentation depth with time shows more noticeable difference in PLK films with higher porosity, plasma exposure, and moisture absorption, it is our belief that PLK stability is greatly affected by porosity, plasma damage and moisture. Viscous flow was found to be mechanism for the viscoplastic deformation at the temperature and load of real PLK integration processing. This finding was obtained from the facts that the kinetics of the indentation creep fit very well with the viscous flow model and the extracted stress exponent is close to unity. Based on the results of temperature dependence in all PLK films, the activation energy(~1.5eV) of the viscosity back calculated from the experimental value of the kinetics was found to be much small than that of a pure glass (> 4eV). This suggests that the viscous flow of PLK is controlled by chemical reaction happening in PLK matrix. The FT-IR measurement for the examination of chemical bond reconfiguration shows that the intensity of Si-OH bonds increases with the flow while that of Si-O-Si, -CHX and Si-CH 3 bonds decreases, indicating that chemical reactions are involved in the deformation process. From these findings, it is

  16. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-21

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests, a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM, which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  17. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-01

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests [1], a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM [2], which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  18. Investigation of cross-linking characteristics of novel hole-transporting materials for solution-processed phosphorescent OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaemin; Ameen, Shahid; Lee, Changjin

    2016-04-01

    After the success of commercialization of the vacuum-evaporated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), solutionprocessing or printing of OLEDs are currently attracting much research interests. However, contrary to various kinds of readily available vacuum-evaporable OLED materials, the solution-processable OLED materials are still relatively rare. Hole-transporting layer (HTL) materials for solution-processed OLEDs are especially limited, because they need additional characteristics such as cross-linking to realize multilayer structures in solution-processed OLEDs, as well as their own electrically hole-transporting characteristics. The presence of such cross-linking characteristics of solutionprocessable HTL materials therefore makes them more challenging in the development stage, and also makes them essence of solution-processable OLED materials. In this work, the structure-property relationships of thermally crosslinkable HTL materials were systematically investigated by changing styrene-based cross-linking functionalities and modifying the carbazole-based hole-transporting core structures. The temperature dependency of the cross-linking characteristics of the HTL materials was systematically investigated by the UV-vis. absorption spectroscopy. The new HTL materials were also applied to green phosphorescent OLEDs, and their device characteristics were also investigated based on the chemical structures of the HTL materials. The device configuration was [ITO / PEDOT:PSS / HTL / EML / ETL / CsF / Al]. We found out that the chemical structures of the cross-linking functionalities greatly affect not only the cross-linking characteristics of the resultant HTL materials, but also the resultant OLED device characteristics. The increase of the maximum luminance and efficiency of OLEDs was evident as the cross-linking temperature decreases from higher than 200°C to at around 150°C.

  19. Investigating the Factors That Influence Chemistry Teachers' Use of Curriculum Materials: The Case of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, B.; Wei, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to explore the factors that influenced teachers' adaptations of the curriculum materials of the new senior secondary chemistry curriculum, a standards-based science curriculum, in China. This study was based on the premise that the interaction of the teacher with curriculum materials in a given social context determined what…

  20. Adaptation Criteria for the Personalised Delivery of Learning Materials: A Multi-Stage Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Personalised e-Learning represents a major step-change from the one-size-fits-all approach of traditional learning platforms to a more customised and interactive provision of learning materials. Adaptive learning can support the learning process by tailoring learning materials to individual needs. However, this requires the initial preparation of…

  1. The Development of Environmental Education Materials for Investigating Fire-Environment-Man Relationships: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanselman, David L.; Reider, David A.

    This publication details the development and use of environmental education materials based on the United States Forest Service "Process Approach." This publication focuses on materials that teach the ecology and management of natural and man-made forest and brush fires. The main body of the contents develop and document a rationale for…

  2. Investigating Velocity Spectra at the Hugoniot State of Shock Loaded Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajeunesse, Jeff; Borg, John; Stewart, Sarah; Thadhani, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Hugoniot states achieved in heterogeneous materials have shown oscillations in particle velocity about an averaged state for both experimental and simulated data. These oscillations arise from the scattering of the transmitted shock wave due to the presence of internal interfaces within heterogeneous materials. The goal of this work is to determine if the spectra of oscillatory behavior can be associated to characteristic length scales of the corresponding un-shocked heterogeneous material. Similarities between different types of shock-loaded materials are compared such as sand, concrete, aluminum foam, and layered composites. I would like to acknowledge the AFOSR under grant: FA9550-12-1-0128, ``Dynamic High-Pressure Behavior of Hierarchical Heterogenous Geological Granular Materials'' and the D.o.D. Supercomputing Resource Center.

  3. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The potentially useful encapsulating materials for Task 3 of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project were studied to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Materials for study were chosen on the basis of existing knowledge of generic chemical types having high resistance to environmental weathering. The materials varied from rubbers to thermoplastics and presented a broad range of mechanical properties and processing requirements. Basic physical and optical properties were measured on the polymers and were redetermined after exposure to indoor artificial accelerated aging conditions covering four time periods. Strengths and weaknesses of the various materials were revealed and data was accumulated for the development of predictive methodologies. To date, silicone rubbers, fluorocarbons, and acrylic polymers appear to have the most promising combination of characteristics. The fluorocarbons may be used only as films, however, because of their high cost.

  4. Synthesis and Investigation of the V-shaped Tröger's Base Derivatives as Hole-transporting Materials.

    PubMed

    Braukyla, Titas; Sakai, Nobuya; Daskeviciene, Maryte; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Kamarauskas, Egidijus; Malinauskas, Tadas; Snaith, Henry J; Getautis, Vytautas

    2016-07-20

    V-shaped Tröger's base core has been investigated as a central linking unit in the synthesis of new charge-transporting materials for optoelectronic applications. The studied molecules have been synthesized in two steps from relatively inexpensive starting materials, and demonstrate high glass transition temperatures, good stability of the amorphous state, and comparatively high hole drift mobility (up to 0.011 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) ).

  5. Investigation of the topographical features of surface carrier concentrations in silicon solar cell material using electrolyte electroreflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollay, F. H.; Okeke, C. E.; Raccah, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    Topographical variations in carrier concentration delta N/N across the surface of n(+) on p diffused silicon solar cell material are studied by utilizing electrolyte electroreflectance with a spatial resolution of 100 microns within approximately 500 A of the surface. The topographical variations of delta N/N approximately 10 - 20% are found to be comparable to Czochralski grown material. The electroreflectance method can also be utilized to investigate other semiconductors such as GaAs.

  6. Investigation of Kevlar fabric-based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.; Rueter, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated, and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar-based materials are compared with conventional Dacron-reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed, and considerable quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided.

  7. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Effects of Environment on Newly Developed Emissive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Louis E.; Hammer, Nathan I.; Rathnayake, Hemali; Hollis, Kieth; Delcamp, Jared

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive spectroscopic analysis of recently synthesized novel emissive materials, such as perylene diimide nanostructures, pincer complexes, and newly developed dyes, provides insight into how to modify these materials to be better suited for applications in photovoltaics and photodiodes. Properties of interest in this study include fluorescence emission, fluorescence lifetime, and quantum yield. Tracking how the photophysics of a compound change as different environments are introduced to the system helps to develop a better understanding of the fundamental photophysical properties of the material. Both solid phase and samples in solution are examined on the bulk and single molecule level.

  8. Investigation of possibility of creation of radiation resistance sensors for physical information based on fiber materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskov, P. B.; Chebyshov, S. B.; Kadilin, V. V.; Sakharov, V. V.; Mosyagina, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    The results of physical and material science and technological development of new materials of radiation photonics - nano- and microstructure of radiation-sensitive and radiation- resistant optical glass and fibers based on quartz are presented in the report. The possibility of their application in neutron diagnostics devices of nuclear power objects are considered. Component and construction options for the radiation-sensitive fiber and glass materials (with isotopes 10B, 6Li, Gd, ions of Nd3+, Ce3+ etc.), in which radiation resistance is achieved through the organization of areas of "drain" and annihilation of radiation-induced defects are considered.

  9. Investigation of the H2S poisoning process for sensing composite material based on carbon nanotubes and metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yichen; Pirolli, Laurent; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    The poisoning of H2S sensing material based on the mixture of acid-treated carbon nanotubes, CuO and SnO2 was investigated by exposing the material to high doses of H2S (1% in volume) and following the changes spectroscopically. The presence of metal sulfides (CuS and SnS2), sulfates and thiols was confirmed on the surface of this material as the result of H2S poisoning. Further study revealed that leaving this material in air for extended period of time led to reoxidation of metal sulfides back to metal oxides. The formation of thiols and sulfates directly on carbon nanotubes is not reversible under these conditions; however, the extent of the overall surface reaction in this case is substantially lower than that for the composite material. PMID:27812240

  10. Investigation of Wear and Friction Properties Under Sliding Conditions of Some Materials Suitable for Cages of Rolling-Contact Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Bisson, Edmond E

    1952-01-01

    An investigation of wear and friction properties of a number of materials sliding against SAE 52100 steel was conducted. These materials included brass, bronze, beryllium copper, monel, nichrome v, 24s-t aluminum, nodular iron, and gray cast iron. The metals investigated may be useful as possible cage (separator or retainer) materials for rolling-contact bearings of high-speed turbine engines. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding is a most important factor in both dry friction and boundary lubrication. On the basis of wear and resistance to welding only, the cast irons were the most promising materials investigated; they showed the least wear and the least tendency to surface failure when run dry, and when boundary lubricated they showed the highest load capacity. On the basis of mechanical properties, nodular iron is superior to gray cast iron. Bronze had the lowest friction coefficient under dry sliding conditions. The results with brass, beryllium copper, and aluminum were poor and these materials do not appear, with regard to friction and wear, to be suitable for cages.

  11. X-ray diffraction from shocked materials: investigating solid-solid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin

    2008-04-01

    X-ray diffraction on nanosecond and sub-nanosecond time-scales has proven to be a useful tool in investigating the transient response of shocked crystals. Perhaps the most notable success in this area has been the direct observation of the α- ɛ transition in laser-shocked single crystals of [001] iron. [1,2] The information extracted from the diffraction patterns has been shown to be in remarkable agreement with multi-million atom molecular dynamics calculations. [3] Having successfully observed the transition in single crystals shocked along the principal axis, several further challenges remain. Amongst these are the exploration of the response of single crystals to shocks propagating along other crystallographic directions (where significantly different response is predicted [4]) the role of pre-existing defects in the time-scale of the elastic/plastic response of the material, and any differences that may occur in polycrystalline compared with single crystal samples.[5] A further challenge will be the development of rapid compression techniques that take samples to off-Hugoniot states (for example so-called quasi-isentropic compression). If such states can be produced in a controlled way, much could potentially be learnt about the state of certain planetary cores, including our own. [1] D.H. Kalantar, J.F. Belak, G.W. Collins, J.D. Colvin, H.M. Davies, J.H. Eggert, T.C. Germann, J. Hawreliak, B.L. Holian, K. Kadau, P.S. Lomdahl, H.E. Lorenzana, M.A. Meyers, K. Rosolankova, M.S. Schneider, J. Sheppard, J.S. Stolken and J.S. Wark, Phys. Rev. Lett., 95 075502, 2005 [2] J. Hawreliak, J.D. Colvin, J.H.Eggert, D. Kalantar, H.E. Lorenzana, J.S. Stölken, H.M. Davies, T.C. Germann, B.L. Holian, K. Kadau, P.S. Lomdahl, A. Higginbotham, K. Rosolankova, J. Sheppard, and J.S. Wark, Phys. Rev. B, 74, 184107, 2006 [3] K. Kadau, Timothy C. Germann, Peter S. Lomdahl, and Brad Lee Holian, Science, 296, 1681, 2002 [4] Kai Kadau, Timothy C. Germann, Peter S. Lomdahl, and Brad

  12. Investigation of IAQ-Relevant Surface Chemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Fisk, William J.

    2010-02-01

    Chemical reactions involving ozone of outdoor origin and indoor materials are known to be significant sources of formaldehyde and other irritant gas-phase oxidation products in the indoor environment. HVAC filters are exposed to particularly high ozone concentrations--close to outdoor levels. In this study, we investigated chemical processes taking place on the surface of filters that included fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester blend and synthetic (e.g., polyolefin) filter media. Ozone reactions were studied on unused filter media, and on filters that were deployed for 3 months in two different locations: at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the Port of Oakland. Specimens from each filter were exposed to ozone under controlled conditions in a laboratory flow tube at a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent relative humidity). Ozone was generated with a UV source upstream of the flow tube, and monitored using a photometric detector. Ozone breakthrough curves were recorded for each sample exposed to ~;;150 ppbv O3 for periods of ~;;1000 min, from which we estimated their uptake rate. Most experiments were performed at 1.3 L/min (corresponding to a face velocity of 0.013 m/s), except for a few tests performed at a higher airflow rate, to obtain a face velocity of 0.093 m/s, slightly closer to HVAC operation conditions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were collected downstream of the filter and quantified. Emissions of these volatile aldehydes were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, at which levels were near the limit of detection. Our results confirm that there are significant reactions of ozone as air containing ozone flows through HVAC filters, particularly when the filters are loaded with particles and the air is humidified. The amount of ozone reacted was not clearly related to the types of filter media, e.g., fiberglass versus synthetic. Specific fiberglass filters that were

  13. Hydraulic and diffusive properties of clay-based backfill material for a low- and intermediate-level waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, W.J.; Lee, J.O.; Hahn, P.S.; Park, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    The results of experimental studies performed to determine the radionuclide diffusion coefficients in a compacted clay and the hydraulic conductivities of clay/crushed granite mixtures with various clay contents are presented. Clay used in the experiments is a natural clay from the southeastern part of Korea, and it contains mainly calcium bentonite. The hydraulic conductivities of clay/crushed granite mixtures decreased with increasing clay content. In case of clay content of 50 wt.%, they maintain the considerably lower values even at the dry density of 1.5 Mg/m{sup 3}. The diffusion coefficients for {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 125}I in water saturated clay at a dry density of 1.4 Mg/m{sup 3} were measured at room temperature. The average apparent diffusion coefficients obtained are 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}/s, 9.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s, 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s, and 6.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s for {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 125}I, respectively.

  14. Modern methods for investigating functional surfaces of advanced materials by mechanical contact testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrzhik, M. I.; Levashov, E. A.

    2007-11-01

    Modern methods for determining the hardness, Young’s modulus, elastic recovery, adhesive/cohesive strength, friction coefficient, and wear resistance of thin films, coatings, multilayer materials, and bulk materials are considered. The experimental data obtained in instrumented indentation, instrumented scratching, and tribological tests of nanostructured and quasicrystalline coatings and composite materials are analyzed. It is noted that the elastic recovery of a number of advanced materials is higher than the elastic recovery of metal alloys by a factor of 2-3. The coefficients of sliding friction of sintered samples and thin films containing Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystals are found to be relatively low. An increase in the fraction of quasicrystalline particles to 30% in composites with an aluminum matrix leads to an increase in the wear resistance.

  15. Hierarchical fiber bundle model to investigate the complex architectures of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Bosia, Federico; Abdalrahman, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    The mechanics of fiber bundles has been widely studied in the literature, and fiber bundle models in particular have provided a wealth of useful analytical and numerical results for modeling ordinary materials. These models, however, are inadequate to treat bioinspired nanostructured materials, where hierarchy, multiscale, and complex properties play a decisive role in determining the overall mechanical characteristics. Here, we develop an ad hoc hierarchical theory designed to tackle these complex architectures, thus allowing the determination of the strength of macroscopic hierarchical materials from the properties of their constituents at the nanoscale. The roles of finite size, twisting angle, and friction are also included. Size effects on the statistical distribution of fiber strengths naturally emerge without invoking best-fit or unknown parameters. A comparison between the developed theory and various experimental results on synthetic and natural materials yields considerable agreement. PMID:22400587

  16. An Investigation of Ferrite and Nanocrystalline Core Materials for Medium-Frequency Power Transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Selami; Sefa, Ibrahim; Altin, Necmi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, two transformers are designed using the ferrite N87 and the nanocrystalline core materials for the same power level and operating frequency. The operating frequency is defined as 10 kHz, which is suitable for both materials. Modeling and simulation studies have been performed with the same finite element analysis software and the obtained results have been reported. The nanocrystalline and the ferrite N87 core materials have been compared according to both electrical and mechanical parameters. In these comparisons, many features such as core and winding losses, flux distributions, leakage flux, efficiency, and both electrical and mechanical performance have been reported comparatively in the case of rectangular waveform excitation of the transformer. Obtained results show that the weight and the volume of the transformer are reduced and more compact transformer is designed by using the nanocrystalline core material. In addition, besides the core loss, winding losses are also reduced in this design.

  17. Computational and Experimental Investigations Into the Mass Loss of a Carbon Material in the Sublimation Regime of its Thermochemical Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorskii, V. V.; Zolotarev, S. L.; Olenicheva, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors give results of an experimental investigation into the ablation characteristics of a modern fi ne granular carbon material in the high-enthalpy jet of a TT-1 arc-heated facility [1] ("TsNIImash" Federal State Unitary Enterprise), and also results of computational and experimental investigations into the parameters of the jet of this facility. Data given in the article provide a basis for studying the regularities of the mass loss of the carbon material in a sublimation regime of its thermochemical destructioncpb

  18. Status of the NASA-Lewis Research Center spacecraft charging investigation. [spacecraft materials tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Berkopec, F. D.; Purvis, C. K.

    1978-01-01

    The technology necessary to control the absolute and differental charging of spacecraft surfaces is detailed for developing ground simulation facilities, characterizing the charging and discharging characteristics of spacecraft materials, deriving analytical modelling tools and issuing design guideline documents. Facilities were developed and testing of various materials was completed. Comparisons between experimental results, space results and predictions from models were made. Harness transient monitors were flown on satellites.

  19. Parameterization of structures in HE composites using surrogate materials: A small angle neutron scattering investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Mang, J.T.; Hjelm, R.P.; Skidmore, C.B.; Howe, P.M.

    1996-07-01

    High explosive materials used in the nuclear stockpile are composites of crystalline high explosives (HE) with binder materials, such as Estane. In such materials, there are naturally occurring density fluctuations (defects) due to cracks, internal (in the HE) and external (in the binder) voids and other artifacts of preparation. Changes in such defects due to material aging can affect the response of explosives due to shock, impact and thermal loading. Modeling efforts are attempting to provide quantitative descriptions of explosive response from the lowest ignition thresholds to the development of full blown detonations and explosions, however, adequate descriptions of these processes require accurate measurements of a number of structural parameters of the HE composite. Since different defects are believed to affect explosive sensitivity in different ways it is necessary to quantitatively differentiate between defect types. The authors report here preliminary results of SANS measurements on surrogates for HE materials. The objective of these measurements was to develop methodologies using SANS techniques to parameterize internal void size distributions in a surrogate material, sugar, to simulate an HE used in the stockpile, HMX. Sugar is a natural choice as a surrogate material, as it has the same crystal structure, has similar intragranular voids and has similar mechanical properties as HMX. It is used extensively as a mock material for explosives. Samples were used with two void size distributions: one with a sufficiently small mean particle size that only small occluded voids are present in significant concentrations, and one where the void sizes could be larger. By using methods in small-angle neutron scattering, they were able to isolate the scattering arising from particle-liquid interfaces and internal voids.

  20. Investigation of Materials for Boundary Layer Control in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braafladt, Alexander; Lucero, John M.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    During operation of the NASA Glenn Research Center 15- by 15-Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), a significant, undesirable corner flow separation is created by the three-dimensional interaction of the wall and floor boundary layers in the tunnel corners following an oblique-shock/ boundary-layer interaction. A method to minimize this effect was conceived by connecting the wall and floor boundary layers with a radius of curvature in the corners. The results and observations of a trade study to determine the effectiveness of candidate materials for creating the radius of curvature in the SWT are presented. The experiments in the study focus on the formation of corner fillets of four different radii of curvature, 6.35 mm (0.25 in.), 9.525 mm (0.375 in.), 12.7 mm (0.5 in.), and 15.875 mm (0.625 in.), based on the observed boundary layer thickness of 11.43 mm (0.45 in.). Tests were performed on ten candidate materials to determine shrinkage, surface roughness, cure time, ease of application and removal, adhesion, eccentricity, formability, and repeatability. Of the ten materials, the four materials which exhibited characteristics most promising for effective use were the heavy body and regular type dental impression materials, the basic sculpting epoxy, and the polyurethane sealant. Of these, the particular material which was most effective, the heavy body dental impression material, was tested in the SWT in Mach 2 flow, and was observed to satisfy all requirements for use in creating the corner fillets in the upcoming experiments on shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction.

  1. Fundamental investigation of the tribological and mechanical responses of materials and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholz, Eric W.

    In the field of tribology, the ability to predict, and ultimately control, frictional performance is of critical importance for the optimization of tribological systems. As such, understanding the specific mechanisms involved in the lubrication processes for different materials is a fundamental step in tribological system design. In this work, a combination of computational and experimental methods that include classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments, and multivariate statistical analyses provides fundamental insight into the tribological and mechanical properties of carbon-based and inorganic nanostructures, lamellar materials, and inorganic ceramic compounds. One class of materials of modern interest for tribological applications is nanoparticles, which can be employed either as solid lubricating films or as lubricant additives. In experimental systems, however, it is often challenging to attain the in situ observation of tribological interfaces necessary to identify the atomic-level mechanisms involved during lubrication and response to mechanical deformation. Here, classical MD simulations establish the mechanisms occurring during the friction and compression of several types of nanoparticles including carbon nano-onions, amorphous carbon nanoparticles, and inorganic fullerene-like MoS2 nanoparticles. Specifically, the effect of a nanoparticle's structural properties on the lubrication mechanisms of rolling, sliding, and lamellar exfoliation is indicated; the findings quantify the relative impact of each mechanism on the tribological and mechanical properties of these nanoparticles. Beyond identifying the lubrication mechanisms of known lubricating materials, the continual advancement of modern technology necessitates the identification of new candidate materials for use in tribological applications. To this effect, atomic-scale AFM friction experiments on the aluminosilicate mineral pyrophyllite demonstrate that

  2. Investigation on Effect of Material Hardness in High Speed CNC End Milling Process

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, N. V.; Thangarasu, V. S.; Sureshkannan, G.

    2015-01-01

    This research paper analyzes the effects of material properties on surface roughness, material removal rate, and tool wear on high speed CNC end milling process with various ferrous and nonferrous materials. The challenge of material specific decision on the process parameters of spindle speed, feed rate, depth of cut, coolant flow rate, cutting tool material, and type of coating for the cutting tool for required quality and quantity of production is addressed. Generally, decision made by the operator on floor is based on suggested values of the tool manufacturer or by trial and error method. This paper describes effect of various parameters on the surface roughness characteristics of the precision machining part. The prediction method suggested is based on various experimental analysis of parameters in different compositions of input conditions which would benefit the industry on standardization of high speed CNC end milling processes. The results show a basis for selection of parameters to get better results of surface roughness values as predicted by the case study results. PMID:26881267

  3. Preliminary Results of a Microgravity Investigation to Measure Net Charge on Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert D.; Myers, Jerry G.; Hansen, Bonnie L.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate characterization of the electrostatic charge on granular materials has typically been limited to materials with diameters on the order of 10 microns and below due to high settling velocities of larger particles. High settling velocities limit both the time and the acceptable uncertainty with which a measurement can be made. A prototype device has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to measure coulombic charge on individual particles of granular materials that are 50 to 500 microns in diameter. This device, a novel extension of Millikan's classic oil drop experiment, utilizes the NASA GRC 2.2 second drop tower to extend the range of electrostatic charge measurements to accommodate moderate size granular materials. A dielectric material with a nominal grain diameter between 1.06 and 250 microns was tribocharged using a dry gas jet, suspended in a 5x10x10 cm enclosure during a 2.2 second period of microgravity and exposed to a known electric field. The response was recorded on video and post processed to allow tracking of individual particles. By determining the particle trajectory and velocity, estimates of the coulombic charge were made. Over 30 drops were performed using this technique and the analysis showed that first order approximations of coulombic charge could successfully be obtained, with the mean charge of 3.4E-14 coulombs measured for F-75 Ottawa quartz sand. Additionally, the measured charge showed a near-Gaussian distribution, with a standard deviation of 2.14E -14 coulombs.

  4. Investigation on Effect of Material Hardness in High Speed CNC End Milling Process.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, N V; Thangarasu, V S; Sureshkannan, G

    2015-01-01

    This research paper analyzes the effects of material properties on surface roughness, material removal rate, and tool wear on high speed CNC end milling process with various ferrous and nonferrous materials. The challenge of material specific decision on the process parameters of spindle speed, feed rate, depth of cut, coolant flow rate, cutting tool material, and type of coating for the cutting tool for required quality and quantity of production is addressed. Generally, decision made by the operator on floor is based on suggested values of the tool manufacturer or by trial and error method. This paper describes effect of various parameters on the surface roughness characteristics of the precision machining part. The prediction method suggested is based on various experimental analysis of parameters in different compositions of input conditions which would benefit the industry on standardization of high speed CNC end milling processes. The results show a basis for selection of parameters to get better results of surface roughness values as predicted by the case study results. PMID:26881267

  5. Investigation of potential waste material insulating properties at different temperature for thermal storage application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, T. Z. S.; Rosli, A. B.; Gan, L. M.; Billy, A. S.; Farid, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal energy storage system (TES) is developed to extend the operation of power generation. TES system is a key component in a solar energy power generation plant, but the main issue in designing the TES system is its thermal capacity of storage materials, e.g. insulator. This study is focusing on the potential waste material acts as an insulator for thermal energy storage applications. As the insulator is used to absorb heat, it is needed to find suitable material for energy conversion and at the same time reduce the waste generation. Thus, a small-scale experimental testing of natural cooling process of an insulated tank within a confined room is conducted. The experiment is repeated by changing the insulator from the potential waste material and also by changing the heat transfer fluid (HTF). The analysis presented the relationship between heat loss and the reserved period by the insulator. The results show the percentage of period of the insulated tank withstands compared to tank insulated by foam, e.g. newspaper reserved the period of 84.6% as much as foam insulated tank to withstand the heat transfer of cooking oil to the surrounding. The paper finally justifies the most potential waste material as an insulator for different temperature range of heat transfer fluid.

  6. Straintronics-based magnetic tunneling junction: Dynamic and static behavior analysis and material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the dynamic and static effects of mechanical stress on a straintronics device that includes a piezoelectric film combined with a magnetic tunneling junction. The inverse magnetostriction effect is studied in detail by realizing the varying magnetic susceptibility of the nanomagnet under stress. A dynamic model is developed based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which provides a platform to simulate the magnetization vector's behavior, critical flipping voltage, and delay properties. Furthermore, by converting the LLG equation into a 2nd order damping differential equation, we develop a proximate approach. This approach predicts the dynamic behavior of the magnetization vector and its dependency on material properties and applied voltage across the device without using sophisticated numerical calculations of the LLG model. Different dynamic and static material properties are observed by simulating five common magnetostrictive materials, including a newly discovered alloy, Galfenol.

  7. Investigation of nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials by the Z-scan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties of various organic materials (vegetable oil, juice, wine, cognac, Coca-Cola and Fanta drinks, Nescafé coffee, tea, gasoline, clock oil, glycerol, and polyphenyl ether) that are used in everyday life. Their nonlinearities have been studied by the Z-scan method in the near-IR and visible spectral ranges. We have shown that the majority of samples possess a nonlinear absorption; however, some of the studied materials show a strong saturated absorption and nonlinear refraction. Red wine and glycerol proved to be the most interesting materials. For these samples, we have observed a change in the sign of the nonlinear absorption with increasing laser intensity, which was attributed to the competition between two-photon absorption and saturated absorption.

  8. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy investigations of dental structures and restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Rominu, Mihai; Hughes, Michael; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-02-01

    Nowadays, optical tomographic techniques are of particular importance in the medical imaging field, because these techniques can provide non-invasive diagnostic images. The present study evaluates the potential of en-face optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a possible non-invasive high resolution imaging method in supplying the necessary information on the quality of dental hard tissues and defects of dental restorative materials. Teeth after several treatment methods are imaged in order to asses the material defects and micro-leakage of tooth-filling interface as well as to evaluate the quality of dental hard tissue. C-scan and B-scan OCT images as well as confocal images are acquired from a large range of samples. Cracks and voids in the dental structures as well as gaps between the dental interfaces and material defects are clearly exposed. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution.

  9. Investigation of Ti6Al4V Orthogonal Cutting Numerical Simulations using Different Material Models

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Roberto

    2010-06-15

    Titanium alloys are materials considered as extremely difficult to cut and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V is a reference in machining of titanium. The segmented (saw toothed) chip morphology has attracted great interest in researchers because the understanding of the saw-toothed chip morphology helps to understand the chip formation mechanisms. In this study, the effect of different constitutive models on the saw-toothed chip morphology is examined in machining Ti6Al4V. The paper presents the influence of eight material constitutive modelling in the simulation of segmented chip formation. A critical comparison of outstanding process outputs as cutting force, temperature and measurable parameters for segmented chips is carried out to compare and discuss the performance of the eight different material models to each other and with experimental data.

  10. An Investigation Into The Viability Of Nanocrystalline Cellulose As A Packaging Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, John

    The focus of this proposal is to identify unexplored areas of research in the field of packaging science, specifically related to the incorporation of Nanocrystalline Cellulose (NCC) as a functional material in fiber based packaging, as well as to highlight some of potential risks and unknowns in the product lifecycle. This research hypothesizes that incorporating NCC into wood fiber-based c-flute corrugated packaging medium will show a sufficient performance improvement to justify additional research. Nanomaterials, as a whole, are still being understood, including those using naturally occurring bases such as NCC. Further incremental testing with NCC will help provide a performance and safety baseline for the necessary future research prior to mass production. NCC holds great promise for the future: a commonly available, naturally occurring material that's easily recyclable and biodegradable, yet has the strength of steel. Due diligence is required for this material to come to market in a safe and sustainable manner.

  11. Investigation of aging effects from high voltage profiles in ceramic phase shifter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, S.; Sengupta, L.C.; Ngo, E.; O`Day, M.E.; Lancto, R.

    1994-12-01

    Ceramic composite materials comprised of Ba(0.60)Sr(0.40)TiO3 and Alumina and other non ferroelectric oxides have been fabricated for use in phased array antennas. These composites have shown superior electronic properties and have been incorporated into several antenna designs. However, minimal testing has been accomplished to determine the electrical aging and fatigue caused by the large electric fields required to operate these devices. In this paper, a systematic study of the effect of the application of large fields will he presented. The electronic properties of the BSTO-Oxide composites (pre-voltage application) will be presented and include the dielectric constant, loss tangent, and tunability (change in dielectric constant with applied field). The study of the change in the electronic properties after large voltages applications include results on the electronic aging and fatigue of the material and appropriate conditioning of the material for application in phased array antenna systems.

  12. Investigation and Characterization of Conductive DEAP Polymer Materials with Nickel Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrisley, Seaver

    Dielectric ElectroActive Polymers, or DEAPs, are devices with coupled electrical and mechanical responses that resemble stretchable parallel plate capacitors, that can act as actuators, sensors, or electrical generators. Currently, the electrode layers on the top and bottom are generally conductive carbon grease, which is dirty and also causes curing issues for certain polymers. This thesis explores several polymers and conductive fillers to identify a conductive nanocomposite material, to replace the grease electrode with a solid material and eliminate issues associated with grease electrodes. It then characterizes the mechanical and electric properties and how they change during cyclic loading, while augmenting an equibiaxial tensile testing machine and advancing the knowledge of equibiaxial characterization. The most promising polymer/filler combination was found to be EcoFlex30, a platinum cure silicone rubber, containing seven volume percent of nickel nanostrands and three volume percent of 0.1 mm length nickel-coated carbon fiber. Using two conductive fillers of different sizes resulted in much higher conductivity than a single filler alone, and an enormous piezoresistive effect. This material gave weak conductivity at no load, increasing several orders of magnitude as strained and well surpassing the benchmark of 1.2 S/m set by conductive carbon grease. Elastomer materials were found to have conductivities as high as 275 S/m under peak strain, and changing the nickel-coated carbon fiber length allowed for strains over 120%. Equibiaxial stress-strain curves were also analyzed for energy lost through hysteresis, in order to compare to published results for DEAPs used as Dielectric Energy Generators. Results and recommendations are presented for using and further improving the materials for applications of DEAPs used as energy harvesters and capacitive sensors, using the material alone as a piezoresistive sensor, and improving the equibiaxial characterization

  13. Collaborative investigations of in-service irradiated material from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Broadhead, B.L.; Suzuki, M.; Kohsaka, A.

    1997-02-01

    There is a need to validate the results of irradiation effects research by the examination of material taken directly from the wall of a pressure vessel that has been irradiated during normal service. Just such an evaluation is currently being conducted on material from the wall of the pressure vessel from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The research is being jointly performed at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-funded Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  14. Fundamental investigation of ultraviolet radiation effects in polymeric film-forming materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.; Llewellen, P.; Gilligan, J.

    1974-01-01

    A literature search from 1958 to present was conducted on the effect of ultraviolet radiation on polymeric materials, with particular emphasis on vacuum photolysis, mechanisms of degradation, and energy transfer phenomena. The literature from 1958 to 1968 was searched manually, while the literature from 1968 to present was searched by using a computerized keyword system. The primary objective was to provide the necessary background information for the design of new or modified materials with improved stability to the vacuum-radiation environment of space.

  15. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  16. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During this quarter the technical activities were directed toward the reformulation of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a compound in solar cell module fabrication. Successful formulations were devised that lowered the temperature required for cure and raised the gel content. A major volatile component was also eliminated (acrylate crosslinking agent) which should aid in the production of bubble free laminates. Adhesive strengths and primers for the bonding of ethylene/vinyl acetate to supersyrate and substrate materials was assessed with encouraging results. The incorporation of silane compounds gave high bond strengths. A survey of scrim materials was also conducted.

  17. Investigation of the wastes of chromium ore concentration for use as raw material in the manufacture of refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Antonov, G.I.; Yakobchuk, L.M.; Prokudin, V.Y.

    1994-09-01

    A complex investigation of wastes of the concentration of chromium ores of the Kempirsaiskoe deposit has demonstrated that they are similar to serpentinites as regards their composition and behavior in roasting. These wastes can be used as magnesia-silicate raw materials for the production of refractories.

  18. The Usability of a Commercial Game Physics Engine to Develop Physics Educational Materials: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Colin B.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial computer games contain "physics engine" components, responsible for providing realistic interactions among game objects. The question naturally arises of whether these engines can be used to develop educational materials for high school and university physics education. To answer this question, the author's group recently conducted a…

  19. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. PMID:25864763

  20. Methods of investigation and properties of powder materials: Thermodynamic properties of lanthanum silicides at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bolgar, A.S.; Gorbachuk, N.P.; Blinder, A.V.

    1994-09-01

    The enthalpies of five lanthanum silicides were determined over the temperature range 380-2225 K by the method of mixtures. Values of the basic thermodynamic functions of the materials were calculated and tabulated, as well as the temperatures, enthalpies, and entropies of fusion. The temperatures and enthalpies of fusion were related to the relative concentrations of silicon in the compounds.

  1. Investigation of the potential carcinogenicity of a range of chromium containing materials on rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, L S; Martin, P A; Bidstrup, P L

    1986-01-01

    Twenty one chromium containing materials were examined for carcinogenic activity in a two year study using an intrabronchial pellet implantation system whereby pellets loaded with test material were surgically implanted into the lower left bronchus of rats. The principal aim of the study was to extend our knowledge of the carcinogenic potential of chromium compounds and, in particular, chromates (Cr6+). A statistically significant incidence of treatment related lung tumours was found with some sparingly soluble chromate materials. All tumours were large keratinizing squamous carcinomas of the left lung, except for a single left lung adenocarcinoma and two left lung anaplastic carcinomas. No bronchial carcinomas (0/100) were seen in the negative control group (blank pellet loaded with cholesterol), whereas bronchial carcinomas (22/48 and 25/100) occurred in the two positive control groups which received pellets loaded with 20-methylcholanthrene and calcium chromate respectively. Among the 20 test materials, only three groups gave statistically significant numbers of bronchial carcinomas. Two of these were groups receiving different samples of strontium chromate which gave 43/99 and 62/99 tumours. The third group, zinc chromate (low solubility), gave 5/100 bronchial carcinomas. A further zinc chromate group (Norge composition) produced 3/100 bronchial carcinomas which was not statistically significant. A few lung tumours were observed in other test groups. Images PMID:3964573

  2. The Investigation of the Degree of Difficulty in the Learning Materials by the Recursive Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Wu, Shing-Ling

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the difficulty of learning materials in the network by using learner's portfolio in the asynchronous learning system. Asynchronous learning takes the advantage of information technology that records the learning portfolio of the learner. The data of the learning portfolio reflects the characteristics of…

  3. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  5. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding of Al Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2003-01-01

    The innovative process of Friction Stir Welding (FSW) has generated tremendous interest since its inception about a decade or so ago since the first patent in 1991 by TWI of Cambridge, England. This interest has been seen in many recent international conferences and publications on the subject and relevant published literature. Still the process needs both intensive basic study of deformation mechanisms during this FSW process and analysis and feasibility study to evaluate production methods that will yield high quality strong welds from the stirring action of the appropriate pin tool into the weld plate materials. Development of production processes is a complex task that involves effects of material thickness, materials weldability, pin tool design, pin height, and pin shoulder diameter and related control conditions. The frictional heating with rotational speeds of the pin tool as it plunges into the material and the ensuing plastic flow arising during the traverse of the welding faying surfaces provide the known special advantages of the FSW process in the area of this new advanced joining technology.

  6. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  7. Fluorine and uranium in phosphate rock processing and waste materials. Report of investigations/1981

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, B.W.; Kramer, G.W.; Jolly, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Materials from phosphate rock mining and processing were analyzed for fluorine and uranium content as part of the Bureau of Mines program to more effectively recover resources from mining and mineral processing reject materials. The analysis of both feed and waste materials generated in the beneficiation and acidulation of phosphate rock was performed to obtain information on the disposition and concentration of these elements in phosphate rock processing streams. Fluorine was determined by a distillation-titration method and by ion chromatography. Uranium was determined by the dibenzoylmethane (DBM) method, the reliability being confirmed by roundrobin analysis of samples within Bureau of Mines research centers. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Material (SRM) 120b-Phosphate Rock was also analyzed for fluorine and uranium to verify procedures and results. Fluorine values ranged from 0.3 wt-pct in gypsum filter cake to 3.7 wt-pct in phosphate rock concentrate. Uranium ranged from less than 5 micrograms/g in gypsum filter cake to 200 micrograms/g in a dried clay slime.

  8. Investigations of nanocomposite magnetic materials based on the oxides of iron, nickel, cobalt and silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracheva, Irina E.; Olchowik, Grazyna; Gareev, Kamil G.; Moshnikov, Vyatcheslav A.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V.; Olchowik, Jan M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of magnetic nanocomposites containing silicon, iron, nickel, and cobalt oxides. These materials were produced in the form of thin films based on Fe-Si-O, Ni-Co-Si-O and Fe-Ni-Co-Si-O systems and powders based on Fe-Si-O, Ni-Si-O, Co-Si-O and Fe-Ni-Co-Si-O systems using sol-gel technology, through centrifugation, and deposition of ammonia solution. The morphology and magnetic properties of materials in the form of thin films were studied by using the atomic force microscopy. The phase composition, specific surface area and magnetic properties of materials in the form of powders were studied by using the X-ray phase analysis, thermal desorption, vibrational magnetometry and immittance measurements. The dependencies of the main parameters were derived for the magnetic materials from their structure and manufacturing conditions. Ways to optimise the technological processes were proposed, aimed at reducing the size of the magnetic particles in an amorphous lattice.

  9. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair.

  10. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, A.; Grabarek, A.; Moroń, L.; Wałecki, M.; Kryla, P.

    2016-02-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before.

  11. Investigating the formation mechanism of soot-like materials present in blast furnace coke samples

    SciTech Connect

    S. Dong; P. A'lvarez; N. Paterson; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2008-09-15

    An attempt to gain an understanding of the formation mechanism of these 'soot-like' materials has been made by means of tracing the changes in the molecular-mass distribution and molecular structure of the NMP-extractable materials from an injectant coal as well as its partially gasified chars and its pyrolytic tars. Variations in the SEC chromatograms provide clues about changes in the apparent molecular-mass distributions of these NMP extracts. Results suggest that the build-up of 'soot-like' materials follows from the secondary reactions of tars evolved from the injectant coal. The likely secondary-reaction pathways have been probed by collating structural information on these NMP extracts. The time-resolved 13-16 and 22-25 min elution fractions from the SEC column have been characterized using UV fluorescence (UV F) spectroscopy. Greater concentrations of larger aromatic ring systems are found present in samples formed under conditions appearing more prone for soot formation. The 11-16 min (large apparent molecular mass) effluent from SEC has been examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results from FTIR spectroscopy are consistent with the UV F data, showing more significant extents of dehydrogenation under conditions more prone to form soot. Similarly, TEM results show that larger amount of graphene layers exist in samples exposed to more soot-prone conditions. The emerging picture for the formation of 'soot-like' materials involves a well-defined sequence. Tars evolved from the injectant coal undergo secondary dehydrogenation, condensation, and repolymerization reactions, which eventually lead to the formation of the NMP-extractable 'soot-like' materials of large apparent molecular mass. 44 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Damage Resistances and Damage Tolerance of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.

    2003-01-01

    The project included three lines of investigation, aimed at a better understanding of the damage resistance and damage tolerance of pultruded composites. The three lines of investigation were: (i) measurement of permanent dent depth after transverse indentation at different load levels, and correlation with other damage parameters such as damage area (from x-radiography) and back surface crack length, (ii) estimation of point stress and average stress characteristic dimensions corresponding to measured damage parameters, and (iii) an attempt to measure the damage area by a reflection photoelastic technique. All the three lines of investigation were pursued.

  13. A long-term bench-scale investigation of permanganate consumption by aquifer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiuyuan; Thomson, Neil R.

    2009-11-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) applications using permanganate involve the injection or release of permanganate into the subsurface to destroy various target contaminants. Naturally occurring reduced components associated with aquifer materials can exert a significant oxidant demand thereby reducing the amount of permanganate available for the destruction of contaminants as well as reducing the overall rate of oxidation. Quantification of this natural oxidant demand (NOD) is a requirement for site-specific assessment and the design of cost-effective oxidant delivery systems. To further our understanding of the interaction between permanganate and aquifer materials, aerobic and anaerobic aquifer materials from eight representative sites throughout North America were tested in a series of systematic bench-scale experiments. Various permanganate to aquifer solids mass loading ratios at different initial permanganate concentrations in well-mixed batch reactors were monitored for > 300 days. All NOD temporal profiles demonstrated an initial fast consumption rate followed by a persistent slower consumption rate. The data generated show that the mass loading ratio, the initial permanganate concentration, and the nature and quantity of reduced aquifer material species are the main factors controlling permanganate consumption rates. A higher initial permanganate concentration or a larger mass loading ratio produced a larger fast NOD consumption rate and generated a corresponding higher maximum NOD value. Hence, both the NOD temporal profile and the maximum NOD are not single-valued but are heavily dependent on the experimental conditions. Predictive relationships were developed to estimate the maximum NOD and the NOD at 7 days based on aquifer material properties. The concentration of manganese oxides deposited on the aquifer solids was highly correlated with the mass of permanganate consumed suggesting that passivation of NOD reaction sites occurred due to the formation

  14. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene in anoxic aquifer material from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.H.; Ehlke, T.A.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Wilson, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Ground water at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, has been contaminated with chlorinated solvents released from the waste water-treatment system of a metal-plating shop and from overflow from a degreasing vat. Trichloroethylene is the major contaminant, but 1,1,1-trichloroethane and tetrachloroethylene are also present. Cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and vinyl chloride were not original contaminants, but their accumulation in the ground water indicates reductive dechlorination of the trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene released to the aquifer. Laboratory microcosms were used to estimate the kinetics of reductive dechlorination at field scale. The microcosms were constructed with aquifer material collected from locations along the longitudinal extent of the plume and from outside the area of contamination. To determine whether supplementary electron donors would enhance reductive dechlorination, three suites of electron donors were added to aquifer material: (1) butyrate, propionate, toluene, and p-cresol; (2) butyrate, propionate, formate, methanol, toluene, and p-cresol; or (3) formate and methanol.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations of functionalized boron nitride as electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Nemeth, Karoly; Bareño, Javier; Dogan, Fulya; Bloom, Ira D.; Shaw, Leon L.

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of synthesizing functionalized h-BN (FBN) via the reaction between molten LiOH and solid h-BN is studied for the first time and its first ever application as an electrode material in Li-ion batteries is evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to provide mechanistic understanding of the possible electrochemical reactions derived from the FBN. Various materials characterizations reveal that the melt-solid reaction can lead to exfoliation and functionalization of h-BN simultaneously, while electrochemical analysis proves that the FBN can reversibly store charges through surface redox reactions with good cycle stability and coulombic efficiency. DFT calculations have provided physical insights into the observed electrochemical properties derived from the FBN.

  16. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G.; La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pelizzari, Charles; Pan, Xiaochuan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-08-01

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm)3 field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  17. Investigation of Liquid Metal Embrittlement of Materials for use in Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Daniel; Jaworski, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metals can provide a continually replenished material for the first wall and extraction blankets of fusion reactors. However, research has shown that solid metal surfaces will experience embrittlement when exposed to liquid metals under stress. Therefore, it is important to understand the changes in structural strength of the solid metal materials and test different surface treatments that can limit embrittlement. Research was conducted to design and build an apparatus for exposing solid metal samples to liquid metal under high stress and temperature. The apparatus design, results of tensile testing, and surface imaging of fractured samples will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  18. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  19. Thermodynamic investigations on materials corrosion in some industrial and environmental processes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Pingfang; Engström, Anders; Sundman, Bo

    2011-06-01

    For better understanding of corrosion schemes and corrosion mechanisms of a wide range of steels/Fe-alloys, Ni-/NiFe-/Co-superalloys, Al-/Mg-/Ti-/Zr-/Sn-/Cu-/Zn-alloys, electronic-packing alloys, medical-instrument alloys and other materials, under various corrosive environments (such as aqueous solutions, non-aqueous solutions, molten salts, high-temperature gases, etc.) during production/application processes and experimental observations, the Thermo-Calc software/database/programming-interface package can be used. This article is aimed at presenting some application examples of thermodynamic calculations/simulations in some specific areas: aqueous corrosions of stainless steels and other alloys, and of high-performance corrosion-resistant materials (HPCRM); molten salt corrosions of stainless steels and high-temperature alloys; high-temperature gaseous corrosions of steels/alloys; formations of oxide-coated protective layers on steel/alloy surfaces; and emergence conditions during oxidation of steels/alloys.

  20. X-ray tomography system to investigate granular materials during mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G.; La Rivière, Patrick J.; Sidky, Emil; Pan, Xiaochuan; Pelizzari, Charles; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-08-15

    We integrate a small and portable medical x-ray device with mechanical testing equipment to enable in situ, non-invasive measurements of a granular material's response to mechanical loading. We employ an orthopedic C-arm as the x-ray source and detector to image samples mounted in the materials tester. We discuss the design of a custom rotation stage, which allows for sample rotation and tomographic reconstruction under applied compressive stress. We then discuss the calibration of the system for 3D computed tomography, as well as the subsequent image reconstruction process. Using this system to reconstruct packings of 3D-printed particles, we resolve packing features with 0.52 mm resolution in a (60 mm){sup 3} field of view. By analyzing the performance bounds of the system, we demonstrate that the reconstructions exhibit only moderate noise.

  1. Investigation of thermal fatigue in fiber composite materials. [(thermal cycling tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahmy, A. A.; Cunningham, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy laminates were thermally cycled to determine the effects of thermal cycles on tensile properties and thermal expansion coefficients of the laminates. Three 12-ply laminate configurations were subjected to up to 5,000 thermal cycles. The cumulative effect of the thermal cycles was determined by destructive inspection (electron micrographs and tensile tests) of samples after progressively larger numbers of cycles. After thermal cycling, the materials' tensile strengths, moduli, and thermal expansion coefficients were significantly lower than for the materials as fabricated. Most of the degradation of properties occurred after only a few cycles. The property degradation was attributed primarily to the progressive development of matrix cracks whose locations depended upon the layup orientation of the laminate.

  2. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron

    PubMed Central

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E.

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  3. A material combination principle for highly efficient polymer solar cells investigated by mesoscopic phase heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Han; Li, Denghua; He, Chang; Wei, Zhixiang; Yang, Yanlian; Li, Yongfang

    2013-12-01

    Organic solar cells have become a promising energy conversion candidate because of their unique advantages. Novel fullerene derivatives, as a common acceptor, can increase power conversion efficiency (PCE) by increasing the open-circuit voltage. As a representative acceptor, Indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA) can reach high efficiency with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). On the other hand, the novel synthesized polymers mainly aimed to broaden the optical absorption range have steadily promoted efficiency to higher than 9%. However, it is challenging to obtain the desired result by simply combining ICBA with other high-efficiency donors. Thus, P3HT or a high-efficiency polymer PBDTTT-C-T (copolymer of thienyl-substituted BDT with substituted TT) is used as donor and PCBM or ICBA as acceptor in this article to clarify the mechanism behind these materials. The optical and photovoltaic properties of the materials are studied for pair-wise combination. Among these four material groups, the highest PCE of 6.2% is obtained for the PBDTTT-C-T/PCBM combination while the lowest PCE of 3.5% is obtained for the PBDTTT-C-T/ICBA combination. The impact of the mesoscopic heterogeneity on the local mesoscopic photoelectric properties is identified by photo-conductive AFM (pc-AFM), and the consistence between the mesoscopic properties and the macroscopic device performances is also observed. Based on these results, an interface combined model is proposed based on the mesoscopic phase heterogeneity. This study provides a new view on the rational selection of photovoltaic materials, where, aside from the traditional energy level and absorption spectrum matching, the matching of mesoscopic heterogeneity must also be considered.

  4. Investigation of the effect of resin material on impact damage to graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental program are described which establishes the feasibility and guide lines for resin development. The objective was to identify the basic epoxy neat resin properties that improve low velocity impact resistance and toughness to graphite-epoxy laminates and at the same time maintain useful structural laminate mechanical properties. Materials tests from twenty-three toughened epoxy resin matrix systems are included.

  5. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

  6. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-01-01

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  7. Emission Spectroscopic Boundary Layer Investigation during Ablative Material Testing in Plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Helber, Bernd; Chazot, Olivier; Hubin, Annick; Magin, Thierry E

    2016-06-09

    Ablative Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) allowed the first humans to safely return to Earth from the moon and are still considered as the only solution for future high-speed reentry missions. But despite the advancements made since Apollo, heat flux prediction remains an imperfect science and engineers resort to safety factors to determine the TPS thickness. This goes at the expense of embarked payload, hampering, for example, sample return missions. Ground testing in plasma wind-tunnels is currently the only affordable possibility for both material qualification and validation of material response codes. The subsonic 1.2MW Inductively Coupled Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics is able to reproduce a wide range of reentry environments. This protocol describes a procedure for the study of the gas/surface interaction on ablative materials in high enthalpy flows and presents sample results of a non-pyrolyzing, ablating carbon fiber precursor. With this publication, the authors envisage the definition of a standard procedure, facilitating comparison with other laboratories and contributing to ongoing efforts to improve heat shield reliability and reduce design uncertainties. The described core techniques are non-intrusive methods to track the material recession with a high-speed camera along with the chemistry in the reactive boundary layer, probed by emission spectroscopy. Although optical emission spectroscopy is limited to line-of-sight measurements and is further constrained to electronically excited atoms and molecules, its simplicity and broad applicability still make it the technique of choice for analysis of the reactive boundary layer. Recession of the ablating sample further requires that the distance of the measurement location with respect to the surface is known at all times during the experiment. Calibration of the optical system of the applied three spectrometers allowed quantitative comparison. At the fiber scale

  8. Investigation of MEMS bi-material sensors with metamaterial absorbers for THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Fabio; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2014-06-01

    There has been a continued interest in the terahertz (THz) imaging due to penetration and non-ionizing properties. Realtime imaging in this spectral range has been demonstrated using infrared microbolometer technology with external illumination by quantum cascade lasers (QCL). However, to achieve high sensitivity, it is necessary to develop focal plane arrays using enhanced THz-absorbing materials. One attractive option to achieve real time THz imaging is MEMS bi-material sensor with embedded metamaterial absorbers, consisting of a periodic array of metallic squared elements separated from a homogeneous metallic ground plane by a dielectric layer. We have demonstrated that the metamaterial films can be designed using standard MEMS materials such as silicon oxide (SiOx), silicon oxinitrate (SiOxNy) and aluminum (Al), to achieve nearly 100 % resonant absorption matched to the illumination source, while providing structural support, desired thermomechanical properties and access to external optical readout. The metamaterial structure absorbs the incident THz radiation and transfers the heat to bi-material microcantilevers that are connected to the substrate, which acts as a heat sink, via thermal insulating legs. A temperature gradient builds up in the legs, allowing the overall structure to deform proportionally to the absorbed power. The amount of deformation can be probed by measuring the displacement of a laser beam reflected from the sensor's metallic ground plane. Several sensor configurations have been designed, fabricated and characterized to optimize responsivity, speed of operation and minimize structural residual stress. Measured figures of merit indicate that the THz MEMS sensors have a great potential for real-time imaging.

  9. Damage sensitivity investigations of EMI technique on different materials through coupled field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhrigu; Adhikari, Sailesh; Bhalla, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study through the piezoelectric coupled field analysis mode of finite element method (FEM) on detection of damages of varying magnitude, encompassing three different types of structural materials, using piezo impedance transducers. An aluminum block, a concrete block and a steel block of dimensions 48×48×10 mm were modelled in finite element software ANSYS. A PZT patch of 10×10×0.3 mm was also included in the model as surface bonded on the block. Coupled field analysis (CFA) was performed to obtain the admittance signatures of the piezo sensor in the frequency range of 0-250 kHz. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) index was employed to quantify the degree of variation of the signatures. It was found that concrete exhibited deviation in the signatures only with the change of damping values. However, the other two materials showed variation in the signatures even with changes in density and elasticity values in a small portion of the specimen. The comparative study shows that the PZT patches are more sensitive to damage detection in materials with low damping and the sensitivity typically decreases with increase in the damping.

  10. Computational Investigations of a Possible New Class of Materials: A Superatom Ionic Solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlberg, Karl; Nasto, Violeta

    2013-03-01

    A ``superatom'' is a cluster of atoms that shows high stability. High stability can arise from the geometric arrangement of the atoms in the cluster. For example, when atoms are close packed, clusters containing an integer number of closed shells of atoms, (i.e. 13, 55, 137... atoms) exhibit enhanced stability and are termed ``magic clusters.'' High stability can also arise from the electronic structure. High symmetry metal clusters that have exactly 8, 20, 40..., valence electrons show enhanced stability. Superatoms can act chemically like a single atom of a different element. We have used electronic structure calculations to test the idea that a new class of materials may be formed based on the periodic arrangement of superatom ions, instead of the typical atomic or polyatomic ions of a conventional ionic solid. A solid is formed based on crystalline packing of anionic (Al@Cu54-)and cationic (Ce@C60+),nearly spherical superatom species that show exceptional stability. According to radius-ratio rules, these ions will favor a CsCl crystal structure with a body-centered (bcc) type of unit cell. Calculations on this material suggest that it is stable, semiconducting and less dense than common metal oxides, but that the metal anion clusters deform within the material.

  11. Investigation of Effects of Material Architecture on the Elastic Response of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2012-01-01

    To develop methods for quantifying the effects of the microstructural variations of woven ceramic matrix composites on the effective properties and response of the material, a research program has been undertaken which is described in this paper. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, CVI SiC/SiC, composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents and collect relevant statistics such as within ply tow spacing. This information was then used to build two dimensional finite element models that approximated the observed section geometry. With the aid of geometrical models generated by the microstructural characterization process, finite element models were generated and analyses were performed to quantify the effects of the microstructure and its variation on the effective stiffness and areas of stress concentration of the material. The results indicated that the geometry and distribution of the porosity appear to have significant effects on the through-thickness modulus. Similarly, stress concentrations on the outer surface of the composite appear to correlate to regions where the transverse tows are separated by a critical amount.

  12. An investigation of anode and cathode materials in photomicrobial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kenneth; Thorne, Rebecca J; Cameron, Petra J

    2016-02-28

    Photomicrobial fuel cells (p-MFCs) are devices that use photosynthetic organisms (such as cyanobacteria or algae) to turn light energy into electrical energy. In a p-MFC, the anode accepts electrons from microorganisms that are either growing directly on the anode surface (biofilm) or are free floating in solution (planktonic). The nature of both the anode and cathode material is critical for device efficiency. An ideal anode is biocompatible and facilitates direct electron transfer from the microorganisms, with no need for an electron mediator. For a p-MFC, there is the additional requirement that the anode should not prevent light from perfusing through the photosynthetic cells. The cathode should facilitate the rapid reaction of protons and oxygen to form water so as not to rate limit the device. In this paper, we first review the range of anode and cathode materials currently used in p-MFCs. We then present our own data comparing cathode materials in a p-MFC and our first results using porous ceramic anodes in a mediator-free p-MFC. PMID:26755764

  13. Computational investigation of noble gas adsorption and separation by nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sanders, Joseph C.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-10-01

    Molecular simulations are used to assess the ability of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to store and separate noble gases. Specifically, grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation techniques are used to predict noble gas adsorption isotherms at room temperature. Experimental trends of noble gas inflation curves of a Zn-based material (IRMOF-1) are matched by the simulation results. The simulations also predict that IRMOF-1 selectively adsorbs Xe atoms in Xe/Kr and Xe/Ar mixtures at total feed gas pressures of 1 bar (14.7 psia) and 10 bar (147 psia). Finally, simulations of a copper-based MOF (Cu-BTC) predict this material's ability to selectively adsorb Xe and Kr atoms when present in trace amounts in atmospheric air samples. These preliminary results suggest that Cu-BTC may be an ideal candidate for the pre-concentration of noble gases from air samples. Additional simulations and experiments are needed to determine the saturation limit of Cu-BTC for xenon, and whether any krypton atoms would remain in the Cu-BTC pores upon saturation.

  14. Investigating materials for breast nodules simulation by using segmentation and similarity analysis of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Paula N.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    The task of identifying the malignancy of nodular lesions on mammograms becomes quite complex due to overlapped structures or even to the granular fibrous tissue which can cause confusion in classifying masses shape, leading to unnecessary biopsies. Efforts to develop methods for automatic masses detection in CADe (Computer Aided Detection) schemes have been made with the aim of assisting radiologists and working as a second opinion. The validation of these methods may be accomplished for instance by using databases with clinical images or acquired through breast phantoms. With this aim, some types of materials were tested in order to produce radiographic phantom images which could characterize a good enough approach to the typical mammograms corresponding to actual breast nodules. Therefore different nodules patterns were physically produced and used on a previous developed breast phantom. Their characteristics were tested according to the digital images obtained from phantom exposures at a LORAD M-IV mammography unit. Two analysis were realized the first one by the segmentation of regions of interest containing the simulated nodules by an automated segmentation technique as well as by an experienced radiologist who has delineated the contour of each nodule by means of a graphic display digitizer. Both results were compared by using evaluation metrics. The second one used measure of quality Structural Similarity (SSIM) to generate quantitative data related to the texture produced by each material. Although all the tested materials proved to be suitable for the study, the PVC film yielded the best results.

  15. Investigation of Dynamic Crack Coalescence Using a Gypsum-Like 3D Printing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Gao-Feng; Zhu, Jianbo; Zhao, Yi-Xin; Shen, Luming

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic crack coalescence attracts great attention in rock mechanics. However, specimen preparation in experimental study is a time-consuming and difficult procedure. In this work, a gypsum-like material by powder bed and inkjet 3D printing technique was applied to produce specimens with preset cracks for split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test. From micro X-ray CT test, it was found that the 3D printing technique could successfully prepare specimens that contain preset cracks with width of 0.2 mm. Basic mechanical properties of the 3D printing material, i.e., the elastic modulus, the Poisson's ratio, the density, the compressive strength, the indirect tensile strength, and the fracture toughness, were obtained and reported. Unlike 3D printed specimens using polylactic acid, these gypsum-like specimens can produce failure patterns much closer to those observed in classical rock mechanical tests. Finally, the dynamic crack coalescence of the 3D printed specimens with preset cracks were captured using a high-speed camera during SHPB tests. Failure patterns of these 3D printed specimens are similar to the specimens made by Portland cement concrete. Our results indicate that sample preparation by 3D printing is highly competitive due to its quickness in prototyping, precision and flexibility on the geometry, and high material homogeneity.

  16. An investigation of anode and cathode materials in photomicrobial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kenneth; Thorne, Rebecca J; Cameron, Petra J

    2016-02-28

    Photomicrobial fuel cells (p-MFCs) are devices that use photosynthetic organisms (such as cyanobacteria or algae) to turn light energy into electrical energy. In a p-MFC, the anode accepts electrons from microorganisms that are either growing directly on the anode surface (biofilm) or are free floating in solution (planktonic). The nature of both the anode and cathode material is critical for device efficiency. An ideal anode is biocompatible and facilitates direct electron transfer from the microorganisms, with no need for an electron mediator. For a p-MFC, there is the additional requirement that the anode should not prevent light from perfusing through the photosynthetic cells. The cathode should facilitate the rapid reaction of protons and oxygen to form water so as not to rate limit the device. In this paper, we first review the range of anode and cathode materials currently used in p-MFCs. We then present our own data comparing cathode materials in a p-MFC and our first results using porous ceramic anodes in a mediator-free p-MFC.

  17. Microstructural investigations of as-fabricated, long-term thermally aged and neutron irradiated RPV materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.J.; Miller, M.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Atom probe field ton microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of as-fabricated, long-term thermally aged ({approximately}100,000h. at 540{degrees}F (282{degrees}C)) and neutron-irradiated (6.6{times}10{sup 18} and 3.47{times}10{sup 19} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E>1 MeV) at {approximately}550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C)) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal aging effects as well as the neutron-induced effects. The microstructural study focused on the quantification of the matrix chemistry and the detection and characterization of radiation-induced precipitates. The APFIM results indicate that there was no microstructural evolution after a long term-thermal exposure in weld (0.28 wt% Cu), plate (0.13 wt% Cu) or forging (0.02 wt% Cu) materials. Conversely, matrix depletion of copper and phosphorus solutes and the presence of Cu. P, Ni, Mn and Si rich clusters were observed in the neutron-irradiated weld material. These APFIM comparisons of materials in all three conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties (transition temperature shift).

  18. A simulation study investigating a Cherenkov material for use with the prompt gamma range verification in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Chen, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In vivo range verification methods will reveal information about the penetration depth into a patient for an incident proton beam. The prompt gamma (PG) method is a promising in vivo technique that has been shown to yield this range information by measuring the escaping MeV photons given a suitable detector system. The majority of current simulations investigating PG detectors utilize common scintillating materials ideal for photons within a low neutron background radiation field using complex geometries or novel designs. In this work we simulate a minimal detector system using a material ideal for MeV photon detection in the presence of a significant neutron field based on the Cherenkov phenomenon. The response of this selected material was quantified for the escaping particles commonly found in proton therapy applications and the feasibility of using the PG technique for this detector material was studied. Our simulations found that the majority of the range information can be determined by detecting photons emitted with a timing window less than ∼50 ns after the interaction of the proton beam with the water phantom and with an energy threshold focusing on the energy range of the de-excitation of 16O photons (∼6 MeV). The Cherenkov material investigated is able to collect these photons and estimate the range with timescales on the order of tens of nanoseconds as well as greatly suppress the signal due to neutron. PMID:27163377

  19. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel

    2008-01-02

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 mu-m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (hot-spots), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of hot-spots decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the hot-spots at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution shows the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the "hot-spots."

  20. Investigation of “Hot-Spots” as a Function of Material Removal in a Large-Grain Niobium Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2006-08-07

    The performance of a single-cell cavity made of RRR > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal by buffered chemical polishing. Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2.0 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed several ''hot-spots'', which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field, mostly at high field levels. It was found that the number of ''hot-spots'' decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses of the ''hot-spots'' at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of niobium material parameters as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution shows the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the ''hot-spots''.

  1. Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Royle, G; Lourenço, A; Schwarz, M; Fracchiolla, F; Ricketts, K

    2016-06-21

    High-Z nano materials have been previously shown to increase the amount of dose deposition within the tumour due to an increase in secondary electrons. This study evaluates the effects of high-Z nano materials in combination with protons, and the impact of proton energy, nanoparticle material and concentration. These effects were studied in silico through Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally through a phantom study, with particular attention to macroscale changes to the Bragg peak in the presence of nanoparticles. Three nanoparticle materials were simulated (gold, silver and platinum) at three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 6.5 mg ml(-1)) at two clinical proton energies (60 and 226 MeV). Simulations were verified experimentally using Gafchromic film measurements of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at two available high concentrations (5.5 mg ml(-1) and 1.1 mg ml(-1)). A significant change to Bragg peak features was evident, where at 226 MeV and 6.5 mg ml(-1), simulations of gold showed a 4.7 mm longitudinal shift of the distal edge and experimentally at 5.5 mg ml(-1), a shift of 2.2 mm. Simulations showed this effect to be material dependent, where platinum having the highest physical density caused the greatest shift with increasing concentration. A dose enhancement of 6%  ±  0.05 and 5%  ±  0.15 (60 MeV and 226 MeV, respectively) was evident with gold at 6.5 mg ml(-1) to water alone, compared to the 21%  ±  0.53 observed experimentally as dose to film with 5.5 mg ml(-1) of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at 226 MeV. The introduction of nanoparticles has strong potential to enhance dose in proton therapy, however the changes to the Bragg peak distribution that occur with high concentrations need to be accounted for to ensure tumour coverage. PMID:27224304

  2. Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.; Royle, G.; Lourenço, A.; Schwarz, M.; Fracchiolla, F.; Ricketts, K.

    2016-06-01

    High-Z nano materials have been previously shown to increase the amount of dose deposition within the tumour due to an increase in secondary electrons. This study evaluates the effects of high-Z nano materials in combination with protons, and the impact of proton energy, nanoparticle material and concentration. These effects were studied in silico through Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally through a phantom study, with particular attention to macroscale changes to the Bragg peak in the presence of nanoparticles. Three nanoparticle materials were simulated (gold, silver and platinum) at three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 6.5 mg ml‑1) at two clinical proton energies (60 and 226 MeV). Simulations were verified experimentally using Gafchromic film measurements of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at two available high concentrations (5.5 mg ml‑1 and 1.1 mg ml‑1). A significant change to Bragg peak features was evident, where at 226 MeV and 6.5 mg ml‑1, simulations of gold showed a 4.7 mm longitudinal shift of the distal edge and experimentally at 5.5 mg ml‑1, a shift of 2.2 mm. Simulations showed this effect to be material dependent, where platinum having the highest physical density caused the greatest shift with increasing concentration. A dose enhancement of 6%  ±  0.05 and 5%  ±  0.15 (60 MeV and 226 MeV, respectively) was evident with gold at 6.5 mg ml‑1 to water alone, compared to the 21%  ±  0.53 observed experimentally as dose to film with 5.5 mg ml‑1 of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at 226 MeV. The introduction of nanoparticles has strong potential to enhance dose in proton therapy, however the changes to the Bragg peak distribution that occur with high concentrations need to be accounted for to ensure tumour coverage.

  3. Investigation into the effects of high-Z nano materials in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.; Royle, G.; Lourenço, A.; Schwarz, M.; Fracchiolla, F.; Ricketts, K.

    2016-06-01

    High-Z nano materials have been previously shown to increase the amount of dose deposition within the tumour due to an increase in secondary electrons. This study evaluates the effects of high-Z nano materials in combination with protons, and the impact of proton energy, nanoparticle material and concentration. These effects were studied in silico through Monte Carlo simulation and experimentally through a phantom study, with particular attention to macroscale changes to the Bragg peak in the presence of nanoparticles. Three nanoparticle materials were simulated (gold, silver and platinum) at three concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 6.5 mg ml-1) at two clinical proton energies (60 and 226 MeV). Simulations were verified experimentally using Gafchromic film measurements of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at two available high concentrations (5.5 mg ml-1 and 1.1 mg ml-1). A significant change to Bragg peak features was evident, where at 226 MeV and 6.5 mg ml-1, simulations of gold showed a 4.7 mm longitudinal shift of the distal edge and experimentally at 5.5 mg ml-1, a shift of 2.2 mm. Simulations showed this effect to be material dependent, where platinum having the highest physical density caused the greatest shift with increasing concentration. A dose enhancement of 6%  ±  0.05 and 5%  ±  0.15 (60 MeV and 226 MeV, respectively) was evident with gold at 6.5 mg ml-1 to water alone, compared to the 21%  ±  0.53 observed experimentally as dose to film with 5.5 mg ml-1 of gold nanoparticles suspended in water at 226 MeV. The introduction of nanoparticles has strong potential to enhance dose in proton therapy, however the changes to the Bragg peak distribution that occur with high concentrations need to be accounted for to ensure tumour coverage.

  4. Investigation of Bio-Inspired Hybrid Materials through Polymer Infiltration of Thermal Spray Formed Ceramic Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Katherine Claire

    High strength and toughness are often mutually exclusive in engineered materials. This is especially true of ceramics and polymers. Ceramics exhibit high strength and stiffness, but are brittle while polymers are flaw tolerant but prone to deformation at low stresses. Nature overcomes this restriction in materials by strategically combining brittle components with tough organics, leading to materials with both a high strength and toughness. One of the most impressive natural composites is nacre consisting of mainly a brittle mineral phase, 95vol% calcium carbonate (aragonite), and 5vol% biopolymer (a combination of proteins and polysaccahrides). Nature combines constituents with poor macroscale properties and achieves levels that surpass those expected despite being formed of mostly mineral CaCO3 tablets. Interestingly, nacreous assemblies can display a toughness 3,000 times higher than their major constituent, aragonite. Similarities have been observed between nacre and sprayed ceramics in terms of their microstructures and mechanical behavior. Both assemblies follow a design hierarchy and layered organization over several length scales. The mineral phase in nacre has evolved on the microscale and nanometer interlayers of biopolymer bond neighboring tablets. In addition, these tablets have a certain degree of waviness, nanoscale roughness, and mineral bridges thereby further enhancing linkages to one another. These inherent microstructural features significantly improve the mechanical properties of nacreous assemblies. On the other hand, sprayed ceramics are formed from micron sized splats, larger than aragonite nacreous tablets, with comparable (nanoscale) roughness, resulting from grain termination sites. Together these features of sprayed ceramics respond similarly to nacre, showing a great extent of mechanical nonlinearity and hysteresis, which is mostly absent in structural ceramics. Due to the splat-by-splat deposition process, sprayed ceramics contain a

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of materials for frequency-agile laser systems. Final report, 15 January 1982-14 January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This research involves the use of laser-spectroscopy techniques such as four-wave mixing, multiphoton absorption, time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy, and holography to characterize dynamical optical processes such as energy transfer, exciton migration, radiation-less relaxation, and the photorefractive effect. In addition, a significant effort was spent in the synthesis and characterization of new types of materials for tunable laser applications. The materials investigated include alexandrite, titanium-doped sapphire, lithium niobate, neodymium pentaphosphate, rhodium-doped rubidium calcium fluoride, manganese silicate, and neodymium-doped garnet crystals and glasses.

  6. Neutron imaging methods for the investigation of energy related materials. Fuel cells, battery, hydrogen storage and nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Boillat, Pierre; Kaestner, Anders; Vontobel, Peter; Mannes, David

    2015-10-01

    After a short explanation of the state-of-the-art in the field of neutron imaging we give some examples how energy related materials can be studied successfully. These are in particular fuel cell studies, battery research approaches, the storage of hydrogen, but also some investigations with nuclear fuel components. The high contrast for light isotopes like H-1, Li-6 or B-10 are used to trace low amounts of material even within compact sealing of metals which are relatively transparent for neutrons at the same time.

  7. Summary and review of Materials Special Investigation Group evaluations of hardware from the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Funk, Joan; Pippin, H. Gary; Dursch, Harry

    1995-01-01

    Major materials findings obtained during LDEF post-flight investigations over the past three and one-half years are reported. The summary of findings to date includes results for thermal control coatings, thin polymeric films, composites, metals, adhesives, contamination, and environments definitions. Reaction rates of selected materials exposed to atomic oxygen are presented. Results useful for model verification and comparison with ground based facility data are specifically highlighted. Potential areas for future work are described. In conclusion, a rationale for a second long term flight experiment is presented.

  8. Rapid prototyping for in vitro knee rig investigations of prosthetized knee biomechanics: comparison with cobalt-chromium alloy implant material.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Steinbrück, Arnd; Müller, Tatjana; Woiczinski, Matthias; Chevalier, Yan; Weber, Patrick; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM) by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM) prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics. PMID:25879019

  9. Experimental Investigation of Three-Dimensional (3-D) Material Flow Pattern in Thick Dissimilar 2050 Friction-Stir Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avettand-Fènoël, Marie-Noëlle; Taillard, Roland; Laye, Julien; Odièvre, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    The current microstructural investigation performed at various scales deals with the three-dimensional (3-D) material flow in thick dissimilar Airware™ 2050 friction-stir butt welds (Airware, Newport Beach, CA) because of the scarcity of the results obtained with thicker than 8 mm joints and the lack of detailed interpretation of features in the longitudinal direction. An additional originality consists in the study of material flow under the probe tip. In the current case of thick plates, the variation of local temperature along the weld depth is of key importance for the material flow. Indeed, it governs the slight difference of local mechanical behavior between both materials and therefore the shift of the interface, which was clearly put into evidence by means of a difference of Mn content as small as 0.3 pct between both alloys. This importance of temperature for the malleability also entails the pear shape of the nugget as well as a change of grains orientation along the depth in the thermomechanically affected zone. Due to the modification of tool-material adhesion with temperature, a new phenomenological model of material flow for thick friction-stir welds is proposed. In accordance with their difference of origin, the coexistence of onion rings and serrated interface is also highlighted.

  10. Investigations on the impact of material-integrated sensors with the help of FEM-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Lang, Gerrit Dumstorff andWalter

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the impact of material-integrated sensors with the help of finite element-based modeling. A sensor (inlay) integrated with a material (matrix) is always a foreign body in the material, which can lead to a "wound effect", that is degradation of the macroscopic behavior of a material. By analyzing the inlay's impact on the material in terms of mechanical load, heat conduction, stress during integration and other impacts of integration, this wound effect is analyzed. For the mechanical load, we found out that the inlay has to be at least as stretchable and bendable as the matrix. If there is a high thermal load during integration, the coefficients of the thermal expansion of the inlay have to be matched to the matrix. In the case of a high thermal load during operation, the inlay has to be as thin as possible or its thermal conductivity has to be adapted to the thermal conductivity of the matrix. To have a general view of things, the results are dimensionless and independent of the geometry. In each section, the results are illustrated by examples. Based on all of the results, we present our idea for the fabrication of future material-integrated sensors. PMID:25621607

  11. Investigations on the Impact of Material-Integrated Sensors with the Help of FEM-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dumstorff, Gerrit; Lang, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the impact of material-integrated sensors with the help of finite element-based modeling. A sensor (inlay) integrated with a material (matrix) is always a foreign body in the material, which can lead to a “wound effect”, that is degradation of the macroscopic behavior of a material. By analyzing the inlay's impact on the material in terms of mechanical load, heat conduction, stress during integration and other impacts of integration, this wound effect is analyzed. For the mechanical load, we found out that the inlay has to be at least as stretchable and bendable as the matrix. If there is a high thermal load during integration, the coefficients of the thermal expansion of the inlay have to be matched to the matrix. In the case of a high thermal load during operation, the inlay has to be as thin as possible or its thermal conductivity has to be adapted to the thermal conductivity of the matrix. To have a general view of things, the results are dimensionless and independent of the geometry. In each section, the results are illustrated by examples. Based on all of the results, we present our idea for the fabrication of future material-integrated sensors. PMID:25621607

  12. Rapid Prototyping for In Vitro Knee Rig Investigations of Prosthetized Knee Biomechanics: Comparison with Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Implant Material

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Christian; Steinbrück, Arnd; Müller, Tatjana; Woiczinski, Matthias; Chevalier, Yan; Müller, Peter E.; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Retropatellar complications after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) such as anterior knee pain and subluxations might be related to altered patellofemoral biomechanics, in particular to trochlear design and femorotibial joint positioning. A method was developed to test femorotibial and patellofemoral joint modifications separately with 3D-rapid prototyped components for in vitro tests, but material differences may further influence results. This pilot study aims at validating the use of prostheses made of photopolymerized rapid prototype material (RPM) by measuring the sliding friction with a ring-on-disc setup as well as knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure on a knee rig. Cobalt-chromium alloy (standard prosthesis material, SPM) prostheses served as validation standard. Friction coefficients between these materials and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were additionally tested as this latter material is commonly used to protect pressure sensors in experiments. No statistical differences were found between friction coefficients of both materials to PTFE. UHMWPE shows higher friction coefficient at low axial loads for RPM, a difference that disappears at higher load. No measurable statistical differences were found in knee kinematics and retropatellar pressure distribution. This suggests that using polymer prototypes may be a valid alternative to original components for in vitro TKA studies and future investigations on knee biomechanics. PMID:25879019

  13. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 6: Materials sciences and manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The development of commercial manufacturing and research activities in space is discussed. The capability is to be installed in space stations in order to exploit the extended free fall which makes many novel manipulations of materials possible and alters the behavior of certain chemical and physical processes. The broad objectives are: (1) to develop technical basis required for commercial use of manned space facilities, (2) to provide indirect economic benefits by exploiting advantages of space laboratory facilities to solve critical experimental problems, and (3) to initiate manufacturing operations in space by private enterprise for commercial purposes and by agencies of the Government for public purposes.

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The historical development of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is presented, including the functional requirements, polymer selection, curing, stabilization, production and module processing. The construction and use of a new method for the accelerated aging of polymers is detailed. The method more closely resembles the conditions that may be encountered in actual module field exposure and additionally may permit service life to be predicted accurately. The use of hardboard as a low cost candidate substrate material is studied. The performance of surface antisoiling treatments useful for imparting a self cleaning property to modules is updated.

  15. Investigative Photography, 16-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This military-developed text consists of nine lessons dealing with investigative photography. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: light (light as the basis of photography, the behavior of light, the composition of white light, light transmission, reflection and absorption, illumination, and pinholes and light); camera…

  16. Identification of recycled continental material in the mantle from Sr, Nd and Pb isotope investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. S.; O'Nions, R. K.

    1982-11-01

    Pb, Nd and Sr isotope compositions of oceanic basalts have been used to identify recycled components of continent derivation in the mantle. The isotopic compositions of Sr, Nd and Pb, together with U, Pb, Sm, Nd, Rb, and Sr abundances have been determined for back-arc basalt glasses from the Scotia Sea and Parece Vela and West Philippine Basins, in addition to basalts from South Sandwich Islands, Ascension, St. Helena and Tristan da Cunha. Comparisons made between the isotopic compositions of South Sandwich Islands basalts and Atlantic MORB glasses permit the identification of recycled components of continent derivation in the source of the island arc basalts. Recycled Sr of continent derivation is also recognisable in back-arc basalt glasses from the Scotia Sea and Parece Vela and West Philippine Basins. However, contemporary reinjection of material with the isotopic structures similar to those identified as a component of island arc and back-arc regions cannot be the sole or dominant influence on the fine structure observed in MORB glasses from the Atlantic Ocean, nor the isotopic compositions of Tristan da Cunha, St. Helena and Ascension basalts. Recycled materials are likely to have been responsible for the generation of these heterogeneities only if they have been stored in the mantle for periods of time exceeding 10 9 years.

  17. Investigation of Thermal Interface Materials Using Phase-Sensitive Transient Thermoreflectance Technique: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; King, C.; DeVoto, D.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.

    2014-08-01

    With increasing power density in electronics packages/modules, thermal resistances at multiple interfaces are a bottleneck to efficient heat removal from the package. In this work, the performance of thermal interface materials such as grease, thermoplastic adhesives and diffusion-bonded interfaces are characterized using the phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance technique. A multi-layer heat conduction model was constructed and theoretical solutions were derived to obtain the relation between phase lag and the thermal/physical properties. This technique enables simultaneous extraction of the contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity of the TIMs. With the measurements, the bulk thermal conductivity of Dow TC-5022 thermal grease (70 to 75 um bondline thickness) was 3 to 5 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 5 to 10 mm2-K/W. For the Btech thermoplastic material (45 to 80 μm bondline thickness), the bulk thermal conductivity was 20 to 50 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 2 to 5 mm2-K/W. Measurements were also conducted to quantify the thermal performance of diffusion-bonded interface for power electronics applications. Results with the diffusion-bonded sample showed that the interfacial thermal resistance is more than one order of magnitude lower than those of traditional TIMs, suggesting potential pathways to efficient thermal management.

  18. Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

  19. Structural investigation of nonionic fluorinated micelles by SANS in relation to mesoporous silica materials.

    PubMed

    Michaux, Florentin; Blin, Jean-Luc; Teixeira, José; Stébé, Marie José

    2012-01-12

    In an attempt to answer the question if there is dependence between the pore ordering of the mesoporous silica, obtained through the cooperative template mechanism, and the shape of the micellar aggregates of the surfactant solutions, the micellar structures of two nonionic fluorinated surfactant based-systems are studied by SANS. By fitting the experimental spectra with theoretical models, the structural evolution of the molecular aggregates can be described, and some important parameters can be obtained, such as the water and eventually oil penetration into the surfactant film, the aggregation number, the area per polar head of the surfactant, and the surfactant chain conformations. We have shown that for the C(8)F(17)C(2)H(4)(OC(2)H(4))(9)OH system, the micelles are prolate spheroids. The increase of the surfactant concentration in water does not change the characteristics of the interfacial film, but the aggregation number raises and the particles become more elongated. By contrast, the experimental curves of C(7)F(15)C(2)H(4)(OC(2)H(4))(8)OH cannot be fitted considering a small particle model. However, progressive incorporation of fluorocarbon induces a change of size and shape of the globules, which become smaller and more and more spherical. Regarding the material mesopore ordering, it appears that the micelles that lead to hexagonal mesoporous silica materials are described with a model of quasi-spherical globules. On the contrary, when large micelles are found, only wormhole-like structures are obtained.

  20. Combined investigation of Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques for composite materials NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. W.; Nath, S.; Fulton, J. P.; Namkung, M.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced composites are not without trade-offs. Their increased designability brings an increase in the complexity of their internal geometry and, as a result, an increase in the number of failure modes associated with a defect. When two or more isotropic materials are combined in a composite, the isotropic material failure modes may also combine. In a laminate, matrix delamination, cracking and crazing, and voids and porosity, will often combine with fiber breakage, shattering, waviness, and separation to bring about ultimate structural failure. This combining of failure modes can result in defect boundaries of different sizes, corresponding to the failure of each structural component. This paper discusses a dual-technology NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) (eddy current (EC) and ultrasonics (UT)) study of graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) laminate samples. Eddy current and ultrasonic raster (Cscan) imaging were used together to characterize the effects of mechanical impact damage, high temperature thermal damage and various types of inserts in gr/ep laminate samples of various stacking sequences.

  1. An Investigation on the Coupled Thermal-Mechanical-Electrical Response of Automobile Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Mu, Yu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Li, Guodong; Zhang, Qingjie

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials, which can directly convert heat to electrical energy, possess wide application potential for power generation from waste heat. As TE devices in vehicle exhaust power generation systems work in the long term in a service environment with coupled thermal-mechanical-electrical conditions, the reliability of their mechanical strength and conversion efficiency is an important issue for their commercial application. Based on semiconductor TE devices wih multiple p- n couples and the working environment of a vehicle exhaust power generation system, the service conditions of the TE devices are simulated by using the finite-element method. The working temperature on the hot side is set according to experimental measurements, and two cooling methods, i.e., an independent and shared water tank, are adopted on the cold side. The conversion efficiency and thermal stresses of the TE devices are calculated and discussed. Numerical results are obtained, and the mechanism of the influence on the conversion efficiency and mechanical properties of the TE materials is revealed, aiming to provide theoretical guidance for optimization of the design and commercial application of vehicle TE devices.

  2. Investigation of residual anode material after electrorefining uranium in molten chloride salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M. A.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J.

    2015-12-01

    A buildup of material at uranium anodes during uranium electrorefining in molten chloride salts has been observed. Potentiodynamic testing has been conducted using a three electrode cell, with a uranium working electrode in both LiCl/KCl eutectic and LiCl each containing ∼5 mol% UCl3. The anodic current response was observed at 50° intervals between 450 °C and 650 °C in the eutectic salt. These tests revealed a buildup of material at the anode in LiCl/KCl salt, which was sampled at room temperature, and analyzed using ICP-MS, XRD and SEM techniques. Examination of the analytical data, current response curves and published phase diagrams has established that as the uranium anode dissolves, the U3+ ion concentration in the diffusion layer surrounding the electrode rises precipitously to levels, which may at low temperatures exceed the solubility limit for UCl3 or in the case of the eutectic salt for K2UCl5. The reduction in current response observed at low temperature in eutectic salt is eliminated at 650 °C, where K2UCl5 is absent due to its congruent melting and only simple concentration polarization effects are seen. In LiCl similar concentration effects are seen though significantly longer time at applied potential is required to effect a reduction in the current response as compared to the eutectic salt.

  3. Investigating the Origin of Bright Materials on Vesta: Synthesis, Conclusions, and Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Pieters, C. M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Schroder, S. E.; Hiesinger, H.; Blewett, D. T.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Keller, H. U.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn spacecraft started orbiting the second largest asteroid (4) Vesta in August 2011, revealing the details of its surface at an unprecedented pixel scale as small as approx.70 m in Framing Camera (FC) clear and color filter images and approx.180 m in the Visible and Infrared Spectrometer (VIR) data in its first two science orbits, the Survey Orbit and the High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) [1]. The surface of Vesta displays the greatest diversity in terms of geology and mineralogy of all asteroids studied in detail [2, 3]. While the albedo of Vesta of approx.0.38 in the visible wavelengths [4, 5] is one of the highest among all asteroids, the surface of Vesta shows the largest variation of albedos found on a single asteroid, with geometric albedos ranging at least from approx.0.10 to approx.0.67 in HAMO images [5]. There are many distinctively bright and dark areas observed on Vesta, associated with various geological features and showing remarkably different forms. Here we report our initial attempt to understand the origin of the areas that are distinctively brighter than their surroundings. The dark materials on Vesta clearly are different in origin from bright materials and are reported in a companion paper [6].

  4. First Principles Investigations of Technologically and Environmentally Important Nano-structured Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sujata

    In the course of my PhD I have worked on a broad range of problems using simulations from first principles: from catalysis and chemical reactions at surfaces and on nanostructures, characterization of carbon-based systems and devices, and surface and interface physics. My research activities focused on the application of ab-initio electronic structure techniques to the theoretical study of important aspects of the physics and chemistry of materials for energy and environmental applications and nano-electronic devices. A common theme of my research is the computational study of chemical reactions of environmentally important molecules (CO, CO2) using high performance simulations. In particular, my principal aim was to design novel nano-structured functional catalytic surfaces and interfaces for environmentally relevant remediation and recycling reactions, with particular attention to the management of carbon dioxide. We have studied the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO), both in the presence and absence of hydrogen, on graphitic edges. Using first-principles calculations we have studied several reactions of CO with carbon nanostructures, where the active sites can be regenerated by the deposition of carbon decomposed from the reactant (CO) to make the reactions self-sustained. Using statistical mechanics, we have also studied the conditions under which the conversion of CO to graphene and carbon dioxide is thermodynamically favorable, both in the presence and in the absence of hydrogen. These results are a first step toward the development of processes for the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of CO in a hydrogen atmosphere. We have elucidated the atomic scale mechanisms of activation and reduction of carbon dioxide on specifically designed catalytic surfaces via the rational manipulation of the surface properties that can be achieved by combining transition metal thin films on oxide

  5. The Role of Materials Degradation and Analysis in the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDanels, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The efforts following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia included debris recovery, reconstruction, and analysis. The debris was subjected to myriad quantitative and semiquantitative chemical analysis techniques, ranging from examination via the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The results from the work with the debris helped the investigators determine the location where a breach likely occurred in the leading edge of the left wing during lift off of the Orbiter from the Kennedy Space Center. Likewise, the information evidenced by the debris was also crucial in ascertaining the path of impinging plasma flow once it had breached the wing. After the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) issued its findings, the major portion of the investigation was concluded. However, additional work remained to be done on many pieces of debris from portions of the Orbiter which were not directly related to the initial impact during ascent. This subsequent work was not only performed in the laboratory, but was also performed with portable equipment, including examination via portable X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Likewise, acetate and silicon-rubber replicas of various fracture surfaces were obtained for later macroscopic and fractographic examination. This paper will detail the efforts and findings from the initial investigation, as well as present results obtained by the later examination and analysis of debris from the Orbiter including its windows, bulkhead structures, and other components which had not been examined during the primary investigation.

  6. Removal of Exogenous Materials from the Outer Portion of Frozen Cores to Investigate the Ancient Biological Communities Harbored Inside.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Robyn A; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Foley, Karen; Jones, Robert; Courville, Zoe; Douglas, Thomas; Perkins, Edward; Reynolds, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    The cryosphere offers access to preserved organisms that persisted under past environmental conditions. In fact, these frozen materials could reflect conditions over vast time periods and investigation of biological materials harbored inside could provide insight of ancient environments. To appropriately analyze these ecosystems and extract meaningful biological information from frozen soils and ice, proper collection and processing of the frozen samples is necessary. This is especially critical for microbial and DNA analyses since the communities present may be so uniquely different from modern ones. Here, a protocol is presented to successfully collect and decontaminate frozen cores. Both the absence of the colonies used to dope the outer surface and exogenous DNA suggest that we successfully decontaminated the frozen cores and that the microorganisms detected were from the material, rather than contamination from drilling or processing the cores. PMID:27403572

  7. Factors affecting the removal of ammonia from air on carbonaceous materials: Investigation of reactive adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Camille

    Air pollution related to the release of industrial toxic gases, represents one of the main concerns of our modern world owing to its detrimental effect on the environment. To tackle this growing issue, efficient ways to reduce/control the release of pollutants are required. Adsorption of gases on porous materials appears as a potential solution. However, the physisorption of small molecules of gases such as ammonia is limited at ambient conditions. For their removal, adsorbents providing strong adsorption forces must be used/developed. In this study, new carbon-based materials are prepared and tested for ammonia adsorption at ambient conditions. Characterization of the adsorbents' texture and surface chemistry is performed before and after exposure to ammonia to identify the features responsible for high adsorption capacity and for controlling the mechanisms of retention. The characterization techniques include: nitrogen adsorption, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Electron Microscopy. The results obtained indicate that ammonia removal is governed by the adsorbent's surface chemistry. On the contrary, porosity (and thus physisorption) plays a secondary role in this process, unless strong dispersive forces are provided by the adsorbent. The surface chemistry features responsible for the enhanced ammonia adsorption include the presence of oxygen-(carboxyl, hydroxyl, epoxy) and sulfur- (sulfonic) containing groups. Metallic species improve the breakthrough capacity as well as they lead to the formation of Lewis acid-base interactions, hydrogen-bonding or complexation. In addition to the latter three mechanisms, ammonia is retained on the adsorbent surface via Bronsted acid-base interactions or via specific reactions with the adsorbent's functionalities leading to the incorporation of ammonia into the adsorbent's matrix. Another mechanism

  8. Experimental and in silico investigations of organic phosphates and phosphonates sorption on polymer-ceramic monolithic materials and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyńska, Monika; Zembrzuska, Joanna; Tomczak, Rafał; Mikołajczyk, Jakub; Rusińska-Roszak, Danuta; Voelkel, Adam; Buchwald, Tomasz; Jampílek, Josef; Lukáč, Miloš; Devínsky, Ferdinand

    2016-10-10

    A method based on experimental and in silico evaluations for investigating interactions of organic phosphates and phosphonates with hydroxyapatite was developed. This quick and easy method is used for determination of differences among organophosphorus compounds of various structures in their mineral binding affinities. Empirical sorption evaluation was carried out using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry or UV-VIS spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm sorption of organic phosphates and phosphonates on hydroxyapatite. Polymer-ceramic monolithic material and bulk hydroxyapatite were applied as sorbent materials. Furthermore, a Polymer-ceramic Monolithic In-Needle Extraction device was used to investigate both sorption and desorption steps. Binding energies were computed from the fully optimised structures utilising Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level. Potential pharmacologic and toxic effects of the tested compounds were estimated by the Prediction of the Activity Spectra of Substances using GeneXplain software. PMID:27552905

  9. Investigation of the Reactions and Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Fullerenes in Extraterrestrial Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.

    2005-01-01

    The work funded by this research grant includes four specific projects: (1) Mapping the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a variety of meteoritic samples and comparing this distribution with mineralogical features of the meteorite to determine whether a correlation exists between the two. (2) Developing a method for detection of fullerenes in extraterrestrial samples using microprobe laser-desorption laser-ionization mass spectrometry ( pL2MS) and utilizing this technique to investigate fullerene presence, while exploring the possibility of spatially mapping the fullerene distribution in these samples through in situ detection. (3) Investigating a possible formation pathway for meteoritic and ancient terrestrial kerogen involving the photochemical reactions of PAHs with alkanes under prebiotic and astrophysically relevant conditions. (4) Studying reaction pathways and identifying the photoproducts generated during the photochemical evolution of PAH-containing interstellar ice analogs as part of an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Astrochemistry Lab at NASA Ames.

  10. An investigation of carbonaceous materials reducing ferric ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, A. V.; Chilton, J. P.; Fray, D. J.

    1988-10-01

    By substituting the ferrous to ferric oxidation for anodic oxygen evolution in an electrowinning cell, it is possible to reduce the cell voltage by about 1 V. However, it is then necessary to reduce the ferric back to ferrous and, depending on the circumstances, acid needs to be cogenerated. Various possible reductants are discussed, and experiments are described on the use of lignite and other carbonaceous materials to reduce the ferric ion. It was found that lignite was able to reduce the ferric ion, in situ in the electrowinning cell, but that the rate of reduction was compatible only with a maximum current density of about 40 Am-2. The efficiency was increased by periodically interrupting the current flow.

  11. Materials of construction for high-salinity geothermal brines. Rept. of investigations/1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.P.; Cramer, S.D.

    1991-05-06

    The high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) are a valuable source of energy and mineral values. The brine and steam produced from them are corrosive and cause early failure of many common materials of construction. Mass-loss and electrochemical corrosion measurements were conducted on over 60 metal alloys in brine and steam environments produced from geothermal well Magmamax No. 1, located at the Salton Sea KGRA, at temperatures from 180 to 215 C, and in synthetic Magmamax brine at 105 and 232 C. General corrosion, crevice and pitting corrosion, and stress corrosion were examined along with the effects of dissolved gases. The alloys with the most acceptable corrosion performance in high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal environments were the high-chromium ferritic stainless steels, the Inconels and Hastelloys, and the titanium alloys.

  12. Investigation of space radiation effects in polymeric film-forming materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.; Jarke, F.

    1975-01-01

    The literature search in the field of ultraviolet radiation effects that was conducted during the previous program, Contract No. NAS1-12549, has been expanded to include the effects of charged particle radiation and high energy electromagnetic radiation. The literature from 1958 to 1969 was searched manually, while the literature from 1969 to present was searched by using a computerized keyword system. The information generated from this search was utilized for the design of an experimental program aimed at the development of materials with improved resistance to the vacuum-radiation environment of space. Preliminary irradiation experiments were performed which indicate that the approaches and criteria employed are very promising and may provide a solution to the challenging problem of polymer stability to combined ultraviolet/high energy radiation.

  13. Investigation of nickel as hard mask for patterning multicomponent oxide materials in chlorine plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigne, S.; Delprat, S.; Chaker, M.; Margot, J.

    2013-09-01

    It is found that in specific Cl2 plasma conditions, using a nickel hard mask over calcium barium niobate, CBN (a material particularly difficult to etch) significantly improves both sidewall angles and etching selectivity. This mask hardening is due to the competition between NiCl2 growth and etching during the process. For applied bias voltage higher than the Ni sputtering threshold and substrate temperatures higher than 200 °C, this competition results in net NiCl2 growth which drastically improves the etching selectivity. This mask hardening was successfully used to define an optical waveguide with 73° sidewall angle in a 1 μm-thick CBN layer. This effect can potentially be used for the etching of a very large number of complex oxides that are known to be inert and very difficult to etch.

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in solar energy technology is reported in the following areas: aging and life prediction methodology and devices for solar cell encapsulation; the function of adhesion chemistry, primers, and a new diagnostic technique for estimations of bond durability; a study of fire retardant formulations for decreasing the potential flammability of solar modules; initial studies of the electrical insulating properties of encapsulation materials and measurement of the intrinsic dielectric strength; antisoiling compounds for the prevention of soil build-up on the outer surface of the module; and low temperature processing encapsulants that permit module fabrication at temperatures less than 100 C. Another area of study has been added to determine the degree to which formulation and processes affect the module quality and manufacturing yield.

  15. An experimental investigation of interfacial temperatures in blade-seal material rubbing of aircraft compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Wolak, J.; Etemad, S.; Choi, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented for the rubbing of rotating (100 m/s) titanium blade specimens, with different plasma-sprayed tip coating, against an abradable porous seal material at two different incursion rates. In general, there was a good correspondence between the average transverse force of rubbing and the seal specimen surface temperature. Instantaneous seal surface temperature measurement showed a significant temperature jump before and after each rubbing with a high rate of cooling during each revolution and a high overall temperature level. Numerical predictions of both blade and seal temperature agreed well for the bare blade tip experiments but were consistently high for the coated blades. This suggests that the thermal properties of the coatings may significantly affect the temperatures and hence the wear characteristics of the system.

  16. High power laser and materials investigation. Final report, 31 July 1978-28 October 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chicklis, E.P.; Folweiler, R.C.; Pollak, T.M.; Baer, J.

    1980-06-01

    This is a combined study of resonant pumped solid state lasers as fusion drivers, and the development of crystalline optical materials suitable for propagation of the high peak powers associated with laser fusion research. During this period of study the concept of rare gas halide lasers was first demonstrated by the lasing of Tm:YLF at 453 nm pumped by the 353 nm energy of XeF. Excited stata densities of 5 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ have been attained and spectroscopic measurements show that up to 60% of the pump energy can be converted into useful stored energy. Alternative lasers and pumping schemes are also discussed. In all cases the potential RGH/SS systems are evaluated in respect to internal efficiency and heat loading.

  17. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  18. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules are identified, and evaluated. Ethylene vinyl acetate lamination pottant studies are conducted with respect to the time/temperature cure requirements for successful use of this compound. The time needed to produce successful gel contents are redetermined at a variety of temperatures and are related to the peroxide half life temperature curve. Formulation of the butyl acrylate syrup casting pottant is complete. The formulation contains an ultraviolet stabilizer system and is cured with an initiator that presents no shipping or handling hazards. The catalyzed syrup is stable at room temperature and has a pot life of at least an eight hour period of time. The syrup cures to a transparent rubber in 18 minutes at a temperature of 60 C.

  19. Mixing of surface materials investigated by spectral mixture analysis with the Moon Mineralogy Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Pieters, Carle M.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Boardman, Joseph W.; Mustard, John F.; M, Sunshine, Jessica; Tompkins, Stephanie; Green, Robert O.

    2010-05-01

    Mapping of surface units on the Moon, as well as identification and quantification of mineralogical components is the main task of the imaging spectrometer Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) [1] onboard Chandrayaan-1. In spectral analysis, mixing of surface materials need to be considered because they may have implications for the interpretation of the lithology. Materials that are juxtaposed within the field of view result on linear combinations of reflectance spectra [2]. Lateral contamination by remote components [e.g. 3,4], minerals in a rock [5,6], coatings [e.g. 7-9] and adjacency effects due to scattered light [10], are non-linear processes. In the present study, we perform linear Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) [11] using the Multiple-Endmember Linear Spectral-Unmixing Model (MELSUM, [12,13]) that allows limiting the number of components used in a model and guarantees positive mixing coefficients, and the sum of the mixing coefficients constrained to one. We use MELSUM both for spectral endmembers selection and to produce corresponding image fractions. This method is convenient for an initial assessment of large data sets [13] prior to using more quantitative methods for compositional analysis [5,6]. We have used a mosaic of all M3 images that cover ~80% of the surface and 10-20 nm spectral sampling. In order to avoid the effects of thermal emission, the analysis is performed in the range 0.4-2.18 μm (65 channels). A sphere-based Lommel-Seeliger photometric correction has been performed to standardize the effects of the geometry of illumination at large scale [14]. From a global scale, resulting spectral endmembers describe the most abundant components at the surface of the Moon: Anorthosite, high-calcium pyroxene (HCP), low calcium pyroxene (LCP) and olivine. Plagioclase-rich soils (anorthosite) are detected in the highlands, especially in the south hemisphere, with few spots in fresh impact craters (e.g. Copernicus). HCP and olivine are highly correlated with

  20. Investigations on deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    The research carried out by this contract was part of a larger effort funded by LANL in the areas of deflagration to detonation in porous energetic materials (DDT) and detonation shock dynamics in high explosives (DSD). In the first three years of the contract the major focus was on DDT. However, some researchers were carried out on DSD theory and numerical implementation. In the last two years the principal focus of the contract was on DSD theory and numerical implementation. However, during the second period some work was also carried out on DDT. The paper discusses DDT modeling and DSD modeling. Abstracts are included on the following topics: modeling deflagration to detonation; DSD theory; DSD wave front tracking; and DSD program burn implementation.

  1. Investigating damage fields in a particulate composite material using real-time x-ray technique

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Tang, B.

    1993-12-31

    The damage fields in an edge-cracked sheet specimen subjected to a constant crosshead speed were investigated using the real-time x-ray technique. The specimen was made from polybutadiene rubber embedded with hard particles. The x-ray data were analyzed to delineate the damage field near the crack tip and to generate contour plots of the damage intensity. The experimental data were analyzed and the results are discussed.

  2. A field investigation of the effect of fine sediment concentration on suspended bed material load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jau-Yau; Su, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Hsien-Li

    2014-05-01

    The estimation of sediment transport rate has been an important issue for river planning and management. Landslide and debris flow occur frequently in the watershed in Taiwan due to the weak geology and frequent earthquakes. For example, the Chi-Chi Earthquake (Richter scale of 7.3) occurred in central Taiwan in 1999 caused a total landslide area of more than 100 km2. It was the second-deadliest quake in recorded history in Taiwan. In this study, four sets of field experiments (3 typhoons and one large rain storm) were conducted during typhoon seasons of 2012 and 2013 to collect the hydraulic and sediment data at the Tzu-Chiang Bridge of the lower Cho-Shui River after the river incision. The main objectives of this study are to increase our understanding of the variations of the sediment transport characteristics, and to evaluate the suitability of the commonly used sediment transport equations for the lower Cho-Shui River after the Chi-Chi Earthquake. After comparing with the field data collected by Tsang's during 2006-2007, it was found that the concentration of wash load plays an important role in the sediment-laden flow. High concentration of fine sediment tends to damp the turbulence of the flow, and to reduce the uniformities of both the velocity and sediment concentration (bed material load) profiles. In addition, commonly used suspended load sediment transport equations in general under-predicted the sediment load for the lower Cho-Shui River. With consideration of the effect of concentration of fine sediment on the suspended bed material load, Chiu et al.'s (2000) equation was modified and gave more reasonable sediment discharge estimations. Reference Chiu, C. L., Jin, W., and Chen, Y.C., 2000, Mathematical models of distribution of sediment concentration, J. Hydraulic Eng., ASCE, 126(1), 16-23.

  3. Investigation into the migration potential of coating materials from cookware products.

    PubMed

    Bradley, E L; Read, W A; Castle, L

    2007-03-01

    Twenty-six non-stick-coated cookware samples were purchased, covering a variety of products, coating/metal types and food contact applications. The polymer coatings were identified to be polyethersulphone, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), bisphenol A/epichlorohydrin and one coating for which no good match was obtained with infra-red library spectra. All of the products intended for stove-top use had a polymer coating containing PTFE. The coatings were analysed as purchased and after heating at 250 degrees C for 30 min to simulate actual conditions of use. Total solvent extractables were measured and the overall migration was determined into simulants. None of the products exceeded an overall migration limit of 10 mg dm(-2). Coating materials were analysed by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), by liquid extraction followed by GC-MS and by liquid extraction followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy with a particle-beam interface. Benzene was detected in two samples, at 1.4 and 2.4 microg dm(-2). These levels in the coatings are too low to give any detectable migration into foods. There was no detectable release of perfluorochemicals. Several other substances were identified and the worst-case migration was calculated. The origin of many of the substances detected was considered to be by pick-up from the printed packaging materials in which the cookware was sold. Potential consumer exposure was calculated. None of the substances identified had the potential to exceed their tolerable daily intake (TDI) value. To confirm these worst-case calculations, the migration of certain phthalates and of bisphenol A was measured into food simulants. Migration levels were very low.

  4. Investigations on the size and shape of river bed material in a proglacial river (Kaunertal, Tyrol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuchardt, Anne; Baewert, Henning; Morche, David

    2014-05-01

    Fluvial systems of proglacial areas are characterized by a high spatiotemporal variability of discharge and sediment transport and are therefore highly vulnerable to morphological changes.In glacier forefields, sediment (moraines andglaciofluvial deposits) is mainly unconsolidated and unvegetated. The discharge in proglacial areas is predominantly influenced by the glaciers. The anticipated climate change will cause an increase of glacial retreat and due to this, higher discharges and a higher rate of sediment transport areexpected in the near future. The understanding of the effectsof climate changeon geomorphodynamicsin high mountainareasis important for regional planning and natural hazard management. Investigations on sediment fluxes, transport paths, sediment mobilization and related channel morphodynamics are part of the project "High-resolution measurements of morphodynamics in rapidlychanging Proglacial Systems of the Alps" (PROSA). The field siteKaunertalis located in the Eastern European Alps.The valley is drained by theFagge River originating from the glacierGepatschferner. Field work was concentrated on a particular channel reach of the Fagge River in the proglacial area in 2012 and 2013.Within this reach 14 cross sections were defined. Most parts of the Fagge River are strongly influenced by the adjacent slopes, moraines and glaciofluvialdeposits. Preliminary results of the grain size and clast shape analysis show very heterogeneous values for the investigation area. Downstream fining is not evident for the whole channel reach due to the high geomorphological activity by debris flows and active slope-channel coupling. For several parts of the river (sedimentary links) downstream fining could be detected. The Graichengries area (an alluvial channel reach)for example shows a downstream fining for the D90, D84 and the D50 value as well as the distal Fernergries area. Clast shape analyses illustrate the subglacial influence at the investigation sites

  5. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties, and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1979-01-01

    The reformulation of a commercial grade of ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer for use as a pottant in solar cell module manufacture was investigated. Potentially successful formulations were prepared by compounding the raw polymer with antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers and crosslinking agents to yield stabilized and curable compositions. The resulting elastomer was found to offer low cost (approximately $0.80/lb.), low temperature processability, high transparency (91% transmission), and low modulus. Cured specimens of the final formulation endured 4000 hours of fluorescent sunlamp radiation without change which indicates excellent stability.

  6. Magnetoresistors as a tool for investigating the mechanical properties of ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Jerzy; Tumański, Slawomir; Żebracki, Jacek

    1996-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility of applying the Villari effect for measurements of the dependence of deformation on the external loading. The magnetic field arising due to the deformation has been measured with a Permalloy magnetoresistive sensor. The plot of the dependence of the external field H on the strain ɛ agrees almost perfectly with the classical dependence σ = f( ɛ) in tensile tests. In steel and nickel samples stress changes in the range 0-500 MPa were accompanied by changes in the external magnetic field in the range 0-300 A/m.

  7. Investigation of the corrosion behavior of cooling coil material in a simulated concrete environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1993-02-01

    Pitting corrosion of the cooling coils embedded in the concrete roof of the waste tanks is one of the suspected causes of the recent cooling coil failures. Cyclic polarization tests were conducted to predict the threshold chloride level above which pitting would initiate. The threshold chloride level was determined to be 9000 ppM. Although these tests predict the electrochemical or corrosion behavior of the metal, they may not predict the severity of attack. Further tests which investigate the effect of the permeability of the concrete matrix on the transport of water and oxygen to the metal surface are planned to assess the severity of attack.

  8. Laboratory Investigations of Complex Refractory Organic Material Produced from Irradiation of Pluto Ice Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Much of Pluto’s surface consists of N2 ice with smaller amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Despite the low temperature 45K), chemistry can be driven in the surface ices by radiation processing such as cosmic ray bombardment. When cosmic rays strike the surface, much of their energy is dispersed in the form of secondary electrons, which in turn drive much of the resulting chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to simulate the conditions on these icy bodies may provide insight into this chemistry. Significant progress has been made in the laboratory toward understanding the smaller, simple compounds produced in the solid phase by radiation processing of (N2, CH4, CO) ices (Bohn et al. 1994; Moore & Hudson 2003; Hodyss et al. 2011; Kim and Kaiser 2012). Recently Materese et al. (2014) used a variety of techniques to better characterize the refractory materials produced from the UV photo-irradiation of N2:CH4:CO ices. However, because Pluto’s atmosphere is optically thick to Lyman-α UV radiation it is important to re-examine the results using an alternate radiation source. Our latest work has consisted of the analysis of refractory materials produced from the electron bombardment of low-temperature N2-, CH4-, and CO-containing ices (100:1:1). The ice mixture was chosen to be analogous to the known surface ices on Pluto and the radiation source was chosen to mimic the secondary electrons produced by cosmic rays bombardment. The residues were studied using multiple chemical techniques including, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic residues produced in these experiments can be seen as an analog for the refractory component of the surface of Pluto, and are compared with the residues previously obtained from UV photo-irradiation. UV and near-IR spectroscopy of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon during the encounter with NASA’s New Horizons

  9. Laboratory Investigations of the Complex Refractory Organic Material Produced from Irradiation of Pluto Ice Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Materese, Christopher K.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Sanford, Scott A.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Much of Pluto's surface consists of N2 ice with smaller amounts of CH4 and CO ices. Despite the low temperature (approximately 45K), chemistry can be driven in the surface ices by radiation processing such as cosmic ray bombardment. When cosmic rays strike the surface, much of their energy is dispersed in the form of secondary electrons, which in turn drive much of the resulting chemical reactions. Laboratory experiments designed to simulate the conditions on these icy bodies may provide insight into this chemistry. Significant progress has been made in the laboratory toward understanding the smaller, simple compounds produced in the solid phase by radiation processing of (N2, CH4, CO) ices (Bohn et al. 1994; Moore & Hudson 2003; Hodyss et al. 2011; Kim and Kaiser 2012). Recently Materese et al. (2014) used a variety of techniques to better characterize the refractory materials produced from the UV photo-irradiation of N2:CH4:CO ices. However, because Pluto's atmosphere is optically thick to Lyman-alpha UV radiation it is important to re-examine the results using an alternate radiation source. Our latest work has consisted of the analysis of refractory materials produced from the electron bombardment of low temperature N2(-), CH4(-), and CO(-)containing ices (100:1:1). The ice mixture was chosen to be analogous to the known surface ices on Pluto and the radiation source was chosen to mimic the secondary electrons produced by cosmic rays bombardment. The residues were studied using multiple chemical techniques including, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The organic residues produced in these experiments can be seen as an analog for the refractory component of the surface of Pluto, and are compared with the residues previously obtained from UV photo-irradiation. UV and near- IR spectroscopy of the surfaces of Pluto and Charon during the encounter with

  10. Material investigation on three special paper molds from Magnani's museum collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osticioli, I.; Bini, M.; Agresti, J.; Cacciari, I.; Calusi, S.; Mandò, P. A.; Siano, S.

    2013-05-01

    In the present work a non-invasive technological study on three molds from Magnani's mills in Pescia (Pistoia, Italy) was carried out. The three molds investigated have been those for making: 1) the invitation letters to the marriage between Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria in 1810; 2) the paper sheets used by Pablo Picasso in 1917 for the drawings of the Russian Ballets currently preserved in the Picasso Museum in Paris; 3) the holy manuscript Bhagavata Purana realized in India in 1840 and currently preserved in the "Museum of Art" of San Diego. The chemical composition of the metal alloy components were investigated and compared using Laser Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (LIPS), electron microscopy (ESEM-EDX) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) while shape and size comparisons were carried out by means of a homemade 3D digital microscopy device. Metallographic characterizations were also carried out on some very small samples. This allowed pointing out the different crafting features of the three molds. The results achieved and represent the first step towards an overall characterization, which will be carried out on Magnani's mold collections.

  11. Investigation of Anomalous Behavior in Metallic-Based Materials Under Compressive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gil, Christopher M.; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1998-01-01

    An anomalous material response has been observed under the action of applied compressive loads in fibrous SiC/Ti (both Ti-6242 and Ti-15-3 alloys) and the monolithic nickel-base alloy IN-718 in the aged condition. The observed behavior is an increase, rather than a decrease, in the instantaneous Young's modulus with increasing load. This increase is small, but can be significant in yield surface determination tests, where an equivalent offset strain on the order of 10 micron(1 x 10(exp -6) m/m) is being used. Stiffening has been quantified by calculating offset strains from the linear elastic loading line. The offset strains associated with stiffening during compressive loading are positive and of the same order as the target offset strains in yield surface determination tests. At this time we do not have a reasonable explanation for this response nor can we identify a deformation mechanism that might cause it. On the other hand, we are not convinced that it is an artifact of the experimental procedure because a number of issues have been identified and seemingly ruled out. In fact, stiffening appears to be temperature dependent, since it decreases as the temperature increases.

  12. Accumulation of air in polymeric materials investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, W. L.; Hermann, J.; Mothe, E.; Beldjilali, S.

    2012-03-15

    We report on spectroscopic analyses of plasmas produced by laser irradiation of nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing polymer materials. Ultraviolet laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 4 mJ energy were focused onto the samples with a fluence of about 20 Jcm{sup -2}. The plasma emission was analyzed with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with a gated detector. Comparing the spectra recorded during ablation in air and argon, it is shown that the spectral line emission of atomic nitrogen originates from the excitation of the ambient air, whereas the CN molecular bands are essentially emitted from the ablation plume. Furthermore, the measurements demonstrate an additional contribution of nitrogen emission from the air molecules accumulated in the polymer. Storage under vacuum over a duration of the order of one day leads to the release of the absorbed air. As a consequence of the air absorption, the measurement of elemental composition of polymers via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is particularly difficult. Here, we quantify the atmospheric contribution to the plume emission during polymer analysis.

  13. Fuel rod and core materials investigations related to LWR extended burnup operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstad, Erik; Vitanza, Carlo

    1992-06-01

    The paper deals with tests and recent measurements related to extended burnup fuel performance and describes test facilities and results in the areas of waterside cladding corrosion and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Fuel temperature data suggest a gradual degradation of UO 2 thermal conductivity with exposure in the range 6-8% per 10 MWd/kgUO 2 at temperatures below 700°C. The effect on the fuel microstructure of interlinkage and resintering phenomena is shown by measuring the surface-to-volume ( S/ V) ratio of the fuel. Changes in S/V with burnup are correlated to power rating and fuel operating temperature. No evidence was found of enhanced fission gas release during load-follow operation in the burnup range 25-45 MWd/kgUO 2. The effect of high lithium concentration (high pH) on the corrosion behaviour of pre-irradiated high burnup Zircaloy-4 fuel rods subjected either to nucleate boiling or to one-phase cooling conditions was studied. The oxide thickness growth rates measured at an average burnup up to 40 MWd/kgUO 2 are consistent with literature data and show no evidence of corrosion enhancement due to the high lithium content and little effect of cooling regime. A test facility for exploring the effects of environmental variables on IASCC behaviour of in-core structural materials is described.

  14. Investigation of Active Interrogation Techniques to Detect Special Nuclear Material in Maritime Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The detection and interdiction of special nuclear material (SNM) is still a high-priority focus area for many organizations around the world. One method that is commonly considered a leading candidate in the detection of SNM is active interrogation (AI). AI is different from its close relative, passive interrogation, in that an active source is used to enhance or create a detectable signal (usually fission) from SNM, particularly in shielded scenarios or scenarios where the SNM has a low activity. The use of AI thus makes the detection of SNM easier or, in some scenarios, even enables previously impossible detection. In this work the signal from prompt neutrons and photons as well as delayed neutrons and photons will be combined, as is typically done in AI. In previous work AI has been evaluated experimentally and computationally. However, for the purposes of this work, past scenarios are considered lightly shielded and tightly coupled spatially. At most, the previous work interrogated the contents of one standard cargo container (2.44 x 2.60 x 6.10 m) and the source and detector were both within a few meters of the object being interrogated. A few examples of this type of previous work can be found in references 1 and 2. Obviously, more heavily shielded AI scenarios will require larger source intensities, larger detector surface areas (larger detectors or more detectors), greater detector efficiencies, longer count times, or some combination of these.

  15. Real-time two-dimensional beam steering with gate-tunable materials: a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jierong; Jafar-Zanjani, Samad; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    A leaky-wave antenna is proposed that furnishes two-dimensional (2-D) beam scanning in both elevation and azimuth planes via electrical control in real time, and at a single frequency. The structure consists of a graphene sheet on a metal-backed substrate. The 2-D beam-scanning performance is achieved through the proper biasing configuration of graphene. Traditional pixel-by-pixel electrical control makes the biasing network a huge challenge for chip-scale designs in the terahertz regime and beyond. The method presented here enables dynamic control by applying two groups of one-dimensional biasing on the sides of the sheet. They are orthogonal and decoupled, with one group offering monotonic impedance variation along one direction, and the other sinusoidal impedance modulation along the other direction. The conductivity profile of the graphene sheet for a certain radiation angle, realized by applying proper voltage to each pad underneath the sheet, is determined by a holographic technique and can be reconfigured electronically and desirably. Such innovative biasing design makes real-time control of the beam direction and beamwidth simple and highly integrated. The concept is not limited to graphene-based structures, and can be generalized to any available gate-tunable material system. PMID:27505400

  16. Methodology on Investigating the Influences of Automated Material Handling System in Automotive Assembly Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffar, Seha; Azni Jafar, Fairul; Jamaludin, Zamberi

    2016-02-01

    A case study was selected as a method to collect data in actual industry situation. The study aimed to assess the influences of automated material handling system in automotive industry by proposing a new design of integration system through simulation, and analyze the significant effect and influence of the system. The method approach tool will be CAD Software (Delmia & Quest). The process of preliminary data gathering in phase 1 will collect all data related from actual industry situation. It is expected to produce a guideline and limitation in designing a new integration system later. In phase 2, an idea or concept of design will be done by using 10 principles of design consideration for manufacturing. A full factorial design will be used as design of experiment in order to analyze the performance measured of the integration system with the current system in case study. From the result of the experiment, an ANOVA analysis will be done to study the performance measured. Thus, it is expected that influences can be seen from the improvement made in the system.

  17. Multielement geochemical investigations by SRXRF microprobe studies on tectite material: Evidence from the NE-Mexican Cretaceous/Tertiary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, M.; Rickers, K.; Kramar, U.; Simon, R.; Staub, S.; Schulte, P.

    2002-12-01

    The K/T boundary is long known as one of a few mass extinctions in earth history. The impact of a big meteorite at the Chicxulub on the northern Yucatan peninsula in Mexico is discussed to have triggered the faunal mass extinction and the rapid change of the palaeoenvironmental conditions near the K/T boundary. Tectite material, especially spherules are explained from many of the sections in correlation to the K/T-boundary event. This rare, glassy or alterated material is extremely variable in its major element chemistry, morphology and stratigraphic position in K/T transitions worldwide. For the first time, we perfom trace element analysis on tectites from the K/T boundary using synchrotron radiation XRF (SRXRF). Measurements were performed at the Hamburger Strahlungssynchrotronlabor HASYLAB at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) and at the ANKA (Karlsruhe, Germany) with polychromatic and monochromatic excitation, respectively collimating the beam to 15 æm by capillary optics. Based on results from SRXRF microprobe determinations, these structures are to be interpreted as mixing of several melts with different chemical composition. The different components may represent melts from different sediment layers and possibly of basement material excavated by the Chicxulub impact. Igneous rocks with andesitic composition in cores at Chicxulub are considered to be impact melt rocks and are correlated mainly by the composition of major elements with the glass spherules found in the surrounding. Our investigations show that it is possible to trace elements with high sensitivity and a high spatial resolution. Some of the samples show clearly zonation and alteration parts, as well as carbonate inclusions, triggered by the Chicxulub impact event. In general, the results from the SRXRF show that the tectite material have different trace element patterns, formed by mixing of melts with different chemical composition derived from different sediment layers and possibly of basement material

  18. Final proposed plan, Army Materials Technology Laboratory, task order 1, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Army is proposing a cleanup plan, referred to as a preferred alternative, to address outdoor contamination at the MTL Superfund site in Watertown, Massachusetts. The Proposed Plan recommends one of the cleanup options from among those that were evaluated during the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) performed for the site. The Army is publishing this Proposed Plan to provide opportunity for public review and comment on the cleanup alternatives, known as remedial alternatives, under consideration for the site. The Army is soliciting comments on the proposed level of cleanup and will consider public comments as part of the final decision-making process for selecting the cleanup remedy for the site.

  19. An Investigation Into the Integrity of Fit of Provisional Crowns Using Current Proprietary Temporary Crown Materials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip D; Georgakis, Georgios; Niggli, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Three methods of direct provisional crown construction were investigated for accuracy of marginal fit. A modified proprietary crown coping was compared to Bis GMA and isobutyl methacrylate resin provisional crowns with margins modified by using a flowable composite and 'bead on' isobutyl methacrylate respectively. Measurement was at 50x magnification at seven sites over the fit surface. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13.0.1 and measurement compared using the Mann Whitney test set at a significance level of 0.05. Reliability was checked using the Bland Altman test. Statistical significant differences were found between the three groups. The order of best fit was Bis-GMA and flowable composite > isobutyl methacrylate with 'bead on' margins > Bis-GMA modified implant temporary coping. The clinical significance is that the Bis GMA and flowable composite combination can be used with equal confidence to traditional methods of temporarisation. PMID:27424335

  20. Nanoscale investigation of the electrical properties in semiconductor polymer-carbon nanotube hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbief, Simon; Hergué, Noémie; Douhéret, Olivier; Surin, Mathieu; Dubois, Philippe; Geerts, Yves; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Leclère, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    The morphology and electrical properties of hybrids of a semiconducting polymer (namely poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT) and carbon nanotubes are investigated at the nanoscale with a combination of Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques, i.e., Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) and time-resolved Current Sensing Force Spectroscopy Atomic Force Microscopy (CSFS-AFM, or PeakForce TUNA™). This allows us to probe the electrical properties of the 15 nm wide P3HT nanofibers as well as the interface between the polymer and single carbon nanotubes. This is achieved by applying controlled, low forces on the tip during imaging, which allows a direct comparison between the morphology and the electrical properties at the nanometre scale.The morphology and electrical properties of hybrids of a semiconducting polymer (namely poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT) and carbon nanotubes are investigated at the nanoscale with a combination of Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques, i.e., Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) and time-resolved Current Sensing Force Spectroscopy Atomic Force Microscopy (CSFS-AFM, or PeakForce TUNA™). This allows us to probe the electrical properties of the 15 nm wide P3HT nanofibers as well as the interface between the polymer and single carbon nanotubes. This is achieved by applying controlled, low forces on the tip during imaging, which allows a direct comparison between the morphology and the electrical properties at the nanometre scale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11888b

  1. Investigation of gelatin/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposite films as packaging materials

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Dadfar, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi; Dadfar, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Ahmadi, Farhad; Niakosari, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Gelatin composite films were prepared from gelatin solutions (10% w/v) containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2% w/w gelatin) as nanofiller. The water solubility, water swelling, water uptake, water vapor permeability (WVP), mechanical, and antibacterial properties of the films were examined. Water solubility, water swelling, water uptake, and WVP for gelatin films were 45 ± 1%, 821 ± 42%, 45 ± 1.1%, and 0.4 ± 0.022 g mm/m2 kPa h, respectively. Incorporation of MWCNT caused a significant decrease in water solubility, water swelling, water uptake, and WVP. Gelatin/MWCNT films containing 1–1.5% MWCNT showed the lowest water vapor transmission. Tensile strength, elongation at break, and Young's modulus for gelatin films were 13.4 ± 1.2 MPa, 95 ± 5%, and 45.4 ± 7 MPa, respectively. Incorporation of MWCNT caused a significant increase in tensile strength and decrease in the elongation at break. The largest mechanical strength was found at 1.5% MWCNT. All gelatin/MWCNT films showed significant antibacterial activities against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Our results suggest that the gelatin/MWCNT composites films could be used as a very attractive alternative to traditional materials for different biomedical and food applications. PMID:24804066

  2. Mechanism investigation for poloxamer 188 raw material variation in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haofan; Ali, Amr; Lanan, Maureen; Hughes, Erik; Wiltberger, Kelly; Guan, Bing; Prajapati, Shashi; Hu, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    Variability in poloxamer 188 (P188) raw material, which is routinely used in cell culture media to protect cells from hydrodynamic forces, plays an important role in the process performance. Even though tremendous efforts have been spent to understand the mechanism of poloxamer's protection, the root cause for lot-to-lot variation was not clear. A recent study reported that the low performance was not due to toxicity but inefficiency to protect cells (Peng et al., Biotechnol Prog. 2014;30:1411-1418). In this study, it was demonstrated for the first time that the addition of other surfactants even at a very low level can interfere with P188 resulting in a loss of efficiency. It was also found that the performance of P188 lots correlated well with its foam stability. Foam generated from low performing lots in baffled shaker flask lasts longer, which suggests that the components in the foam layers are different. The spiking of foam generated from a low performing lot into the media containing a high performance lot resulted in cell damage and low growth. Analytical studies using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) identified differences in high molecular weight (HMW) species present in the P188 lots. These differences are much clearer when comparing the HMW region of the SEC chromatogram of foam vs. bulk liquid samples. This study shows that low performing lots have enriched HMW species in foam samples due to high hydrophobicity, which can be potentially used as a screening assay. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:767-775, 2016. PMID:27038070

  3. Investigation of Self Consolidating Concrete Containing High Volume of Supplementary Cementitious Materials and Recycled Asphalt Pavement Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patibandla, Varun chowdary

    The use of sustainable technologies such as supplementary cementitiuous materials (SCMs), and/or recycled materials is expected to positively affect the performance of concrete mixtures. However, it is important to study and qualify such mixtures and check if the required specifications of their intended application are met before they can be implemented in practice. This study presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Self Consolidating concrete (SCC) containing sustainable technologies. A total of twelve concrete mixtures were prepared with various combinations of fly ash, slag, and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP). The mixtures were divided into three groups with constant water to cementitiuous materials ratio of 0.37, and based on the RAP content; 0, 25, and 50% of coarse aggregate replaced by RAP. All mixtures were prepared to achieve a target slump flow equal to or higher than 500 mm (24in). A control mixture for each group was prepared with 100% Portland cement whereas all other mixtures were designed to have up to 70% of portland cement replaced by a combination of supplementary cementitiuous materials (SCMs) such as class C fly ash and granulated blast furnace slag. The properties of fresh concrete investigated in this study include flowability, deformability; filling capacity, and resistance to segregation. In addition, the compressive strength at 3, 14, and 28 days, the tensile strength, and the unrestrained shrinkage up to 80 days was also investigated. As expected the inclusion of the sustainable technologies affected both fresh and hardened concrete properties. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that inclusion of RAP not only reduces the ultimate strength, but it also affected the compressive strength development rate. Moreover, several mixes satisfied compressive strength requirements for pavements and bridges; those mixes included relatively high percentages of SCMs and RAP. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is not

  4. Investigation of mechanical and thermal properties of microwave-sintered lunar simulant materials using 2.45 GHz radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal properties of lunar simulant material were investigated. An alternative method of examining thermal shock in microwave-sintered lunar samples was researched. A computer code was developed that models how the fracture toughness of a thermally shocked lunar simulant sample is related to the sample hardness as measured by a micro-hardness indentor apparatus. This technique enables much data to be gathered from a few samples. Several samples were sintered at different temperatures and for different times at the temperatures. The melting and recrystallization characteristics of a well-studied binary system were also investigated to see if the thermodynamic barrier for the nucleation of a crystalline phase may be affected by the presence of a microwave field. The system chosen was the albite (sodium alumino silicate) anorthite system (calcium alumino silicate). The results of these investigations are presented.

  5. Investigating the biological impacts of nanoengineered materials in Caenorhabditis elegans and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Elizabeth Quevedo

    In nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the chronic and multi-generational toxicological effects of commercially relevant engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as quantum dots (QDs) and silver (AgNP) caused significant changes in a number of physiological endpoints. The increased water-solubility of ENPs in commercial products, for example, makes them increasingly bioavailable to terrestrial organisms exposed to pollution and waste in the soil. Since 2008, attention to the toxicology of nanomaterials in C. elegans continues to grow. Quantitative data on multiple physiological endpoints paired with metal analysis show the uptake of QDs and AgNPs, and their effects on nematode fitness. First, C. elegans were exposed for four generations through feeding to amphiphilic polymer coated CdSe/ZnS (core-shell QDs), CdSe (core QDs), and different sizes of AgNPs. These ENPs were readily ingested. QDs were qualitatively imaged in the digestive tract using a fluorescence microscopy and their and AgNP uptake quantitatively measured using ICP-MS. Each generation was analyzed for changes in lifespan, reproduction, growth and motility using an automated computer vision system. Core-shell QDs had little impact on C. elegans due to its metal shell coating. In contrast, core QDs lacked a metal shell coating, which caused significant changes to nematode physiology. iii In the same way, at high concentrations of 100 ppm, AgNP caused the most adverse effect to lifespan and reproduction related to particle size, but its adverse effect to motility had no correlation to particle size. Using C. elegans as an animal model allowed for a better understanding of the negative impacts of ENPs than with cytotoxicity tests. Lastly, to test the toxicity of water-dispersed fullerene (nanoC60) using human dermal fibroblast cells, this thesis investigated a suite of assays and methods in order to establish a standard set of cytotoxicity tests. Ten assays and methods assessed nanoC60 samples of different

  6. Visualization experiment to investigate capillary barrier performance in the context of a Yucca Mountain emplacement drift.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vincent C; Glass, Robert J; Chocas, Connie; Barker, Glenn; Orear, Lee

    2003-01-01

    The use of capillary barriers as engineered backfill systems to divert water away from radioactive waste potentially stored in a Yucca Mountain emplacement drift is investigated. We designed and conducted a flow visualization experiment to investigate capillary barrier performance in this context. A two-dimensional, thin slab, test system replicated the physical emplacement drift to one-quarter scale (1.4-m diameter) and included the simulated drift wall, waste canister, pedestal, capillary barrier backfill, and host-rock fracture system. Water was supplied at the top of the simulated drift and allowed to discharge by way of wicks located along the left wall of the cell (simulated fractures) or by a gravity drain at the bottom of the right side (simulated impermeable rock with floor drain). Photographs captured the migration of water and a blue dye tracer within the system, analytical balances measured the mass balance of water, while tensiometers measured the capillary pressure at numerous locations. Of particular concern to this test was the drainage of the capillary barrier, which terminates against the drift wall. We found that while the simulated fractures (left side) and drain (right side) each influenced the performance of the capillary barrier at early time, they had little differential affect at later times. Also of concern was the small disparity in capillary properties between the fine and coarse layer (limited by the need of a fine-grained material that would not filter into the coarse layer under dry conditions). While the capillary barrier was able to divert the majority of flow toward the edges of the system and away from the simulated waste canister, the barrier did not preclude flow in the coarse layer, which was noted to be visually wet next to the waste canister on day 92 and was continuing to take on water at termination on day 112.

  7. Investigations of some building materials for γ-rays shielding effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh; Kaur, Baljit; Sidhu, Gurdeep Singh; Kumar, Ajay

    2013-06-01

    For construction of residential and non-residential buildings bricks are used as building blocks. Bricks are made from mixtures of sand, clay, cement, fly ash, gypsum, red mud and lime. Shielding effectiveness of five soil samples and two fly ash samples have been investigated using some energy absorption parameters (Mass attenuation coefficients, mass energy absorption coefficients, KERMA (kinetic energy released per unit mass), HVL, equivalent atomic number and electron densities) firstly at 14 different energies from 81-1332 keV then extended to wide energy range 0.015-15 MeV. The soil sample with maximum shielding effectiveness has been used for making eight fly ash bricks [(Lime)0.15 (Gypsum)0.05 (Fly Ash)x (Soil)0.8-x, where values of x are from 0.4-0.7]. High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. The agreements of theoretical and experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient have been found to be quite satisfactory. It has been verified that common brick possess the maximum shielding effectiveness for wide energy range 0.015-15 MeV. The results have been shown graphically with some useful conclusions for making radiation safe buildings.

  8. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho K.; Cheng L.; Keener, T.C.; Jegadeesan G.; Al-Abed, S.R.

    2009-08-15

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method and samples from power plants in Pennsylvania. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride, mercurous chloride, mercury oxide, mercury sulfide, and mercuric sulfate were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and HgCl{sub 2} could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Cho, Kyungmin; Cheng, Lei; Keener, Tim C; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2009-08-01

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2), mercury oxide (HgO), mercury sulfide (HgS), and mercuric sulfate (HgSO4) were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg2Cl2 and HgCl2 could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury.

  10. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Youp; Cho, Kyungmin; Cheng, Lei; Keener, Tim C; Jegadeesan, Gautham; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2009-08-01

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2), mercury oxide (HgO), mercury sulfide (HgS), and mercuric sulfate (HgSO4) were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg2Cl2 and HgCl2 could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. PMID:19728491

  11. Investigations on the Effects of the Tool Material, Geometry, and Tilt Angle on Friction Stir Welding of Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshad Seighalani, K.; Besharati Givi, M. K.; Nasiri, A. M.; Bahemmat, P.

    2010-10-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) parameters, such as tool material, tool geometry, tilt angle, tool rotational speed, welding speed, and axial force play a major role in the weld quality of titanium alloys. Because of excessive erosion, tool material and geometry play the main roles in FSW of titanium alloys. Therefore, in the present work for the first time, tool material and geometry, tool tilt angle, cooling system and shielding gas effects on macrostructure, microstructure, and mechanical properties of pure titanium weld joint were investigated. Result of this research shows that Ti can be joined by the FSW, using a tool with a shoulder made of tungsten (W) and simple pin made of tungsten carbide (WC). The best conditions for welding were use of compressed air as a cooling system, tool tilt angle of 1°, and a stream of Argon as a shielding medium. Investigation on mechanical properties shows that the tensile strength and the yield strength of the welded joint in the best case could be similar to the corresponding strengths of the base metal.

  12. [The role of forensic medical expertise of material evidence in the investigations into the cases of sexual offence].

    PubMed

    Revnitskaia, L A; Ivanina, T V; Ivanina, A A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to search for the methods for the enhancement of the effectiveness of forensic medical examination of material evidence during the investigations into the crimes against sexual immunity and personal sexual freedom. The work included the analysis of the relevant expert conclusions and copies of the decisions approving the performance of the forensic medical expertises. The study was carried out with the use of the following methods: the extraction of necessary data from the primary materials, their systematization and treatment by the methods of descriptive and analytical statistics. The study has demonstrated significant differences in the frequency of discovery of biological evidence of sexual offence depending on the character of the objects available for the examination and the time of their obtaining; these parameters were shown to depend on a variety of factors. It is concluded that the multidisciplinary approach to the selection and examination of material evidence for the purpose of the investigation into the cases of sexual offence makes it possible to considerably enhance the effectiveness of forensic medical expertises for the search of biological evidence of sexual crimes and thereby to improve the quality of this work.

  13. An investigation of the self-heating phenomenon in viscoelastic materials subjected to cyclic loadings accounting for prestress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, A. M. G.; Rade, D. A.; Lacerda, H. B.; Araújo, C. A.

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated by many authors that the internal damping mechanism of the viscoelastic materials offers many possibilities for practical engineering applications. However, in traditional procedures of analysis and design of viscoelastic dampers subjected to cyclic loadings, uniform, constant temperature is generally assumed and do not take into account the self-heating phenomenon. Moreover, for viscoelastic materials subjected to dynamic loadings superimposed on static preloads, such as engine mounts, these procedures can lead to poor designs or even severe failures since the energy dissipated within the volume of the material leads to temperature rises. In this paper, a hybrid numerical-experimental investigation of effects of the static preloads on the self-heating phenomenon in viscoelastic dampers subjected to harmonic loadings is reported. After presenting the theoretical foundations, the numerical and experimental results obtained in terms of the temperature evolutions at different points within the volume of the viscoelastic material for various static preloads are compared, and the main features of the methodology are discussed.

  14. Analytical methods in bioassay-directed investigations of mutagenicity of air particulate material.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Christopher H; Hewitt, L Mark

    2007-01-01

    The combination of short-term bioassays and analytical chemical techniques has been successfully used in the identification of a variety of mutagenic compounds in complex mixtures. Much of the early work in the field of bioassay-directed fractionation resulted from the development of a short-term bacterial assay employing Salmonella typhimurium; this assay is commonly known as the Ames assay. Ideally, analytical methods for assessment of mutagenicity of any environmental matrix should exhibit characteristics including high capacity, good selectivity, good analytical resolution, non-destructiveness, and reproducibility. A variety of extraction solvents have been employed in investigations of mutagenicity of air particulate; sequential combination of dichloromethane followed by methanol is most popular. Soxhlet extraction has been the most common extraction method, followed by sonication. Attempts at initial fractionation using different extraction solvents have met with limited success and highlight the need for fractionation schemes applicable to moderately polar and polar mutagenic compounds. Fractionation methods reported in the literature are reviewed according to three general schemas: (i) acid/base/neutral partitioning followed by fractionation using open-column chromatography and/or HPLC; (ii) fractionation based on normal-phase (NP) HPLC using a cyanopropyl or chemically similar stationary phase; and (iii) fractionation by open-column chromatography followed by NP-HPLC. The HPLC methods may be preparative, semi-preparative, or analytical scale. Variations based on acid/base/neutral partitioning followed by a chromatographic separation have also been employed. Other lesser-used approaches involve fractionation based on ion-exchange and thin-layer chromatographies. Although some of the methodologies used in contemporary studies of mutagenicity of air particulate do not represent significant advances in technology over the past 30 years, their simplicity, low

  15. Insect Residue Contamination on Wing Leading Edge Surfaces: A Materials Investigation for Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzi, Tyler M.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2011-01-01

    Flight tests have shown that residue from insect strikes on aircraft wing leading edge surfaces may induce localized transition of laminar to turbulent flow. The highest density of insect populations have been observed between ground level and 153 m during light winds (2.6 -- 5.1 m/s), high humidity, and temperatures from 21 -- 29 C. At a critical residue height, dependent on the airfoil and Reynolds number, boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent results in increased drag and fuel consumption. Although this represents a minimal increase in fuel burn for conventional transport aircraft, future aircraft designs will rely on maintaining laminar flow across a larger portion of wing surfaces to reduce fuel burn during cruise. Thus, insect residue adhesion mitigation is most critical during takeoff and initial climb to maintain laminar flow in fuel-efficient aircraft configurations. Several exterior treatments investigated to mitigate insect residue buildup (e.g., paper, scrapers, surfactants, flexible surfaces) have shown potential; however, implementation has proven to be impractical. Current research is focused on evaluation of wing leading edge surface coatings that may reduce insect residue adhesion. Initial work under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation Program focused on evaluation of several commercially available products (commercial off-the-shelf, COTS), polymers, and substituted alkoxy silanes that were applied to aluminum (Al) substrates. Surface energies of these coatings were determined from contact angle data and were correlated to residual insect excrescence on coated aluminum substrates using a custom-built "bug gun." Quantification of insect excrescence surface coverage was evaluated by a series of digital photographic image processing techniques.

  16. Spectroscopic investigations on thin adhesive layers in multi-material laminates.

    PubMed

    Voronko, Yuliya; Chernev, Boril S; Eder, Gabriele C

    2014-01-01

    Three different spectroscopic approaches, Raman linescans, Raman imaging, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) imaging were evaluated for the visualization of the thin adhesive layers (3-6 μm) present in polymeric photovoltaic backsheets. The cross-sections of the multilayer laminates in the original, weathered, and artificially aged samples were investigated spectroscopically in order to describe the impact of the environmental factors on the evenness and thickness of the adhesive layers. All three methods were found to be suitable tools to detect and visualize these thin layers within the original and aged polymeric laminates. However, as the adhesive layer is not very uniform in thickness and partly disintegrates upon weathering and/or artificial aging, Raman linescans yield only qualitative information and do not allow for an estimation of the layer thickness. Upon increasing the measuring area by moving from one-dimensional linescans to two-dimensional Raman images, a much better result could be achieved. Even though a longer measuring time has to be taken into account, the information on the uniformity and evenness of the adhesive layer obtainable using the imaging technique is much more comprehensive. Although Raman spectroscopy is known to have the superior lateral resolution as compared with ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, the adhesive layers of the samples used within this study (layer thickness 3-6 μm) could also be detected and visualized by applying the ATR FT-IR spectroscopic imaging method. However, the analysis of the images was quite a demanding task, as the thickness of the adhesive layer was in the region of the resolution limit of this method. The information obtained for the impact of artificial aging and weathering on the adhesive layer obtained using Raman imaging and ATR FT-IR imaging was in good accordance.

  17. Investigation of Metal Oxide/Carbon Nano Material as Anode for High Capacity Lithium-ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, James Jianjun; Hong, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing high specific energy and high specific capacity lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology for future NASA missions. Current state-of-art LIBs have issues in terms of safety and thermal stability, and are reaching limits in specific energy capability based on the electrochemical materials selected. For example, the graphite anode has a limited capability to store Li since the theoretical capacity of graphite is 372 mAh/g. To achieve higher specific capacity and energy density, and to improve safety for current LIBs, alternative advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte materials are pursued under the NASA Advanced Space Power System Project. In this study, the nanostructed metal oxide, such as Fe2O3 on carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite as an LIB anode has been investigated.

  18. Investigation of the analysis parameters and background subtraction for high-k materials with atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Mutas, S; Klein, C; Gerstl, S S A

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we present depth profiles of a high-k layer consisting of HfO(2) with an embedded sub-nm thick ZrO(2) layer obtained with atom probe tomography (APT). In order to determine suitable measurement parameters for reliable, reproducible, and quantitative analysis, we have investigated the influence of the laser energy and the specimen temperature on the resulting elemental composition. In addition we devise a procedure for local background subtraction both for the composition and the depth scale that is crucial for gaining reproducible results. We find that the composition of the high-k material remains unaffected even for extreme laser energies and base temperatures, while higher laser energies lead to an accumulation of silicon at the upper interface of the high-k layer. Furthermore we show that APT is capable of providing sub-nm depth resolution for high-k materials with high reproducibility, good compositional accuracy, and high measurement yield.

  19. Thermochemical investigations of zirconolite, pyrochlore and brannerite: Three materials relevant to issues of plutonium immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helean, Katheryn Bridget

    For the purpose of immobilizing plutonium, a crystalline ceramic waste form is being developed that can be described as a pseudo-quaternary system consisting of CaHfTi2O7- CaPuTi2O7- CaUTi2O7- GdTi2O7. High-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry offers an effective methodology for the determination of enthalpies of formation of rare earth-bearing and other refractory oxides relevant to the proposed waste form. Calorimetric investigations of the waste form end-member phases (using Ce as a Pu analogue) plus brannerite, the major waste form impurity, were conducted using 3Na2O•4MoO3 solvent at 975 K. Standard enthalpies of formation, DeltaH°f (kJ/mol), were derived for three pyrochlore phases: Ca0.93Ce1.00Ti 2.035O7.00 (-3656.0 +/- 5.6), Ca1.46U 4+0.23U6+0.46Ti1.85O 7.00 (-3610.6 +/- 4.1) and Gd2Ti2O 7 (-3822.5 +/- 4.9). Enthalpies of formation with respect to an oxide phase assemblage, DeltaH°f-ox: CaO+MO2+2TiO2=CaMTi2O7 or Gd 2O3+2TiO2=Gd2Ti2O7 , and an oxide/perovskite phase assemblage, DeltaH° f-pv+ox: CaTiO3+MO2+TiO2=CaMTi 2O7, M = Ce, U were also calculated. DeltaH° f-ox (kJ/mol): Gd2Ti2O7 (-113.4 +/- 2.8); Ca1.46U4+0.23U 6+0.46Ti1.85O7.00 (-123.1 +/- 3.4); Ca0.93Ce1.00Ti2.035O7.00 (-54.1 +/- 5.2). DeltaH°f-pv+ox (kJ/mol): Ca1.46U4+0.23U6+ 0.46Ti1.85O7.00 (-5.1 +/- 4.0); Ca 0.93Ce1.00Ti2.035O7.00 (+21.0 +/- 5.5). A significant metastability field was defined with respect to an oxide/perovskite phase assemblage. DeltaH°f (kJ/mol) were derived for two zirconolite phases: CaZr1.03Ti1.97O7 (-3719.4 +/- 3.9) and CaHf1.02Ti1.98O 7 (-3720.5 +/- 3.9). DeltaH° f-ox (kJ/mol): CaZr1.03Ti1.97O7 (-89.6 +/- 2.8); CaHf1.02Ti1.98O7 (-74.8 +/- 3.1). CaZr1.03Ti1.97O7 was stable with respect to a perovskite plus oxides assemblage (DeltaH° f-pv+ox = -8.8 +/- 3.3 kJ/mol). CaHf1.02Ti 1.98O7 was marginally metastable in enthalpy (Delta H°f-pv+ox = +6.0 +/- 3.5 kJ/mol). DeltaH°f (kJ/mol) were derived for three brannerites: CeTi2O6 (-2948.8 +/- 4.3); U0.97Ti2.03O6

  20. Investigation of anisotropic photonic band gaps in three-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals containing the uniaxial material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, the dispersive properties of three-dimensional (3D) magnetized plasma photonic crystals (MPPCs) composed of anisotropic dielectric (the uniaxial material) spheres immersed in homogeneous magnetized plasma background with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, as the Voigt effects of magnetized plasma are considered. The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and two flatbands regions can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field on the dispersive properties of the 3D MPPCs are investigated in detail, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in 3D MPPCs with fcc lattices and the complete PBGs can be found compared to the conventional 3D MPPCs doped by the isotropic material. The bandwidths of PBGs can be tuned by introducing the magnetized plasma into 3D PCs containing the uniaxial material. It is also shown that the anisotropic PBGs can be manipulated by the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, filling factor, plasma frequency, and external magnetic field, respectively. The locations of flatbands regions cannot be manipulated by any parameters except for the plasma frequency and external magnetic field. Introducing the uniaxial material can obtain the complete PBGs as the 3D MPPCs with high symmetry and also provides a way to design the tunable devices.