Science.gov

Sample records for backfill materials investigated

  1. Investigation of Flash Fill{reg_sign} as a thermal backfill material

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, P.H.; Charlton, C.B.; Frishette, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    Flash Fill{reg_sign} was created as a fast-setting, flowable backfill material made entirely from coal combustion by-products and water. Its quick-setting, self-leveling, self-compacting characteristics makes trench road repairs faster, easier, and more economical. Other uses include building foundations, fill around pipes, gas lines, and manholes, and replacement of weak subgrade beneath rooters. Flash Fill can be hand-excavated without the use of power assisted tools or machinery. To enhance thermal resistivity, the original Flash Fill mix was modified to include concrete sand. This resulted in a new Flash Fill, designated FSAND, with all of the aforementioned desirable characteristics of Flash Fill and a thermal resistivity of approximately 50{degree} C-cm/watt. Thermal resistivity tests using conventional laboratory thermal probes, high-current thermal tests, and moisture migration tests have been performed to determine the properties of FSAND. As a result of these tests, FSAND has been approved for use as power cable thermal backfill on all AEP System distribution projects.

  2. Modeling of sorption characteristics of backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chitra, S.; Sasidhar, P.; Lal, K.B.; Ahmed, J.

    1998-06-01

    Sorption data analysis was carried out using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Modified Freundlich isotherms for the uptake of sodium and potassium in an initial concentration range of 10--100 mg/L on backfill materials, viz., bentonite, vermiculite, and soil samples. The soil samples were collected from a shallow land disposal facility at Kalpakkam. The Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of K{sup +} by all the selected backfill materials. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred mathematical tool for representing the sorption of Na{sup +} by the soil samples. Since a negative sorption was observed for the uptake of Na{sup +} by commercial clay minerals (vermiculite and bentonite clay in the laboratory experiments), sorption analysis could not be carried out using the above-mentioned isotherm equations. Hill plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation (10--40 mg/L), sorption of K{sup +} by vermiculite is impeded by interaction among sorption sites. In the region of higher saturation (60--100 mg/L), sorption of K{sup +} by all three backfill materials is enhanced by interaction among sorption sites. The Hill plot of the sorption data for Na{sup +} by soil suggests that irrespective of Na{sup +} concentration, sorption of Na{sup +} at one exchange size enhances sorption at other exchange sites.

  3. Some characteristics of potential backfill materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    A backfill material is one of the multiple barriers that may be involved in the disposal of nuclear waste. Such backfill should be a desiccant with the hydrous product having acceptable stability; it should sorb any released radioisotopes, and it should reseal any breached site. The backfill must also have acceptable thermal conductivity. This report presents data on the rate of hydration and the nature of the product of reaction of some candidate backfill materials with water and with brine. Thermal conductivity data is reported for both the reactants and the products. Granular MgO at 150/sup 0/C completely hydrates in less than 10 hours. At 60/sup 0/C and 20/sup 0/C, such extensive hydration requires about 100 and 1000 hours, respectively. The product of the reaction is stable to more than 300/sup 0/C. A doped discalcium silicate was less reactive and the product contains less water of crystallization than the MgO. The reaction product of dicalcium silicate is cementous, but it has low thermal stability. Bentonite readily reacts with water and expands. The reaction product has the properties of vermiculite, which indicates that magnesium ions have diffused into the bentonite structure and are not simply adsorbed on the surface. If bentonite is emplaced in a saline environment, the properties of vermiculite, the reaction product, should also be considered. The thermal conductivity of MgO, discalcium silicate, and bentonite is primarily dependent on the porosity of the sample. A slight increase in thermal conductivity was found with increased temperature, in contrast to most rocks. If the conductive data for the different materials is equated to the same porosity, MgO has the superior thermal conductivity compared to bentonite or discalcium silicate.

  4. Thermal conductivity of backfill materials for inground heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Shadley, J.T.; Den Braven, K.R.

    1995-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of the material immediately surrounding the heat exchangers in a vertical borehole directly affects the performance and costs of a ground-coupled heat pump (GCHP) system by regulating the flow of energy to or from the ground. Many properties of the backfill material such as moisture content, composition, specific heat and density influence the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivities of a wide variety of pure backfill materials and mixtures were measured. All the materials examined were compared with a standard bentonite backfill. Saturated natural sandy soil was the backfill material with the highest thermal conductivity. One attractive mixture consists of a pure silica sand, acrylic latex, and graphite. This mixture forms a solid backfill around the heat exchanger. Yet, the attractiveness of any backfill material combination remains very location and application dependent, varying with the native soils at the site, and the mode in which the GCHP is to be used.

  5. Flowable Backfill Materials from Bottom Ash for Underground Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Joong; Kim, Seong-Kyum; Lee, Kwan-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between strength and strain in manufacturing controlled low strength materials to recycle incineration bottom ash. Laboratory tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. The optimum mixing ratios were 25%–45% of in-situ soil, 30% of bottom ash, 10%–20% of fly ash, 0%–3% of crumb rubber, 3% of cement, and 22% of water. Each mixture satisfied the standard specifications: a minimum 20 cm of flowability and 127 kPa of unconfined compressive strength. The average secant modulus (E50) was (0.07–0.08) qu. The ranges of the internal friction angle and cohesion for mixtures were 36.5°–46.6° and 49.1–180 kPa, respectively. The pH of all of the mixtures was over 12, which is strongly alkaline. Small-scale chamber tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. Vertical deflection of 0.88–2.41 mm and horizontal deflection of 0.83–3.72 mm were measured during backfilling. The vertical and horizontal deflections of controlled low strength materials were smaller than that of sand backfill. PMID:28788621

  6. Flowable Backfill Materials from Bottom Ash for Underground Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Joong; Kim, Seong-Kyum; Lee, Kwan-Ho

    2014-04-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between strength and strain in manufacturing controlled low strength materials to recycle incineration bottom ash. Laboratory tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. The optimum mixing ratios were 25%-45% of in-situ soil, 30% of bottom ash, 10%-20% of fly ash, 0%-3% of crumb rubber, 3% of cement, and 22% of water. Each mixture satisfied the standard specifications: a minimum 20 cm of flowability and 127 kPa of unconfined compressive strength. The average secant modulus (E50) was (0.07-0.08) qu. The ranges of the internal friction angle and cohesion for mixtures were 36.5°-46.6° and 49.1-180 kPa, respectively. The pH of all of the mixtures was over 12, which is strongly alkaline. Small-scale chamber tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. Vertical deflection of 0.88-2.41 mm and horizontal deflection of 0.83-3.72 mm were measured during backfilling. The vertical and horizontal deflections of controlled low strength materials were smaller than that of sand backfill.

  7. TRIAXIAL AND SHEAR TESTING OF SELECTED BACKFILL MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    2000-08-07

    The Subsurface Performance Testing Section is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various backfill materials. Triaxial and shear tests were conducted on select backfill materials. The specific materials tested were: crushed tuff, overton sand, 4- 10 silica sand, 1/4'' dolostone/marble, and limestone. The objective of this report is to provide an estimated value for Poisson's ratio, determine internal friction angle, and stress-strain modulus of the backfill materials that were tested. These basic parameters are necessary for the selection of a backfill material to be included in the repository. This report transmits the results in both hardcopy and electronic formats plus describes the methodology and interpretation of the results. No conclusions will be drawn about the test results, as this will be the purview of other reports. The scope of this report is to use the triaxial and shear testing information and calculate, the internal friction angle, stress-strain modulus, and provide an estimate of Poisson's ratio (Sowers 1979, p. 199) of the selected backfill materials. Standard laboratory procedures, mentioned in Section 2 of this report, were used.

  8. Diffusion of radionuclides in brine-saturated backfill barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    The diffusion of cesium (I), strontium (II), pertechnetate and europium in brine-saturated backfill materials was measured. Plastic diffusion cells containing cylindrical diffusion columns were used for low density backfill materials. The diffusion of gamma-emitters was followed by a gamma scanning technique. Metal diffusion cells constructed entirely from Hastelloy C-276 were used for the diffusion of pertechnetate in highly compacted bentonite. Apparent distribution coefficients calculated from diffusion data are (a) 0.02 m/sup 3//kg for cesium (I) in 40 wt.% mordenite and 60 wt.% bentonite; (b) 0.04 m/sup 3//kg for strontium (II) in 10 wt.% sodium titanate and 90 wt.% bentonite; (c) 0.5 m/sup 3//kg for pertechnetate in 70 wt.% charcoal and 30 wt.% bentonite; and (d) 3 m/sup 3//kg for europium in 100% bentonite. Backfill effectiveness estimates based on batch sorption measurements were supported by these results; however, the diffusion results for europium did not agree well with a model for diffusion retarded by linear sorption. First measurements of pertechnetate diffusion in highly compacted bentonite suggest that anion exclusion may play a role in reducing mass transport rates of anions in this material. Needs for diffusion measurements that take into account site-specific materials interactions are described. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  9. A novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu

    2012-04-30

    In this paper, a systematic study was conducted to investigate a novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash. The coal refuse and fly ash had different properties under various thermal activation temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 350 °C, 550 °C, 750 °C and 950 °C). It is known that a thermal activation temperature ranging from 20 °C to 950 °C significantly increases the flowability and pozzolanic properties of the coal refuse; however, the flowability of fly ash decreases when the activation temperature is higher than 550 °C because of a severe agglomeration phenomenon on its surface. An optimal design for this backfill material was determined to include an activated portion composed of 5% coal refuse at 750 °C and 15% fly ash at 20 °C. This combination yields the best performance with excellent flowability, a high compressive strength and a low bleeding rate. The microanalysis results corresponded well with the performance tests at different activation conditions. In the coal refuse, kaolinite peaks began to decrease because of their transformation into metakaolin at 550 °C. Chlorite peaks disappeared at 750 °C. Muscovite peaks decreased at 750 °C and disappeared at 950 °C. During this process, muscovite 2M(1) gradually dehydroxylated to muscovite HT. Furthermore, this paper examined the environmental acceptance and economic feasibility of this technology and found that this silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash not only meets EPA requirements but also has several advantages in industry feasibility when compared with hydraulic backfill, rock backfill and paste backfill. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Physical response of backfill materials to mineralogical changes in a basalt environment. [Sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1983-01-01

    Backfill materials surrounding waste canisters in a high-level nuclear waste repository are capable of ensuring very slow flow of groundwater past the canisters, and thereby increase the safety of the repository. However, in the design of a repository it will be necessary to allow for possible changes in the backfill. In this experimental program, changes in permeability, swelling behavior, and plastic behavior of the backfill at the temperatures, pressures, and radiation levels expected in a repository are investigated. The emphasis is on investigation of relevant phenomena and evaluation of experimental procedures for use in licensing procedures. The permeability of a slightly compacted sand-clay mixture containing 25% bentonite, with a dry bulk density of 1.59 g/cm/sup 3/, was determined to be 0.9 x 10/sup -18/ m/sup 2/ in liquid water at 25 and 200/sup 0/C, respectively. This is sufficiently low to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of proposed materials. In practice, fractures in the host rock may form short circuits around the backfill, so an even lower flow rate is probable. However, alteration by any of several mechanisms is expected to change the properties of the backfill. Crushed basalt plus bentonite is a leading candidate backfill for a basalt repository. Experiments show that basalt reacts with groundwater vapor or with liquid groundwater producing smectites, zeolites, silica, and other products that may be either beneficial or detrimental to the long-term performance of the backfill. Concentration of groundwater salts in the backfill by evaporation would cause immediate, but possibly reversible, reduction of the swelling abaility of bentonite. Moreover, under some circumstances, gamma radiolysis of moist air in the backfill could produce up to 0.5 mole of nitric acid or ammonia per liter of pore space. 27 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Effects of rocks and backfill materials on waste glass leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, K.; Sasaki, N.; Kashihara, H.; Yamamoto, M.

    1986-12-31

    Extensive studies have been made on the interactions between a waste glass and repository materials under static conditions. One of the PNC reference glasses was leached in the solution prepared from water in contact with crushed granite, tuff, diabase and backfill materials such as bentonite and zeolite. The leachant solutions except for some bentonite solutions reduced the glass leach rate compared with that measured in distilled water. The extent of the reduction was a function of silicon concentration in solution. The bentonite solutions enhanced the glass dissolution rate by a factor of 2 to 3 at low bentonite/water ratios but the effect was found to be less important at high bentonite/water ratios and in the long-term experiment. Addition of granite and zeolite to the bentonite solutions decreased the leach rate below the value measured in distilled water.

  12. Investigation into groundwater recovery and backfill consolidation in British surface coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.N.; Reed, S.M.; Denby, B.; Hughes, D.B.

    1985-12-09

    The paper presents the instrumentation and results from an investigation into groundwater recovery and backfill consolidation conducted in the United Kingdom. British surface mining often requires the removal of roads or other structures which must be replaced on the cessation of backfilling. It is imperative for successful reconstruction that degrees of surface settlement be evaluated and thus precautions against structural damage may taken. Methods of working and geological characteristics of the backfills investigated are also detailed. An outline of research being carried out with respect to groundwater pollution from mine backfills is presented.

  13. Environmental impacts of cemented mine waste backfill. Report of investigations/1996

    SciTech Connect

    Levens, R.L.; Marcy, A.D.; Boldt, C.M.K.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) was to study the possible impacts of cemented mine waste backfill on the quality of ground water in the rock surrounding a stope. The objectives of the field work were to (1) document the impacts of cemented backfill on water being discharged from a selected stope, (2) investigate how the mobility of metals retained in cemented backfill differed from their mobility in uncemented mine waste sandfill, and (3) discuss the long-term impacts of cemented backfill after mine closure and subsequent mine flooding.

  14. Groundwater flow evaluation through backfilling materials of a surface coal mining site of Northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Ojeda, C.; Martínez-Morales, M.; Ortíz-Flores, G.

    2013-05-01

    Surface coal mining at the Allende-Piedras Negras aquifer system requires the complete dewatering and removal of the aquifer. The aquifer contains several geologic layers of variable hydraulic conductivity. Backfilling material is composed of a mixture of permeable and impermeable layers and it was initially considered as impermeable. Exploratory drillings, pumping tests and a geophysical survey were performed in the backfilling materials and the surrounding unaltered materials in order to evaluate the natural groundwater flow modification due to the mining activities. Results of geophysical survey evidenced a saturated water table within the back filling material which was verified by exploratory drilling. Pumping tests showed that unaltered materials have a mean hydraulic conductivity of 34.5 m/day while the backfilling of 5.3 m/day. Although the mining activities reduce the hydraulic conductivity by almost an order of magnitude, it was corroborated the existence of a groundwater flow through the backfilling materials.

  15. Evaluation of in-situ cemented backfill performance. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, D.R.; Vickery, J.D.; Seymour, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    As part of its research program to investigate ways of improving resource recovery and reducing subsidence, researchers from the U.S. Bureau of Mines placed instruments in the B-North ore body of the Cannon Mine, Wenatchee, WA, to monitor cemented backfill and rock deformation during mining. The vibrating-wire guages proved to be reliable and versatile, and approximately half of the instruments are providing data after 2 years of use. A two-dimensional, finite-element model was used to analyze the Cannon Mine's multilevel bench cut-and-fill mining method and predict rock and backfill displacements. The model accurately predicted rock displacements, but the predicted and measured displacements in cemented backfill had a correlation coefficient near zero, indicating that the model should only be used to predict rock displacements and not backfill displacements. A finite-difference model was also used to evaluate the stability of a cemented backfill pillar. Results can be used to conservatively predict backfill stresses, but on-site observations of pillar failures coupled with in situ measurements are needed to make more accurate predictions. An ongoing evaluation of the mining system has indicated that filling the primary stopes tight to the back with cemented backfill allowed these pillars to carry overburden loads soon after the cemented backfill was placed.

  16. Dessicant materials screening for backfill in a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    Maintaining an anhydrous environment around nuclear waste stored in a salt repository is a concern which can be alleviated by using a desiccant material for backfilling. Such a desiccant should desiccate a brine yet be non deliquescent, the hydrated product should have moderate thermal stability, and the desiccant should have a high capacity and be readily available. From a literature search MgO and CaO were identified for detailed study. These oxides, and an intimate mixture of the two obtained by calcining dolomite, were used in experiments to further determine their suitability. They proved to be excellent desiccants with a high water capacity. The hydrates of both have moderate thermal stability and a high water content. Both MgO and CaO react in an alkaline chloride brine forming oxychloride compounds with different waters of crystallization. Some of these compounds are the Sorel Cements. CaO hydrates to Ca(OH)/sub 2/ which carbonates with CO/sub 2/ in air to form CaCO/sub 3/ and release the hydrated water. Thus the intimate mixture of CaO and MgO from calcined dolomite may serve as a desiccant and remove CO/sub 2/ from the repository atmosphere.

  17. Summary of WIPP Room B heater test brine and backfill material data

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Stein, C.L.; Jarrell, G.D.; Kimball, K.M.

    1991-07-01

    Simulated DHLW (Defense High Level Waste) package performance tests were carried out at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) by emplacing a number of waste canisters containing electrical heaters into the floor of the mine. Peak temperatures were about 130{degrees}C, and the tests ran for three years. During this time, an unanticipated large amount of water was collected from heater hole BO42. A study was, therefore, undertaken to determine if this fluid was derived from normal weep brines. This was accomplished by comparing the amount of salt deposited by the dried weep brines with the volume of condensed steam collected during the test. Documenting the post-test condition of the various backfills was the other objective of this report. In spite of being exposed to acidic vapors, the bentonite-sand backfill retained its mineralogic integrity. However, the bentonite-sand backfill compacted between the canister and the wall only achieved a density that was about three quarters that of a pore-free material. The bentonite backfill also showed evidence of hair-line cracks through which steam had left the vicinity of the canister. In contrast, compacted crushed salt backfill exhibited no evidence of through-going cracks and was compacted to better than 99% of that of pure nonporous sodium chloride. Thus, the seal provided by a crushed salt backfill appears to be superior to that provided by bentonite. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  18. Dielectric measurement method for real-time monitoring of initial hardening of backfill materials used for underground construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlovšek, Jurij; Schwing, Moritz; Chen, Zhen; Wagner, Norman; Williams, David J.; Scheuermann, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The broadband dielectric measurement method based on the vector network analysis technique, in combination with an open-ended coaxial probe, was applied to the determination of the dielectric relaxation behaviour of one- and two-component backfilling grout materials in the frequency range from 40 MHz to 2 GHz. The cement hydration process and the gelling of commercial grouts was monitored in real-time to investigate the application of non-destructive testing methods in the tunnelling industry. It was found that the time-dependent dielectric relaxation behaviour can accurately reveal the different stages of the hydration process and delineate the start of gel hardening. These measurement results demonstrate the practicability of the real-time dielectric measurement method to determine the broadband dielectric parameters of conventional backfill materials used in underground construction to determine construction integrity using non-destructive testing methods.

  19. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  20. The algorithm for determination of necessary characteristics of backfill materials used for grounding resistances of grounding loops reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunović, Jovan

    2012-12-01

    Various backfill materials are used with the aim to reduce grounding resistance of grounding systems to the desired values. The algorithm for determination of a proper combination of features a backfill material needs to possess in order to successfully perform this task is developed and presented. It is based on the numerical analysis of the results obtained with finite-element method modelling of the considered grounding system, surrounding soil, backfill material and imperfect contact. As an example, the developed algorithm is applied on two grounding loops (one conventional and the other backfilled with bentonite suspension) embedded in a two-layer soil. The results obtained with the application of the proposed algorithm can be used as guidance for the researchers who are looking for new suitable low cost backfill materials.

  1. Refinement of Foam Backfill Technology for Expedient Airfield Damage - Phase I: Laboratory Evaluation of Foam Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    Materials En gi ne er R es ea rc h an d D ev el op m en t Ce nt er Luke Gurtowski, Mariely Mejías-Santiago, Christopher Griggs, Jared...Airfield Damage Repair Phase I: Laboratory Evaluation of Foam Materials Mariely Mejías-Santiago and Bryan Ruiz-Cruz Geotechnical and Structures...a number of foam materials for their suitability as crater-backfill materials . Seven foam formulations were evaluated between the summer of 2015 and

  2. Development of backfill material as an engineered barrier in the waste package system- Interim topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelwright, E.J.; Hodges, F.N.; Bray, L.A.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Lester, D.H.; Nakai, T.L.; Spaeth, M.E.; Stula, R.T.

    1981-09-01

    A backfill barrier, emplaced between the containerized waste and the host rock, can both protect the other engineered barriers and act as a primary barrier to the release of radionuclides from the waste package. Attributes that a backfill should provide in order to carry out its required function have been identified. Primary attributes are those that have a direct effect upon the release and transport of radionuclides from the waste package. Supportive attributes do not directly affect radionuclide release but are necessary to support the primary attributes. The primary attributes, in order of importance, are: minimize (retard or exclude) the migration of ground water between the host rock and the waste canister system; retard the migration of selected chemical species (corrosive species and radionuclides) in the ground water; control the Eh and pH of the ground water within the waste-package environment. The supportive attributes are: self-seal any cracks or discontinuities in the backfill or interfacing host geology; retain performance properties at all repository temperatures; retain peformance properties during and after receiving repository levels of gamma radiation; conduct heat from the canister system to the host geology; retain mechanical properties and provide resistance to applied mechanical forces; retain morphological stability and compatibility with structural barriers and with the host geology for required period of time. Screening and selection of candidate backfill materials has resulted in a preliminary list of materials for testing. Primary emphasis has been placed on sodium and calcium bentonites and zeolites used in conjunction with quartz sand or crushed host rock. Preliminary laboratory studies have concentrated on permeability, sorption, swelling pressure, and compaction properties of candidate backfill materials.

  3. Sorption of cesium and strontium from concentrated brines by backfill barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, C D

    1981-03-01

    The sorption of radionuclides from potentially intruding groundwater at a nuclear waste repository is a major chemical function of backfill barriers. In this study, various materials (including clays, zeolites and an inorganic ion exchanger) were screened for the sorption of the fission products cesium and strontium in concentrated brines. Representative brines A and B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt were used. Sorption properties were quantified using empirical distribution coefficients, k/sub d/. Of the materials examined, sodium titanate had the highest k/sub d/ for the sorption of Sr(II) in both brine A (k/sub d/ = 125 ml/g) and brine B(k/sub d/ = 500 to 600 ml/g). A mordenite-type zeolite was the most effective getter for Cs(I) in brine A (k/sub d = 27 ml/g), while illite yielded the highest k/sub d/ for Cs(I) in brine B (k/sub d/ = 115 ml/g). The relative merit of these k/sub d/ values is evaluated in terms of calculated estimates of breakthrough times for a backfill barrier containing the getter. Results show that a backfill mixture containing these getters is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Sr(II) and Cs(I), although further study (especially for the sorption of cesium from brine A) is recommended. Initial mechanistic studies revealed competing ion effects which would support an ion exchange mechanism. K/sub d/'s were constant over a Sr(II) concentration range of 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -5/ M and a Cs(I) concentration range of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ M, supporting the choice of a linear sorption isotherm as a model for the results. Constant batch composition was shown to be attained within one week.

  4. Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

    2003-10-01

    A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron

  5. Effect of incinerator bottom-ash composition on the mechanical behavior of backfill material.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Liang; Weng, Meng-Chia; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2012-12-30

    This study explores the influence of the chemical composition (SiO(2), CaO, Fe(2)O(3), and Al(2)O(3)) of incinerator bottom ash on its friction angle. Direct shear tests were performed to measure the strength of bottom ash with two distinctly different compositions. Then, an empirical equation was regressed to determine the correlation between each composition and the friction angle. The experimental results showed that the main constituent material of the incinerator bottom ash from general municipal wastes is SiO(2), and the friction angle is 48.04°-52.66°. The bottom ash from incineration plants treating both municipal wastes and general industrial wastes has a high content of iron-aluminum oxides, and its friction angle is 44.60°-52.52°. According to the multivariate regression analysis result, the friction angle of bottom ash of any composition is influenced mainly by the Fe(2)O(3) and Al(2)O(3) contents. This study used the friction angle of the bottom ash from four different incineration plants to validate the empirical equation, and found that the error between actual friction angles and the predicted values was -1.36% to 5.34%. Therefore, the regressed empirical equation in this study can be employed in engineering applications to preliminarily identify the backfill quality of incinerator bottom ash.

  6. Backfill LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Norman

    1999-11-17

    Backfill is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for License Application (LA). The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository of the inclusion of backfill in emplacement drifts. Backfill may act as a barrier to water flow, may reduce the waste dissolution rate, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. However, installation of the backfill material can be costly in terms of time, money, and human effort. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of backfill materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate dispersion of groundwater intrusions into backfill over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the backfill material. (2) Review the thermal effects of backfill on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of backfill and the depth of backfill required to protect waste packages under backfill. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of backfill. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of backfill. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and dusting potential. (6) Evaluate drift conditions and configurations to determine the suitability of backfilling methodology. (7) Perform cost assessment of backfill material placement. (8) Evaluate the feature with criteria that will be supplied by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) Team. This report does not discuss backfill for sealing of ramps, shafts and mains but is limited to backfill in emplacement drifts.

  7. Repository Drift Backfilling Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Londe, I.; Dubois, J.Ph.; Bauer, C.

    2008-07-01

    The 'Backfilling Demonstrator' is one of the technological demonstrators developed by ANDRA in the framework of the feasibility studies for a geological repository for high-level long-lived (HL-LL waste) within a clay formation. The demonstrator concerns the standard and supporting backfills as defined in Andra's 2005 design. The standard backfill is intended to fill up almost all drifts of the underground repository in order to limit any deformation of the rock after the degradation of the drift lining. The supporting backfill only concerns a small portion of the volume to be backfilled in order to counter the swelling pressure of the swelling clay contained in the sealing structures. The first objective of the demonstrator was to show the possibility of manufacturing a satisfactory backfill, in spite of the exiguity of the underground structures, and of reusing as much as possible the argillite muck. For the purpose of this experiment, the argillite muck was collected on Andra's work-site for the implementation of an underground research laboratory. Still ongoing, the second objective is to follow up the long-term evolution of the backfill. Approximately 200 m{sup 3} of compacted backfill material have been gathered in a large concrete tube simulating a repository drift. The standard backfill was manufactured exclusively with argillite. The supporting backfill was made by forming a mixture of argillite and sand. Operations were carried out mostly at Richwiller, close to Mulhouse, France. The objectives of the demonstrator were met: an application method was tested and proven satisfactory. The resulting dry densities are relatively high, although the moduli of deformation do not always reach the set goal. The selected objective for the demonstrator was a dry density corresponding to a relatively high compaction level (95% of the standard Proctor optimum [SPO]), for both pure argillite and the argillite-sand mixture. The plate-percussion compaction technique was

  8. Borehole Heat Exchanger Systems: Hydraulic Conductivity and Frost-Resistance of Backfill Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbergen, Hauke; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are economic solutions for both, domestic heating energy supply, as well as underground thermal energy storage (UTES). Over the past decades the technology developed to complex, advanced and highly efficient systems. For an efficient operation of the most common type of UTES, borehole heat exchanger (BHE) systems, it is necessary to design the system for a wide range of carrier fluid temperatures. During heat extraction, a cooled carrier fluid is heated up by geothermal energy. This collected thermal energy is energetically used by the heat pump. Thereby the carrier fluid temperature must have a lower temperature than the surrounding underground in order to collect heat energy. The steeper the thermal gradient, the more energy is transferred to the carrier fluid. The heat injection case works vice versa. For fast and sufficient heat extraction, even over long periods of heating (winter), it might become necessary to run the BHE with fluid temperatures below 0°C. As the heat pump runs periodically, a cyclic freezing of the pore water and corresponding ice-lens growth in the nearfield of the BHE pipes becomes possible. These so called freeze-thaw-cycles (FTC) are a critical state for the backfill material, as the sealing effect eventually decreases. From a hydrogeological point of view the vertical sealing of the BHE needs to be secured at any time (e.g. VDI 4640-2, Draft 2015). The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the BHE is influenced not only by the permeability of the grouting material itself, but by the contact area between BHE pipes and grout. In order to assess the sealing capacity of grouting materials a laboratory testing procedure was developed that measures the vertical hydraulic conductivity of the system BHE pipe and grout. The key features of the procedure are: • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity • assessment of the systeḿs hydraulic conductivity after simulation of freeze-thaw-cycle

  9. Shredded tires and rubber-sand as lightweight backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Salgado, R.; Lovell, C.W.; Bernal, A.

    1999-02-01

    The growing interest in utilizing waste materials in civil engineering applications has opened the possibility of constructing reinforced soil structures with unconventional backfills. Scrap tires are a high-profile waste material for which several uses have been studied, including the use of shredded tires as backfill. A triaxial testing program was conducted to investigate the stress-strain relationship and strength of tire chips and a mixture of sand and tire chips. The test results and additional information from the literature were used in the numerical modeling of wall backfills, both unreinforced and reinforced with geosynthetics. The numerical modeling results suggest tire shreds, particularly when mixed with sand, may be effectively used as a backfill.

  10. Uptake Mechanisms of Eu(III) on Hydroxyapatite: A Potential Permeable Reactive Barrier Backfill Material for Trapping Trivalent Minor Actinides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zheng, Tao; Yang, Shitong; Zhang, Linjuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Liu, Wei; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-04-05

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technique has attracted an increasing level of attention for the in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. In this study, the macroscopic uptake behaviors and microscopic speciation of Eu(III) on hydroxyapatite (HAP) were investigated by a combination of theoretical modeling, batch experiments, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) fitting, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The underlying removal mechanisms were identified to further assess the application potential of HAP as an effective PRB backfill material. The macroscopic analysis revealed that nearly all dissolved Eu(III) in solution was removed at pH 6.5 within an extremely short reaction time of 5 min. In addition, the thermodynamic calculations, desorption experiments, and PXRD and XAS analyses definitely confirmed the formation of the EuPO4·H2O(s) phase during the process of uptake of dissolved Eu(III) by HAP via the dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A detailed comparison of the present experimental findings and related HAP-metal systems suggests that the relative contribution of precipitation to the total Eu(III) removal increases as the P:Eu ratio decreases. The dosage of HAP-based PRB for the remediation of groundwater polluted by Eu(III) and analogous trivalent actinides [e.g., Am(III) and Cm(III)] should be strictly controlled depending on the dissolved Eu(III) concentration to obtain an optimal P:M (M represents Eu, Am, or Cm) ratio and treatment efficiency.

  11. Application of Paste Backfill in Underground Coal Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masniyom, M.; Drebenstedt, C.

    2009-04-01

    Coal fires are known from different coalfields worldwide. China, India, USA, Australia, Indonesia and South Africa are the main countries affected by coal fires. The fires is thermally intensive and cause numerous sinkholes, large-scale subsidence, air pollution, global warming, loss of mining productivity and increasing safety risk. The Wuda Inner Mongolia coalfield has been selected as a possible test area for paste backfill. The traditional methods, executed by fire fighting teams, by covering the coalfire areas with soil, blasting burning coal outcrops and injecting water in the subsurface fire pockets are continuously improved and extended. Initiatives to introduce modern techniques, such as backfill placement at fracture and borehole, to cool down the burning coal and cut off the air supply. This study is to investigate backfill materials and techniques suited for underground coal fires. Laboratory tests were carried out on physical, chemical and mechanical properties of different backfill materials and mixtures thereof. Special attention was paid to materials generated as by-products and other cheaply available materials e.g. fly ash from power plants. There is a good chance that one of the different material mixtures investigated can be used as a technically and economically viable backfill for underground coal fires.

  12. The evaluation of a metered mixer for RTV silicone for RSRM nozzle backfill operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardell, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    Metered mixing specifically for the RSRM backfill operation was investigated. Projected advantages were the elimination of waste RTV silicone produced in the operation and the elimination of entrapped air during the mix. Although metered mixing proved to be a viable method for mixing the Dow Corning DC 90-0006 rubber with its catalyst, applying the technology to the RSRM backfill operation has several disadvantages that are decisive. Use of a metered mixer would increase the amount of material that was being scraped for each backfill and increase the amount of time required to clean up the equipment after each operation. Therefore, use of metered static mixers is not recommended for use in the RSRM nozzle backfill operations. Because metered mixers proved to have significant disadvantages other methods of mixing and dispensing the RTV during the backfill operation are being investigated, and will be reported in a separate document.

  13. Experiments on seismic behavior of back-fill gravel layer as liquefaction countermeasure of buried gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuo; Shimizu, Kenji; Ueno, Junichi

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on seismic behavior of back-fill gravel layer as a back-fill material for buried pipelines was experimented with to investigate the effectiveness against liquefaction with a scaled model using a shaking table. A non-liquefied sandy surface layer was made with a steel mold divided into several pieces for a model. The back-fill gravel was found to be efficient for drainage but didn`t prevent liquefaction from occurring in the below layer. It was also found that the pipe doesn`t move up by buoyancy but subsides following the settlement of the back-fill gravel.

  14. Research and Development of a New Silica-Alumina Based Cementitious Material Largely Using Coal Refuse for Mine Backfill, Mine Sealing and Waste Disposal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Henghu Sun; Yuan Yao

    2012-06-29

    Coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. To activate coal refuse is one practical solution to recycle this huge amount of solid waste as substitute for Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). The central goal of this project is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to Ordinary Portland Cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economic benefit as a construction and building material.

  15. Direct characterization of transport parameters in near-field and engineered backfill/invert materials

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.L.; Robinson, B.A.; Triay, I.R.; Bussod, G.Y.

    1997-12-31

    Performance assessment of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain includes flow and transport modeling of the unsaturated zone as the critical predictive component, and involves a series of model calculations that provide predictions of the migration of important radionuclides in the inventory to the water table. The modeling requires the relevant properties of both the natural environment and the engineered systems. The Unsaturated Flow Apparatus, UFA, was used to directly measure the unsaturated and saturated transport properties of whole rock tuff cores and candidate barrier materials to provide real input parameters to the models. These properties included hydraulic conductivity, matric potential, air permeability, and diffusion coefficient, all of which are strong functions of the volumetric water content. Results show that for all recharges above 0.1 mm/yr, fractures will be partially saturated and conducting at that recharge rate. Whenever the thermal conditions relax enough to allow rewetting of the host rock, there will be dripping from the drift ceiling. Unsaturated transport of colloids through fractured cores of Topopah Spring and Prow Pass tuffs was also investigated and found to depend primarily upon colloid charge, and not size, for the rock cores investigated.

  16. Backfill barriers: the use of engineered barriers based on geologic materials to assure isolation of radioactive wastes in a repository. [Nickel-iron alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Apps, J.A.; Cook, N.G.W.

    1981-06-01

    A preliminary assessment is made to show that canisters fabricated of nickel-iron alloys, and surrounded by a suitable backfill, may produce an engineered barrier where the canister material is thermodynamically stable with respect to its environment. As similar conditions exist in nature, the performance of such systems as barriers to isolate radionuclides can be predicted over very long periods, of the order of 10/sup 6/ years.

  17. SEEPAGE/BACKFILL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2000-04-14

    As directed by written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a sub-model of seepage/backfill interactions is developed and presented in this document to support the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Physical and Chemical Environment Model. The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift. In this analysis, a conceptual model is developed to provide PAO a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The development plan calls for a sub-model that evaluates the effect on water chemistry of chemical reactions between water that enters the drift and backfill materials in the drift. The development plan specifically requests an evaluation of the following important chemical reaction processes: dissolution-precipitation, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction. The development plan also requests the evaluation of the effects of varying seepage and drainage fluxes, varying temperature, and varying evaporation and condensation fluxes. Many of these effects are evaluated in a separate Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Precipitates Salts Analysis AMR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000), so the results of that AMR are referenced throughout this AMR.

  18. Utilization of industrial waste products as pozzolanic material in cemented paste backfill of high sulphide mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2009-09-15

    In this study, the potential use of the industrial waste products including waste glass (WG), fly ash (FA), granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) and silica fume (SF) as pozzolanic additive for the partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in cemented paste backfill (CPB) of sulphide-rich mill tailings was investigated. The influence of these industrial waste products on the short- and long-term mechanical performance of CPB was demonstrated. The rate of development of strength of CPB samples tended to slow down when the pozzolanic wastes were incorporated or increased in dosage in the binder phase. Severe losses (by 26%) in the strength of CPB samples produced from exclusively OPC occurred after an initial curing period of 56 days. The addition of WG (10-30 wt%) as a partial replacement of OPC was observed to aggravate further the strength losses of CPB samples. GBFS, FA and SF appeared to improve the long-term performance of CPB samples; albeit, only GBFS and SF could be incorporated into the binder phase only at certain levels i.e. up to 20 wt% GBFS and 15wt% SF in order to maintain a threshold strength level of 0.7MPa over 360 days. SEM studies have provided further insight into the microstucture of CPB and confirmed the formation of deleterious gypsum as the expansive phase. These findings have demonstrated that the industrial waste products including GBFS and SF can be suitably used as mineral additives to improve the long-term mechanical performance of CPB produced from sulphide-rich tailings as well as to reduce the binder costs in a CPB plant.

  19. Implementation of Paste Backfill Mining Technology in Chinese Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qingliang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  20. Implementation of paste backfill mining technology in Chinese coal mines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qingliang; Chen, Jianhang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application.

  1. Laboratory determination of migration of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures as buffer/backfill material for high-level waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lang; Zhang, Huyuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ming

    2013-12-01

    For the safety assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the migration of Eu(III) through compacted bentonite-sand mixtures was measured under expected repository conditions. Under the evaluated conditions, advection and dispersion is the dominant migration mechanism. The role of sorption on the retardation of migration was also evaluated. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were K=2.07×10(-10)-5.23×10(-10)cm/s, The sorption and diffusion of Eu(III) were examined using a flexible wall permeameter for a solute concentration of 2.0×10(-5)mol/l. The effective diffusion coefficients and apparent diffusion coefficients of Eu(III) in compacted bentonite-sand mixtures were in the range of 1.62×10(-12)-4.87×10(-12)m(2)/s, 1.44×10(-14)-9.41×10(-14)m(2)/s, respectively, which has a very important significance to forecast the relationship between migration length of Eu(III) in buffer/backfill material and time and provide a reference for the design of buffer/backfill material for HLW disposal in China.

  2. Preparation for YMP backfill activities

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, J.

    1998-12-23

    Yucca Mountain activities for FY 1999 are anticipated to require specific information on the chemical and physical properties of the candidate getter materials and other backfill components necessary for defensible modeling of the source term, and possible controlling of the source term. There should be three tasks to this activity: at the end of this report is a draft test plan reflecting the present funding anticipated, the other tasks may be added as funding becomes available. (Task 1) The immobilization capacity of the getter materials for specific radionuclides. This task will primarily include column sorption tests of getter materials with solutions spiked with radionuclides. The getter materials will include Apatite II, MgO (with NaPO{sub 4} plus Ba,SrCO{sub 3} and soluble sulfate, with and without Apatite II), Gibbsite/Boehmite, and Hematite. Radionuclides will include Pu, U, Np, Am, Ra, Tc, and Th. Experiments will be performed under various anticipated repository conditions and with anticipated solution compositions. Occasional batch tests will be used to obtain specific K{sub d}s and other thermodynamic data. Solid and liquid analyses will be needed for characterization of the effluent concentrations from the columns to assess performance and for use in geochemical modeling. (Task 2) Intrinsic stability of the getter materials under repository conditions. The use of any candidate getter material will depend upon its anticipated lifetime in the backfill environment. Literature search for any existing data will be performed and augmented by solubility experiments on the getter materials. This is especially important for the reactive materials such as MgO and the soluble sulfates and phosphates that may be a limited lifetime in the backfill. It is also necessary to decide how much getter material to emplace. (Task 3) Diffusion of radionuclides across a Richards Barrier. The Richards Barrier, if emplaced, will act as a hydraulic diversion barrier for the

  3. Migration of radionuclides through backfill in a nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Lung, H.

    1986-01-01

    Four models are analyzed to predict the performance of a backfill layer as part of the waste package emplacement in a nuclear waste repository. The corresponding computer code for each model is also developed. The time-dependent mass transfer analysis on a spherical waste-backfill geometry indicates that the radioactive decay effect can enhance the mass transfer rate from the backfill instead of reducing it. The analysis yields the breakthrough time of the backfill layer, which in turn characterizes the backfill performance. A non-linear (Langmuir) sorption isotherm is used to describe the sorption saturation in the backfill. The steady state mass transport analysis through a prolate spheroidal waste-backfill geometry shows that a simple formula can be used to calculate the individual resistances to mass transport in backfill and in host rock. A general, non-recursive analytical solution is derived for a radioactive decay chain of arbitrary length in either a finite or a semi-infinite medium. Numerical examples are given for different boundary conditions and for different decay chains. The results justify that for a backfill layer made of low permeability material, a zero water velocity can be used in the backfill analysis. It is also shown that under normal repository conditions, the mass transfer rate from the backfill is quite small. For the daughter member with a smaller retardation coefficient than that of the mother nuclide, such as /sup 226/Ra in the /sup 234/U ..-->.. /sup 230/Th ..-->.. /sup 226/Ra chain, an interior maximum in the concentration profile appears in the backfill. This phenomenon can be seen only in a chain calculation.

  4. A Historical Review of WIPP Backfill Development

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, L.H.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Molecke, M.A.; Papenguth, H.W.

    1999-07-15

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. It's introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  5. Wormhole Formation in RSRM Nozzle Joint Backfill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J.

    2000-01-01

    The RSRM nozzle uses a barrier of RTV rubber upstream of the nozzle O-ring seals. Post flight inspection of the RSRM nozzle continues to reveal occurrence of "wormholes" into the RTV backfill. The term "wormholes", sometimes called "gas paths", indicates a gas flow path not caused by pre-existing voids, but by a little-understood internal failure mode of the material during motor operation. Fundamental understanding of the mechanics of the RSRM nozzle joints during motor operation, nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the RTV backfill material, identification of the conditions that predispose the RTV to form wormholes, and screening of candidate replacement materials is being pursued by a joint effort between Thiokol Propulsion, NASA, and the Army Propulsion & Structures Directorate at Redstone Arsenal. The performance of the RTV backfill in the joint is controlled by the joint environment. Joint movement, which applies a tension and shear load on the material, coupled with the introduction of high pressure gas in combination create an environment that exceeds the capability of the material to withstand the wormhole effect. Little data exists to evaluate why the material fails under the modeled joint conditions, so an effort to characterize and evaluate the material under these conditions was undertaken. Viscoelastic property data from characterization testing will anchor structural analysis models. Data over a range of temperatures, environmental pressures, and strain rates was used to develop a nonlinear viscoelastic model to predict material performance, develop criteria for replacement materials, and quantify material properties influencing wormhole growth. Three joint simulation analogs were developed to analyze and validate joint thermal barrier (backfill) material performance. Two exploratory tests focus on detection of wormhole failure under specific motor operating conditions. A "validation" test system provides data to "validate" computer models and

  6. Efficacy of backfilling and other engineered barriers in a radioactive waste repository in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-09-01

    In the United States, investigation of potential host geologic formations was expanded in 1975 to include hard rocks. Potential groundwater intrusion is leading to very conservative and expensive waste package designs. Recent studies have concluded that incentives for engineered barriers and 1000-year canisters probably do not exist for reasonable breach scenarios. The assumption that multibarriers will significantly increase the safety margin is also questioned. Use of a bentonite backfill for surrounding a canister of exotic materials was developed in Sweden and is being considered in the US. The expectation that bentonite will remain essentially unchanged for hundreds of years for US repository designs may be unrealistic. In addition, thick bentonite backfills will increase the canister surface temperature and add much more water around the canister. The use of desiccant materials, such as CaO or MgO, for backfilling seems to be a better method of protecting the canister. An argument can also be made for not using backfill material in salt repositories since the 30-cm-thick space will provide for hole closure for many years and will promote heat transfer via natural convection. It is concluded that expensive safety systems are being considered for repository designs that do not necessarily increase the safety margin. It is recommended that the safety systems for waste repositories in different geologic media be addressed individually and that cost-benefit analyses be performed.

  7. Investigating Encrypted Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Niall; Gladyshev, Pavel; Kechadi, Tahar; Carthy, Joe

    When encrypted material is discovered during a digital investigation and the investigator cannot decrypt the material then s/he is faced with the problem of how to determine the evidential value of the material. This research is proposing a methodology of extracting probative value from the encrypted file of a hybrid cryptosystem. The methodology also incorporates a technique for locating the original plaintext file. Since child pornography (KP) images and terrorist related information (TI) are transmitted in encrypted format the digital investigator must ask the question Cui Bono? - who benefits or who is the recipient? By doing this the scope of the digital investigation can be extended to reveal the intended recipient.

  8. Electrical resisitivity of mechancially stablized earth wall backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, Michael; Tucker-Kulesza, Stacey; Koehn, Weston

    2017-06-01

    Mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining walls utilized in transportation projects are typically backfilled with coarse aggregate. One of the current testing procedures to select backfill material for construction of MSE walls is the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials standard T 288: ;Standard Method of Test for Determining Minimum Laboratory Soil Resistivity.; T 288 is designed to test a soil sample's electrical resistivity which correlates to its corrosive potential. The test is run on soil material passing the No. 10 sieve and believed to be inappropriate for coarse aggregate. Therefore, researchers have proposed new methods to measure the electrical resistivity of coarse aggregate samples in the laboratory. There is a need to verify that the proposed methods yield results representative of the in situ conditions; however, no in situ measurement of the electrical resistivity of MSE wall backfill is established. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides a two-dimensional (2D) profile of the bulk resistivity of backfill material in situ. The objective of this study was to characterize bulk resistivity of in-place MSE wall backfill aggregate using ERT. Five MSE walls were tested via ERT to determine the bulk resistivity of the backfill. Three of the walls were reinforced with polymeric geogrid, one wall was reinforced with metallic strips, and one wall was a gravity retaining wall with no reinforcement. Variability of the measured resistivity distribution within the backfill may be a result of non-uniform particle sizes, thoroughness of compaction, and the presence of water. A quantitative post processing algorithm was developed to calculate mean bulk resistivity of in-situ backfill. Recommendations of the study were that the ERT data be used to verify proposed testing methods for coarse aggregate that are designed to yield data representative of in situ conditions. A preliminary analysis suggests that ERT may be utilized

  9. Centrifuge modeling of radioactive waste migration through backfill in a near surface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Investigations on the performance of backfill barrier in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) for radioactive wastes are important to ensure the long term safety of such disposal option. Favorable condition to delay migration of radionuclides from disposed waste to far fields is diffusion process. However, advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism plays an important role due to changes in backfill over a period of time. In order to understand these mechanisms, detailed laboratory experiments are usually conducted for developing mathematical models to assess the behaviour of backfill. However, these experiments are time consuming and suffer with the limitations due to material complexity. Also, there are constraints associated with validation of theoretical predictions due to intricacy of boundary conditions as well as the time scale is quite different as compared to the time required for completion of the processes in the field. Keeping in view these aspects, centrifuge modeling technique has been adopted by various researchers to model and understand various geo-environment problems in order to provide a link between the real life situation termed as the 'Prototype' and its model, which is exposed to a higher gravitational field. An attempt has been made in this paper to investigate the feasibility of this technique to model advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism of radionuclides through saturated Bentonite-Sand (B:S) backfill. Various stages of centrifuge modeling are highlighted. Column tests were conducted in the centrifuge to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of B:S mixture under prototype NSDF stress conditions. Results showed that steady state hydraulic conductivity under saturated conditions was 2.86 10{sup -11} m/sec. Studies indicate the feasibility of centrifuge modeling technique and usefulness to model advective diffusion of radionuclides through B:S backfill. (authors)

  10. Instrumentation for monitoring buried pipe behavior during backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, T.J.; Selig, E.T.; Webb, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    An extensive instrumentation plan was devised to monitor buried pipe behavior, soil behavior and pipe-soil interaction during backfilling. The emphasis of the instrumentation plan was to monitor these parameters under different installation techniques without impeding construction operations. Different types and sizes of pipe were selected for installation in trenches excavated in undisturbed in situ soil conditions. Installation variables included in situ soil conditions, trench widths, backfill material (including controlled low strength material), haunching effort, and compaction methods. A total of fourteen tests, each including reinforced concrete, corrugated steel, and corrugated HDPE, were conducted. Eleven of the installations were conducted with 900 mm inside diameter pipe and three with 1,500 mm inside diameter pipe. The pipes were buried to a cover depth of 1.2 m. Measurements of pipe shape, pipe strains, pipe-soil interface pressures, soil density, soil stresses, and soil strains were collected. Pipe shape changes were measured by a custom built profilometer. Custom designed bending beam pressure transducers were used in the steel pipe to measure interface pressures. Most of the instrumentation performed well and measured results were within the range expected. Pipe-soil interaction effects were effectively measured with the instruments selected. Pipe shape changes were a very valuable parameter for investigating pipe-soil interaction.

  11. Investigations of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, G. M.; Fvwaraye, A. O.; Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The investigations were directed at determining the radiation history and surface chronology of lunar materials using the etched particle track technique. The major lunar materials studied are the igneous rocks and double core from Apollo 12, the breccia and soil samples from Apollo 14, and the core samples from Luna 16. In the course of this work two new and potentially important observations were made: (1) Cosmic ray-induced spallation-recoil tracks were identified. The density of such tracks, when compared with the density of tracks induced by a known flux of accelerator protons, yields the time of exposure of a sample within the top meter or two of moon's surface. (2) Natural, fine scale plastic deformation was found to have fragmented pre-existing charged particle tracks, allowing the dating of the mechanical event causing the deformation.

  12. Role of natural organic solutes on the sorption of selenium by coal mine backfill-core samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, G.F.; Fadlelmawia, A.A.; Reddy, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    Concentrations of dissolved selenium (Se) as large as 330 {mu}gL{sup -1} have been detected in water samples from backfill aquifers in the southern Powder River Basin (PRB) of northeastern Wyoming. During surface coal mining, rock material overlying the coal is redistributed in relation to its original stratigraphic position; exposure of the previously buried material to surface oxidizing conditions decreases the stability of sulfides and organic matter containing Se, increasing Se concentrations in associated ground waters. Ground-water and backfill-core samples were collected from three sites located at two active mines in the PRB. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the ground-water samples was dominated by the acid fraction (sum of hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids) at 38 to 84% of the DOC; the neutral fraction (sum of hydrophobic and hydrophilic neutrals) ranged from 10 to 55% and the base fraction (sum of hydrophobic and hydrophilic bases) was generally less than 10%. Three sorption experiments were conducted to investigate selenite sorption on backfill-core samples. Selenite concentration in these experiments ranged from 0 to 11 mg kg{sup -1} in backfill-core samples. The first experiment determined the selenite sorption capacity of the backfill-core samples with selenite in distilled-deionized water as a background solution. In the third experiment, hydrophobic and hydrophilic acid fractions, isolated and concentrated from ground-water samples, were added to the selenite background solutions. Results of the three experiments indicated that backfill-core samples have a high sorption capacity for Se (generally, greater than 90% of the added Se) and can sorb as much as 99% of Se added as selenite. A substantial decrease in selenite sorption rates occurred in the presence of individual organic-solute fractions. Hydrophilic acids caused the largest decrease in Se sorption by the backfill-core samples.

  13. Geochemical alteration of backfill FY98 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T; Knauss, K; Rosenberg, N; Viani, B

    1998-09-30

    The Yucca Mountain Project is considering some type of backfill, possibly emplaced as a capillary barrier, for inclusion in the Engineering Barrier System (EBS) at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site. The performance of capillary barriers in isothermal, low- temperature, environments has been studied extensively (e.g., Ho and Webb, 1998; OZdenburg and Pruess, 1993; Ross, 1990). The performance of capillary barriers in an non-isothermal, high temperature environment, such as during the thermal pulse phase of a nuclear waste repository, has received much less attention. One concern is that the backfill materials may be altered from that of the as-placed material by the hydrothermal regime imposed by the emplacement of waste in the repository, changing hydrologic properties in a way that degrades the performance of the EBS system. This report is a status report on our efforts to address this concern. The work was initiated by SCR #98-76-041 and was authorized to begin at LLNL in summer 1998. This report is organized as follows. In the first part, we discuss our understanding of the relevant issues of backfill performance based on thermal hydrology. We focus here on changes to hydrologic properties, but we recognize that changes to thermal, mechanical and chemical (e.g., sorptive) properties are also important. Our primary interest is in addressing concerns over possible changes in the magnitude of key hydrologic properties (i.e., porosity, permeability, and moisture retention characteristics) that could significantly affect the design performance of backfill in the EBS. We report on what we know from previous work about geochemical alteration of backfill material, focusing primarily on crushed tuff. In the second part of this report, we present our progress on geochemical studies on backfill materials. These include sub-boiling, two-phase column experiments, batch experiments at above boiling temperatures and associated numerical modeling.

  14. A historical review of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant backfill development

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; MOLECKE,MARTIN A.; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; BRUSH,LAURENCE H.

    2000-06-05

    Backfills have been part of Sandia National Laboratories' [Sandia's] Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] designs for over twenty years. Historically, backfill research at Sandia has depended heavily on the changing mission of the WIPP facility. Early testing considered heat producing, high level, wastes. Bentonite/sand/salt mixtures were evaluated and studies focused on developing materials that would retard brine ingress, sorb radionuclides, and withstand elevated temperatures. The present-day backfill consists of pure MgO [magnesium oxide] in a pelletized form and is directed at treating the relatively low contamination level, non-heat producing, wastes actually being disposed of in the WIPP. Its introduction was motivated by the need to scavenging CO{sub 2} [carbon dioxide] from decaying organic components in the waste. However, other benefits, such as a substantial desiccating capacity, are also being evaluated. The MgO backfill also fulfills a statutory requirement for assurance measures beyond those needed to demonstrate compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regulatory release limits. However, even without a backfill, the WIPP repository design still operates within EPA regulatory release limits.

  15. Backfilling canals to mitigate Wetland dredging in Louisiana coastal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, Christopher; Turner, R. Eugene

    1987-11-01

    Returning canal spoil banks into canals, or backfilling, is used in Louisiana marshes to mitigate damage caused by dredging for oil and gas extraction. We evaluated 33 canals backfilled through July 1984 to assess the success of habitat restoration. We determined restoration success by examining canal depth, vegetation recolonization, and regraded spoil bank soils after backfilling. Restoration success depended on: marsh type, canal location, canal age, marsh soil characteristics, the presence or absence of a plug at the canal mouth, whether mitigation was on- or off-site, and dredge operator performance. Backfilling reduced median canal depth from 2.4 to 1.1 m, restored marsh vegetation on the backfilled spoil bank, but did not restore emergent marsh vegetation in the canal because of the lack of sufficient spoil material to fill the canal and time. Median percentage of cover of marsh vegetation on the canal spoil banks was 51.6%. Median percentage of cover in the canal was 0.7%. The organic matter and water content of spoil bank soils were restored to values intermediate between spoil bank levels and predredging marsh conditions. The average percentage of cover of marsh vegetation on backfilled spoil banks was highest in intermediate marshes (68.6%) and lowest in fresh (34.7%) and salt marshes (33.9%). Average canal depth was greatest in intermediate marshes (1.50 m) and least in fresh marshes (0.85 m). Canals backfilled in the Chenier Plain of western Louisiana were shallower (average depth = 0.61 m) than in the eastern Deltaic Plain (mean depth range = 1.08 to 1.30 m), probably because of differences in sediment type, lower subsidence rate, and lower tidal exchange in the Chenier Plain. Canals backfilled in marshes with more organic soils were deeper, probably as a result of greater loss of spoil volume caused by oxidation of soil organic matter. Canals ten or more years old at the time of backfilling had shallower depths after backfilling. Depths varied widely

  16. 30 CFR 816.104 - Backfilling and grading: Thin overburden.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....104 Section 816.104 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.104 Backfilling and grading: Thin overburden. (a) Definition. Thin overburden means insufficient spoil and other waste materials available from the entire permit area to...

  17. Coupled analysis of a backfill hydration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, E. E.; Lloret, A.; Delahaye, C. H.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Volckaert, G.

    1998-01-01

    BACCHUS2 in situ isothermal wetting experiment has been analysed by means of a coupled flow-deformation approach. Backfill material, a mixture of Boom clay powder and high density pellets, has been extensively tested in the laboratory in order to determine its hydraulic and mechanical properties. Parameters of constitutive equations were derived from this experimental data base. Two mechanical constitutive models have been used in the simulation of the in situ experiment: a state surface approach and an elastoplastic model. Calculations have shown several features of the hydration process which help to understand the behaviour of expansive clay barriers. Predictions using both models have been compared with each other and with actual measurement records. This has allowed a discussion of the comparative mertis of both approaches and the identification of some critical parameters of backfill behaviour. Overall agreement between calculations and field measurements is encouraging and shows the potential of the methods developed to model the behaviour of engineered clay barriers in the context of nuclear waste disposal.

  18. Functional Nanocomposites Formed by Two-step Back-filling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Theodore J.

    This thesis investigates the synthesis and properties of nanocomposite materials comprised of inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) combined with a complementary organic compound utilizing sequential two-step synthesis methods. We demonstrate an enhancement in the mechanical and optical properties of electrophoreticially deposited (EPD) cadmium selendide (CdSe) nanocrystal (NC) films through post-deposition addition of organic ligand molecules and polymeric precursor molecules (monomers). Specifically we show that when these organic compounds are added (i.e. back-filled) into the as-deposited, wet EPD NC film, that fracture in the dried film is suppressed and photoluminscent (PL) efficiency of the inorganic NC phase is greatly increased. We go on to study the synthesis and properties of a novel nanocomposite comprised of inorganic NCs back-filled into a mat of semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) [P3HT] nanowires. P3HT nanowire films are synthesized using a novel method developed as part of this thesis; where P3HT is blended with a sacrificial polymer (polystyrene, PS), leading to spontaneous demixing of the two polymers upon casting, and upon selective removal of the PS phase exposes a dense mat of P3HT nanowires. When back filled with CdSe NCs the composite material exhibits photovoltaic (PV) performance and provides a flexible platform for low-cost, hybrid organic/inorganic NC PV device fabrication. We conclude by showing how the above methods, in conjunction with novel ligand chemistry and lithographic techniques, can be utilized to create a photo-active nanocomposite consisting of lithographically defined, micron-scale, electrodes that are selectively decorated with electron-accepting NCs using EPD, and subsequently back-filled with a complementary electron-donating NC phase. The device architecture and resulting nanocomposite material is capable of lateral exciton separation on a potentially low-cost substrate.

  19. Modelling of cementitious backfill interactions with vitrified intermediate-level waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baston, Graham; Heath, Timothy; Hunter, Fiona; Swanton, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    New types of wasteform are being considered for the geological disposal of radioactive intermediate-level waste (ILW) in the UK. These include vitrified ILW products arising from the application of thermal treatment processes. For disposal of such wasteforms in a geological disposal facility, a range of concepts are under consideration, including those with a high-pH cementitious backfill (the NRVB, Nirex Reference Vault Backfill). Alternatively, a cement-based material that buffers to a less alkaline pH could be used (an LPB, Low-pH Backfill). To assess the compatibility of these potential new wasteforms with cement-based disposal concepts, it is necessary to understand their impacts on the long-term evolution of the backfill. A scoping thermodynamic modelling study was undertaken to help understand the possible effects of these wasteforms on the performance of the backfill. The model primarily considers the interactions occurring between the vitirified waste, the porewater and the backfill, within a static and (in most cases) totally closed system. The approach was simplified by assuming equilibrium between the backfill and the corroded glass available at selected times, rather than involving detailed, reactive transport modelling. The aim was to provide an understanding of whether the impacts of the vitrified wastes on backfill performance are sufficient to compromise disposal in such environments. The calculations indicated that for NRVB, the overall alkaline buffering capacity of the backfill is not expected to be impaired by interactions with vitrified waste; rather the buffering will be to less alkaline pH values (above pH 9) but for a longer period. For the LPB, slightly lower pH values were predicted in some cases. The sorption capacities of the backfills are unlikely to be impaired by interactions with vitrified ILW. Indeed they may be increased, due to the additional C-S-H phase formation. The results of this study suggest that disposal of vitrified ILW

  20. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  1. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  2. Status of Research on Magnesium Oxide Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    PAPENGUTH,HANS W.; KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BYNUM,R. VANN; WANG,YIFENG; KELLY,JOHN W.; ANDERSON,HOWARD; NOWAK,E. JAMES

    2000-07-31

    For the WIPP, chemical and physical characteristics of MgO suggest it to be the most beneficial backfill choice, particularly because it has the ability to buffer the aqueous chemical conditions to control actinide volubility. In the current experimental program, the authors are developing a technical basis for taking credit for the complete set of attributes of MgO in geochemical, hydrogeological, and geomechanical technical areas, resulting in an improved conceptual model for the WIPP such as the following. Water uptake by MgO will delay the development of mobile actinides and gas generation by microbes and corrosion. Reduced gas generation will reduce or even eliminate spallings releases. As MgO hydrates, it swells, reducing porosity and permeability, which will inhibit gas flow in the repository, in turn reducing spallings releases. Hydration will also result in a self-sealing mechanism by which water uptake and swelling of MgO adjacent to a groundwater seep cuts off further seepage. Reaction with some groundwaters will produce cementitious materials, which will help to cement waste particles or produce a cohesive solid mass. Larger particles are less likely to be entrained in a spallings release. If sufficient water eventually accumulates in a repository to support microbial gas generation, magnesium carbonate cements will form; also producing good cohesion and strength.

  3. Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    Fryxell, Glen E [Kennewick, WA; Zemanian, Thomas S [Richland, WA; Addleman, R Shane [Benton City, WA; Aardahl, Christopher L [Sequim, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA; Busche, Brad [Raleigh, NC; Egorov, Oleg B [West Richland, WA

    2009-06-30

    Backfilled, self-assembled monolayers and methods of making the same are disclosed. The self-assembled monolayer comprises at least one functional organosilane species and a substantially random dispersion of at least one backfilling organosilane species among the functional organosilane species, wherein the functional and backfilling organosilane species have been sequentially deposited on a substrate. The method comprises depositing sequentially a first organosilane species followed by a backfilling organosilane species, and employing a relaxation agent before or during deposition of the backfilling organosilane species, wherein the first and backfilling organosilane species are substantially randomly dispersed on a substrate.

  4. Tribochemical investigation of microelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Milind Sudhakar

    To achieve efficient planarization with reduced device dimensions in integrated circuits, a better understanding of the physics, chemistry, and the complex interplay involved in chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is needed. The CMP process takes place at the interface of the pad and wafer in the presence of the fluid slurry medium. The hardness of Cu is significantly less than the slurry abrasive particles which are usually alumina or silica. It has been accepted that a surface layer can protect the Cu surface from scratching during CMP. Four competing mechanisms in materials removal have been reported: the chemical dissolution of Cu, the mechanical removal through slurry abrasives, the formation of thin layer of Cu oxide and the sweeping surface material by slurry flow. Despite the previous investigation of Cu removal, the electrochemical properties of Cu surface layer is yet to be understood. The motivation of this research was to understand the fundamental aspects of removal mechanisms in terms of electrochemical interactions, chemical dissolution, mechanical wear, and factors affecting planarization. Since one of the major requirements in CMP is to have a high surface finish, i.e., low surface roughness, optimization of the surface finish in reference to various parameters was emphasized. Three approaches were used in this research: in situ measurement of material removal, exploration of the electropotential activation and passivation at the copper surface and modeling of the synergistic electrochemical-mechanical interactions on the copper surface. In this research, copper polishing experiments were conducted using a table top tribometer. A potentiostat was coupled with this tribometer. This combination enabled the evaluation of important variables such as applied pressure, polishing speed, slurry chemistry, pH, materials, and applied DC potential. Experiments were designed to understand the combined and individual effect of electrochemical interactions

  5. Behavior of Radionuclides and RCRA Elements in Tank Backfill Grouts

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.; Gillow, J.

    2006-07-01

    One approach to decommissioning emptied high-level waste tanks is to backfill them with grout. Because of the long lives and high toxicity of some of the contaminants, the chemical behavior of the contaminants in the grout need to be understood, especially as the grout ages and weathers over long times. In this paper, the sequestration of technetium and iodine in contact with two grout formulations, and their component materials, is discussed. Preliminary results are presented of experiments examining the solubility of actinides in contact with the grouts as pH is lowered and carbonate content increased, representing conditions of a weathered grout system. (authors)

  6. Radial diffusion of radiocaesium and radioiodide through cementitious backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M.; Hinchliff, J.; Drury, D.; Evans, N. D. M.; Williams, S.; Read, D.

    The function of the backfill material in a geological disposal facility (GDF) is to chemically condition the environment of the near field and thereby chemically retard the transport of the radionuclides present in the waste. This function of the backfill material is usually referred to as chemical containment. Diffusion experiments are being carried out over periods up to four years to assess the diffusion of Cs, Ni, Eu, Th, U and I (as I-) through Nirex Reference Vault Backfill (NRVB). The method uses cylinders of NRVB (40 mm diameter, 40-45 mm height) which can be doped via a central well with the radionuclides of interest. Diffusion occurs radially into a surrounding solution already pre-equilibrated with the cement. This paper shows the results obtained during the first two years for experiments undertaken using 137Cs and 125I- tracers with and without carrier. Comparison is made to tritiated water under identical experimental conditions. Breakthrough of Cs and I- occurred within the first week of the experiments, reaching steady state in the surrounding solution after 20-50 days. The maximum concentrations expected from the original inventories based on a simple dilution calculation have not been reached, indicating that retention in the matrix has occurred; ranging from 10% to 40% for Cs, and up to 50% for I-. Corresponding experiments using a solution containing cellulose degradation products (CDP) showed an increased diffusion for both Cs and I. Migration profiles have been obtained and the relative retention of each radionuclide has been confirmed using digital autoradiography. The results indicate that, for both isotopes, migration occurs through the cement matrix rather than through microfissures. However, whereas Cs is homogeneously distributed within the blocks, there is evidence of zones of preferential I- accumulation even where concentrations in solution have reached steady state. Transport modelling using GoldSim has replicated experimental

  7. Backfilling with guarantees granted upon job submission.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bunde, David P.; Lindsay, Alexander M.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Galloway-Carson, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present scheduling algorithms that simultaneously support guaranteed starting times and favor jobs with system desired traits. To achieve the first of these goals, our algorithms keep a profile with potential starting times for every unfinished job and never move these starting times later, just as in Conservative Backfilling. To achieve the second, they exploit previously unrecognized flexibility in the handling of holes opened in this profile when jobs finish early. We find that, with one choice of job selection function, our algorithms can consistently yield a lower average waiting time than Conservative Backfilling while still providing a guaranteed start time to each job as it arrives. In fact, in most cases, the algorithms give a lower average waiting time than the more aggressive EASY backfilling algorithm, which does not provide guaranteed start times. Alternately, with a different choice of job selection function, our algorithms can focus the benefit on the widest submitted jobs, the reason for the existence of parallel systems. In this case, these jobs experience significantly lower waiting time than Conservative Backfilling with minimal impact on other jobs.

  8. Identification and evaluation of appropriate backfills for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bynum, R.V.; Stockman, C.; Papenguth, H.

    1998-08-01

    A backfill system has been designed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) which will control the chemical environment of the post-closure repository to a domain where the actinide solubility is within its lowest region. The actinide solubility is highly dependent on the chemical species which constitute the fluid, the resulting pH of the fluid, and the oxidation state of the actinide which is stable under the specific conditions. The use of magnesium oxide (MgO) has the backfill material not only controls the pH of the expected fluids, but also effectively removes carbonate from the system, which has a significant impact on actinide solubility. The backfill selection process, emplacement system design, and confirmatory experimental results are presented.

  9. Radon emanation from backfilled mill tailings in underground uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Patitapaban; Mishra, Devi Prasad; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekananda; Patnaik, R Lokeswara; Sethy, Narendra Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Coarser mill tailings used as backfill to stabilize the stoped out areas in underground uranium mines is a potential source of radon contamination. This paper presents the quantitative assessment of radon emanation from the backfilled tailings in Jaduguda mine, India using a cylindrical accumulator. Some of the important parameters such as (226)Ra activity concentration, bulk density, bulk porosity, moisture content and radon emanation factor of the tailings affecting radon emanation were determined in the laboratory. The study revealed that the radon emanation rate of the tailings varied in the range of 0.12-7.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1) with geometric mean of 1.01 Bq m(-2) s(-1) and geometric standard deviation of 3.39. An increase in radon emanation rate was noticed up to a moisture saturation of 0.09 in the tailings, after which the emanation rate gradually started declining with saturation due to low diffusion coefficient of radon in the saturated tailings. Radon emanation factor of the tailings varied in the range of 0.08-0.23 with the mean value of 0.21. The emanation factor of the tailings with moisture saturation level over 0.09 was found to be about three times higher than that of the absolutely dry tailings. The empirical relationship obtained between (222)Rn emanation rate and (226)Ra activity concentration of the tailings indicated a significant positive linear correlation (r = 0.95, p < 0.001). This relationship may be useful for quick prediction of radon emanation rate from the backfill material of similar nature.

  10. Roadway backfill method to prevent geohazards induced by room and pillar mining: a case study in Changxing coal mine, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Jixiong; Gao, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Coal mines in the western areas of China experience low mining rates and induce many geohazards when using the room and pillar mining method. In this research, we proposed a roadway backfill method during longwall mining to target these problems. We tested the mechanical properties of the backfill materials to determine a reasonable ratio of backfill materials for the driving roadway during longwall mining. We also introduced the roadway layout and the backfill mining technique required for this method. Based on the effects of the abutment stress from a single roadway driving task, we designed the distance between roadways and a driving and filling sequence for multiple-roadway driving. By doing so, we found the movement characteristics of the strata with quadratic stabilization for backfill mining during roadway driving. Based on this research, the driving and filling sequence of the 3101 working face in Changxing coal mine was optimized to avoid the superimposed influence of mining-induced stress. According to the analysis of the surface monitoring data, the accumulated maximum subsidence is 15 mm and the maximum horizontal deformation is 0.8 mm m-1, which indicated that the ground basically had no obvious deformation after the implementation of the roadway backfill method at 3101 working face.

  11. Backfill for iliac-crest donor sites: a prospective, randomized study of coralline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Bojescul, John A; Polly, David W; Kuklo, Timothy R; Allen, Thomas W; Wieand, Kay E

    2005-08-01

    We report on a prospective randomized study of coralline hydroxyapatite (CH) used as backfill for iliac-crest donor sites. Autogenous iliac-crest bone graft is routinely harvested for spinal fusion. Donor-site morbidity is underappreciated; the presumption is that donor sites regenerate. In this study, we assessed the biological viability of the backfill CH (Pro OsteonTM Implant 500 Hydroxyapatite Bone Void Filler; Interpore, Irvine, Calif) and compared donor-site morbidity after harvest. Twelve patients (11 men, 1 woman) were enrolled: 5 in the backfill group and 7 in the no-backfill group. As part of routine evaluations done preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively, plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) scans were used to assess bone ingrowth, and technetium bone scans were used to assess biological activity. Postoperative pain analysis was also done. Ten patients (9 men, 1 woman) completed the study. Of the 4 completers in the backfill group, 3 (75%) showed bony ingrowth on plain radiographs and CT scans at 1 year; the fourth patient showed bony ingrowth only on plain radiographs. All 4 patients showed biological activity on bone scans and reported mild pain to no pain. Of the 6 completers in the no-backfill group, 1 (17%) showed bony ingrowth on plain radiographs and CT scans. No patient showed biological activity on bone scans at 1 year. CH aids in iliac-crest healing after bone-graft harvesting by acting as a biological osteoconductive matrix. Postoperative pain at the bone-graft site is potentially reduced. More studies of larger numbers of patients are needed to assess the true long-term benefits of this material in a clinical setting.

  12. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR BACKFILL EMPLACEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) backfill emplacement system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  13. Investigation of Materials Processing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    macrosegregation. Interdendritic fluid flow occurs as a result of solidification shrinkage and the force of gravity acting on a liquid of variable density ...MATERIAL ARMYUP @ 0.$000 0$9.3•W R E 1.51 S S 6.96 -1.00 ) TEý E 4% • •e TE RATLII• -3- ’LG $T (C) Figure 22: Plot of flow stress 42 43 LOG STRAIN RATE ...plots ..................... 32 Figure 21: Plot of copper content vs distance from chill plate ................. 33 Figure 22: Plot of flow stress

  14. Bedding factors and E values for buried pipe installations backfilled with air-modified CLSM

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, T.J.; Hoopes, R.J.

    1998-10-01

    The use of controlled low strength material (CLSM) as a pipe bedding and backfill material requires characterization in terms of traditional design parameters such as bedding factors for rigid pipe and modulus of soil reaction, or E, values for flexible pipe. Triaxial compression and one-dimensional consolidation tests were conducted on two mixes of air-modified CLSM to establish parameters for use in finite element analyses of buried pipe installations. Both trial mixes contained 25 to 30% entrained air to provide flowability. The tests were conducted at ages of 16 hours, 7 days and 28 days to evaluate the change in strength and stiffness with time. Results of the tests were analyzed to fit parameters to the Duncan hyperbolic soil model with the Selig bulk modulus model. These parameters were then used in analyses of flexible and rigid pipe installations, backfilled with CLSM, to determine traditional installation design parameters. The finite element analyses indicate that bedding factors for rigid pipe installations range from 1.8, for trench installations backfilled at an age of 16 hours, to 2.5 for trench installations backfilled at an age of 28 days. Bedding factors for embankment installations of rigid pipe range from 2.5 to 4.8 for ages from 16 hours to 28 days, respectively. Values for the modulus of soil reaction (E) for installation of flexible pipe range from 7 MPa to 21 MPa (1,000 psi to 3,000 psi) for ages from 16 hours to 28 days respectively.

  15. Radiocolloid migration through backfill-surrounding porous media in semi-infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.S.; Lee, K.J.; Hwang, Y.S.

    1995-12-01

    Numerical simulation of radionuclide migration as a form of colloid in two dimentional cylindrical geometry were conducted. Due to the relatively strong filtration phenomena in backfill material of waste repository, colloid concentrations decay out very rapidly along the geosphere. Inside the backfill material, diffusional transport of radiocolloid is known to be relatively dominant than that of advection. The flow conditions of the waste repository groundwater can be represented with a dimensionless Peclet number. If the Peclet number is lower than 2, which means diffusion is dominant transport mechanism, general Finite Difference Method (FDM) cannot predict the migration behavior of the colloid exactly due to the numerical error. Instead, so called Central Difference Method (CDM) is applicable for the low Peclet number problems. outside the backfill media, where advection is the controlling transport process with Peclet number being greater than 2, the upwind numerical scheme would be a powerful tool. Most of the experiments simulating the radionuclide migration were conducted at high flow conditions, and the theoretical modelling about the experiments typically neglected the role of the diffusion in filtration mechanism. In this paper the two-dimensional CDM scheme and CDM-upwind scheme are developed to describe radio-colloid migration in two-dimensional porous media using potential flow theorem. Then the mass fluxes at a given position inside the backfill are predicted.

  16. Investigation of materials processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Douglas R.; Seetharaman, Venkat; Goetz, Robert

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in materials processing research over the 45-month period from April 1989 through December 1992. The research work included projects on measuring the interface heat transfer coefficient in casting, predicting macro-segregation in casting, hot extrusion of TiAl alloy, canned extrusion of TiAl with core insulation, visioplasticity study of 6061 Al, cold rolling of Bi-based superconductor, and die design and process modeling of Mg+B4C alloy. The processing work in the Processing Laboratory included 2,357 extrusion, forging, rolling, vacuum arc melting, vacuum induction melting, and evacuation/outgas operations. The Processing Laboratory was also relocated as part of this program and the 700-ton Lombard extrusion press was completely rebuilt and modernized.

  17. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, David J.; Groves, Oliver J.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus and method for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  18. Evacuate and backfill apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

    1984-06-27

    An apparatus and method as described for treatment of hollow articles by evacuating existing gas or gases therefrom and purging or backfilling the articles with a second gas such as helium. The apparatus includes a sealed enclosure having an article storage drum mounted therein. A multiplicity of such articles are fed singly into the enclosure and loaded into radial slots formed in the drum. The enclosure is successively evacuated and purged with helium to replace the existing gas in the articles with helium. The purged articles are then discharged singly from the drum and transported out of the enclosure.

  19. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  20. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  1. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  2. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  3. 30 CFR 819.19 - Auger mining: Backfilling and grading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. 819.19 Section 819.19 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... MINING § 819.19 Auger mining: Backfilling and grading. (a) General. Auger mining shall be conducted...

  4. 30 CFR 816.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 816.107... ACTIVITIES § 816.107 Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. (a) Surface mining activities on steep slopes... section except where mining is conducted on flat or gently rolling terrain with an occasional steep...

  5. 30 CFR 817.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 817.107 Section 817.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... ACTIVITIES § 817.107 Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. (a) Underground mining activities on steep...

  6. 30 CFR 816.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 816.107 Section 816.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.107 Backfilling and...

  7. 30 CFR 817.107 - Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Steep slopes. 817.107 Section 817.107 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.107 Backfilling an...

  8. Investigating Material Approximations in Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Steven A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2011-01-01

    During the design process, the configuration of space vehicles and habitats changes frequently and the merits of design changes must be evaluated. Methods for rapidly assessing astronaut exposure are therefore required. Typically, approximations are made to simplify the geometry and speed up the evaluation of each design. In this work, the error associated with two common approximations used to simplify space radiation vehicle analyses, scaling into equivalent materials and material reordering, are investigated. Over thirty materials commonly found in spacesuits, vehicles, and human bodies are considered. Each material is placed in a material group (aluminum, polyethylene, or tissue), and the error associated with scaling and reordering was quantified for each material. Of the scaling methods investigated, range scaling is shown to be the superior method, especially for shields less than 30 g/cm2 exposed to a solar particle event. More complicated, realistic slabs are examined to quantify the separate and combined effects of using equivalent materials and reordering. The error associated with material reordering is shown to be at least comparable to, if not greater than, the error associated with range scaling. In general, scaling and reordering errors were found to grow with the difference between the average nuclear charge of the actual material and average nuclear charge of the equivalent material. Based on this result, a different set of equivalent materials (titanium, aluminum, and tissue) are substituted for the commonly used aluminum, polyethylene, and tissue. The realistic cases are scaled and reordered using the new equivalent materials, and the reduced error is shown.

  9. Hot Gas Testing Results of Stagnant Volume Filling Through a Back-Filled RSRM Nozzle Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Andrew S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicone rubber is back-filled into RSW nozzle joints after assembly. A possible artifact of this process is the formation of small pathways through this filter leading to sensitive sealing materials within the joint. At motor ignition, hot gases fill the stagnant volumes within the joint through this path. A series of 14 test has been completed studying this scenario and providing anchoring data for thermal/flow models. Parameters such as gas path cross section, gas path length, gas path materials, fill volume size, and post path gas spreading prior to unpingement on seal material, have been investigated. Tests were accomplished using geometry similar to RSRM nozzle joint 4 with attached volumes replicating the free volume and flow friction in the actual hardware. The test hardware simulated 8 inches of the full-scale circumference. Testing has pointed to changes required in model boundary condition assumptions and gas dynamics corrections for gas paths of this size and geometry. Areas ,where this date has provided improvement in analysis models will be covered as well as model inadequacies that require separate specialized efforts. Questions remaining after this testing and a possible direction for future testing will be suggested.

  10. Glassy materials investigated for nuclear reactor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, E. D.

    1968-01-01

    Studies determine the feasibility of preparing fuel-bearing glasses and glasses bearing neutron-absorbing materials for use as crystalline fuel and control rods for reactors. Properties investigated were devitrification resistance, urania solubility, and density.

  11. Dedicated heterogeneous node scheduling including backfill scheduling

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Robert R.; Eckert, Philip D.; Hommes, Gregg

    2006-07-25

    A method and system for job backfill scheduling dedicated heterogeneous nodes in a multi-node computing environment. Heterogeneous nodes are grouped into homogeneous node sub-pools. For each sub-pool, a free node schedule (FNS) is created so that the number of to chart the free nodes over time. For each prioritized job, using the FNS of sub-pools having nodes useable by a particular job, to determine the earliest time range (ETR) capable of running the job. Once determined for a particular job, scheduling the job to run in that ETR. If the ETR determined for a lower priority job (LPJ) has a start time earlier than a higher priority job (HPJ), then the LPJ is scheduled in that ETR if it would not disturb the anticipated start times of any HPJ previously scheduled for a future time. Thus, efficient utilization and throughput of such computing environments may be increased by utilizing resources otherwise remaining idle.

  12. State-of-the-art techniques for backfilling abandoned mine voids. Information circular/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Abandoned underground mine openings are susceptible to collapse because of the mining methods used, the character of the overburden, and the typically large wide entries with minimal roof support. The final effect of the collapse of the underground workings is surface subsidence. To reduce the probability of subsidence, methods to backfill the mine void with various types of materials have been developed. The paper describes the available technologies for subsidence abatement and discusses their operation and application.

  13. Use of Dilute Flowable Backfill for Corrosion Mitigation of Buried Pipe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Research Laboratory Dilute Flowable Backfill Properties Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) • Flowable Fill – pulverized aggregate, Portland cement...in flowable fill and native soil cement mixtures • Laboratory Analysis at ERDC-CERL – To provide comparative performance results – Evaluate several...Requirements: • Steel pipe segments to be embedded in a flowable fill and a soil-cement at Ft. Hood, TX • Periodic Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR

  14. State-of-the-art techniques for backfilling abandoned mine voids

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Abandoned underground mine openings are susceptible to collapse because of the mining methods used, the character of the overburden, and the typically large, wide entries with minimal roof support. The final effect of the collapse of the underground workings is surface subsidence. To reduce the probability of subsidence, methods to backfill the mine void with various types of materials have been developed. This US Bureau of Mines report describes the available technologies for subsidence abatement and discusses their operation and application. The basis of these abatement methods is the replacement of the mined material with mine waste. Backfilling of mine voids is the most common method of stabilization used to abate subsidence and protect surface structures. Hydraulic flushing and grouting, using remote methods from single or multiple boreholes, are the most often-used methods for the placement of backfill material. Other subsidence abatement techniques are available and may be more appropriate under different conditions. These other techniques include pneumatic stowing, either by in-mine or remote methods, and various point support methods that do not completely fill the mine void and are used for the protection of small areas of the land surface and surface structures. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  15. A methodology to assess the radionuclide migration parameters through bentonite-sand backfill in a short experimental duration

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Bentonite-Sand Backfill is a part of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) widely used in a Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) to delay migration of radionuclides from the disposed nuclear waste in a geo environment. Laboratory migration experiments have been conducted to understand the advection/diffusion mechanisms of various radionuclides through backfill and to evaluate their migration rates in order to assess the performance of EBS. Migration through backfill is an extremely slow process and the experiments are time consuming. Also, these experiments have limitations to simulate the field stress conditions. Various researchers have experienced the advantages of centrifuge modeling technique to model contaminant transport problems of geo-environment. However, no such studies have been carried out adopting this technique to model the behaviour of bentonite-sand mixture as backfill in NSDF. An attempt has been made in the present study to investigate the validity of this technique to carry out such studies. Significance of geotechnical centrifuge modeling to simulate the prototype radionuclide migration mechanisms through backfill is highlighted. This paper presents the dimensional analysis of various scale factors to construct a physical model for centrifuge tests to monitor online the migration phenomena of radionuclides through bentonite-sand mixture. Studies reveal the feasibility of the technique to evaluate the migration parameters in a short experimental duration. Such studies help in improving EBS design and assessing the long-term performance of EBS in NSDF. (authors)

  16. Investigation of Biodentine as dentine replacement material.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Josette

    2013-07-01

    Biodentine was compared to glass ionomer and resin modified cements in an "open sandwich" restoration. Fuji IX, Vitrebond and Biodentine were characterised using various techniques. The effect of etching with 35% phosphoric acid was investigated by assessment of surface topography, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, surface micro-hardness and micro-leakage using tagged carboxylated-modified fluorescent microspheres and tracing the presence of these particles with a confocal microscope. Acid etching resulted in erosion of the material surface with exposure of the glass particles in the glass ionomer-based materials. Biodentine exhibited a reduction in the chlorine peak and the calcium-silicon ratio. There was no difference in the micro-hardness in etched and un-etched materials. The FT-IR plots did not show any chemical changes caused by etching for all the materials investigated. Both Vitrebond and Fuji IX exhibited no leakage at the dentine to material interface while Biodentine exhibited leakage both when it was etched and also when the surface was left unprepared. The sandwich technique was effective and prevented micro-leakage with glass ionomer-based materials but micro-leakage occurred with Biodentine. Biodentine demonstrated both structural and chemical changes when etched with 37% phosphoric acid. Biodentine exhibited a lower calcium to silicon ratio and a reduction in the chloride peak height when etched. When used as a dentine replacement material in the sandwich technique overlayed with composite, significant leakage occurred at the dentine to material interface. On the other hand materials based on glass ionomer cement were etched successfully and no chemical and physical changes or micro-leakage were detected when the materials were used as bases under composite restorations. The micro-hardness of all the materials was unaffected by etching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. LDEF materials special investigation group's data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, John W.; Funk, Joan G.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of and contained a wide array of materials, representing the largest collection of materials flown for space exposure and returned for ground-based analyses to date. The results and implications of the data from these materials are the foundation on which future space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been tasked with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the space user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. The format and content of the data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task are discussed. The hardware and software requirements for each of the three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases.

  18. 40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING BY POWER SHOVEL IN PROGRESS. ZION NP NEGATIVE NO. 1490. PHOTOGRAPHER: PARKER, NO DATE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  19. Tire shreds as lightweight retaining wall backfill: Active conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tweedie, J.J.; Humphrey, D.N.; Sandford, T.C.

    1998-11-01

    A 4.88-m-high retaining wall test facility was constructed to test tire shreds as retaining wall backfill. The front wall of the facility could be rotated outward away from the fill and was instrumented to measure the horizontal stress. Measurement of movement within the backfill and settlement of the backfill surface during wall rotation allowed estimation of the pattern of movement within the fill. Tests were conducted with tire shreds from three suppliers. Moreover, horizontal stress at this rotation for tire shreds was about 35% less than the active stress expected for conventional granular backfill. Design parameters were developed using two procedures; the first used the coefficient of lateral earth pressure and the other was based on equivalent fluid pressure. The inclination of the sliding plane with respect to horizontal was estimated to range from 61{degree} to 70{degree} for the three types of shreds.

  20. DUSCOBS - a depleted-uranium silicate backfill for transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Pope, R.B.; Ashline, R.C.; DeHart, M.D.; Childs, K.W.; Tang, J.S.

    1995-11-30

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside storage, transport, and repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill all void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (1) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (2) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. In addition, the DUSCOBS improves the integrity of the package by acting as a packing material and ensures criticality control for the package during SNF storage and transport. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments.

  1. Stability analysis of a backfilled room-and-pillar mine

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, D.R.; Seymour, J.B.; Yanske, T.R.; McKibbin, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    Displacement and stress changes in cemented backfill and ore pillars at the Buick Mine, near Boss, MO, were monitored by engineers from the US Bureau of Mines and The Doe Run Co., St. Louis, MO. A test area in this room-and-pillar mine was backfilled to provide support when remnant ore pillars were mined. Objectives of this research were to evaluate the effect of backfill on mine stability, observe backfill conditions during pillar removal, and calibrate a numerical model to be used to design other areas of the mine. Relative vertical displacements in the backfill were measured with embedment strain gauges and vertical extensometers. Other types of instruments used were earth pressure cells (to identify loading trends in the backfill), borehole extensometers (to measure relative displacement changes in the mine roof and support pillars), and biaxial stressmeters (to measure stress changes in several support pillars and abutments). Two- and three-dimensional numeric codes were used to model the study area. With information from these codes and the installed instruments, two failed pillars were identified and rock mass properties were estimated.

  2. Investigative study of holographic recording materials development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The potential of certain cis-trans isomers and doped LiNbO3 for the holographic read/write/erase memory application was investigated. The cis-trans work involved the photochemical investigation of a number of potential materials as well as specific molecular engineering efforts on alpha-methyl stilbene and its derivatives. These efforts resulted in an increase in the change in index of refraction, and thereby, in potential recording utility, of an order of magnitude. The work on LiNbO3 was directed toward a preliminary investigation of the dynamics of the writing process. Several samples and a variety of writing conditions were investigated. An unexpected and as yet unexplained improvement in material behavior with continued recycling was observed. In addition, some effort was devoted to an analysis of the physical conditions under which several current theories of the optical damage process are valid.

  3. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  4. Assessment of strength properties of cemented paste backfill by ultrasonic pulse velocity test.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram; Karaman, Kadir; Külekçi, Gökhan

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques used in the assessment of the mechanical properties of concrete or rock materials. In this study, the effects of binder type/dosage, water to cement ratio (w/c) and fines content (<20 μm) of the tailings on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples were investigated and correlated with the corresponding unconfined compressive strength (UCS) data. A total of 96 CPB samples prepared at different mixture properties were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7, 14, 28 and 56-days of curing periods. UPV and UCS of CPB samples of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I 42.5 R) and sulphate resistant cement (SRC 32.5) initially increased rapidly, but, slowed down after 14 days. However, UPV and UCS of CPB samples of the blast furnace slag cement (CEM III/A 42.5 N) steadily increased between 7 and 56 days. Increasing binder dosage or reducing w/c ratio and fines content (<20 μm) increased the UCS and UPV of CPB samples. UPV was found to be particularly sensitive to fines content. UCS data were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. A linear relation appeared to exist between the UCS and UPV of CPB samples. These findings have demonstrated that the UPV test can be reliably used for the estimation of the strength of CPB samples.

  5. Mechanical performance and ultrasonic properties of cemented gangue backfill with admixture of fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhang, Yongliang; Liu, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Cemented gangue backfill (CGB) is prepared by mixing cement, coal gangue and water. Fly ash from the combustion of coal is commonly utilized as admixture to improve the mechanical performance and fluidity of CGB, as well as to reduce cost of preparing CGB. Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is one of the most commonly used indicators for evaluating the mechanical performance of CGB. Ultrasonic testing, which is a non-destructive measurement, can also be applied to determine the mechanical properties of cementitious materials such as CGB. So this paper investigates the UCS and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of CGB prepared at different fly ash dosage (19, 20 and 21 wt.%) and solid content (76.5, 77.5 and 78.5 wt.%), versus curing periods of 3-28 days. The UCS and UPV values of CGB increase with increasing fly ash dosage and solid content. In order to find out the correlation between the UCS and UPV values of CGB, different types (linear, logarithmic, exponential and power) of curve fitting are conducted on the CGB samples made at different solid content. An exponential relationship with the correlation coefficient of 0.959 appears to exist between the UCS and UPV for CGB samples. This obtained exponential relationship is validated to be available by performing the t- and F- tests. The results acquired by this paper are capable of providing guidance for utilizing UPV test to estimate the strength of underground CGB structures.

  6. The effect of various backfilling techniques on the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth performed apical plug with Biodentine.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kesim, Bertan; Düzgün, Salih; Tuncay, Öznur; Demirbuga, Sezer; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth that had been backfilled using different materials after using Biodentine as the apical plug material. Seventy-five single-rooted teeth were divided into five groups (n = 15). The 15 teeth in group 1 served as a negative control group and received no treatment. The remaining 60 teeth were instrumented to a #6 Peeso reamer to obtain a standard internal diameter of 1.5 mm. The apical 4 mm of 60 teeth was filled with Biodentine. The backfilling was then performed on each group as follows: group 2--no backfilling (positive control), group 3--gutta-percha, group 4--fiber post, and group 5--Biodentine. Specimens were then subjected to fracture testing. The force required to fracture each specimen was recorded, and the data were statistically analyzed. The mean fracture values of groups 1 and 4 were significantly higher than groups 2, 3, and 5 (P < 0.05). The values of groups 3 and 5 were significantly higher than group 2 (P < 0.05). The backfilling with fiber post after an apical Biodentine plug provided the highest fracture resistance among all experimental groups. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A simplified DEM numerical simulation of vibroflotation without backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. J.; Liu, W. W.; He, J.; Sun, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Vibroflotation is one of the deep vibratory compaction techniques for ground reinforcement. This method densities the soil and improves its mechanical properties, thus helps to protect people's lives and property from geological disasters. The macro reinforcement mechanisms of vibroflotation method have been investigated by numerical simulations, laboratory and in-situ experiments. However, little attention has been paid on its micro - mechanism, which is essential to fully understand the principle of the ground reinforcement. Discrete element method (DEM), based on discrete mechanics, is more powerful to solve large deformation and failure problems. This paper investigated the macro-micro mechanism of vibroflotation without backfill under two conditions, i.e., whether or not the ground water was considered, by incorporating inter-particle rolling resistance model in the DEM simulations. Conclusions obtained are as follows: The DEM simulations incorporating rolling resistance well replicate the mechanical response of the soil assemblages and are in line with practical observations. The void ratio of the granular soil fluctuates up and down in the process of vibroflotation, and finally reduces to a lower value. It is more efficient to densify the ground without water compared to the ground with water.

  8. Residual Earth Pressure on a Retaining Wall with Sand Backfill Subjected to Forced Cyclic Lateral Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Daiki; Nojiri, Minehiro; Aizawa, Hiroyuki; Tatsuoka, Fumio; Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Uchimura, Taro

    A pair of about 11 m-high soil retaining walls of an U-shaped underground reinforced concrete (RC) structure in Tokyo exhibited a large residual inward (i.e., toward the active side) displacement with potential structural damage, which became 18 cm between the tops of the two walls about three years after its completion. Noticeable settlements of the backfill were observed behind the walls. A series of small-scale model tests was performed in the laboratory to understand this field behaviour. The results from in-situ investigation and model tests showed that this wall behaviour can be attributed to a gradual increase in the residual lateral earth pressure, resulting from cyclic lateral displacements of the walls caused by a small number of relatively large seasonal thermal cyclic displacement of the RC wall facing and bottom slab of the structure, not by a great number of relatively small daily displacement. Three factors for the mechanism of this wall behaviour (i.e., ratcheting, cyclic hardening and cyclic loading-induced residual deformation of the backfill) were identified and analyzed based the model test results. The settlement in the backfill observed in the model tests is consistent with the field behaviour.

  9. Assessment of (222)Rn emanation from ore body and backfill tailings in low-grade underground uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Devi Prasad; Sahu, Patitapaban; Panigrahi, Durga Charan; Jha, Vivekanand; Patnaik, R Lokeswara

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of (222)Rn emanation from the ore and backfill tailings in an underground uranium mine located at Jaduguda, India. The effects of surface area, porosity, (226)Ra and moisture contents on (222)Rn emanation rate were examined. The study revealed that the bulk porosity of backfill tailings is more than two orders of magnitude than that of the ore. The geometric mean radon emanation rates from the ore body and backfill tailings were found to be 10.01 × 10(-3) and 1.03 Bq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. Significant positive linear correlations between (222)Rn emanation rate and the (226)Ra content of ore and tailings were observed. For normalised (226)Ra content, the (222)Rn emanation rate from tailings was found to be 283 times higher than the ore due to higher bulk porosity and surface area. The relative radon emanation from the tailings with moisture fraction of 0.14 was found to be 2.4 times higher than the oven-dried tailings. The study suggested that the mill tailings used as a backfill material significantly contributes to radon emanation as compared to the ore body itself and the (226)Ra content and bulk porosity are the dominant factors for radon emanation into the mine atmosphere.

  10. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  11. Thermophysical investigations of nanotechnological insulation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, Ákos

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, to sufficiently reduce the heat loss through the wall structures with the so-called traditional insulations (polystyrene and fibrous slabs), huge thicknesses (20 - 25 cm) must be applied. In some cases there is no place for their applications e.g.: historical or heritage builfings, since the use of nano-insulation materials (aerogel, vacuum ceramic paints) takes place. They are said to be much more efficient insulations than the above mentioned ones, since they should be used in thinner forms. In this article the thermal insulating capability of solid brick wall covered with a silica-aerogel slab with 1.3 cm, moreover with a vacuum ceramic hollow contained paint with 2 mm thick are investigated. As well as a literature review about the thermal conductivity of nano-technological insulation materials will be given. Comparison of the atomic and thermal diffusion will be also presented.

  12. Numerical Modelling of Soil Arching in a Shallow Backfill Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajna, Waldemar St.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the application of the finite element method into the modelling of soil arching. The phenomenon plays fundamental role in soil-shell flexible structures behaviour. To evaluate the influence of arching on a pressure reduction, a plain strain trapdoor under a shallow layer of backfill was simulated. The Coulomb-Mohr plasticity condition and the nonassociated flow rule were used for the soil model. The research examines the impact of the internal friction angle and the influence of the backfill layer thickness on the value of soil arching. The carried out analyses indicate that the reduction of pressures acting on a structure depends on the value of the internal friction angle, which confirms the earlier research. For a shallow backfill layer however, the reduction is only a local phenomenon and can influence only a part of the structure.

  13. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  14. Mechanic of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment are Mark Lankton (Program Manager at University Colorado at Boulder), Susan Batiste (research assistance, UCB), and Stein Sture (principal investigator). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  15. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  16. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  17. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  18. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  19. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  20. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  1. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  2. 30 CFR 816.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  3. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  4. 30 CFR 817.106 - Backfilling and grading: Previously mined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authority to be insufficient to completely backfill the reaffected or enlarged highwall. The highwall shall... used to backfill the area. Reasonably available spoil in the immediate vicinity of the remining operation shall be included within the permit area. (2) The backfill shall be graded to a slope which...

  5. Machanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  6. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  7. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  8. Machanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  9. Materials investigation of STS-3 parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Main parachute, No. 2 of SRB A-12 on STS-3, sustained damage during deployment or initial inflation that resulted in its collapse and failure to sustain load. During an investigation of the materials from this parachute, optical and scanning electron microscope analyses were conducted. This examination identified stains and abrasions on vent lines that appear to have been a result of friction contact with its flotation bag lanyard. Mechanical testing of the vent band indicated a reduction in strength of 37 percent obviously due to structural overload, heat, and ocean water exposure. It is concluded from this and other available data that entanglement of parachutes No. 1 and No. 2 during deployment caused adequate structural damage to main parachute No. 2 to render it unable to carry load.

  10. Investigating nonlinear distortion in the photopolymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malallah, Ra'ed; Cassidy, Derek; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Zhao, Liang; Ryle, James P.; Sheridan, John T.

    2017-05-01

    Propagation and diffraction of a light beam through nonlinear materials are effectively compensated by the effect of selftrapping. The laser beam propagating through photo-sensitive polymer PVA/AA can generate a waveguide of higher refractive index in direction of the light propagation. In order to investigate this phenomenon occurring in light-sensitive photopolymer media, the behaviour of a single light beam focused on the front surface of photopolymer bulk is investigated. As part of this work the self-bending of parallel beams separated in spaces during self-writing waveguides are studied. It is shown that there is strong correlation between the intensity of the input beams and their separation distance and the resulting deformation of waveguide trajectory during channels formation. This self-channeling can be modelled numerically using a three-dimension model to describe what takes place inside the volume of a photopolymer media. Corresponding numerical simulations show good agreement with experimental observations, which confirm the validity of the numerical model that was used to simulate these experiments.

  11. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOEpatents

    Beall, G.W.; Allard, B.M.

    1980-05-30

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50 to 70% by weight of quartz, 10 to 30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1 to 10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1 to 10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1 to 10% by weight of attapulgite.

  12. Backfill composition for secondary barriers in nuclear waste repositories

    DOEpatents

    Beall, Gary W.; Allard, Bert M.

    1982-01-01

    A backfill composition for sorbing and retaining hazardous elements of nuclear wastes comprises 50-70% by weight of quartz, 10-30% by weight of montmorillonite, 1-10% by weight of phosphate mineral, 1-10% by weight of ferrous mineral, 1-10% by weight of sulfate mineral and 1-10% by weight of attapulgite.

  13. Solubility constraints affecting the migration of selenium through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Evans, N D M; Read, D

    2016-03-15

    This work presents the study of the solubility of selenium under cementitious conditions and its diffusion, as SeO3(2-), through monolithic cement samples. The solubility studies were carried out under alkaline conditions similar to those anticipated in the near-field of a cement-based repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Experiments were conducted in NaOH solution, 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2, water equilibrated with a potential backfill material (Nirex reference vault backfill, NRVB) and in solutions containing cellulose degradation products, with and without reducing agents. The highest selenium concentrations were found in NaOH solution. In the calcium-containing solutions, analysis of the precipitates suggests that the solubility controlling phase is Ca2SeO3(OH)2·2H2O, which appears as euhedral rhombic crystals. The presence of cellulose degradation products caused an increase in selenium concentration, possibly due to competitive complexation, thereby, limiting the amount of calcium available for precipitation. Iron coupons had a minor effect on selenium solubility in contrast to Na2S2O4, suggesting that effective reduction of Se(IV) occurs only at Eh values below -300mV. Radial through-diffusion experiments on NRVB and in a fly ash cement showed no evidence of selenium breakthrough after one year. However, autoradiography of the exposed surfaces indicated that some migration had occurred and that selenium was more mobile in the higher porosity backfill than in the fly ash cement.

  14. Multicomponent Nanomaterials with Complex Networked Architectures from Orthogonal Degradation and Binary Metal Backfilling in ABC Triblock Terpolymers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etching and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer–inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures. PMID:25836760

  15. Multicomponent nanomaterials with complex networked architectures from orthogonal degradation and binary metal backfilling in ABC triblock terpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Cowman, Christina D.; Padgett, Elliot; Tan, Kwan Wee; Hovden, Robert; Gu, Yibei; Andrejevic, Nina; Muller, David; Coates, Geoffrey W.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2015-04-02

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etching and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer–inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Lastly, multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures.

  16. Multicomponent nanomaterials with complex networked architectures from orthogonal degradation and binary metal backfilling in ABC triblock terpolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Cowman, Christina D.; Padgett, Elliot; Tan, Kwan Wee; ...

    2015-04-02

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etchingmore » and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer–inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Lastly, multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures.« less

  17. Multicomponent Nanomaterials with Complex Networked Architectures from Orthogonal Degradation and Binary Metal Backfilling in ABC Triblock Terpolymers.

    PubMed

    Cowman, Christina D; Padgett, Elliot; Tan, Kwan Wee; Hovden, Robert; Gu, Yibei; Andrejevic, Nina; Muller, David; Coates, Geoffrey W; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2015-05-13

    Selective degradation of block copolymer templates and backfilling the open mesopores is an effective strategy for the synthesis of nanostructured hybrid and inorganic materials. Incorporation of more than one type of inorganic material in orthogonal ways enables the synthesis of multicomponent nanomaterials with complex yet well-controlled architectures; however, developments in this field have been limited by the availability of appropriate orthogonally degradable block copolymers for use as templates. We report the synthesis and self-assembly into cocontinuous network structures of polyisoprene-block-polystyrene-block-poly(propylene carbonate) where the polyisoprene and poly(propylene carbonate) blocks can be orthogonally removed from the polymer film. Through sequential block etching and backfilling the resulting mesopores with different metals, we demonstrate first steps toward the preparation of three-component polymer-inorganic hybrid materials with two distinct metal networks. Multiblock copolymers in which two blocks can be degraded and backfilled independently of each other, without interference from the other, may be used in a wide range of applications requiring periodically ordered complex multicomponent nanoarchitectures.

  18. Investigation of electromagnetic effects in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Sorin Gabriel

    A new contactless inductive technique has been developed to evaluate both thermophysical and rheological properties of metals in solid and molten states. This is based on the theory that when a conductor moves in a magnetic field, circulating eddy currents are induced and the opposing mechanical torque created is directly proportional to the electrical conductivity and size of the sample. It was determined that the damping torque T, produced by rotating a sample in a magnetic field, is T=23swLR4 B2 , where s is the electrical conductivity of the sample, w is the angular velocity of the crucible, L and R are the length and radius of the sample, respectively, and B represents the strength of the magnetic induction. The technique was applied to a series of materials, including both pure metals and alloys. The results are in excellent agreement with existing data, and new data for several alloys are presented. The technique can also be used in characterization of microstructural condition for various metals, depending on specific applications. The continuous monitoring of electrical resistivity during heat treatment is sensitive to slight modifications in the metal's microscopic structure like solute content, precipitation hardening, and increasing dislocation densities. Isothermal transformation C-curves for 3024 aluminum-copper alloy were determined based on the electrical resistivity measurements. The C-curves were supplemented with hardness and x-ray diffraction measurements. The results obtained in this investigation were in very good agreement with published literature data. In addition, an electromagnetic-based permanent-magnet probe was designed and tested for monitoring velocity (as well as the temperature) in molten metals. It is shown that, when rotating a molten metal in a DC magnetic field, the azimuthal velocity in the vicinity of the crucible is significantly different from the one in the center, which is evidence of secondary flow induced by the DC

  19. DFT investigations of hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang

    Hydrogen serves as a promising new energy source having no pollution and abundant on earth. However the most difficult problem of applying hydrogen is to store it effectively and safely, which is smartly resolved by attempting to keep hydrogen in some metal hydrides to reach a high hydrogen density in a safe way. There are several promising metal hydrides, the thermodynamic and chemical properties of which are to be investigated in this dissertation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is one of the promising metal hydrides with high hydrogen storage capacity around 7.4 wt. % and relatively low decomposition temperature of around 100 °C with proper catalyst. Sodium hydride is a product of the decomposition of NaAlH4 that may affect the dynamics of NaAlH4. The two materials with oxygen contamination such as OH- may influence the kinetics of the dehydriding/rehydriding processes. Thus the solid solubility of OH - groups (NaOH) in NaAlH4 and NaH is studied theoretically by DFT calculations. Magnesium boride [Mg(BH4)2] is has higher hydrogen capacity about 14.9 wt. % and the decomposition temparture of around 250 °C. However one flaw restraining its application is that some polyboron compounds like MgB12H12 preventing from further release of hydrogen. Adding some transition metals that form magnesium transition metal ternary borohydride [MgaTMb(BH4)c] may simply the decomposition process to release hydrogen with ternary borides (MgaTMbBc). The search for the probable ternary borides and the corresponding pseudo phase diagrams as well as the decomposition thermodynamics are performed using DFT calculations and GCLP method to present some possible candidates.

  20. Transport of soluble species in backfill and rock

    SciTech Connect

    Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.; Light, W.B.; Pigford, T.H.

    1992-03-01

    In this report we study the release and transport of soluble species from spent nuclear fuel. By soluble species we mean a fraction of certain fission product species. Our previously developed methods for calculating release rates of solubility-limited species need to be revised for these soluble species. Here we provide methods of calculating release rates of soluble species directly into rock and into backfill and then into rock. Section 2 gives a brief discussion of the physics of fission products dissolution from U0{sub 2} spent fuel. Section 3 presents the mathematics for calculating release rates of soluble species into backfill and then into rock. The calculation of release rates directly into rock is a special case. Section 4 presents numerical illustrations of the analytic results.

  1. Field Verification of Structural Performance of Thermoplastic Pipe Under Deep Backfill Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargand, S.

    2002-05-01

    This report provides information regarding the structural performance of thermoplastic pipes under relatively deep soil cover conditions. The eighteen (12 HDPE, 6 PVC) thermoplastic pipes, with diameter ranging from 30 to 60 in., were instrumented with sensors, embedded with granular backfill in shallow trenches, and subjected to 20-ft or 40-ft high soil fill for about 10 months. Their installation plans involved two types of backfill soil, three relative compactions, and varying bedding thickness to study the effects of these installation parameters on the pipe performance. Once the field performance of each test pipe was presented and discussed, comparative cross examinations of the entire field data were made to identify the effects of various installation parameters on the pipe deformations/deflections and soil pressure against pipe. A comprehensive set of soil testing was performed in the laboratory to characterize each of the three soil types that existed in the field. Results from the shear strength tests were analyzed further to obtain hyperbolic model parameter values for these soils. Three analytical methods (modified Iowa formula, elastic solutions, and finite element) were applied to evaluate their abilities to predict the field performance of the thermoplastic pipes under relatively deep soil cover. In their applications, material properties measured in the laboratory were utilized as much as possible.

  2. High-G Plastic Material Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    the material is virtually unaffected by aliphatic and aroma - tic hydrocarbons, halogenated solvents and most acid and base solutions. It is affected...addition to the properties of the bisphenol A type. The cycloaliphatic types have been produced which are synthesized by the epoxidation of the

  3. Investigations into the behaviour of radome materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Mouly, M. C.; Bhupathi Reddy, K.; Phani Raj Kumar, K.; Subba Rao, B. V.

    1984-11-01

    An analysis of radome material behavior based on thin-film analogy and on nonuniform linear-array analogy is carried out. In the first case, the computed results indicate waviness of the power reflection and transmission coefficients. It is found that the results of the two methods compare well with each other and also with those by Leaderman and Turner (1948). The use of the results in the design of radome wall thickness is considered. Experimental work is also reported.

  4. Preliminary investigations into UHCRE thermal control materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levadou, Francois; Froggatt, Mike; Rott, Martin; Schneider, Eberhard

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the initial work which has been done in the European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC) Materials and Processes Division to evaluate the effect of space environment on the thermal blankets of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Nuclei Experiment (UHCRE). Also, an account is given of the simulation of the impacts of micrometeoroids and space debris in a spare flight thermal blanket by means of plasma gun and light gas gun acceleration facilities.

  5. Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill samples from the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, R.B.; Reddy, K.J.; Vance, G.F.; Fadlelmawla, A.A.; Blaylock, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    Geochemical processes and the effects of natural organic solutes on the solubility of selenium in coal-mine backfill aquifers were investigated. Backfill and ground-water samples were collected at coal mines in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Backfill was generally dominated by aluminum (14,400 to 49,000 mg/kg (milligrams per kilogram)), iron (3,330 to 23,200 mg/kg), and potassium (7,950 to 18,000 mg/kg). Backfill saturated-paste selenium concentrations ranged from 1 to 156 mg/kg (microsiemens per kilogram). Ground-water total selenium concentrations ranged from 3 to 125 mg/L. Dissolved organic carbon in all ground-water samples was dominated by hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids (38 to 84 percent). Selenite sorption/desorption experiments were conducted using background solutions of distilled-deionized water, 0.1 molar calcium chloride, and isolated hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids. Selenite sorption was larger when 0.1 molar calcium chloride was used. The addition of hydrophilic acid decreased selenite sorption more than the addition of hydrophobic acids. Geochemical modelling was used to predict the solid phases controlling dissolved selenium concentrations and to evaluate the effects of dissolved organic carbon on selenium solubility. Results suggested that 55 to 90 percent of selenium in backfill precipitation/dissolution extracts was dominated by magnesium selenate ion pairs. Dissolved organic carbon had little effect on selenium speciation. A redox chamber was constructed to control Eh and pH in water and backfill-core sample suspensions. The response of selenite and selenate in water samples to redox conditions did not follow thermodynamic predictions. Reduction of selenate in water samples did not occur at any of the redox levels tested.

  6. Experiments investigating advanced materials under thermomechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    Many high temperature aircraft and rocket engine components experience large mechanical loads as well as severe thermal gradients and transients. These nonisothermal conditions are often large enough to cause inelastic deformations, which are the ultimate cause for failure in those parts. A way to alleviate this problem is through improved engine designs based on better predictions of thermomechanical material behavior. To address this concern, an experimental effort was recently initiated within the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program at Lewis. As part of this effort, two new test systems were added to the Fatigue and Structures Lab., which allowed thermomechanical tests to be conducted under closely controlled conditions. These systems are now being used for thermomechanical testing for the Space Station Receiver program, and will be used to support development of metal matrix composites.

  7. Investigation of New Airdrop Energy Dissipater Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    Foam Compressive strengths of molded foams wei me^ured on an Instron testing machine at a crosshead si d of 0.2 inches per minute. Testing was in...and type of pneumatogen did not greatly affect the foam’s physical properties. There was a drop in compressive strength with each drop in foam...sample, 172389, caused an increase In compressive strength over all other variables investigated. This was at 25 and 50% compression . Flameout 56CO

  8. Initial investigation of cryogenic wind tunnel model filler materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, H. F.; Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Various filler materials are being investigated for applicability to cryogenic wind tunnel models. The filler materials will be used to fill surface grooves, holes and flaws. The severe test environment of cryogenic models precludes usage of filler materials used on conventional wind tunnel models. Coefficients of thermal expansion, finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability of several candidate filler materials were examined. Promising filler materials are identified.

  9. Investigation of electrode materials for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcand, G. M.

    1971-01-01

    A number of amalgam electrode systems were investigated for possible use as high rate anodes and cathodes. The systems examined include: lithium, sodium, and potassium in Group 1, magnesium, calcium, and barium in Group 2, aluminum in Group 3, lead in Group 4, copper in Group 1b, and zinc and cadmium in Group 2b. The K(Hg) and Na(Hg) anodes in 10 VF and 15 VF (an unambiguous expression of concentration that indicates the number of formula weights of solute dissolved in a liter of solution) hydroxide solutions have proven satisfactory; some of these have produced current densities of more than 8 A/sq cm. None of the amalgam cathodes have approached this performance although the TI(Hg) has delivered 1 A/sq cm. Se(Hg) and Te(Hg) cathodes have given very stable discharges. Zn(Hg) and Cd(Hg) electrodes did not show good high rate characteristics, 200 to 300 mA/sq cm being about the maximum current densities obtainable. Both anodes are charged through a two-step process in which M(Hg) is first formed electrochemically and subsequently reduces Zn(II or Cd(II) to form the corresponding amalgam. The second step is extremely rapid for zinc and very slow for cadmium.

  10. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as...

  11. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. 816.101 Section 816.101 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.101 Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements. (a) Except as...

  12. Water migration through compacted bentonite backfills for containment of high-level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Westsik, J.H.; Hodges, F.N.; Kuhn, W.L.; Myers, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    Tests carried out with compacted sodium and calcium bentonites at room temperature indicate that bentonite backfills will effectively control water movement near a high-level nuclear waste package. Saturation tests indicate that water will rapidly diffuse into a dry bentonite backfill, reaching saturation in times on the order of tens of years. The apparent diffusion coefficient for sodium bentonite (about5 wt% initial water content) compacted to 2.1 g/cm/sup 3/ is 1.7 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//sec. However, the hydraulic conductivities of saturated bentonites are low, ranging from approximately 10/sup -11/ cm/sec to 10/sup -13/ cm/sec over a density range of 1.5 g/cm/sup 3/ to 2.2 g/cm/sup 3/. The hydraulic conductivities of compacted bentonites are at least several orders of magnitude lower than those of candidate-host silicate rocks, indicating that most flowing groundwater contacting a bentonite backfill would be diverted around the backfill rather than flowing through it. In addition, because of the very low hydraulic conductivities of bentonite backfills, the rate of chemical transport between the containerized waste and the surrounding host rock will be effectively controlled by diffusion through the backfill. The formation of a diffusion barrier by the backfill will significantly reduce the long-term rate of radionuclide release from the waste package, an advantage distinct from the delay in release resulting from the sorptive properties of a bentonite backfill.

  13. Initial Investigation of Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Model Filler Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firth, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Filler materials are used for surface flaws, instrumentation grooves, and fastener holes in wind tunnel models. More stringent surface quality requirements and the more demanding test environment encountered by cryogenic wind tunnels eliminate filler materials such as polyester resins, plaster, and waxes used on conventional wind tunnel models. To provide a material data base for cryogenic models, various filler materials are investigated. Surface quality requirements and test temperature extremes require matching of coefficients of thermal expansion or interfacing materials. Microstrain versus temperature curves are generated for several candidate filler materials for comparison with cryogenically acceptable materials. Matches have been achieved for aluminum alloys and austenitic steels. Simulated model surfaces are filled with candidate filler materials to determine finishing characteristics, adhesion and stability when subjected to cryogenic cycling. Filler material systems are identified which meet requirements for usage with aluminum model components.

  14. Cementitious backfill with high sulfur content: Physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Benzaazoua, M.; Ouellet, J.; Servant, S.; Newman, P.; Verburg, R.

    1999-05-01

    Use of cemented backfill in underground mining is common practice. The major economical benefits include increased recovery of ore and a reduction in the volume of waste requiring surface disposal. This paper presents new studies into the behavior of cemented backfill, namely, the chemical and mineralogical changes (weathering) with time that affect the mechanical strength of the fill. The weathering mechanism typically consists of sulfate attack. This process can occur rapidly during curing and depends on the binding agents used. The reaction involves dissolution of hydrated calcium phases followed by formation of expansive phases resulting in the degradation of the backfill`s mechanical properties. The use of fly ash, which is resistant to sulfate attack, generally reduces any strength deterioration. These phenomena are illustrated with a case study that demonstrates the influence of these alterations on the long-term mechanical properties of a cemented paste backfill sampled in situ.

  15. Chemical modeling of backfill composed of quartz sand, lime and an Fe-phase

    SciTech Connect

    Meike, A.; Glassley, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    The area adjacent to the waste package is an important component of the engineered barrier system in a high level radioactive waste repository. The combination of lime, quartz sand, and a phase containing reduced iron is investigated whether it can achieve reduction of oxygen in the waste emplacement drift (thereby reducin corrosion rates) and increase the pH. The simulations conducted to date have examined the following backfill options: Fe metal only, Fe metal and lime, and iron metal/lime/quartz sand in equal volume ratios. Each option was simulated under two environments: limited and unlimited air exchange with the atmosphere. Results suggest that the most important variable during the process of chemical conditioning is the amount of air exchange that occurs in the emplacement drift. The desired chemical conditioing (both oxidation potential and pH) will be far less effective in an emplacement that experiences an unlimited exchange of air with the atmosphere.

  16. Spectroscopic Investigation of Materials for Frequency Agile Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of divalent Rh, Ru, Pt, and Ir ions in alkali halide crystals are measured using pulsed nitrogen laser excitation...AD-Ai5t 73t SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGRTION OF MATERIALS FOR FREQUENCY t/ AGILE LASER SYSTEMS(U) OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV STILLWATER DEPT OF PHYSICS R C...INVESTIGATION OF MATERIALS FOR FREQUENCY AGILE LASER SYSTEMS Richard C. Powell, Ph.D. Principal Investigator Department of Physics OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

  17. Backfill-simulated moving bed operation for improving the separation performance of simulated moving bed chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Lee, Chang-Ha

    2013-10-11

    The Backfill-SMB (BF-SMB) strategy was designed to improve the separation performance of simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatography. In the BF-SMB operation, a limited amount of products from raffinate and/or extract was re-fed to the SMB circuit as a backfill-feed. Two additional operating variables, backfill ratio (BR) and backfill length (BL), were suggested to determine the amount and injection length of backfill-feed. This strategy was applied to a four-zone SMB with one column (1-1-1-1) and two columns (2-2-2-2) per zone using a binary mixture with a nonlinear isotherm. Various BF-SMB operational methods were designed to supply backfill-feed to the feed node and/or intermediate node. The separation performances of conventional SMB and BF-SMB were compared in terms of purity, recovery, and eluent consumption. The BF-SMB successfully improved the separation performance of the conventional SMB because backfill-feed led to the rich condition of the main component at each product withdrawal node. Due to the 'TMB effect' caused by backfill-feed, the BF-SMB operation was more efficient in the 1-1-1-1 configuration than in the 2-2-2-2 configuration, showing maximum improvement of 5-7% purity and recovery from the performance of conventional SMB. In addition, partial recycling of eluent by backfill-feed resulted in a decrease in eluent consumption up to 10% even with improved purity and recovery in BF-SMB.

  18. The solubility of nickel and its migration through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility for nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Holt, J D; Taylor, S E; Read, D

    2016-08-15

    This work describes the solubility of nickel under the alkaline conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious repository for intermediate level nuclear waste. The measured solubility of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solution is similar to values obtained in water equilibrated with a bespoke cementitious backfill material, on the order of 5×10(-7)M. Solubility in 0.02M NaOH is one order of magnitude lower. For all solutions, the solubility limiting phase is Ni(OH)2; powder X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy indicate that differences in crystallinity are the likely cause of the lower solubility observed in NaOH. The presence of cellulose degradation products causes an increase in the solubility of Ni by approximately one order of magnitude. The organic compounds significantly increase the rate of Ni transport under advective conditions and show measurable diffusive transport through intact monoliths of the cementitious backfill material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Method of investigation of deformations of solids of incompressible materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrakhmanova, A. I.; Garifullin, I. R.; Sultanov, L. U.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is development mathematical models, algorithm for the investigation stress-strain state of elastic solids, taking into account the incompressibility materials. The constitutive equations are received using a potential energy of deformations. The system of the linear algebraic equations is received by linearization of a resolving equation. The penalty method is applied for a modelling of the incompressibility of the material. The finite element method is used for numerical solution of the problems.

  20. Investigation of thermal properties of raw materials of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géber, R.; Simon, A.; Kocserha, I.

    2017-02-01

    Asphalt mixtures are composite materials, which are made of different grades of mineral aggregates and bitumen. During the mixing process mineral materials were blended with bitumen at relatively high temperature (∼200 °C). As the binding process come off in these higher temperature range, thermal properties of asphaltic materials are important. The aim of this project is to reveal the thermal properties of raw materials. During our research two types of mineral aggregates were tested (limestone and dolomite) by different methods. Differential thermal analysis, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity were investigated at technologically important temperatures. The results showed that the structure of mineral materials did not change at elevated temperatures, expansion of samples was neglible, while thermal conductivity changed by temperature.

  1. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining activities... State program approval process. (b) The regulatory authority may extend the time allowed for rough...

  2. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining activities... State program approval process. (b) The regulatory authority may extend the time allowed for rough...

  3. 30 CFR 816.101 - Backfilling and grading: Time and distance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provided in paragraph (b) of this section, rough backfilling and grading for surface mining activities... State program approval process. (b) The regulatory authority may extend the time allowed for rough...

  4. Investigation of novel inorganic resist materials for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysak, Marie E.; Blackwell, James M.; Putna, Steve E.; Leeson, Michael J.; Younkin, Todd R.; Harlson, Shane; Frasure, Kent; Gstrein, Florian

    2014-04-01

    Recently, both PSI1 and ASML2 illustrated champion EUVL resolution using slow, non-chemically amplified inorganic resists. However, the requirements for EUVL manufacturing require simultaneous delivery of high resolution, good sensitivity, and low line edge/width roughness (LER/LWR) on commercial grade hardware. As a result, we believe that new classes of materials should be explored and understood. This paper focuses on our efforts to assess metal oxide based nanoparticles as novel EUV resists3. Various spectroscopic techniques were used to probe the patterning mechanism of these materials. EUV exposure data is presented to investigate the feasibility of employing inorganic materials as viable EUV resists.

  5. Numerical and reliability analysis of gravity cantilever retaining walls backfilled with shredded tires subjected to seismic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Eleanor Lynn

    Shredded tires have been considered as a suitable alternative to conventional sand and gravel backfill materials as they offer benefits from their significantly lower unit weight, reductions in the cost of materials and construction, and because they utilize a common and potentially hazardous waste material. This research addresses some gaps in previous research in the implementation of shredded tires in this capacity by examining variation in material properties through a reliability analysis, developing an improved design technique for retaining walls tailored to shredded tire fills, and simulating how shredded tire backfill behaves in conjunction with retaining walls when subject to seismic loads. First, an in depth literature review was performed to determine previously defined material properties of shredded tires based on a myriad of standard and specialized lab tests performed for many sizes and types of shredded tires. Review of the literature also served to identify additional design considerations that, along with geotechnical properties and LRFD methods, were used to design a retaining wall that was optimized for use with shredded tire fills. This wall was then modeled with the shredded tire fill in the finite element software, PLAXIS, under seismic loadings and considering variations in the material properties as defined by the literature as well as utilizing different damping schemes at governing equation level and constitutive model for the materials. The conclusion was that shredded tires can be a very beneficial alternative to conventional fills and further benefit can be realized by designing walls specifically for shredded tire use thus reducing wall size and changing wall dimensions for optimum shredded tire fill performance.

  6. Response of earth-covered slabs in clay and sand backfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, S. A.; Eagles, P. S.; Baylot, J. T.

    1984-10-01

    Five tests were conducted, three static and two dynamic, on identical 2-foot-wide, one-way reinforced concrete slabs. Each slab was 2 feet long and had a span-to-effective-depth ratio of 10. Static test were conducted using water over a waterproof membrane to apply a uniform surface pressure with the test slabs surface flush, 1 foot deep in clay soil backfill, and 1 foot deep in a sand backfill. The clay and sand backfill conditions were repeated in the two dynamic tests. The reaction structure supporting the slabs was rigid enough to prevent any slab support rotation at the clamped edges. The rigid reaction structure also eliminated any inplane thrust generated by lateral earth pressures. Therefore, compressive membrane thrust was not a variable between the tests. The surface-flush static test slab failed at about 174 psi, failure in the static clay backfill test occurred at about 835-psi overpressure. The approximately fivefold increase in static capacity in the sand backfill was due to soil arching in the high-shear-strength sand backfill. Peak dynamic pressure in the dynamic sand backfill test was approximately 3,300 psi and in the dynamic clay backfill about 860 psi. These test results indicate that soil arching, both static and dynamic, is much more important than current calculations indicate at this very shallow burial depth. The dynamic tests approximately simulated 0.027- and 0.010-KT nuclear weapons at about 3,300- and 860-psi peak overpressures, respectively. Assuming a 16-foot prototype span, these weapons scale up to approximately 14 and 5 KT, respectively.

  7. Investigating the thermophysical properties of indurated materials on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Nathaniel William

    Indurated materials have been observed on the surface of Mars at every landing site and inferred from orbital remote-sensing data by the Viking, Mars Global Surveyor, and Mars Odyssey spacecraft. However, indurated materials on Mars are poorly understood because there is no ground truth for the indurated surfaces inferred from thermal remote-sensing data. I adopted two approaches to investigate indurated materials on Mars: (1) remote-sensing analysis of the Isidis basin, which shows some of the highest thermal inertia values derived from TES 1 observations, and (2) laboratory analyses of terrestrial indurated materials. To characterize the surface of the Isidis basin, I combined a variety of remote-sensing datasets, including thermal inertia data derived from TES and MO-THEMIS, TES albedo, THEMIS thermal and visible imaging, and Earth-based radar observations. From these observations I concluded that the thermal inertia values in the Isidis basin are likely the result of variations in the degree of cementation of indurated materials. To examine the thermophysical properties of indurated materials I collected four examples of terrestrial indurated materials. These included two types of gypcrete collected from a gypcrete deposit near Upham Hills, NM, clay-materials from Lunar Lake Playa, NV, and a pyroclastic material from the Bandelier Tuff near Los Alamos, NM. Despite significant differences in their physical properties and origins, all of these materials have thermal inertia values consistent with inferred indurated surfaces on Mars. There are no strong correlations between the thermal and physical properties of the collected samples due to thermal effects of the fabrics of the indurated materials. 1 Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. 2 Thermal Emission Imaging System onboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft

  8. Coronal leakage of sealer-only backfill: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, John Martin; Baco, Lina

    2005-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that AH Plus and Roeko Seal Automix (RSA) sealers alone are no less effective in preventing coronal microleakage than gutta-percha compacted with sealer. Freshly prepared sheep incisor root canals were obturated with warm gutta-percha alone, AHPlus or RSA alone, or warm gutta-percha with AH Plus or RSA (n = 20 each group). Coronal leakage was assessed under vacuum conditions with Indian ink and tooth clearing. Sealer-only backfills with AH Plus and RSA yielded significantly more dye-free canals than backfills of gutta-percha alone or with sealer (p < 0.001). Warm gutta-percha with or without sealer kept no more canals sealer free than the positive control. Mean dye penetration was 0.92% of canal length for AH Plus and RSA backfills, 27.42% for gutta-percha only backfills, 26.47% for gutta-percha with RSA and 13.92% for gutta-percha with AH Plus. Sealer only backfills allowed significantly less leakage than those including warm gutta-percha (p < 0.001). Sealer-only backfills may be a viable alternative to traditional gutta-percha and sealer compaction methods.

  9. Backfilling behavior of a mixed aggregate based on construction waste and ultrafine tailings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinli; Xiao, Chongchun; Chen, Xin

    2017-01-01

    To study the possibility of utilizing mixed construction waste and ultrafine tailings (CW&UT) as a backfilling aggregate that can be placed underground in a mine, physicochemical evaluation, proportioning strength tests, and pumpability experiments were conducted. It was revealed that mixed CW&UT can be used as a backfilling aggregate due to the complementarities of their physicochemical properties. In addition, as the results of the proportioning strength tests show, the compressive strength of a cemented CW&UT backfilling specimen cured for 28 days, with a mass fraction of 72–74%, a cement-sand ratio of 1:12, and a CW proportion of 30%, is higher than 1.0 MPa, which meets the safety requirements and economic consideration of backfilling technology in many underground metal mines, and can also be enhanced with an increase in the cement-sand ratio. The results of the pumpability experiments show that cemented backfilling slurry based on CW&UT can be transported to the stope underground with a common filling pump, with a 16.6 MPa maximum pressure, with the condition that the time of emergency shut-down is less than approximately 20 min. All in all, the research to utilize mixed CW&UT as a backfilling aggregate can not only provide a way to dispose of CW&UT but also will bring large economic benefits and can provide constructive guidance for environmental protection. PMID:28662072

  10. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  11. Investigation of Shielding Material in Radioactive Waste Management - 13009

    SciTech Connect

    OSMANLIOGLU, Ahmet Erdal

    2013-07-01

    In this study, various waste packages have been prepared by using different materials. Experimental work has been performed on radiation shielding for gamma and neutron radiation. Various materials were evaluated (e.g. concrete, boron, etc.) related to different application areas in radioactive waste management. Effects of addition boric compound mixtures on shielding properties of concrete have been investigated for neutron radiation. The effect of the mixture addition on the shielding properties of concrete was investigated. The results show that negative effects of boric compounds on the strength of concrete decreasing by increasing boric amounts. Shielding efficiency of prepared mixture added concrete up to 80% better than ordinary concretes for neutron radiation. The attenuation was determined theoretically by calculation and practically by using neutron dose rate measurements. In addition of dose rate measurements, strength tests were applied on test shielding materials. (authors)

  12. [Silica risk in construction industry: an investigation on raw materials].

    PubMed

    Bottai, M; Cini, A; Talini, D; Dini, F; Berti, S; Vincentini, M; Cosentino, E; Taddeo, D

    2007-01-01

    Typical construction activities like demolition, excavation and sanding can expose workers to silica, but there are few investigations carried out with the aim of evaluating the silica content in raw materials used for these activities (mortars, plasters, cement...). Our intervention has been directed in looking for free crystalline silica in samples of raw materials. We have measured the silica content in these materials comparing declared and real composition found in the products. Our intent was to obtain more information about the working activities which expose workers to free crystalline silica in construction industry and to highlight the silica presence in raw materials also when the companies don't declare it, against labeling rules based on Italian law D.lgs 65/03.

  13. FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill ? Unconsolidated to Consolidated.

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-28

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two-phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in other realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Models for waste release scenarios in salt back-fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and validate. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potential usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mechanics, using sieved run-of-mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (~900 psi) and temperatures to 90°C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone “FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill – Unconsolidated to Consolidated”. Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time-dependent consolidation, or creep, to various degrees. Creep volume strain-time relations obey simple log-time behavior through the range of porosities (~50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as expected. Mercury porosimetry

  14. Investigation of low velocity impact damage on filamentary composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of an investigation of the effect of low velocity impact on the residual modulus and residual strength of flat filamentary composite materials. Theoretical analysis of composite materials indicates that the modulus of the material must decrease as impact damage increases. This decrease must also correlate to the decrease in residual strength. This study attempts to verify these hypotheses. Graphite/epoxy laminates (AS4/3501-6) of various fiber orientations (8 (0 deg), 2 (+ or - 45 deg)sub 8) were impacted using a falling weight impact tester. Impact energies ranged from 0.42 to 1.55 ft-lb, with impact velocities from 2.03 to 3.98 ft/sec. The results show that there is a reduction in residual modulus of the plate as the impact energy increases.

  15. Leakage associated with single or multiple increment backfill with the Obtura II gutta-percha system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B T; Bond, M S

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare dye leakage between canals backfilled in a single increment and canals backfilled in multiple increments using the Obtura II system with two different sealers. Sixty extracted single canal teeth were decoronated, cleaned, and shaped. After master cone fit and placement of either Roth 801 or AH26 sealers, the canals were down-packed to 4 mm from working length. The teeth were then divided into 4 groups of 15: group 1--Roth 801 sealer with 1 increment of Obtura II back-fill; group 2--Roth 801 sealer backfilled in 4- to 5-mm increments; group 3--AH26 sealer with 1 increment of backfill; and group 4--AH26 sealer backfilled in 4- to 5-mm increments. After sealer set, the teeth were apicected 5 mm from working length. The apices were discarded. The coronal segments were coated with two layers of fingernail polish, except for the resected apical end. The teeth were immersed in Pelikan ink for 5 days. The teeth were then decalcified, dehydrated, and rendered transparent in methylsalicylate. Dye penetration was measured on four surfaces of each root. The mean measurements of each tooth were averaged for each group. Leakage of group 1 was 6.69; group 2, 5.39; group 3, 5.71; and group 4, 5.02. Differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). This study suggests that it may be clinically acceptable to backfill canals up to 10 mm in a single increment using sealer and the Obtura II gutta-percha system.

  16. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369].

  17. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369] PMID:27099236

  18. Investigating the Materials Limits on Coherence in Superconducting Charge Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    where the junction inductance strongly dominates. We have also investigated other materials (such as electroplated indium and aluminum) which yield...and cost of fabrication, we have had copper cavity forms electroplated (commercially) with both aluminum and indium . Despite the fact that one might...quality factors in the range approaching 100 million (or one millisecond lifetime). Another interesting feature of the indium films is that they can

  19. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-14

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. The third major topic was Non Consumable Anode (Data Base, Candidate Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented. 162 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-01

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented.

  1. Investigation of woven composites as potential cryogenic tank materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. S.; Melendez-Soto, E.; Castellanos, A. G.; Prabhakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, carbon fiber and Kevlar® fiber woven composites were investigated as potential cryogenic tank materials for storing liquid fuel in spacecraft or rocket. Towards that end, both carbon and Kevlar® fiber composites were manufactured and tested with and without cryogenic exposure. The focus was on the investigation of the influence of initial cryogenic exposure on the degradation of the composite. Tensile, flexural and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS) tests were conducted, which indicate that Kevlar® and carbon textile composites are potential candidates for use under cryogenic exposure.

  2. Assessing materials (''Getters'') to immobilize or retard the transport of technetium through the engineered barrier system at the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B E

    1999-03-15

    Current performance assessment calculations show that technetium (Tc) and neptunium (Np) will deliver the major fraction of the radiation dose to the accessible environment from the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Therefore, materials that can immobilize or delay the transport of Tc or Np (getters) are being considered for addition to either the waste-package or the backfill adjacent to the waste-package. Of the two radionuclides, Tc presents the greater challenge in identifying a suitable getter material. This report identifies several materials that warrant further consideration for immobilizing and/or sorbing Tc as additives to the backfill, and recommends active carbon and an inorganic oxide for initial testing. Other materials, such as zero valent iron, might be useful as getters if they were placed in the waste package itself, a subject that merits further investigation.

  3. Investigation of graphene-based nanoscale radiation sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Joshua A.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Hughes, Zachary; LaBella, Michael, III; Bresnehan, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Current state-of-the-art nanotechnology offers multiple benefits for radiation sensing applications. These include the ability to incorporate nano-sized radiation indicators into widely used materials such as paint, corrosion-resistant coatings, and ceramics to create nano-composite materials that can be widely used in everyday life. Additionally, nanotechnology may lead to the development of ultra-low power, flexible detection systems that can be embedded in clothing or other systems. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, exhibits exceptional electronic and structural properties, and is being investigated for high-frequency devices and sensors. Previous work indicates that graphene-oxide (GO) - a derivative of graphene - exhibits luminescent properties that can be tailored based on chemistry; however, exploration of graphene-oxide's ability to provide a sufficient change in luminescent properties when exposed to gamma or neutron radiation has not been carried out. We investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced chemical modifications and radiation damage induced shifts in luminescence in graphene-oxide materials to provide a fundamental foundation for further development of radiation sensitive detection architectures. Additionally, we investigate the integration of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with graphene-based devices to evaluate radiation induced conductivity in nanoscale devices. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of graphene transport properties to the presence of alpha particles, and discuss the successful integration of hBN with large area graphene electrodes as a means to provide the foundation for large-area nanoscale radiation sensors.

  4. Strength and ultrasonic properties of cemented paste backfill.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Yılmaz, Tekin; Külekci, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the strength (UCS) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) produced from two different mill tailings (Tailings T1 and T2). A total of 240 CPB samples with diameter×height of 5 × 10 cm and 10 × 20 cm prepared at different binder dosages (5-7 wt.%) and water-to-cement ratios (3.97-5.10) were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7, 14, 28 and 56-days of curing periods. UCS and UPV of CPB samples increased with increasing the binder dosage and reducing the w/c ratio irrespective of the sample size and tailings type. CPB samples with a diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm were observed to produce consistently higher (up to 1.69-fold) UCSs than those of 10 × 20 cm CPB samples at all binder dosages and w/c ratios. However, at the corresponding binder dosages and w/c ratios, the maximum variation of UPV between the CPB samples of 5 × 10 cm and 10 × 20 cm was only 7.45%. Using the method of least squares regression, the UCS values were correlated with the UPV values for CPB samples of 10 × 20 cm in size. A linear relation with a high correlation coefficient appeared to exist between the UCS and UPV for CPB samples. These findings suggest that the UPV is essentially independent of the sample size. In this regard, the UPV test can be suitably exploited for the rapid estimation of the strength and quality of CPB samples even using small samples with concomitant benefits of reducing sample size.

  5. Systematic investigation of silylation materials for recovery use of low-k material plasma damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Tadahiro; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Shiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Nakamura, Tomoji

    2015-07-01

    We systematically investigated the recovery ability of some silylation materials for a plasma-damaged porous silica low-k material. In order to evaluate recovery ability, the permittivity and leakage current were measured. The recovery ability is listed in ascending order as ethoxy group, disilazane group, and dimethylamino group, and materials with SiH-(CH3)2 showed a better recovery ability than those with Si-(CH3)3. Recovery mechanisms were also analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal desorption spectrometer (TDS). Clear differences in the silylation abilities were observed in the silylation rate as well as the amount of silylation. We focused on trimethylsilyldimethylamine (TMSDMA) and tetramethyldisilazane (TMDS) as the recovery material of vapor phase and both materials showed good recovery characteristics. TMSDMA showed rapid recovery because of its higher vapor pressure. TMDS effectively reduced the amount of absorbed water.

  6. Deformation Monitoring of Waste-Rock-Backfilled Mining Gob for Ground Control

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tongbin; Zhang, Yubao; Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhanhai; Ma, Shuqi

    2017-01-01

    Backfill mining is an effective option to mitigate ground subsidence, especially for mining under surface infrastructure, such as buildings, dams, rivers and railways. To evaluate its performance, continual long-term field monitoring of the deformation of backfilled gob is important to satisfy strict public scrutiny. Based on industrial Ethernet, a real-time monitoring system was established to monitor the deformation of waste-rock-backfilled gob at −700 m depth in the Tangshan coal mine, Hebei Province, China. The designed deformation sensors, based on a resistance transducer mechanism, were placed vertically between the roof and floor. Stress sensors were installed above square steel plates that were anchored to the floor strata. Meanwhile, data cables were protected by steel tubes in case of damage. The developed system continually harvested field data for three months. The results show that industrial Ethernet technology can be reliably used for long-term data transmission in complicated underground mining conditions. The monitoring reveals that the roof subsidence of the backfilled gob area can be categorized into four phases. The bearing load of the backfill developed gradually and simultaneously with the deformation of the roof strata, and started to be almost invariable when the mining face passed 97 m. PMID:28475168

  7. Deformation Monitoring of Waste-Rock-Backfilled Mining Gob for Ground Control.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongbin; Zhang, Yubao; Zhang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhanhai; Ma, Shuqi

    2017-05-05

    Backfill mining is an effective option to mitigate ground subsidence, especially for mining under surface infrastructure, such as buildings, dams, rivers and railways. To evaluate its performance, continual long-term field monitoring of the deformation of backfilled gob is important to satisfy strict public scrutiny. Based on industrial Ethernet, a real-time monitoring system was established to monitor the deformation of waste-rock-backfilled gob at -700 m depth in the Tangshan coal mine, Hebei Province, China. The designed deformation sensors, based on a resistance transducer mechanism, were placed vertically between the roof and floor. Stress sensors were installed above square steel plates that were anchored to the floor strata. Meanwhile, data cables were protected by steel tubes in case of damage. The developed system continually harvested field data for three months. The results show that industrial Ethernet technology can be reliably used for long-term data transmission in complicated underground mining conditions. The monitoring reveals that the roof subsidence of the backfilled gob area can be categorized into four phases. The bearing load of the backfill developed gradually and simultaneously with the deformation of the roof strata, and started to be almost invariable when the mining face passed 97 m.

  8. Laser vibrometry for investigation of tympanic membrane implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnert, Thomas; Kuster, Manfred; Vogel, Uwe; Hofmann, Gert; Huettenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    1996-12-01

    The human tympanic membrane has reasonably good sound sensing properties. A destroyed tympanic membrane due to middle ear diseases or traumata may be repaired by different types of grafts. Middle ear surgery mostly uses autologous temporal fascia, cartilage, or cartilage perichondrium transplants. We have investigated the acoustical and mechanical properties of these materials and compared them with human tympanic membrane by constructing an ear canal model completed by an artificial tympanic membrane. Circular stretched human fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage preparations were exposed to static pressures up to 4 kPa and white noise sound pressure levels of 70 dB. The vibrational amplitudes and displacements due to static pressure of the graft material were measured by laser Doppler vibrometry and compared. The thin materials temporal fascia and perichondrium show similar amplitude frequency responses compared to the tympanic membrane for dynamic excitation. The displacement of these materials at static pressures above 4 kPA yields a higher compliance than tympanic membrane. The acoustical and mechanical properties of cartilage transplants change with the thickness of the slices. However, the thinner the cartilage slice combined with lower stability, the more similar is the frequency response with the intact tympanic membrane. The vibration amplitudes decrease more and more for layer thicknesses above 500 micrometers. Cartilage acts as an excellent transplant material which provides a better prognosis than different materials in cases of ventilation disorders with long-term middle ear pressure changes. Large cartilage slice transplants should not exceed layer thicknesses of 500 micrometer in order to prevent drawbacks to the transfer characteristics of the tympanic membrane.

  9. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  10. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  11. Investigation of Effective Material Properties of Stony Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Carlozzi, Alex; Bryson, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    To assess the threat posed by an asteroid entering Earth's atmosphere, one must predict if, when, and how it fragments during entry. A comprehensive understanding of the Asteroid material properties is needed to achieve this objective. At present, the meteorite material found on Earth are the only objects from an entering asteroid that can be used as representative material and be tested inside a laboratory setting. Therefore, unit cell models are developed to determine the effective material properties of stony meteorites and in turn deduce the properties of asteroids. The unit cell is representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, and matrix composition inside a meteorite. The various classes under investigation includes H-class, L-class, and LL-class chondrites. The effective mechanical properties such as Young's Modulus and Poisson's Ratio of the unit cell are calculated by performing several hundreds of Monte-Carlo simulations. Terrestrial analogs such as Basalt and Gabbro are being used to validate the unit cell methodology.

  12. Strata behavior at fully-mechanized coal mining and solid backfilling face.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Chen, Zhiwei; Quan, Kai; Mei, Xiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Taking Ping Dingshan Coal Mine Group 12 as an example, this paper explains the system layout, key equipment and backfilling technology in detail. It probes into the characteristic of rock strata movement behavior and surface deformation above the gob area through in-site measurement method. The results show that as the overburden strata are effectively supported by the backfill body in mined out areas, there were no evident phenomena as first weighting or periodic weighting during mining process. Besides, influencing scope of advanced support pressure and the strata behavior degree were much smaller than that of the traditional methods of caving mining. Since overburden strata had been well supported by backfill body, it shows the posture of sinking slowly, only resulting in bending zone and minor fracture zone.

  13. The advantages of a salt/bentonite backfill for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.; Novak, C.F. ); Jercinovic, M. )

    1991-04-01

    A 70/30 wt% salt/bentonite mixture is shown to be preferable to pure crushed salt as backfill for disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report discusses several selection criteria used to arrive at this conclusion: the need for low permeability and porosity after closure, chemical stability with the surroundings, adequate strength to avoid shear erosion from human intrusion, ease of emplacement, and sorption potential for brine and radionuclides. Both salt and salt/bentonite are expected to consolidate to a final state of impermeability (i.e., {le} 10{sup {minus}18}m{sup 2}) adequate for satisfying federal nuclear regulations. Any advantage of the salt/bentonite mixture is dependent upon bentonite's potential for sorbing brine and radionuclides. Estimates suggest that bentonite's sorption potential for water in brine is much less than for pure water. While no credit is presently taken for brine sorption in salt/bentonite backfill, the possibility that some amount of inflowing brine would be chemically bound is considered likely. Bentonite may also sorb much of the plutonium, americium, and neptunium within the disposal room inventory. Sorption would be effective only if a major portion of the backfill is in contact with radioactive brine. Brine flow from the waste out through highly localized channels in the backfill would negate sorption effectiveness. Although the sorption potentials of bentonite for both brine and radionuclides are not ideal, they are distinctly beneficial. Furthermore, no detrimental aspects of adding bentonite to the salt as a backfill have been identified. These two observations are the major reasons for selecting salt/bentonite as a backfill within the WIPP. 39 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Recent advances in graphene family materials toxicity investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka Maria; Kurtycz, Patrycja; Olszyna, Andrzej Roman

    2012-12-01

    Recently, graphene family materials (GFMs) have been introduced among all fields of science and still get numerous attention. Also, the applicability of these materials in many areas makes them very attractive. GFMs have attracted both academic and industrial interest as they can produce a dramatic improvement in materials properties at very low filler content. This article presents recent findings on GFMs toxicity properties based on the most current literature. This article studies the effects of GFMs on bacteria, mammalian cells, animals, and plants. This article also reviews in vitro and in vivo test results as well as potential anticancer activity and toxicity mechanisms of GFMs. The effect of functionalization of graphene on pacifying its strong interactions with cells and associated toxic effects was also analyzed. The authors of the article believe that further work should focus on in vitro and in vivo studies on possible interactions between GFMs and different living systems. Further research should also focus on decreasing GFMs toxicity, which still poses a great challenge for in vivo biomedical applications. Consequently, the potential impact of graphene and its derivatives on humans and environmental health is a matter of academic interest. However, potential hazards sufficient for risk assessment first need to be investigated.

  15. Investigations of novel high dielectric materials and new mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Meng

    A high dielectric constant material with excellent dielectric properties is highly desirable for a wide range of applications, such as high energy density capacitors and optical limiting materials. High dielectric constant materials used for embedded capacitors require characteristics such as a high dielectric constant (>7), a low dielectric loss (<0.01) as well as good thermal stability. Some success has been made in ceramics, polymers and polymeric composites, where a large dielectric constant was obtained at low frequency. However, many of these materials possess relatively large dielectric loss and their performance is limited by their percolative nature. Organic molecules have been widely investigated for various applications. However, the use of organic molecules toward obtaining large dielectric constant at high operational frequencies is a relatively new approach. Hyperelectronic polarization has been suggested as the main contributor to the high dielectric constant found in polyacene quinone radical (PAQR) polymers (e.g. 14000 at 100Hz for a PAQR polymer) by Pohl and his co-workers. However, the physics underlying this polarization mechanism is not well understood so far. In addition, this polarization mechanism hasn't been explored in other organic systems, such as hyperbranched polymers and dendrimers yet. In my Ph.D investigations, I studied a novel strategy of creating a high dielectric constant material by utilizing the long-range delocalization in a controllable organic structure to produce hyperelectronic polarization. My studies initiated the investigation with the hyperbranched polyaniline and dendritic triarylamine. A remarkable enhancement in the dielectric response at higher frequency was obtained in comparison to linear polymer systems. For example, a dielectric constant ˜ 200 was obtained in hyperbranched polyaniline at 1MHz, which is 45 times that of linear polyaniline base (4.4+/-0.05). The enhancement is due to the extended delocalization

  16. Serial sectioning methods for 3D investigations in materials science.

    PubMed

    Zankel, Armin; Wagner, Julian; Poelt, Peter

    2014-07-01

    A variety of methods for the investigation and 3D representation of the inner structure of materials has been developed. In this paper, techniques based on slice and view using scanning microscopy for imaging are presented and compared. Three different methods of serial sectioning combined with either scanning electron or scanning ion microscopy or atomic force microscopy (AFM) were placed under scrutiny: serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, which facilitates an ultramicrotome built into the chamber of a variable pressure scanning electron microscope; three-dimensional (3D) AFM, which combines an (cryo-) ultramicrotome with an atomic force microscope, and 3D FIB, which delivers results by slicing with a focused ion beam. These three methods complement one another in many respects, e.g., in the type of materials that can be investigated, the resolution that can be obtained and the information that can be extracted from 3D reconstructions. A detailed review is given about preparation, the slice and view process itself, and the limitations of the methods and possible artifacts. Applications for each technique are also provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radon emissions during mill tailings backfill operations in a uranium mine

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, D.; Kong, E.J.C.; Lin, J.P.H. )

    1987-01-01

    Experimental measurements of airflow and radon concentrations in a part of an underground uranium mine in the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, area were used to determine total radon release rates during construction/maintenance, mining, and backfill operations. A mathematical model of the airflow and radon emissions was developed to simulate radon release in this same mine area. Calculated estimates were high by a factor of about 2.6. When calibrated using the experimental data, the simulation model predicted release rates and trends very well. Backfilling of mined-out rooms resulted in a small decrease in total radon release.

  18. Investigation of select energetic materials by differential reflection spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna Marie

    The presence of explosive or energetic materials is prevalent in today's world. Terrorists continue to target buildings and mass transit systems with explosive devices. The detection of these energetic materials is necessary to insure national security and welfare. Detection techniques such as X-ray scanners, Raman spectroscopy, Terahertz spectroscopy and ion mobility spectrometry are in current use or development; however, none of these are appropriate for all necessary applications. These techniques include. The present document provides an overview of the current detection techniques and describes a new technique for detecting energetic materials called differential reflection spectrometry (DRS). DRS essentially measures the optical absorption of energetic materials. The use of DRS has led to the discovery of previously unreported optical characteristics for some energetic compounds that are unique to the individual material. These optical characteristics consist of absorption shoulders between 270 and 420 nm, e.g. near 420 nm for 2, 4, 6 trinitrotoluene (TNT). In the presented research, the origin of the differential reflection spectra obtained was investigated using several techniques including UV-Visible spectrophotometry (transmission and reflection) and computer molecular modeling. Experimental DRS spectra of TNT, hexahydro-1,3,5 trinitro-1,3,5 triazine (RDX), octahydro 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,6 tetrazocine (HMX), 18 pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and 2, 4, 6, n-tetranitro-n-methylaniline (Tetryl) were taken and analyzed. From the experimental results and verification by molecular modeling, it was found that the absorption features observed in the redder region of the UV range (270--420 nm) are due to molecular orbital transitions in the nitro (NO2) groups of the measured explosives. These transitions only occur in specific conditions, such as high concentration solutions and solids, where the normally forbidden transitions are allowed. The unique

  19. Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2004-09-01

    Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a

  20. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  2. Isotopic, Chemical and Mineralogical Investigation's of Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    During the grant period we have concentrated on the following main topics: 1. Enstatite meteorites and original heterogeneity of Mn-53 distribution in the solar nebula. We have completed our studies of the enstatite chondrites. 2. Processes of planetary differentiation. We have completed our study of silicate clasts from the mesosiderite Vaca Muerta and found that the global Mn/Cr fractionation event that established mantle source reservoirs on the parent body of the Vaca Muerta silicate clasts occurred approx. 2 Ma after a similar event on the howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED) parent body. 3. Carbonaceous chondrites. Much effort has been devoted during the last three years to the investigation of this important class of meteorites. 4. Early solar system timescales. Based on the studies of the Mn-53 - Cr-53 isotope system in various meteorites and using results obtained with other isotope chronometers we constructed an absolute time-scale for events in the early solar system. 5.Unusual meteorites. We have studied the anomalous pallasite Eagle Station. 6. The chromium isotopic composition as a tracer for extraterrestrial material on Earth. Based on the observed difference in the Cr-53/Cr-52 ratios between Earth and the other solar system objects we developed a method for detecting cosmic materials on Earth using the Cr-53/Cr-52 ratio as a tracer.

  3. Investigation of composite materials using SLM-based phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2013-07-01

    We present a robust method to inspect a typical composite material constructed of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). It is based on optical surface contouring using the spatial light modulator (SLM)-based phase retrieval technique. The method utilizes multiple intensity observations of the wave field, diffracted by the investigated object, captured at different planes along the optical axis to recover the phase information across the object plane. The SLM-based system allows for the recording of the required consecutive intensity measurements in various propagation states across a common recording plane. This overcomes the mechanical shifting of a camera sensor required within the capturing process. In contrast to existing phase retrieval approaches, the measuring time is considerably reduced, since the switching time of the SLM is less than 50 ms. This enables nondestructive testing under thermal load. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the approach can be used to assess structural properties of technical components made from CFRP.

  4. Numerical investigation on composite material marine current turbine using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jifeng; Müller, Norbert

    2011-12-01

    A novel manufacturing approach similar to filament winding has been developed and automated and is able to produce the Composite Material Marine Current Turbines (CMMCT), which have significant advantages over traditional designs. This paper presents numerical results to investigate the performance of these turbines. The numerical approach was performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in a free stream of water with various hydrodynamic flow conditions. Static torque, extracted power and power coefficient were calculated at different rotating speeds in a free stream with various hydrodynamics flow conditions. The power coefficient of CMMCT was compared to that of traditional current turbines. The calculated results will provide a fundamental understanding of the impeller as a water turbine, and this design method is used to shorten the design process and improve the water turbine's performance.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Pyridine Derivatives as High Energy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, He; Chen, Peng-Yuan; Zhu, Shun-Guan; Li, Kun; Li, Hong-Zhen; Peng, Xin-Hua

    2014-07-01

    In this work, properties of polynitro-bridged pyridine derivatives were systemically studied at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. Gas-phase heats of formation (HOFs) for the designed compounds were calculated using isodesmic reactions, and their solid-phase HOFs were estimated using the Politzer approach. All designed compounds possess large solid-phase HOFs, larger than 700 kJ/mol. Based on the predicted crystal densities, solid-phase HOFs, and chemical energies, detonation properties were evaluated by means of Kamlet-Jacobs empirical equations. The results show that detonation velocities and pressures of all of the designed compounds are above 9.30 km/s and 40.00 GPa, respectively. In addition, bond dissociation energy (BDE) was employed to investigate their thermal stability. Considering solid-phase HOFs, detonation performance, and thermal stability, most of the designed compounds meet the requirements of high energy density materials (HEDMs).

  6. Investigating the Size Dependent Material Properties of Nanoceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Bushra B.

    Nanoceria is widely being investigated for applications as support materials for fuel cell catalysts, free radical scavengers, and as chemical and mechanical abrasives due to its high antioxidant capacity and its oxygen buffering capacity. This antioxidant or oxygen buffering capacity has been reported to be highly size dependent and related to its redox properties. However, the quantification of this antioxidant capacity has not been well defined or understood and has been often been carried out using colorimetric assays which do not directly correlate to ceria nanoparticle properties. Fabrication rules for developing materials with optimal antioxidant/oxygen buffering capacities are not yet defined and one of the limitations has been the challenge of obtaining quantitative measurements of the antioxidant properties. In this work, we create our own library of ceria nanoparticles of various size distributions by two synthesis methods: sol-gel peroxo and thermal decomposition/calcination and annealing in open atmosphere at three different temperatures. The synthesis methods and conditions produce characteristic sizes and morphologies of ceria nanoparticles. Qualitative and quantitative approaches are used for characterization and to predict reactivity. Qualitative approaches include Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements and Raman analysis while quantitative approaches include a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) Rietveld analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure crystallite sizes, lattice parameters, oxygen site occupancies, and the relative abundance of Ce(III) ions in a nanoceria sample. These methods are discussed in detail in addition to their limitations and challenges. These methods are used to predict nanocrystalline or bulk-like behavior of ceria nanoparticles. The investigation of the material properties is also extended to test the redox properties of ceria

  7. UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

    2002-06-01

    This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to

  8. Predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of cemented paste backfill from ultrasonic pulse velocity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Tekin; Ercikdi, Bayram

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the predictability of the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of cemented paste backfill (CPB) prepared from three different tailings (Tailings T1, Tailings T2 and Tailings T3) using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) test. For this purpose, 180 CPB samples with diameter × height of 5 × 10 cm (similar to NX size) prepared at different binder dosages and consistencies were subjected to the UPV and UCS tests at 7-56 days of curing periods. The effects of binder dosage and consistency on the UPV and UCS properties of CPB samples were investigated and UCS values were correlated with the corresponding UPV data. Microstructural analyses were also performed on CPB samples in order to understand the effect of microstructure (i.e. total porosity) on the UPV data. The UPV and UCSs of CPB samples increased with increasing binder dosage and reducing the consistency irrespective of the tailings type and curing periods. Changes in the mixture properties observed to have a lesser extent on the UPV properties of CPB, while, their effect on the UCS of CPB was significant. Empirical equations were produced for each mixture in order to predict the UCSs of CPB through UPV. The validity of the equations was also checked by t- and F-test. The results showed that a linear relation appeared to exist between the UPV and UCS with high correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.79) and all models were valid by statistical analysis. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses have revealed that the UPV properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties (i.e. total porosity). The major output of this study is that UPV test can be effectively used for a preliminary prediction of the strength of CPB.

  9. Strength properties of fly ash based controlled low strength materials.

    PubMed

    Türkel, S

    2007-08-25

    Controlled low strength material (CLSM) is a flowable mixture that can be used as a backfill material in place of compacted soils. Flowable fill requires no tamping or compaction to achieve its strength and typically has a load carrying capacity much higher than compacted soils, but it can still be excavated easily. The selection of CLSM type should be based on technical and economical considerations for specific applications. In this study, a mixture of high volume fly ash (FA), crushed limestone powder (filler) and a low percentage of pozzolana cement have been tried in different compositions. The amount of pozzolana cement was kept constant for all mixes as, 5% of fly ash weight. The amount of mixing water was chosen in order to provide optimum pumpability by determining the spreading ratio of CLSM mixtures using flow table method. The shear strength of the material is a measure of the materials ability to support imposed stresses on the material. The shear strength properties of CLSM mixtures have been investigated by a series of laboratory tests. The direct shear test procedure was applied for determining the strength parameters Phi (angle of shearing resistance) and C(h) (cohesion intercept) of the material. The test results indicated that CLSM mixtures have superior shear strength properties compared to compacted soils. Shear strength, cohesion intercept and angle of shearing resistance values of CLSM mixtures exceeded conventional soil materials' similar properties at 7 days. These parameters proved that CLSM mixtures are suitable materials for backfill applications.

  10. Colloids in the mortar backfill of a cementitious repository for radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Wieland, E; Spieler, P

    2001-01-01

    Colloids are present in groundwater aquifers and water-permeable engineered barrier systems and may facilitate the migration of radionuclides. A highly permeable mortar is foreseen to be used as backfill for the engineered barrier of the Swiss repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The backfill is considered to be a chemical environment with some potential for colloid generation and, due to its high porosity, for colloid mobility. Colloid concentration measurements were carried out using an in-situ liquid particle counting system. The in-house developed counting system with three commercially available sensors allowed the detection of single particles and colloids at low concentrations in the size range 50-5000 nm. The counting system was tested using suspensions prepared from certified size standards. The concentrations of colloids with size range 50-1000 nm were measured in cement pore water, which was collected from a column filled with a highly permeable backfill mortar. The chemical composition of the pore water corresponded to a Ca(OH)2-controlled cement system. Colloid concentrations in the backfill pore water were found to be typically lower than approximately 0.1 ppm. The specific (geometric) surface areas of the colloid populations were in the range 240 m2 g(-1) to 770 m2 g(-1). The low colloid inventories observed in this study can be explained by the high ionic strength and Ca concentrations of the cement pore water. These conditions are favourable for colloid-colloid and colloid-backfill interactions and unfavourable for colloid-enhanced nuclide transport.

  11. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  12. Metallurgical investigation of material from chill-water piping system

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-02-01

    The mechanical properties and microstructures of two steel pipes that were removed from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) chill-water system have been studied. Concerns for low-stress failure of aging pipes prompted a metallurgical investigation to determine the risk of using a cryogenic freeze-plug technique to isolate a section of piping for repair. The two pipes, designated S and L, were low-alloy carbon steel, with microstructures of ferrite and pearlite. Pipe S had a small grain size and a banded microstructure, whereas pipe L had a larger grain size with less pearlite, which was randomly spaced. Pipe S had a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 0{degree}C, compared to 84{degree}C for pipe L. Because of the high transition temperature and the very low level of the lower shelf, cooling to liquid-nitrogen temperature resulted in a very small margin of safety for these pipes. Therefore, this technique is not recommended for the pipe materials, and caution is advised in applying this technique to any pipe with unknown toughness properties. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  14. Investigations of advanced photochemical and photovoltaic material structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing

    In this thesis, a complete crystallization of an ordered mesoporous titania film was successfully achieved using carbon as a confining material to prevent framework deconstruction during high-temperature calcination. The resulting films were investigated for applications in water-photolysis, decomposition of organic molecules, and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC), and they showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activities. Another chemistry approach was also exploited for the synthesis of high-surface-area TiO2 for the DSSC application. Single-crystal titanium glycolate nano-ribbons were synthesized using organometallic precursors and using ethylene glycol as both solvent and template. The resulted nano-ribbons were transformed to anatase in the form of nanoparticles (<5 nm) after heat treatment without altering their macroscopic nano-ribbon morphology. These nanoparticulate anatase nano-ribbons were fabricated into a DSSC device and showed ˜8% power conversion efficiency under standard solar illumination. A new solid-state titania photovoltaic structure, surface sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell, is proposed, which may take advantage of both the solid-state junction cell and the sensitization principle from the conventional DSSC. In this new configuration, photon absorption occurs in photoreceptors deposited on the surface of an ultrathin metal-semiconductor junction Schottky diode. Photoexcited electrons are transferred to the metal and travel ballistically to and over the Schottky barrier, providing the photocurrent output. Unlike conventional solid-state cells, the semiconductor in this device serves only for majority charge transport and separation. Prototype devices were fabricated using merbromin dye molecules on a Au/TiO2/Ti multi-layer structure. An external quantum efficiency of 1.6% and an internal quantum efficiency of 10% were achieved under standard sun illumination. To eliminate the need for an organic photosensitizer, CdSe/CdS core

  15. M4FT-16LL080303052-State of Knowledge for Colloid Facilitated Radionuclide Transport and Update on Actinide Diffusion in Bentonite Backfill

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, Mavrik; Joseph, C.

    2016-08-16

    This progress report (Level 4 Milestone Number M4FT-16LL080303052) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within the Crystalline Disposal R&D Activity Number FT-16LL080303051 and Crystalline International Collaborations Activity Number FT-16LL080303061. The focus of this research is the interaction of radionuclides with Engineered Barrier System (EBS) and host rock materials at various physico-chemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. They include both chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion. The colloid-facilitated transport effort focused on preparation of a draft manuscript summarizing the state of knowledge and parameterization of colloid-facilitated transport mechanisms in support of reactive transport and performance assessment models for generic crystalline repositories. This draft manuscript is being submitted as a level 3 milestone with LANL as the primary author. LLNL’s contribution to that effort is summarized only briefly in the present report. A manuscript summarizing long-term U(VI) diffusion experiments through bentonite backfill material was recently accepted for publication; the contents of that manuscript are summarized in the present report. The Np(IV) diffusion experiments were started mid-year and are ongoing. The completion of these experiments is planned for early FY17. Our progress in quantifying Np(IV) diffusion in bentonite backfill is summarized in the present report. Our involvement with the NEA TDB project was summarized in a recent Argillite Disposal activity report. It is not included in this report.

  16. Monomethylhydrazine Propellant/Material Compatibility Investigation and Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    Handbooks Hydrazine Fuels," Volume 1, AFRPL-TR-69-149, Bell Aerospace Company, Buffalo , New York, March 1970 (70X15809/AD-507864). 3. Hazardous Materials...Spec. 0.018 Clear, colorless tarnish 50 Table A-1. (contd) Specimen Capsule Propellant Semen WeiPressu e.b S me a Weioht N/cm Decompo- Material

  17. An Investigation on Teaching Materials Used in Social Studies Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Halil Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the teaching materials employed during social studies lessons on the basis of certain variables. Specifically, the researcher tried to find out whether teachers' gender, service length, having a personal computer, receiving an in-service training regarding the use of teaching materials, having an interest on…

  18. Raman Mapping for the Investigation of Nano-phased Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouadec, G.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Baron, D.; Colomban, Ph.

    Nanosized and nanophased materials exhibit special properties. First they offer a good compromise between the high density of chemical bonds by unit volume, needed for good mechanical properties and the homogeneity of amorphous materials that prevents crack initiation. Second, interfaces are in very high concentration and they have a strong influence on many electrical and redox properties. The analysis of nanophased, low crystallinity materials is not straigtforward. The recording of Raman spectra with a geometric resolution close to 0.5 \\upmu {text{ m}^3} and the deep understanding of the Raman signature allow to locate the different nanophases and to predict the properties of the material. Case studies are discussed: advanced polymer fibres, ceramic fibres and composites, textured piezoelectric ceramics and corroded (ancient) steel.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  20. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  1. In Situ Investigations of Ion Exchange Processes in Microporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Parise, J. B.; Hanson, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    The mechanism by which ions exchange in microporous and layered solids, such as zeolites and clays for example, has important implications in areas as diverse as soil fertility and environmental remediation. A detailed characterization of the ion-exchange pathway, the structural consequences of ion exchange and the specific sites involved in the course of exchange, is desirable. A probe that is both time- and structure-sensitive allows resolution of which specific sites are involved, along with the effects of different cation types on the uptake and release of ions. In order to discern the mechanism of ion exchange, it is necessary not only to observe the course of the reaction, which can now be done routinely using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction at synchrotron sources, but also to collect dynamic diffraction data of sufficient quality to allow structure refinement using Rietveld structure refinement techniques. This at present requires the collection of monochromatic data. Tradeoffs between time-resolution, peak-to-background discrimination and structural resolution are often required and depend on the problem at hand. We have developed a number of strategies for in situ ion exchange techniques that probe both structural and kinetic information from dynamic solid media. Examples include investigations of the site-specific ion-exchange mechanism in zeolite LSX using a combination of ex situ and in situ time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, Iterative Target Transformation Factor Analysis (ITTFA) and Rietveld structural refinements. Measurement of competitive ion depletion curves showed that the newly synthesized gallosilicate TsG-1 is more selective for Sr than mineral clinoptilolite, and the structural pathway of Sr-exchange in TsG-1 was monitored by in situ and ex situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In those cases where full structure refinement is desirable using less than optimal powder diffraction data, we found it necessary to first

  2. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  3. Quasi-Static Compaction Studies for DDT Investigations: Inert Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    and Identify by block number) Compaction Melamine Porous Beds Sound Velocity Deflagration to Detonation Vickers Hardness Transition Shore Hardness...porous beds of two powdered inert materials: Teflon 7C, a highly crystalline polvmer and melamine , a molecular crystal. These two materials were...compaction measurements on melamine were funded by the NAVSEA 6.2 Explosives Block. The results and conclusions given in this report regarding the quasi

  4. Investigation of low cost material processes for liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyentat, Thinh; Kawashige, Chester M.; Scala, James G.; Horn, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    The development of low cost material processes is essential to the achievement of economical liquid rocket propulsion systems in the next century. This paper will present the results of the evaluation of some promising material processes including powder metallurgy, vacuum plasma spray, metal spray forming, and bulge forming. The physical and mechanical test results from the samples and subscale hardware fabricated from high strength copper alloys and superalloys will be discussed.

  5. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Dinakar, Devina; Kurian, Swetha S.; Bindoo, Y. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG). Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials. PMID:25165644

  6. A Fundamental Investigation into the Joining of Advanced Light Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-25

    materials to replace conventional elevated-temperature aluminum alloys (eg., 2XXX series alloys) and titanium alloys. The effective utilization of...effective utilization of Al-Fe-V-Si al- loys in structural applications as potential replacements for conventional elevated- temperature aluminum ...Fo-V- Si alloys are currently being considered as a strong candidate material to replace titanium alloys and conventional high- strength aluminum

  7. Dextran backfill tracers combined with Lucifer yellow injections for neuroanatomic studies of the leech head ganglion.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Vaughan, D K

    1996-08-01

    Several neuronal tracing substances were applied to the cut ends of leech cephalic nerves and the resulting backfills into the subesophageal ganglion (sbEG) were mapped. A 12 h incubation in 3 kDa dextrans conjugated either to a fluorochrome or to biotin (subsequently tagged with peroxidase) was satisfactory. In separate experiments, possible targets of cephalic nerve afferents (R3 Retzius neurons) were injected with Lucifer Yellow (LY) to visualize their projections. Comparison of the LY-R3 Retzius neuron map with that of the dextran-backfilled D1 nerve revealed extensive overlap in the sbEG. Experiments were performed combining the two protocols, confirming this observation. Moreover, confocal microscopy placed D1 nerve processes in close proximity to R3 Retzius neuron processes, suggesting that they could make synaptic contact with one another in the sbEG. With modifications, this method could be used to identify such contacts using electron microscopy.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of nitrogen-functionalized carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Kevin N.; Christensen, Steven T.; Nordlund, Dennis; Dameron, Arrelaine A.; Ngo, Chilan; Dinh, Huyen; Gennett, Thomas; O'Hayre, Ryan; Pylypenko, Svitlana

    2016-04-07

    Carbon materials are used in a diverse set of applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to catalysis. Nitrogen modification of carbon powders has shown to be an effective method for enhancing both surface and bulk properties of as-received material for a number of applications. Unfortunately, control of the nitrogen modification process is challenging and can limit the effectiveness and reproducibility of N-doped materials. Additionally, the assignment of functional groups to specific moieties on the surface of nitrogen-modified carbon materials is not straightforward. Herein, we complete an in-depth analysis of functional groups present at the surface of ion-implanted Vulcan and Graphitic Vulcan through the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Our results show that regardless of the initial starting materials used, nitrogen ion implantation conditions can be tuned to increase the amount of nitrogen incorporation and to obtain both similar and reproducible final distributions of nitrogen functional groups. The development of a well-controlled/reproducible nitrogen implantation pathway opens the door for carbon supported catalyst architectures to have improved numbers of nucleation sites, decreased particle size, and enhanced catalyst-support interactions.

  9. Optical investigation of molecular structure of sophisticated materials for photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyba, Marcin; Keraenen, Mikko

    2003-10-01

    Permanent development of photonics stimulates a searching for new materials, which have better optical, mechanical and electrical properties. One of the new classes of materials with large application and development potential are hybrid polymers, synthesized in sol-gel technology. Thanks to incorporation of organic components into an in organic network, a combination of advantages of both class of materials became available. Properties of hybrids may be formed in wide range. These materials can be used in photonics to produce planar waveguides, lenses, Bragg gratings and components for integrated optics. Moreover, dielectric layers, coatings and packaging are made from hybrids. Additionally, research to apply them in optical fiber sensors (including bio-sensors) and solid state lasers is underway. However, to obtain a high quality product, a strict control of its molecular structure must be ensured. This is a very difficult task, because of a sophisticated structure of hybrid polymers. To address these problems, optical, non-destructive measurement techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy were used. They are compementary methods, so their simultaneous application, as it was shown in this paper, can significantly increase the amoung of information about molecular structure of materials and process of their synthesis.

  10. Thermal analysis of sludge transport system for Argon backfill and extended transport window

    SciTech Connect

    ROMANO, T.

    2003-10-02

    This calculation, which addresses the use of argon as the backfill gas and extended periods of transfer, provides the thermal and gas generation analyses for the Sludge Transportation System (STS) under Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) for onsite transportation of the STS between the K Basins and the interim storage location (Le., T Plant). The STS is comprised of a packaging and transportation system for the removal of radioactive sludge from the K Basins.

  11. Investigating materials formation with liquid-phase and cryogenic TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Yoreo, J. J.; N. A. J. M., Sommerdijk

    2016-08-01

    The recent advent of liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and advances in cryogenic TEM are transforming our understanding of the physical and chemical mechanisms underlying the formation of materials in synthetic, biological and geochemical systems. These techniques have been applied to study the dynamic processes of nucleation, self-assembly, crystal growth and coarsening for metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles, (bio)minerals, electrochemical systems, macromolecular complexes, and organic and inorganic self-assembling systems. New instrumentation and methodologies that are currently on the horizon promise new opportunities for advancing the science of materials synthesis.

  12. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Investigations of Metal Dichalcogenide Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-25

    reactivity and wear of metal dichalcogen~e materials that are or have potential as solid state lubricants. Single crystals of MoS2 , NixMol-xS2, MoS2 .xSex...and MoS2 .xTex 1 ave been prepared to determine how chemical modifications affect the local structure and electronic properties of this lubricant) STM...images oftNi-doped MoS2 show localized electronic states due to the Ni atoms, while images of Se- and Te-doped material indicate that anion

  13. Magnetic responses to traffic related contamination recorded by backfills: A case study from Tongling City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, M. M.; Hu, S. Y.; Lin, H.; Cao, L. W.; Wang, L. S.

    2014-08-01

    With the development of urbanization and industrialization, traffic is creating a serious contamination problem. Conventional methods for contamination testing are generally expensive and time-consuming, while magnetic methods have been suggested to be an economic and non-destructive alternative. In this study, we measured magnetic properties and heavy metal contents in backfills along an urban road side in China, in situ on surface and on samples in vertical sections. Magnetic results and SEM images show the dominance of coarse magnetite, supposed to origin from human activities. Furthermore, there is an obvious decreasing trend of magnetic susceptibility (χ) and several heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb) with increasing distance from the road edge, symmetrically at both road sides, indicating that this is a typical traffic-related contamination signal. The detailed distribution patterns of χ and heavy metals exhibit slight variations in the surface data, probably due to the local topography and surface runoff due to rainfall. In vertical soil cores magnetic parameters show significant positive relationships (r = 0.88-0.99) with concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Pb, Fe). Our results suggest that backfills unaffected by the traffic contamination signal and characterized by low χ value can be chosen for contamination monitoring. Despite the complex nature of backfills and the possibility of contamination prior to their transportation to the site, they are especially important for areas where undisturbed soil is not available.

  14. Physics of Granular Materials: Investigations in Support of Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John R.

    2002-01-01

    This publication list is submitted as a summary of the work conducted under Cooperative Agreement 1120. The goal of the 1120 research was to study granular materials within a planetary, astrophysical, and astrobiological context. This involved research on the physical, mechanical and electrostatic properties of granular systems, as well as the examination of these materials with atomic force microscopy and x-ray analysis. Instruments for analyzing said materials in planetary environments were developed, including the MECA (Mars Environment Compatibility Assessment) experiment for the MSP '01 lander, the ECHOS/MATADOR experiment for the MSP '03 lander, an ISRU experiment for the '03 lander, and MiniLEAP technology. Flight experiments for microgravity (Space Station and Shuttle) have also been developed for the study of granular materials. As expressed in the publications, work on 1120 encompassed laboratory research, theoretical modeling, field experiments, and flight experiments: a series of successful new models were developed for understanding the behavior of triboelectrostatically charged granular masses, and 4 separate instruments were selected for space flight. No inventions or patents were generated by the research under this Agreement.

  15. Financial Institutions Investigated. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Elaine

    This document provides teaching guidelines and student material for a unit intended for use in high school business, consumer, or home economics programs. Time allotment is from four to six hours of classroom time. The objective of this capsule is to help students understand the basic functions of and services provided by three types of financial…

  16. Looking at, Engaging More: Approaches for Investigating Material Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Doug; Bolin, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Objects of material culture are not always those items most commonly explored in the art classroom, and are, instead, the frequently overlooked things in people's everyday world. They are the items people collect in their homes, carry with them in backpacks, purses, and pockets, and stow on shelves in the back of closets--often the things they…

  17. Investigation of the reactivity of organic materials in liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D.; Irwin, K.; Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.; Stringham, R.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of impact-ignition sensitivity and studies of the relative reactivity of t-butoxy and t-butyl peroxy radicals toward a variety of organic compounds reveal improved methods of selection of materials for safe use in a liquid oxygen environment.

  18. Roofing Materials Assessment: Investigation of Five Metals in Runoff from Roofing Materials.

    PubMed

    Winters, Nancy; Granuke, Kyle; McCall, Melissa

    2015-09-01

    To assess the contribution of five toxic metals from new roofing materials to stormwater, runoff was collected from 14 types of roofing materials and controls during 20 rain events and analyzed for metals. Many of the new roofing materials evaluated did not show elevated metals concentrations in the runoff. Runoff from several other roofing materials was significantly higher than the controls for arsenic, copper, and zinc. Notably, treated wood shakes released arsenic and copper, copper roofing released copper, PVC roofing released arsenic, and Zincalume® and EPDM roofing released zinc. For the runoff from some of the roofing materials, metals concentrations decreased significantly over an approximately one-year period of aging. Metals concentrations in runoff were demonstrated to depend on a number of factors, such as roofing materials, age of the materials, and climatic conditions. Thus, application of runoff concentrations from roofing materials to estimate basin-wide releases should be undertaken cautiously.

  19. Ultrafast laser diagnostics to investigate initiation fundamentals in energetic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrow, Darcie; Jilek, Brook Anton; Kohl, Ian Thomas; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We present the results of a two year early career LDRD project, which has focused on the development of ultrafast diagnostics to measure temperature, pressure and chemical change during the shock initiation of energetic materials. We compare two single-shot versions of femtosecond rotational CARS to measure nitrogen temperature: chirped-probe-pulse and ps/fs hybrid CARS thermometry. The applicability of measurements to the combustion of energetic materials will be discussed. We have also demonstrated laser shock and particle velocity measurements in thin film explosives using stretched femtosecond laser pulses. We will discuss preliminary results from Al and PETN thin films. Agreement between our results and previous work will be discussed.

  20. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Early time material motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two-dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory-scale hypervelocity (6 km/sec) impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed and the resulting material motions analyzed. Results show that the initial jetting of vaporized target material is qualitatively similar to experimental observation. The velocity flow field developed within the target is shown to have features quite similar to those found in calculations of near-surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model (developed to interpret the flow fields of near-surface explosion cratering calculations), shows that this model can be used to describe the flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations, provided that the flow field center is located beneath the target surface, and that application of the model is made late enough in time that most of the projectile momentum has been dissipated.

  1. New polymeric materials for photonic applications: Preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Anca; Albu, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose two types of polymeric materials synthesized by us suitable to interact by assembling with DNA in order to obtain new NLO biomaterials. The first polymer is a methacrylic chromophore with azobenzene groups and carbazolyl sequences known for their carrying principles while the second one is a copolymer of the methacrylic chromophore with a N-substituted amide. The N-substituted amide is N-acryloyl morpholine already used in biological application and also because is compatible with DNA. Spectral characterization of these materials showed charge transfer interactions depending on the solvent. The results obtained indicate that these new polymeric/copolymeric chromophores could interact with DNA in order to obtain biomaterials for photonic applications.

  2. Investigation of composite materials property requirements for sonic fatigue research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, H. V. L.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental techniques for determining the extensional and bending stiffness characteristics for symmetric laminates are presented. Vibrational test techniques for determining the dynamic modulus and material damping are also discussed. Partial extensional stiffness results intially indicate that the laminate theory used for predicting stiffness is accurate. It is clearly shown that the laminate theory can only be as accurate as the physical characteristics describing the lamina, which may vary significantly. It is recommended that all of the stiffness characteristics in both extension and bending be experimentally determined to fully verify the laminate theory. Dynamic modulus should be experimentally evaluated to determine if static data adequately predicts dynamic behavior. Material damping should also be ascertained because laminate damping is an order of magnitude greater than found in common metals and can significantly effect the displacement response of composite panels.

  3. Investigations of Novel Energetic Materials to Stabilize Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-30

    and various additives were developed in the second half of the 20th Century. The earliest such propellants were asphalt -based developed at GALCIT with...Decomposition of Energetic Materials 74. Volatile Metal Isocyanates from Flash Pyrolysis of Metal-NTO and Metal-Picrate Salts and an Application Hypothesis...pressure with 100 W/cm2 CO2 laser augmentation. Bottom row: computational simulations. Dotted line is stoichiometric level surface. References 1. Traineau

  4. Experimental investigation of the electrocaloric response in ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es'kov, A. V.; Belyavskii, P. Yu.; Anokhin, A. S.; Pakhomov, O. V.; Semenov, A. A.; Myl'nikov, I. L.; Nikitin, A. A.; Bui, M. T.; Cherkasskii, M. A.; Plotnikov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed the electrocaloric response in ferroelectric materials in nonequilibrium thermal conditions. The temperature dependences of the electrocaloric response during polarization and depolarization of ferroelectric samples based on solid solutions of barium-strontium titanate and lead magnoniobate-titanate are considered. The difference in the electrocaloric responses for polarization and depolarization, which can be as large as 5 mK, has been demonstrated experimentally.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less

  6. Experimental investigation of high velocity impacts on brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, David Isaac

    Experiments were conducted on soda lime glass and AS800 grade silicon nitride. Soda lime glass is often used in windows of military vehicles and aircraft where integrity in the event of shrapnel impacts is of vital concern. AS800 grade silicon nitride is considered one of the leading material candidates for the next generation of aircraft engine turbine blades because of its superior high temperature properties when compared with nickel based super-alloys. The suitability of these materials for their applications depends upon their response to point and planar dynamic impact loading. An experimental apparatus was constructed to fire one-sixteenth inch diameter hardened chrome steel ball bearings at 50 mm square soda lime glass blocks of thicknesses between 3 mm and 25.4 mm. Inelasticity due to the crushed zone effects the coefficients of restitution and the surface strains. The change in severity of cracking with velocity and specimen thickness is observed. Shock compression and pressure-shear experiments were conducted by means of a single stage gas gun capable of attaining impact velocities of 600 m/s. High velocity planar shock compression experiments on soda lime glass reveal a lack of spall strength, and a decrease of shear impedance and shear strength in the presence of a failure wave. The longitudinal impedance remains nearly constant. The spall strength of glass is 3.49 GPa and is sensitive to the presence of shear. Shock compression studies on silicon nitride using normal shock compression show that the material has a Hugoniot Elastic Limit of 12 GPa and that the spall strength decreases with increasing impact velocity due to damage below the HEL. The presence of inelastic deformation stops this trend, while the presence of shear increases the rate of spall strength drop by five times because of more severe microscopic damage. Experiments involving multiple shocks on silicon nitride show that material loading and unloading follows the shock Hugoniot

  7. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1998-11-03

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package. 6 figs.

  8. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1997-12-01

    A method is described for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotonically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  9. Depleted uranium as a backfill for nuclear fuel waste package

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    A method for packaging spent nuclear fuel for long-term disposal in a geological repository. At least one spent nuclear fuel assembly is first placed in an unsealed waste package and a depleted uranium fill material is added to the waste package. The depleted uranium fill material comprises flowable particles having a size sufficient to substantially fill any voids in and around the assembly and contains isotopically-depleted uranium in the +4 valence state in an amount sufficient to inhibit dissolution of the spent nuclear fuel from the assembly into a surrounding medium and to lessen the potential for nuclear criticality inside the repository in the event of failure of the waste package. Last, the waste package is sealed, thereby substantially reducing the release of radionuclides into the surrounding medium, while simultaneously providing radiation shielding and increased structural integrity of the waste package.

  10. Two dimensional layered materials: First-principle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Youjian

    Two-dimensional layered materials have emerged as a fascinating research area due to their unique physical and chemical properties, which differ from those of their bulk counterparts. Some of these unique properties are due to carriers and transport being confined to 2 dimensions, some are due to lattice symmetry, and some arise from their large surface area, gateability, stackability, high mobility, spin transport, or optical accessibility. How to modify the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional layered materials for desirable long-term applications or fundamental physics is the main focus of this thesis. We explored the methods of adsorption, intercalation, and doping as ways to modify two-dimensional layered materials, using density functional theory as the main computational methodology. Chapter 1 gives a brief review of density functional theory. Due to the difficulty of solving the many-particle Schrodinger equation, density functional theory was developed to find the ground-state properties of many-electron systems through an examination of their charge density, rather than their wavefunction. This method has great application throughout the chemical and material sciences, such as modeling nano-scale systems, analyzing electronic, mechanical, thermal, optical and magnetic properties, and predicting reaction mechanisms. Graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides are arguably the two most important two-dimensional layered materials in terms of the scope and interest of their physical properties. Thus they are the main focus of this thesis. In chapter 2, the structure and electronic properties of graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides are described. Alkali adsorption onto the surface of bulk graphite and metal intecalation into transition metal dichalcogenides -- two methods of modifying properties through the introduction of metallic atoms into layered systems -- are described in chapter 2. Chapter 3 presents a new method of tuning

  11. Investigations into distribution of lidocaine in human autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Reinhard; Arenz, Norman; Zeitz, Sten Gunnar; Pietsch, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    With screening methods in the legal medicine drugs were often detected in autopsy material. In this study the antiarrhythmic and the local anesthetic drug lidocaine could be proved in fifty-one cases and determined in different autopsy materials. For the first time the comparison of so many distribution patterns of lidocaine in human compartments was possible. A liquid-liquid extraction procedure, a standard addition method and LC/MS/MS were used for analytics. The measured concentrations in blood were in the therapeutic range or lower. The time between lidocaine application and death was given in twenty-nine cases. These data were very helpful to estimate and interpret the distribution process of lidocaine between application and death. This time exerted a crucial influence on the distribution of lidocaine in the compartments. Most of the intravenous applicated lidocaine was found in heart blood after a very short time of distribution. Afterwards the highest concentrations were measured in brain. Later the highest concentration was found in the kidney samples or in urine. If the time between lidocaine application and death is known, the results of this study can be used to deepen the knowledge of its pharmacokinetics. If this time is unknown, the circumstances and the causes of death can be better explained.

  12. [Investigation of fibrous cultural materials by infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi-yun; Du, Yi-ping; Shen, Mei-hua; Zhang, Wen-qing; Zhou, Xin-guang; Fang, Shu-ying; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Cultural fibrous material includes both important categories, i. e. textile and paper, consisting of precious cultural materials in museum, such as costume, painting, and manuscript. In recent years more and more connoisseur and conservator's concerns are, through nondestructive method, the authenticity and the ageing identification of these cultural relics especially made from fragile materials. In this research, we used attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy to identify five traditional textile fibers, alongside cotton, linen, wool, mulberry silk and tussah silk, and another five paper fibers alongside straw, wheat straw, long qisong, Chinese alpine rush and mulberry bar, which are commonly used for making Chinese traditional xuan paper. The research result showed that the animal fiber (wool, mulberry silk and tussah silk) and plant fiber (cotton and linen) were easier to be distinguished by comparing the peaks at 3 280 cm-1 belonging to NH stretching vibration and a serious peaks related to amide I to amide III. In the spectrum of wool, the peak at 1 076 cm-1 was assigned to the S-O stretching vibration absorption of cystine in wool structure and can be used to tell wool from silk. The spectrum of mulberry silk and tussah silk seems somewhat difficult to be identified, as well as the spectrum of cotton and linen. Five rural paper fibers all have obvious characteristic peaks at 3 330, 2 900 cm-1 which are related to OH and CH stretching vibration. In the fingerprint wavenumber range of 1 600 - 800 cm, the similar peaks also appeared at 1 370, 1 320 cm-1 and 1 162, 1 050 cm-1, both group peaks respectively are related to CH and CO vibration in the structure of cellulose and hemicellulose in paper fibers. Although there is more similarity of the infrared spectroscopy of these 5 paper fibers, some tiny difference in absorbance also can be found at 3 300 cm-1 and in the fingerprint range at 1 332, 1 203, and 1 050 cm-1 which are related to C-O-C vibration

  13. Infrared spectroscopic investigations of the compensatoin effect in ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vanina, E.A.; Kostyukov, N.S.

    1995-09-01

    The objective in this paper was to investigate by means of infrared spectroscopy samples of M-23 electrical porcelain ceramic after irradiation in a BOR-60 reactor with a neutron fluence of 6.5 x 10(exp 21)/square centimeter and isothermal annealing at 700 C and 1000 C for 10 hours. The work was performed on an IKS-29 spectrophotometer using samples in the form of a suspension in vasoline oil and pressed tablets with Potassium Bromide. The investigations were performed after the irradiated samples were allowed to stand for 7 years. It was found that partial amorphization of the quartz occurred.

  14. A Step Forward: Investigating Expertise in Materials Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Keith; Kim, Mija; Ya-Fang, Liu; Nava, Andrea; Perkins, Dawn; Smith, Anne Margaret; Soler-Canela, Oscar; Lu, Wang

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the textbook evaluation techniques of novice and experienced teachers, which was conducted by the Language Teaching Expertise Research Group (or LATEX) within Lancaster University's Department of Linguistics and English Language. Three ELT teachers were chosen to evaluate the student and teacher…

  15. A Step Forward: Investigating Expertise in Materials Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Keith; Kim, Mija; Ya-Fang, Liu; Nava, Andrea; Perkins, Dawn; Smith, Anne Margaret; Soler-Canela, Oscar; Lu, Wang

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating the textbook evaluation techniques of novice and experienced teachers, which was conducted by the Language Teaching Expertise Research Group (or LATEX) within Lancaster University's Department of Linguistics and English Language. Three ELT teachers were chosen to evaluate the student and teacher…

  16. {sup 129}I{sup -} and {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}-scavengers for low level radioactive waste backfills

    SciTech Connect

    Balsley, S.D.; Brady, P.V.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Anderson, H.L.

    1997-03-01

    Minimization of {sup 129}I{sup -} and {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} transport to the biosphere is critical to the success of low level radioactive waste (LLRW) storage facilities. Here we experimentally identify and classify optimal sorbent materials for inclusion in LLRW backfills. For low pH conditions (pH 4-5), Cu-sulfides and possibly imogolite-rich soils provide K{sub d}`s (surface-solution partition coefficients) of roughly 10{sup 3} ml g{sup -1} for iodide, and 10{sup 2} ml g{sup -1} for technetium. At near neutral pH, hydrotalcites, Cu-oxides, Cu-sulfides and lignite coal possess K{sub d}`s on the order of 10{sup 2} ml g{sup -1} for both iodine and technetium. At high pH (pH > 10), such as might occur in a cementitious LLRW facility, calcium monosulfate aluminate K{sub d}`s are calculated to be roughly 10{sup 2} ml g{sup -1} for both iodine and technetium.

  17. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high-temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  18. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power System (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  19. Analysis of Images from Experiments Investigating Fragmentation of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Hurricane, O

    2007-09-10

    Image processing techniques have been used extensively to identify objects of interest in image data and extract representative characteristics for these objects. However, this can be a challenge due to the presence of noise in the images and the variation across images in a dataset. When the number of images to be analyzed is large, the algorithms used must also be relatively insensitive to the choice of parameters and lend themselves to partial or full automation. This not only avoids manual analysis which can be time consuming and error-prone, but also makes the analysis reproducible, thus enabling comparisons between images which have been processed in an identical manner. In this paper, we describe our approach to extracting features for objects of interest in experimental images. Focusing on the specific problem of fragmentation of materials, we show how we can extract statistics for the fragments and the gaps between them.

  20. Microbeam Investigations of Presolar and Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.

    2005-01-01

    This grant provided three years of funding for my Cosmochemistry research program at Arizona State University. This research resulted in 11 peer-reviewed papers in six Journals and 35 abstracts to 11 Conferences and Workshops (see list below). My original proposal listed three main areas of research: 1) Studies of presolar grains; 2) Studies of short-lived radionuclides and; 3) Investigations of nebular processes and the origin of chondritic components.

  1. Investigation of Resin Systems for Improved Ablative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-04-01

    carbon/oxygen atom ratio six times larger than phenol- formaldehyde currently employed as an ablative resin . Table VIII. Carbon Content of Various... Resins Empirical C atoms/- Weight % Weight % Resin System Formula 0 atoms Carbon Hydrocarbon Epoxide C 1 9 H 2 0 0 4 19/4 73. 1 79.5 Phenol- Formaldehyde C...AFSS-A Washington, D. C. 20546 . . . . . .. . . . -" . . . . . L NASA CR-54471 4176-6014-SOOOO FINAL REPORT INVESTIGATION OF RESIN SYSTEMS FOR

  2. Experimental investigation into the erosion wear of structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhenkov, V. A.; Seleznev, L. I.; Mednikov, A. F.; Tkhabisimov, A. B.

    2014-08-01

    Results of investigations into erosion wear of Grade 20Kh13 steel with the collision velocity of rotating samples V imp = 250 m/s with the particles of monodispersed erodent d d = 800 μm are considered. Substantial distinctions in the development of the erosion process of steel of the same brand subjected to the erodent effect with the same characteristics determined by accidental (unknown) circumstances are shown.

  3. Development and investigation of functional hierarchical hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athauda, Thushara J.

    In this dissertation, a series of hierarchical hybrid materials were developed and their process-morphology-activity relationship was studied. In this context, zinc oxide was used as a model metal-oxide semiconductor for the development of branched hierarchical nanostructures on various flexible substrates including cotton, nylon, and electrospun organic and inorganic nanofibers. In all cases, well-defined, radially oriented, highly dense, uniform, and single crystalline arrays of ZnO nanostructures were successfully grown using an optimized hydrothermal growth strategy. This process involves seed solution treatment of a substrate with ZnO nanocrystals that will form nucleation sites for subsequent anisotropic growth of single crystalline ZnO nanowires by incubation in the growth solution. All ZnO nanowires exhibit wurtzite crystal structure oriented along the c-axis which was confirmed by XRD analysis. Seed-to-growth solution concentration ratio ([S]/[G]) was determined to be the most important process parameter on the morphology of the resulting nanostructures when applied to cotton and nylon surfaces. Increase in the [S]/[G] values resulted in the amount of ZnO grown on the surfaces to drop significantly, which also resulted in a morphological transform from nanorods to needle-like structures. Consequently, a strong dependency of the physical, optical, and electrochemical properties of the resulting materials was observed. In addition, room temperature photoluminescence measurements revealed that the band-gap of ZnO widened as the morphology changed from nanorods to nanoneedles. Additional analyses revealed that cotton bearing ZnO nanorods exhibits a lower propensity for contact transfer of E. coli than unmodified cotton fabric. Moreover, studies with nonwoven nanofibers generated by electrospinning revealed that the morphology of the branched nanostructures was also controlled by the density of the underlying fibrous platform. The amount of ZnO nanorods grown

  4. Investigation of the ElectroPuls E3000 Test Machine for Fatigue Testing of Structural Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Investigation of the ElectroPuls E3000 Testing Machine for Fatigue Testing of Structural Materials Lucy...of the Instron ElectroPuls E3000 for the purpose of fatigue crack growth rate testing of structural materials was conducted. The reference material ...PUBLIC RELEASE UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Investigation of the ElectroPuls E3000 Testing Machine for Fatigue Testing of Structural Materials

  5. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  6. Synthesis and Investigation of Advanced Energetic Materials Based on Bispyrazolylmethanes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dennis; Gottfried, Jennifer L; Klapötke, Thomas M; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Stierstorfer, Jörg; Witkowski, Tomasz G

    2016-12-23

    Herein we present the preparation and characterization of three new bispyrazolyl-based energetic compounds with great potential as explosive materials. The reaction of sodium 4-amino-3,5-dinitropyrazolate (5) with dimethyl iodide yielded bis(4-amino-3,5-dinitropyrazolyl)methane (6), which is a secondary explosive with high heat resistance (Tdec =310 °C). The oxidation of this compound afforded bis(3,4,5-trinitropyrazolyl)methane (7), which is a combined nitrogen- and oxygen-rich secondary explosive with very high theoretical and estimated experimental detonation performance (Vdet (theor)=9304 m s(-1) versus Vdet (exp)=9910 m s(-1) ) in the range of that of CL-20. Also, the thermal stability (Tdec =205 °C) and sensitivities of 7 are auspicious. The reaction of 6 with in situ generated nitrous acid yielded the primary explosive bis(4-diazo-5-nitro-3-oxopyrazolyl)methane (8), which showed superior properties to those of currently used diazodinitrophenol (DDNP). © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Program to investigate advanced laser processing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinan, E. M.; Snow, D. B.; Brown, C. O.

    1981-01-01

    This program included two major areas of research. In the processing area, a LAYERGLAZE (trade name) apparatus using a powder feed was developed and used to produce a 13.2 cm diameter by 3 cm thick cylindrical blank which was used as a preform for a scale model gas turbine disk. In addition to demonstrating that the process was capable of fabricating model size parts, mechanical testing and microstructural analysis of LAYERGLAZED material indicated that LAYERGLAZED parts exhibit good structural integrity and that the process produces no sizable or serious fabrication flaws provided that the alloy has adequate 'weldability' at high cooling rates. In a second major area, design of a LAYERGLAZE-processable superalloy was undertaken. With the system Ni-Al-Mo - X, numerous processable compositions were found, however, these compositions were characterized by embrittling phase transformations in the 600-800 deg temperature range. The research efforts in the alloy design area aimed at understanding and controlling this instability produced several alloys in the Ni-Al-Mo + X family which appeared to demonstrate the necessary characteristics of processability and phase stability. The mechanical properties of these alloys are being evaluated under an additional program. In addition to alloys from the above system, a number of additional alloys with high strength potentials have been developed based on other systems.

  8. Microbeam Investigations of Presolar and Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant provided three years of funding to initiate an independent research program in Cosmochemistry at Arizona State University. Because the new equipment that was installed at ASU took longer than expected to get running, the project was extended for a fourth year with no additional funding. By the time the funds were expended, we had set up an entirely new ion microprobe laboratory at ASU, and we have been fully operational for over two years. This laboratory was funded in almost equal parts by NASA, NSF, and ASU. Papers describing the first results from this new laboratory are being published now, and the results have been making an impact on the Cosmochemistry community. While this laboratory was being built, I continued my research program in collaboration with G. J. Wasserburg at Caltech. As equipment became available, I gradually shifted my research to ASU. Over the lifetime of this grant, my research program resulted in 12 papers and 13 abstracts on topics ranging from presolar grains (2 papers, 3 abstracts), short-lived radionuclides (6 papers, 6 abstracts), chemical compositions of chondritic materials (3 papers, 3 abstracts), silicon isotopic fractionation (1 abstract), and the oxygen composition of the Sun (1 paper). The most important results of this period were the discovery of presolar hibonite in a meteorite residue, the measurement of 26A1 in CAIs from enstatite chondrites, and the measurements of 10Be in type A CAIs from CV chondrites. All of these results have had a significant impact on research in Cosmochemstry.

  9. Preliminary investigations into UHCRE thermal control materials (A0178)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levadou, Francois; Froggatt, Mike; Rott, Martin; Schneider, Eberhard

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the initial work that was done in the ESTEC Materials and Processes Division to evaluate the effect of space environment on the thermal blankets of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Nuclei Experiments (UHCRE) is presented. The topics covered include: (1) a preliminary survey of the perforations of the two-thirds of the thermal blanket returned to ESTEC; (2) thermo-optical properties and thickness recessions of three samples cut from each of the third center parts of the 16 thermal blankets were measured and effects of environments (sun illumination and atomic oxygen fluences); (3) contamination was analyzed on trays, external blanket and internal aluminized Kapton foil by IR technique and scanning electron microscopy SEM/EDX examination; (4) the pattern of contamination on the Al Kapton foils was observed, sketched, and related to atomic oxygen flow; and (5) the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) yaw angle misorientation was evaluated from the contaminated areas visible on some of the trays. In addition, impacts of micrometeoroids and space debris were experimentally simulated on spare flight thermal blankets. Relations between penetration/perforation hole characteristics and projectile parameters were established.

  10. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Anlage, Steven

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  11. Investigation of Riveted Joints of Fiberglass Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielawski, R.; Kowalik, M.; Suprynowicz, K.; Rządkowski, W.; Pyrzanowski, P.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of riveted joints of composites. Using tensile tests, a series of strength investigations were conducted. The strength of composite specimens was examined with and without the presence of a feed force. The specimens were made using two types of fabric with four fiber orientations. The digital image correlation method was used to prepare their strain maps. Depending on the arrangement of fiber orientations, various composite damage models are described. Based on the failure mode of the test specimens, the least and most desirable fiber orientations are determined.

  12. Raman spectroscopic investigation of blood and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyba, M.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.; Wróbel, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports preliminary studies on use of Raman spectroscopy for investigation of blood. High quality blood spectra were recorded in-vitro with excitation wavelengths of 830 nm. Because of complex composition of the blood as well as by light attenuation and scattering in the tissues, spectra set up from wide, low-intensive Raman bands and intensive optical background. To get information about origin of bands in Raman spectra it is necessary to create phantom, which would show influence of this parameter and can be used to calibrate the Raman measurement system. Spectra of phantoms of selected blood components were acquired and discussed.

  13. Investigation of the acoustic properties of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. T.

    1987-01-01

    An effort to provide inspection of the bondlines in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) is discussed. Investigation of the bondlines in the membrane region of the SRM has centered on representative samples provided by Morton Thiokol. These samples have pull-tabs, or in one case grafoil inserts, to simulate delaminations at various points in the multilayer structure of steel case, liner, insulation, liner, and propellant. Discussed here is the continuing approach to examining these defects which is predicated on a model of an ultrasonic wave propagating in a lossy multilayer resonant structure, the experimental arrangements used, and the results of these experiments.

  14. 4π FOV compact Compton camera for nuclear material investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    A compact Compton camera with a 4π field of view (FOV) was manufactured using the design parameters optimized with the effective choice of gamma-ray interaction order determined from a Monte Carlo simulation. The camera consisted of six CsI(Na) planar scintillators with a pixelized structure that was coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) consisting of multiple anodes connected to custom-made circuits. The size of the scintillator and each pixel was 4.4×4.4×0.5 and 0.2×0.2×0.5 cm, respectively. The total size of each detection module was only 5×5×6 cm and the distance between the detector modules was approximately 10 cm to maximize the camera performance, as calculated by the simulation. Therefore, the camera is quite portable for examining nuclear materials in areas, such as harbors or nuclear power plants. The non-uniformity of the multi-anode PMTs was corrected using a novel readout circuit. Amplitude information of the signals from the electronics attached to the scintillator-coupled multi-anode PMTs was collected using a data acquisition board (cDAQ-9178), and the timing information was sent to a FPGA (SPARTAN3E). The FPGA picked the rising edges of the timing signals, and compared the edges of the signals from six detection modules to select the coincident signal from a Compton pair only. The output of the FPGA triggered the DAQ board to send the effective Compton events to a computer. The Compton image was reconstructed, and the performance of the 4π FOV Compact camera was examined.

  15. Investigation of gold as a material for thermal radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Amit Harenkumar

    CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells technology is one of the fastest growing carbon neutral energy sources in the world today. Manufacturing of CdS/CdTe solar modules is carried out at temperature in the range of 620350°C under a vacuum of 40 millitorr using a Heated Pocket Deposition (HPD) system in the materials engineering laboratory. Since this system operates in vacuum, majority of the heat loss is due to thermal radiation. The concept here is to conserve the heat by reflecting the infrared radiation back into the deposition system thus increasing the thermal efficiency. Various metals may be used but calculations show that using a Gold thin film mirror can effectively reflect almost 97% of the incident radiation, thus conserving energy required for the manufacturing process. However, a phenomenon called thermal grooving or island formation inhibits its use. Thermal grooving occurs when the stress concentration at the grain boundaries causes grain separation. This phenomenon is observed in thin gold films that are exposed to a temperature in excess of 350°C for over 3 to 5 hours. In this study, these films are exposed to temperature upto 620350°C for cycles as long as 200 hours. The goal of this research is to explore the solutions for elimination of the phenomenon of thermal grooving and thus extract maximum life out of these thin gold films for conservation of heat. After carefully exploring literature on past research and conducting experiments it was found that within the range of the films that were tested, a 2000 A350° film with a 150 A350° of Indium underlay showed the best performance after thermal annealing and testing.

  16. Investigation of polarization effects on new mask materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubke, Karsten; Teuber, Silvio; Hoellein, Ingo; Becker, Hans; Seitz, Holger; Buttgereit, Ute

    2005-05-01

    As microlithography moves to smaller critical dimensions, structures on reticles reach feature sizes comparable to the operating wavelength. Furthermore, with increasing NA the angle of incidence of light illuminating the mask steadily increases. In particular for immersion lithography this will have severe consequences on the printing behavior of reticles. Polarization effects arise which have an impact on, among other things, the contrast of the printed image. Angular effects have to be considered when aggressive off-axis illumination schemes are used. Whereas numerous articles have been published on those effects and the underlying theory seems to be understood, there is a strong need for experimental verification of properties of real masks at the actinic wavelength. This paper presents measurements of polarization effects on different mask blank types produced at Schott Lithotec including chrome and alternative absorber binary mask blanks, as well as phase shift mask blanks. Thickness and optical dispersion of all layers were determined using grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). The set of mask blanks was patterned using a special design developed at the Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) to allow measurements at different line width and pitch sizes. VUV Ellipsometry was then used to measure the properties of the structured materials, in particular the intensities in the 0th and 1st diffraction order for both polarization directions and varying angle of incidence. The degree of polarization of respective mask types is evaluated for dense lines with varying pitches and duty cycles. The results obtained experimentally are compared with simulations based on rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA).

  17. Investigations of physicochemical properties of bottom-ash materials for use them as secondary raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'chik, A. G.; Litovkin, S. V.; Rodionov, P. V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper chemical content and particle size distribution of bottom-ash material are defined; results of differential thermal and X-ray analyzes are given; processes of phase transformations occurring during heating, are examined for possible use of the waste to produce ceramic products. Studies have shown that effective specific activity of radionuclides in the material under examination would have no effect on radiation safety of the finished product.

  18. [Application of tiered approach to assess the impact of backfilling remediated soil on groundwater].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mao-Sheng; Jiang, Lin; Yao, Jue-Jun; Fan, Yan-Ling; Xia, Tian-Xiang; Li, Ting-Ting; Tian, Mei-Ying

    2013-03-01

    The tiered approach for assessing the impact of backfilling treated contaminated soil on groundwater was presented in details with a case study. The soil was contaminated by 1,2-dicholorenthane and 9 other organic pollutants and had been remediated before backfilling to meet the pre-set remediation goals based on health risk assessment. The results from tiered I assessment indicate that the concentrations of 8 contaminants in the leachate of the backfilling soil layer would exceed the assessment standards probably leading to groundwater contamination. However, the results from tiered II assessment, in which the adsorption and retardation of vadose zone soil was taken into account and the concentrations of pollutants reaching the groundwater table were predicated, reveal that only the concentrations of 6 contaminants would exceed the assessment standards. Further, taking the dilution and mixing of the groundwater into consideration, tiered III assessment was adopted and the results reveal that only 4 contaminants were beyond the standards. Finally, tiered IV assessment, aiming at predicting the concentration at the target well downstream, was carried out by considering the retardation of contaminants in saturated layer, and the results indicate only 1 pollutant was above the assessment standard. Therefore, it can be seen that the predicted concentrations of the target pollutants at advanced assessment levels will be closer to those at the target drinking water well and the amount of contaminants whose initially-set remediation goals need to be modified will decrease correspondingly, indicating the reduction in pollution prevention cost, although more efforts should be made and more field data should be collected to implement the advance assessment level.

  19. Investigation on low velocity impact resistance of SMA composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dianyin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Rongqiao; Zhang, Xiaoyong

    2016-04-01

    A method to improve low velocity impact resistance of aeroengine composite casing using shape memory alloy's properties of shape memory(SM) and super-elasticity(SE) is proposed in this study. Firstly, a numerical modeling of SMA reinforced composite laminate under low velocity impact load with impact velocity of 10 m/s is established based on its constitutive model implemented by the VUMAT subroutine of commercial software ABAQUS. Secondly, the responses of SMA composite laminate including stress and deflection distributions were achieved through transient analysis under low velocity impact load. Numerical results show that both peak stress and deflection values of SMA composite laminate are less than that without SMA, which proves that embedding SMA into the composite structure can effectively improve the low velocity impact performance of composite structure. Finally, the influence of SM and SE on low velocity impact resistance is quantitatively investigated. The values of peak stress and deflection of SMA composite based on SM property decrease by 18.28% and 9.43% respectively, compared with those without SMA, instead of 12.87% and 5.19% based on SE. In conclusion, this proposed model described the impact damage of SMA composite structure and turned to be a more beneficial method to enhance the impact resistance by utilizing SM effect.

  20. Isotopic, Chemical and Mineralogical Investigations of Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, Guenter W.

    1998-01-01

    The principal aim of our work was to improve our understanding of the earliest evolutionary period of our solar system (i.e. the first tens of millions of years). We have studied its chronology by using short and long term chronometers (based on extinct and long lived radioactive nuclei), explored the bearing of short lived nuclei on planetary heating and differentiation, and the addition of 'exotic' nuclei to solar system matter to help constrain models of nucleosynthesis. Our basic tool is high precision Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS). Over the years we have developed clean chemical separation procedures for many elements. The chemical elements most relevant to our investigations are Cr, Ni, Rb, Sr, Sm, Nd, Pb, and U, for which highly efficient measurement techniques by TIMS have been developed and have been in use in our laboratory for many years. We have explored the Mn-53 Cr-53 system (T (Mn-53) = 3.7 Ma) and have found it to be a powerful tool to obtain relative ages of meteorite formation and, more general, of early solar system processes with a time resolution of approx. 1 Ma. By measuring the Mn-Cr system in many meteorite types (chondrites, basaltic achondrites, angrites, pallasites, etc.) we have found that this condition is indeed met for most meteorite families.

  1. A device for vacuum drying, inert gas backfilling and solder sealing of hermetic implant packages.

    PubMed

    Schuettler, Martin; Huegle, Matthias; Ordonez, Juan S; Wilde, Juergen; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Modern implanted devices utilize microelectronics that have to be protected from the body fluids in order to maintain their functionality over decades. Moisture protection of implants is addressed by enclosing the electronic circuits into gas-tight packages. In this paper we describe a device that allows custom-built hermetic implant packages to be vacuum-dried (removing residual moisture from inside the package), backfilled with an inert gas at adjustable pressure and hermetically sealed employing a solder seal. A typical operation procedure of the device is presented.

  2. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands for... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Protection of Environment...

  3. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands for... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Protection of Environment...

  4. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands for... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Protection of Environment...

  5. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands for... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Protection of Environment...

  6. 40 CFR 1612.3 - Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. (a) Demands for... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Published reports and material contained in the public incident investigation dockets. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Protection of Environment...

  7. Assessment of arsenic immobilization in synthetically prepared cemented paste backfill specimens.

    PubMed

    Coussy, Samuel; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Blanc, Denise; Moszkowicz, Pierre; Bussière, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Mine tailings coming from the exploitation of sulphide and/or gold deposits can contain significant amounts of arsenic (As), highly soluble in conditions of weathering. Open mine voids backfilling techniques are now widely practiced by modern mining companies to manage the tailings. The most common one is called cemented paste backfill (CPB), and consists of tailings mixed with low amounts of hydraulic binders (3-5%) and a high proportion of water (typically 25%). The CPB is transported through a pipe network, to be placed in the mine openings. CPB provides storage benefits and underground support during mining operations. Moreover, this technique could also enhance contaminant stabilization, by fixing the contaminants in the binder matrix. CPB composites artificially spiked with As were synthesized in laboratory, using two types of hydraulic binders: a Portland cement, and a mix of fly ash and Portland cement. After curing duration of 66 days, the CPB samples were subjected to several leaching tests in various experimental conditions in order to better understand and then predict the As geochemical behaviour within CPBs. The assessment of the As release indicates that this element is better stabilized in Portland cement-based matrices rather than fly ash-based matrices. The As mobility differs in these two matrices, mainly because of the different As-bearing minerals formed during hydration processes. However, the total As depletion does not exceed 5% at the end of the most aggressive leaching test, indicating that As is well immobilized in the two types of CPB.

  8. Retardation of uranium and thorium by a cementitious backfill developed for radioactive waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Preedy, O; Read, D

    2017-07-01

    The solubility of uranium and thorium has been measured under the conditions anticipated in a cementitious, geological disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Similar solubilities were obtained for thorium in all media, comprising NaOH, Ca(OH)2 and water equilibrated with a cement designed as repository backfill (NRVB, Nirex Reference Vault Backfill). In contrast, the solubility of U(VI) was one order of magnitude higher in NaOH than in the remaining solutions. The presence of cellulose degradation products (CDP) results in a comparable solubility increase for both elements. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data suggest that the solubility-limiting phase for uranium corresponds to a becquerelite-type solid whereas thermodynamic modelling predicts a poorly crystalline, hydrated calcium uranate phase. The solubility-limiting phase for thorium was ThO2 of intermediate crystallinity. No breakthrough of either uranium or thorium was observed in diffusion experiments involving NRVB after three years. Nevertheless, backscattering electron microscopy and microfocus X-ray fluorescence confirmed that uranium had penetrated about 40 μm into the cement, implying active diffusion governed by slow dissolution-precipitation kinetics. Precise identification of the uranium solid proved difficult, displaying characteristics of both calcium uranate and becquerelite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Giorgia

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  10. Investigating perceptual qualities of static surface appearance using real materials and displayed images.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Midori; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2015-10-01

    Recent experimental evidence supports the idea that human observers are good at recognizing and categorizing materials. Fleming et al. reported that perceptual qualities and material classes are closely related using projected images (Journal of Vision 13(8) (2013) 9). In this paper, we further investigated their findings using real materials and degraded image versions of the same materials. We constructed a real material dataset, as well as four image datasets by varying chromaticity (color vs. gray) and resolution (high vs. low) of the material images. To investigate the fundamental properties of materials' static surface appearance, we used stimuli that lacked shape and saturated color information. We then investigated the relationship between these perceptual qualities and the various types of image representation through psychophysical experiments. Our results showed that the representation method of some materials affected their perceptual qualities. These cases could be classified into the following three types: (1) perceptual qualities decreased by reproducing the materials as images, (2) perceptual qualities decreased by creating gray images, and (3) perceptual qualities such as "Hardness" and "Coldness" tended to increase when the materials were reproduced as low-quality images. Through methods such as principal component analysis and k-means clustering, we found that material categories are more likely to be confused when materials are represented as images, especially gray images.

  11. [Investigation of susceptibility of materials contacting with drinking water for microbial growth].

    PubMed

    Szczotko, Maciej; Krogulska, Bozena; Krogulski, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Main purpose of this paper was to confirm of results obtained by new method based on bioluminescence technique for determination of susceptibility of materials contacting with drinking water were repeatable. Investigation was conducted during 8 weeks in dynamic conditions using continuous flow reactor UPE. Every week swabbes from tested materials were collected and level of ATP was examined. The results obtained from the surface of tested materials were repeatable and clearly approximate to those obtained from the surface of negative control material (stainless steel, low susceptibility for microbial growth). The level of the ATP on the surface of positive control material (paraffin, large susceptibility for microbial growth) was fifty times higher than that observed on other materials. Presented investigation was the main part of validation process, which in short time will serve to initiate system of complete assessment for materials contacting with drinking water according to Council Directives 89/106/EEC and 98/83/EC requirements.

  12. Pump and probe damage testing for investigation of transient material modifications associated with laser damage in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Feit, M D; DeMange, P; Bude, J D; Demos, S G

    2007-10-18

    Laser-induced breakdown in the bulk of transparent dielectric materials is associated with the generation of extreme localized conditions of temperatures and pressures. In this work, we perform pump and probe damage testing experiments to investigate the evolution of transient absorption by the host material arising from modifications following confined laser energy deposition in fused silica and DKDP materials. Specifically, we measure the size of the damage sites observed in the region of spatial overlap between the pump and probe pulses versus probe time delay and energy. Results of this proof-of-principle experimental work confirm that material modifications under extreme conditions created during a damage event include transient optical absorption. In addition, we found that the relaxation times of the induced absorption are very distinct for DKDP and SiO{sub 2} even under identical excitation conditions, on the order of 100 ns and 100 {micro}s, respectively.

  13. Investigation of the physical properties of tricalcium silicate cement-based root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-02-01

    Tricalcium silicate-based cements have been displayed as suitable root-end filling materials. The physical properties of prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material was used as a control. The physical properties of a prototype zirconium oxide replaced tricalcium silicate cement and two proprietary cements composed of tricalcium silicate namely Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material (IRM) was used as a control. Radiopacity assessment was undertaken and expressed in thickness of aluminum. In addition the anti-washout resistance was investigated using a novel basket-drop method and the fluid uptake, sorption and solubility were investigated using a gravimetric method. The setting time was assessed using an indentation technique and compressive strength and micro-hardness of the test materials were investigated. All the testing was performed with the test materials immersed in Hank's balanced salt solution. All the materials tested had a radiopacity value higher than 3mm thickness of aluminum. IRM exhibited the highest radiopacity. Biodentine demonstrated a high washout, low fluid uptake and sorption values, low setting time and superior mechanical properties. The fluid uptake and setting time was the highest for Bioaggregate. The addition of admixtures to tricalcium silicate-based cements affects the physical properties of the materials. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Total scattering investigation of materials for clean energy applications: the importance of the local structure.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-04-21

    In this Perspective article we give an account of the application of total scattering methods and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to the investigation of materials for clean energy applications such as materials for solid oxide fuel cells and lithium batteries, in order to show the power of this technique in providing new insights into the structure-property correlation in this class of materials.

  15. Physical Property Investigation of Two Recently Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials 7. Intended publication/meeting: International Association of Dental Research Annual Meeting 8...Marketed Resin Composite Restorative Materials Major Marcus P. Kropf APPROVED; Colo71 Howard W. Roberts Date APPROVED: Col Drew W. Fallis Dean, Air... Composite  Restorative  Materials   Marcus  P.  Kropf   Physical  Property  Investigation  of  Two  Recently-­‐Marketed   Resin

  16. Vocabulary Recycling in Children's Authentic Reading Materials: A Corpus-Based Investigation of Narrow Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Dee

    2008-01-01

    Fourteen collections of children's reading materials were used to investigate the claim that collections of authentic texts with a common theme, or written by one author, afford readers with more repeated exposures to new words than unrelated materials. The collections, distinguished by relative thematic tightness, authorship (1 vs. 4 authors),…

  17. Investigation of electrical parameters of the samples of optical materials in a decimeter wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseichik, L. V.; Butyrin, P. A.; Shakirzyanov, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Semiconductors, being the intermediates between conductors and dielectrics, possess the properties of both conductors and dielectrics. There are few studies devoted to the consideration of dielectric properties of semiconductor materials. In this study, dielectric properties of zinc selenide and germanium in a decimeter wavelength range are investigated. The results of investigation indicate the possibility of using these materials in new promising directions of microwave electrical engineering.

  18. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-09-01

    Low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat Plate Solar Array Program (FSA) are investigated. The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost effective and long life solar modules. Accelerated aging techniques for module component lifetime studies, investigation of candidate outer cover films and continued evaluation of soil repellant coatings are also included.

  20. Effect of Waste Brick as Mineral Admixture on the Mechanical Performance of Cemented Paste Backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külekçi, Gökhan; Erçikdi, Bayram; Aliyazicioğlu, Şener

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the replacement and addition of granulated waste brick (WB) to ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a cemented paste backfill (CPB) of sulphide tailings. The addition and OPC rate is about 15-45% and 7% in weight respectively. Pozzolanic activity tests indicated the fineness of WB samples being the major factor of pozzolanic activity instead of chemical composition. All CPB samples displayed the required strength and durability when WB was used as an additive to OPC. On the other hand, a binder dosage of >7wt % was needed to apply the required 28-day strength of ≥ 0.7 MPa when the OPC was replaced by 15-45 wt% WB samples. The durability of CPB samples is closely inter-related with the calcination temperatures and glass phase content of WB.

  1. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting.

    PubMed

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D; Tuck, Chris J; Christie, Steven D R; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-02-12

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting.

  2. An Investigation of the Behavior of Solvent based Polycaprolactone ink for Material Jetting

    PubMed Central

    He, Yinfeng; Wildman, Ricky D.; Tuck, Chris J.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An initial study of processing bioresorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) through material jetting was conducted using a Fujifilm Dimatix DMP-2830 material printer. The aim of this work was to investigate a potential solvent based method of jetting polycaprolactone. Several solvents were used to prepare a PCL solvent based ink and 1, 4-dioxane was chosen with the consideration of both solubility and safety. The morphology of PCL formed under different substrate temperatures, droplet spacings were investigated. Multi-layer PCL structures were printed and characterized. This work shows that biodegradable polycaprolactone can be processed through material jetting. PMID:26868530

  3. Experimental investigations and numerical simulations of notch effect in cellular plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsavina, L.; Linul, E.; Voiconi, T.; Negru, R.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular plastics are light weight structures with many applications in civil, aeronautical, automotive and mechanical engineering. Properties of cellular materials depend on the properties of the solid material, on the shape and dimensions of the cellular structure and on the relative density of the cellular material. Most of cellular plastic materials are crushing in compression and have a brittle behavior in tension. The effect of notches represents an important issue in such materials, taking into account that for packing applications for example, notches/holes should be introduced in the cellular material. This paper investigates the effect of notches in compression for three different densities 100, 145 and 300 kg/m3 polyurethane (PUR) foams. Experimental investigations were performed on rectangular blocks of 100×100×25 mm with 16, 28 and 40 mm central holes. The mechanism of damage was monitored with an IR camera FLIR A40M. Purpose of the numerical simulations was to calibrate a material model, based on compression test for un-notched specimens using the CRUSHABLE FOAM models implemented in ABAQUS SIMULIA. Then the material models were used to simulate the experimental tests on notched blocks. Good agreement was obtained for the load - displacement curves obtained experimentally and from simulation. Also the plastic deformation patterns observed experimentally by IR thermograpghy were obtained numerically using the CRUSHABLE FOAM material model.

  4. Preliminary investigation and application of alternate dry gas seal face materials{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, R.; Peterson, R.; Hanson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional seal mating ring materials such as tungsten carbide (WC) are commonly used in high pressure centrifugal gas compressor dry gas (gas lubricating film) seal applications. Although these materials possess desirable properties for minimizing thermal distortion and deformation when subjected to pressure and centrifugal force, they have low toughness, i.e., they are brittle and have poor resistance to thermal shock. It has been found that these materials are easily heat checked during seal face touchdown. Heat checking as well as other crack indications inherent in these materials can quickly propagate, resulting in a catastrophic seal ring failure. In this paper, an investigation of alternate seal face materials is described. Two ductile, nitrided, low ferrous materials proved to be readily manufacturable into dry gas seal rings and performed comparably to tungsten carbide in natural gas service. 10 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, C.L.; Morris, J.S.; Agnew, S.F.

    1997-01-14

    Diamond anvil cell is described for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear. 4 figs.

  6. Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear

    DOEpatents

    Westerfield, Curtis L.; Morris, John S.; Agnew, Stephen F.

    1997-01-01

    Diamond anvil cell for spectroscopic investigation of materials at high temperature, high pressure and shear. A cell is described which, in combination with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, permits the spectroscopic investigation of boundary layers under conditions of high temperature, high pressure and shear.

  7. Evaluating hydro-mechanical interactions of adjacent clay-based sealing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.-S.; Dixon, D.

    Canada’s Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is investigating various geological isolation concepts for Canada’s used reactor fuel (NWMO, 2005). These options are all based on the concept of multiple barriers that include Highly Compacted Bentonite (HCB), Dense Backfill (DBF), Light Backfill (LBF), and Gap Fill (GF). The hydraulic, mechanical, and other characteristics of these clay-based sealing materials have been examined previously, but typically in relative isolation (e.g., Dixon, 1999; Blatz, 2000; Siemens, 2006; Stroes-Gascoyne et al., 2006; Baumgartner et al., 2007). Information on how these clay-based sealing materials interact with each other is needed to understand the evolution and performance of the overall sealing system. A total of twenty-three (23) tests that examine the physical interaction of physically dissimilar clay-based sealing materials were installed and monitored at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited’s (AECL) geotechnical laboratory. This paper describes the process of water uptake, interaction between the components installed, and the role of groundwater salinity on water uptake as interpreted from these tests.

  8. Investigation of Thermostability of a Composite Resistive Material with Nanodimensional Carbon Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, T. D.; Vlasov, V. A.; Volokitin, G. G.; Melentyev, S. V.

    2014-06-01

    Thermostability of resistive materials based on polyurethane used as heat-liberating elements in the design of heating elements of thermoactive formworks is investigated. The application of polyurethane as a binder provides solid contact of polymer molecules with nanodimensional carbon fillers and their uniform distribution in a composite material. The influence of thermal treatment and dispersed fillers on the stability of electrophysical and thermophysical properties of carbon-filled polyurethane coatings is established.

  9. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  10. Numerical Investigation for the Microstructural Effects on the Crack Growth Behavior of Particulate Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-26

    When the damage constitutive law is adopted in an analysis, we perform an incremental analysis, just like the case of elastoplasticity (see Okada...isotropic elastoplasticity . 2.4 Some other issues associated with the damage constitutive law-initiation of nonlinear deformation Material...ABSTRACT In present investigation, analyses for the damage evolution behavior of particulate composite materials by using the finite element method

  11. Experimental Investigation of Stiffness Characteristics and Damping Properties of a Metallic Rubber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ch. Zh.; Li, Jingyuan; Zhou, Bangyang; Li, Shuang

    2017-09-01

    The static stiffness and dynamic damping properties of a metallic rubber material (MR) were investigated, which exhibited a nonlinear deformation behavior. Its static stiffness is analyzed and discussed. The effects of structural parameters of MR and experimental conditions on its shock absorption capacity were examined by dynamic tests. Results revealed excellent elastic and damping properties of the material. Its stiffness increased with density, but decreased with thickness. The damping property of MR varied with its density, thickness, loading frequency, and amplitude.

  12. Systematic numerical investigation of the role of hierarchy in heterogeneous bio-inspired materials.

    PubMed

    Bosia, Federico; Della Croce, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that hierarchical structure is an important feature in biological materials to optimise various properties, including mechanical ones. It is however still unclear how these hierarchical architectures can improve material characteristics, for example strength. Also, the transposition of these structures from natural to artificial bioinspired materials remains to be perfected. In this paper, we introduce a numerical method to evaluate the strength of fibre-based heterogeneous biological materials and systematically investigate the role of hierarchy. Results show that hierarchy indeed plays an important role and that it is possible to "tune" the strength of bio-inspired materials in a wide range of values, in some cases improving the strength of non-hierarchical structures considerably.

  13. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials for the Flat-Plate Solar Array project is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations included studies of aging and degradation of candidate encapsulation materials, continued identification of primers for durable bonding of module interfaces, continued evaluation of soil resistant treatments for the sunlit surface of the module and testing of corrosion protective coatings for use low cost mild steel substrates.

  14. Comparative Investigation of the Efficiency of Absorption of Solar Energy by Carbon Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhod‧ko, N. G.; Smagulova, G. T.; Rakhymzhan, N. B.; Kim, S.; Lesbaev, B. T.; Nazhipkyzy, M.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research on the efficiency of absorption of solar energy by various carbon materials (soot, carbonized apricot pits and rice husks, and carbon nanotubes in the form of a ″forest″), as well as by composites based on them with inclusions of metal oxide nanoparticles. An analysis of the efficiency of absorption of solar energy by various carbon materials has demonstrated the advantage of the carbon material from carbonized apricot pits. The results of the comparative investigation of the absorptivity of apricot pits with that of the coating of a production prototype of solar collector are presented.

  15. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transient fiberglass-epoxy birefringent material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study is reported in which a nondestructive technique involving the use of a transparent fiberglass-epoxy composite birefringent material has been used to investigate compression failure mechanisms in graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that the birefringency and transparency of the fiberglass-epoxy material permits regions of high stress to be located and the mechanisms of local failure propagation to be identified within the laminate. The material may also be useful for studying stress fields and for identifying failure initiation and propagation mechanisms in a wide variety of composite-structure problems.

  16. Computational investigation of heat transfer analysis through perforated pin fins of different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Ambarish; Bhanja, Dipankar; Patowari, P. K.; Choubey, Gautam; Deshamukhya, Tuhin

    2017-07-01

    The present work investigates the enhancement of heat transfer rate through staggered perforated pin fins of different materials with increasing number and size of perforations. Three dimensional CFD simulations have been carried out to analyze the effects of fin number, size and materials of fin to enhance heat transfer rate against pressure loss. Results show that the heat transfer rates of perforated fins up to certain perforation number and size are always greater than the solid ones and with the change of fin material heat transfer rate also improves significantly. On the other hand pressure drop through heat sink decreases not only with increasing perforation number but also with size of perforations.

  17. Investigation of Lithium Metal Hydride Materials for Mitigation of Deep Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure to crew, electronics, and non-metallic materials is one of many concerns with long-term, deep space travel. Mitigating this exposure is approached via a multi-faceted methodology focusing on multi-functional materials, vehicle configuration, and operational or mission constraints. In this set of research, we are focusing on new multi-functional materials that may have advantages over traditional shielding materials, such as polyethylene. Metal hydride materials are of particular interest for deep space radiation shielding due to their ability to store hydrogen, a low-Z material known to be an excellent radiation mitigator and a potential fuel source. We have previously investigated 41 different metal hydrides for their radiation mitigation potential. Of these metal hydrides, we found a set of lithium hydrides to be of particular interest due to their excellent shielding of galactic cosmic radiation. Given these results, we will continue our investigation of lithium hydrides by expanding our data set to include dose equivalent and to further understand why these materials outperformed polyethylene in a heavy ion environment. For this study, we used HZETRN 2010, a one-dimensional transport code developed by NASA Langley Research Center, to simulate radiation transport through the lithium hydrides. We focused on the 1977 solar minimum Galactic Cosmic Radiation environment and thicknesses of 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 g/cm2 to stay consistent with our previous studies. The details of this work and the subsequent results will be discussed in this paper.

  18. Tribological characteristics of enamel-dental material contacts investigated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wojda, Sylwia; Szoka, Bogusława; Sajewicz, Eugeniusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate wear and friction behaviour of tooth enamel against selected dental restorative materials. The experimental material was obtained under simulated mastication, during which human tooth enamel was sub- jected to friction and wear in contact with composite dental materials: Estelite Sigma and FulFil Extra. The results have shown that the enamel's resistance to tribological wear is significantly higher than the resistance of the dental materials tested. The microscopic observations of the sample surfaces subsequent to the tribological research as well as the analysis of the chemical composition of the surface layer confirm the existence of diverse tribological wear mechanisms dependent on the type of dental materials used. Composite materials such as Estellite Sigma and FulFil Extra are characterized by greater resistance to wear and are less destructive to enamel than the material investigated by the authors earlier. It has also been stated that the spherical shape of the filler particles (Estellite Sigma) has a beneficial effect in reducing enamel wear.

  19. Pseudo-Glassification Material for G-Demption

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Gates, Robert O.; Riley, Brian J.

    2014-09-01

    G-Demption, LLC has requested that PPNL provide design input for a “pseudo-glassification” process associated with their proposed technology for generating gamma irradiation stations from used nuclear fuel. The irradiation design currently consists of an aluminum enclosure designed to allow for proper encapsulation of and heat flow from a used fuel rod while minimally impacting the streaming of gamma rays from the fuel. In order to make their design more robust, G-Demption is investigating the benefits of backfilling this aluminum enclosure with a setting material once the used fuel rod is properly placed. This process has been initially referred to as “pseudo-glassification”, and strives not to impact heat transport or gamma streaming from the used fuel rod while providing increased fuel rod protection and fission gas retention. PNNL has compiled an internal material evaluation and discussion for the “pseudo-glassification” process in this report.

  20. The stabilization of the rock mass of the wieliczka salt mine through the backfilling of the witos chamber with the use of injection methods / Stabilizacji górotworu kopalni soli "wieliczka" poprzez likwidację komór "witos" z zastosowaniem metod iniekcji

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Obyrn, Kajetan

    2012-10-01

    The Wieliczka Salt Mine is the most famous and the most visited mining industry monument in the world and it requires modern methods to ensure rock mass stability and tourists' security. Both for conservation and tourism organization reasons, the group of Warszawa-Wisla-Budryk-Lebzeltern-Upper Witos Chambers (Photo. 1, 2. 3) located the Kazanów mid-level at a depth of 117 m underground is extremely important. Discontinuous deformation occurring in this Chamber complex was eliminated by comprehensive securing work with anchor housing, but their final securing and stability is conditioned by further backfilling and sealing the Witos Chambers situated directly beneath. In the 1940s and 1950s, the Witos Chamber was backfilled with slag from the mine boilerhouse. However, slags with 80% compressibility are not backfilling material which would ensure the stability of the rock mass. The chambers were exploited in the early nineteenth century in the Spizit salts of the central part of the layered deposit. The condition of the Upper Witos, Wisla, Warszawa, Budryk, and Lebzeltern Chambers is generally good. The western part if the Lebzeltern Chamber (Fig. 1), which was threatened with collapse, was backfilled with sand. In all the chambers of the Witos complex, local deformation of ceiling rock of varying intensity is observed as well as significant destruction of the side walls of pillars between chambers. No hydrogeological phenomena are observed in the chambers. It has been attempted to solve the problem of stability of the rock mass in this region of the mine by extracting the slag and backfilling with sand, erecting concrete supporting pillars, backfilling the voids with sand, anchoring the ceiling and the side walls, the use of the pillar housing. The methods have either not been applied or have been proved insufficient to properly protect the excavation situated above. In order to select the optimal securing method, a geomechanical analysis was conducted in order to

  1. Modulation of drug efflux by aloe materials: An In Vitro investigation across rat intestinal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Carien, Beneke; Alvaro, Viljoen; Josias, Hamman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinically, significant herb-drug interactions have been previously documented and can be pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic in nature. Pharmacokinetic interactions have been attributed to induction or inhibition of either metabolic enzymes or efflux transporters. Objective: The effect of gel and whole leaf materials from 3 different aloe species namely Aloe ferox, Aloe marlothii, and Aloe vera as well as polysaccharides precipitated from the A. vera materials on the bi-directional transport of cimetidine across rat intestinal tissue was investigated. Materials and Methods: Cimetidine transport studies were performed across excised rat intestinal tissue mounted in Sweetana-Grass diffusion chambers in both the apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical directions. Results: While A. vera gel and whole leaf materials did not inhibit the efflux of cimetidine, the polysaccharides precipitated from them did show a reduction of cimetidine efflux. On the other hand, both A. ferox and A. marlothii gel and whole leaf materials exhibited an inhibition effect on cimetidine efflux. Conclusions: This study identified a modulation effect of efflux transporters by certain aloe materials. This may cause herb-drug pharmacokinetic interactions when drugs that are substrates for these efflux transporters are taken simultaneously with aloe materials. On the other hand, these aloe materials may be used for drug absorption enhancement for drugs with low bioavailability due to extensive efflux. PMID:24143044

  2. Investigations of the electrical breakdown properties of insulator materials used in high voltage vacuum diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Carlson, R.L.; Melton, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    The Injector for the proposed Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos utilizes a monolithic insulator deployed in a radial configuration. The 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick insulator with embedded grading rings separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. Although much work has been done by the pulse power community in studying surface flash-over of insulating materials used in both axial and radial configurations, dendrite growth at the roots of grading rings embedded in materials suitable for very large insulators is less well characterized. Degradation of several acrylic insulators has been observed in the form of dendrites growing at the roots of the grading rings for large numbers (100`s) of pulses on the prototype DARHT Injector and other machines using similar radial geometries. In a few cases, these dendrites have led to catastrophic bulk breakdown of the acrylic between two grading rings making the insulator a costly loss. Insulating materials under investigation are acrylic (Lucite), epoxy (Furane), and cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite); each of these materials has its own particular mechanical and electrical merits. All of these materials have been cast and machined into the required large size for the Injector. Test methods and the results of investigations into the breakdown strength of various interface geometries and the susceptibility of these materials to dendrite growth are reported.

  3. Investigation on Suitability of Natural Fibre as Replacement Material for Table Tennis Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifin, A. M. T.; Fahrul Hassan, M.; Ismail, A. E.; Zulafif Rahim, M.; Rasidi Ibrahim, M.; Haq, R. H. Abdul; Rahman, M. N. A.; Yunos, M. Z.; Amin, M. H. M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of suitability natural fibre as replacement material for table tennis blade, due to low cost, lightweight and apparently environmentally. Nowadays, natural fibre are one of the materials often used in replaced the main material on manufacturing sector, such as automotive, and construction. The objective of this study is to investigate and evaluate the suitability natural fiber materials to replace wood as a structure on table tennis blade. The mechanical properties of the different natural fibre material were examined, and correlated with characteristic of table tennis blade. The natural fibre selected for the study are kenaf (Hibiscus Cannabinus), jute, hemp, sisal (Agave Sisalana) and ramie. A further comparison was made with the corresponding properties of each type of natural fiber using Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). TRIZ has been used to determine the most appropriate solution in producing table tennis blade. The results showed the most appropriate solution in producing table tennis blade using natural fibre is kenaf natural fibre. The selected on suitability natural fibre used as main structure on table tennis blade are based on the characteristics need for good performance of table tennis blade, such as energy absorption, lightweight, strength and hardness. Therefore, it shows an opportunity for replacing existing materials with a higher strength, lower cost alternative that is environmentally friendly.

  4. Ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes for in vivo analysis with high stability and low polarized potential.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Peipei; Yu, Ping; Wang, Kai; Hao, Jie; Fei, Junjie; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-11-07

    The development of stable and reproducible methods for in vivo electrochemical monitoring of neurochemicals is of great physiological importance. In this study, we demonstrate ferricyanide-filled cylindrical carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) of high stability and low polarized potential for in vivo electrochemical analysis. We first studied the voltammetric behavior of cylindrical CFEs by using a model system consisting of two separated cells each containing potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) or potassium ferrocyanide (K4Fe(CN)6). We observed that E1/2 values of the system were dependent on the ratio of the lengths of the cylindrical CFEs and of the concentrations of the redox species on both poles. Based on this property, we prepared the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs, and found that this kind of electrode exhibits a more stable current response and a lower polarized potential than the CFEs backfilled with KCl or Ru(NH3)6Cl3. Animal experiments with the ferricyanide-backfilled cylindrical CFEs demonstrate that this kind of electrode could be used for in vivo monitoring of neurochemical release with a high stability under some physiological conditions.

  5. Investigation of a new approach to measuring contact angles for hydrophilic impression materials.

    PubMed

    Kugel, Gerard; Klettke, Thomas; Goldberg, Jeffrey A; Benchimol, Jaques; Perry, Ronald D; Sharma, Shradha

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the initial water contact angles of seven unset impression materials using commercially available equipment, in an effort to determine whether polyether impression materials (Impregum) have lower contact angles and are, therefore, more hydrophilic than VPS impression materials. The hydrophilic properties of unset polyether and VPS impression materials were analyzed with respect to their water contact angle measurements using the commercially available Drop Shape Analysis System DSA 10. Twenty-five data points per second were collected via video analysis. There was no delay from start of measurement and data collection. Data was collected for approximately 12 s. Droplet size was determined on the thickness of canula. If the droplets became too small in volume, the water that evaporated during the measurement was large in comparison to the volume of the droplet. Therefore, 5 microl was chosen as the lowest volume. Five trials were conducted per series for each featured material. Contact angles were calculated using the circle fitting method. Three tests using this technique were designed to control the variables of contact angle measurement with regard to time, the varying amount of fluid in contact with impression material during clinical use, and material thickness. Sample thickness of impression material was controlled by stripping the paste flat on a glass plate using a marking template to ensure a constant film thickness. Tests were conducted in a climatized room at 24 degrees C +/- 1 degree C. Deionized water was used as the fluid. The device was calibrated according to manufacturer's instruction for Young-Laplace fitting prior to the measurements. Results were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA, Tukey test, and t-test, as appropriate. Comparing the fast setting impression materials by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p < .05) revealed the initial contact angles to range from 66.2 +/- 1.5 degrees to 127.5 +/- 4.4 degrees

  6. Investigation on the achievable flow length in injection moulding of polymeric materials with dynamic mould tempering.

    PubMed

    Meister, Steve; Drummer, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    A variety of parts in microsystems technology are manufactured by injection moulding of polymeric materials. In Particular the high cooling velocity affects negatively the process and the resulting part properties. The scope of this paper is to investigate the influence on the reachable flow length in injection moulding of different polymeric materials. The results indicate that the mould temperature has less impact on the achievable flow length of the polymer melt as the injection pressure. A higher mould temperature leads only to a slight increase in flow length. In addition, a transcending of the glass or the crystallization temperature of polymeric materials with the mould temperature shows no effect on the achievable flow length of the material.

  7. Preliminary Investigation of Zircaloy-4 as a Research Reactor Cladding Material

    SciTech Connect

    Brian K Castle

    2012-05-01

    As part of a scoping study for the ATR fuel conversion project, an initial comparison of the material properties of Zircaloy-4 and Aluminum-6061 (T6 and O-temper) is performed to provide a preliminary evaluation of Zircaloy-4 for possible inclusion as a candidate cladding material for ATR fuel elements. The current fuel design for the ATR uses Aluminum 6061 (T6 and O temper) as a cladding and structural material in the fuel element and to date, no fuel failures have been reported. Based on this successful and longstanding operating history, Zircaloy-4 properties will be evaluated against the material properties for aluminum-6061. The preliminary investigation will focus on a comparison of density, oxidation rates, water chemistry requirements, mechanical properties, thermal properties, and neutronic properties.

  8. Investigation on the Achievable Flow Length in Injection Moulding of Polymeric Materials with Dynamic Mould Tempering

    PubMed Central

    Drummer, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    A variety of parts in microsystems technology are manufactured by injection moulding of polymeric materials. In Particular the high cooling velocity affects negatively the process and the resulting part properties. The scope of this paper is to investigate the influence on the reachable flow length in injection moulding of different polymeric materials. The results indicate that the mould temperature has less impact on the achievable flow length of the polymer melt as the injection pressure. A higher mould temperature leads only to a slight increase in flow length. In addition, a transcending of the glass or the crystallization temperature of polymeric materials with the mould temperature shows no effect on the achievable flow length of the material. PMID:23970840

  9. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-01

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process.

  10. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-09

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process.

  11. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-01

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process. PMID:28067289

  12. Investigation of Kevlar fabric based materials for use with inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niccum, R. J.; Munson, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    Design, manufacture and testing of laminated and coated composite materials incorporating a structural matrix of Kevlar are reported in detail. The practicality of using Kevlar in aerostat materials is demonstrated and data are provided on practical weaves, lamination and coating particulars, rigidity, strength, weight, elastic coefficients, abrasion resistance, crease effects, peel strength, blocking tendencies, helium permeability, and fabrication techniques. Properties of the Kevlar based materials are compared with conventional, Dacron reinforced counterparts. A comprehensive test and qualification program is discussed and quantitative biaxial tensile and shear test data are provided. The investigation shows that single ply laminates of Kevlar and plastic films offer significant strength to weight improvements, are less permeable than two ply coated materials, but have a lower flex life.

  13. Censorship of Written Curricular Materials in Public Schools: An Historical Investigation of Legal Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Robert C.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and explain the censorship of written curricular and library materials in public schools over the past 20 years. Analysis of the 15 cases decided between 1972 and 1992, only one of which was decided by the Supreme Court, indicates that: (1) in every case except one, a school board or employees of the…

  14. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules were investigated. The following areas were explored: (1) soil resistant surface treatment; (2) corrosion protecting coatings from mild steel substrates; (3) primers for bonding module interfaces; and (4) RS/4 accelerated aging of candidate encapsulation compounds

  15. 1064nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression...

  16. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

  17. Investigating the Application of Needs Analysis on EAP Business Administration Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Saifalislam Abdalla Hajahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate the application of needs analysis in developing EAP materials for business administration students in two Sudanese universities. The subjects are 2 head departments of English language. To collect data, the researcher uses interview and content analysis. The study adopts the descriptive approach. The data of…

  18. Investigating the Chemical Safety of Household Products. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Phil J.

    This document provides teaching guidelines and student material for a unit intended for use in high school science or consumer programs. Time allotment is from four to six hours of classroom time. The objective of this capsule is to investigate the chemical safety of household products by teaching students how to form a hypothesis through the…

  19. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  20. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  1. A Micromechanical Investigation of Instability in Particulate Materials and Higher Order Continuum Theory Assumptions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-31

    The micropolar theory (Eringen, 1966, 1968) is a continuum version of the structural theory of Cosserat (1909). It enriches the kinematics and...kinetics of continua by adding material rotations and couple stresses. Using a micropolar approach similar to Kanatani (1979), Muhlhaus and Vardoulakis...analysis and micropolar description, and investigated the structure of persistent shear bands in idealized granular media. They successfully

  2. Investigation on Using SBS and Active Carbon Filler to Reduce the VOC Emission from Bituminous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peiqiang; Wu, Shaopeng; Li, Fuzhou; Xiao, Yue; Zhang, Honghua

    2014-01-01

    Bituminous materials are playing a vital role in pavement design and the roofing industry because of outstanding properties. Unfortunately, bituminous materials will release volatile organic compounds (VOC), making them non-environmentally friendly. Therefore, technologies that can be used to decrease the VOC emission are urgently required. In this research, the VOC emission and material behaviors were analyzed and compared to investigate the possibility of adding styrene butadiene styrene (SBS) and active carbon filler into bituminous materials to develop environmentally-friendly materials. Thermal gravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy testing (UV-Vis) were employed to characterize the VOC emission process. Temperature sweep testing and frequency sweep testing were conducted to evaluate the rheological properties of bituminous materials. Research results indicated that the combined introduction of 4 wt% styrene butadiene styrene (SBS) and 4 wt% active carbon filler cannot only significantly lower the VOC emission speed and amount, but also improve the deformation resistance behavior at a higher temperature. SBS and active carbon filler can be used to reduce the VOC emission form bituminous materials. PMID:28788181

  3. Modulation of drug efflux by aloe materials: An In Vitro investigation across rat intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Carien, Beneke; Alvaro, Viljoen; Josias, Hamman

    2013-10-01

    Clinically, significant herb-drug interactions have been previously documented and can be pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic in nature. Pharmacokinetic interactions have been attributed to induction or inhibition of either metabolic enzymes or efflux transporters. The effect of gel and whole leaf materials from 3 different aloe species namely Aloe ferox, Aloe marlothii, and Aloe vera as well as polysaccharides precipitated from the A. vera materials on the bi-directional transport of cimetidine across rat intestinal tissue was investigated. Cimetidine transport studies were performed across excised rat intestinal tissue mounted in Sweetana-Grass diffusion chambers in both the apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical directions. While A. vera gel and whole leaf materials did not inhibit the efflux of cimetidine, the polysaccharides precipitated from them did show a reduction of cimetidine efflux. On the other hand, both A. ferox and A. marlothii gel and whole leaf materials exhibited an inhibition effect on cimetidine efflux. This study identified a modulation effect of efflux transporters by certain aloe materials. This may cause herb-drug pharmacokinetic interactions when drugs that are substrates for these efflux transporters are taken simultaneously with aloe materials. On the other hand, these aloe materials may be used for drug absorption enhancement for drugs with low bioavailability due to extensive efflux.

  4. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  5. Utilization of water-reducing admixtures in cemented paste backfill of sulphide-rich mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    This study presents the effect of three different water-reducing admixtures (WRAs) on the rheological and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples. A 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa and the maintenance of the stability (i.e. > or = 0.7 MPa) over 360 days of curing were desired as the design criteria. Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland composite cement (PCC) were used as binders at 5 wt.% dose. WRAs were initially tested to determine the dosage of a WRA for a required consistency of 7'' for CPB mixtures. A total of 192 CPB samples were then prepared using WRAs. The utilization of WRAs enhanced the flow characteristics of the CPB mixture and allowed to achieve the same consistency at a lower water-to-cement ratio. For OPC, the addition of WRAs appeared to improve the both short- and long-term performance of CPB samples. However, only polycarboxylate-based superplasticiser produced the desired 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa when PCC was used as the binder. These findings suggest that WRAs can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich tailings to improve the strength and stability in short and long terms allowing to reduce binder costs in a CPB plant.

  6. An investigation of the fixation materials for cartilage frames in microtia.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Aritaka; Kiyokawa, Kensuke; Rikimaru, Hideaki; Watanabe, Koichi; Nishi, Yukiko

    2012-05-01

    When performing auriculoplasty for microtia surgery, wires are typically used to fix the costal cartilage frames. However, cases in which such wires become exposed during a long-term follow-up were frequently observed at our facility. Hence, using various materials, we conducted an investigation of the materials most suitable for fixation. The subjects consisted of 122 cases in which auriculoplasty by costal cartilage graft surgery was performed and the postoperative course was traceable, within approximately 24 years from January 1984 to March 2007. Regarding the fixation materials used in the 84 cases in which wire was used, 5 cases used monofilament non-absorbable sutures (Nylon(®)), 5 cases used monofilament absorbable sutures (PDS(®)), and 28 cases used braided absorbable sutures(VICRYL(®)).Their postoperative course was investigated, and the presence of auricular deformities caused by a loosening of the fixation materials and the exposure of the fixation materials was examined. An exposure of the wire was observed in 19 cases (22.6%) of the 84 cases that used wires. An exposure of nylon was observed in 2 (40%) of 5 the cases that used nylon, and of those, a mild deformation was observed in the lower helix in one case that was suspected to have been caused by a loosening of the surgical suture. Regarding the 33 cases in which absorbable sutures were used (5 cases used monofilament absorbable sutures and 28 cases used braided absorbable sutures), neither any auricular deformities nor exposure of the fixation materials was observed in any of the cases. Whether using monofilament or braided sutures, absorbable sutures are therefore believed to be the most suitable material for the fixation of cartilage. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Laboratory investigation into the contribution of contaminants to ground water from equipment materials used in sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P. Evan; Sklarew, Deborah S.

    2004-07-31

    Benzene contamination was detected in water samples from the Ogallala aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. DOE assembled a Technical Assistance Team to evaluate the source of benzene. One of the team's recommendations was to assess whether the sampling equipment material could be a source of benzene and other volatile organic compounds. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory tests indicated that the equipment material did, in fact, contribute volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds to the groundwater samples. Specifically, three materials were identified as contributing contaminants to water samples. The nylon-11 tubing used contributed benzene and the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA), the urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed toluene and trace amounts of NBSA, while the sampling port "spacer" material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests are below the concentrations measured in actual groundwater samples, the equipment material was found to contribute organics to the test water rendering the results reported for the groundwater samples highly suspect.

  8. Theoretical investigation of single wavelength hollow waveguide sensor for chemical materials sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, M.; Braunstein, I.; Gannot, I.

    2008-02-01

    Hazardous material sensing such as chemical agents, has become an important issue due to terrorist threats. In this work we examine the possibility of using a hollow waveguide as a sensor for chemical material sensing using only one wavelength. We propose to coat the waveguide with a dielectric layer that is sensitive to a certain chemical agent. Once such an agent interacts with the dielectric layer, it changes the index of refraction of the layer and therefore the waveguides transmission at the chosen wavelength. Using our ray model we have conducted a theoretical investigation of the suggested sensor and applied it to three chemical agents; Tabun, Ammonia and Hydrogen Cyanide.

  9. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Zakaria bin; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A.; Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  10. Cryostat system for investigation on new neutron moderator materials at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    SciTech Connect

    Dris, Zakaria bin; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz bin; Hamid, Nasri A.; Azman, Azraf; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Hafizal

    2016-01-22

    A simple continuous flow (SCF) cryostat was designed to investigate the neutron moderation of alumina in high temperature co-ceramic (HTCC) and polymeric materials such as Teflon under TRIGA neutron environment using a reflected neutron beam from a monochromator. Cooling of the cryostat will be carried out using liquid nitrogen. The cryostat will be built with an aluminum holder for moderator within stainless steel cylinder pipe. A copper thermocouple will be used as the temperature sensor to monitor the moderator temperature inside the cryostat holder. Initial measurements of neutron spectrum after neutron passing through the moderating materials have been carried out using a neutron spectrometer.

  11. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating corium crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Presented is an analysis of the results of the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten corium initially at 3080/sup 0/K was directed downward upon a stainless steel plate. The experiments are a continuation of a program of reactor material tests investigating LWR severe accident phenomena. Objective of the present analysis is to determine the existence or nonexistence of a corium crust during impingement from comparison of the measured heatup of the plate (as measured by thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the steel surface) with model calculations assuming alternately the presence and absence of a stable crust during impingement.

  12. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  13. First-Principles Modeling and Experimental Investigation of Novel Materials for Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus, Isaac M.

    The following dissertation presents several studies aimed at better understanding the behavior of different materials employed in energy storage and conversion applications with the goal of putting forth design criteria that can enhance the performance of fuel cells and batteries with different chemistries. The third chapter models the ion conduction in the rare earth phosphate DyPO 4. This material is investigated for use in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells, and the results highlight the benefits for proton conduction associated with a higher symmetry structure, relative to previously studied orthophosphate solid electrolyte materials. The fourth and fifth chapter combines modeling and experiments to understand why Ti substitution of Co in the cathode material Li(NixMnxCo1-2x)O 2 results in enhanced capacity and cyclability when used in lithium ion batteries. The results of these studies show that Ti substitution results in a lower intercalation voltage that allows for higher lithium extraction given a set voltage cut-off. Further results indicate that Ti helps suppress the formation of a secondary rocksalt phase that reduces cell efficiency. The sixth chapter investigates the intercalation mechanism of Li and Na into alkali titanate compounds that are of interest as anode materials in lithium-ion or sodium-ion batteries. The goal is to elucidate the susceptibility of each kind of titanate to phase transformations during the lithiation or sodiation process in a functioning battery. The results indicate that these materials fail to deliver theoretical capacities due to site limitations, that can be further aggravated by solvent uptake. Analysis of sodium energy barriers reveal a strong dependence on the state of charge, and potentially the rate of charging. The seventh chapter investigates electrolyte concentration effects in lithium-oxygen batteries. The model electrolyte system of lithium bistrifluoromethanesulfonimidate (LiTFSI) dissolved in 1

  14. Investigation of acoustic emission and surface treatment to improve tool materials and metal forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Deming

    Silicon nitride and WC-Co cermet tools are used for metal forming processes including extrusion and drawing. These materials are used to make tool dies which are exposed to deformation caused by friction and wear. Surface treatments such as ion implantation, laser blazing and coating have been found to improve surface properties, to optimize tribological behavior between the metal and die, as well as to extend service life of the tool dies. Early detection and continuous monitoring processes by non destructive testing (NDT) methods are needed in order to ensure the functionality of the wear process and extend the tool service life. Acoustic emission is one of the promising NDT methods for this application. The surface treatment chosen for this investigation was ion implantation. Three types of wear resistant materials with and without surface treatment were selected for this project; silicon nitride and two tungsten carbides (6% Cobalt and 10% Cobalt). This investigation was conducted using a pin-on-disk device for wear/friction tests of the selected materials with lubrication and/or without lubrication against both a stainless steel disk and an aluminum disk. The acoustic emissions generated during the experiments were recorded and analyzed. The results of this investigation showed that the ion implantation improved the tribological properties of the materials and reduced acoustic emission and coefficient of friction. A linear relationship between the average amplitude of the acoustic emission and the coefficient of friction of the tested materials was found. The investigation demonstrated that the acoustic emission method could be used to monitor the wear/friction processes.

  15. Investigation of the ultrasonic attenuation in anisotropic weld materials with finite element modeling and grain-scale material description.

    PubMed

    Lhuillier, P E; Chassignole, B; Oudaa, M; Kerhervé, S O; Rupin, F; Fouquet, T

    2017-03-08

    A finite element modeling approach of ultrasonic propagation combined with a description of the microstructure at the scale of the grains has been implemented. The simulations seek to determine the contribution of scattering to the ultrasonic attenuation in polycrystalline materials. The approach is applied to anisotropic microstructures exhibiting both elongated grains and transversely isotropic crystallographic texture which can be found in multipass welds. The ultrasonic propagation is computed with the 2D finite element code ATHENA 2D. The description of the propagation media accounts for the geometric, elastic and crystallographic properties of anisotropic welds. The study is focused on two types of welds made of austenitic 316L stainless steel and Ni-based alloy (182). The attenuation was computed from the decay of multiple backwall echoes. The contribution of the microstructure scattering was isolated by a correction of the attenuation data with the attenuation obtained in an equivalent homogenized material. The simulation investigates the attenuation as a function of several parameters: grain orientation and size, ultrasonic frequency, or anisotropy level. The attenuation level of elastic pressure waves was specifically examined as a function of the angle between the propagation direction and the grain orientation. The evolution of the attenuation is consistent with the theoretical models. Moreover the simulation results were compared to experimental data available from the literature in 316L stainless steel welds. The simulated and experimental values are in very good agreement.

  16. An investigation on the effects of phase change material on material components used for high temperature thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeil; Singh, Dileep; Zhao, Weihuan; Yua, Wenhua; France, David M.

    2016-05-01

    The latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems for concentrated solar power (CSP) plants with advanced power cycle require high temperature phase change materials (PCMs), Graphite foams with high thermal conductivity to enhance the poor thermal conductivity of PCMs. Brazing of the graphite foams to the structural metals of the LHTES system could be a method to assemble the system and a method to protect the structural metals from the molten salts. In the present study, the LHTES prototype capsules using MgCl2-graphite foam composites were assembled by brazing and welding, and tested to investigate the corrosion attack of the PCM salt on the BNi-4 braze. The microstructural analysis showed that the BNi-4 braze alloy can be used not only for the joining of structure alloy to graphite foams but also for the protecting of structure alloy from the corrosion by PCM.

  17. An Investigation for Ground State Features of Some Structural Fusion Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, H.; Tel, E.; Baldik, R.; Aydin, A.

    2011-02-01

    Environmental concerns associated with fossil fuels are creating increased interest in alternative non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear fusion can be one of the most attractive sources of energy from the viewpoint of safety and minimal environmental impact. When considered in all energy systems, the requirements for performance of structural materials in a fusion reactor first wall, blanket or diverter, are arguably more demanding or difficult than for other energy system. The development of fusion materials for the safety of fusion power systems and understanding nuclear properties is important. In this paper, ground state properties for some structural fusion materials as 27Al, 51V, 52Cr, 55Mn, and 56Fe are investigated using Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method. The obtained results have been discussed and compared with the available experimental data.

  18. Investigation on Painting Materials in "Madonna col Bambino e S. Giovannino" by Botticelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersani, D.; Lottici, P. P.; Casoli, A.; Ferrari, M.; Lottini, S.; Cauzzi, D.

    A study on the painting materials (pigments and binders) of the famous painting "Madonna col Bambino e S. Giovannino" by Sandro Botticelli, located in the Museo Civico of Piacenza (Italy), was performed before a recent restoration. The painting materials were investigated by the analysis of five millimetric samples taken in damaged regions. The pigments were determined using the micro-Raman spectroscopy, with the 632.8nm line of a He-Ne laser. Despite the strong fluorescence background, the nature of the ground layer (gypsum and anhydrite) and of most pigments (i.e. goethite, lapis lazuli, white lead) was determined. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) was used to determine the organic binder media, and in particular proteinaceous and lipid materials. Egg and animal glue were found, while no siccative oils were detected.

  19. Investigation of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in bolting materials on light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Laboratory experiments performed at BNL have shown that the concentration of boric acid to a moist paste at approximately the boiling point of water can produce corrosion rates of the order of several tenths of an inch per year on bolting and piping materials, which values are consistent with service experience. Other failure evaluation experience has shown that primary coolant/lubricant interaction may lead to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator manway studs. An investigation was also performed on eleven lubricants and their effects on A193 B7 and A540 B24 bolting materials. H/sub 2/S generation by the lubricants, coefficient of friction results and transgranular SCC of the bolting materials in steam are discussed. 13 refs.

  20. Investigation of Test Methods, Material Properties and Processes for Solar Cell Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1982-01-01

    The evaluation of potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials is discussed. The goal is to identify, evaluate, test and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatment, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. Two component aliphatic urethane casting syrups were evaluated for suitability as solar module pottants on the basis of optical, physical and fabrication characteristics.

  1. A finite element model investigation of ultrasonic array performance for inspecting polycrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Pamel, A.; Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Brett, C. R.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructural noise has long hindered ultrasonic NDE of polycrystalline materials. In recent years however, arrays have enabled new possibilities to advance ultrasonic inspection of these materials. A Finite Element (FE) model is used to explore the different phenomena caused by grain scattering which may hinder detection of defects by an array. These include multiple scattering and beam deviation due to anisotropy; two aspects of the physics which are often required to be ignored in analytical models due to theoretical assumptions or computational limitations. We rely on a GPU based FE solver, Pogo, to provide fast computation and thereby enable parametric studies. The impact on array detection performance when varying center-frequency and aperture size is investigated. Preliminary results show that there exists an optimum for both the array aperture and frequency for inspection of these materials.

  2. New method of the polymeric material properties experimental investigation under powerful energy flux impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, B. A.; Efremov, V. P.; Kalinin, Yu G.; Kazakov, E. D.; Metelkin, S. Yu; Petrov, V. A.; Potapenko, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    Investigation of the polymeric material properties under powerfull energy flux impact is relevant as for basic research (mathematical modeling of polymeric materials behavior in extreme conditions, testing the state equations), as for practical applications (for testing of protective coatings for space research and laboratory facilities). This paper presents the results of experimental studies of the interaction of polymeric materials with a relativistic electron beam produced by a high-current electron accelerator Calamary. Calamary facility provides a wide range of electron beam parameters: diameter 10-15 mm, the voltage on the diode up to 300 kV, the current through the diode up to 30 kA. New method of beam-target interaction area measurement was developed. The original method for the mechanical kick impulse measuring based on piezoelectric vibration sensor was presented. The dependence of the kick impulse from the power flux was obtained.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Turning Parameters on AA 6061-T6 Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthiban, A.; Pugazhenthi, R.; Ravikumar, R.; Vivek, P.

    2017-03-01

    Turning is a broadly used material removal process to manufacture cylindrical products. The effects of various process parameters on turning like spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut have been investigated to Impact on Material Removal Rate (MRR) and surface roughness (Ra) by using Response Surface Methodology. Experimental plan is performed by a Box-behenken design. The main purpose of this work is to study the effect of process parameters on Aluminium alloy AA6061-T6 surface, and to develop the mathematical model for Material removal rate and surface roughness on milling process. The quadratic model is best agreement with experimental data; finally the numerical optimization technique has been used to find out best optimum milling parameters. The optimal set of process parameters has also been predicted to maximize the MRR and minimize the surface roughness.

  4. Corrosion investigation of two materials for implant supraconstructions coupled to a titanium implant.

    PubMed

    Ravnholt, G; Jensen, J

    1991-04-01

    The corrosion of two materials for implant supraconstructions, a carbon fiber/PMMA composite and a silver-palladium alloy, was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium implant. Corrosion current and pH of the electrolyte were monitored, and corrosion products were identified by powder X-ray diffraction. The carbon composite and the silver-palladium per se did not corrode, whereas a silver-palladium specimen brazed with the recommended brazing alloy corroded unmistakably, yielding copper-containing corrosion products. The action of local corrosion cells around the brazed joint is considered, and it is concluded that the two materials seem well suited for implant supraconstructions, provided that brazing the silver-palladium can be avoided. Considering the clinical relevance of the experimental model used, it is concluded that the model is likely to predict a lower corrosion susceptibility than the one found in vivo.

  5. Investigation of migrant-polymer interaction in pharmaceutical packaging material using the linear interaction energy algorithm.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Peter; Brunsteiner, Michael; Khinast, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    The interaction between drug products and polymeric packaging materials is an important topic in the pharmaceutical industry and often associated with high costs because of the required elaborative interaction studies. Therefore, a theoretical prediction of such interactions would be beneficial. Often, material parameters such as the octanol water partition coefficient are used to predict the partitioning of migrant molecules between a solvent and a polymeric packaging material. Here, we present the investigation of the partitioning of various migrant molecules between polymers and solvents using molecular dynamics simulations for the calculation of interaction energies. Our results show that the use of a model for the interaction between the migrant and the polymer at atomistic detail can yield significantly better results when predicting the polymer solvent partitioning than a model based on the octanol water partition coefficient.

  6. EBIC/TEM investigations of defects in solar silicon ribbon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ast, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the defect structure of edge defined film growth (EFG) material, web dentritic ribbons (WEB), and ribbon to ribbon recrystallized material (RTR). The most common defects in all these materials are coherent first order twin boundaries. These coherent twins can be very thin, a few atomic layers. Bundles of the twins which contain odd numbers of twins will in optical images appear as a seemingly single first twin boundary. First-order coherent twin boundaries are not electrically active, except at locations where they contain intrinsic (grain boundary) dislocations. These dislocations take up small deviations from the ideal twin relation and play the same role in twin boundaries as conventional and play the some role in twin boundaries as conventional edge and screw dislocations in small angle tilt and twist boundaries.

  7. Investigations on comminution of sheared prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Hancock, W.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The comminution (or breakage) of granular materials under shearing loads is conjectured to strongly influence dynamics of both natural processes (such as fault zone evolution and landslides) and man-made processes (such as underground cave mining and minerals processing). Previous laboratory [1] and numerical studies [4] have demonstrated that two distinct breakage mechanisms contribute to the comminution of granular materials under shear. The first mechanism is that of abrasion in which grinding or chipping removes small volumes of material from the surface of larger blocks. The amount of abrasion has been found to be dependent both on the total shear strain and the confining pressure applied to the granular material. The second breakage mechanism is that of bulk-splitting, in which a single block is broken into two or more smaller blocks. The degree of bulk-splitting has been shown to be largely dependent upon confining pressure, and only to a lesser extent the total shear strain. Common to previous laboratory and numerical studies is that the granular material is typically initially mono-disperse and often of a contrived shape (cylindrical [1] or spherical [4]). This approach has two adverse consequences. Firstly, the initial granular material has a porosity much higher than a similar volume of compacted prismatic material. The higher porosity results in less dilation of the granular material as shear commences, which may inhibit breakage via builk-splitting. Secondly, there are fewer edges or corners, the sites most amenable for abrasion both during confinement and shear. This study extends previous studies using the Discrete Element Method (DEM [2]) to investigate the breakge mechanisms of sheared prismatic granular materials whose initial porosity is near zero. The granular prismatic material is constructed by first filling a volume with large spheres of variable size. These spheres are then replaced by convex polyhedra forming planar surfaces between

  8. Alternative disposal for Investigation Derived Wastes (IDW) containing low activity source material

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, H.T.; Majer, T.

    2007-07-01

    As part of a Remedial Investigation (RI) at a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site, approximately 77,111 kg (85 tons) I would use the actual tons of investigation derived wastes (IDW) were generated from exploratory soil borings and as part of removal activities at a former drum burial area. Characterization of these materials indicated elevated concentrations of metals including uranium and thorium (source material). Concentrations of uranium and thorium were at levels less than 0.05% by mass, which is the threshold for exempt source material under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. Disposal of this material was evaluated as low-level radioactive waste and as exempt radioactive waste. The NRC has established a process for evaluation and review of exempt source material transfer and direct disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) landfill. These requests are normally approved if the dose to a member of the general public is unlikely to exceed 0.25 mSv per year (25 milli-rem per year). The soil was evaluated for disposal as exempt radioactive waste at a RCRA landfill, which included dose modeling to workers during transportation and disposal as well as potential dose to members of the public after closure of the disposal facility. These evaluations determined that the potential dose was very small, and review by the agreement state regulatory agency indicated that this disposal process should not result in any undue hazard to public health and safety or property. The advantage of this approach is that disposal of 77,111 kg (85 tons) of IDW at a RCRA landfill is estimated to result in a savings of $80,000 as compared to disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Alternative waste disposal of exempt source material provides more disposal options and can lead to significant cost savings. (authors)

  9. Parental separation and adult psychological distress: an investigation of material and relational mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An association between parental separation or divorce occurring in childhood and increased psychological distress in adulthood is well established. However relatively little is known about why this association exists and how the mechanisms might differ for men and women. We investigate why this association exists, focussing on material and relational mechanisms and in particular on the way in which these link across the life course. Methods This study used the 1970 British Cohort Study (n = 10,714) to investigate material (through adolescent and adult material disadvantage, and educational attainment) and relational (through parent–child relationship quality and adult partnership status) pathways between parental separation (0–16 years) and psychological distress (30 years). Psychological distress was measured using Rutter’s Malaise Inventory. The inter-linkages between these two broad mechanisms across the life course were also investigated. Missing data were multiply imputed by chained equations. Path analysis was used to explicitly model prospectively-collected measures across the life course, therefore methodologically extending previous work. Results Material and relational pathways partially explained the association between parental separation in childhood and adult psychological distress (indirect effect = 33.3% men; 60.0% women). The mechanisms were different for men and women, for instance adult partnership status was found to be more important for men. Material and relational factors were found to interlink across the life course. Mechanisms acting through educational attainment were found to be particularly important. Conclusions This study begins to disentangle the mechanisms between parental separation in childhood and adult psychological distress. Interventions which aim to support children through education, in particular, are likely to be particularly beneficial for later psychological health. PMID:24655926

  10. Parental separation and adult psychological distress: an investigation of material and relational mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Rebecca E; Bartley, Mel; Pikhart, Hynek; Stafford, Mai; Cable, Noriko

    2014-03-23

    An association between parental separation or divorce occurring in childhood and increased psychological distress in adulthood is well established. However relatively little is known about why this association exists and how the mechanisms might differ for men and women. We investigate why this association exists, focussing on material and relational mechanisms and in particular on the way in which these link across the life course. This study used the 1970 British Cohort Study (n=10,714) to investigate material (through adolescent and adult material disadvantage, and educational attainment) and relational (through parent-child relationship quality and adult partnership status) pathways between parental separation (0-16 years) and psychological distress (30 years). Psychological distress was measured using Rutter's Malaise Inventory. The inter-linkages between these two broad mechanisms across the life course were also investigated. Missing data were multiply imputed by chained equations. Path analysis was used to explicitly model prospectively-collected measures across the life course, therefore methodologically extending previous work. Material and relational pathways partially explained the association between parental separation in childhood and adult psychological distress (indirect effect=33.3% men; 60.0% women). The mechanisms were different for men and women, for instance adult partnership status was found to be more important for men. Material and relational factors were found to interlink across the life course. Mechanisms acting through educational attainment were found to be particularly important. This study begins to disentangle the mechanisms between parental separation in childhood and adult psychological distress. Interventions which aim to support children through education, in particular, are likely to be particularly beneficial for later psychological health.

  11. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  12. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  13. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Material motions during the crater growth period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.; Orphal, D. L.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with studies which are to provide a better understanding of the detailed dynamics of impact cratering processes. Such an understanding is vital for a comprehension of planetary surfaces. The investigation is the continuation of a study of impact dynamics in a uniform, nongeologic material at impact velocities achievable in laboratory-scale experiments conducted by Thomsen et al. (1979). A calculation of a 6 km/sec impact of a 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectile into low strength (50 kPa) homogeneous plasticene clay has been continued from 18 microseconds to past 600 microseconds. The cratering flow field, defined as the material flow field in the target beyond the transient cavity but well behind the outgoing shock wave, has been analyzed in detail to see how applicable the Maxwell Z-Model, developed from analysis of near-surface explosion cratering calculations, is to impact cratering

  14. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Material motions during the crater growth period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.; Orphal, D. L.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with studies which are to provide a better understanding of the detailed dynamics of impact cratering processes. Such an understanding is vital for a comprehension of planetary surfaces. The investigation is the continuation of a study of impact dynamics in a uniform, nongeologic material at impact velocities achievable in laboratory-scale experiments conducted by Thomsen et al. (1979). A calculation of a 6 km/sec impact of a 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectile into low strength (50 kPa) homogeneous plasticene clay has been continued from 18 microseconds to past 600 microseconds. The cratering flow field, defined as the material flow field in the target beyond the transient cavity but well behind the outgoing shock wave, has been analyzed in detail to see how applicable the Maxwell Z-Model, developed from analysis of near-surface explosion cratering calculations, is to impact cratering

  15. An atomic force microscopy tip model for investigating the mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Alderighi, Michele; Ierardi, Vincenzo; Allegrini, Maria; Fuso, Francesco; Solaro, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Investigation of the mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale is often performed by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation. However, substrates with large surface roughness and heterogeneity demand careful data analysis. This requirement is even more stringent when surface indentations with a typical depth of a few nanometers are produced to test material hardness. Accordingly, we developed a geometrical model of the nanoindenter, which was first validated by measurements on a reference gold sample. Then we used this technique to investigate the mechanical properties of a coating layer made of Balinit C, a commercially available alloy with superior anti-wear features deposited on steel. The reported results support the feasibility of reliable hardness measurements with truly nanosized indents.

  16. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  17. Investigation of photon attenuation coefficient of some building materials used in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, B.; Altinsoy, N.

    2015-03-30

    In this study, some building materials regularly used in Turkey, such as concrete, gas concrete, pumice and brick have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient at different gamma-ray energies. Measurements were carried out by gamma spectrometry containing NaI(Tl) detector. Narrow beam gamma-ray transmission geometry was used for the attenuation measurements. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation of XCOM code.

  18. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  19. Klimt artwork: material investigation by backscattering Fe-57 Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, B. F. O.; Blumers, M.; Sansano, A.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Rull, F.; Lehmann, R.; Renz, F.

    2014-04-01

    The long lost painting "Trumpeting Putto" was discovered and now is not only in the focus of art historian, but has also scientific interest too. We underwent this rare case of an inorganic layered artwork a non-destructive material investigation by employing Raman and MIMOSII Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy. First results indicate several layers, where two layers of different pigments are on an inorganic background layer stabilised by a metallic wire within a wooden frame structure

  20. Laboratory Investigation into the Contribution of Contaminants to Ground Water from Equipment Materials Used in Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Dresel, P Evan; Sklarew, Debbie S.

    2004-08-30

    Benzene contamination was detected in well water samples from the Ogallala Aquifer beneath and adjacent to the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. This study assessed whether or not the materials used in multilevel sampling equipment at this site could have contributed to the contaminants found in well water samples. As part of this investigation, laboratory testing of the sample equipment material was conducted. Results from the laboratory test indicated three different materials from two types of multilevel samplers did, in fact, contribute volatile and semivolatile organic compounds to the ground water samples from static leach tests that were conducted during an eight week period. The nylon-11 tubing contributed trace concentrations of benzene (1.37 ?g/L) and relatively high concentrations of the plasticizer N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA) (764 mg/L) to the water; a urethane-coated nylon well liner contributed relatively high concentrations of toluene (278 ?g/L) and trace amounts of NBSA; and a sampling port spacer material made of nylon/polypropylene/polyester-composite contributed trace amounts of toluene and NBSA. While the concentrations of benzene and toluene measured in the laboratory tests were below the concentrations measured in actual ground water samples, the concentrations of organics from these equipment materials were sufficient to render the results reported for the ground water samples suspect.

  1. Ground-based simulation of LEO environment: Investigations of a select LDEF material: FEP Teflon (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has produced a wealth of data on materials degradation in the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment and has conclusively shown that surface chemistry (as opposed to surface physics-sputtering) is the key to understanding and predicting the degradation of materials in the LEO environment. It is also clear that materials degradation and spacecraft contamination are closely linked and that the fundamental mechanisms responsible for this linking are in general not well understood especially in the area of synergistic effects. The study of the fundamental mechanisms underlying materials degradation in LEO is hampered by the fact that the degradation process itself is not observed during the actual exposure to the environment. Rather the aftermath of the degradation process is studied, i.e., the material that remains after exposure is observed and mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results. The EOIM-3 flight experiment is an attempt to bring sophisticated diagnostic equipment into the space environment and monitor the degradation process in real time through the use of mass spectrometry. More experiments of this nature which would include surface sensitive diagnostics (Auger and photoelectron spectroscopes) are needed to truly unravel the basic chemical mechanisms involved in the materials degradation process. Since these in-space capabilities will most likely not be available in the near future, ground-based LEO simulation facilities employing sophisticated diagnostics are needed to further advance the basic understanding of the materials degradation mechanisms. The LEO simulation facility developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been used to investigate the atomic oxygen/vacuum ultraviolet (AO/VUV) enhanced degradation of FEP Teflon. The results show that photo-ejection of polymer fragments occur at elevated temperature (200 C), that VUV synergistic rare gas sputtering of polymer fragments occur even at

  2. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Umesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs. PMID:25295049

  3. 1064 nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Umesh P

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression can be achieved, the utility of the Raman investigations has increased significantly. Moreover, the development of several new capabilities such as estimation of cellulose-crystallinity, ability to analyze changes in cellulose conformation at the local and molecular level, and examination of water-cellulose interactions have made this technique essential for research in the field of plant science. The FT-Raman method has also been applied to research studies in the arenas of biofuels and nanocelluloses. Moreover, the ability to investigate plant lignins has been further refined with the availability of near-IR Raman. In this paper, we present 1064-nm FT-Raman spectroscopy methodology to investigate various compositional and structural properties of plant material. It is hoped that the described studies will motivate the research community in the plant biomass field to adapt this technique to investigate their specific research needs.

  4. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalgund, Megha; Zunjarrao, Suraj; Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.

    2015-03-01

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT's capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage & understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  5. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Navalgund, Megha Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.; Zunjarrao, Suraj

    2015-03-31

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT’s capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage and understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  6. Investigation on the application of steel slag-fly ash-phosphogypsum solidified material as road base material.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiguo; Zhou, Mingkai; Ma, Wei; Hu, Jinqiang; Cai, Zhi

    2009-05-15

    The aim of the present work is to prepare a new type of steel slag-fly ash-phosphogypsum solidified material totally composed with solid wastes to be utilized as road base material. The mix formula of this material was optimized, the solidified material with optimal mix formula (fly ash/steel slag=1:1, phosphogypsum dosage=2.5%) results in highest strength. The strength development, resilience modulus and splitting strength of this material were studied comparing with some typical road base materials, the 28- and 360-day strength of this material can reach 8MPa and 12MPa, respectively, its resilience modulus reaches 1987MPa and splitting strength reaches 0.82MPa, it has higher early strength than lime-fly ash and lime-soil road base material, its long-term strength is much higher than cement stabilized granular materials, the solidified material has best water stability among those road base materials, it can be engineered as road base material with competitive properties. The strength formation mechanism of this solidified material is discussed also.

  7. Cellular water distribution, transport, and its investigation methods for plant-based food material.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Imran H; Karim, M A

    2017-09-01

    Heterogeneous and hygroscopic characteristics of plant-based food material make it complex in structure, and therefore water distribution in its different cellular environments is very complex. There are three different cellular environments, namely the intercellular environment, the intracellular environment, and the cell wall environment inside the food structure. According to the bonding strength, intracellular water is defined as loosely bound water, cell wall water is categorized as strongly bound water, and intercellular water is known as free water (FW). During food drying, optimization of the heat and mass transfer process is crucial for the energy efficiency of the process and the quality of the product. For optimizing heat and mass transfer during food processing, understanding these three types of waters (strongly bound, loosely bound, and free water) in plant-based food material is essential. However, there are few studies that investigate cellular level water distribution and transport. As there is no direct method for determining the cellular level water distributions, various indirect methods have been applied to investigate the cellular level water distribution, and there is, as yet, no consensus on the appropriate method for measuring cellular level water in plant-based food material. Therefore, the main aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review on the available methods to investigate the cellular level water, the characteristics of water at different cellular levels and its transport mechanism during drying. The effect of bound water transport on quality of food product is also discussed. This review article presents a comparative study of different methods that can be applied to investigate cellular water such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dilatometry. The article closes with a discussion of current challenges to investigating cellular water

  8. Experimental studies of seal materials for potential use in a Los Medanos-type bedded salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Roy, D.M.; Grutzeck, M.W.

    1981-09-01

    This investigation is composed of the following three tasks: (1) materials selection and factors affecting longevity of seal materials; (2) experimental seal materials for shaft, tunnel, and room backfill incorporating rock from the Los Medanos area; and (3) effects of the curing environment on properties of seal materials. Cement-based materials have been studied as candidates for backfilling and sealing boreholes, shafts, tunnels, and rooms in potential repository environments, particularly in bedded salt. In these studies, potential seal materials were selected and subjected to preliminary tests. Then, geochemical factors which control longevity of repository-sealing materials were investigated. The subjects of investigations included: factors controlling the attainment of equilibrium, with time, of the plug components; and the rate of approach of the plug-component subsystem to a state of equilibrium within the total system. The effect of these factors upon changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radwaste species are being determined. High values were obtained for compressive strengths of some concretes (> 35 MPa); these samples also had very low permeabilities to brine (10/sup -7/ or 10/sup -8/ darcy). Highest strengths were obtained from samples cast with dolostone and anhydrite aggregate. Apparently, a strong bond generally was formed between the grout and the various rocks, evidenced by breakage through aggregate particles in tests of compressive strength. An expansive grout mixture containing salt was evaluated in five curing conditions, including: solutions saturated with CaSO/sub 4/, and Ca(OH)/sub 2/; deionized water; naturally occurring brine; and humid air, all at 38/sup 0/C. Expansion due to extensive growth of ettringite occurred in the first three of these five environments.

  9. Investigation of the Higher Harmonic Lamb Wave Generation in Hyperelastic Isotropic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauter, Natalie; Lammering, Rolf

    Micro-structural damages, such as micro-cracks and voids, give locally rise to stresses and may initiate subsequent failure of structural components. Therefore, the development of methods for the detection of microstructural damage and the observation of their growth is an important and ongoing area of research, especially for thin-walled structures. The proposed method for the detection is based on the nonlinearity caused by the micro-structural damages. Lamb waves are generated which induce simultaneously higher harmonic modes due the inherent nonlinearity. For detailed investigations, numerical simulations are essential. In this work, the nonlinearity is modeled by the material law, which is based on the Neo- Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin material models. In contrast to previous studies, which used third order elastic coefficients, these hyperelastic material models are widely accepted, frequently used, and implemented in commonly available FEM software. In the numerical investigations, Lamb waves are generated in a thin-walled aluminum plate with windowed sine burst signals. Due to the nonlinearity in the material law, the waves are not only observed at the excitation frequency, but also at higher harmonic frequencies. Excitation at especially selected frequencies evoke the cumulative effect, and thus gives rise to the amplitudes of the higher harmonics. Comparing the S1-S2 and S2-S4 mode pairs clearly show the higher sensitivity of the latter to the material nonlinearity. This matches with previous published experimental results. Finally, it is shown that the results obtained agree qualitatively well with numerical analyses, in which the micro-structural damages are modeled directly by a respective finite element discretization.

  10. In vivo and in vitro investigations of a nanostructured coating material – a preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Martin; Ganz, Cornelia; Xu, Weiguo; Sarajian, Hamid-Reza; Götz, Werner; Gerber, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants is only possible if a firm bone-implant anchorage at early stages is developed. This implies early and high bone apposition onto the implant surface. A nanostructured coating material based on an osseoinductive bone grafting is investigated in relation to the osseointegration at early stages. The goal is to transmit the structure (silica matrix with embedded hydroxyapatite) and the properties of the bone grafting into a coating material. The bone grafting substitute offers an osseoinductive potential caused by an exchange of the silica matrix in vivo accompanied by vascularization. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis show that the coating material consists of a high porous silica matrix with embedded nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite with the same morphology as human hydroxyapatite. An in vitro investigation shows the early interaction between coating and human blood. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis showed that the silica matrix was replaced by an organic matrix within a few minutes. Uncoated and coated titanium implants were inserted into the femora of New Zealand White rabbits. The bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was measured after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The BIC of the coated implants was increased significantly at 2 and 4 weeks. After 6 weeks, the BIC was decreased to the level of the control group. A histological analysis revealed high bone apposition on the coated implant surface after 2 and 4 weeks. Osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities on the coating material indicated that the coating participates in the bone-remodeling process. The nanostructure of the coating material led to an exchange of the silica matrix by an autologous, organic matrix without delamination of the coating. This is the key issue in understanding initial bone formation on a coated surface. PMID:24627631

  11. A preliminary investigation of materialism and impulsiveness as predictors of technological addictions among young adults.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James A; Pirog, Stephen F

    2013-03-01

    Background and aims The primary objective of the present research is to investigate the drivers of technological addiction in college students - heavy users of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). The study places cell phone and instant messaging addiction in the broader context of consumption pathologies, investigating the influence of materialism and impulsiveness on these two technologies. Clearly, cell phones serve more than just a utilitarian purpose. Cell phones are used in public and play a vital role in the lives of young adults. The accessibility of new technologies, like cell phones, which have the advantages of portability and an ever increasing array of functions, makes their over-use increasingly likely. Methods College undergraduates (N = 191) from two U.S. universities completed a paper and pencil survey instrument during class. The questionnaire took approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and contained scales that measured materialism, impulsiveness, and mobile phone and instant messaging addiction. Results Factor analysis supported the discriminant validity of Ehrenberg, Juckes, White and Walsh's (2008) Mobile Phone and Instant Messaging Addictive Tendencies Scale. The path model indicates that both materialism and impulsiveness impact the two addictive tendencies, and that materialism's direct impact on these addictions has a noticeably larger effect on cell phone use than instant messaging. Conclusions The present study finds that materialism and impulsiveness drive both a dependence on cell phones and instant messaging. As Griffiths (2012) rightly warns, however, researchers must be aware that one's addiction may not simply be to the cell phone, but to a particular activity or function of the cell phone. The emergence of multi-function smart phones requires that research must dig beneath the technology being used to the activities that draw the user to the particular technology.

  12. Numerical investigations on flow dynamics of prismatic granular materials using the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, W.; Weatherley, D.; Wruck, B.; Chitombo, G. P.

    2012-04-01

    The flow dynamics of granular materials is of broad interest in both the geosciences (e.g. landslides, fault zone evolution, and brecchia pipe formation) and many engineering disciplines (e.g chemical engineering, food sciences, pharmaceuticals and materials science). At the interface between natural and human-induced granular media flow, current underground mass-mining methods are trending towards the induced failure and subsequent gravitational flow of large volumes of broken rock, a method known as cave mining. Cave mining relies upon the undercutting of a large ore body, inducement of fragmentation of the rock and subsequent extraction of ore from below, via hopper-like outlets. Design of such mines currently relies upon a simplified kinematic theory of granular flow in hoppers, known as the ellipsoid theory of mass movement. This theory assumes that the zone of moving material grows as an ellipsoid above the outlet of the silo. The boundary of the movement zone is a shear band and internal to the movement zone, the granular material is assumed to have a uniformly high bulk porosity compared with surrounding stagnant regions. There is however, increasing anecdotal evidence and field measurements suggesting this theory fails to capture the full complexity of granular material flow within cave mines. Given the practical challenges obstructing direct measurement of movement both in laboratory experiments and in-situ, the Discrete Element Method (DEM [1]) is a popular alternative to investigate granular media flow. Small-scale DEM studies (c.f. [3] and references therein) have confirmed that movement within DEM silo flow models matches that predicted by ellipsoid theory, at least for mono-disperse granular material freely outflowing at a constant rate. A major draw-back of these small-scale DEM studies is that the initial bulk porosity of the simulated granular material is significantly higher than that of broken, prismatic rock. In this investigation, more

  13. Investigation of binary coating material mixtures using grazing incidence EUV-reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasa, I.; Neiers, X.; Mende, M.; Jensen, L.; Ristau, D.

    2014-10-01

    Having been of special interest in thin film technology for a long time already, mixtures of coating materials are still in the focus of research aiming for highest performance in high power as well as in ultra-short pulse laser applications. On the one hand, coating material combinations allow customizing the coating for a certain application by modifying advantageously the refractive index or the band gap energy. On the other hand, that technology is essential in the production of Rugate-filters, using gradually varied refractive index profiles. Therefore, it is of special interest to get insight into the composition of such mixed layers, not only in terms of refractive index and absorption coefficient, but also to evaluate the fractions of materials involved for gaining a better understanding, and therefore to reach highest possible reproducibility for production of such kind of thin films. In this work, single layers of binary mixtures of aluminum oxide, aluminum fluoride, and silicon dioxide are studied with respect to their composition using extreme ultraviolet reflectometry (EUV-R). As the penetration depth of EUV radiation is only a few tens of nanometers under grazing incidence, this non-invasive measurement technique is sensitive to the near surface composition of the film. Therefore it allows investigating the layer material independently of the substrate on which it was deposited. Using specific absorption edges of the involved materials in the EUV spectrum, an empirical correlation between EUV response and mixture ratio is developed and compared to the deep ultraviolet (VUV) absorption edges of the mixture materials.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENCE OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES WITHIN CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G

    2008-06-04

    During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles, (Stegobium paniceum (L.) Coleoptera: Anobiidae), were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. Initial indications were that the beetles were feeding on the Celotex{trademark} assemblies within the package. Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is used in numerous radioactive material packages serving as both a thermal insulator and an impact absorber for both normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident conditions. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-63) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex{trademark}. The Savannah River National Laboratory is conducting the investigation with entomological expertise provided by Clemson University. The two empty 9975 shipping packages were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory in the fall of 2007. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation.

  15. Investigation of titanium and polyethylene as UCN absorber materials with AbEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picker, R.; Altarev, I.; Amos, P.; Franke, B.; Geltenbort, P.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hartmann, F. J.; Mann, A.; Materne, S.; Müller, A. R.; Paul, S.; Stoepler, R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2009-12-01

    Marginally trapped neutrons are a major source of systematic errors in storage experiments with ultra-cold neutrons (UCN): their energies slightly exceed the trapping potential and their storage lifetimes are of the same order of magnitude as the neutron β-decay lifetime to be measured. Hence, they have to be removed before the actual neutron storage period starts. For the magneto-gravitational neutron-lifetime experiment PENeLOPE, a novel absorber scheme was proposed; its efficiency to reduce the systematic influence of marginally trapped UCN on the extracted β-decay lifetime value had to be investigated. To this end, the cryogenic material-storage experiment AbEx ( Ab sorber Ex periment) was conducted at ILL, Grenoble; neutron-optical properties of storage and absorption materials were investigated. Storage lifetimes shorter than 10 s could be reached for high-energy UCN with the proposed scheme. This translates to a systematic effect on the neutron-lifetime measurement with PENeLOPE of Δτn<0.03 s. Polyethylene (PE) and titanium were tested as absorber materials. The temperature dependence of their UCN absorbing efficiency was determined to be rather small and connected not with the upscattering cross-section, but probably with surface contaminations.

  16. Experimental investigation of Rayleigh Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Aaron Alan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2010-11-01

    The interface of an elastic-plastic plate accelerated by a fluid of lower density is Rayleigh Taylor (RT) unstable, the growth being mitigated by the mechanical strength of the plate. The instability is observed when metal plates are accelerated by high explosives, in explosive welding, and in volcanic island formation due to the strength of the inner crust. In contrast to the classical case involving Newtonian fluids, RT instability in accelerated solids is not well understood. The difficulties for constructing a theory for the linear growth phase in solids is essentially due to the character of elastic-plastic constitutive properties which has a nonlinear dependence on the magnitude of the rate of deformation. Experimental investigation of the phenomena is difficult due to the exceedingly small time scales (in high energy density experiments) and large measurement uncertainties of material properties. We performed experiments on our Two-Wheel facility to study the linear stage of the incompressible RT instability in elastic-plastic materials (yogurt) whose properties were well characterized. Rotation of the wheels imparted a constant centrifugal acceleration on the material interface that was cut with a small sinusoidal ripple. The controlled initial conditions and precise acceleration amplitudes are levied to investigate transition from elastic to plastic deformation and allow accurate and detailed measurements of flow properties.

  17. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations

    DOE PAGES

    Varga, Z.; Mayer, K.; Bonamici, C. E.; ...

    2015-05-11

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the ²²⁰Th/²³⁴U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory proceduresmore » used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations.« less

  18. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  19. Investigation of test methods, material properties and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify, test, evaluate and recommend encapsulation materials and processes for the fabrication of cost-effective and long life solar modules. Of the $18 (1948 $) per square meter allocated for the encapsulation components approximately 50% of the cost ($9/sq m) may be taken by the load bearing component. Due to the proportionally high cost of this element, lower costing materials were investigated. Wood based products were found to be the lowest costing structural materials for module construction, however, they require protection from rainwater and humidity in order to acquire dimensional stability. The cost of a wood product based substrate must, therefore, include raw material costs plus the cost of additional processing to impart hygroscopic inertness. This protection is provided by a two step, or split process in which a flexible laminate containing the cell string is prepared, first in a vacuum process and then adhesively attached with a back cover film to the hardboard in a subsequent step.

  20. Investigation of student use of Web-based tutorial materials and understanding of chemistry concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, William Joseph

    The purpose of this study was to investigate students' use of Web-based tutorial materials in general chemistry and these students' understanding of chemistry concepts. The Visualization and Problem Solving Web Site includes tutorial materials for several visual chemistry topics such as VSEPR and coordination chemistry. Students generally valued the web site because of the representations and visualizations it provided, the materials and information available on the web site, and because they felt that they needed help with chemistry. Many students who did not use the web site felt that they did not need help with chemistry and thus did not need this additional source of help. Both web site users and nonusers were generally positive about using the web to learn chemistry. Motivation was also a factor in student decisions to use or not use the materials on the web. To gauge students' understanding of chemistry concepts, students were asked questions about coordination chemistry and drew concept maps during the interviews. Web site users made more incorrect statements during the discussion of coordination chemistry questions, but the student concept maps did not show a great difference in terms of percentages of correct and incorrect links.

  1. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2015-01-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  2. Investigation of the Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) Electron Resist as Insulating Material in Phase Change Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiao; Ji, Hongkai; Lan, Tian; Yan, Junbing; Zhou, Wenli; Miao, Xiangshui

    2014-09-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) affords many advantages over conventional solid-state memories due to its nonvolatility, high speed, and scalability. However, high programming current to amorphize the crystalline phase through the melt-quench process of PCRAM, known as the RESET current, poses a critical challenge and has become the most significant obstacle for its widespread commercialization. In this work, an excellent negative tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), has been investigated as the insulating material which locally blocks the contact between the bottom electrode and the phase change material in PCRAM devices. Fabrications of the highly scaled HSQ nanopore arrays (as small as 16 nm) are presented. The insulating properties of the HSQ material are studied, especially under e-beam exposure plus thermal curing. Some other critical issues about the thickness adjustment of HSQ films and the influence of the PCRAM electrode on electron scattering in e-beam lithography are discussed. In addition, the HSQ material was successfully integrated into the PCRAM devices, achieving ultra-low RESET current (sub-100 μA), outstanding on/off ratios (~50), and improved endurance at tens of nanometers.

  3. Recent results on materials aspects of the investigation of new topological states of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, Robert

    Investigation of the electronic states of matter that are determined by topological physics has exploded in recent years through parallel progress in theory, experimental characterization, device fabrication and new materials development. In our group working in this area, the speaker has been responsible for the development of new materials to allow the experimentalists to probe the emergence of new topological properties, and to help embody the concepts of our theorists in real materials. The field is fast-moving, with particular thrusts at the present time toward Weyl and Dirac semimetals, and in this talk I will describe the materials aspects of our work in the past year in these areas, specifically as they are related to our strong collaborations with the groups of N.P. Ong, A. Yazdani, and B.A. Bernevig at Princeton, T. Valla and J. Tao at Brookhaven, and A. Vishwanath at Berkeley. The support of our work in this area by the NSF through its MRSEC program, Grant DMR 1420541, and the ARO through its MURI on topological insulators, Grant W911NF-12-1-0461, is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives.

  5. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Z; Mayer, K; Bonamici, C E; Hubert, A; Hutcheon, I; Kinman, W; Kristo, M; Pointurier, F; Spencer, K; Stanley, F; Steiner, R; Tandon, L; Williams, R

    2015-08-01

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the (230)Th/(234)U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory procedures used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental investigation of micromechanical behavior of advanced materials by moiré interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin; Qin, Yuwen; Dai, Fulong

    1996-09-01

    Several typical instances show that moiré interferometry is an effective experimental method for micromechanics study of advanced materials. By using moiré interferometry, stress-induced martensitic transformation plastic zone in ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramics (Ce-TZP) is studied. The experimental results show that the stress-induced transformation at room temperature is not uniform within the transformation zone and the phenomenon of microscopic plastic flow localization for transformation is revealed. Meanwhile, the experimental investigation of the pseudoelasticity behavior of Cu-Zn-Al polycrystalline shape memory alloy and bending behavior of carbon-fiber aluminium laminates (CALL) are reported. The experiments reveal some important features of the deformation processes of the materials. Finally, the measuring ability of moiré interferometry for micromechanics study is discussed.

  7. Experimental investigations of the influence of material and thickness on fracture under pure mode II loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.

    2010-06-01

    Experimental investigation to the effects of thickness and material on mode II fracture were performed. Tension-shear specimens made of aluminium alloy LC4CS and 7050-T7452 with thicknesses of 2, 4, 8 and 14 mm were used. All crack tip appearances and fracture profiles of the specimens were observed. Mode II fracture toughness were calculated. It is shown that material and thickness play an important role in mode II fracture. The fracture of LC4CS appears shear fracture under all kinds of thicknesses, however the fracture of 7050-T7452 is tensile fracture when thickness is larger or equal to 8mm, and shear initiation along the original crack plane, then turnaround and tensile failure when thickness is smaller than 8mm. Mode II fracture toughness is independent of thickness.

  8. Experimental investigation on the dynamic mechanical properties of soft magnetic entangled metallic wire material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhong; Zhang, Qicheng; Zhang, Dayi; Hu, Wenzhong; Hong, Jie

    2017-05-01

    This work describes the dynamic characteristics of a novel soft magnetic entangled metallic wire material(SM-EMWM) by the dynamic tests for the first time. The mechanical properties of three batches of SM-EMWMs with different porosities have been investigated under different dynamic loads in different magnetic field intensities. The result shows that its properties (storage modulus and loss factor) have commendably controllable magnetic responses in the magnetic field. In particular, the dynamic damping is more remarkable than its quasi-static performance, and the loss factor can be improved above 50% in the magnetic field of 500 mT. The results indicate that SM-EMWM as a magneto-sensitive smart material possesses a considerable application prospect for the active vibration control with variable stiffness and damping.

  9. Radiative property investigation. [digital computer programs for determining bidirectional reflectance of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed formulation of radiative heat transfer problems involving the use of bidirectional reflectance is discussed. Except for very simple systems this formulation is very intricate. For this reason and the fact that bidirectional data are scarce, such a formulation is not in common use. However, with the development of the digital computer there have been numerical methods developed for detailed radiative investigations using the bidirectional reflectance. Since computations using bidirectional reflectance are coming into use for spacecraft radiative studies, it is necessary to have reflectance data on the materials involved. Materials that are frequently studied are coatings which are used in controlling the thermal environment of spacecrafts. This study is primarily concerned with the bidirectional reflectance of zinc oxide which is one constituent commonly used for coatings.

  10. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns.

  11. Direct investigation of (sub-) surface preparation artifacts in GaAs based materials by FIB sectioning.

    PubMed

    Belz, Jürgen; Beyer, Andreas; Torunski, Torsten; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    The introduction of preparation artifacts is almost inevitable when producing samples for (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). These artifacts can be divided in extrinsic artifacts like damage processes and intrinsic artifacts caused by the deviations from the volume strain state in thin elastically strained material systems. The reduction and estimation of those effects is of great importance for the quantitative analysis of (S)TEM images. Thus, optimized ion beam preparation conditions are investigated for high quality samples. Therefore, the surface topology is investigated directly with atomic force microscopy (AFM) on the actual TEM samples. Additionally, the sectioning of those samples by a focused ion beam (FIB) is used to investigate the damage depth profile directly in the TEM. The AFM measurements show good quantitative agreement of sample height modulation due to strain relaxation to finite elements simulations. Strong indications of (sub-) surface damage by ion beams are observed. Their influence on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging is estimated with focus on thickness determination by absolute intensity methods. Data consolidation of AFM and TEM measurements reveals a 3.5nm surface amorphization, negligible surface roughness on the scale of angstroms and a sub-surface damage profile in the range of up to 8.0nm in crystalline gallium arsenide (GaAs) and GaAs-based ternary alloys. A correction scheme for thickness evaluation of absolute HAADF intensities is proposed and applied for GaAs based materials.

  12. In Vitro Investigations of Human Bioaccessibility from Reference Materials Using Simulated Lung Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Pelfrêne, Aurélie; Cave, Mark R.; Wragg, Joanna; Douay, Francis

    2017-01-01

    An investigation for assessing pulmonary bioaccessibility of metals from reference materials is presented using simulated lung fluids. The objective of this paper was to contribute to an enhanced understanding of airborne particulate matter and its toxic potential following inhalation. A large set of metallic elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn) was investigated using three lung fluids (phosphate-buffered saline, Gamble’s solution and artificial lysosomal fluid) on three standard reference materials representing different types of particle sources. Composition of the leaching solution and four solid-to-liquid (S/L) ratios were tested. The results showed that bioaccessibility was speciation- (i.e., distribution) and element-dependent, with percentages varying from 0.04% for Pb to 86.0% for Cd. The higher extraction of metallic elements was obtained with the artificial lysosomal fluid, in which a relative stability of bioaccessibility was observed in a large range of S/L ratios from 1/1000 to 1/10,000. For further investigations, it is suggested that this method be used to assess lung bioaccessibility of metals from smelter-impacted dusts. PMID:28125027

  13. Preliminary investigation of cement materials in the Taif area, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of possible sources of cement rock in the Taft area was made during the latter part of August 1968. Adequate deposits of limestone, clay, quartz conglomerate and sandstone, and pisolitic iron ore, yet no gypsum, were located to support a Cement plant should it prove feasible to establish one in this area. These materials, made up mostly of Tertiary and later sediments, crop out in isolated, inconspicuous low hills in a north- trending belt, 10 to 15 kilometers wide, lying about 90 kilometers to-the east of At Taft. The belt extends for more than 90 kilometers from the vicinity of Jabal 'An in the south to the crushed rock pits at Radwan and beyond in the north. The area is readily accessible either from the Talf-Riyadh highway or from the Taif-Bishah road presently under construction. The limestone, which is quite pure and dense in some localities but dolomitic, argillaceous, and cherty in others, occurs in a variety of colors and would make suitable decorative building stone. The volcanic rocks of the Harrat Hadan, lying directly to the east of the limestone belt, include volcanic ash beds some of which may have been altered to bentonitlc clays. Others may have been lithified and might be suitable for light-weight aggregate. These possibilities remain to be investigated. Precambrian metamorphic rocks lying directly to the south and southeast of Taif were also investigated as possible cement rock sources, but no suitable material was found here.

  14. Nanotribological investigations of materials, coatings and lubricants for nanotechnology applications at high sliding velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambe, Nikhil S.

    The advent of micro/nanostructures and the subsequent miniaturization of moving components for various nanotechnology applications, such as micro/nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), have ascribed paramount importance to the tribology and mechanics on the nanoscale. Most of these micro/nanodevices and components operate at very high sliding velocities (of the order of tens of mm/s to few m/s). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies to investigate potential materials, coatings and lubricants for these devices have been rendered inadequate due to the inherent limitations on the highest sliding velocities achievable with commercial AFMs (<250 mum/s). The development of a new AFM based technique, done as part of this research work, has allowed nanotribological investigations over a wide range of velocities (up to 10 mm/s). The impacts of this research on the design and development of nanotechnology applications are profound. Research conducted on various materials, coatings and lubricants reveals a strong velocity dependence of friction, adhesion and wear on the nanoscale. Based on the experimental evidence, theoretical formulations have been conducted for nanoscale friction behavior to design a comprehensive analytical model that explains the velocity dependence. The model takes into consideration the contributions of adhesion at the tip-sample interface, high impact velocity related deformations at the contacting asperities and atomic scale stick-slip. Dominant friction mechanisms are identified and the critical operating parameters corresponding to their transitions are defined. Wear studies are conducted at high sliding velocities for materials, coatings and lubricants to understand the primary failure mechanisms. A novel AFM based nanowear mapping technique is developed to map wear on the nanoscale and the interdependence of normal load and sliding velocity on sample surface wear is studied. This technique helps identify and classify wear mechanisms and

  15. Experimental Investigation of Material Flows Within FSWs Using 3D Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Timothy A. White; Karen S. Miller; Denis E. Clark; Herschel B. Smartt

    2008-06-01

    There exists significant prior work using tracers or pre-placed hardened markers within friction stir welding (FSWing) to experimentally explore material flow within the FSW process. Our experiments replaced markers with a thin sheet of copper foil placed between the 6061 aluminum lap and butt joints that were then welded. The absorption characteristics of x-rays for copper and aluminum are significantly different allowing for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods such as x-ray computed tomography (CT) to be used to demonstrate the material movement within the weldment on a much larger scale than previously shown. 3D CT reconstruction of the copper components of the weldment allows for a unique view into the final turbulent state of the welding process as process parameters are varied. The x-ray CT data of a section of the weld region was collected using a cone-beam x-ray imaging system developed at the INL. Six-hundred projections were collected over 360-degrees using a 160-kVp Bremsstrahlung x-ray generator (25-micrometer focal spot) and amorphoussilicon x-ray detector. The region of the object that was imaged was about 3cm tall and 1.5cm x 1cm in cross section, and was imaged at a magnification of about 3.6x. The data were reconstructed on a 0.5x0.5x0.5 mm3 voxel grid. After reconstruction, the aluminum and copper could be easily discriminated using a gray level threshold allowing visualization of the copper components. Fractal analysis of the tomographic reconstructed material topology is investigated as a means to quantify macro level material flow based on process parameters. The results of multi-pass FSWs show increased refinement of the copper trace material. Implications of these techniques for quantifying process flow are discussed.

  16. Synthesis and investigation of novel cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Monica

    Environmental pollution and eventual depletion of fossil fuels and lithium has increased the need for research towards alternative electrical energy storage systems. In this context, research in sodium ion batteries (NIBs) has become more prevalent since the price in lithium has increased due to its demand and reserve location. Sodium is an abundant resource that is low cost, and safe; plus its chemical properties are similar to that of Li which makes the transition into using Na chemistry for ion battery systems feasible. In this study, we report the effects of processing conditions on the electrochemical properties of Na-ion batteries made of the NaCrO2 cathode. NaCrO2 is synthesized via solid state reactions. The as-synthesized powder is then subjected to high-energy ball milling under different conditions which reduces particle size drastically and causes significant degradation of the specific capacity for NaCrO2. X-ray diffraction reveals that lattice distortion has taken place during high-energy ball milling and in turn affects the electrochemical performance of the cathode material. This study shows that a balance between reducing particle size and maintaining the layered structure is essential to obtain high specific capacity for the NaCrO2 cathode. In light of the requirements for grid scale energy storage: ultra-long cycle life (> 20,000 cycles and calendar life of 15 to 20 years), high round trip efficiency (> 90%), low cost, sufficient power capability, and safety; the need for a suitable cathode materials with excellent capacity retention such as Na2MnFe(CN)6 and K2MnFe(CN)6 will be investigated. Prussian blue (A[FeIIIFeII (CN)6]•xH2O, A=Na+ or K+ ) and its analogues have been investigated as an alkali ion host for use as a cathode material. Their structure (FCC) provides large ionic channels along the direction enabling facile insertion and extraction of alkali ions. This material is also capable of more than one Na ion insertion per unit formula

  17. Mars: electric properties of clay materials in martian-like conditions to refine radar investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantuono, Luca; Baliva, Antonio; Lauro, Sebastian; Mattei, Elisabetta; Marinangeli, Lucia; Pettinelli, Elena; Seu, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    The orbital radar instruments are giving new opportunities for planetary geological investigation regarding subsurface layering and geometry. Sedimentary deposits of paleolacustrine environments on Mars have shown the presence of various clay minerals . These clay deposits are very important in planetary exploration because they are strictly linked to the presence of water and to the capability of the analyzed environment to develop life and, as a consequence, to preserve fossilized life marker. The subsurface stratigraphy and geometry of sedimentary deposits on Mars are investigated by two orbiting radar instruments (SHARAD and MARSIS) and in the next future another radar instrument, a landing one, will be send on Mars (WISDOM). For small grain size sediments, like clay minerals, the dielectric properties have a strong impact on the penetration depth of the radar signal. We studied the correct evaluation of these properties and their correlation with chemical and mineralogical phases. The focus of this research is on the dielectric properties of natural clayey materials at different frequencies and temperature, evaluating the correlation among water content , temperature and electric properties. Several natural clayey material samples, considered as analogues to the Martian ones, have been collected from different geological settings in Italy and we analyzed their water content, mineralogical assemblage and chemical content and the correlation with the permittivity at different frequencies and temperatures using the Network Analyzer technique. We also changed the water content of the samples, and using the SHARAD, MARSIS and WISDOM operating frequencies, we measured the variation of permittivity and electric properties in the thermal range of 180 K to 298 K. The goal of the study is to refine the sounding depths of the radar investigation on Mars, exploring the possibility to identify clayey sedimentary layers analyzing the differences between the electric

  18. Investigations of Non-Thermal Interactions Between Microwave Fields and Ionic Ceramic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Samuel Anthony

    Reports of enhanced mass transport and solid-state reaction rates during microwave processing have been reported in the literature for a variety of ceramic, glass, and polymer materials. These empirical observations of microwave enhancements have been broadly called the "microwave effect," even though no satisfactory theory existed to explain them. This dissertation describes a series of theoretical and experimental investigations of possible causes for enhanced mass transport in ceramic materials heated in microwave furnaces. The scientific method followed was to examine many of the assumptions used (either implicitly or explicitly) in the models and rate equations of mass transport processes and to challenge some of these assumptions in light of the conditions existing in microwave-heated materials. the investigations fall into two categories: (1) studies of enhanced mass transport coefficients; and (2) studies of enhanced driving forces. The investigations of increased transport coefficients first considered two temperature issues. Temperature measurement of a microwave-heated object is nontrivial, and so some consideration of temperature mismeasurement effects is described. Furthermore, the average thermal energy may not be completely related to the probability of high-energy diffusion events; therefore the possibility of athermal energy distributions is examined. Finally, the microwave field effects on activation energy barriers (and therefore diffusion probabilities) is considered. Experimental investigations of these effects using ionic current measurements is also described. Both the theoretical an experimental results indicate that transport coefficients are not affected by microwave heating, although temperature mismeasurement can account for some apparent enhancement. For microwave-enhanced driving forces, transport driven by temperature gradients in microwave-heated bodies is first examined and found to be unimportant. However, a new model for a

  19. Implementation of Neural Network Method to Investigate Defect Centers in Semi-Insulating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, S.; Wierzbowski, M.; Kaminski, P.; Pawlowski, M.

    A neural network (NN) method has been proposed as a new algorithm for extraction of defect centers parameters in semi-insulating materials from experimental data obtained by photoinduced transient spectroscopy (PITS). The new algorithm is applied to investigate irradiation-induced defect centers in high resistive silicon. The folds on the PITS spectral surface formed due to the presence of defect levels are best fitted with a two-dimensional approximation function with implementation of the NN learning process. As a result, the Arrhenius plots for defect centers are obtained and the parameters of these centers are determined.

  20. Investigation of Cement Pastes and Related Materials by Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    metric (SI) units as follows: Multiply By To Obtain angstroms 0.1 nanometres torr 133.322 pascals inches 25.4 millimetres 3 3 r.° I-i?5 INVESTIGATION OF...cement pastes were cast in rubber finger cots to allow for expansion. The hydrated pastes of alite and the ettringite-forming material were examined...freeze-dried to fracture the surface that will be examined. ** 10 angstroms = 1 nanometre . 7 elected samples of hydrated cement were polished and exam

  1. Methods for an investigation of the effect of material components on the mechanical characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willax, H. O.

    1980-01-01

    The materials used in the production of glass reinforced plastics are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to matrix polyester materials, the reinforcing glass materials, and aspects of specimen preparation. Various methods of investigation are described, giving attention to optical impregnation and wetting measurements and the gravimetric determination of the angle of contact. Deformation measurements and approaches utilizing a piezoelectric device are also considered.

  2. Pressurized grout remote backfilling at AML sites near Beulah and Zap, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.J.; Dodd, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Division of the North Dakota Public Service Commission (PSC) is charged with the reclamation of hazardous abandoned mine sites in North Dakota. Several underground lignite coalmines were operated near the cities of Beulah and Zap, North Dakota, from the early 1900's until about 1955. Coal seams in this area were relatively thick and the overburden generally shallow. As these mines have deteriorated with time, deep collapse features, or sinkholes, have surfaced in many areas. These features are very dangerous, especially when they occur at or near residential and commercial areas and public roads. In the past five years, sinkholes have surfaced beneath a commercial building (boat dealership, lounge, and gas station) and beneath a nearby occupied mobile home north of Beulah. sinkholes have also surfaced near KHOL Radio Station in Beulah and in the right of way of a public road south of Zap. The AML Division has conducted several emergency sinkhole-filling projects in these areas. In 1995--97, the AML Division conducted exploratory drilling which confirmed the presence of collapsing underground mines at these sites. The remediation of these sites around Beulah/Zap will take place over several years and involve three or more separate contracts due to budget considerations. In 1997, the AML Division began reclamation at these sties utilizing pressurized grout remote backfilling. In this technique, a cementitious grout is pumped through cased drill holes directly into the mine cavities to fill them and thereby stabilize the surface from collapse. The successful contractor for Phase One of the project was The Concrete Doctor, Inc. (TCDI). This paper will concentrate on Phase One of this work performed from June through September 1997. This project is especially interesting because grout was pumped through holes drilled inside the occupied commercial building. Grout was also pumped through angled holes that intercepted mined workings directly

  3. Experimental investigation of various vegetable fibers as sorbent materials for oil spills.

    PubMed

    Annunciado, T R; Sydenstricker, T H D; Amico, S C

    2005-11-01

    Oil spills are a global concern due to their environmental and economical impact. Various commercial systems have been developed to control these spills, including the use of fibers as sorbents. This research investigates the use of various vegetable fibers, namely mixed leaves residues, mixed sawdust, sisal (Agave sisalana), coir fiber (Cocos nucifera), sponge-gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and silk-floss as sorbent materials of crude oil. Sorption tests with crude oil were conducted in deionized and marine water media, with and without agitation. Water uptake by the fibers was investigated by tests in dry conditions and distillation of the impregnated sorbent. The silk-floss fiber showed a very high degree of hydrophobicity and oil sorption capacity of approximately 85goil/g sorbent (in 24hours). Specific gravity measurements and buoyancy tests were also used to evaluate the suitability of these fibers for the intended application.

  4. Investigation and characterization of constraint effects on flaw growth during fatigue loading of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.; Yeung, P.; Gibbins, M. N.

    1979-01-01

    An investigative program is presented in an attempt to add to the current understanding of constraint effects on the response of composite materials under cyclic loading. The objectives were: (1) to use existing data and to develop additional data in order to establish an understanding and quantitative description of flaw growth in unidirectional lamina under cyclic loading at different load direction to fiber direction angles; (2) to establish a similar understanding and description of flaw growth in lamina which are embedded in laminates between other unflawed lamina; (3) to determine the nature of the influence of constraint on flaw growth by quantitatively comparing the results of the tests; and (4) to develop a model and philosophy of constraints effects based on our investigative results.

  5. Numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of heated natural composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Mohammed, F. Abbas; Hashim, R.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work numerical investigation was carried out for laminar natural convection heat transfer from natural composite material (NCM). Three types of natural materials such as seed dates, egg shells, and feathers are mixed separately with polyester resin. Natural materials are added with different volume fraction (10%, 20%, and 30%) are heated with different heat flux (1078W/m2, 928W/m2, 750W/m2, 608W/m2, and 457W/m2) at (vertical, inclined, and horizontal) position. Continuity and Navier-Stocks equations are solved numerically in three dimensions using ANSYS FLUENT package 12.1 software commercial program. Numerical results showed the temperature distribution was affected for all types at volume fraction 30% and heat flux is 1078 W/m2, for different position. So, shows that the plumes and temperature behavior are affected by the air and the distance from heat source. Numerical results showed acceptable agreement with the experimental previous results.

  6. Experimental investigation on materials and lubricants for sliding-vane air compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgia, Stefano; Valenti, Gianluca; Contaldi, Giulio; Valenti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Positive-displacement compressors and, among them, sliding-vane rotary machines are widely used in the compressed air sector. As in many other industrial fields, the efficient utilization of energy has become a major goal also in this sector. The aim of the present activity is the experimental investigation on the influence of two vanes materials (cast iron and aluminium with anodized surface) and of four commercial lubricants (characterized by different formulations and additives concentrations) on the performance of a mid-capacity sliding-vane rotary compressor in a number of operating pressures. The performance is identified by both the volume flow rate and the absorbed mechanical power, evaluated according to the international standard ISO 5167 and ISO 1217. The campaign indicates that the considered lubricants do not affect appreciably the volumetric flow rate. On the other hand, the specific lubricants determine a variation of about 1% of the mechanical power for both materials, while the specific material a variation between 0.9% and 2.6%. The best performance is achieved by aluminium vanes and a synthetic poly-α-olefin lubricant.

  7. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The investigation of vermiculite as an alternating shielding material for gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülbiçim, Hasan; Tufan, M. Çağatay; Türkan, M. Nureddin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, gamma ray shielding properties of vermiculite has been investigated for the first time as a shielding material. The photon total mass attenuation coefficients μm, the half value layer (HVL), the tenth value layer (TVL) and the mean free path (MFP) values have been experimentally determined for the photon energies at 0.244, 0.262, 0.342, 0.600, 0.778, 1.173, 1.332, 1.408 and 1.728 MeV. The theoretical data are calculated by using WinXCom computer code. At the end, we obtained good agreement between experimental and theoretical values. As well as the total mass attenuation coefficients, we have also calculated the effective atomic number, Zeff, the effective electron number, Neff, the total atomic cross-section, σt,a, the total electronic cross-section, σt,e, values for vermiculite and some building materials. Consequently, the obtained results showed that vermiculite could be used as a shielding material for gamma radiation.

  9. Dielectric engineered symmetric underlap double gate tunnel FET (DGTFET): An investigation towards variation of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjunarao; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pradhan, K. P.; Sahu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, an underlap silicon n-channel Tunnel Field Effect Transistor (n-TFET) i.e., symmetric single-k spacer (SSS) Double Gate N-TFET (DGTFET) is proposed to improve the performance of the device by using different spacer materials. A detailed investigation has been made on the proposed device characteristics with the help of extensive 2-D TCAD simulations. It is demonstrated that an optimized underlap length is chosen for a significant on-state current (Ion) without deteriorating the off-state current (Ioff) and sub-threshold swing (SS). The proposed model with different spacer materials has been extensively analyzed by using transfer characteristics, output characteristics, and analog/RF characteristics. The structure is optimized based on the comparison among various performance metrics like Ion, Ioff, SS, on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), threshold (or) cut-off frequency (fT), and intrinsic delay with considering different spacer materials like SiO2 (k = 3.9), Si3N4 (k = 7.5), and HfO2 (k = 25).

  10. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  11. Investigation of Friction Stir Welding and Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Metal Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.

    2002-01-01

    The improvement in weld quality by the friction stir welding (FSW) process invented by TWI of Cambridge, England, patented in 1991, has prompted investigation of this process for advanced structural materials including Al metal matrix composite (Al-MMC) materials. Such materials can have high specific stiffness and other potential beneficial properties for the extreme environments in space. Developments of discontinuous reinforced Al-MMCs have found potential space applications and the future for such applications is quite promising. The space industry has recognized advantages of the FSW process over conventional welding processes such as the absence of a melt zone, reduced distortion, elimination of the need for shielding gases, and ease of automation. The process has been well proven for aluminum alloys, and work is being carried out for ferrous materials, magnesium alloys and copper alloys. Development work in the FSW welding process for joining of Al-MMCs is relatively recent and some of this and related work can be found in referenced research publications. NASA engineers have undertaken to spear head this research development work for FSW process investigation of Al-MMCs. Some of the reported related work has pointed out the difficulty in fusion welding of particulate reinforced MMCs where liquid Al will react with SiC to precipitate aluminum carbide (Al4C3). Advantages of no such reaction and no need for joint preparation for the FSW process is anticipated in the welding of Al-MMCs. The FSW process has been best described as a combination of extrusion and forging of metals. This is carried out as the pin tool rotates and is slowly plunged into the bond line of the joint as the pin tool's shoulder is in intimate contact with the work piece. The material is friction-stirred into a quality weld. Al-MMCs, 4 in. x 12 in. plates of 0.25 in. (6.35mm) thickness, procured from MMCC, Inc. were butt welded using FSW process at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using

  12. Investigation of sputtered iridium oxide as a stimulating/sensing material for neural prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, Sandeep

    Neural interface devices are developed for neuroscience and neuroprosthetics applications to record and stimulate nerve signals. Microelectrodes represent the direct interface between the biological tissue and the electronic system in neural prostheses that serve to record electrical signals from the nerves to obtain information from the natural sensors of the body or the motor fibers of the muscles. Also, the microelectrodes can inject charge into the targeted tissue to functionally excite nerves and muscles by electrical stimulation. Overall, the neural microelectrodes have to measure electrical potentials and have to exchange charge between the solid state of the electrode and the fluid state of the electrolyte in the body. Therefore, the interface between the microelectrode and biological fluid is a critical factor for the performance of the neural device. The interface properties depend mainly on the physical, electrical and chemical property of the electrode material. Even though a large selection of electrode materials has been tested for this purpose, to date no electrode material or coating process presented in scientific literature has been identified or qualified for long-term stimulation and recording neural signals. In this work, sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) was investigated as a potential electrode material. SIROF was deposited on the microelectrodes by reactive pulsed DC sputtering. The deposition parameters and corresponding film properties were examined and correlated with the stimulation and recording characteristics. Furthermore, for chronic applications, the stability of SIROF was investigated and stimulation protocol was determined for damage threshold of the film. The sputtering pressure was varied to obtain SIROF with desired properties. The SIROF properties were optimized based on its ability to inject charge in the tissue and its mechanical strength. The electrochemical characterization of SIROF was studied by electrochemical

  13. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials and tangible things the Bureau...

  14. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials, written reports, answers to...

  15. 12 CFR 1080.14 - Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Confidential treatment of demand material and non-public nature of investigations. 1080.14 Section 1080.14 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER... and non-public nature of investigations. (a) Documentary materials, written reports, answers to...

  16. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    PubMed Central

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; Mcleod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-01-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface. PMID:26098413

  17. Geophysical investigation at US Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Massachusetts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Simms, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Results of a comprehensive, integrated geophysical investigation at 5 sites at the U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) located in Watertown, MA, are presented. In 1960, the Army's first materials research reactor was completed at MTL, which was used actively in molecular and atomic structure research activities until 1970, when it was deactivated. In addition to the research reactor were facilities that stored and handled depleted uranium (DU). In 1989, the Commission on Base Realignment and Closure recommended that MTL be closed. The MTL closure program is being supervised by the U.S. Army Environmental Center. As part of the MTL closure program, any previously contaminated sites must be identified. Based on historical information, 5 sites were selected at MTL to be examined in further detail using geophysical methods. The geophysical investigation was designed to detect and delineate anomalous conditions indicative of buried waste, waste containers, fuel storage tanks, and unmapped drain or sewer lines having the potential of carrying wastes off the site. Electromagnetics, Geophysics, Magnetics, Geophysical surveys, Ground penetrating, Radar.

  18. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals.

    PubMed

    Berean, Kyle J; Adetutu, Eric M; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P; Paull, David; Mcleod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-22

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  19. Lithium transport investigation in LixFeSiO4: A promising cathode material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Rafael B.; Scheicher, Ralph H.; de Almeida, J. S.; Ferreira da Silva, A.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate lithium mobility in both Li2FeSiO4 and its half-lithiated state LiFeSiO4 considering an orthorhombic crystal structure. We find that the calculated activation energy of Li+ ions hopping between adjacent equilibrium sites predicts two least hindered diffusion pathways in both materials. One of them is along the [100] direction characterizing an ionic diffusion in a straight line and the other follows a zig-zag way between the Fe-Si-O layers. We also show that diffusion of Li+ ions in the half-lithiated structure follows the same behavior as in the lithiated structure. As a whole, the activation energies for the investigated compounds present a greater value compared with the activation energies in currently used materials such as LiFePO4. The results were calculated in the framework of density functional theory in conjunction with the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The Hubbard term was added to the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian to overcome the delocalization problem of d electrons. Furthermore, the diffusion coefficients were calculated for both structures considering temperatures ranging from 300 to 700 K.

  20. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  1. Investigation of Deuterium Loaded Materials Subject to X-Ray Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Martin, Richard E.; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Chait, Arnon; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Penney, Nicholas; Kamm, Tracy R.; Becks, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Results are presented from an exploratory study involving x-ray irradiation of select deuterated materials. Titanium deuteride plus deuterated polyethylene, deuterated polyethylene alone, and for control, hydrogen-based polyethylene samples and nondeuterated titanium samples were exposed to x-ray irradiation. These samples were exposed to various energy levels from 65 to 280 kV with prescribed electron flux from 500 to 9000 µA impinging on a tungsten braking target, with total exposure times ranging from 55 to 280 min. Gamma activity was measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and for all samples no gamma activity above background was detected. Alpha and beta activities were measured using a gas proportional counter, and for select samples beta activity was measured with a liquid scintillator spectrometer. The majority of the deuterated materials subjected to the microfocus x-ray irradiation exhibited postexposure beta activity above background and several showed short-lived alpha activity. The HPE and nondeuterated titanium control samples exposed to the x-ray irradiation showed no postexposure alpha or beta activities above background. Several of the samples (SL10A, SL16, SL17A) showed beta activity above background with a greater than 4s confidence level, months after exposure. Portions of SL10A, SL16, and SL17A samples were also scanned using a beta scintillator and found to have beta activity in the tritium energy band, continuing without noticeable decay for over 12 months. Beta scintillation investigation of as-received materials (before x-ray exposure) showed no beta activity in the tritium energy band, indicating the beta emitters were not in the starting materials.

  2. Mechanical property investigation of soft materials by cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-01-01

    Cantilever-based optical interfacial force microscopy (COIFM) was applied to the investigation of the mechanical properties of soft materials to avoid the double-spring effect and snap-to-contact problem associated with atomic force microscopy (AFM). When a force was measured as a function of distance between an oxidized silicon probe and the surface of a soft hydrocarbon film, it increases nonlinearly in the lower force region below ∼10 nN, following the Herzian model with the elastic modulus of ∼50 MPa. Above ∼10 nN, it increases linearly with a small oscillatory sawtooth pattern with amplitude 1-2 nN. The pattern suggests the possible existence of the layered structure within the film. When its internal part of the film was exposed to the probe, the force depends on the distance linearly with an adhesive force of -20 nN. This linear dependence suggests that the adhesive internal material behaved like a linear spring with a spring constant of ∼1 N/m. Constant-force images taken in the repulsive and attractive contact regimes revealed additional features that were not observed in the images taken in the noncontact regime. At some locations, however, contrast inversions were observed between the two contact regimes while the average roughness remained constant. The result suggests that some embedded materials had spring constants different from those of the surrounding material. This study demonstrated that the COIFM is capable of imaging mechanical properties of local structures such as small impurities and domains at the nanometer scale, which is a formidable challenge with conventional AFM methods.

  3. Raman and photoelectron spectroscopic investigation of high-purity niobium materials: Oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Nand, Mangla; Jha, S. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present investigations of the presence of oxides, hydrides, and hydrocarbons in high-purity (residual resistivity ratio, ˜300) niobium (Nb) materials used in fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for particle accelerators. Raman spectroscopy of Nb materials (as-received from the vendor as well as after surface chemical- and thermal processing) revealed numerous peaks, which evidently show the presence of oxides (550 cm-1), hydrides (1277 and 1385 cm-1: ˜80 K temperature), and groups of hydrocarbons (1096, 2330, 2710, 2830, 2868, and 3080 cm-1). The present work provides direct spectroscopic evidence of hydrides in the electropolished Nb materials typically used in SRF cavities. Raman spectroscopy thus can provide vital information about the near-surface chemical species in niobium materials and will help in identifying the cause for the performance degradation of SRF cavities. Furthermore, photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the Nb samples to complement the Raman spectroscopy study. This study reveals the presence of C and O in the Nb samples. Core level spectra of Nb (doublet 3d5/2 and 3d3/2) show peaks near 206.6 and 209.4 eV, which can be attributed to the Nb5+ oxidation state. The core level spectra of C 1 s of the samples are dominated by graphitic carbon (binding energy, 284.6 eV), while the spectra of O 1 s are asymmetrically peaked near binding energy of ˜529 eV, and that indicates the presence of metal-oxide Nb2O5. The valence-band spectra of the Nb samples are dominated by a broad peak similar to O 2p states, but after sputtering (for 10 min) a peak appears at ˜1 eV, which is a feature of the elemental Nb atom.

  4. Sheetflow Effects and Canal Backfilling on Sediment Source and Transport in Everglades Freshwater Marshes: Analysis of Molecular Organic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regier, P.; He, D.; Saunders, C.; Coronado-Molina, C.; Jara, B.; Jaffe, R.

    2014-12-01

    Historic freshwater sheetflow in the Florida Everglades distributed sediment to form a ridge-and-slough landscape. However, drainage along with reduction and obstruction of flow has resulted in degradation of this ridged topography. The DECOMP Physical Model is a landscape-scale project aiming to reestablish natural sheetflow to the central and southern Everglades by redesigning barriers to flow. To validate proof of concept that increased flow will rebuild ridge-slough microtopography, biomarker proxies were established for ridge and slough organic matter sources. In addition, partial and complete canal backfill options were assessed via sediment trap accumulation in each backfill treatment area. Flocculent matter (floc) and sediment samples were collected, solvent extracted, chromatographically separated, and analyzed on a GC/MS using internal standard for quantification. Four molecular organic biomarkers were evaluated: the aquatic proxy (Paq), highly-branched isoprenoids (C20 HBI), kaurenes and botyrococcenes. Paq, an aquatic proxy of mid to long-chain n-alkanes, was shown to clearly differentiate between ridge-derived and slough-derived organic matter with Paq values increasing along ridge-to-slough transects. Kaurenes indicated presence of ridge-derived organic matter while C20 HBI and botyrococcenes were indicative of periphyton-derived organic matter which is commonly more abundant in sloughs. Biomarker distributions during both low (present day) and high (managed) water flow through the DECOMP experimental parcel were determined and discussed comparatively.

  5. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE RELEASE FROM INTACT STRUCTURES BACKFILLED WITH CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN, T.

    2004-09-30

    This calculation determines the release of residual radioactivity (including H-3, C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137), from subsurface structures filled with concrete debris at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station. Analyses were performed to assess the rate of release from the source of contamination and the resulting dose in the groundwater pathway. Two mechanisms were considered, diffusive release from the concrete structures (walls and floors) that remain intact and sorption onto concrete backfill placed within these structures. RESRAD was used to calculate the predicted maximum dose assuming a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on the intact structures. To the extent possible, the same assumptions in the soil DCGL calculations performed for Yankee Atomic were used in the calculation. However, modifications to some input parameter values were needed to represent the geometry of the subsurface facilities, flow through these facilities, and releases from the backfill and intact structures. Input parameters specific to these calculations included the leach rate, disposal geometry, pumping rate, porosity and bulk density. The dose results for a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on intact structures showed that Sr-90 had the highest dose (3.67E-02 mrem/yr).

  7. Application of Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Engineering Site Investigation. A Case Study on Prospective Hospital Site, Varamin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amin; Ramazi, Hamidreza

    2016-12-01

    The article addresses the application of electrical resistivity imaging for engineering site investigation in Pishva Hospital, Varamin, Iran. Some aqueduct shafts exist in the study area backfilled by loose materials. The goals of this study are to detect probable aqueduct tunnels and their depth, investigate filling quality in the shafts as well as connection(s) between them. Therefore, three profiles were surveyed by dipoledipole electrode array. Also, to investigate the potentially anomalous areas more accurately, five additional resistivity profiles were measured by a Combined Resistivity Sounding-Profiling array (CRSP). According to the results of 2-D inversion modelling, a main aqueduct tunnel was detected beneath the central part of the site. Finally, the resistivity pattern of the detected aqueduct system passing the investigated area was provided using the obtained results.

  8. The high throughput investigation of polyphenolic couplers in biodegradable packaging materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochhead, Robert Y.; Haynes, Camille T.; Jones, Stephen R.; Smith, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    Our goal is to select and develop stimuli-responsive interfacial coupling materials for nanocomposites that will enhance substrate mechanical properties during use but cause triggered disintegration when exposed to the appropriate aqueous environment. The study could potentially provide the scientific underpinning for the development of an interfacially interacting nanocomposite alloy capable of enhanced biodegradation in the aqueous environment. In the first stage of this study it was shown that quaternary ammonium polymers adsorbed on the faces of the montmorillonite platelets, non-ionic polyacrylamides adsorbed on the faces and edges by hydrogen bonding, and anionic polyelectrolytes, carboxylates and sulfonates, did not adsorb at all on the montmorillonite [R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, An investigative study of polymer adsorption to smectite clay: polyelectrolytes and sodium montmorillonite, in: R. Krishnamoorti, R. Vaia (Eds.), Polymer Nanocomposites, American Chemical Society, 2002; R.Y. Lochhead, C.L. McConnell-Boykin, C. Haynes, Interaction of hydrophilic polymers with smectite clays, Polymer Materials Science and Engineering, vol. 85, American Chemical Society, 2001, p. 419]. The objective of the second part of the study was to examine model polymers in order to guide research aimed at designing coupling polymers that would cause exfoliation of the clay. Based upon the earlier study, polyvinylamine was chosen as the model on the basis that it is a simple polymer with primary amine groups and the polymer charge density could be modified by simply changing the system pH. The aim of this research was to determine the conditions under which polyvinylamine, and selected derivatives of this polymer, would penetrate the galleries of the stacked montmorillonite platelets. The knowledge gained could be applied to predict systems that would facilitate intercalation or exfoliation of sodium montmorillonite. The investigative approach of the third stage was to

  9. Permittivity Investigations of the Road Construction Raw Materials for Purposes of GPR Data Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysiński, Lech

    2014-05-01

    Permittivity is the major material property governing the formation of GPR response signal in diagnostic measurements. Every quantitative interpretation refers explicitly or implicitly to discussion of permittivity values. Thus, the recognition of permittivity for materials typical of the given technological area is necessary to make use of diagnostic measurements. Collection of several tens of stone cores representing different outcrops was investigated in order to obtain cross-sectional view of permittivity for stone materials being in use in Polish road construction industry as components of stone-asphalt mixtures. The main task was to estimate the typical permittivity values for stone materials treated as representation of several major petrological types. The capacimetry (at 50 MHz) was used as major and very efficient method of permittivity assessment and formation of the samples was subordinated to demands of this method. This method allows for determination of permittivity variability on the lateral surface of the cylindrical sample, giving the insight into the major features of the permittivity spatial distribution characteristic for the given rock. For the most homogeneous samples (in terms of permittivity distribution) the permittivity was measured also on the core top at frequency 2 GHz using impulse GPR reflectometry. No clear proofs for considerable permittivity frequency dependence were found (in the frame of the two methods precision) for these rocks. This conclusion can be related generally to major rock-forming minerals at least in dry igneous rocks. Only solid rocks obtained from regular massive outcrops were included to this first cross-sectional sampling, while artificial synthetic materials and natural gravels of postglacial origin were omitted since additional problems occur in these cases. This first experience allowed to recognize practical problems related to the sampling procedure. The collected data allow for provisional identification

  10. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  11. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  12. Investigating the role of educative curriculum materials in supporting teacher enactment of a field-based urban ecology investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houle, Meredith

    2008-10-01

    This multiple case study examined how three urban science teachers used curriculum materials designed educatively. Educative curriculum materials have been suggested as one way to support science teacher learning, particularly around new innovations and new pedagogies and to support teachers in evaluating and modifying materials to meet the needs of their students (Davis & Krajcik, 2005). While not a substitute for professional development, educative curriculum materials may provide an opportunity to support teachers' enactment and learning in the classroom context (Davis & Krajcik, 2005; Remillard, 2005; Schneider & Krajcik, 2002). However, little work has examined how science teachers interact with written curriculum materials to design classroom instruction. Grounded in sociocultural analysis, this study takes the theoretical stance that teachers and curriculum materials are engaged in a dynamic and participatory relationship from which the planned and enacted curriculum emerges (Remillard, 2005). Teaching is therefore a design activity where teachers rely on their personal resources and the curricular resources to construct and shape their students' learning experiences (Brown, 2002). Specifically this study examines how teacher beliefs influence their reading and use of curriculum and how educative features in the written curriculum inform teachers' pedagogical decisions. Data sources included classroom observation and video, teacher interviews, and classroom artifacts. To make sense how teachers' make curricular decisions, video were analyzed using Brown's (2002) Pedagogical Design for Enactment Framework. These coded units were examined in light of the teacher interviews, classroom notes and artifacts to examine how teachers' beliefs influenced these decisions. Data sources were then reexamined for evidence of teachers' use of specific educative features. My analyses revealed that teachers' beliefs about curriculum influenced the degree to which teachers

  13. Investigation of thermal distortion and control of spacecraft based on shape memory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongwei; Du, Xingwen; Tan, Huifeng

    2009-07-01

    Gossamer space structures are relatively large, flimsy, and lightweight. As a result, they are more easily affected or distortion by space thermal environments compared to other space structures. This study examines the structural integrity of a Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna under space thermal environments. To maintain the required accuracy of the reflector under orbital temperature changes, the Gossamer space structures will utilize an active control system, consisting of boundary control actuators and an electrostatic figure control system with a real time closed loop feedback. An experimental system is established to verify the control mechanism with photogrammetric measurement technique and Bragg fiber grating (FBG) sensor technique. The shape control experiments are finished by measuring and analyzing small amplitude distortion of Five-Meter Ka-Band Inflatable/Self-Rigidizable Reflect Antenna based on the active components made of shape memory alloy (SMA) and shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) material. Then, simulations are finished by NASTRAN finite element software with active effect which is considered to be deformation applied on the analytical model. The amplitude of distortion is obtained by the simulations. Both the experimental and numerical solution show that the amplitude of accuracy are developed which proves the feasibility of shape control using shape memory materials and this investigation explores the feasibility of utilizing an active cable based control system of shape memory materials to reduce global distortion due to thermal loading. It is found that through proper assemble of cable lengths and attachment points, significant thermal distortion reduction is achieved. Specifically, radial distortion due to on-orbit thermal loading .

  14. Investigation of engineered bacterial adhesins for opportunity to interface cells with abiotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrell, Jessica L.; Dong, Hong; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Small, Meagan C.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    The convenience of cellular genetic engineering has afforded the power to build `smart' synthetic biological tools with novel applications. Here, we have explored opportunities to hybridize engineered cells with inorganic materials toward the development of 'living' device-compatible systems. Cellular structural biology is engineerable based on the ability to rewrite genetic code to generate recombinant, foreign, or even unnatural proteins. With this capability on the biological end, it should be possible to achieve superior abio-compatibility with the inorganic materials that compose current microfabricated technology. This work investigated the hair-like appendages of Escherichia coli known as Type 1 fimbriae that enable natural adhesion to glycosylated substrates. Sequence alterations within the fimbrial gene cluster were found to be well-tolerated, evidenced by tagging the fimbriae with peptide-based probes. As a further development, fimbriae tips could be reconfigured to, in turn, alter cell binding. In particular, the fimbriae were fused with a genetically optimized peptide-for-inorganics to enable metal binding. This work established methodologies to systematically survey cell adhesion properties across a suite of fimbriae-modified cell types as well as to direct patterned cell adhesion. Cell types were further customized for added complexity including turning on secondary gene expression and binding to gold surfaces. The former demonstrates potential for programmable gene switches and the latter for interfacing biology with inorganic materials. In general, the incorporation of 'programmed' cells into devices can be used to provide the feature of dynamic and automated cell response. The outcomes of this study are foundational toward the critical feature of deliberate positioning of cells as configurable biocomponentry. Overall, cellular integration into bioMEMs will yield advanced sensing and actuation.

  15. Interactions between Antibiotics and Graphene-Based Materials in Water: A Comparative Experimental and Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuntong; Shen, Jiachun; Zhuo, Ning; Tian, Ziqi; Xu, Peiran; Yang, Zhen; Yang, Weiben

    2016-09-14

    Complex interactions between antibiotics and graphene-based materials determine both the adsorption performance of graphene-based materials and the transport behaviors of antibiotics in water. In this work, such interactions were investigated through adsorption experiments, instrumental analyses and theoretical DFT calculations. Three typical antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) and tetracycline (TC)) and different graphene-based materials (divided into two groups: graphene oxides-based ones (GOs) and reduced GOs (RGOs)) were employed. Optimal adsorption pHs for NOR, SDZ, and TC are 6.2, 4.0, and 4.0, respectively. At corresponding optimal pHs, NOR favored RGOs (adsorption capability: ∼50 mg/g) while SDZ preferred GOs (∼17 mg/g); All adsorbents exhibited similar uptake of TC (∼70 mg/g). Similar amounts of edge carboxyls of both GOs and RGOs wielded electrostatic attraction with NOR and TC, but not with SDZ. According to DFT-calculated most-stable-conformations of antibiotics-adsorbents complexes, the intrinsic distinction between GOs and RGOs was the different amounts of sp(2) and sp(3) hybridization regions: π-π electron donor-acceptor effect of antibiotic-sp(2)/sp(3) and H-bonds of antibiotic-sp(3) coexisted. Binding energy (BE) of the former was larger for NOR; the latter interaction was stronger for SDZ; two species of TC at the optimal pH, i.e., TC(+) and TC(0), possessed larger BE with sp(3) and sp(2) regions, respectively.

  16. Investigation of Sintering Temperature on Attrition Resistance of Highly Porous Diatomite Based Material

    SciTech Connect

    Garderen, Noemie van; Clemens, Frank J.; Scharf, Dagobert; Graule, Thomas

    2010-05-30

    Highly porous diatomite based granulates with a diameter of 500 mum have been produced by an extrusion method. In order to investigate the relation between microstructure, phase composition and attrition resistance of the final product, the granulates were sintered between 800 and 1300 deg. C. Mean pore size of the granulates was evaluated by Hg-porosimetry. An increase of the pore size is observed in the range of 3.6 nm to 40 mum with increasing sintering temperature. Higher mean pore radii of 1.6 mum and 5.7 mum obtained by sintering at 800 and 1300 deg. C respectively. X-ray diffraction shows that mullite phase appears at 1100 deg. C due to the presence of clay. At 1100 deg. C diatomite (amorphous silicate) started to transform into alpha-cristobalite. Attrition resistance was determined by evaluating the amount of ground material passed through a sieve with a predefined mesh size. It was observed that a material sintered at high temperature leads to an increase of attrition resistance due to the decrease of total porosities and phase transformation. Due to the reason that attrition resistance significantly increased by sintering the granulates at higher temperature, a so called attrition resistance index was determined in order to compare all the different attrition resistance values. This attrition resistance index was determined by using the exponential component of the equation obtained from attrition resistance curves. It permits comparison of the attrition behaviour without a time influence.

  17. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    Technical investigations concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants; the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. New compounds were evaluated for efficiency in curing both ethylene/vinyl acetate and ethylene/methyl acrylate pottants intended for vacuum bag lamination of solar cells. One compound in particular, designated Lupersol - TBEC (Lucidol Division of Pennwalt Corp.) was found to be unusually effective in promoting the rapid cure of both these materials. Formulation of these resins with TBEC resulted in compositions of very high gel content, lower temperatures of activation, and much lower cure times, even in the ethylene/methyl acrylate polymer that is more difficult to cure. It is expected that TBEC modified pottant formulations may permit the lamination/encapsulation step to be operated at lower temperatures, higher speed, higher throughput and a much wider tolerance for intentional or accidental variations in the cure schedule. An experimental program continued to determine the effectiveness of soil resistant coatings.

  18. Dynamic acousto-elastic test using continuous probe wave and transient vibration to investigate material nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Eiras, J N; Vu, Q A; Lott, M; Payá, J; Garnier, V; Payan, C

    2016-07-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the dynamic acousto-elastic effect of a continuous high frequency wave for investigating the material nonlinearity upon transient vibration. The approach is demonstrated on a concrete sample measuring 15×15×60cm(3). Two ultrasonic transducers (emitter and receiver) are placed at its middle span. A continuous high frequency wave of 500kHz propagates through the material and is modulated with a hammer blow. The position of the hammer blow on the sample is configured to promote the first bending mode of vibration. The use of a continuous wave allows discrete time extraction of the nonlinear behavior by a short-time Fourier transform approach, through the simultaneous comparison of a reference non-modulated signal and an impact-modulated signal. The hammer blow results in phase shifts and variations of signal amplitude between reference and perturbed signals, which are driven by the resonant frequency of the sample. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of the relaxation mechanisms (modulus and attenuation recovery) is conducted to untangle the coupled fast and slow hysteretic effects.

  19. Investigating flow behaviors of colloidal materials at the single-particle scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Chih

    My thesis work focuses on the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of colloidal suspensions at the particle-level. This work covers both quiescent and strongly sheared suspensions. For quiescent suspensions, we image their 3D structures with confocal microscopy, and implement Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA) to visualize the stress fields in them. Unlike traditional numerical methods, SALSA takes a statistical approach converting the probability of hard-sphere Brownian collisions to stresses. This direct stress measurement allows us to quantify the particle-level stresses surrounding vacancies, dislocations, and grain boundaries in crystalline materials. To drive the suspensions away from equilibrium, we develop a confocal-rheoscope, which is able to shear and image colloidal materials simultaneously. Using this device, we investigate the nonlinear flow behavior governed by Brownian motion, shear induced diffusion, and advection, and more importantly, disentangle them. We also study particle assembly and its corresponding rheological properties under confinement. Finally, we study even more strongly sheared suspensions, in which particle dynamics are too fast to be imaged by a confocal microscope. Here, we use flow reversal rheometry to reveal the underlying mechanism of suspension shear thickening where the viscosity increases with shear rate. We show that the thickening behavior of a suspension arises from the particle contact forces rather than hydrodynamic interactions. Such findings then lead us to design a biaxial shear protocol that can tune the suspension viscosity on demand. This viscosity tuning capability is a foundational step toward using dense suspensions in 3D printing, energy storage, and robotics.

  20. Investigation of Thunniform Swimming Using Material Testing, Biomimetic Robotics and Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruijie; Saraiya, Vishaal; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lewis, Gregory; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2015-11-01

    Thunniform swimming is well recognized as an efficient method for high-speed long-distance underwater travelers such as tuna. Previous research has shown that tuna relies on contraction and relaxation of red muscle to generate angular motion of its large, crescent-shaped caudal fin through its peduncle. However, few researchers conduct deep investigation of material properties of tuna caudal fin and peduncle. This research project is composed of two parts, first of which is determining mechanical properties of components such as spine joints, tendons, fin rays and cartilage, from which the biomechanics of tuna tail can be better understood. The second part is building a robotic system mimicking a real tuna tail based on previously retrieved information, and testing the system inside a flow tank. With the help of PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry), fluid-structure interaction of the biomimetic fin is visualized and data such as swimming speed and power consumption are retrieved through the robotic system. The final outcome should explain how the material properties of tuna tail affect fluid dynamics of thunniform swimming. This project is supported by Office of Naval Research (ONRBAA13-022).

  1. Investigation of oxidation resistance of carbon based first-wall liner materials of fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moormann, R.; Hinssen, H. K.; Krüssenberg, A.-K.; Stauch, B.; Wu, C. H.

    1994-09-01

    One important aspect in selection of carbon based first-wall liner materials in fusion reactors is a sufficient oxidation resistance against steam and oxygen; this is because during accidents like loss of coolant into vacuum or loss of vacuum these oxidizing media can enter the vacuum vessel and may cause some corrosion of carbon followed by release of adsorbed tritium; in addition other consequences of oxidation like formation of burnable gases and their explosions have to be examined. Based on extensive experience on nuclear graphite oxidation in HTRs KFA has started in cooperation with NET some experimental investigations on oxidation of fusion reactor carbons. Results of first experiments on CFCs, Ti- and Si-doped carbons and graphites in steam (1273-1423 K) and oxygen (973 K) are reported. It was found that most materials have a similar reactivity as HTR nuclear graphites (which is much smaller than those of usual technical carbons); Si-doped CFCs however have a remarkably better oxidation resistance than those, which is probably due to the formation of a protecting layer of SiO 2. The measured kinetic data will be used in safety analyses for above mentioned accidents.

  2. Investigating Fracture Behaviors of Polymer and Polymeric Composite Materials Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Tan, Ting; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Agastra, Pancasatya; Mandell, John; Bertelsen, Williams D.; LaFrance, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbine blades are usually fabricated from fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) materials, which are subject to complex loading conditions during service. The reliability of the blades thus depends on the mechanical behaviors of the FRP under various loading conditions. Specifically, the fracture behavior of FRP is of great importance to both the scientific research community and the wind industry. In the current project, a new testing technique is proposed based on the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) to study the fracture behavior of composite structures under mixed mode loading conditions, particularly under combined Mode I (flexural or normal tensile stress) and Mode III (torsional shear stress) loading. For the SNTT test method, round-rod specimens with V-grooved spiral lines are subjected to pure torsion. Depending on the pitch angle of the spiral lines, pure Mode I, pure Mode III, or mixed Mode I/Mode III loading conditions can be simulated. A three dimensional finite element analysis is then used to evaluate the fracture toughness and energy release rate of SNTT specimens. In the current study, both epoxy and fiberglass reinforced epoxy materials are investigated using the SNTT technique. This paper will discuss the fracture behaviors of mode I and mixed mode samples, with or without fatigue precrack. In addition, results from fractographic study and finite element analysis will be presented and discussed in detail.

  3. Nonionic fluorinated surfactant: investigation of phase diagram and preparation of ordered mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Blin, J L; Lesieur, P; Stébé, M J

    2004-01-20

    The behavior of fluorinated surfactant F(CF2)8C2H4(OC2H4)9OH in water solution was investigated, and the preparation ofmesoporous molecular sieves was achieved. A direct micellar phase (L1) and a hexagonal (H1) liquid crystal were found. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements proved that the hydrophobic chains are completely extended and that the cross sectional area remains constant in H1. At 80 degrees C, materials with a hexagonal array of their channel are prepared via a cooperative templating type mechanism in a wide range of surfactant concentrations (5-20 wt %). Decreasing the hydrothermal temperature leads to the formation ofwormhole-like structure. In this case the channel arrangement is no longer governed by the surfactant behavior but by the silica condensation and polymerization. An increase of the mean pore diameter with heating temperature is noted. This result is associated with changes of aggregation number with temperature. A comparison of the characteristics of the materials obtained with both hydrogenated and fluorinated surfactants is also made.

  4. Structural investigation of biological material in aqueous environment by means of infrared-ATR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, P; Fringeli, U P

    1979-12-01

    Infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy may be used to investigate biological material (e.g., membranes, proteins, erythrocytes etc.) under biological conditions provided that adhesion of the sample can be achieved in aqueous environment. Uncharged lipid multilayer model membranes can be attached by hydrophobic interaction when hydrophobic internal reflection plates (e.g., ZnSe, CdTe) are used. However, if an electric field is applied across the membrane, germanium reflection elements would be preferred because of their low electric resistance (approximately 50 omega cm). This material can also be used if cells or proteins are linked chemically to the ATR plate because of the hydrophilic surface which is similar to that of glass and, thus, enables chemical modification by silanization. It has turned out that good adhesion of uncharged and negatively charged model membranes to germanium plates is achieved when they are coated with a monomolecular layer of aminopropylsilane. There is some evidence that erythrocytes remain more stable when adsorbed to a polymerized aminosilane coating (organic silanization) rather than to the corresponding monolayer (aqueous silanization). Negatively charged germanium surfaces have been obtained by succinylation of the aminosilane coating. Furthermore it has been demonstrated that proteins can be bound to the aminosilane coating by means of carbodiimide. Immobilized acetylcholinesterase was still enzymatically active.

  5. Experimental investigation of impinging jet erosion on model cohesive granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier-Coulin, Florian; Sarrat, Jean-Loup; Cuéllar, Pablo; Philippe, Pierre

    2017-06-01

    Erosion of soils affects both natural landscapes and engineering constructions as embankment dams or levees. Improving the safety of such earthen structures requires in particular finding out more about the elementary mechanisms involved in soil erosion. Towards this end, an experimental work was undertaken in three steps. First, several model materials were developed, made of grains (mostly glass beads) with solid bridges at particle contacts whose mechanical yield strength can be continuously varied. Furthermore, for most of them, we succeeded in obtaining a translucent system for the purpose of direct visualization. Second, these materials were tested against surface erosion by an impinging jet to determine a critical shear stress and a kinetic coefficient [2, 3]. Note that an adapted device based on optical techniques (combination of Refractive Index Matching and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence [3]) was used specifically for the transparent media. Third, some specifically developed mechanical tests, and particularly traction tests, were implemented to estimate the mechanical strength of the solid bridges both at micro-scale (single contact) and at macro-scale (sample) and to investigate a supposed relationship with soil resistance to erosion.

  6. Surface investigation on biomimetic materials to control cell adhesion: the case of RGD conjugation on PCL.

    PubMed

    Causa, Filippo; Battista, Edmondo; Della Moglie, Raffaella; Guarnieri, Daniela; Iannone, Maria; Netti, Paolo A

    2010-06-15

    The cell recognition of bioactive ligands immobilized on polymeric surfaces is strongly dependent on ligand presentation at the cell/material interface. While small peptide sequences such as Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) are being widely used to obtain biomimetic interfaces, surface characteristics after immobilization as well as presentation of such ligands to cell receptors deserve more detailed investigation. Here, we immobilized an RGD-based sequence on poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), a largely widespread polymeric material used in biomedical applications, after polymer aminolysis. The surface characteristics along with the efficacy of the functionalization was monitored by surface analysis (FTIR-ATR, contact angle measurements, surface free energy determination) and spectrophotometric assays specially adapted for the analytical quantification of functional groups and/or peptides at the interface. Particular attention was paid to the evaluation of a number, morphology, and penetration depth of immobilized functional groups and/or peptides engrafted on polymeric substrates. In particular, a typical morphology in peptide distribution was evidenced on the surface raised from polymer crystallites, while a significant penetration depth of the engrafted molecules was revealed. NIH3T3 fibroblast adhesion studies verified the correct presentation of the ligand with enhanced cell attachment after peptide conjugation. Such work proposes a morphological and analytical approach in surface characterization to study the surface treatment and the distribution of ligands immobilized on polymeric substrates.

  7. Investigating the effectiveness of economically sustainable carrier material complexes for marine oil remediation.

    PubMed

    Simons, Keryn L; Ansar, Alfiya; Kadali, Krishna; Bueti, Angelo; Adetutu, Eric M; Ball, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    The application of bioremediation to marine oil spills is limited due to dilution of either nutrients or hydrocarbonoclastic organisms. This study investigated the effectiveness of three unique natural carrier materials (mussel shells, coir peat and mussel shell/agar complex) which allowed nutrients, hydrocarbonoclastic organisms and oil to be in contact, facilitating remediation. TPH analysis after 30 d showed that mussel shells exhibited the greatest capacity to degrade oil with a 55% reduction (123.3 mg l(-1) from 276 mg l(-1)) followed by mussel shell/agar complex (49%) and coir peat (36%). Both the mussel shells and mussel shell/agar complex carriers were significantly different to the control (P=0.008 and P=0.002, respectively). DGGE based cluster analysis of the seawater microbial community showed groupings based on time rather than carriers. This study demonstrated that inexpensive, accessible waste materials used as carriers of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria led to significant degradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in seawater. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ex Situ Investigation of Anisotropic Interconnection in Silicon-Titanium-Nickel Alloy Anode Material

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Jong -Soo; Alaboina, Pankaj Kumar; Kang, Chan -Soon; ...

    2017-03-10

    Herein we investigate the nanostructural evolution of Silicon-Titanium-Nickel (Si-Ti-Ni) ternary alloy material synthesized by melt spinning process for advanced lithium-ion battery anode. The synthesized material was found to have nano-Silicon particles dispersed in the Ti4Ni4Si7 (STN) alloy buffering matrix and was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution- transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopes - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (STEM-EDS), and electrochemical performance test. The role of STN matrix is to accommodate the volume expansion stresses of the dispersed Si nanoparticles. However, an interesting behavior was observed during cycling. The Si nanoparticles were observed to form interconnection channelsmore » growing through the weak STN matrix cracks and evolving to a network isolating the STN matrix into small puddles. In conclusion, this unique nanostructural evolution of Si particles and isolation of the STN matrix failing to offer significant buffering effect to the grown Si network eventually accelerates more volume expansions during cycling due to less mechanical confinement and leads to performance degradation and poor cycle stability.« less

  9. Hyperspectral imaging as a technique for investigating the effect of consolidating materials on wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia; Capobianco, Giuseppe; Agresti, Giorgia; Calienno, Luca; Picchio, Rodolfo; Lo Monaco, Angela; Santamaria, Ulderico; Pelosi, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the potential of hyperspectral imaging (HSI) in the monitoring of commercial consolidant products applied on wood samples. Poplar (Populus spp.) and walnut (Juglans Regia L.) were chosen for the consolidant application. Both traditional and innovative products were selected, based on acrylic, epoxy, and aliphatic compounds. Wood samples were stressed by freeze/thaw cycles in order to cause material degradation without the loss of wood components. Then the consolidant was applied under vacuum. The samples were finally artificially aged for 168 h in a solar box chamber. The samples were acquired in the short wave infrared (1000 to 2500 nm) range by SISUChema XL™ device (Specim, Finland) after 168 h of irradiation. As comparison, color measurement was also used as an economic, simple, and noninvasive technique to evaluate the deterioration and consolidation effects on wood. All data were then processed adopting a chemometric approach finalized to define correlation models, HSI based, between consolidating materials, wood species, and short-time aging effects.

  10. Recovery of high-grade barite from waste pond materials. Report of investigations/1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, W.E.; Sullivan, G.V.

    1982-06-01

    The Bureau of Mines studied the potential for recovering marketable barite concentrates that meet oil well drilling-mud specifications from barite waste pond materials. The samples, which were obtained from Georgia, Nevada, Missouri, and Illinois, varied widely in character, particle size, and barite content. The samples were treated with sodium silicate and sodium cetyl-stearyl sulfate and then floated. The flotation flow sheet was modified to reject barren coarse and/or slime fractions from some of the samples, and one feed sample had to be scrubbed prior to flotation to remove residual flotation reagents. The cleaned concentrates had BaSO4 contents ranging from 95.0 to 96.9 percent, while recovering 81.2 to 95.9 percent of the barite in the feed. The specific gravity of each concentrate exceeded the specification of 4.2. The removal of the flotation reagents from the flotation concentrate was not investigated.

  11. Structural and multi-scale rheophysical investigation of diphasic magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Roger, Stéphane; Sang, Yan Yip Cheung; Bee, Agnès; Perzynski, Régine; Di Meglio, Jean Marc; Ponton, Alain

    2015-08-01

    We present a structural and a multi-scale rheophysical investigation of magneto-sensitive materials based on biopolymers, namely aqueous solutions of sodium alginate incorporating magnetic maghemite nanoparticles, functionalized with adsorbed negative citrate ions. The large alginate ionic strength impacts the structure and the rheology of these nanocomposites in zero magnetic field. In given physico-chemical conditions, the system is fluid and homogeneous on macroscopic scales while it is diphasic on microscopic ones, containing micro-droplets coming from the demixion of the system. These micro-droplets are liquid and deformable under magnetic field. Their under-field elongation and their zero-field relaxation are directly observed by optical microscopy to determine their interfacial tension, their magnetic susceptibility and their internal viscosity. A structural analysis of the solutions of alginate chains and of the phase-separated mixtures of alginate and nanoparticles by Small Angle Scattering completes the local description of the system.

  12. Preliminary Investigation of Candidate Materials for Use in Accident Resistant Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Lessing; Blair H. Park; Jakeob Maupin

    2013-09-01

    As part of a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with industry, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating several options for accident resistant uranium compounds including silicides, and nitrides for use in future light water reactor (LWR) fuels. This work is part of a larger effort to create accident tolerant fuel forms where changes to the fuel pellets, cladding, and cladding treatment are considered. The goal fuel form should have a resistance to water corrosion comparable to UO2, have an equal to or larger thermal conductivity than uranium dioxide, a melting temperature that allows the material to stay solid under power reactor conditions, and a uranium loading that maintains or improves current LWR power densities. During the course of this research, fuel fabricated at INL will be characterized, irradiated at the INL Advanced Test Reactor, and examined after irradiation at INL facilities to help inform industrial partners on candidate technologies.

  13. Investigation of a Cermet Gas-turbine-blade Material of Titanium Carbide Infiltrated with Hastalloy C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Charles A

    1955-01-01

    A cermet composition was investigated as a potential material for gas-turbine blades. Blades of HS-21 alloy were also operated in the engine simultaneously to provide a basis of comparison. The cermet blades survived as long as approximately 312-1/2 hours at about 1500 degrees F with an average midspan centrifugal stress of approximately 11,500 psi. The alloy blade midspan stress was about 15,300 psi. Because of extensive damage to both types of blade due to external causes, a reliable comparison of operating lives could not be made. The cermet blades tended to fail in the airfoil rather than in the base, although the base was the usual location of failure in a prior study of cold-pressed and sintered cermets of other compositions with the same blade shape.

  14. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Modification of material properties and coating deposition using plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnyak, Alexander D.; Tyurin, Yu N.

    2005-05-01

    The review is concerned with the current status of research on the use of plasma jets for the modification of surface properties of metalware, as well as of investigations of doping and mass transfer of elements. The effect of thermal plasma parameters on the efficiency of surface processing of metal materials is discussed. The structure and properties of protective coatings produced by exposure to pulsed plasmas are analyzed. A new direction for the production of combined coatings is considered. Their structure and properties were studied by the example of Fe, Cu, steels, and alloys, including titanium alloys; the modification process was shown to be controllable by the action of pulsed plasma jets. The physical factors that affect the modification process and the coating deposition, and their effect on the structure and properties of metallic, ceramic - metal, and ceramic coatings were analyzed.

  15. Investigation of Electron Transfer-Based Photonic and Electro-Optic Materials and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Abbott, Edwin H; Dickensheets, David; Donovan, Richard P; Hobbs, J D; Spangler, Lee; McGuirl, Michele A; Spangler, Charles; Rebane, Aleksander; Rosenburg, Edward; Schmidt, V H; Singel, David J

    2008-03-28

    Montana's state program began its sixth year in 2006. The project's research cluster focused on physical, chemical, and biological materials that exhibit unique electron-transfer properties. Our investigators have filed several patents and have also have established five spin-off businesses (3 MSU, 2 UM) and a research center (MT Tech). In addition, this project involved faculty and students at three campuses (MSU, UM, MT Tech) and has a number of under-represented students, including 10 women and 5 Native Americans. In 2006, there was an added emphasis on exporting seminars and speakers via the Internet from UM to Chief Dull Knife Community College, as well as work with the MT Department of Commerce to better educate our faculty regarding establishing small businesses, licensing and patent issues, and SBIR program opportunities.

  16. CEM V based special cementitious materials investigated by means of SANS method. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragolici, A. C.; Balasoiu, M.; Orelovich, O. L.; Ionascu, L.; Nicu, M.; Soloviov, D. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lizunov, E. I.; Dragolici, F.

    2017-05-01

    The management of the radioactive waste assume the conditioning in a cement matrix as an embedding, stable, disposal material. Cement matrix is the first and most important engineering barrier against the migration in the environment of the radionuclides contained in the waste packages. Knowing how the microstructure develops is therefore desirable in order to assess the compatibility of radioactive streams with cement and predict waste form performance during storage and disposal. For conditioning wastes containing radioactive aluminum new formulas of low basicity cements, using coatings as a barrier between the metal and the conditioning environment or introducing a corrosion inhibitor in the matrix system are required. Preliminary microstructure investigation of such improved CEM V based cement matrix is reported.

  17. Investigations on bactericidal properties of molybdenum-tungsten oxides combinatorial thin film material libraries.

    PubMed

    Mardare, Cezarina Cela; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2014-11-10

    A combinatorial thin film material library from the molybdenum-tungsten refractory metals oxides system was prepared by thermal coevaporation, and its structural and morphological properties were investigated after a multiple step heat treatment. A mixture of crystalline and amorphous oxides and suboxides was obtained, as well as surface structuring caused by the enrichment of molybdenum oxides in large grains. It was found that the oxide phases and the surface morphology change as a function of the compositional gradient. Tests of the library antimicrobial activity against E. coli were performed and the antimicrobial activity was proven in some defined compositional ranges. A mechanism for explaining the observed activity is proposed, involving a collective contribution from (i) increased local acidity due to the enrichment in large grains of molybdenum oxides with different stoichiometry and (ii) the release of free radicals from the W18O49 phase under visible light.

  18. Experimental investigation on phase change materials as heating element for non-electric neonatal incubator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matahari, Rho Natta; Putra, Nandy; Ariantara, Bambang; Amin, Muhammad; Prawiro, Erwin

    2017-02-01

    High number of preterm births is one of the issues in improving health standard. The effort to help premature babies is hampered by high cost of NICU care in hospital. In addition, uneven distribution of electricity to remote area made it hard to operate the incubator. Utilization of phase change material beeswax to non-electricity incubator as heating element becomes alternative option to save premature babies. The objective of this experiment is to investigate the most efficient mass of beeswax according to Indonesian National Standard to earn over time and ideal temperature of incubator. Experiment was performed using prototype incubator, which utilizes natural convection phenomenon in the heating process of incubator. Utilization of fin is to accelerate heat distribution in the incubator. Result of experiment showed that the most efficient mass of PCM is 3 kg, which has 2.45 hours of running time for maintaining temperature of incubator in range of 32-36 °C.

  19. Investigation on the effects of temperature dependency of material parameters on a thermoelastic loading problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Mukhopadhyay, Santwana

    2017-08-01

    The present work is concerned with the investigation of thermoelastic interactions inside a spherical shell with temperature-dependent material parameters. We employ the heat conduction model with a single delay term. The problem is studied by considering three different kinds of time-dependent temperature and stress distributions applied at the inner and outer surfaces of the shell. The problem is formulated by considering that the thermal properties vary as linear function of temperature that yield nonlinear governing equations. The problem is solved by applying Kirchhoff transformation along with integral transform technique. The numerical results of the field variables are shown in the different graphs to study the influence of temperature-dependent thermal parameters in various cases. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent effect is more prominent in case of stress distribution as compared to other fields and also the effect is significant in case of thermal shock applied at the two boundary surfaces of the spherical shell.

  20. Investigating Students' Ideas About X-rays While Developing Teaching Materials for a Medical Physics Course

    SciTech Connect

    Kalita, Spartak; Zollman, Dean

    2007-01-30

    The goal of the Modern Miracle Medical Machines project is to promote pre-med students' interest in physics by using the context of contemporary medical imaging. The X-ray medical imaging learning module will be a central part of this effort. To investigate students' transfer of learning in this context we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. In the latter interview, some of the proposed learning materials were used. The students brought to our discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models which often are not always internally consistent or coherent.

  1. The Effect of Chromite Slag as a Binder Agent on Stress-Strain Behaviour of Cemented Tailing Backfill in Compression, a Case Study: Faryab Chromite Mine / Wpływ dodatku żużla zawierającego spoiwo w postaci chromitu na wytrzymałość na ściskanie materiału podsadzkowego zawierającego odpady pogórnicze z dodatkiem cementu. studium przypadku: kopalnia chromitu (żelaziaka chromowego) w faryab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Saeed; Shahriar, Koroush; Maarefvand, Parviz; Goshtasbi, Kamran

    2013-03-01

    Due to improving the environmental aspect and reduce the backfilling cost, the Faryab mine carry out researches into the replacement of cement by chromite slag. The test samples consisted of tailing from the washing plant of Faryab mine and different binders such as Portland cement, Pozzolanic cement and different combinations of Portland cement with chromite slag. The chromite slag produced by Ferrochromite refinery plant of this mine. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the findings from extensive laboratory test programs carried out to determine the effects of chromite slag on mechanical properties of cemented tailing backfills (CTB). The results show that chromite slag improves the mechanical properties of CTB samples. Also, the results indicate that chromite slag can be used as a replaceable material with cement and reduced 2-3% consumption of cement in 1 m3 of backfill mixes. In addition, improving the environmental conditions can be achieved by reducing the cement content and moving tailing and chromite slag to underground stopes.

  2. Investigation of the Ignition and Burning of Materials in Space Cabin Atmospheres. Part 1: Ignition and Burning of Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical study of the theory of ignition and burning of a plastic material immersed in an atmosphere of a space cabin which may be subjected to gravity force changes is considered. The hazardous condition in a space cabin environment where the changes of gravity may effect the combustion process is evaluated. The model considered the analysis of the coupled gas and solid phases and is based on the premise that material heating leads to the formation of pyrolysis gases from the decomposed solid which then react with the ambient oxidizer to further the combustion process. Moreover, free convection plays a dominant role in transporting these hot gases to the virgin material. A time-dependent study of the coupled gas-solid model as required for ignition processes with emphasis on the surface energy interchange of the gas and solid phases has been made. Detailed distribution of species composition and temperature patterns provide a spatial and time map of the evolving gases from the material combustion.

  3. Material Modeling of Space Shuttle Leading Edge and External Tank Materials For Use in the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly; Melis, Matthew; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Gabrys, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Upon the commencement of the analytical effort to characterize the impact dynamics and damage of the Space Shuttle Columbia leading edge due to External Tank insulating foam, the necessity of creating analytical descriptions of these materials became evident. To that end, material models were developed of the leading edge thermal protection system, Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC), and a low density polyurethane foam, BX-250. Challenges in modeling the RCC include its extreme brittleness, the differing behavior in compression and tension, and the anisotropic fabric layup. These effects were successfully included in LS-DYNA Material Model 58, *MAT_LAMINATED_ COMPOSITE_ FABRIC. The differing compression and tension behavior was modeled using the available damage parameters. Each fabric layer was given an integration point in the shell element, and was allowed to fail independently. Comparisons were made to static test data and coupon ballistic impact tests before being utilized in the full scale analysis. The foam's properties were typical of elastic automotive foams; and LS-DYNA Material Model 83, *MAT_FU_CHANG_FOAM, was successfully used to model its behavior. Material parameters defined included strain rate dependent stress-strain curves for both loading and un-loading, and for both compression and tension. This model was formulated with static test data and strain rate dependent test data, and was compared to ballistic impact tests on load-cell instrumented aluminum plates. These models were subsequently utilized in analysis of the Shuttle leading edge full scale ballistic impact tests, and are currently being used in the Return to Flight Space Shuttle re-certification effort.

  4. Synthesis and Structural Investigations of Infrared Transmitting Materials in Rare Earth Chalcogenide Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumta, Prashant Nagesh

    1990-01-01

    gamma rm La _2S_3 (lanthanum sulfide) shows potential as a candidate window material for far IR transmission in the 8-14 μm spectral region. Novel low temperature routes using metalorganic solutions have been developed for the synthesis of gamma and beta rm La_2S_3. Two different amorphous precursors (20 nm size and SSA of 74 m^2 /gm) were synthesized at room temperature which undergo transformation in a sulfur atmosphere to generate sulfide particles (1-3 μm size). A sulfur content of 8.50 wt% in the precursor is critical for the transformation to the cubic (gamma ) form of rm La_2S_3 . The transformation controlled by the extent of hydrolysis of the alkoxide as determined by thermal stability and chemical analysis of the precursor. Detailed microstructural characterization of the precursors and phase evolution mechanisms were studied. Hot pressed disks (9mm thick) of the cubic sulfide ceramic show a far IR cut-off at 13 mum. Structural analysis by convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) confirmed the BCC cell structure and the space group of I43d for the powders and ceramic. Amorphous IR materials in the rm La_2S_3-GeS_2 system were also studied with an emphasis on bulk glass formation and structural characteristics. Glasses containing 92.5 mol% GeS_2 show evidence of primary (60-800 A) and secondary (30-130 A) phase separation at the molecular level. The effect of composition on the microstructure and thermal stability of these glasses were also investigated. The Molecular Dynamics simulation technique was applied to study the structure of IR transmitting materials in liquid and glassy forms. An empirical model was developed which successfully describes the liquid and glass structures of a representative IR material (ZnCl_2 ) and studies were performed to assess the effect of the mass of the borders (W) of the simulation cell on the glass transition temperature. An extension of the model to simulate crystalline rm La_2S _3 was also attempted.

  5. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's official public docket files of its accident investigations, or its computerized accident database(s) shall...

  6. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's official public docket files of its accident investigations, or its computerized accident database(s) shall...

  7. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's official public docket files of its accident investigations, or its computerized accident database(s) shall...

  8. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's official public docket files of its accident investigations, or its computerized accident database(s) shall...

  9. 49 CFR 837.3 - Published reports, material contained in the public accident investigation dockets, and accident...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... public accident investigation dockets, and accident database data. 837.3 Section 837.3 Transportation... investigation dockets, and accident database data. (a) Demands for material contained in the NTSB's official public docket files of its accident investigations, or its computerized accident database(s) shall...

  10. Investigations on modern carbon materials in the Boris Kidrič Institute, Vinča

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinković, Slobodan

    1980-03-01

    Modern carbon materials which have been objects of research at the Boris Kidrič Institute, Vinča involve high-performance carbon fibres from PAN precursor, carbon-fibre-reinforced phenolic and epoxy resins, carbon-carbon composites, pyrolytic carbons deposited at 1500-2450 K both pure and containing small amounts of B, Si, P or U, and carbon felt from viscose rayon precursor. Investigations relevant to carbon fibres comprise a study of processes during air oxidation of PAN fibres and an extensive research of low-temperature SO 2-treatment of PAN fibres, which has resulted in a model of the structure stabilization and shows that this stabilization can be successfully applied for the preparation of high-performance carbon fibres. Extensive investigations of codeposition of carbon and small amounts of B, Si, P and U suggest that B, Si and P enter the pyrocarbon lattice substitutionally and produce important changes in properties of the product. B, Si and U act as graphitizing catalysts, the effect being most pronounced for Si. The fabrication technology of the carbon fibres, carbon-fibre-reinforced-plastics and of pyrolytic carbon has been developed on a laboratory scale.

  11. Investigation of the Crystal Growth of Dielectric Materials by the Bridgman Technique Using Vibrational Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.; Zharikov, Evgenii

    2002-01-01

    The principal goal of this ground-based program, which started on February 1, 1998 and concluded on April 30, 2002, was to investigate the influence of low frequency vibrations on the fluid flow and quality of dielectric oxide crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. This experimental program was a collaborative effort between Stanford University and the General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, and included a strong emphasis on both physical modeling and the growth of some technologically important materials. Additionally it was carried out initially in collaboration with the theoretical and numerical investigations of A.Fedoseyev and I.Alexander (ongoing in another NASA sponsored program). This latter program involved a study of vibro-convective buoyancy-driven flows in cylindrical configurations with the expectation of being able to use vibrational flows to control buoyancy driven fluid transport to off-set the effect of "g-jitter" during microgravity Bridgman crystal growth. These two programs taken together, were designed to lead to a new parametric control variable which can be used to either suppress or control convection, and thereby heat and mass transport during Bridgman crystal growth. It was expected to be effective in either a terrestrial or space environment.

  12. Investigation of plasma-organic materials interaction in aqueous solution with atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, K.; Miyazaki, A.; Setsuhara, Y.

    2014-06-01

    An investigation was carried out into the interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma with an organic material in an aqueous solution. The degradation of methylene blue (MB) by plasma exposure through the gas/liquid interface was studied. In the optical emission spectrum of the plasma, in addition to strong He emission lines, emissions due to O and OH radicals formed by dissociation of water were present. The change in the absorbance of a MB aqueous solution during plasma exposure was measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The absorption peak intensity decreased with plasma exposure time and complete decolorization occurred after 10 min. Since plasma exposure was found to decrease the pH of water, the effect of changes in pH on MB degradation in the absence of a plasma was investigated using solutions with different pH values. However, varying the pH was found to have no influence on MB degradation. The results indicated that MB degradation occurred due to interactions between MB and radicals across the plasma/liquid interface.

  13. Investigation of intrinsic defect magnetic properties in wurtzite ZnO materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. S.; Visotin, M. A.; Kholtobina, A. S.; Kuzubov, A. A.; Mikhaleva, N. S.; Hsu, Hua Shu

    2017-10-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the ferromagnetism induced by intrinsic defects inside wurtzite zinc oxide structures are performed using magnetic field-dependent circular dichroism (MCD-H), direct magnetization measurement (M-H) by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as well as by generalized gradient density functional theory (GGA-DFT). To investigate localized magnetic moments of bulk material intrinsic defects - vacancies, interstitial atoms and Frenkel defects, various-size periodic supercells are calculated. It is shown that oxygen interstitial atoms (Oi) or zinc vacancies (Znv) generate magnetic moments of 1,98 и 1,26 μB respectively, however, the magnitudes are significantly reduced when the distance between defects increases. At the same time, the magnetic moments of oxygen Frenkel defects are large ( 1.5-1.8 μB) and do not depend on the distance between the defects. It is shown that the origin of the induced ferromagnetism in bulk ZnO is the extra spin density on the oxygen atoms nearest to the defect. Also dependence of the magnetization of ZnO (10 1 ̅ 0) and (0001) thin films on the positions of Oi and Znv in subsurface layers were investigated and it is shown that the magnetic moments of both defects are significantly different from the values inside bulk material. In order to check theoretical results regarding the defect induced ferromagnetism in ZnO, two thin films doped by carbon (C) and having Zn interstitials and oxygen vacancies were prepared and annealed in vacuum and air, respectively. According to the MCD-H and M-H measurements, the film, which was annealed in air, exhibits a ferromagnetic behavior, while the other does not. One can assume annealing of ZnO in vacuum should create oxygen vacancies or Zn interstitial atoms. At that annealing of the second C:ZnO film in air leads to essential magnetization, probably by annihilation of oxygen vacancies, formation of interstitial oxygen atoms or zinc vacancies

  14. Effects of Material Degradation on the Structural Integrity of Composite Materials: Experimental Investigation and Modeling of High Temperature Degradation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Ronan A.; McManus, Hugh L.

    1996-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that simple coupled reaction-diffusion models can approximate the aging behavior of PMR-15 resin subjected to different oxidative environments. Based on empirically observed phenomena, a model coupling chemical reactions, both thermal and oxidative, with diffusion of oxygen into the material bulk should allow simulation of the aging process. Through preliminary modeling techniques such as this it has become apparent that accurate analytical models cannot be created until the phenomena which cause the aging of these materials are quantified. An experimental program is currently underway to quantify all of the reaction/diffusion related mechanisms involved. The following contains a summary of the experimental data which has been collected through thermogravimetric analyses of neat PMR-15 resin, along with analytical predictions from models based on the empirical data. Thermogravimetric analyses were carried out in a number of different environments - nitrogen, air and oxygen. The nitrogen provides data for the purely thermal degradation mechanisms while those in air provide data for the coupled oxidative-thermal process. The intent here is to effectively subtract the nitrogen atmosphere data (assumed to represent only thermal reactions) from the air and oxygen atmosphere data to back-figure the purely oxidative reactions. Once purely oxidative (concentration dependent) reactions have been quantified it should then be possible to quantify the diffusion of oxygen into the material bulk.

  15. Results of investigating the physicomechanical properties of a sample of lunar surface material in a research chamber in nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonovich, A. K.; Gromov, V. V.; Dmitriyev, A. N.; Lozhkin, V. A.; Pavlov, P. S.; Rybakov, A. V.; Shvarev, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported on an investigation of the mechanical properties of the lunar surface material sample returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The study included determination of the specific weight of the surface material, the nature of its disintegration, and the determination of its compressibility characteristics, shear resistance, and bearing capacity. Quantitative data are presented on mechanical properties for the lunar surface material, many of which are determined for the first time. The instruments and experimental techniques are described.

  16. Energy and raw material potentials of wood residue in the Pacific Coast States: a summary of a preliminary feasibility investigation.

    Treesearch

    John B. Grantham; Eldon Estep; John M. Pierovich; Harold Tarkow; Thomas C. Adams

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of a preliminary investigation of feasibility of using wood residue to meet energy and raw material needs in the Pacific Coast States. Magnitude of needs was examined and volume of logging-residue and unused mill residue was estimated. Costs of obtaining and preprocessing logging residue for energy and pulp and particle board raw material were...

  17. Computational and experimental investigations of carbon-ceramic composite materials thermochemical resistance in combustion products of liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V. V.; Volkov, N. N.; Volkova, L. I.; Kondratenko, V. I.; Popov, V. A.; Tsatsuev, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    Computational and experimental investigations of thermochemical resistance of carbon-ceramic composites in the combustion products of liquid rocket engine (LRE) are presented. The tests with model extensions made of the composite material (CM) were performed. The test time was about 200 s. The maximal temperature of the material fire surface was 1600 K. Physical and numerical model of silicon carbide destruction was developed.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Material Removal Characteristics in Silicon Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Boumyoung; Jeong, Sukhoon; Lee, Hyunseop; Kim, Hyoungjae; Jeong, Haedo; Dornfeld, David A.

    2009-11-01

    The material removal characteristics of a silicon wafer were experimentally investigated with respect to the chemical dissolution and mechanical abrasion of the wafer during silicon chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) using an alkali-based slurry. The silicon surface without native oxide is rapidly dissolved by the slurry containing an amine agent, which effectively leads to the reduced hardness of the loaded silicon wafer due to Si-Si bond breaking during polishing. The abrasive particles in the slurry easily remove the reacted silicon surface, and the removal rate and wafer non-uniformity for abrasive concentrations of 1.5-3 wt % are better than those for other concentrations because of the low and steady coefficient of friction (COF) owing to the evenness of abrasive particles between the wafer and pad. Also, it was found that a high slurry flow rate of 700-1000 cm3/min improves wafer non-uniformity owing to the reduced temporal variation of temperature, because the slurry acts as a good cooling source during polishing. However, the removal rate remains almost constant upon varying the slurry flow rate because of the effective dissolution characteristic of the slurry with abundant amine as an accelerator, regardless of the reduction of average temperature with increasing slurry flow rate. In the break-in process used to stabilize the material removal, the viscoelastic behaviors of the pad and the ground wafer surface with native oxide and wheel marks cause a temporal change of the friction force during polishing, which is related to the removal rate and wafer non-uniformity. As a result, the stabilization of removal rate and wafer non-uniformity is achieved through a steady-state process with elevated temperature and reduced COF after a total polishing time of 60 min, based on the removal process of the wafer surface and the permanent deformation in the viscoelastic behavior of the pad.

  19. State Variables in Granular Materials: an Investigation of Volume and Stress Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James Graham

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of granular materials near the transition between solid-like and fluid-like behavior. We aim to understand the collective dynamics in dense driven systems, the role of geometry in the volume fluctuations, and the equilibration of granular temperatures. The experiments are conducted using two-dimensional materials composed of a single layer of disks which are supported by a thin layer of air. In driven granular systems, particle dynamics have commonly been quantified by the diffusion, even though this measure discards information about collective particle motion known to be important in dense systems. We draw inspiration from fluid mixing, and utilize the braid entropy, which provides a direct topological measure of the entanglement of particle trajectories and has been used to quantify mixing. We find that as the density or pressure increases, the dynamics slow and the braiding factor exhibits intermittency signifying a loss of chaos in the trajectories on the experimental timescale. In the same system, we experimentally measure the local volume fraction distribution, which we find to be independent of the boundary condition and the inter-particle friction coefficient. We extend the granocentric model to account for randomness in particle separations, which are important in dynamic systems. This model is in quantitative agreement with experimentally-measured local volume fraction distributions, indicating that geometry plays a central role in determining the magnitude of local volume fluctuations. Finally, we test whether the zeroth law (temperature-equilibration) of several ensemble-based granular temperatures is satisfied by two granular systems in contact. We calculate the compactivity and angoricity which are the temperature-like quantities associated with the volume and stress ensembles; we observe the compactivity does not satisfy the zeroth law test, while the angoricity does equilibrate between the two systems.

  20. Optoacoustic Microscopy for Investigation of Material Nanostructures-Embracing the Ultrasmall, Ultrafast, and the Invisible

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmikko, Arto; Humphrey, Maris

    2014-07-10

    The goal of this grant was the development of a new type of scanning acoustic microscope for nanometer resolution ultrasound imaging, based on ultrafast optoacoustics (>GHz). In the microscope, subpicosecond laser pulses was used to generate and detect very high frequency ultrasound with nanometer wavelengths. We report here on the outcome of the 3-year DOE/BES grant which involved the design, multifaceted construction, and proof-of-concept demonstration of an instrument that can be used for quantitative imaging of nanoscale material features – including features that may be buried so as to be inaccessible to conventional lightwave or electron microscopies. The research program has produced a prototype scanning optoacoustic microscope which, in combination with advanced computational modeling, is a system-level new technology (two patents issues) which offer novel means for precision metrology of material nanostructures, particularly those that are of contemporary interest to the frontline micro- and optoelectronics device industry. For accomplishing the ambitious technical goals, the research roadmap was designed and implemented in two phases. In Phase I, we constructed a “non-focusing” optoacoustic microscope instrument (“POAM”), with nanometer vertical (z-) resolution, while limited to approximately 10 micrometer scale lateral recolution. The Phase I version of the instrument which was guided by extensive acoustic and optical numerical modeling of the basic underlying acoustic and optical physics, featured nanometer scale close loop positioning between the optoacoustic transducer element and a nanostructured material sample under investigation. In phase II, we implemented and demonstrated a scanning version of the instrument (“SOAM”) where incident acoustic energy is focused, and scanned on lateral (x-y) spatial scale in the 100 nm range as per the goals of the project. In so doing we developed advanced numerical simulations to provide