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Sample records for background explorer cobe

  1. The Cosmic Background Explorer /COBE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, under study by NASA since 1976, will map the spectrum and the angular distribution of diffuse radiation from the universe over the entire wavelength range from 1 micron to 1.3 cm. It carries three instruments: a set of differential microwave radiometers (DMR) at 23.5, 31.4, 53, and 90GHz, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 1 to 100 per cm, and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) covering 1 to 300 microns. They will use the ideal space environment, a one year lifetime, and standard instrument techniques to achieve orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and accuracy, providing a fundamental data base for cosmology. The instruments are united by common purpose as well as similar environmental and orbital requirements. The data from all three experiments will be analyzed together, to distinguish nearby sources of radiation from the cosmologically interesting diffuse background radiations. Construction is planned to begin in 1982 for a launch in 1988.

  2. Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) press kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    COBE, the Cosmic Background Explorer spacecraft, and its mission are described. COBE was designed to study the origin and dynamics of the universe including the theory that the universe began with a cataclysmic explosion referred to as the Big Bang. To this end, earth's cosmic background - the infrared radiation that bombards earth from every direction - will be measured by three sophisticated instruments: the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE).

  3. Scientific results from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Murdock, T. L.; Shafer, R. A.; Silverberg, R. F.; Smoot, G. F.; Weiss, R.; Wright, E. L.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has flown the COBE satellite to observe the Big Bang and the subsequent formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background is that of a black body of temperature T = 2.73 ± 0.06 K, with no deviation from a black-body spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant cosmic microwave background anisotropy, consistent with a scale-invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservative upper limits to the cosmic infrared background. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the cosmic infrared background limits. PMID:11607383

  4. Early results from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Hauser, M. G.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Gulkis, S.; Isaacman, R. B.; Janssen, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer, launched 18 Nov. 1989, has nearly completed its first full mapping of the sky with all three of its instruments: A Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS) covering 0.1 to 10 mm, a set of Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) operating at 3.3, 5.7, and 9.6 mm, and a diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) spanning 1 to 300 microns in ten bands. A preliminary map of the sky derived from DIRBE data is presented. Initial cosmological implications include: a limit on the comptonization parameter of 0.001, on the chemical potential parameter of 0.01, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy has the spectrum expected from a Doppler shift of a blackbody. There are no significant anisotropies in the microwave sky detected, other than from our own galaxy and a cos theta dipole anisotropy whose amplitude and direction agree with previous data. At shorter wavelengths, the sky spectrum and anisotropies are dominated by emission from local sources of emission within our Galaxy and Solar System. Preliminary comparison of IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite) and DRIBE sky brightnesses toward the ecliptic poles shows the IRAS values to be significantly higher than found by DRIBE at 100 microns. The presence of gain and zero point errors in the IRAS total brightness data is suggested. The spacecraft, instrument designs, and data reduction methods are described.

  5. Science objectives lead to contamination requirements for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Eve M.; Carosso, Nancy J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The mission aims and related requirements of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) are described in order to assess the measure needed for adequate control of optical system contamination. Instrument requirements are set forth so that the Diffuse IR Background Experiment (DIRBE), the Far IR Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), and the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMRs) can achieve performance goals. The BRDF requirement for the primary mirror of the DIRBE is a maximum change of 50 percent on clean versus contaminated mirrors. The most critical components of the FIRAS and the DMR are discussed which are the sky horn and the antennae throats, respectively. The contamination-control devices include contamination covers, cleanroom assembly, and retractable cover assembly. The COBE is not found to perform unreliably due to contamination problems which suggests that the contamination program is effective.

  6. An overview of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and its observations - New sky maps of the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the three instruments aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and presents early results obtained from the first six months of observations. The three instruments (FIRAS, DMR, and DIRBE) have operated well and produced significant new results. The FIRAS measurement of the CMB spectrum supports the standard Big Bang model. The maps made from the DMR instrument measurements show a spatially smooth early universe. The maps of galactic and zodiacal emission produced by the DIRBE instrument are needed to identify the foreground emissions from extragalactic and thus to interpret its and the other COBE results in terms of events in the early universe.

  7. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  8. Cosmic background explorer (COBE) navigation with TDRSS one-way return-link Doppler in the post-helium-venting phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemesure, M.; Dunham, J.; Maher, M.; Teles, J.; Jackson, J.

    1991-01-01

    A navigation experiment was performed which establishes Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) frequency stabilized one way return link Doppler TDRSS tracking data as a feasible option for mission orbit determination support at the Goddard Space Center Flight Dynamics Facility. The study was conducted using both one way and two way Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) tracking measurements for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. Tracking data for a 4 week period immediately follow the depletion of the helium supply was used. The study showed that, for both definitive orbit solution and short term orbit prediction (up to 4 weeks), orbit determination results based on one way return link Doppler tracking measurements are comparable to orbit determination results based on two way range and two way Doppler tracking measurements.

  9. Cosmic background explorer (COBE) navigation with TDRSS one-way return-link Doppler in the post-helium-venting phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemesure, M.; Dunham, J.; Maher, M.; Teles, J.; Jackson, J.

    1991-10-01

    A navigation experiment was performed which establishes Ultra-Stable Oscillator (USO) frequency stabilized one way return link Doppler TDRSS tracking data as a feasible option for mission orbit determination support at the Goddard Space Center Flight Dynamics Facility. The study was conducted using both one way and two way Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) tracking measurements for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. Tracking data for a 4 week period immediately follow the depletion of the helium supply was used. The study showed that, for both definitive orbit solution and short term orbit prediction (up to 4 weeks), orbit determination results based on one way return link Doppler tracking measurements are comparable to orbit determination results based on two way range and two way Doppler tracking measurements.

  10. Topological analysis of COBE-DMR cosmic microwave background maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Sergio

    1994-03-01

    Geometric characteristics of random fields are exploited to test the consistency of density perturbation model spectra with Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) data. These cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps are analyzed using the number of anisotropy hot spots and their boundary curvature. CMB maps which account for instrumental effects and sky coverage are Monte Carlo generated. These simulations show that a scale-invariant Harrison-Zeldovich primordial Gaussian density fluctuation spectrum is consistent with the data. The CMB fluctuation coherence angle, based on boundary curvature, gives a spectral index n = 1.2 +/- 0.3.

  11. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  12. Microwave and theoretical studies for Cosmic Background Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, its instruments, and its scientific mission are discussed. The COBE radiometer is considered, and measurement of galactic radio emission with masers is reviewed. Extragalactic radiation and zodiacal dust are mentioned briefly.

  13. One-way return-link Doppler navigation with the Tracking and Data Satellite System (TDRSS) - The ultrastable oscillator (USO) experiment on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, J. B.; Nemesure, M.; Teles, J.; Brown-Conwell, E. R.; Jackson, J. A.; Reamy, V. L.; Maher, M. J.; Elrod, B. D.

    The principal objectives of the USO experiment on the COBE spacecraft are defined, and results of space qualification studies for the COBE USO experiment are summarized. The principal objectives of the experiment are: (1) to determine flight performance of the USO coupled to the second-generation TDRSS transponder; (2) space qualify TDRSS noncoherent one-way return-link Doppler tracking; and (3) analyze algorithms for one-way navigation with real data. The three objectives of the experiment have been met in the first stage of the experiment analysis.

  14. Angular power spectrum of the microwave background anisotropy seen by the COBE differential microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Lubin, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    The angular power spectrum estimator developed by Peebles (1973) and Hauser & Peebles (1973) has been modified and applied to the 2 yr maps produced by the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE DMR)). The power spectrum of the real sky has been compared to the power spectra of a large number of simulated random skies produced with noise equal to the observed noise and primordial density fluctuation power spectra of power-law form, with P(k) proportional to k(exp n). Within the limited range of spatial scales covered by the COBE DMR, corresponding to spherical harmonic indices 3 less than or = l is less than or approximately = 30, the best-fitting value of the spectral index is n = 1.25(sup +0.39 sub -0.44) with the Harrisson-Zel'dovich value n = 1 approximately 0.5 sigma below the best fit. For 3 less than or = l less than or approximately = 19, the best fit is n = 1.46(sup +0.39 sub -0.44). Comparing the COBE DMR delta-T/T at small l to the delta-T/T at l approximately = 50 from degree scale anisotropy experiments gives a smaller range of acceptable spectral indices which includes n = 1.

  15. Angular power spectrum of the microwave background anisotropy seen by the COBE differential microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Lubin, P. M.

    1994-12-01

    The angular power spectrum estimator developed by Peebles (1973) and Hauser & Peebles (1973) has been modified and applied to the 2 yr maps produced by the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE DMR)). The power spectrum of the real sky has been compared to the power spectra of a large number of simulated random skies produced with noise equal to the observed noise and primordial density fluctuation power spectra of power-law form, with P(k) proportional to kn. Within the limited range of spatial scales covered by the COBE DMR, corresponding to spherical harmonic indices 3 less than or = l is less than or approximately = 30, the best-fitting value of the spectral index is n = 1.25+0.39-0.44 with the Harrisson-Zel'dovich value n = 1 approximately 0.5 sigma below the best fit. For 3 less than or = l less than or approximately = 19, the best fit is n = 1.46+0.39-0.44. Comparing the COBE DMR delta-T/T at small l to the delta-T/T at l approximately = 50 from degree scale anisotropy experiments gives a smaller range of acceptable spectral indices which includes n = 1.

  16. COBE: 20 Years Ago

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite rocketed into Earth orbit on Nov. 18, 1989, and quickly revolutionized our understanding of the early cosmos. This archival video was reissued by ...

  17. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) has a blackbody spectrum within 3.4 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm over the frequency range from 2 to 20/cm (5-0.5 mm). These measurements, derived from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotomer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, imply stringent limits on energy release in the early universe after t approximately 1 year and redshift z approximately 3 x 10(exp 6). The deviations are less than 0.30% of the peak brightness, with an rms value of 0.01%, and the dimensionless cosmological distortion parameters are limited to the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) (95% confidence level). The temperature of the CMBR is 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (95% confidence level systematic).

  18. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  19. COBE diffuse infrared background experiment observations of Galactic reddening and stellar populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, R. G.; Berriman, G. B.; Boggess, N.; Dwek, E.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Murdock, T. L.; Odegard, N.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    This Letter describes the results of an initial study of Galactic extinction and the colors of Galactic stellar populations in the near-IR using the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The near-IR reddening observed by DIRBE is consistent with the extinction law tabulated by Rieke & Lebofsky (1985). The distribution of dust and stars in most of the first and fourth quadrants of the Galactic plane (0 deg less than l less than 90 deg, and 270 deg less than l less than 360 deg, respectively) can be modeled as a stellar background source seen through up to approximately 4 mag of extinction at 1.25 micrometers. The unreddened near-IR colors of the Galactic disk are similar to those of late-K and M giants. The Galactic bulge exhibits slightly bluer colors in the 2.2-3.5 micrometers range, as noted by Terndrup et al. (1991). Star-forming regions exhibit colors that indicate the presence of a approximately 900 K continuum produced by hot dust or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contributing at wavelengths as short as 3.5 micrometers.

  20. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  1. Gaussian statistics of the cosmic microwave background: Correlation of temperature extrema in the COBE DMR two-year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function of the extrema points (peaks and valleys) in the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 2 year sky maps as a test for non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. A maximum-likelihood analysis compares the DMR data to n = 1 toy models whose random-phase spherical harmonic components a(sub lm) are drawn from either Gaussian, chi-square, or log-normal parent populations. The likelihood of the 53 GHz (A+B)/2 data is greatest for the exact Gaussian model. There is less than 10% chance that the non-Gaussian models tested describe the DMR data, limited primarily by type II errors in the statistical inference. The extrema correlation function is a stronger test for this class of non-Gaussian models than topological statistics such as the genus.

  2. Cold dark matter and degree-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropy statistics after COBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Stompor, Radoslaw; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1993-01-01

    We conduct a Monte Carlo simulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy in the UCSB South Pole 1991 degree-scale experiment. We examine cold dark matter cosmology with large-scale structure seeded by the Harrison-Zel'dovich hierarchy of Gaussian-distributed primordial inhomogeneities normalized to the COBE-DMR measurement of large-angle CMB anisotropy. We find it statistically implausible (in the sense of low cumulative probability F lower than 5 percent, of not measuring a cosmological delta-T/T signal) that the degree-scale cosmological CMB anisotropy predicted in such models could have escaped a detection at the level of sensitivity achieved in the South Pole 1991 experiment.

  3. Cosmology from MAXIMA-1, BOOMERANG, and COBE DMR cosmic microwave background observations.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, A H; Ade, P A; Balbi, A; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Coble, K; Crill, B P; de Bernardis, P; Farese, P; Ferreira, P G; Ganga, K; Giacometti, M; Hanany, S; Hivon, E; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Lange, A E; Lee, A T; Martinis, L; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Melchiorri, A; Montroy, T; Netterfield, C B; Oh, S; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Pogosyan, D; Prunet, S; Rabii, B; Rao, S; Richards, P L; Romeo, G; Ruhl, J E; Scaramuzzi, F; Sforna, D; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Winant, C D; Wu, J H

    2001-04-16

    Recent results from BOOMERANG-98 and MAXIMA-1, taken together with COBE DMR, provide consistent and high signal-to-noise measurements of the cosmic microwave background power spectrum at spherical harmonic multipole bands over 2

  4. COBE Astronomical Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, I.; Raugh, A. C.; Cheng, E. S.

    A project to store and convert external astronomical survey maps to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft pixelization is described. Established software is reused in order to reduce development costs. The proposed packages and systems include the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF), Interactive Data Language Astronomy Library (IDL), the FITSIO data transfer package and the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). The software structure of the astronomical databases, projected conversion schemes, quality assurance procedures and outstanding problems will be discussed.

  5. COBE looks back to the Big Bang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview is presented of NASA-Goddard's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), the first NASA satellite designed to observe the primeval explosion of the universe. The spacecraft carries three extremely sensitive IR and microwave instruments designed to measure the faint residual radiation from the Big Bang and to search for the formation of the first galaxies. COBE's far IR absolute spectrophotometer has shown that the Big Bang radiation has a blackbody spectrum, proving that there was no large energy release after the explosion.

  6. Near- and far-infrared observations of interplanetary dust bands from the COBE diffuse infrared background experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesman, William J.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kelsall, Thomas; Lisse, Carey M.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.; Reach, William T.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Stemwedel, Sally W.; Weiland, Janet L.

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) spacecraft have been used to examine the near and far infrared signatures of the interplanetary dust (IPD) bands. Images of the dust band pairs at ecliptic latitudes of +/- 1.4 deg and +/- 10 deg have been produced at DIRBE wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 micrometers. The observations at the shorter wavelengths provide the first evidence of scattered sunlight from particles responsible for the dust bands. It is found that the grains in the bands and those in the smooth IPD cloud have similar spectral energy distributions, suggesting similar compositions and possibly a common origin. The scattering albedos from 1.25 to 3.5 micrometers for the grains in the dust bands and those in the IPD cloud are 0.22 and 0.29, respectively. The 10 deg band pair is cooler (185 +/- 10 K) than the smooth interplanetary dust cloud (259 +/- 10 K). From both parallactic and thermal analyses, the implied location of the grains responsible for the peak brightness of the 10 deg band pair is 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU the Sun A parallactic distance of 1.4 +/- 0.2 AU is found for the peak of the 1.4 deg band pair.

  7. A comparison of the cosmic microwave and cosmic X-ray backgrounds - Constraints on local sources of the fluctuations observed by COBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughn, S. P.; Jahoda, K.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested by Hogan (1992) that the microwave background anisotropy detected by the COBE DMR experiment (Smoot et al., 1992) might be produced by inverse Compton scattering from hot diffuse clouds of electrons in nearby superclusters. If the COBE fluctuations are due to this mechanism, then the absence of anticorrelations between maps of the cosmic microwave and cosmic X-ray backgrounds constrains the temperature (16 keV) and density (less than 2 x 10 exp -6/cu cm) of the ionized supercluster gas. Since the COBE limits on spectral distortion indicate that the temperature of the intergalactic medium is less than 10 keV, we conclude that the fluctuations observed by COBE are probably not produced by this mechanism.

  8. Determination of the Cosmic Infrared Background from COBE/FIRAS and Planck HFI Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, Alan

    Current determinations of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far-infrared to millimeter wavelengths have large uncertainties, on the order of 30%. We propose to make new, more accurate determinations of the CIB at these wavelengths using COBE /FIRAS and Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) Data. This work will enable a factor of two improvement in our understanding of the CIB. Planck was not designed to measure the monopole component of sky brightness, so the FIRAS data will be used to recalibrate the zero level of the HFI maps. Correlation of the recalibrated HFI maps with Galactic H I 21-cm line emission will be used to separate the Galactic foreground emission and determine the CIB in the HFI bands from 217 to 857 GHz, or 1380 to 350 microns. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the HFI data will allow the correlations with H I to be established more accurately and to lower H I column density than is possible with the 7± resolution FIRAS data, resulting in significant improvement in the accuracy of the derived CIB. Correlations of the CIB-subtracted 857 GHz map with FIRAS maps averaged over broad frequency bins will then be used to determine CIB values at frequencies not observed by Planck. Uncertainties in the CIB results are expected to be as low as 14% for the HFI 857 GHz band. Our results will allow more accurate determination of the fraction of the CIB that is resolved by deep source surveys, and a tighter limit to be placed on the contribution to the CIB of any diffuse emission such as emission from intergalactic dust. Possible gray extinction by intergalactic dust may produce significant systematic error in determinations of dark energy parameters from type Ia supernova measurements, and our results will be important for placing a tighter upper limit on such extinction. Our CIB results will also provide tighter constraints on models of the evolution of star-forming galaxies, and will be important in constraining the evolution in

  9. Determination of the Far-Infrared Cosmic Background Using COBE/DIRBE and WHAM Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, N.; Arendt, R. G.; Dwek, E.; Haffner, L. M.; Hauser, M. G.; Reynolds, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far infrared wavelengths using COBE/DIRBE data is limited by the accuracy to which foreground interplanetary and Galactic dust emission can be modeled and subtracted. Previous determinations of the far infrared CIB (e.g., Hauser et al. 1998) were based on the detection of residual isotropic emission in skymaps from which the emission from interplanetary dust and the neutral interstellar medium were removed. In this paper we use the Wisconsin H(alpha) Mapper (WHAM) Northern Sky Survey as a tracer of the ionized medium to examine the effect of this foreground component on determination of the CIB. We decompose the DIRBE far infrared data for five high Galactic latitude regions into HI- and H(alpha)- correlated components and a residual component. Eased on FUSE H2 absorption line observations, the contribution of a11 H2-correlated component is expected to he negligible. We find the H(alpha)-correlated component to be consistent with zero for each region, and we find that addition of an H(alpha)-correlated component in modeling the foreground emission has negligible effect on derived CIB results. Our CIB detections and 2(sigma) upper limits are essentially the same as those derived by Hauser et al. and are given by (nu)I(sub nu)(nW/sq m/sr) < 75, < 32, 25+/-8, and 13+/-3 at gamma = 60, 100, 140, and 240 microns, respectively. Our residuals have not been subjected to a detailed anisotropy test, so our CIB results do not supersede those of Hauser et al. Mie derive upper limits on the 100 micron emissivity of the ionized medium that are typically about 40% of the 100 micron emissivity of the neutral atomic medium. This low value may be caused in part by a lower dust-to-gas mass ratio in the ionized medium than in the neutral medium, and in part by a shortcoming of using H(alpha) intensity as a tracer of far infrared emission. If H(alpha) is not a reliable tracer, our analysis would underestimate the emissivity of

  10. The gravitational wave contribution to cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the amplitude of mass fluctuations from COBE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Mollerach, Silvia

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic background of primordial gravitational waves may substantially contribute, via the Sachs-Wolfe effect, to the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies recently detected by COBE. This implies a bias in any resulting determination of the primordial amplitude of density fluctuations. We consider the constraints imposed on n is less than 1 ('tilted') power-law fluctuation spectra, taking into account the contribution from both scalar and tensor waves, as predicted by power-law inflation. The gravitational wave contribution to CMB anisotropies generally reduces the required rms level of mass fluctuation, thereby increasing the linear bias parameter, even in models where the spectral index is close to the Harrison-Zel'dovich value n = 1. This 'gravitational wave bias' helps to reconcile the predictions of CDM models with observations on pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion on small scales.

  11. First results of the COBE satellite measurement of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Aymon, J.; De Amici, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Gulkis, S.; Backus, C.; Galuk, K.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.

    1991-01-01

    The concept and operation of the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite are reviewed, with emphasis on the software identification and subtraction of potential systematic effects. Preliminary results obtained from the first six months of DMR data are presented, and implications for cosmology are discussed.

  12. COBE On-Orbit Engineering Performance, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) was successfully launched on Nov. 18, 1989. The Delta Launch Vehicle performed flawlessly, and observatory deployments occurred as planned. The dewar cover successfully deployed on day 4, as planned, and the cryogen temperature is currently at 1.41 K. All three instruments are operating and acquiring science data, and the Payload Operational Control Center (POCC)/Network support has been excellent. Various performance aspects of the COBE are presented in view graph form.

  13. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  14. COBE Final Report: Dirbe Celestial Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, Shawn V.; Murdock, Thomas L.

    1997-01-01

    We report the results of a comparative study of the COsmic Background Explorer/Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment (COBE/DIRBE) photometric calibration over about 100 selected stellar and non-stellar calibration objects across a wide range of the DIRBE instrument dynamic range, wavelength coverage, and source temperature. A statistical comparison of the DIRBE-reported flux to the accepted values from the literature (as summarized in the CIO) provides an independent verification of the DIRBE point source calibration.

  15. COBE experience with filter QUEST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filla, O.; Keat, J.; Chu, D.

    1991-01-01

    A gyro based filter variation on the standard QUEST attitude determination algorithm is applied to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Filter QUEST is found to be three times as fast as the batch estimator and slightly more accurate than regular QUEST. Perhaps more important than its speed or accuracy is the fact that Filter QUEST can provide real time attitude solutions when regular QUEST cannot, due to lack of observability. Filter QUEST is also easy to use and adjust for the proper memory length. Suitable applications for Filter QUEST include coarse and real time attitude determination.

  16. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  17. Scientific results from COBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Murdock, T. L.; Shafer, R. A.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) carries three scientific instruments to make precise measurements of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales greater than 7 deg and to conduct a search for a diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation with 0.7 deg angular resolution. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the CMB is that of a blackbody of temperature T = 2.73 +/- 0.06 K, with no deviation from a blackbody spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The first year of data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant CMB anisotropy. The anisotropy is consistent with a scale invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Infrared sky brightness measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservative upper limits to the CIB. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the CIB limits.

  18. Scientific results from COBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Murdock, T. L.; Shafer, R. A.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1993-12-01

    NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) carries three scientific instruments to make precise measurements of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales greater than 7 deg and to conduct a search for a diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation with 0.7 deg angular resolution. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the CMB is that of a blackbody of temperature T = 2.73 +/- 0.06 K, with no deviation from a blackbody spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The first year of data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant CMB anisotropy. The anisotropy is consistent with a scale invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Infrared sky brightness measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservative upper limits to the CIB. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the CIB limits.

  19. Contamination control program for the Cosmic Background Explorer: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barney, Richard D.

    1990-01-01

    Each of the three state of the art instruments flown aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) were designed, fabricated, and integrated using unique contamination control procedures to ensure accurate characterization of the diffuse radiation in the universe. The most stringent surface level cleanliness specifications ever attempted by NASA were required by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DRIBE) which is located inside a liquid helium cooled dewar along with the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS). The DRIBE instrument required complex stray radiation suppression that defined a cold primary optical baffle system surface cleanliness level of 100A. The cleanliness levels of the cryogenic FIRAS instrument and the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) which were positioned symmetrically around the dewar were less stringent ranging from 300 to 500A. To achieve these instrument cleanliness levels, the entire flight spacecraft was maintained at level 500A throughout each phase of development. The COBE contamination control program is described along with the difficulties experienced in maintaining the cleanliness quality of personnel and flight hardware throughout instrument assembly.

  20. Contamination control program for the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barney, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    Each of the three state of the art instruments flown aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) were designed, fabricated, and integrated using unique contamination control procedures to ensure accurate characterization of the diffuse radiation in the universe. The most stringent surface level cleanliness specifications ever attempted by NASA were required by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DRIBE) which is located inside a liquid helium cooled dewar along with the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS). The DRIBE instrument required complex stray radiation suppression that defined a cold primary optical baffle system surface cleanliness level of 100A. The cleanliness levels of the cryogenic FIRAS instrument and the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) which were positioned symmetrically around the dewar were less stringent ranging from 300 to 500A. To achieve these instrument cleanliness levels, the entire flight spacecraft was maintained at level 500A throughout each phase of development. The COBE contamination control program is described along with the difficulties experienced in maintaining the cleanliness quality of personnel and flight hardware throughout instrument assembly.

  1. Systems aspects of COBE science data compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, I.; Boggess, E.; Seiler, E.

    1993-01-01

    A general approach to compression of diverse data from large scientific projects has been developed and this paper addresses the appropriate system and scientific constraints together with the algorithm development and test strategy. This framework has been implemented for the COsmic Background Explorer spacecraft (COBE) by retrofitting the existing VAS-based data management system with high-performance compression software permitting random access to the data. Algorithms which incorporate scientific knowledge and consume relatively few system resources are preferred over ad hoc methods. COBE exceeded its planned storage by a large and growing factor and the retrieval of data significantly affects the processing, delaying the availability of data for scientific usage and software test. Embedded compression software is planned to make the project tractable by reducing the data storage volume to an acceptable level during normal processing.

  2. COBE's search for structure in the Big Bang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Guerny, Gene (Editor); Keating, Thomas (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Truszkowski, Walt (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The launch of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and the definition of Earth Observing System (EOS) are two of the major events at NASA-Goddard. The three experiments contained in COBE (Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), and Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)) are very important in measuring the big bang. DMR measures the isotropy of the cosmic background (direction of the radiation). FIRAS looks at the spectrum over the whole sky, searching for deviations, and DIRBE operates in the infrared part of the spectrum gathering evidence of the earliest galaxy formation. By special techniques, the radiation coming from the solar system will be distinguished from that of extragalactic origin. Unique graphics will be used to represent the temperature of the emitting material. A cosmic event will be modeled of such importance that it will affect cosmological theory for generations to come. EOS will monitor changes in the Earth's geophysics during a whole solar color cycle.

  3. Microwave anisotropies in the light of the data from the COBE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1993-01-01

    The recent measurement of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and the recent South Pole experiment offer an excellent opportunity to probe cosmological theories. We test a class of theories in which the universe today is flat and matter dominated, and primordial perturbations are adiabatic parameterized by an index n. In this class of theories the predicted signal in the South Pole experiment depends on n, the Hubble constant, and the baryon density. For n = 1 a large region of this parameter space is ruled out, but there is still a window open which satisfies constraints from COBE, the South Pole experiment, and big bang nucleosynthesis.

  4. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) data processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, P. D.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Aymon, J.; Backus, C.; Deamici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Keegstra, P. B.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) experiment on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite is to make whole-sky maps, at frequencies of 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz, of any departures of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from its mean value of 2.735 K. An elaborate software system is necessary to calibrate and invert the differential measurements, so as to make sky maps free from large scale systematic errors to levels less than a millionth of the CMB.

  5. COBE anisotropy from supercluster gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1992-01-01

    It is suggested that the microwave background anisotropy detected by the COBE DMR might be dominated not by the direct gravitational effect of primordial fluctuations in the last scattering surface, but by scattering off of moving electrons in optically thin, nearby superclusters. Hot diffuse clouds of ionized gas created during supercluster collapse produce Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and Doppler background anisotropy whose properties may closely mimic those of primordial anisotropy in current data. Strategies for and difficulties in separating the effects are discussed, based on the anisotropy spectrum, autocorrelation, correlation with galaxy catalogs, X-ray emission, and integrated spectral distortions.

  6. Resolution of the COBE Earth sensor anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedler, J.

    1993-01-01

    Since its launch on November 18, 1989, the Earth sensors on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) have shown much greater noise than expected. The problem was traced to an error in Earth horizon acquisition-of-signal (AOS) times. Due to this error, the AOS timing correction was ignored, causing Earth sensor split-to-index (SI) angles to be incorrectly time-tagged to minor frame synchronization times. Resulting Earth sensor residuals, based on gyro-propagated fine attitude solutions, were as large as plus or minus 0.45 deg (much greater than plus or minus 0.10 deg from scanner specifications (Reference 1)). Also, discontinuities in single-frame coarse attitude pitch and roll angles (as large as 0.80 and 0.30 deg, respectively) were noted several times during each orbit. However, over the course of the mission, each Earth sensor was observed to independently and unexpectedly reset and then reactivate into a new configuration. Although the telemetered AOS timing corrections are still in error, a procedure has been developed to approximate and apply these corrections. This paper describes the approach, analysis, and results of approximating and applying AOS timing adjustments to correct Earth scanner data. Furthermore, due to the continuing degradation of COBE's gyroscopes, gyro-propagated fine attitude solutions may soon become unavailable, requiring an alternative method for attitude determination. By correcting Earth scanner AOS telemetry, as described in this paper, more accurate single-frame attitude solutions are obtained. All aforementioned pitch and roll discontinuities are removed. When proper AOS corrections are applied, the standard deviation of pitch residuals between coarse attitude and gyro-propagated fine attitude solutions decrease by a factor of 3. Also, the overall standard deviation of SI residuals from fine attitude solutions decrease by a factor of 4 (meeting sensor specifications) when AOS corrections are applied.

  7. On determining the spectrum of primordial inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR sky maps: Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1994-01-01

    The natural approach to a spectral analysis of data distributed on the sky employs spherical harmonic decomposition. A common problem encountered in practical astronomy is the lack of full sky coverage in the available data. For example, the removal of the Galactic plane data from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) sky maps compromises Fourier analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution due to the loss of orthogonality of the spherical harmonics. An explicit method for constructing orthonormal functions on an incomplete (e.g., Galaxy-cut) sphere is presented. These functions should be used in the proper Fourier analysis of the COBE DMR sky maps to provide the correct input for the determination of the spectrum of primordial inhomogeneity. The results of such an analysis are presented in an accompanying Letter. A similar algebraic construction of appropriate functions can be devised for other astronomical applications.

  8. On determining the spectrum of primordial inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR sky maps: Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1994-08-01

    The natural approach to a spectral analysis of data distributed on the sky employs spherical harmonic decomposition. A common problem encountered in practical astronomy is the lack of full sky coverage in the available data. For example, the removal of the Galactic plane data from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) sky maps compromises Fourier analysis of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution due to the loss of orthogonality of the spherical harmonics. An explicit method for constructing orthonormal functions on an incomplete (e.g., Galaxy-cut) sphere is presented. These functions should be used in the proper Fourier analysis of the COBE DMR sky maps to provide the correct input for the determination of the spectrum of primordial inhomogeneity. The results of such an analysis are presented in an accompanying Letter. A similar algebraic construction of appropriate functions can be devised for other astronomical applications.

  9. COBE attitude as seen from the FDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, J.; Chu, D.; Scheidker, E.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) attitude support is twofold: to determine spacecraft attitude and to explain deviations from nominal attitude behavior. Attitude determination often requires resolving contradictions in the sensor observations. This may be accomplished by applying calibration corrections or by revising the observation models. After accounting for all known sources of error, solution accuracy should be limited only by observation and propagation noise. The second half of the goal is to explain why the attitude may not be as originally intended. Reasons for such deviations include sensor or actuator misalignments and control system performance. In these cases, the ability to explain the behavior should, in principle, be limited only by knowledge of the sensor and actuator data and external torques. Documented here are some results obtained to date in support of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Advantages and shortcomings of the integrated attitude determination/sensor calibration software are discussed. Some preliminary attitude solutions using data from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) instrument are presented and compared to solutions using Sun and Earth sensors. A dynamical model is constructed to illustrate the relative importance of the various sensor imprefections. This model also shows the connection between the high- and low-frequency attitude oscillations.

  10. Calibration of the COBE FIRAS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Mather, J. C.; Massa, D. L.; Meyer, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite was designed to accurately measure the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) in the frequency range 1-95/cm with an angular resolution of 7 deg. We describe the calibration of this instrument, including the method of obtaining calibration data, reduction of data, the instrument model, fitting the model to the calibration data, and application of the resulting model solution to sky observations. The instrument model fits well for calibration data that resemble sky condition. The method of propagating detector noise through the calibration process to yield a covariance matrix of the calibrated sky data is described. The final uncertainties are variable both in frequency and position, but for a typical calibrated sky 2.6 deg square pixel and 0.7/cm spectral element the random detector noise limit is of order of a few times 10(exp -7) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm for 2-20/cm, and the difference between the sky and the best-fit cosmic blackbody can be measured with a gain uncertainty of less than 3%.

  11. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  12. COBE - New sky maps of the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents early results obtained from the first six months of measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by instruments aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and discusses the implications for cosmology. The three instruments: FIRAS, DMR, and DIRBE have operated well and produced significant new results. The FIRAS measurement of the CMB spectrum supports the standard big bang nucleosynthesis model. The maps made from the DMR instrument measurements show a surprisingly smooth early universe. The measurements are sufficiently precise that we must pay careful attention to potential systematic errors. The maps of galactic and local emission produced by the DIRBE instrument will be needed to identify foregrounds from extragalactic emission and thus to interpret the terms of events in the early universe.

  13. Correlated noise in the COBE DMR sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineweaver, C. H.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Tenorio, L.; Kogut, A.; Keegstra, P. B.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite Differential Radiometer (COBE DMR) sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky maps is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occure with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60 deg due to the 60 deg separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at 60 deg is 0.45%((sup +0.18)(sub -0.14)) of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is 0.7% greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Autocorrelation functions suffer from a approximately 1.5 sigma positive bias at 60 deg while cross-correlations have no bias. Published COBE DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  14. Correlated noise in the COBE DMR sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, C. H.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Tenorio, L.; Kogut, A.; Keegstra, P. B.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.

    1994-12-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite Differential Radiometer (COBE DMR) sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky maps is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occure with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60 deg due to the 60 deg separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at 60 deg is 0.45%(+0.18-0.14) of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is 0.7% greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Autocorrelation functions suffer from a approximately 1.5 sigma positive bias at 60 deg while cross-correlations have no bias. Published COBE DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  15. Mapping the sky with the COBE differential microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.; Gulkis, S.

    1992-01-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument on COBE is designed to determine the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background by providing all-sky maps of the diffuse sky brightness at microwave frequencies. The principal intent of this lecture is to show how these maps are generated from differential measurements.

  16. Exploring the moon. [personal historical background perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrow, R.

    1981-01-01

    The genesis of lunar exploration programs is described. The idea that the dead moon could give important clues about the origin of the solar system germinated into plans for a soft landing on the moon and then into the Apollo program. The exchanges between NASA scientists and other astronomers that led to these plans are recounted.

  17. The COBE normalization for standard cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunn, Emory F.; Scott, Douglas; White, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) detection of microwave anisotropies provides the best way of fixing the amplitude of cosmological fluctuations on the largest scales. This normalization is usually given for an n = 1 spectrum, including only the anisotropy caused by the Sachs-Wolfe effect. This is certainly not a good approximation for a model containing any reasonable amount of baryonic matter. In fact, even tilted Sachs-Wolfe spectra are not a good fit to models like cold dark matter (CDM). Here, we normalize standard CDM (sCDM) to the two-year COBE data and quote the best amplitude in terms of the conventionally used measures of power. We also give normalizations for some specific variants of this standard model, and we indicate how the normalization depends on the assumed values on n, Omega(sub B) and H(sub 0). For sCDM we find the mean value of Q = 19.9 +/- 1.5 micro-K, corresponding to sigma(sub 8) = 1.34 +/- 0.10, with the normalization at large scales being B = (8.16 +/- 1.04) x 10(exp 5)(Mpc/h)(exp 4), and other numbers given in the table. The measured rms temperature fluctuation smoothed on 10 deg is a little low relative to this normalization. This is mainly due to the low quadrupole in the data: when the quadrupole is removed, the measured value of sigma(10 deg) is quite consistent with the best-fitting the mean value of Q. The use of the mean value of Q should be preferred over sigma(10 deg), when its value can be determined for a particular theory, since it makes full use of the data.

  18. An IDL-based analysis package for COBE and other skycube-formatted astronomical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, J. A.; Isaacman, Richard B.; Gales, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    UIMAGE is a data analysis package written in IDL for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) project. COBE has extraordinarily stringent accuracy requirements: 1 percent mid-infrared absolute photometry, 0.01 percent submillimeter absolute spectrometry, and 0.0001 percent submillimeter relative photometry. Thus, many of the transformations and image enhancements common to analysis of large data sets must be done with special care. UIMAGE is unusual in this sense in that it performs as many of its operations as possible on the data in its native format and projection, which in the case of COBE is the quadrilateralized sphereical cube ('skycube'). That is, after reprojecting the data, e.g., onto an Aitoff map, the user who performs an operation such as taking a crosscut or extracting data from a pixel is transparently acting upon the skycube data from which the projection was made, thereby preserving the accuracy of the result. Current plans call for formatting external data bases such as CO maps into the skycube format with a high-accuracy transformation, thereby allowing Guest Investigators to use UIMAGE for direct comparison of the COBE maps with those at other wavelengths from other instruments. It is completely menu-driven so that its use requires no knowledge of IDL. Its functionality includes I/O from the COBE archives, FITS files, and IDL save sets as well as standard analysis operations such as smoothing, reprojection, zooming, statistics of areas, spectral analysis, etc. One of UIMAGE's more advanced and attractive features is its terminal independence. Most of the operations (e.g., menu-item selection or pixel selection) that are driven by the mouse on an X-windows terminal are also available using arrow keys and keyboard entry (e.g., pixel coordinates) on VT200 and Tektronix-class terminals. Even limited grey scales of images are available this way. Obviously, image processing is very limited on this type of terminal, but it is nonetheless surprising how

  19. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Smoot, George

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

  20. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, George

    2007-03-05

    Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

  1. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1992-01-01

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the initial data'' for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  2. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1992-12-31

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the ``initial data`` for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  3. Wiener filtering of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunn, Emory F.; Fisher, Karl B.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Lahav, Ofer; Silk, Joseph; Zaroubi, Saleem

    1994-01-01

    We derive an optimal linear filter to suppress the noise from the cosmic background explorer satellite (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) sky maps for a given power spectrum. We then apply the filter to the first-year DMR data, after removing pixels within 20 deg of the Galactic plane from the data. We are able to identify particular hot and cold spots in the filtered maps at a level 2 to 3 times the noise level. We use the formalism of constrained realizations of Gaussian random fields to assess the uncertainty in the filtered sky maps. In addition to improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the map as a whole, these techniques allow us to recover some information about the cosmic microwave background anisotropy in the missing Galactic plane region. From these maps we are able to determine which hot and cold spots in the data are statistically significant, and which may have been produced by noise. In addition, the filtered maps can be used for comparison with other experiments on similar angular scales.

  4. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  5. COBE-DMR two-year large scale anisotropy results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Banday, A.; Górski, K.; Hinshaw, G.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the results of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements of the COBE-DMR using the first two years of data. The inference of angular power spectrum parameters from the DMR data is complicated by the need to omit Galaxy contaminated regions of the sky, preventing the spherical harmonics from forming an orthogonal basis set over the remaining sky. The COBE-DMR team has implemented three methods for deducing the power spectrum parameters. These include: a two-point correlation function analysis (Bennett et al. 1994); an analysis in terms of orthogonal modes constructed on the cut sphere (Górski et al. 1994); and an analysis of a modified Hauser-Peebles power spectrum (Wright et al. 1994). These methods for deducing the power spectrum are discussed and the results are summarized and compared.

  6. Conceptual design study for the use of COBE rocket engines on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this conceptual design study is to verify that the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Hydrazine Propulsion Subsystem (HPS) Rocket Engine Assembly (REA) will satisfy the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) requirements and to develop a preliminary thruster module design using the existing REAs. The performance of the COBE HPS 5 lbf thrusters meet the TRMM mission requirements. The preliminary design consists of a single 5 lbf REA REM which is isolation mounted to a spacecraft interface angle bracket (5 or 10 deg angle). The REM incorporates a catalyst bed heater and sensor assembly, and propellant thermal control is achieved by thermostatically controlled heaters on the thruster valves. A ROM cost of approx. $950 K has been estimated for the phase 2 program to finalize the design, fabricate, and test the hardware using mechanical thermostats for thermal control. In the event that solid state thermostats are used, the cost is estimated to be $160 K higher. A ROM cost is approx. $145 K is estimated to study the effects of using Japanese manufactured hydrazine for the TRMM mission.

  7. The test facility requirements for the thermal vacuum thermal balance test of the Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Laura J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory (COBE) underwent a thermal vacuum thermal balance test in the Space Environment Simulator (SES). This was the largest and most complex test ever conducted at this facility. The 4 x 4 m (13 x 13 ft) spacecraft weighed approx. 2223 kg (4900 lbs) for the test. The test set up included simulator panels for the inboard solar array panels, simulator panels for the flight cowlings, Sun and Earth Sensor stimuli, Thermal Radio Frequency Shield heater stimuli and a cryopanel for thermal control in the Attitude Control System Shunt Dissipator area. The fixturing also included a unique 4.3 m (14 ft) diameter Gaseous Helium Cryopanel which provided a 20 K environment for the calibration of one of the spacecraft's instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer. This cryogenic panel caused extra contamination concerns and a special method was developed and written into the test procedure to prevent the high buildup of condensibles on the panel which could have led to backstreaming of the thermal vacuum chamber. The test was completed with a high quality simulated space environment provided to the spacecraft. The test requirements, test set up, and special fixturing are described.

  8. Limits on three-point correlations in the COBE DMR first-year anisotropy maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G.; Kogut, A.; Gorski, K. M.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Lineweaver, C.; Lubin, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Wright, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    We compute the three-point temperature correlation function of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps to search for non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. The level of fluctuations seen in the computed correlation function are too large to be attributable solely to instrument noise. However the fluctuations are consistent with the level expected to result from a superposition of istrument noise and sky signal arising from a Gaussian power-law model of initial fluctuations, with a quadrupole normalized amplitude of 17 micro K and a power-law spectral index n = 1. We place limits on the amplitude of intrinsic three-point correlations with a variety of predicted functional forms.

  9. Astrophysical component separation of COBE-DMR 4-yr data with FASTICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maino, D.; Banday, A. J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Perrotta, F.; Górski, K. M.

    2003-09-01

    We present an application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis (FASTICA) method to the Cosmic Background Explorer Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE-DMR) 4-yr data. Although the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the COBE-DMR data is typically ~1, the approach is able to extract the cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal with high confidence from high galactic latitude regions. However, the foreground emission components have too low a S/N ratio to be reconstructed by this method (moreover, the number of components which can be reconstructed is directly limited by the number of input channels). The reconstructed CMB map shows the expected frequency scaling of the CMB and, fitting for the rms quadrupole normalization Qrms-PS and primordial spectral index n we find results in excellent agreement with those derived from the minimum-noise combination of the 90- and 53-GHz DMR channels without galactic emission correction. We extend the analysis by including additional channels (priors): the Haslam map of radio emission at 408 MHz and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) 140-μm map of galactic infrared emission. The FASTICA algorithm is now able to both detect galactic foreground emission and separate it from the dominant CMB signal. Fitting again for Qrms-PS and n we find good agreement with the results of Górski et al. where galactic emission has been taken into account by means of correlation analysis of the DMR signal. We investigate the ability of FASTICA to evaluate the extent of foreground contamination in the COBE-DMR data further including an all-sky Hα survey to determine a reliable free-free. The derived frequency scalings of the recovered foregrounds are consistent with previous correlation studies. After subtraction of the thermal dust emission as in model 7 of Finkbeiner, Davis & Schlegel, we find a clear indication of an anomalous dust-correlated component which is the dominant foreground emission at 31.5 GHz and which is well

  10. COBE differential microwave radiometers - Calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Janssen, M.; Gulkis, S.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Backus, C.; Hauser, M. G.; Mather, J. C.; Rokke, L.

    1992-01-01

    The COBE spacecraft was launched November 18, 1989 UT carrying three scientific instruments into earth orbit for studies of cosmology. One of these instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), is designed to measure the large-angular-scale temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies (31.5, 53, and 90 GHz). This paper presents three methods used to calibrate the DMR. First, the signal difference between beam-filling hot and cold targets observed on the ground provides a primary calibration that is transferred to space by noise sources internal to the instrument. Second, the moon is used in flight as an external calibration source. Third, the signal arising from the Doppler effect due to the earth's motion around the barycenter of the solar system is used as an external calibration source. Preliminary analysis of the external source calibration techniques confirms the accuracy of the currently more precise ground-based calibration. Assuming the noise source behavior did not change from the ground-based calibration to flight, a 0.1-0.4 percent relative and 0.7-2.5 percent absolute calibration uncertainty is derived, depending on radiometer channel.

  11. COBE DMR results and implications. [Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture presents early results obtained from the first six months of measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) aboard COBE and discusses significant cosmological implications. The DMR maps show the dipole anisotropy and some galactic emission but otherwise a spatially smooth early universe. The measurements are sufficiently precise that we must pay careful attention to potential systematic errors. Maps of galactic and local emission such as those produced by the FIRAS and DIRBE instruments will be needed to identify foregrounds from extragalactic emission and thus to interpret the results in terms of events in the early universe. The current DMR results are significant for Cosmology.

  12. CMB Anisotropies Two Years after Cobe: Observations, Theory and the Future - Proceedings of the 1994 Cwru Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.

    1995-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * I. The Experimental Situation Two Years After COBE: Anisotropies, and the CMB Power Spectrum * COBE DMR Data, Signal and Noise: Color Plates * CMB Two Years After the COBE Discovery of Anisotropies * Comparison of Spectral Index Determinations * Two-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR Two-Year Anisotropy Maps * A Preliminary Analysis of UCSB's South Pole 1993-94 Results * CMB Anisotropy Measurements During the Fourth Flight of MAX * Observations of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Firs, SK93, and MSAM-I Experiments * The Python Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment * II. Theoretical Implications and Cosmology: The Early Universe, Large Scale Structure and Dark Matter * Testing Inflationary Cosmology and Measuring Cosmological Parameters Using the Cosmic Microwave Background * Inflation Confronts the CMB: An Analysis Including the Effects of Foreground * Testing Inflation with MSAM, MAX Tenerife and COBE * CMBR Anisotropy Due to Gravitational Radiation in Inflationary Cosmologies * Black Holes From Blue Spectra * Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies and the Geometry of the Universe * Ω and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies * CDM Cosmogony in an Open Universe * Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Anisotropy Induced by Cosmic Strings * Temperature Anisotropies in a Universe with Global Defects * The Nature Versus Nurture of Anisotropies * The Existence of Baryons at z = 1000 * Polarization-Temperature Correlations in the Microwave Background * III. Related Issues: BBN Limits on ΩB, and Comparing Theoretical Predictions and Observations * Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and ΩB: A Guide for CMB Interpreters * Quoting Experimental Information

  13. On the rms anisotropy at 7 deg and 10 deg observed in the COBE-DMR two year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.; Tenorio, L.; Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency-independent rms temperature fluctuations determined from the Cosmic Background Explorer-Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE-DMR) two-year sky maps are used to infer the parameter Q(sub rms-PS), which characterizes the normalization of power-law models of primordial cosmological temperature anisotropy, for a forced fit to a scale-invariant Harrison-Zel'dovich (n = 1) spectral model. Using a joint analysis of the 7 deg and 10 deg 'cross'-rms derived from both the 53 and 90 GHz sky maps, we find Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.0(sub -2.1 sup +2.5) micro Kelvin when the low quadrupole is included, and Q(sub rms-PS) = 19.4(sub -2.1 sup +2.3) micro Kelvin excluding the quadrupole. These results are consistent with the n = 1 fits from more sensitive methods. The effect of the low quadrupole derived from the COBE-DMR data on the inferred Q(sub rms-PS) normalization is investigated. A bias to lower Q(sub rms-PS) is found when the quadrupole is included. The higher normalization for a forced n = 1 fit is then favored by the cross-rms technique.

  14. Natural inflation: Particle physics models, power-law spectra for large-scale structure, and constraints from the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Bond, J. Richard; Freese, Katherine; Frieman, Joshua A.; Olinto, Angela V.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the particle physics basis for models of natural inflation with pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons and study the consequences for large-scale structure of the nonscale-invariant density fluctuation spectra that arise in natural inflation and other models. A pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson, with a potential of the form V(φ)=Λ4[1+/-cos(φ/f)], can naturally give rise to an epoch of inflation in the early Universe, if f~MPl and Λ~MGUT. Such mass scales arise in particle physics models with a gauge group that becomes strongly interacting at the grand unified theory scale. We work out a specific particle physics example based on the multiple gaugino condensation scenario in superstring theory. We then study the cosmological evolution of and constraints upon these inflation models numerically and analytically. To obtain sufficient inflation with a probability of order 1 and a high enough post-inflation reheat temperature for baryogenesis, we require f>~0.3MPl. The primordial density fluctuation spectrum generated by quantum fluctuations in φ is a non-scale-invariant power law P(k)~kns, with ns~=1-(M2Pl/8πf2) leading to more power on large length scales than the ns=1 Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. (For the reader primarily interested in large-scale structure, the discussion of this topic is presented in Sec. IV and is intended to be nearly self-contained.) We pay special attention to the prospects of using the enhanced power to explain the otherwise puzzling large-scale clustering of galaxies and clusters and their flows. We find that the standard cold dark matter (CDM) model with 0<~ns<~0.6 could in principle explain these data. However, the microwave background anisotropies recently detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) imply such low primordial amplitudes for these CDM models (that is, bias factors b8>~2 for ns<~0.6) that galaxy formation would occur too late to be viable and the large-scale galaxy velocities would be too small. In fact, combining the

  15. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100 μm and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  16. The COBE cosmic 3 K anisotropy experiment: A gravity wave and cosmic string probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Smoot, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Among the experiments to be carried into orbit next year, by the COBE satellite, are differential microwave radiometers. They will make sensitive all-sky maps of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies, giving dipole, quadrupole, and higher order multipole measurements of the background radiation. The experiment will either detect, or place significant constraints on, the existence of cosmic strings and long wavelength gravity waves.

  17. On determining the spectrum of primordial inhomogeneity from the COBE DMR sky maps: Results of two-year data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, K. M.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Lubin, P.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique of Fourier analysis on a cut sky has been applied to the two-year Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) 53 and 90 GHz sky maps. The Bayesian power spectrum estimation results are consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich n = 1 model. The maximum likelihood estimates of the usual parameters defining the power spectrum of primordial perturbations are n = 1.22 (1.02) and Q(sub rms-PS) = 17 (20) microK including (excluding) the quadrupole. A spectral-index-independent normalization is naturally expressed for the two-year maps in terms of the multipole amplitude a(sub 9) = 8.2 (8.3) microK (to approximately 12 sigma significance). The marginal likelihood function on n obtained by intergration with respect to a(sub 9) renders n = 1.17 +/- 0.31 (0.96 +/- 0.36).

  18. COBE navigation with one-way return-link Doppler in the post-helium-venting phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Joan; Nemesure, M.; Samii, M. V.; Maher, M.; Teles, Jerome; Jackson, J.

    1991-12-01

    The results of a navigation experiment with one way return link Doppler tracking measurements for operational orbit determination of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft are presented. The frequency of the tracking signal for the one way measurements was stabilized with an Ultrastable Oscillator (USO), and the signal was relayed by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The study achieved three objectives: space qualification of TDRSS noncoherent one way return link Doppler tracking; determination of flight performance of the USO coupled to the second generation TDRSS compatible user transponder; and verification of algorithms for navigation using actual one way tracking data. Orbit determination and the inflight USO performance evaluation results are presented.

  19. COBE DMR observations of early universe physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-02-01

    The COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument has observed that the full microwave sky is remarkably uniform in the millimeter to centimeter wavelength range. However at a small level (<=10-5), there is large-scale structure. The natural interpretation of this structure is as the imprint of spatial curvature fluctuations, primarily due to density variations, in the early universe. The results are supportive of gravitational instability theories of structure formation and inflation/quantum cosmology models. The natural energy scale for inflation then is ~1016 GeV. A failure to find fluctuations within a factor of two of the COBE DMR level would have contradicted gravitational instability models with a near scale-invariant spectra.

  20. Cosmic microwave background probes models of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard L.; Hodges, Hardy M.; Smoot, George F.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Inflation creates both scalar (density) and tensor (gravity wave) metric perturbations. We find that the tensor-mode contribution to the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on large-angular scales can only exceed that of the scalar mode in models where the spectrum of perturbations deviates significantly from scale invariance. If the tensor mode dominates at large-angular scales, then the value of DeltaT/T predicted on 1 deg is less than if the scalar mode dominates, and, for cold-dark-matter models, bias factors greater than 1 can be made consistent with Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) DMR results.

  1. Statistics and topology of the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Tenorio, L.; Banday, A. J.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-12-01

    We use statistical and topological quantities to test the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps against the hypothesis that the observed temperature fluctuations reflect Gaussian initial density perturbations with random phases. Recent papers discuss specific quantities as discriminators between Gaussian and non-Gaussian behavior, but the treatment of instrumental noise on the data is largely ignored. The presence of noise in the data biases many statistical quantities in a manner dependent on both the noise properties and the unknown cosmic microwave background temperature field. Appropriate weighting schemes can minimize this effect, but it cannot be completely eliminated. Analytic expressions are presented for these biases, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the best strategy for determining cosmologically interesting information from noisy data. The genus is a robust discriminator that can be used to estimate the power-law quadrupole-normalized amplitude, Qrms-PS, independently of the two-point correlation function. The genus of the DMR data is consistent with Gaussian initial fluctuations with Qrms-PS = (15.7 +/- 2.2) - (6.6 +/- 0.3)(n - 1) micro-K, where n is the power-law index. Fitting the rms temperature variations at various smoothing angles gives Qrms-PS = 13.2 +/- 2.5 micro-K and n = 1.7(+0.3(-0.6)). While consistent with Gaussian fluctuations, the first year data are only sufficient to rule out strongly non-Gaussian distributions of fluctuations.

  2. Reappraising foreground contamination in the COBE-DMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banday, A. J.; Dickinson, C.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Górski, K. M.

    2003-11-01

    With the advent of all-sky Hα surveys it is possible to determine a reliable free-free template of the diffuse interstellar medium which can be used in conjunction with the synchrotron and dust templates to correct cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations for diffuse Galactic foregrounds. We have used the COBE-DMR data at 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz and employed cross-correlation techniques to re-evaluate the foreground contributions, particularly that due to dust which is known to be partially correlated with Hα (and free-free) emission. The DMR microwave maps are found to contain, as well as the expected synchrotron and free-free components, a component tightly correlated to the COBE-DIRBE 140-μm dust map. At 31.5, 53 and 90 GHz this emission is 6.3 +/- 0.6, 2.4 +/- 0.4 and 2.2 +/- 0.4 μK MJy-1 sr at 140 μm, respectively. When corrected for the contribution from thermal dust, a strong anomalous dust-correlated emission component remains, which is well fitted by a frequency spectrum of the form ν-β where β~ 2.5 in the DMR frequency range; this is the dominant foreground at 31.5 GHz. The result implies the presence of an emission component with a dust-like morphology but a synchrotron-like spectrum. We discuss the possible origins of this component and compare it with the recent WMAP interpretation. The better knowledge of the individual foregrounds provided by the present study enables a larger area of the sky (|b| > 15°) to be used to reappraise the CMB quadrupole normalization, Qrms-PS, and the scalar perturbations spectral index, n. We find Qrms-PS= 15.2+2.8-2.3 with a power-law spectral index of n= 1.2 +/- 0.2. These values are consistent with previous COBE-DMR analyses and the WMAP 1-yr analysis.

  3. American Holidays: Exploring Traditions, Customs and Backgrounds. Vocabureader Workbook 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebanow, Barbara; Fischer, Sara

    The workbook is an English vocabulary development text focusing on words associated with traditions, customs, and background of holidays celebrated in the United States, and in some cases also in Canada and elsewhere. The special vocabulary is presented in seventeen readings, written in repetitive style so the student can learn the definitions of…

  4. Exploring Career Success of Late Bloomers from the TVET Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Zoharah; Krauss, Steven Eric; Sail, Rahim M.; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore objective and subjective career success and to identify factors contributing to career success among a sample of technical and vocational education and training (TVET) "late bloomers" working in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: Incorporating a mixed method design, the authors…

  5. COBE limits on explosive structure formation scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Janna J.; Freese, Katherine; Spergle, David N.

    1992-01-01

    The Compton y-distortion that would result from an epoch of explosions at moderate redshifts is estimated and compared to recent measurements of the CBR spectrum made by the COBE satellite. The temperature anisotropy on large angular scales is estimated, and it is found that in general the limits on the overall spectral distortion are more constraining than those on the temperature anisotropy. It is found that most of the y-distortion is produced during the early, noncosmological phase of bubble evolution. An expression is obtained for the y-distortion including the effects of Compton cooling. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  7. Calibration and systematic error analysis for the COBE(1) DMR 4year sky maps

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A.J.; Bennett, C.L.; Gorski, K.M.; Hinshaw,G.; Jackson, P.D.; Keegstra, P.; Lineweaver, C.; Smoot, G.F.; Tenorio,L.; Wright, E.L.

    1996-01-04

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has mapped the full microwave sky to mean sensitivity 26 mu K per 7 degrees held of view. The absolute calibration is determined to 0.7 percent with drifts smaller than 0.2 percent per year. We have analyzed both the raw differential data and the pixelized sky maps for evidence of contaminating sources such as solar system foregrounds, instrumental susceptibilities, and artifacts from data recovery and processing. Most systematic effects couple only weakly to the sky maps. The largest uncertainties in the maps result from the instrument susceptibility to Earth's magnetic field, microwave emission from Earth, and upper limits to potential effects at the spacecraft spin period. Systematic effects in the maps are small compared to either the noise or the celestial signal: the 95 percent confidence upper limit for the pixel-pixel rms from all identified systematics is less than 6 mu K in the worst channel. A power spectrum analysis of the (A-B)/2 difference maps shows no evidence for additional undetected systematic effects.

  8. Search for unresolved sources in the COBE-DMR two-year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Loewenstein, K.; Lubin, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Wright, E. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have searched the temperature maps from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) first two years of data for evidence of unresolved sources. The high-latitude sky (absolute value of b greater than 30 deg) contains no sources brighter than 192 microKelvin thermodynamic temperature (322 Jy at 53 GHz). The cumulative count of sources brighter than threshold T, N(greater than T), is consistent with a superposition of instrument noise plus scale-invariant spectrum of cosmic temperature fluctuations normalized to Q(sub rms-PS) = 17 microKelvin. We examine the temperature maps toward nearby clusters and find no evidence for any Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, delta y less than 7.3 x 10(exp -6) (95% CL) averaged over the DMR beam. We examine the temperature maps near the brightest expected radio sources and detect no evidence of significant emission. The lack of bright unresolved sources in the DMR maps, taken with anisotropy measurements on smaller angular scales, places a weak constraint on the integral number density of any unresolved Planck-spectrum sources brighter than flux density S, n(greater than S) less than 2 x 10(exp 4)/(S/1 Jy)(exp 2)/sr.

  9. Comments on the statistical analysis of excess variance in the COBE differential microwave radiometer maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Tenorio, L.; Lineweaver, C.; Bennett, C. L.; Lubin, P. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic anisotrophy produces an excess variance sq sigma(sub sky) in the Delta maps produced by the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) on cosmic background explorer (COBE) that is over and above the instrument noise. After smoothing to an effective resolution of 10 deg, this excess sigma(sub sky)(10 deg), provides an estimate for the amplitude of the primordial density perturbation power spectrum with a cosmic uncertainty of only 12%. We employ detailed Monte Carlo techniques to express the amplitude derived from this statistic in terms of the universal root mean square (rms) quadrupole amplitude, (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5). The effects of monopole and dipole subtraction and the non-Gaussian shape of the DMR beam cause the derived (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5) to be 5%-10% larger than would be derived using simplified analytic approximations. We also investigate the properties of two other map statistics: the actual quadrupole and the Boughn-Cottingham statistic. Both the sigma(sub sky)(10 deg) statistic and the Boughn-Cottingham statistic are consistent with the (Q sq/RMS)(exp 0.5) = 17 +/- 5 micro K reported by Smoot et al. (1992) and Wright et al. (1992).

  10. Search for unresolved sources in the COBE-DMR two-year sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Loewenstein, K.; Lubin, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Wright, E. L.

    1994-10-01

    We have searched the temperature maps from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) first two years of data for evidence of unresolved sources. The high-latitude sky (absolute value of b greater than 30 deg) contains no sources brighter than 192 microKelvin thermodynamic temperature (322 Jy at 53 GHz). The cumulative count of sources brighter than threshold T, N(greater than T), is consistent with a superposition of instrument noise plus scale-invariant spectrum of cosmic temperature fluctuations normalized to Qrms-PS = 17 microKelvin. We examine the temperature maps toward nearby clusters and find no evidence for any Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, delta y less than 7.3 x 10-6 (95% CL) averaged over the DMR beam. We examine the temperature maps near the brightest expected radio sources and detect no evidence of significant emission. The lack of bright unresolved sources in the DMR maps, taken with anisotropy measurements on smaller angular scales, places a weak constraint on the integral number density of any unresolved Planck-spectrum sources brighter than flux density S, n(greater than S) less than 2 x 104/(S/1 Jy)2/sr.

  11. Statistics and topology of the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Tenorio, L.; Banday, A. J.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    We use statistical and topological quantities to test the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps against the hypothesis that the observed temperature fluctuations reflect Gaussian initial density perturbations with random phases. Recent papers discuss specific quantities as discriminators between Gaussian and non-Gaussian behavior, but the treatment of instrumental noise on the data is largely ignored. The presence of noise in the data biases many statistical quantities in a manner dependent on both the noise properties and the unknown cosmic microwave background temperature field. Appropriate weighting schemes can minimize this effect, but it cannot be completely eliminated. Analytic expressions are presented for these biases, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the best strategy for determining cosmologically interesting information from noisy data. The genus is a robust discriminator that can be used to estimate the power-law quadrupole-normalized amplitude, Q(sub rms-PS), independently of the two-point correlation function. The genus of the DMR data is consistent with Gaussian initial fluctuations with Q(sub rms-PS) = (15.7 +/- 2.2) - (6.6 +/- 0.3)(n - 1) micro-K, where n is the power-law index. Fitting the rms temperature variations at various smoothing angles gives Q(sub rms-PS) = 13.2 +/- 2.5 micro-K and n = 1.7(sup (+0.3) sub (-0.6)). While consistent with Gaussian fluctuations, the first year data are only sufficient to rule out strongly non-Gaussian distributions of fluctuations.

  12. Search for correlations between COBE DMR and ROSAT PSPC all-sky survey data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, R.; Egger, R.; Hasinger, G.; Soltan, A. M.; Truemper, J.

    1997-04-01

    Results from a cross-correlation analysis between the COBE DMR 4 year, and ROSAT PSPC All-Sky Survey data are presented. Statistical comparisons between microwave and X-ray maps can probe interesting astrophysical environments and processes, such as the warm interstellar medium, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in clusters of galaxies or gaseous group halos, X-ray luminous radio sources and the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe or the Rees-Sciama effect. In order to test the diffuse, extragalactic X-ray background as probed by ROSAT, against the COBE DMR large-scale CMB structure, our analysis was performed in most detail in a ROSAT selected region of the sky (+40°COBE low noise and least Galactic contribution channels. Comparing to other regions of the sky and neighbouring energies and frequencies, we find indication for a positive Galactic correlation on large scales. This correlation is most prominent in the softest X-ray band and lowest microwave channel, with a>95% confidence level detection against COBE noise and CMB cosmic variance, including the high quadrupole value resulting from the power spectrum fit. The spectral dependences are consistent with Galactic thermal X-ray emission, and Galactic synchrotron radiation or free-free (Bremsstrahlung) emission by the warm interstellar medium in the microwave regime. Removing the quadrupole term on a sky map with a Galactic cutout or related gradients in the selected regions leaves no correlations above a 1-σ level on smaller angular scales. We conclude that there is no significant extragalactic correlation on scales for which the combined data are sensitive (7°-40°) and that Galactic correlation is significant only on large angular scales, of the order of the quadrupole. In the context of removing large angular scale gradients we give results on best fit X-ray dipoles from various ROSAT data and discuss

  13. The cryo-testing of infrared filters and beamsplitters for the cosmic background explorer's instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaney, James B.; Stewart, Kenneth P.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Alley, Phillip W.; Korb, Andrew R.

    1986-01-01

    The cryooptical methods used to measure the spectral transmittances of filters and beamsplitters for the Cosmic Background Explorer's instruments are described. Measured results demonstrate the temperature sensitivity, or insensitivity, of various infrared filter designs within the wavelength range from 1 to 1000 microns.

  14. A Case Study Exploring Science Competence and Science Confidence of Middle School Girls from Marginalized Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Yeni Violeta

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of learners from underrepresented background in biology field research experiences has not been widely explored in the literature. Increased access and equity to experiences for groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been identified as a priority for many, yet little is…

  15. Exploring Effects of Background Context Familiarity and Signaling on Comprehension, Recall, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Minjung; Bruning, Roger

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effects of different geographical background contexts and signalling for information about global warming on comprehension, recall and cognitive load. Two different geographical contexts, US and Korean, were employed to frame explanations of global warming phenomena to US students. Two signalling conditions…

  16. COBE. [spectrum study of galactic dust, galactic clusters, and infrared galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from COBE's three observational instruments. These are the FIRAS spectrum experiment, which surveyed over 98 percent of the sky, the IR background experiment, DIRBE which surveyed all of the sky, and the DMR anisotropy experiment. It is found that the cosmic microwave background is very close to a blackbody, with a temperature of 2.735 + or - 0.06 K. The only reliably detected background anisotropy is the 3.3 + or - 0.2 mK-amplitude dipole. The rms quadrupole anisotropy is less than 0.00003 with 95-percent confidence. DIRBE results indicate that the IRAS 60-100 micron diffuse-flux calibrations suffer from gain and offset errors.

  17. Latest COBE results, large-scale data, and predictions of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the predictions of the inflationary scenario of cosmology is that the initial spectrum of primordial density fluctuations (PDFs) must have the Harrison-Zeldovich (HZ) form. Here, in order to test the inflationary scenario, predictions of the microwave background radiation (MBR) anisotropies measured by COBE are computed based on large-scale data for the universe and assuming Omega-1 and the HZ spectrum on large scales. It is found that the minimal scale where the spectrum can first enter the HZ regime is found, constraining the power spectrum of the mass distribution to within the bias factor b. This factor is determined and used to predict parameters of the MBR anisotropy field. For the spectrum of PDFs that reaches the HZ regime immediately after the scale accessible to the APM catalog, the numbers on MBR anisotropies are consistent with the COBE detections and thus the standard inflation can indeed be considered a viable theory for the origin of the large-scale structure in the universe.

  18. Investigation of the diffuse ultraviolet background using satellite data: Dynamics explorer guest investigator program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The imaging instrumentation for the Dynamics Explorer Mission was designed primarily to obtain global auroral images. The instrument, however, was also used successfully to study marine bioluminescence, the geocorona, and the global distribution of atmospheric ozone. The imager has considerable potential for the study of astronomical sources of ultraviolet radiation as well. The data produced by the imager is used to study the brightness and isotrophy of the diffuse ultraviolet background.

  19. Comparing and combining the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Devlin, Mark J.; Herbig, Thomas; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman

    2001-05-15

    We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE-DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signals at the 21{sigma} and 40{sigma} levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka and Q bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available on the web together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE-DMR, showing good agreement.

  20. Noncosmological signal contributions to the COBE DMR anisotropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.; Loewenstein, K.; Cheng, E. S.

    1993-09-01

    We examine the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) data for evidence of noncosmological source contributions. The DMR maps are cross-correlated with maps of rich clusters, extragalactic IRAS sources, HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray emission, and 5 GHz radio sources. We limit the rms contributions from these sources on a 7 deg angular scale to less than 10 micro-K (95 percent confidence level) in the DMR maps, although the LMC probably contributes about 50 micro-K to a limited region of the sky. Thus, our previous interpretation that the fluctuations in the COBE DMR data are most likely due to cosmic fluctuations at the surface of last scattering remains intact. The Comptonization parameter for hot electrons traced by rich clusters is limited to delta(y) less than 2 x 10 exp -6 (95 percent confidence level) averaged over the 7 deg DMR beam.

  1. The implications of the COBE diffuse microwave radiation results for cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.; Stebbins, Albert; Bouchet, Francois R.

    1992-01-01

    We compare the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation measured by the COBE experiment to those predicted by cosmic string theories. We use an analytic model for the Delta T/T power spectrum that is based on our previous numerical simulations of strings, under the assumption that cosmic strings are the sole source of the measured anisotropy. This implies a value for the string mass per unit length of 1.5 +/- 0.5 x 10 exp -6 C-squared/G. This is within the range of values required for cosmic strings to successfully seed the formation of large-scale structures in the universe. These results clearly encourage further studies of Delta T/T and large-scale structure in the cosmic string model.

  2. Noncosmological Signal Contributions to the COBE DMR 4 Year Sky Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.

    1996-09-01

    We limit the possible contributions from noncosmological sources to the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) 4 year sky maps. The DMR data are cross-correlated with maps of rich clusters, extragalactic IRAS sources, HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray emission, and 5 GHz radio sources using a Fourier space technique. There is no evidence of significant contamination by such sources at an rms level of ~8 mu K [95% confidence level (c.l.) at 7 deg resolution] in the most sensitive 53 GHz sky map. This level is consistent with previous limits set by analysis of earlier DMR data and by simple extrapolations from existing source models. We place a limit on the rms Comptonization parameter averaged over the high-latitude sky of delta y < 1 x 10-6 (95% c.l.). Extragalactic sources have an insignificant effect on the cosmic microwave background power spectrum parameterizations determined from the DMR data.

  3. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE): A Nulling Polarimeter for Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.; Fixsen, D. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Dotson, J.; Dwek, E.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Meyer, S. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Seiffert, M. D.; Spergel, D. N.; Wollack, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a concept for an Explorer-class mission to measure the gravity-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The instrument consists of a polarizing Michelson interferometer configured as a nulling polarimeter to measure the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from two co-aligned beams. Either input can view the sky or a temperature-controlled absolute reference blackbody calibrator. Rhe proposed instrument can map the absolute intensity and linear polarization (Stokes I, Q, and U parameters) over the full sky in 400 spectral channels spanning 2.5 decades in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 micron wavelength). Multi-moded optics provide background-limited sensitivity using only 4 detectors, while the highly symmetric design and multiple signal modulations provide robust rejection of potential systematic errors. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r < 10..3 at 5 standard deviations. The rich PIXIE data set can also constrain physical processes ranging from Big Bang cosmology to the nature of the first stars to physical conditions within the interstellar medium of the Galaxy.

  4. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE): a nulling polarimeter for cosmic microwave background observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D.J.; Chuss, D.T.; Dwek, E.; Moseley, S.H.; Wollack, E.J. E-mail: Dale.J.Fixsen@nasa.gov E-mail: Eliahu.Dwek-1@nasa.gov; and others

    2011-07-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is a concept for an Explorer-class mission to measure the gravity-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The instrument consists of a polarizing Michelson interferometer configured as a nulling polarimeter to measure the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from two co-aligned beams. Either input can view the sky or a temperature-controlled absolute reference blackbody calibrator. Rhe proposed instrument can map the absolute intensity and linear polarization (Stokes I, Q, and U parameters) over the full sky in 400 spectral channels spanning 2.5 decades in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 μm wavelength). Multi-moded optics provide background-limited sensitivity using only 4 detectors, while the highly symmetric design and multiple signal modulations provide robust rejection of potential systematic errors. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r < 10{sup −3} at 5 standard deviations. The rich PIXIE data set can also constrain physical processes ranging from Big Bang cosmology to the nature of the first stars to physical conditions within the interstellar medium of the Galaxy.

  5. A case study exploring science competence and science confidence of middle school girls from marginalized backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Yeni Violeta

    The inclusion of learners from underrepresented background in biology field research experiences has not been widely explored in the literature. Increased access and equity to experiences for groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been identified as a priority for many, yet little is known about the components these experiences should have and what types of transformations participants undergo as a result of these experiences. This dissertation explored the systemic creation of an intervention purposely designed to serve middle school girls from underrepresented backgrounds, the implementation of such intervention, and effect on the girls' science competence and science confidence. El Espejo, Spanish for "The Mirror," was an ongoing field ecology research program for middle schools girls founded in 2009 at a local interdisciplinary learning center. Girls from all walks of life had the opportunity to be apprentice researchers and to work with scientists and science educators from the local community. All activities were strategically designed to promote student-led inquiry, career awareness, cultural awareness, and opportunities for research and mentorship for girls from underrepresented backgrounds. An increased understanding of if, how, and why this experience was perceived by the girls to be life changing was of importance to add to the conversations that seek ways to inspire and prepare this generation of students to be the next generation of scientists. The study built on systems theory, and on theories that were embedded in the participants' system: critical race theory, identity theory, and experiential learning theory, grounded in the context of the lived experiences of girls from underrepresented backgrounds. The girls' experiences were captured through journals, observer participant notes, photo-documentation, artifacts (posters, videos) created by the girls, and by using science perception

  6. Design Studies for a Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer for the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Unrelenting symmetry of design is required to assure the thermal balance of a cryogenically cooled, rapid scan interferometer spectrometer to be mounted in vacuum with the Cosmic Background Explorer liquid helium dewar. The instrument receives inputs from Winston cone optical flux collectors, one open to space and a second coupled to a black body reference source. A differential instrument, the spectrometer produces outputs corresponding to the Fourier transform of the spectral radiance difference between the two inputs. The two outputs are sensed by four detectors, two optimized for shorter wavelength response, and two optimized for longer wavelengths. The optical design, detector and signal channel, system sensitivity, mechanics, thermal control and cryogenics, electronics and power systems, command and control, calibration, system test requirements, and the instrument interface are discussed. Recommendations for continued work are indicated for the superconducting reflective horns, the motor bearing and drive, and design detail.

  7. Information geometry with correlated data: Bayesian explorations of cosmological predictions for the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine; de Bernardis, Francesco; Niemack, Michael; Sethna, James

    We developed a new, generalized fitting algorithm for miltiparameter models which incorporates varying and correlated errors. This was combined with geometrical methods of sampling to explore model prediction space, notably to plot geodesics and determine the size and edges of the model manifold. We illustrate this using the microwave background spectra for all possible universes, as described by the standard Λ-cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmological model. In this case, the predicted data are fluctuations and highly correlated with varying errors, resulting in a manifold with a varying metric (as the natural metric to use is given by the Fisher information matrix). Furthermore, the model manifold shares the hyperribbon structure seen in other models, with the edges forming a strongly distorted image of a hypercube. Practical applications of such an analysis include optimizing experimental instrumentation designed to test more detailed cosmological theories. Funding supported in part by NSERC.

  8. COBE DMR-normalized open inflation cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Ratra, Bharat; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Banday, Anthony J.

    1995-01-01

    A cut-sky orthogonal mode analysis of the 2 year COBE DMR 53 and 90 GHz sky maps (in Galactic coordinates) is used to determine the normalization of an open inflation model based on the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario. The normalized model is compared to measures of large-scale structure in the universe. Although the DMR data alone does not provide sufficient discriminative power to prefer a particular value of the mass density parameter, the open model appears to be reasonably consistent with observations when Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4 and merits further study.

  9. Maximum-likelihood analysis of the COBE angular correlation function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1993-01-01

    We have used maximum-likelihood estimation to determine the quadrupole amplitude Q(sub rms-PS) and the spectral index n of the density fluctuation power spectrum at recombination from the COBE DMR data. We find a strong correlation between the two parameters of the form Q(sub rms-PS) = (15.7 +/- 2.6) exp (0.46(1 - n)) microK for fixed n. Our result is slightly smaller than and has a smaller statistical uncertainty than the 1992 estimate of Smoot et al.

  10. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers - Preliminary systematic error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Aymon, J.; De Amici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Jackson, P. D.; Kaita, E.; Keegstra, P.

    1992-01-01

    The techniques available for the identification and subtraction of sources of dynamic uncertainty from data of the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument aboard COBE are discussed. Preliminary limits on the magnitude in the DMR 1 yr maps are presented. Residual uncertainties in the best DMR sky maps, after correcting the raw data for systematic effects, are less than 6 micro-K for the pixel rms variation, less than 3 micro-K for the rms quadruple amplitude of a spherical harmonic expansion, and less than 30 micro-(K-squared) for the correlation function.

  11. COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers - Preliminary systematic error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Aymon, J.; de Amici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Jackson, P. D.; Kaita, E.; Keegstra, P.; Lineweaver, C.; Loewenstein, K.; Rokke, L.; Tenorio, L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Gulkis, S.; Hauser, M. G.; Janssen, M. A.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J. C.; Meyer, S.; Moseley, S. H.; Murdock, T. L.; Shafer, R. A.; Silverberg, R. F.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1992-12-01

    The techniques available for the identification and subtraction of sources of dynamic uncertainty from data of the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument aboard COBE are discussed. Preliminary limits on the magnitude in the DMR 1 yr maps are presented. Residual uncertainties in the best DMR sky maps, after correcting the raw data for systematic effects, are less than 6 micro-K for the pixel rms variation, less than 3 micro-K for the rms quadruple amplitude of a spherical harmonic expansion, and less than 30 micro-(K-squared) for the correlation function.

  12. The microwave background anisotropies: Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation—fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 μK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1° and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe—the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century. PMID:9419320

  13. Stray light analysis of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breault, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The straylight analysis of the diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) on the cosmic background explorer (COBE) mission is discussed. From the statement of work (SOW), the purpose of DIRBE is to measure, or set upper limits on, the spectral and spatial character of the diffuse extra galactic infrared radiation. Diffuse infrared sources within our own galaxy are measured. The required reduction of the unwanted radiation imposes severe design and operating restrictions on the DIRBE instrument. To accomplish its missions, it will operate at a multitude of wavelengths ranging from 1.25 um out to 200 to 300 microns. The operating bands and the required point source normalized irradiance transmittance (PSNIT) are shown. The important straylight concepts in the DIRBE design are reviewed. The model and assumptions used in APART analysis are explained. The limitations due to the scalar theory used in the analysis are outlined.

  14. Cosmic temperature fluctuations from two years of COBE differential microwave radiometers observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Wright, E. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Weiss, R.; Smoot, G. F.; Meyer, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)(sub rms) (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)(sub rms) (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)(sup 1/2) = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to R(exp n). The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 14.3(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K (12.8(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55)(n = 1.53(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.4(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K (15.8(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55) (n = 1.22(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely

  15. Cosmic temperature fluctuations from two years of COBE differential microwave radiometers observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Wright, E. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Weiss, R.; Smoot, G. F.; Meyer, S. S.; Mather, J. C.; Lubin, P.; Loewenstein, K.; Lineweaver, C.; Keegstra, P.; Kaita, E.; Jackson, P. D.; Cheng, E. S.

    1994-12-01

    The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)rms (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)rms (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)1/2 = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to Rn. The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Qrms-PS = 14.3+5.2-3.3 micro-K (12.8+5.2-3.3 micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42+0.49-0.55 (n = 1.53+0.49-0.55. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Qrms-PS = 17.4+7.5-5.2 micro-K (15.8+7.5-5.2 micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11+0.60-0.55 (n = 1.22+0.60-0.55. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.6 +/- 1.6 micro-K (18.2 +/- 1.6 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.11 +/- 0.40 (1.22 +/- 0.40). Our best

  16. Detection of cosmic microwave background anisotropy at 1.8 deg: Theoretical implications on inflationary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bernardis, Paolo; de Gasperis, Giancarlo; Masi, Silvia; Vittorio, Nicola

    1994-09-01

    Theoretical scenarios for the formation of large-scale structure in the universe are strongly constrained by ARGO (a balloon borne experiment reporting detection of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy at 1.8 deg) and Cosmic Background Explorer/Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE/DMR). Here we consider flat hybrid models with either scale invariant or tilted (n not equal to 1) initial conditions. For n less than 1, we take into account the effect of a primordial background of gravitational waves, predicted by power-law inflation scenarios. The main result of our analysis is that the ARGO and COBE/DMR data select a range of values for the primordial spectral index: n = 0.95+0.25-0.15 (values of n outside this range can be rejected at more than 95% confidence level). These bounds are basically independent of the cosmological abundance of baryons (at least in the range allowed from primordial nucleosynthesis) and of the ratio of cold to hot dark matter. So, flat, cold, or mixed dark matter models, with scale-invariant initial conditions and a standard recombination history, successfully take into account the CMB anisotropy detected at intermediate and large angular scales.

  17. Report on 3- and 4-Point Correlation Statistics in COBE DMR Anisotropy Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Gorski, Krzystof M.; Bennett, Charles L.; Banday, Anthony J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the work performed under this contract, we have computed the 3- and 4-point correlation functions of the COBE-DMR 2-year and 4-year anisotropy maps. The results of our work showed that the 3-point correlation function is consistent with zero and that the 4-point function is not a very sensitive probe of non-Gaussian behavior in the COBE-DMR data.

  18. Exploring the Transformation of Actorship among Students at a Small Swedish University: Background, Actorship and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    With an aim to better understand higher education's potential for fostering personal development and social change, this study explores how students' actorship in studies and civic engagement changed over time while enrolled in undergraduate programs at Halmstad University, Sweden. Additionally, it explores the relation among these students'…

  19. The Effects of Nearby Clusters of Galaxies on the Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkinshaw, M.

    1999-01-01

    This project proposed to use the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) DMR sky-maps to measure the anisotropies introduced into the microwave background radiation by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and Rees-Sciama effects of nearby clusters and superclusters of galaxies. We intended to seek these effects by making maps of the best-fit anisotropies on particular angular scales and comparing the apparent anisotropies near target clusters and superclusters with the statistical noise and sky variance. The locations of the clusters and superclusters were to be found using HEAO-1 (High Energy Astronomy Observatory) A2 and Einstein X-ray maps. Checks against biases were to be made using radio and X-ray sky-maps as guides to the properties of the clusters and superclusters. Any signals detected would have implications for the gas properties and baryonic masses of clusters and superclusters. The scientific background, project activities and references to published papers are included.

  20. Comparison of COBE DMR and ROSAT All-Sky Survey data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, R.

    Stastistical comparisons of microwave maps in the GHz range and X-ray maps at around 1 keV are an interesting probe to constrain different astrophysical phenomena. Possible correlations on various angular scales and with different frequency (energy) dependences, although not expected at present day experimental sensitivity, could in principle be due to galactic emission/absorption, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in cosmological models with a cosmological constant or low density, or X-ray luminous radio sources such as radio-loud AGNs. The author reports on work cross-correlating the COBE DMR and ROSAT All-Sky Survey in a selected area of the sky. This area (+40° < b, 70° < l < 250°) is the best presently available data set probing the medium-hard extragalactic X-ray background around 1 keV. No significant correlation on astrophysically relevant scales has been found in this analysis, but it will be possible to infer constraints from the limits.

  1. Exploring the Effect of Background Knowledge and Text Cohesion on Learning from Texts in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparinatou, Alexandra; Grigoriadou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the effect of background knowledge and local cohesion on learning from texts. The study is based on construction-integration model. Participants were 176 undergraduate students who read a Computer Science text. Half of the participants read a text of maximum local cohesion and the other a text of minimum local cohesion.…

  2. Exploring Anti-Semitism in the Classroom: A Case Study among Norwegian Adolescents from Minority Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study explores high school students' views of Jews in one minority-dominated school in Oslo, Norway. Employing a qualitative approach, semistructured interview guides and classroom-based discussions teased out attitudes toward Jews drawing on questions from a nationwide research conducted by The Center for Studies of the Holocaust and…

  3. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported

  4. Far-Infrared Spectral Observations of the Galaxy by COBE

    SciTech Connect

    Reach, W.T.; Dwek, E.; Fixsen, D.J.; Hewagama, T.; Mather, J.C.; Shafer, R.A.; Banday, A.J.; Bennett, C.L.; Cheng, E.S.; Eplee Jr., R.E.,; Leisawi tz, D.; Lubin, P.M.; Read, S.M.; Rosen, L.P.; Shuman, F.G.D.; Smoot, G.F.; Sodroski, T.J.; Wright, E.L.

    1994-10-27

    We derive Galactic continuum spectra from 5-96 cm(-1) fromCOBE/FIRAS observations. The spectra are dominated by warm dust emission,which may be fitted with a single temperature in the range 16-21 K (fornu(2) emissivity) along each line of sight. Dust heated by the attenuatedradiation field in molecular clouds gives rise tointermediate-temperature (10-14 K) emission in the inner Galaxy only. Awidespread, very cold component (4-7 K) with optical depth that isspatially correlated with the warm component is also detected. The coldcomponent is unlikely to be due to very cold dust shielded from starlightbecause it is present at high latitude. We consider hypotheses that thecold component is due to enhanced submillimeter emissivity of the dustthat gives rise to the warm component, or that it may be due to verysmall, large, or fractal particles. Lack of substantial power above theemission from warm dust places strong constraints on the amount of coldgas in the Galaxy. The microwave sky brightness due to interstellar dustis dominated by the cold component, and its angular variation could limitour ability to discern primordial fluctuations in the cosmic microwavebackground radiation.

  5. Another look at distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zotti, G. De; Negrello, M.; Castex, G.; Lapi, A.; Bonato, M. E-mail: NegrelloM@cardiff.ac.uk E-mail: lapi@sissa.it

    2016-03-01

    We review aspects of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectral distortions which do not appear to have been fully explored in the literature. In particular, implications of recent evidences of heating of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by feedback from active galactic nuclei are investigated. Taking also into account the IGM heating associated to structure formation, we argue that values of the y parameter of several × 10{sup −6}, i.e. a factor of a few below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit, are to be expected. The Compton scattering by the re-ionized plasma also re-processes primordial distortions, adding a y-type contribution. Hence no pure Bose-Einstein-like distortions are to be expected. An assessment of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, taking into account the latest results from the Planck satellite as well as the contributions from the strong CII and CO lines from star-forming galaxies, demonstrates that a foreground subtraction accurate enough to fully exploit the PIXIE sensitivity will be extremely challenging. Motivated by this fact we also discuss methods to detect spectral distortions not requiring absolute measurements and show that accurate determinations of the frequency spectrum of the CMB dipole amplitude may substantially improve over COBE/FIRAS limits on distortion parameters. Such improvements may be at reach of next generation CMB anisotropy experiments. The estimated amplitude of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) dipole might be detectable by careful analyses of Planck maps at the highest frequencies. Thus Planck might provide interesting constraints on the CIB intensity, currently known with a ≅ 30% uncertainty.

  6. Power spectrum constraints from spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Wayne; Scott, Douglas; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Using recent experimental limits on chemical potential distortions from Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Far Infrared Astronomy Satellite (FIRAS), and the large lever-arm spanning the damping of sub-Jeans scale fluctuations to the COBE DMR fluctuations, we set a constraint on the slope of the primordial power spectrum n. It is possible to analytically calculate the contribution over the full range of scales and redshifts, correctly taking into account fluctuation growth and damping as well as thermalization processes. Assuming conservatively that mu is less than 1.76 x 10(exp -4), we find that the 95% upper limit on n is only weakly dependent on other cosmological parameters, e.g., n is less than 1.60 (h=0.5) and n is less than 1.63 (h=1.0) for Omega(sub 0) = 1, with marginally weaker constraints for Omega(sub 0) is less than 1 in a flat model with a cosmological constant.

  7. Exploration of Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, East Antarctica: Background and Plans for the Near Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalay, Pavel; Sun, Youhong; Zhao, Yue; Li, Yuansheng; Cao, Pinlu; Xu, Huiwen; Zheng, Zhichuan; Wang, Rusheng; Zhang, Nan; Markov, Alexey; Yu, Dahui; Fan, Xiaopeng; Hu, Zhengyi; Yang, Cheng; Gong, Da; Hong, Jialing; Liu, Chunpeng; Han, Junjie; Yu, Chengfeng; Wang, Lili

    2014-05-01

    The Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains (GSM), located in the central part of East Antarctica, were discovered by the Soviet team of the 3rd Complex Antarctic Expedition in 1958-1959. The GSM has highly dissected Alpine topography reaching maximum elevations of 3000 m and are completely covered by over 600 m of ice and snow. The mechanism driving uplift of the young-shaped GSM in the middle of the old East Antarctic Shield is unknown. With only limited constraints available on the topography, geology, and lithospheric structure, the origin of the GSM has been a matter of considerable speculation. The latest interpretation suggested that the GSM were formed during Permian and Cretaceous (roughly 250-100 Ma ago) due to the combination of rift-flank uplift, root buoyancy and the isostatic response. Later on, the Antarctic Ice Sheet covered the range and protected it from erosion. However, this theory cannot explain lack of erosion process during many millions years in between uplifting and beginning of glaciation. The next step of the GSM exploration focuses on the direct observation of ice sheet bed by drilling. In order to penetrate into subglacial bedrock in the GSM region the development activity already has been started in China. Drilling operations in Antarctica are complicated by extremely low temperature at the surface and within ice sheet, by ice flow, the absence of roads and infrastructures, storms, winds, snowfalls, etc. All that are the reasons that up to the present moment bedrock cores were never obtained at inland of Antarctica. It is proposed to use cable-suspended drilling technology in which an armored cable with a winch is used instead of a pipe-string to provide power to the down-hole motor system and to retrieve the down-hole unit. It is assumed to choose the drill site with the ice thickness at most of 1000 m and to pierce into the mountain slope to a depth of few meters. Proposed borehole construction includes five following steps: (1) dry core

  8. LoCuSS: exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziparo, Felicia; Smith, Graham P.; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P.; Pereira, Maria J.; Egami, Eiichi

    2016-12-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogues derived from the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z ≃ 0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies with the same 1 per cent contamination level that we have achieved with red galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. Nevertheless, our least contaminated blue galaxy sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies, and we show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ˜10-30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.

  9. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    SciTech Connect

    Lineweaver, Charles Howe

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than ~20° is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9σ, > 10σ and > 18σ above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60° due to the 60° separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60° is 0.45%$+0.18\\atop{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  10. Morphology of the interstellar cooling lines detected by COBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hinshaw, G.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Wright, E. L.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Gales, J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the COBE satellite has conducted an unbiased survey of the far-infrared emission from our Galaxy. The first results of this survey were reported by Wright et al. (1991). We report the results of new analyses of this spectral survey, which includes emission lines from 158 micrometer C(+), 122 and 205 micrometer N(+), 370 and 609 micrometer C(0), and CO J = 2 goes to 1 through J = 5 goes to 4. We report the morphological distribution along the Galactic plane (b = 0 deg) of the spectral line emission, and the high Galactic latitude intensities of the C(+) and 205 micrometer N(+) emission. In the Galactic plane the 205 micrometer line of N(+) generally follows the 158 micrometer C(+) line distribution, but the intensities scale as I(N(+) 205 micrometer) varies as I(C(+) 158 micrometer)(exp 1.5) toward the inner Galaxy. The high Galactic latitude intensity of the 158 micrometer fine-structure transition from C(+) is I(C(+) 158 micrometer) = (1.43 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -6) csc (absolute value of b) ergs/sq cm s sr for absolute value of b greater than 15 deg, and it decreases more rapidly than the far-infrared intensity with increasing Galactic latitude. C(+) and neutral atomic hydrogen emission are closely correlated with a C(+) cooling rate of (2.65 +/- 0.15) x 10(exp -26) ergs/s. We conclude that this emission arises almost entirely from the cold neutral medium. The high Galactic latitude intensity of the 205 micrometer fine-structure transition from N(+) is I(N(+) 205 micrometer) = (4 +/- 1) x 10(exp -8) csc (absolute value of b) ergs/((sq cm)(s)(sr)) arising entirely from the warm ionized medium. We estimate the total ionizing photon rate in the Galaxy to be phi = 3.5 x 10(exp 53) ionizing photons per second, based on the 205 micrometer N(+) transition.

  11. Introducing 3D U-statistic method for separating anomaly from background in exploration geochemical data with associated software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannadpour, Seyyed Saeed; Hezarkhani, Ardeshir

    2016-03-01

    The U-statistic method is one of the most important structural methods to separate the anomaly from the background. It considers the location of samples and carries out the statistical analysis of the data without judging from a geochemical point of view and tries to separate subpopulations and determine anomalous areas. In the present study, to use U-statistic method in three-dimensional (3D) condition, U-statistic is applied on the grade of two ideal test examples, by considering sample Z values (elevation). So far, this is the first time that this method has been applied on a 3D condition. To evaluate the performance of 3D U-statistic method and in order to compare U-statistic with one non-structural method, the method of threshold assessment based on median and standard deviation (MSD method) is applied on the two example tests. Results show that the samples indicated by U-statistic method as anomalous are more regular and involve less dispersion than those indicated by the MSD method. So that, according to the location of anomalous samples, denser areas of them can be determined as promising zones. Moreover, results show that at a threshold of U = 0, the total error of misclassification for U-statistic method is much smaller than the total error of criteria of bar {x}+n× s. Finally, 3D model of two test examples for separating anomaly from background using 3D U-statistic method is provided. The source code for a software program, which was developed in the MATLAB programming language in order to perform the calculations of the 3D U-spatial statistic method, is additionally provided. This software is compatible with all the geochemical varieties and can be used in similar exploration projects.

  12. Noncosmological signal contributions to the COBE DMR anisotropy maps. [Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.; Loewenstein, K.; Cheng, E. S.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) data for evidence of noncosmological source contributions. The DMR maps are cross-correlated with maps of rich clusters, extragalactic IRAS sources, HEAO 1 A-2 X-ray emission, and 5 GHz radio sources. We limit the rms contributions from these sources on a 7 deg angular scale to less than 10 micro-K (95 percent confidence level) in the DMR maps, although the LMC probably contributes about 50 micro-K to a limited region of the sky. Thus, our previous interpretation that the fluctuations in the COBE DMR data are most likely due to cosmic fluctuations at the surface of last scattering remains intact. The Comptonization parameter for hot electrons traced by rich clusters is limited to delta(y) less than 2 x 10 exp -6 (95 percent confidence level) averaged over the 7 deg DMR beam.

  13. Do wavelets really detect non-Gaussianity in the 4-year COBE data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.; Hobson, M. P.; Lasenby, A. N.

    2000-11-01

    We investigate the detection of non-Gaussianity in the 4-year COBE data reported by Pando, Valls-Gabaud & Fang, using a technique based on the discrete wavelet transform. Their analysis was performed on the two DMR faces centred on the North and South Galactic poles, respectively, using the Daubechies 4 wavelet basis. We show that these results depend critically on the orientation of the data, and so should be treated with caution. For two distinct orientations of the data, we calculate estimates of the skewness, kurtosis and scale-scale correlation of the corresponding wavelet coefficients in all of the available scale domains of the transform. We obtain several detections of non-Gaussianity in the DMR-DSMB map at greater than the 99per cent confidence level, but most of these occur on pixel-pixel scales and are therefore not cosmological in origin. Indeed, after removing all multipoles beyond l=40 from the COBE maps, only one robust detection remains. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the probability of obtaining such a detection by chance is 0.59. We repeat the analysis for the 53+90GHz coadded COBE map. In this case, after removing l>40 multipoles, two non-Gaussian detections at the 99per cent level remain. Nevertheless, again using Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the probability of obtaining two such detections by chance is 0.28. Thus, we conclude the wavelet technique does not yield strong evidence for non-Gaussianity of cosmological origin in the 4-year COBE data.

  14. Preliminary separation of galactic and cosmic microwave emission for the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennet, C. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Hinshaw, G.; Wright, E. L.; Kogut, A.; De Amici, G.; Meyer, S. S.; Weiss, R.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Gulkis, S.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary models of microwave emission from the Milky Way Galaxy based on COBE and other data are constructed for the purpose of distinguishing cosmic and Galactic signals. Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) maps, with the modeled Galactic emission removed, are fitted for a quadrupole distribution. Autocorrelation functions for individual Galactic components are presented. When Galactic emission is removed from the DMR data, the residual fluctuations are virtually unaffected, and therefore they are not dominated by any known Galactic emission component.

  15. Cross-correlation between the 170 GHz survey map and the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganga, Ken; Cheng, ED; Meyer, Stephan; Page, Lyman

    1993-01-01

    This letter describes results of a cross-correlation between the 170 GHz partial-sky survey, made with a 3.8 deg beam balloon-borne instrument, and the COBE DMR 'Fit Technique' reduced galaxy all-sky map with a beam of 7 deg. The strong correlation between the data sets implies that the observed structure is consistent with thermal variations in a 2.7 K emitter. A chi-square analysis applied to the correlation function rules out the assumption that there is no structure in either of the two maps. A second test shows that if the DMR map has structure but the 170 GHz map does not, the probability of obtaining the observed correlation is small. Further analyses support the assumption that both maps have structure and that the 170 GHz-DMR cross-correlation is consistent with the analogous DMR correlation function. Maps containing various combinations of noise and Harrison-Zel'dovich power spectra are simulated and correlated to reinforce the result. The correlation provides compelling evidence that both instruments have observed fluctuations consistent with anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background.

  16. Non-Gaussian microwave background fluctuations from nonlinear gravitational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Kunstatter, G. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Whether the statistics of primordial fluctuations for structure formation are Gaussian or otherwise may be determined if the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Satellite makes a detection of the cosmic microwave-background temperature anisotropy delta T(sub CMB)/T(sub CMB). Non-Gaussian fluctuations may be generated in the chaotic inflationary model if two scalar fields interact nonlinearly with gravity. Theoretical contour maps are calculated for the resulting Sachs-Wolfe temperature fluctuations at large angular scales (greater than 3 degrees). In the long-wavelength approximation, one can confidently determine the nonlinear evolution of quantum noise with gravity during the inflationary epoch because: (1) different spatial points are no longer in causal contact; and (2) quantum gravity corrections are typically small-- it is sufficient to model the system using classical random fields. If the potential for two scalar fields V(phi sub 1, phi sub 2) possesses a sharp feature, then non-Gaussian fluctuations may arise. An explicit model is given where cold spots in delta T(sub CMB)/T(sub CMB) maps are suppressed as compared to the Gaussian case. The fluctuations are essentially scale-invariant.

  17. A continued search for transient events in the COBE DMR database simultaneous with cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, J. Gregory; Jackson, Peter D.; Bontekoe, Tj. Romke; Winkler, Christoph

    1996-08-01

    We report on the status of our ongoing project to search the database of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) experiment for transient signals at microwave wavelengths simultaneous with cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). To date we have carried out a complete search of the DMR database using burst positions taken from the original BATSE 1B catalog for the eight-month period of overlap (May-December 1991) corresponding to the first public release of COBE data. We are currently repeating our original search of the COBE DMR database using the revised burst positions of the newly-released BATSE 3B catalog. Using BATSE 1B positions, at least two apparent simultaneous observations of GRBs by the COBE DMR occurred in 1991, along with a number of ``near misses'' within 30 seconds in time. At present, only upper limits to burst microwave emission are indicated. Even in the event of a non-detection of a GRB by the COBE DMR, unprecedented observational limits will still be obtained, constraining the predictions of the many theoretical models proposed to explain the origin of GRBs.

  18. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

    2009-09-24

    This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

  19. Simultaneous Observations of Compton Gamma Ray Observatory-BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts with the COBE DMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Peter D.; Winkler, Christoph; Stacy, J. Gregory; Bontekoe, Tj. Romke

    1998-09-01

    Data acquired with the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) provide a unique opportunity to observe simultaneous emission from cosmic gamma-ray bursts in the previously unexplored microwave region of the spectrum. We have searched the COBE DMR time-ordered data sets for instances when one of the DMR horns (FWHM ~ 7°) was pointing in the direction of a gamma-ray burst at the time of burst occurrence. During the overlap period 1991 April-December corresponding to the first public release of COBE data, 210 Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO)/BATSE gamma-ray bursts listed in the Third BATSE (3B) Catalog were viewable by the COBE DMR. For five of these events the DMR was pointing within 7° of the burst positions at the exact moment of burst occurrence. For another four events the DMR was pointed within 2° of the BATSE positions within 10 s of the burst trigger time. No obvious microwave emission (at 31.5, 53, or 90 GHz), with upper limits in the 10-100 kJy range, can be associated with any of these events. The COBE DMR has a relatively low sensitivity for the detection of point sources within its field of view. A positive detection of a gamma-ray burst by the COBE DMR would imply that the integrated microwave flux must be of the same order as the energy observed in gamma rays. By extending an acceptance window in time of up to 20 minutes before and after a gamma-ray burst another 60 bursts are sampled by the DMR, whose signals are analyzed statistically. We conclude that the ``average'' gamma-ray burst produces less than about 7-42 kJy in simultaneous microwave radiation.

  20. Exploring the Cross-Cultural Experiences of College Students with Diverse Backgrounds Performing International Service-Learning in Myanmar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ruo-lan; Lee, Hsin-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background: In view of the growing globalization, volunteer service organizations, local universities, colleges, and student groups have begun extending their service programs from Taiwan to other countries. This study employs a self-organized, self-funded group of university students participating in international service-learning as its subject,…

  1. Report on 3 and 4-point correlation statistics in the COBE DMR anisotrophy maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary (Principal Investigator); Gorski, Krzystof M.; Banday, Anthony J.; Bennett, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the work performed under NASA contract # NAS5-32648, we have computed the 3-point and 4-point correlation functions of the COBE-DNIR 2-year and 4-year anisotropy maps. The motivation for this study was to search for evidence of non-Gaussian statistical fluctuations in the temperature maps: skewness or asymmetry in the case of the 3-point function, kurtosis in the case of the 4-point function. Such behavior would have very significant implications for our understanding of the processes of galaxy formation, because our current models of galaxy formation predict that non-Gaussian features should not be present in the DMR maps. The results of our work showed that the 3-point correlation function is consistent with zero and that the 4-point function is not a very sensitive probe of non-Gaussian behavior in the COBE-DMR data. Our computation and analysis of 3-point correlations in the 2-year DMR maps was published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, volume 446, page L67, 1995. Our computation and analysis of 3-point correlations in the 4-year DMR maps will be published, together with some additional tests, in the June 10, 1996 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Copies of both of these papers are attached as an appendix to this report.

  2. High-Latitude Galactic Emission in the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer 2 Year Sky Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Hinshaw, G.; Reach, W. T.

    1996-03-01

    We cross-correlate the COBE6 DMR 2 year sky maps with spatial templates from long-wavelength radio surveys and the far-infrared COBE DIRBE maps. We place an upper limit on the spectral index of synchrotron radiation βsynch < -2.9 between 408 MHz and 31.5 GHz. We obtain a statistically significant cross-correlation with the DIRBE maps, whose dependence on the DMR frequencies indicates a superposition of dust and free-free emission. The high-latitude dust emission (|b| > 30°) is well fitted by a single dust component with temperature T = 18+3-7 K and emissivity ν ∝ (υ/ν0)β with β = 1.9+3.0-0.5. The free-free emission is spatially correlated with the dust on angular scales larger than the 70 DMR beam, with rms variations 5.3±1.8 μK at 53 GHz and angular power spectrum p ∝ l-3. If this correlation persists to smaller angular scales, free-free emission should not be a significant contaminant to measurements of the cosmic microwave anisotropy at degree angular scales for frequencies above 20 GHz.

  3. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1996 uses available data from literature, industry, and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on minerals industry direction are drawn from these data.

  4. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  5. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF B & BX & BY TANK FARMS AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA

    2007-09-28

    This report documents the results of preliminary surface geophysical exploration activities performed between October and December 2006 at the B, BX, and BY tank farms (B Complex). The B Complex is located in the 200 East Area of the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. The objective of the preliminary investigation was to collect background characterization information with magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction to understand the spatial distribution of metallic objects that could potentially interfere with the results from high resolution resistivity survey. Results of the background characterization show there are several areas located around the site with large metallic subsurface debris or metallic infrastructure.

  6. On the RMS anisotropy at 7° and 10° observed in the COBE-DMR two year sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banday, A. J.; Górski, K. M.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Smoot, G. F.; Tenorio, L.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the recent results on the observed COBE-DMR two year sky rms temperature fluctuations. A ``cross-RMS'' statistic is used to infer the Qrms-PS normalization for a scale-invariant (n=1) spectral model. The method is extended to the normalization of other cosmological power spectra.

  7. A Search for Prompt Microwave Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Archival COBE and WMAP Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbonye, M.; Stacy, J. G.; Jackson, P. D.; Winkler, C.

    2004-08-01

    We report on an extension of earlier work to search the archival database of the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite, and the more recent public time-ordered datasets acquired with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), for transient signals associated with cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Over the course of its 4-year mission the COBE/DMR serendipitously observed a number of GRBs and we previously established the first limits on prompt microwave emission from GRBs using a 9-month sample of data from the COBE/DMR instrument. We have been remotivated to extend our earlier search following the detection in recent years of a small number of bright optical and radio flares from GRBs. The prompt multiwavelength burst emission, presumed to arise from reverse shocks in the burst ejecta, provides insight into burst physics and the physical environments in which bursts occur. We present here the status of our extended search. We also describe how the increased sensitivity and angular resolution of the WMAP radiometers compared to the COBE/DMR lead to a factor of 10,000 improvement in overall point-source sensitivity. Such limits approach the signal levels predicted in the microwave band for the peak prompt emission arising from reverse shocks in GRBs. We acknowledge partial support for this work through NASA grant NAG5-10253.

  8. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1997 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Sulvey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  9. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1999 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The report documents data on exploration budgets by region and commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry. And it presents inferences and observations on mineral industry direction based on these data and discussions.

  10. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Porter, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1998 draws on available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  11. Extragalactic Backgrounds in the Far UV and Exploring Star Formation at High Redshifts with Gamma-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2006-01-01

    The determination of the intergalactic photon densities from the FIR to the UV which is produced by stellar emission and dust reradiation at various redshifts can provide an independent measure of the star formation history of the universe. Using recent Spitzer and GALEX data in conjunction with other observational inputs, Stecker, Malkan and Scully have calculated the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0 < zeta < 6 for photon energies from 0.003 eV to the Lyman limit cutoff at 13.6 eV in a ACDM universe with Omega(sub Lambda) = 0.7 and Omega(sub m) = 0.3. Their results are based on backwards evolution models for galaxies which were developed by Malkan and Stecker previously. The calculated background SEDs at zeta = 0 are in good agreement with the present observational data and limits. The calculated intergalactic photon densities as a function of redshift were used to predict to extend the absorption of high energy 7-rays in intergalactic space from sources such as blazars and quasars, this absorption being produced by interactions the y-rays with the intergalactic FIR-UV photons having the calculated densities. The results are in excellent agreement with absorption features found in the low gamma-ray spectra of Mkn 421, Mkn 501 at, zeta = 0.03 and PKS

  12. Exploring occupation roles of hospice family caregivers from Māori, Chinese and Tongan ethnic backgrounds living in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Jennifer; Wilson, Linda

    2014-06-01

    A major challenge to occupational therapists working in palliative care is determining the best ways to help family caregivers who are caring for family members. The purpose of this study was to explore palliative caregiver occupations among Māori, Chinese and Tongan ethnicities. Six informants participated, one woman and one man from each ethnic group. In each of their homes, informants were asked to discuss what it was like caring for their dying family member. The occupational themes resulting from these interviews were food preparation, spirituality and family gathering. Therapists need to be aware of the differences in how people care for family members within their ethnicity. Implications are that occupational therapists can help families identify activities important to them within the main occupational themes: different types of foods and their preparations, various ways to express spirituality and how families gather together members of their extended family. Further, clinicians need to take on the role of a "not-knowing" but curious health-care provider in order to meet the needs of caregivers. The limitation was the small number of participants who all lived in one geographic area. Future studies should include a wider group of ethnicities.

  13. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonferrous, nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 58 percent in 2004 from the 2003 budget, according to Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes two years after a five-year period of declining spending for mineral exploration (1998 to 2002). Figures suggest a subsequent 27 percent increase in budgeted expenditures from 2002 to 2003. For the second consecutive year, all regional exploration budget estimates were anticipated to increase.

  14. Exploring the background features of acidic and basic air pollutants around an industrial complex using data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ho-Wen; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; She, Chin-Wen; Lin, Yo-Chen; Chiang, Chow-Feng

    2010-11-01

    Air pollution data around a monitored site are normally difficult to analyze due to highly inter-related meteorological and topographical factors on top of many complicated atmospheric chemical interactions occurred in local and regional wind fields. The challenge prompts this study to develop a comprehensive data-mining algorithm of cluster analysis followed by meteorological and interspecies correlations to mitigate the inherent data complexity and dissimilarity. This study investigated the background features of acidic and basic air pollutants around a high-tech industrial park in Taiwan. Monthly samplings were taken at 10 sites around the park in a year. The temporal distribution plots show a baseline with two characteristic groups of high and low peaks. Hierarchical cluster analysis confirms that high peaks were primarily associated with low speed south wind in summer for all the chemical species, except for F(-), Cl(-), NH(3) and HF. Crosschecking with the topographical map identifies several major external sources in south and southwest. Further meteorological correlation suggests that HCl is highly positively associated with humidity, while Cl(-) is highly negatively associated with temperature, both for most stations. Interestingly, HNO(3) is highly negatively associated with wind speed for most stations and the hotspot was found in summer and around the foothill of Da-Tu Mountain in the northwest, a stagnant pocket on the study site. However, F(-) is highly positively associated with wind speed at downwind stations to the prevailing north wind in winter, indicating an internal source from the north. The presence of NH(4)(+) stimulates the formation of NO(3)(-), SO(4)(-2) (R=0.7), and HNO(3), H(2)SO(4), NH(3) (R=0.3-0.4). As H(2)SO(4) could be elevated to a level as high as 40% of the regulated standard, species interactions may be a dominate mechanism responsible for the substantial increase in summer from external sources.

  15. Comparison of the ISOPHOT and COBE/DIRBE Absolute Photometry in the Low Surface Brightness Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Héraudeau, Ph.; Ábrahám, P.; del Burgo, C.; Klaas, U.; Kiss, C.

    The DIRBE database is the most extensively used reference for absolute sky surface brightness in the infrared. We performed a thorough analysis of the ISOPHOT surface brightness calibration using a large number of observations. We have built up a large data base of suitable fields where an ISOPHOT vs. DIRBE comparison can be performed. This includes all large rasters of low surface brightness, absolute photometry observations and minimaps in the ISO archive. We use this database for a systematic comparison of the ISOPHOT and COBE/DIRBE surface brightness calibration for all filters and all detectors of the ISOPHOT instrument. We describe the steps of the comparison: a) retrieve DIRBE values for each ISOPHOT observation, b) interpolate DIRBE values at the proper wavelength; c) colour correct the data and d) take into account the smaller beam size of ISOPHOT using the ISSA maps. Finally we present our preliminary results with PIA V7 for all filters as transformations between the 2 photometric systems.

  16. Three-Point Correlations in the COBE DMR 2 Year Anisotropy Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Kogut, A.

    1995-01-01

    We compute the three-point temperature correlation function of the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) 2 year sky maps to search for evidence of non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations. We detect three-point correlations in our sky with a substantially higher signal-to-noise ratio than from the first-year data. However, the magnitude of the signal is consistent with the level of cosmic variance expected from Gaussian fluctuations, even when the low-order multipole moments, up to l = 9, are filtered from the data. These results do not strongly constrain most existing models of structure formation, but the absence of intrinsic three-point correlations on large angular scales is an important consistency test for such models.

  17. Estimating Background and Lunar Contribution to Neutrons Detected by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Chin, G.; Boynton, W. V.; Evans, L. G.; Litvak, M. L.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sagdeev, R.; Sanin, A. B.; Starr, R. D.; Su, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The fraction of hydrogen-bearing species embedded in planetary regolith can be determined from the ratio between measured epithermal neutron leakage flux and the flux measured from similar dry regolith. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft is equipped with the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) instrument to measure embedded hydrogen in the Moon's polar regions and elsewhere. We have investigated the relative contribution of lunar and non-lunar (spacecraft-sourced) neutrons by modeling maps of the measured count rate from three of the LEND detector systems using linear combinations of maps compiled from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) and the LEND detectors, demonstrating that the two systems are compatible and enabling reference signal to be inferred to enable detecting hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing volatiles. The pole-to-equator contrast ratio in epithermal neutrons indicates that the average concentration of hydrogen in the Moon's polar regolith above 80° north or south latitude is ~110 ppmw, or 0.10±0.01 wt% water-equivalent hydrogen. Above 88° north or south, the concentration increases to ~140 ppmw, or 0.13±0.02 wt% water-equivalent hydrogen. Nearly identical suppression of neutron flux at both the north and south poles, despite differences in topography and distribution of permanently-shadowed regions, supports the contention that hydrogen is broadly distributed in the polar regions and increasingly concentrated approaching the poles. Similarity in the degree of neutron suppression in low-energy and high-energy epithermal neutrons suggests that the hydrogen fraction is relatively uniform with depth down to ~1 m; the neutron leakage flux is insensitive to greater depth.

  18. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration budgets fell for a fourth successive year in 2001. These decreases reflected low mineral commodity prices, mineral-market investment reluctance, company failures and a continued trend of company mergers and takeovers.

  19. Microwave background fluctuations due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects in pancakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, M. U.; Szalay, A. S.; Schaefer, R. K.; Gulkis, S.; Von Gronefeld, P.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate distortions in the microwave background radiation from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, produced by hot gas in large (approximately 100 Mpc) pancakes. The large-scale distribution of the pancakes is taken to be that of a Voronoi foam. Fluctuations for this scenario are estimated to be on the order of delta T/T is approximately 10(exp -5). Using computer simulations, we produce several 32 deg x 32 deg images with 0.25 deg resolution. These images show characteristic linear features produced when a pancake is viewed nearly edge-on. By calculating the two-point and the degenerate three-point correlation functions, we are able to statistically detect such non-Gaussian features even in the presence of a relatively large amount of Gaussian noise. The degenerate three-point correlation function is found to be particularly useful since it is insensitive to correlated Gaussian noise. We also smooth our data over a 7 deg Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) Gaussian window to simulate the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) observations. We find that under such low-resolution conditions, the features are highly suppressed.

  20. Derivation of a Large Isotopic Diffuse Sky Emission Component at 1.25 and 2.2um from the COBE/DIRBE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, K.; Kawara, K.; Matsuura, S.; Kataza, H.; Arai, T.; Matsuoka, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Using all-sky maps obtained with COBE/DIRBE, we reanalyzed the diffuse sky brightness at 1.25 and 2.2 μ {{m}}, which consists of zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light (DGL), integrated starlight (ISL), and isotropic emission including the extragalactic background light. Our new analysis including an improved estimate of the DGL and the ISL with the 2MASS data showed that deviations of the isotropic emission from isotropy were less than 10% in the entire sky at high Galactic latitude (| b| \\gt 35^\\circ ). We derived the DGL to 100 μm brightness ratios of ˜4.79 and ˜1.49 n W m-2 MJy-1 at 1.25 and 2.2 μm, respectively. The result of our analysis revealed a significantly large isotropic component at 1.25 and 2.2 μ {{m}} with intensities of 60.15 ± 16.14 and 27.68+/- 6.21 {{n}} {{W}} {{{m}}}-2 {{sr}}-1, respectively. This intensity is larger than the integrated galaxy light, upper limits from γ-ray observation, and potential contribution from exotic sources (i.e., Population III stars, intrahalo light, direct collapse black holes, and dark stars). We therefore conclude that the excess light may originate from the local universe: the Milky Way and/or the solar system.

  1. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies in cold dark matter models with cosmological constant: The intermediate versus large angular scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stompor, Radoslaw; Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1994-01-01

    We obtain predictions for cosmic microwave background anisotropies at angular scales near 1 deg in the context of cold dark matter models with a nonzero cosmological constant, normalized to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) detection. The results are compared to those computed in the matter-dominated models. We show that the coherence length of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy is almost insensitive to cosmological parameters, and the rms amplitude of the anisotropy increases moderately with decreasing total matter density, while being most sensitive to the baryon abundance. We apply these results in the statistical analysis of the published data from the UCSB South Pole (SP) experiment (Gaier et al. 1992; Schuster et al. 1993). We reject most of the Cold Dark Matter (CDM)-Lambda models at the 95% confidence level when both SP scans are simulated together (although the combined data set renders less stringent limits than the Gaier et al. data alone). However, the Schuster et al. data considered alone as well as the results of some other recent experiments (MAX, MSAM, Saskatoon), suggest that typical temperature fluctuations on degree scales may be larger than is indicated by the Gaier et al. scan. If so, CDM-Lambda models may indeed provide, from a point of view of CMB anisotropies, an acceptable alternative to flat CDM models.

  2. The Explorer of Diffuse Galactic Emission (EDGE): Determination of Large-Scale Structure Evolution from Measurement of the Anisotropy of the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    2004-01-01

    The formation of the first objects, stars and galaxies and their subsequent evolution remain a cosmological unknown. Few observational probes of these processes exist. The Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) originates from this era, and can provide information to test models of both galaxy evolution and the growth of primordial structure. The Explorer of Diffuse Galactic Emission (EDGE) is a proposed balloon-borne mission designed to measure the spatial fluctuations in the CIB from 200 micrometers to 1 millimeter on 6' to 3 degree scales with 2 microKelvin sensitivity/resolution element. Such measurements would provide a sensitive probe of the large-scale variation in protogalaxy density at redshifts approximately 0.5-3. In this paper, we present the scientific justification for the mission and show a concept for the instrument and observations.

  3. An exploration of the impact of family background factors on the science achievement of Afro-Caribbean and African American students in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinder, Patrice J.

    Ogbu and Simons (1998) defined voluntary immigrants as individuals who chose to migrate to the United States (U.S.). Involuntary immigrants are defined as individuals whose ancestors were brought to the U.S. by force (Obgu & Simons, 1998). There have been recent reports indicating that voluntary immigrants are outperforming involuntary immigrants (Fisher, 2005; Williams, Fleming, Jones, & Griffin, 2007). There seems to be a trend in voluntary immigrants exhibiting a higher academic achievement pattern than involuntary immigrants (Fisher, 2005; Rong & Preissle, 1998; Williams et al., 2007). However, the reason for the groups' differences in achievement has not been extensively explored. The primary objective of this research study was to explore the impact of family background on the academic achievement patterns of Afro-Caribbean and African American students in the United States. The study utilized two research designs; a causal-comparative and a correlational design. A questionnaire was distributed to a sample of eighty-seven high school students. Eighteen of the participants were Afro-Caribbean students, and sixty-seven were African American students. Chemistry test scores for the students were also provided. The results of the study indicated that Afro-Caribbean students outperformed African American students on the test of science achievement. The difference was statistically significant (t= 2.43, p<0.05). Additionally, results suggested that there were a few significant differences in Afro-Caribbean and African American students' family backgrounds. Moreover, the findings of this study suggest that the positive impact of arrival status on the first-generation of Afro-Caribbean immigrants may be influencing their children's academic success in science. The present study holds a few implications for parents and teachers of immigrant minority students. Additionally, the current researcher has offered several implications for future research on ethnicity

  4. Cosmic Ray Exposure & Linear-Energy-Transfer Evaluations for the COBE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Barth, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetospherically attenuated, orbit integrated, surface incident cosmic ray fluxes of galactic origin were determined for the COBE mission. All heavy ions up to Nickel (z=28) were considered in this, evaluation. In order to provide worst case approximations, estimates were based on solar minimum conditions. Transport and material shielding calculations were then performed for these vehicle encountered particles, for a simple spherical 3-D aluminum geometry, and the materially attenuated cosmic ray distributions emerging behind selected shield thicknesses were obtained. Finally, Linear-Energy-Transfer (LET) spectra were evaluated for the energy spectra of each ion specie and these were, in turn, integrated into the sum-total LET distribution contained in this report. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form for eight (8) different shield thicknesses from.01 to 10.0 gm/cm2 of aluminum. They show most conclusively, and not unexpectedly, that material shielding has virtually no 'effect on the final LET spectrum, at least not for aluminum shields. This was predictable. Please note that in the LET graphs, two curves were plotted. Of these, please ignore the one labeled "grazing" and use only the one labeled "normal". Again, it should be remembered that the end results contain contributions from all elements up to Nickel (z=28).

  5. Collection of peripheral progenitor cells: a comparison between Amicus and Cobe-Spectra blood cell separators.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Gaspare; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Palombi, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Ballatore, Giovanna; Postorino, Massimiliano; Tendas, Andrea; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Isacchi, Giancarlo; Amadori, Sergio

    2004-04-01

    The authors compared the efficiency of two different blood cell separators (Amicus and Cobe-Spectra) in collecting peripheral blood progenitor cells for autologous or homologous transplantation. A total number of 129 procedures were performed, 36 with Spectra, 93 with Amicus. There was no difference between Spectra and Amicus efficiencies for CD34+ cell collection (46.685% vs 46.235%; p=n.s) but the platelet efficiencies were 17.31% and 12.54% respectively (p=0.04) and, if autologous and allogeneic collections were considered separately, a marked difference resulted in allogeneic platelet efficiency between 6 Spectra and 23 Amicus procedures (26.83% vs 8.68%, p=0.0004). The authors were able to demonstrate that in 70 Amicus autologous collections there was a different platelet efficiency, if peripheral count was considered: 12 procedures performed with a platelet count > 100 x 10(9)/l had a very low efficiency (6.86%), but this value increased if platelet count lowered (13.02% if between 100 and 50 x 10(9)/l, 22.63% if between 50 and 0 x 10(9)/l, 23 and 35 procedures respectively). The study is preliminary and the number of collections is little, but the overall data suggest that Spectra (AutoPBSC, V 6.0) and Amicus separators have the same efficiency for collecting CD34+ cells while Amicus procedures have a very low platelet contamination, especially with donors.

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy: Python V Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, K.; Dragovan, M.; Kovac, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Knox, L.; Dodelson, S.; Ganga, K.; Peterson, J. B.; Alvarez, D.; Griffin, G.; Newcomb, M.; Miller, K.; Platt, S. R.; Novak, G.

    1999-05-01

    Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37-45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a 0.91 x 1.02 deg beam the instrument fully sampled 598 deg(2) of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations. Interpreting the observed fluctuations as anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, we place constraints on the angular power spectrum of fluctuations in multipole bands up to l ~ 260. The observed spectrum is consistent with both the COBE experiment and previous Python results. There is no significant contamination from known foregrounds. The results show a discernible rise in the angular power spectrum from large (l ~ 40) to small (l ~ 200) angular scales.

  7. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  8. On the calibration of the COBE/IRAS dust emission reddening maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, C. M.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.; Barbuy, B.

    2003-09-01

    In this work we study the spectral properties (3600-6800 Å) of the nuclear region of early-type galaxies at low (|b|<25deg), intermediate (including surroundings of the Magellanic Clouds) and high (South Polar Cap) Galactic latitudes. We determine the E(B-V) reddening values of the galaxies by matching their continuum distribution with respect to those of reddening-free spectral galaxy templates with similar stellar populations. We also compare the spectroscopic reddening value of each galaxy with that derived from 100 mu m dust emission (E(B-V)FIR) in its line of sight, and we find that there is agreement up to E(B-V)=0.25. Beyond this limit E(B-V)FIR values are higher. Taking into account the data up to E(B-V) ~ 0.7, we derive a calibration factor of 0.016 between the spectroscopic E(B-V) values and Schlegel et al.'s (\\cite{Schlegel1998}) opacities. By combining this result with an AK extinction map built within ten degrees of the Galactic centre using Bulge giants as probes (Dutra et al. \\cite{Dutra2003}), we extended the calibration of dust emission reddening maps to low Galactic latitudes down to |b|=4deg and E(B-V)= 1.6 (AV ~ 5). According to this new calibration, a multiplicative factor of ~0.75 must be applied to the COBE/IRAS dust emission reddening maps. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Pata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  9. The Zodiacal Emission Spectrum as Determined by COBE and its Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Dwek, Eli; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We combine observations from the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments on the COBE satellite to derive an annually-averaged spectrum of the zodiacal cloud in the 10 to 1000 micron wavelength region. The spectrum exhibits a break at approx. 150 microns which indicates a sharp break in the dust size distribution at a radius of about 30 microns The spectrum can be fit with a single blackbody with a lambda(exp -2) emissivity law beyond 150 microns and a temperature of 240 K. We also used a more realistic characterization of the cloud to fit the spectrum, including a distribution of dust temperatures, representing different dust compositions and distances from the sun, as well as a realistic representation of the spatial distribution of the dust. We show that amorphous carbon and silicate dust with respective temperatures of 280 and 274 K at 1 AU, and size distributions with a break at grain radii of 14 and 32 microns, can provide a good fit to the average zodiacal dust spectrum. The total mass of the zodiacal cloud is 2 to 11 Eg (Eg=10(exp 18) g), depending on the grain composition. The lifetime of the cloud, against particle loss by Poynting- Robertson drag and the effects of solar wind, is about 10(exp 5) yr. The required replenishment rate is approx. 10(exp 14) g/yr. If this is provided by asteroid belt alone, the asteroids lifetime would be approx. 3 x 10(exp 10) yr. But comets and Kuiper belt objects may also contribute to the zodiacal cloud.

  10. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, Alan; Chluba, Jens; Fixsen, Dale J.; Meyer, Stephan; Spergel, David

    2016-07-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer is an Explorer-class mission to open new windows on the early universe through measurements of the polarization and absolute frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. PIXIE will measure the gravitational-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint in linear polarization, and characterize the thermal history of the universe through precision measurements of distortions in the blackbody spectrum. PIXIE uses an innovative optical design to achieve background-limited sensitivity in 400 spectral channels spanning over 7 octaves in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 micron wavelength). Multi-moded non-imaging optics feed a polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer to produce a set of interference fringes, proportional to the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from the two input beams. Multiple levels of symmetry and signal modulation combine to reduce systematic errors to negligible levels. PIXIE will map the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters with angular resolution 2.6° and sensitivity 70 nK per 1° square pixel. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r < 10-3 at 5 standard deviations. The PIXIE mission complements anticipated ground-based polarization measurements such as CMB- S4, providing a cosmic-variance-limited determination of the large-scale E-mode signal to measure the optical depth, constrain models of reionization, and provide a firm detection of the neutrino mass (the last unknown parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics). In addition, PIXIE will measure the absolute frequency spectrum to characterize deviations from a blackbody with sensitivity 3 orders of magnitude beyond the seminal COBE/FIRAS limits. The sky cannot be black at this level; the expected results will constrain physical processes ranging from

  11. Re-Imagining Otherness: An Exploration of the Global Imaginaries of Children from Immigrant Backgrounds in Primary Schools in France and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welply, Oakleigh

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of global representations in immigrant-background children's social imaginaries in primary schools in France and England. Increased globalisation, mobility and migration hold strong implications in terms of identity and belonging for children from immigrant backgrounds in schools in European countries, based on…

  12. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF TX-TY TANK FARMS AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH GROUND PENETRATING RADAR

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; CUBBAGE R; BRAUCHLA R; O'BRIEN G

    2008-07-24

    Ground penetrating radar surveys of the TX and TY tank farms were performed to identify existing infrastructure in the near surface environment. These surveys were designed to provide background information supporting Surface-to-Surface and Well-to-Well resistivity surveys of Waste Management Area TX-TY. The objective of the preliminary investigation was to collect background characterization information with GPR to understand the spatial distribution of metallic objects that could potentially interfere with the results from high resolution resistivity{trademark} surveys. The results of the background characterization confirm the existence of documented infrastructure, as well as highlight locations of possible additional undocumented subsurface metallic objects.

  13. Calibration and Systematic Error Analysis for the COBE DMR 4 Year Sky Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Hinshaw, G.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.; Lineweaver, C.; Smoot, G. F.; Tenorio, L.; Wright, E. L.

    1996-10-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (CO BE) has mapped the full microwave sky to mean sensitivity 26 μK per 7° field of view. The absolute calibration is determined to 0.7% with drifts smaller than 0.2% per year. We have analyzed both the raw differential data and the pixelized sky maps for evidence of contaminating sources such as solar system foregrounds, instrumental susceptibilities, and artifacts from data recovery and processing. Most systematic effects couple only weakly to the sky maps. The largest uncertainties in the maps result from the instrument susceptibility to Earth's magnetic field, microwave emission from Earth, and upper limits to potential effects at the spacecraft spin period. Systematic effects in the maps are small compared to either the noise or the celestial signal: the 95% confidence upper limit for the pixel-pixel rms from all identified systematics is less than 6 μK in the worst channel. A power spectrum analysis of the (A - B)/2 difference maps shows no evidence for additional undetected systematic effects.

  14. Analysis of small-scale microwave background radiation anisotropy in the presence of foreground contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Stebbins, Albert

    1994-01-01

    Many of the current round of experiments searching for anisotropies in the microwave background radiation (MBR) are confronting the problem of how to disentangle the cosmic signal from contamination due to Galactic and intergalactic foreground sources. Here we show how commonly used likelihood function techniques can be generalized to account for foreground. Specifically we set some restrictions on the spectrum of foreground contamination but allow the amplitude to vary arbitrarily. The likelihood function thus generalized gives reasonable limits on the MBR anisotropy which, in some cases, are not much less restrictive than what one would get from more detailed modeling of the foreground. Furthermore, the likelihood function is exactly the same as one would obtain by simply projecting out foreground contamination and looking at the reduced data set. We apply this generalized analysis to the recent medium-angle data sets of ACME-HEMT (Gaier et al. 1992; Schuster et al. 1993) and MAX (Meinhold et al. 1993; Gunderson et al. 1993). The resulting analysis constrains the one free parameter in the standard cold dark matter theory to be Q(sub rms-ps) = 18(sub -5 sup +8) microKelvin. This best fit value, although in striking agreement with the normalization from Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), is not a very good fit, with an overall chi-squared/degrees of freedom = 208/168. We also argue against three commonly used methods of dealing with foreground: (1) ignoring it completely; (2) subtracting off a best-fit foreground and treating the residuals as if uncontaminated; and (3) culling data which appears to be contaminated by foreground.

  15. Visual search for real world targets under conditions of high target-background similarity: Exploring training and transfer in younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Neider, Mark B; Boot, Walter R; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-05-01

    Real world visual search tasks often require observers to locate a target that blends in with its surrounding environment. However, studies of the effect of target-background similarity on search processes have been relatively rare and have ignored potential age-related differences. We trained younger and older adults to search displays comprised of real world objects on either homogenous backgrounds or backgrounds that camouflaged the target. Training was followed by a transfer session in which participants searched for novel camouflaged objects. Although older adults were slower to locate the target compared to younger adults, all participants improved substantially with training. Surprisingly, camouflage-trained younger and older adults showed no performance decrements when transferred to novel camouflage displays, suggesting that observers learned age-invariant, generalizable skills relevant for searching under conditions of high target-background similarity. Camouflage training benefits at transfer for older adults appeared to be related to improvements in attentional guidance and target recognition rather than a more efficient search strategy.

  16. National Research Council Dialogue to Assess Progesss on NASA's Human Exploration Systems and Mobility Capability Roadmap Development: General Background and Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    General Background and Introduction of Capability Roadmaps: Agency Objective. Strategic Planning Transformation. Advanced Planning Organizational Roles. Public Involvement in Strategic Planning. Strategic Roadmaps and Schedule. Capability Roadmaps and Schedule. Technology and Capability Readiness Levels. Relationships Between Roadmaps. Purpose of NRC Review. Capability Roadmap Development (Team Progress to Date).

  17. Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (Phase 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogurt, Alan; Bennett, Charles

    This is the Lead Proposal for the proposed investigation "Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (Phase 2)" We propose to fly the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravitational waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. Such a signal is expected to exist: the simplest inflation models predict tensor-to-scalar ratio 0.01 < r < 0.16 corresponding to detectable amplitudes in the range 30--100 nK. Detection of the inflationary signal would have profound consequences for both cosmology and high-energy physics. Not only would it establish inflation as a physical reality, it would provide a direct, model- independent determination of the relevant energy scale, shedding light on physics at energies twelve orders of magnitude beyond those accessible to direct experimentation in particle accelerators. PIPER is a balloon-borne instrument optimized to detect the inflationary signal on large angular scales. It consists of two co-aligned telescopes cooled to 1.5 K within a large liquid helium bucket dewar. A variable-delay polarization modulator (VPM) on each telescope chops between linear and circular polarization to isolate the polarized signal while rejecting the much brighter unpolarized emission. PIPER's innovative architecture combines cryogenic optics with kilo-pixel detector arrays to provide unprecedented sensitivity to CMB polarization. The fast modulation between linear and circular polarization takes advantage of the lack of astrophysical circular polarization to eliminate common sources of systematic error. The sensitivity and control of systematic errors in turn enable measurements over most of the sky from mid-latitude launch sites; long-duration Antarctic flights are not required. With sensitivity r < 0.007 at 95% CL, PIPER will either detect the inflationary signal or rule out nearly all large-field inflation models

  18. Deep-sequencing method for quantifying background abundances of symbiodinium types: exploring the rare symbiodinium biosphere in reef-building corals.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Kate M; Davies, Sarah W; Kenkel, Carly D; Willis, Bette L; Matz, Mikhail V; Bay, Line K

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of reef-building corals to associate with environmentally-appropriate types of endosymbionts from the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium contributes significantly to their success at local scales. Additionally, some corals are able to acclimatize to environmental perturbations by shuffling the relative proportions of different Symbiodinium types hosted. Understanding the dynamics of these symbioses requires a sensitive and quantitative method of Symbiodinium genotyping. Electrophoresis methods, still widely utilized for this purpose, are predominantly qualitative and cannot guarantee detection of a background type below 10% of the total Symbiodinium population. Here, the relative abundances of four Symbiodinium types (A13, C1, C3, and D1) in mixed samples of known composition were quantified using deep sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal RNA gene (ITS-2) by means of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) using Roche 454. In samples dominated by each of the four Symbiodinium types tested, background levels of the other three types were detected when present at 5%, 1%, and 0.1% levels, and their relative abundances were quantified with high (A13, C1, D1) to variable (C3) accuracy. The potential of this deep sequencing method for resolving fine-scale genetic diversity within a symbiont type was further demonstrated in a natural symbiosis using ITS-1, and uncovered reef-specific differences in the composition of Symbiodinium microadriaticum in two species of acroporid corals (Acropora digitifera and A. hyacinthus) from Palau. The ability of deep sequencing of the ITS locus (1 and 2) to detect and quantify low-abundant Symbiodinium types, as well as finer-scale diversity below the type level, will enable more robust quantification of local genetic diversity in Symbiodinium populations. This method will help to elucidate the role that background types have in maximizing coral fitness across diverse environments and in response to

  19. Combination of Cobe AutoPBSC and Gambro Elutra as a platform for monocyte enrichment in dendritic cell (DC) therapy: clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Hoecker, Paul; Zeng, Jia; Dettke, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Monocytes are a common source for generating dendritic cells (DCs). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of a platform for monocyte collection and enrichment in a clinical setting. The platform was based on the combination of two semiautomated devices; the Cobe Spectra Auto PBSC for mononuclear cells (MNC) collection followed by counterflow elutriation for monocyte enrichment (Gambro BCT Elutra). Twenty-four patients with various types of epithelial cancer participated in the study. MNC collections were first performed as large volume leukapheresis (LVL). Subsequently, MNC products were processed with an elutriation system for monocyte isolation. LVL resulted in the collection of MNC at a median of 8.1 x 10(9) cells, containing of 31.4% monocytes. A similar efficacy was also shown in patients with lower peripheral blood counts. Elutriation of the MNC product with the Cobe Elutra device resulted in the enrichment of monocytes at a median of 2.7 x 10(9) cells, with a recovery of 80.2% and a purity of 90.7%. These monocytes were then successfully developed into DCs for clinical therapy after in vitro manipulation. These data suggest that the combination of the Cobe Spectra Auto PBSC and the Gambro BCT Elutra is an effective platform for monocyte enrichment in clinical practice according to GCP standards and GMP guidelines, and can be easily implemented in the clinical routine under current DC protocols.

  20. Integrating the molecular background of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in lung cancer: a way to explore the impact of mutational landscape on tumor immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Pilotto, Sara; Molina-Vila, Miguel Angel; Karachaliou, Niki; Carbognin, Luisa; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, Maria; Bria, Emilio; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    The results of randomized clinical trials employing immune checkpoint inhibitors for pre-treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have recently revolutionised the standard available option for this disease setting. Nevertheless, the validation of reliable predictive biomarkers, able to define that proportion of patients most likely to benefit from immunotherapy, represents a crucial and still unsolved issue. This intensive research aimed at selecting potentially predictive biomarkers for immunotherapy is developed together with a wide range of analyses investigating the molecular profiling of lung cancer, leading to the spontaneous question of how these two parallel aspects of the same disease may coexist and influence one another. The potential impact of the mutational landscape of lung cancer on tumor immunogenicity (in both oncogene-addicted and molecularly unselected disease) will be explored and discussed in this review in order to begin to answer the unsolved questions. PMID:26798581

  1. Local Signal Impedes the Definition of the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsall, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    It was noted (ApJ 508, 44, 1998) when developing a COBE/DIRBE-data-based model for the infrared (IR) signal from the interplanetary dust cloud (IPD) that there were clear evidences of unexpected time-variable wavelength-dependent signals in all the ten DIRBE bands (1.2 to 240 μm). The amplitudes of these signals range in magnitude from the order of one-half to a few percent of the respective-wavelength IPD signal. This presentation provides selected details on the nature of these signals as regards their wavelength-dependent periodicities, time-variable amplitudes, and complex spatial configurations. Particular attention is devoted to describing the consequences imposed by these signals which impede the observational determination of and/or the setting of limits on the cosmic IR background.

  2. Current Status and Perspectives of Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersanelli, Marco; Maino, Davide; Mennella, Aniello

    2004-04-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provide a unique opportunity for a direct study of the primordial cosmic plasma at redshift z ~103. The angular power spectra of temperature and polarisation fluctuations are powerful observational objectives as they encode information on fundamental cosmological parameters and on the physics of the early universe. A large number of increasingly ambitious balloon-borne and ground-based experiments have been carried out following the first detection of CMB anisotropies by COBE-DMR, probing the angular power spectrum up to high multipoles. The recent data from WMAP provide a new major step forward in measurements percision. The ESA mission ``Planck Surveyor'', to be launched in 2007, is the third-generation satellite devoted to CMB imaging. Planck is expected to extract the full cosmological information from temperature anisotropies and to open up new fronteers in the CMB field.

  3. Background and comparison of water-quality, streambed-sediment, and biological characteristics of streams in the Viburnum Trend and the exploration study areas, southern Missouri, 1995 and 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Femmer, Suzanne R.

    2004-01-01

    Missouri has a long history of lead mining in the Park Hills and Viburnum Trend areas. Lead ore production has been a significant economic presence since the settlement of Missouri in the 1700?s. As lead sources are depleted in active mining areas, new areas are being explored for economical ore bodies. The exploration area south of Winona, a possible extension of the Viburnum Trend lead-producing area, lies in an area of intense interest because of its scenic beauty and sensitive environment. Water-quality, streambed-sediment, fish tissue, instream and riparian habitat, and invertebrate-community samples were collected from three sites in the Viburnum Trend for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program Black River synoptic study in 1995 and from four sites in the exploration study area in 2001. The samples, which were collected using NAWQA protocols, were analyzed and compared to establish background conditions and similarities between sites. Bacteria, lead, and zinc concentrations were substantially different between the study areas. Habitat characteristics, such as streambed substrate size and embeddedness were similar. The Eleven Point River at Turner?s Mill is substantially larger in size than the other six surveyed sites. Trace element concentrations in fish tissue samples collected in the two study areas are similar. Samples from both areas had elevated mercury levels. Invertebrate community data indicated similarity among the Viburnum Trend study area sites, but these sites had little in common with the exploration study area sites. The invertebrate community structure in the exploration study area were not similar.

  4. Cold dark matter confronts the cosmic microwave background - Large-angular-scale anisotropies in Omega sub 0 + lambda 1 models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is used to compute the correlation function for large-angle cosmic microwave background anisotropies resulting from both the space and time variations in the gravitational potential in flat, vacuum-dominated, cold dark matter cosmological models. Such models with Omega sub 0 of about 0.2, fit the excess power, relative to the standard cold dark matter model, observed in the large-scale galaxy distribution and allow a high value for the Hubble constant. The low order multipoles and quadrupole anisotropy that are potentially observable by COBE and other ongoing experiments should definitively test these models.

  5. Clustering of the Diffuse Infrared Light from the COBE DIRBE Maps. 3; Power Spectrum Analysis and Excess Isotropic Component of Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Odenwald, S.

    1999-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation is the cosmic repository for energy release throughout the history of the universe. The spatial fluctuations of the CIB resulting from galaxy clustering are expected to be at least a few percent on scales of a degree, depending on the luminosity and clustering history of the early universe. Using the all-sky data from the COBE DIRBE instrument at wavelengths 1.25 - 100 microns we attempt to measure the CIB fluctuations. In the near-IR, foreground emission is dominated by small scale structure due to stars in the Galaxy. There we find a strong correlation between the amplitude of the fluctuations and Galactic latitude after removing bright foreground stars. Using data outside the Galactic plane (absolute value of b > 20 deg) and away from the center (90 deg < l < 270 deg) we extrapolate the amplitude of the fluctuations to cosec absolute value of b = 0. We find a positive intercept of delta.F(sub rms) = 15.5(sup +3.7, sub -7.0), 5.9(sup +1.6, sub -3.7), 2.4(sup +0.5, sub -0.9), 2.0(sup +0.25, sub -0.5) nW/sq m.sr at 1.25, 2.2, 3.5 and 4.9 microns respectively, where the errors are the range of 92% confidence limits. For color subtracted maps between band 1 and 2 we find the isotropic part of the fluctuations at 7.6(sup +1.2, sub -2.4) nW/sq m.sr. Based on detailed numerical and analytic models, this residual is not likely to originate from the Galaxy, our clipping algorithm, or instrumental noise. We demonstrate that the residuals from the fit used in the extrapolation are distributed isotropically and suggest that this extra variance may result from structure in the CIB. We also obtain a positive intercept from a linear combination of maps at 1.25 and 2.2 microns. For 2 deg < theta < 15 deg, a power-spectrum analysis yields limits of (theta/5 deg) x delta.F(sub rms)(theta) < 6, 2.5, 0.8, 0.5 nW/sq m.sr at 1.25, 2.2, 3.5 and 4.9 microns respectively. From 10 - 100 microns, the dominant foregrounds are emission by dust

  6. Studying the Fine Structure and Temporal Variations of the Zodiacal Cloud and Asteroidal Dust Bands Using the 3-Year Near-IR COBE-DIRBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraman, Sumita

    1999-01-01

    The report presents the results of the data analyses of the DIRBE-COBE data set to study the structure of the zodiacal cloud in the near-infrared wavebands at 1.2, 2.2, and 3.4 microns. The cloud has been divided into two components which have been analyzed and studied separately. The annual variation of the flux in the smooth or low frequency component has been measured in all three bands and the presence of any asymmetries due to the Earth's resonant ring have been studied. The high frequency component which primarily consisted of the asteroidal dust bands. Extensive and careful co-addition was done to extract the central bands in all three wavebands. The ten-degree bands are present in the 1.2 and 2.2 microns but not in the 3.4 micron waveband.

  7. Comparison of plasma exchange performances between Spectra Optia and COBE Spectra apheresis systems in repeated procedures considering variability and using specific statistical models.

    PubMed

    Hequet, O; Stocco, V; Assari, S; Drillat, P; Le, Q H; Kassir, A; Rigal, D; Bouzgarrou, R

    2014-08-01

    Repeated therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) procedures using centrifugation techniques became a standard therapy in some diseases. As the new device Spectra Optia (SPO; Terumo BCT) was available, we studied its performances in repeated procedures in 20 patients in three apheresis units. First we analysed the performance results obtained by SPO. Second we compared the performances of the SPO device to a standard device, COBE Spectra (CSP; Terumo BCT) in the same patients using statistical method of mixed effects linear regression that considers variability between patients, centres and apheresis procedures. The performances analysed were classified according to plasma removal performances and their consequences on patients whose blood disturbances were assessed. Primary outcome was plasma removal efficiency (PRE) and PRE-anticoagulant corrected which was a more accurate parameter. Secondary outcomes corresponded to the volume of ACD-A consumed, platelets content in waste bag, procedure duration and status of coagulation system observed after TPE sessions. Before comparing the performances of both devices we compared the plasma volumes (PVs) processed in both techniques which showed that the PVs processed in SPO procedures were lower than in CSP procedures. In these conditions the statistical analysis revealed similar performances in both apheresis devices in PRE (p = ns) but better performances with SPO when considering higher PRE corrected by anticoagulant volume used (p < 0.05). Comparison of secondary outcomes showed no difference after SPO and CSP. After verifying that pre-apheresis patients' coagulation blood levels were identical before SPO and CSP, we showed identical haemostasis disturbances after SPO and CSP but lower platelet losses and higher fibrinogen post-apheresis blood levels after SPO (p < 0.05). No side effects or technical complications occurred during and after SPO and CSP. This study demonstrated that the Spectra Optia device is an

  8. Test of the Einstein equivalence principle with spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shun; Nitta, Daisuke; Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) can be verified by the measurement of the spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). One of the consequences of the EEP on cosmological scales is the energy independency of the cosmological redshift effect. We propose a new test of the energy independency of the redshift effect by the measurement of the spectral distortion of CMB. In general relativity, the energy independency of the redshift effect is ensured by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) metric which does not depend on energy. We show that the CMB spectral distortions arise when the FRW metric has the energy dependence. Assuming the simple energy-dependent form of the FRW metric, we evaluate the CMB distortions. From the COBE/FIRAS bound, we find that the deviation degree from the EEP is, at least, less than 10-5 at the CMB energy scales.

  9. Large-scale polarization of the microwave background and foreground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Tegmark, Max; O'dell, Christopher; Keating, Brian; Timbie, Peter; Efstathiou, George; Smoot, George

    2003-10-01

    The DASI discovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization has opened a new chapter in cosmology. Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where galactic foreground contamination is the worst, so a key challenge is to model, quantify, and remove polarized foregrounds. We use the POLAR experiment, COBE/DMR and radio surveys to provide the strongest limits to date on the TE cross-power spectrum of the CMB on large angular scales and to quantify the polarized synchrotron radiation, which is likely to be the most challenging polarized contaminant for the WMAP satellite. We find that the synchrotron E and B contributions are equal to within 10% from 408 820 MHz with a hint of E domination at higher frequencies. We quantify Faraday rotation and depolarization effects in the two-dimensional (l,ν) plane and show that they cause the synchrotron polarization percentage to drop both towards lower frequencies and towards lower multipoles.

  10. Large-scale polarization of the microwave background andforeground

    SciTech Connect

    de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Tegmark, M.; O'Dell, C.; Keating,B.; Timbie, P.; Efstathiou, G.; Smoot, G.

    2002-12-22

    The DASI discovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization has opened a new chapter in cosmology. Most of the useful information about inflationary gravitational waves and reionization is on large angular scales where galactic foreground contamination is the worst, so a key challenge is to model, quantify, and remove polarized foregrounds. We use the POLAR experiment, COBE/DMR and radio surveys to provide the strongest limits to date on the TE cross-power spectrum of the CMB on large angular scales and to quantify the polarized synchrotron radiation, which is likely to be the most challenging polarized contaminant for the WMAP satellite. We find that the synchrotron E and B contributions are equal to within 10 percent from 408-820 MHz with a hint of E domination at higher frequencies. We quantify Faraday rotation and depolarization effects in the two-dimensional ([script l],nu) plane and show that they cause the synchrotron polarization percentage to drop both towards lower frequencies and towards lower multipoles.

  11. Dark Matter-Cosmic microwave background connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górski, Krzysztof M.

    1995-07-01

    A method for inference of the primordial power spectrum from the COBE2 DMR sky maps is discussed. This approach involves a Fourier decomposition of the sky maps in a basis of orthonormal functions on the incompletely sampled sky, a detailed mathematical model of all noise properties, and a likelihood analysis of the data based on an exact probabilistic model of the measurable quantities, valid in the context of Gaussian theories of structure formation. Results form the two year COBE-DMR data analysis and the implications for inflationary (flat geometry) models dominated by either dark matter or a cosmological constant are presented. The cross power spectrum of the 53 and 90 GHz DMR sky maps is also discussed.

  12. The impact of non-Planckian effects on cosmological radio background

    SciTech Connect

    Colafrancesco, Sergio; Emritte, Mohammad Shehzad; Marchegiani, Paolo E-mail: emrittes@yahoo.com

    2015-05-01

    Non-Planckian (NP) spectral modifications of the CMB radiation spectrum can be produced due to the existence of a non-zero value of the plasma frequency at the recombination epoch. We present here an analysis of NP effects on the cosmological radio background and we derive, for the first time, predictions of their amplitude on three different observables: the CMB spectrum, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in cosmic structures, and the 21-cm background temperature brightness change. We find that NP effect can manifest in the CMB spectrum at ν ∼< 400 MHz as a drastic cut-off in the CMB intensity. Using the available CMB data in the relevant ν range (i.e., mainly at ∼< 1 GHz and in the COBE-FIRAS data frequency range), we derive upper limits on the plasma frequency ν{sub p} = 206, 346 and 418 MHz at 1, 2 and 3 σ confidence level, respectively. We find that the difference between the pure Planck spectrum and the one modified by NP effects is of the order of mJy/arcmin{sup 2} at ν ∼< 0.5 GHz and it becomes smaller at higher frequencies where it is ∼ 0.1 mJy/arcmin{sup 2} at ν ∼> 150 GHz, thus indicating that the experimental route to probe NP effects in the early universe is to observe the cosmological radio background at very low frequencies. We have calculated for the first time the NP SZ effect (SZ{sub NP}) using the upper limits on ν{sub p} allowed by the CMB data. We found that the SZ{sub NP} effect shows a unique spectral feature, i.e. a peak located exactly at the plasma frequency ν{sub p} and this is independent of the cluster parameters (such as its temperature or optical depth). This offers a way, therefore, to measure directly and unambiguously the plasma frequency in the early universe at the epoch of recombination by using galaxy clusters in the local universe, thus opening a unique window for the experimental exploration of plasma effects in the early universe. We have shown that the SKA-LOW has the potential to observe such a

  13. The impact of non-Planckian effects on cosmological radio background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafrancesco, Sergio; Shehzad Emritte, Mohammad; Marchegiani, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Non-Planckian (NP) spectral modifications of the CMB radiation spectrum can be produced due to the existence of a non-zero value of the plasma frequency at the recombination epoch. We present here an analysis of NP effects on the cosmological radio background and we derive, for the first time, predictions of their amplitude on three different observables: the CMB spectrum, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in cosmic structures, and the 21-cm background temperature brightness change. We find that NP effect can manifest in the CMB spectrum at ν lesssim 400 MHz as a drastic cut-off in the CMB intensity. Using the available CMB data in the relevant ν range (i.e., mainly at lesssim 1 GHz and in the COBE-FIRAS data frequency range), we derive upper limits on the plasma frequency νp = 206, 346 and 418 MHz at 1, 2 and 3 σ confidence level, respectively. We find that the difference between the pure Planck spectrum and the one modified by NP effects is of the order of mJy/arcmin2 at ν lesssim 0.5 GHz and it becomes smaller at higher frequencies where it is ~ 0.1 mJy/arcmin2 at ν gtrsim 150 GHz, thus indicating that the experimental route to probe NP effects in the early universe is to observe the cosmological radio background at very low frequencies. We have calculated for the first time the NP SZ effect (SZNP) using the upper limits on νp allowed by the CMB data. We found that the SZNP effect shows a unique spectral feature, i.e. a peak located exactly at the plasma frequency νp and this is independent of the cluster parameters (such as its temperature or optical depth). This offers a way, therefore, to measure directly and unambiguously the plasma frequency in the early universe at the epoch of recombination by using galaxy clusters in the local universe, thus opening a unique window for the experimental exploration of plasma effects in the early universe. We have shown that the SKA-LOW has the potential to observe such a signal integrating over the central

  14. Rinseback during red blood cell exchange with COBE Spectra does not affect fraction of cells remaining or post-exchange hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Ramesh; Matevosyan, Karén; Jones, Rebecca; Vetus, Maria L; Burner, James; Sarode, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    CaridianBCT currently does not recommend rinseback with its COBE Spectra cell separator during red blood cell (RBC) exchange procedure, as the machine's software does not take into account the "rinseback" when calculating the fraction of cells remaining (FCR, and therefore target hemoglobin S (HbS) value) and postexchange hematocrit (Hct). To our knowledge, no study has investigated the effect of rinseback on these laboratory values. Therefore, we performed pre- and postrinseback evaluations of FCR and Hct in 22 consecutive combined Isovolemic Hemodilution/Red blood cell (IHD-RBCx) exchange procedures in sickle cell anemia patients with stroke currently enrolled in our institution's chronic RBC exchange program. The pre- and-post rinseback values for HbS were 9.9 ± 4.66 and 10.7 ± 4.83 (P = 0.56) with corresponding FCRs of 22.6 ± 8.57 and 24.7 ± 8.75 (P = 0.44), and for Hct were 32.4 ± 2.93% and 32.2 ± 3.19% (P = 0.79), respectively. Since there was no significant difference in the "pre" and "post" values, we conclude that rinseback can be used during RBC exchange without any concern for significantly affecting Post Exchange HbS and Hct and possibly not waste 53 mL of precious red cell mass in the rinseback.

  15. [Effects of different procedures of disinfection on the bacteriologic quality of hemodialysis monitors of the Cobe CS3 and AK 100 type].

    PubMed

    Di Majo, P; Hartemann, P; Andre, J L

    1996-03-01

    ]n recent years, hemodialysis treatment for chronic renal failure has been increasing. Although the technical evolutions have improved the therapy, the problem of microbial, toxic and chemical contamination of the dialysis fluid is now re-emerging. Most of all, because of increasing use of high-flux dialysis and its potential for transmembrane transport of bacteria into patients, one should be aware that dialysis fluid pathways may be colonised with bacteria. On the bacterial point of view, the French legislation proposed 100 CFU/mL as a maximum for total count of aerobic bacteria in the bi-osmosed water used for dilution of the dialysis concentrate. This study took place during 8 weeks in the children-hospital dialysis unit in Nancy (France). Our laboratory have succeeded in validating an aseptic bacteriological sampling procedure within fluid pathways of haemodialysis monitors Cobe CS3 and AK 100. It has also be shown that 6 to 12 hours of dialysis monitoring doesn't affect the quantitative and qualitative bacterial contamination of the biosmosed water (mean: 5 CFU/100 mL) drained through the 5 years' old internal pipes of the 2 monitors. So it has whatever the 4 different disinfection procedures applied and on the monitors (Formol or Formol + Citric acid + Chlorine or Heat or Heat + dehydrated Citric acid).

  16. Reading Engagement in Social Studies: Exploring the Role of a Social Studies Literacy Intervention on Reading Comprehension, Reading Self-Efficacy, and Engagement in Middle School Students with Different Language Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Ana Taboada; Buehl, Michelle M.; Kidd, Julie K.; Sturtevant, Elizabeth G.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Beck, Jori

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the role of an intervention designed to increase reading comprehension, reading self-efficacy beliefs, and engagement in social studies for middle school students of varying language backgrounds. Thirteen sixth- and seventh-grade teachers implemented the United States History for Engaged Reading (USHER) program with their…

  17. Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors among Youth in an Underserved Area of the Southern United States: Exploring the Moderating Roles of Gender, Racial/Ethnic Background, and School-Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzman, Robert D.; Gratz, Kim L.; Young, John; Heiden, Laurie J.; Damon, John D.; Hight, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the clinical relevance of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITB) among youth, little is known about the subset of youth most at-risk for SITB. This study examined the moderating roles of gender, racial/ethnic background, and school-level (and their interactions) on rates of SITB within a large (N = 2638, 52.2% female),…

  18. Background sources at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, ..gamma..-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Are South African Speech-Language Therapists adequately equipped to assess English Additional Language (EAL) speakers who are from an indigenous linguistic and cultural background? A profile and exploration of the current situation.

    PubMed

    Mdladlo, Thandeka; Flack, Penelope; Joubert, Robin

    2016-03-18

    This article presents the results of a survey conducted on Speech-Language Therapists (SLTs) regarding current practices in the assessment of English Additional Language (EAL) speakers in South Africa. It forms part of the rationale for a broader (PhD) study that critiques the use of assessment instruments on EAL speakers from an indigenous linguistic and cultural background. This article discusses an aspect of the broader research and presents the background, method, findings, discussion and implications of the survey. The results of this survey highlight the challenges of human and material resources to, and the dominance of English in, the profession in South Africa. The findings contribute to understanding critical factors for acquiring reliable and valid assessment results with diverse populations, particularly the implications from a cultural and linguistic perspective.

  20. On the determination of the cosmic infrared background radiation from the high-energy spectrum of extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    some exotic sources. With careful modeling of infrared foreground emissions, these constraints on the CIBR are above the values measurable by the DIRBE experiment on board the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite.

  1. Correlations Between the Cosmic X-Ray and Microwave Backgrounds: Constraints on a Cosmological Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughn, S. P.; Crittenden, R. G.; Turok, N. G.

    1998-01-01

    In universes with significant curvature or cosmological constant, cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are created very recently via the Rees-Sciama or integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects. This causes the CMB anisotropies to become partially correlated with the local matter density (z less than 4). We examine the prospects of using the hard (2- 10 keV) X-ray background as a probe of the local density and the measured correlation between the HEAO1 A2 X-ray survey and the 4-year COBE-DMR map to obtain a constraint on the cosmological constant. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the cosmological constant is OMega(sub Lambda) less than or equal to 0.5, assuming that the observed fluctuations in the X-ray map result entirely from large scale structure. (This would also imply that the X-rays trace matter with a bias factor of b(sub x) approx. = 5.6 Omega(sub m, sup 0.53)). This bound is weakened considerably if a large portion of the X-ray fluctuations arise from Poisson noise from unresolved sources. For example, if one assumes that the X-ray bias is b(sub x) = 2, then the 95% confidence level upper limit is weaker, Omega(sub Lambda) less than or equal to 0.7. More stringent limits should be attainable with data from the next generation of CMB and X-ray background maps.

  2. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  3. The Athena Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Lotti, Simone; Macculi, Claudio; Molendi, Silvano; Eraerds, Tanja; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Estimating, reducing and controlling the residual particle background is fundamental for achieving the objectives of several science topics of Athena, in particular those connected with background dominated observations of faint and/or diffuse sources. This requires assessing the particle environment in L2, propagating the various particle components throughout the mirror, spacecraft, and instruments via proper modelling and simulations of various physical processes, implementing design and h/w measures at instrument and mission level to reduce the un-rejected background and identifying proper calibration methods to control the background variations. Likewise, an adequate knowledge of the XRB, made of components that may vary spatially or temporally, is required as well. Here we will review the present status of the background knowledge, and summarize the activities on-going within Athena at various levels.

  4. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-10-20

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}< 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup -1}. Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of {mu} and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  5. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  6. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  7. Notification: Background Investigation Services

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY15-0029, February 26, 2015. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to begin field work for our audit of background investigation services.

  8. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J. F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Ritz, S.; Mizuno, T.

    2007-07-12

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  9. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  10. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  11. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  12. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  13. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Ross, Donna; Grant, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Too often, students enter our classrooms with insufficient knowledge of physical science. As a result, they have a difficult time understanding content in texts, lectures, and laboratory activities. This lack of background knowledge can have an impact on their ability to ask questions and wonder--both key components of inquiry. In this article,…

  14. Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background at Degree Angular Scales: Python V Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, K.; Dragovan, M.; Kovac, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Knox, L.; Dodelson, S.; Ganga, K.; Alvarez, D.; Peterson, J. B.; Griffin, G.; Newcomb, M.; Miller, K.; Platt, S. R.; Novak, G.

    1999-07-01

    Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37 to 45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a 0.91d×1.02d beam, the instrument fully sampled 598 deg2 of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations. Interpreting the observed fluctuations as anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, we place constraints on the angular power spectrum of fluctuations in eight multipole bands up to l~260. The observed spectrum is consistent with both the COBE experiment and previous Python results. There is no significant contamination from known foregrounds. The results show a discernible rise in the angular power spectrum from large (l~40) to small (l~200) angular scales. The shape of the observed power spectrum is not a simple linear rise, but has a sharply increasing slope starting at l~150.

  15. Data Reduction and Analysis of the Python V Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, Kimberly Ann

    1999-11-01

    Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37-45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a 0.91(°) × 1.02(°) beam the instrument fully sampled 598 deg(2) of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations. Interpreting the observed fluctuations as anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, we place constraints on the angular power spectrum of fluctuations in eight multipole bands up to l ˜ 260. The observed spectrum is consistent with both the COBE experiment and previous Python results. Total-power Wiener-filtered maps of the CMB are also presented. There is no significant contamination from known foregrounds. The results show a discernible rise in the angular power spectrum from large (l ˜ 40) to small (l ˜ 200) angular scales.

  16. The optimisation, design and verification of feed horn structures for future Cosmic Microwave Background missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Darragh; Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J. Anthony; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Gradziel, Marcin; Doherty, Stephen; Huggard, Peter G.; Polegro, Arturo; van der Vorst, Maarten

    2016-05-01

    In order to investigate the origins of the Universe, it is necessary to carry out full sky surveys of the temperature and polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the remnant of the Big Bang. Missions such as COBE and Planck have previously mapped the CMB temperature, however in order to further constrain evolutionary and inflationary models, it is necessary to measure the polarisation of the CMB with greater accuracy and sensitivity than before. Missions undertaking such observations require large arrays of feed horn antennas to feed the detector arrays. Corrugated horns provide the best performance, however owing to the large number required (circa 5000 in the case of the proposed COrE+ mission), such horns are prohibitive in terms of thermal, mechanical and cost limitations. In this paper we consider the optimisation of an alternative smooth-walled piecewise conical profiled horn, using the mode-matching technique alongside a genetic algorithm. The technique is optimised to return a suitable design using efficient modelling software and standard desktop computing power. A design is presented showing a directional beam pattern and low levels of return loss, cross-polar power and sidelobes, as required by future CMB missions. This design is manufactured and the measured results compared with simulation, showing excellent agreement and meeting the required performance criteria. The optimisation process described here is robust and can be applied to many other applications where specific performance characteristics are required, with the user simply defining the beam requirements.

  17. Effect of Primordial Black Holes on the Cosmic Microwave Background and Cosmological Parameter Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, Massimo; Ostriker, Jeremiah; Mack, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of nonevaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) on the ionization and thermal history of the universe. X-rays emitted by gas accretion onto PBHs modify the cosmic recombination history, producing measurable effects on the spectrum and anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the third-year WMAP data and COBE FIRAS data we improve existing upper limits on the abundance of PBHs with masses > 0 . 1 M⊙ by several orders of magnitude, thus ruling out PBHs in this mass range as a significant component of the dark matter. Fitting WMAP/Planck data with cosmological models that do not allow for nonstandard recombination histories, as produced by PBHs or other early energy sources, leads to underestimating the best-fit values of the amplitude of linear density fluctuations (σ8) and the scalar spectral index (ns). We find that a fraction > 0 . 1 % - 1 % of the dark matter in 30 M⊙ PBHs produces CMB spectral distortions at a level detectable by FIRAS. Therefore, even allowing for possible modeling uncertainties, future missions measuring CMB spectral distortions will detect the imprint of dark matter if it's composed of 30 M⊙ PBHs, as suggested to interpret recent LIGO results.

  18. Ultraviolet Background Radiation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    5.4 Apollo-Soyuz 3 5 5.5 Evidence for Scattering From Dust ? 3 8 5.6 More Evidence For Scattering From Dust ? 4 0 5.7 More Observations 4 2...Emission from cold interstellar dust . This has been observed by IRAS as the 100 u.m cosmic cirrus (64). The existence of such dust at moderate and... DUST 4 6 CONCLUSIONS 4 7 6.1 Spectral Structure in the Diffuse 4 7 Ultraviolet Background 6.2 Is There Light Scattered From Dust ? 4 7 6.3

  19. Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Valluri, S. R.

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that a collection of photons with nearly the same frequency exhibits a "condensation" type of phenomenon corresponding to a peak intensity. The observed cosmic background radiation can be explained from this standpoint. We have obtained analogous results by extremization of the occupation number for photons with the use of the Lambert W function. Some of the interesting applications of this function are briefly discussed in the context of graphene which exhibits an interesting two dimensional structure with several characteristic properties and diverse practical applications.

  20. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  1. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  2. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  3. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  4. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  5. Galileons on cosmological backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Trodden, Mark E-mail: kurthi@physics.upenn.edu

    2011-12-01

    We construct four-dimensional effective field theories of a generalized DBI galileon field, the dynamics of which naturally take place on a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The theories are invariant under non-linear symmetry transformations, which can be thought of as being inherited from five-dimensional bulk Killing symmetries via the probe brane technique through which they are constructed. The resulting model provides a framework in which to explore the cosmological role that galileons may play as the universe evolves.

  6. Extragalactic Backgrounds after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    Among the potentially most important results of cosmology in the last decade is the realization that the star formation rate at redshifts greater than 1 is higher than at present by about an order of magnitude, and that half of the energy produced since the surface of last scattering has been absorbed and reemitted by dust. Most of the light produced by stars at high redshifts thus reaches us in the far infrared. This radiation is referred to as the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and is emitted primarily by dusty, star-forming galaxies at redshift z=1-4. Embedded in far infrared emission of the CIB is the history of star formation, dust production, and the growth of large scale structures. Our research project aims at shedding new light on several extragalactic backgrounds investigated by NASA surveys, in light of recent observational progresses in mapping the CIB. Most lately, two new missions, Planck and Herschel, released ground-breaking measurements of the CIB. These measurements are an order of magnitude deeper and wider than previous ones, and they are literally revolutionizing the field. Our understanding of these data is now advanced enough for us to leverage our measurement of the CIB in Planck and Herschel, in order to extract new scientific insights from past missions. We propose to combine Planck and Herschel public data with archival data from WISE, GALEX, Chandra and Fermi. Not only original, the impact of our research project should be immediate. Using the CIB as a full sky, bright, high redshift reference extragalactic background, we will exploit the underlying physical connection among these various cosmological datasets. We expect new insights about the CIB, but also about the multiple extragalactic backgrounds probed in combination with it. In particular, we will investigate the cosmic star formation history at a period where it peaks, and because the clustering of matter is driven by dark matter, the measurement of the CIB clustering also

  7. High-energy radiation background in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.; Trombka, J. I.

    The radiation environment of near-earth space and its effects on biological and hardware systems are examined in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to particle interactions and propagation, data bases, instrument background and dosimetry, detectors and experimental progress, biological effects, and future needs and strategies. Particular attention is given to angular distributions and spectra of geomagnetically trapped protons in LEO, bremsstrahlung production by electrons, nucleon-interaction data bases for background estimates, instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, the GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica, space protons and brain tumors, a new radioprotective antioxidative agent, LEO radiation measurements on the Space Station, and particle-background effects on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Lyman FUV Spectroscopic Explorer.

  8. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2006 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based upon these data.

  9. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2008 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry, and presents analyses of exploration activities by the mineral industry based upon these data.

  10. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Vasil, R.L.; Nolting, A.

    2011-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2010 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry.

  11. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Bourget, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2009 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on industry exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities by the mineral industry based upon these data.

  12. Biomorphic Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, the first NASA/JPL workshop on Biomorphic Explorers for future missions. The topics include: 1) Biomorphic Explorers: Classification (Based on Mobility and Ambient Environment); 2) Biomorphic Flight Systems: Vision; 3) Biomorphic Explorer: Conceptual Design; 4) Biomorphic Gliders; 5) Summary and Roadmap; 6) Coordinated/Cooperative Exploration Scenario; and 7) Applications. This paper also presents illustrations of the various biomorphic explorers.

  13. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ℓ-manifold, determines a (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometry (k+ℓ≤4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ℓ-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(∞) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(Σ^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently

  14. The Diffuse Extreme Ultraviolet Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John; Slavin, Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse EUV background towards 138 different directions using the spectrometers aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (EUVE) have been combined into a spectrum from 150A to 730A and represent an effective exposure of 18 million seconds. There is no significant evidence of any non-local line flux in the resultant spectrum such as that from a hot coronal plasma. These results are inconsistent with the Wisconsin C and B broad-band surveys assuming the source is a logT = 5.8 - 6.1 hot plasma in ionization equilibrium with solar abundances, confirming the previous result of Jelinksy, Vallerga and Edelstein) (hereafter Paper 1) using an observation along the ecliptic with the same instrument. To make these results consistent with the previous broad-band surveys, the plasma responsible for the emission must either be depleted in Fe by a factor of approximately 6, be behind an absorbing slab of neutral H with a column of 2 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, or not be in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE). One such non-CIE model (Breitswerdt and Schmutzier) that explains the soft x-ray results is also inconsistent with this EUV data.

  15. 14 CFR § 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Background. § 1217.102 Section § 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES...

  16. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  17. Exploration Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Stanley, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for 2012 draws upon information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analyses of exploration activities performed by the mineral industry. Three sources of information are reported and analyzed in this annual review of international exploration for 2012: 1) budgetary statistics expressed in U.S. nominal dollars provided by SNL Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia; 2) regional and site-specific exploration activities that took place in 2012 as compiled by the USGS and 3) regional events including economic, social and political conditions that affected exploration activities, which were derived from published sources and unpublished discussions with USGS and industry specialists.

  18. Participatory Exploration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kathy Nado delivers a presentation on Participatory Exploration on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to present NASA'...

  19. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2007 draws upon available information from industry, literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based upon these data.

  20. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2005 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. It provides data on exploration budgets by global region and mineral commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents analysis of the mineral industry based on these data.

  1. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Rapstine, T.D.; Lee, E.C.

    2012-01-01

    This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2011 draws upon available information from industry sources, published literature and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. This summary provides data on exploration budgets by region and mineral commodity, identifies significant mineral discoveries and areas of mineral exploration, discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry and presents surveys returned by companies primarily focused on precious (gold, platinum-group metals and silver) and base (copper, lead, nickel and zinc) metals.

  2. Characterizing background error with the NASA GMAO OSSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Errico, R. M.; Prive, N. C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of background error is vital to the design and performance of data assimilation systems. However, the true state of the atmosphere is unknown, and qualitative determination of background error is thus a challenge. We present an exploration of background error characteristics using the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office Observing System Simulation Experiment framework, where the presence of the Nature Run allows direct calculation of the background error. The behavior of the data assimilation system (DAS) can be compared with the character of the background error, and performance of the DAS will be investigated in a series of both idealized and realistic experiments.

  3. Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was made of the UF6 fueled gas core reactor as a function of cavity reactor criticality and fluid mechanics tests, investigations of uranium optical emission spectra, and radiant heat transfer power plant studies. Data are also given on nuclear and thermodynamic cycle analysis.

  4. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  5. Exploration review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 27 percent in 2003 from the 2002 budget, according to the Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes after five years of declining spending for mineral exploration.

  6. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  7. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  8. Background events in microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Wargelin, B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements have been made to assess the characteristics and origins of background events in microchannel plates (MCPs). An overall background rate of about 0.4 events/sq cm persec has been achieved consistently for MCPs that have been baked and scrubbed. The temperature and gain of the MCPs are found to have no significant effect on the background rate. Detection of 1.46-MeV gamma rays from the MCP glass confirms the presence of K-40, with a concentration of 0.0007 percent, in MCP glass. It is shown that beta decay from K-40 is sufficient to cause the background rate and spectrum observed. Anticoincidence measurements indicate the the background rate caused by cosmic ray interactions is small (less than 0.016 events/sq cm per sec).

  9. Background investigation in EDELWEISS-III

    SciTech Connect

    Scorza, Silvia

    2015-08-17

    Protection from and rejection of backgrounds is a key issue for the EDELWEISS-III direct dark matter detection experiment which aims at exploring the 10{sup −9} pb cross-section region for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction. The detector is located in the low radioactivity environment of the Modane Underground Laboratory and consists of 36 advanced FID germanium detectors operating at 18 mK in a dilution refrigerator in order to identify eventual rare nuclear recoils induced by elastic scattering of WIMPs from our Galactic halo. I will discuss the background and the methods of rejecting it with the FID detectors. Detector performances and the first analysis of data acquired in a long-term campaign will be presented as well. The FID detector technology is not limited to EDELWEISS-III but can further be employed in the next generation of cryogenic detector experiments.

  10. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  11. Aluminum as a source of background in low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorovits, B.; Abt, I.; Laubenstein, M.; Volynets, O.

    2011-08-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay would be a key to understanding the nature of neutrino masses. The next generation of High Purity Germanium experiments will have to be operated with a background rate of better than 10 -5 counts/(kg y keV) in the region of interest around the Q-value of the decay. Therefore, so far irrelevant sources of background have to be considered. The metalization of the surface of germanium detectors is in general done with aluminum. The background from the decays of 22Na, 26Al, 226Ra and 228Th introduced by this metalization is discussed. It is shown that only a special selection of aluminum can keep these background contributions acceptable.

  12. The Primordial Inflation Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer is an Explorer-class mission to measure the gravity-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background. PIXIE uses an innovative optical design to achieve background-limited sensitivity in 400 spectral channels spanning 2.5 decades in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 micron wavelength). The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r < 10(exp -3) at 5 standard deviations. The rich PIXIE data set will also constrain physical processes ranging from Big Bang cosmology to the nature of the first stars to physical conditions within the interstellar medium of the Galaxy. I describe the PIXIE instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the inflationary signature using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  13. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offer a means to explore the universe at a very early epoch. Specifically, if the universe went through a brief period of exponential expansion called inflation as current data suggest, gravitational waves from this period would polarize the CMB in a specific pattern. At GSFC, we are currently working towards two experiments that work in concert to measure this polarization pattern in search of evidence for inflation. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization at frequencies between 40 and 150 GHz from the Atacama Desert in Chile. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne experiment that will make similar measurements at frequencies between 200 and 600 GHz.

  14. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  15. Exploring Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    With a temperature higher than the inside of your oven and atmospheric pressure equal to that a kilometer under the ocean, the surface of Venus is one of the most hostile environments in the solar system, and Venus exploration presents a challenge to technology. This lecture presents mission trade-offs and discusses a proposed mission concept for rover and aircraft based exploration of the surface and atmosphere of Venus. Several approaches to the technology, electronics, mechanical parts, and power systems, are discussed.

  16. Analysis of the XRS background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Cottam, J.; Fujimoto, R.; Furusho, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.

    2005-01-01

    Background counts on the XRS Calorimeter spectrometer of Astro-E2 have several sources, including primary cosmic rays and secondary particles interacting with the pixels and with the silicon structure of the array. After rejecting events coincident between pixels or between a pixel and the anti-coincidence detector behind the calorimeter array, the residual background on the ground in the 0.1 - 10 keV band is 1e-3 counts/s (8e-3 counts/s/sq cm). We will present the details of the ground background events and the rejection criteria required lo remove them while minimizing deadtime. We will also present preliminary analysis of the in-orbit background.

  17. Greater need for background checks.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-11-01

    The push is on for a more uniform system of background checks for health care employees. Studies and crimes against patients have prompted regulation by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), state governments, hospitals, and Congress.

  18. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  19. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; ...

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  20. Fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldarriaga, Matias

    1998-06-01

    In this thesis we investigate several aspects related to the theory of fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We develop a new algorithm to calculate the angular power spectrum of the anisotropies which is two orders of magnitude faster than the standard Boltzmann hierarchy approach (Chapter 3). The new algorithm will become essential when comparing the observational results of the next generation of CMB experiments with theoretical predictions. The parameter space of the models is so large that an exhaustive exploration to find the best fit model will only be feasible with this new type of algorithm. We also investigate the polarization properties of the CMB field. We develop a new formalism to describe the statistics of the polarization variables that takes into account their spin two nature (Chapter 2). In Chapter 4 we explore several physical effects that create distinct features in the polarization power spectrum. We study the signature of the reionization of the universe and a stochastic background of gravitational waves. We also describe how the polarization correlation functions can be used to test the causal structure of the universe. Finally in Chapter 5 we quantify the amount of information the next generation of satellites can obtain by measuring both temperature and polarization anisotropies. We calculate the expected error bars on the cosmological parameters for the specifications of the MAP and Planck satellite missions.

  1. Exploring Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, William

    "Exploring Television" is an inquiry/discovery textbook designed to help students to understand, analyze, criticize, evaluate, and judge the experiences they have had in front of the television set. The text consists of three main parts. "The Medium" inquires into the radio-movie origins of television and prompts research into the networks and…

  2. Exploring Fractals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewdney, A. K.

    1991-01-01

    Explores the subject of fractal geometry focusing on the occurrence of fractal-like shapes in the natural world. Topics include iterated functions, chaos theory, the Lorenz attractor, logistic maps, the Mandelbrot set, and mini-Mandelbrot sets. Provides appropriate computer algorithms, as well as further sources of information. (JJK)

  3. Exploring Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  4. Robust background modelling in DIALS

    PubMed Central

    Parkhurst, James M.; Winter, Graeme; Waterman, David G.; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Gildea, Richard J.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-01-01

    A method for estimating the background under each reflection during integration that is robust in the presence of pixel outliers is presented. The method uses a generalized linear model approach that is more appropriate for use with Poisson distributed data than traditional approaches to pixel outlier handling in integration programs. The algorithm is most applicable to data with a very low background level where assumptions of a normal distribution are no longer valid as an approximation to the Poisson distribution. It is shown that traditional methods can result in the systematic underestimation of background values. This then results in the reflection intensities being overestimated and gives rise to a change in the overall distribution of reflection intensities in a dataset such that too few weak reflections appear to be recorded. Statistical tests performed during data reduction may mistakenly attribute this to merohedral twinning in the crystal. Application of the robust generalized linear model algorithm is shown to correct for this bias. PMID:27980508

  5. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  6. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  7. Background music and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance.

  8. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  9. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  10. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  11. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  12. Ambient background particulate composition, outdoor natural background: interferents/clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, Dorothea

    2012-06-01

    It has proven a very difficult task to discriminate an actual BW threat from the natural occurring ambient particulate aerosol, which includes a significant fraction of particles consisting of mixed mineral and biological material. The interferent particles [clutter] (bio and non bio) concentration varies widely both by location, weather and season and diurnally. Naturally occurring background particulates are composed of fungal and bacterial spores both fragments and components, plant fragments and debris, animal fragments and debris, all of which may be associated with inert dust or combustion material. Some or all of which could also be considered to be an interferent to a biological warfare detector and cause these biodector systems to cause False Alarms by non specific BW bio detectors. I will share analysis of current long term background data sets.

  13. The cosmic infrared background experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Battle, John; Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hea; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Pak, Soojong; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Watabe, Toyoki

    2006-03-01

    The extragalactic background, based on absolute measurements reported by DIRBE and IRTS at 1.2 and 2.2 μm, exceeds the brightness derived from galaxy counts by up to a factor 5. Furthermore, both DIRBE and the IRTS report fluctuations in the near-infrared sky brightness that appear to have an extra-galactic origin, but are larger than expected from local ( z = 1-3) galaxies. These observations have led to speculation that a new class of high-mass stars or mini-quasars may dominate primordial star formation at high-redshift ( z ˜ 10-20), which, in order to explain the excess in the near-infrared background, must be highly luminous but produce a limited amount of metals and X-ray photons. Regardless of the nature of the sources, if a significant component of the near-infrared background comes from first-light galaxies, theoretical models generically predict a prominent near-infrared spectral feature from the redshifted Lyman cutoff, and a distinctive fluctuation power spectrum. We are developing a rocket-borne instrument (the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment, or CIBER) to search for signatures of primordial galaxy formation in the cosmic near-infrared extra-galactic background. CIBER consists of a wide-field two-color camera, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer, and a high-resolution narrow-band imaging spectrometer. The cameras will search for spatial fluctuations in the background on angular scales from 7″ to 2°, where a first-light galaxy signature is expected to peak, over a range of angular scales poorly covered by previous experiments. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by the IRTS arise from first-light galaxies or have a local origin. In a short rocket flight CIBER has sensitivity to probe fluctuations 100× fainter than IRTS/DIRBE, with sufficient resolution to remove local-galaxy correlations. By jointly observing regions of the sky studied by Spitzer and ASTRO-F, CIBER will build a multi-color view of the near

  14. Ambient Background Particulate Compositiion Outdoor Natural Background: Interferents/Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    the biological warfare detection world), you must conduct long term ( seasonally ) particulate monitoring. Anecdotal short term monitoring attempts...particulates (interferents or clutter) in the lower atmosphere at four locations along a transect in the UK for 2 years. In addition, seasonal , diurnal...CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND 9 2. UK AEROSOL BIODIVERSITY STUDY-2 YEARS, FOUR LOCATIONS. FOUR SEASONS 10 3. DoD SPONSORED ANAL YSIS OF UK

  15. Exploration Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Delores Beasley, NASA Public Affairs, introduces the panel who consist of: Scott "Doc" Horowitz, Associate Administrator of Exploration Systems from NASA Headquarters; Jeff Henley, Constellation Program Manager from NASA Johnson Space Flight Center; and Steve Cook, Manager Exploration Launch Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Scott Horowitz presents a short video entitled, "Ares Launching the Future". He further explains how NASA personnel came up with the name of Ares and where the name Ares was derived. Jeff Henley, updates the Constellation program and Steve Cook presents two slide presentations detailing the Ares l crew launch vehicle and Ares 5 cargo launch vehicle. A short question and answer period from the news media follows.

  16. Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract covers a one hour presentation on Space Exploration. The audience is elementary students; therefore there are few words on the slides, mostly pictures of living and working in space. The presentation opens with a few slides describing a day in the life of a space explorer. It begins with a launch, discussions of day-night cycles, eating, exercising, housekeeping, EVA, relaxation, and sleeping. The next section of the presentation shows photos of astronauts performing experiments on the ISS. Yokomi Elementary School launched this fall with the most advanced educational technology tools available in schools today. The science and technology magnet school is equipped with interactive white boards, digital projectors, integrated sound systems and several computers for use by teachers and students. The only elementary school in Fresno Unified with a science focus also houses dedicated science classrooms equipped specifically for elementary students to experience hands-on science instruction in addition to the regular elementary curriculum.

  17. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  18. WFC3/UVIS Sky Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia; Anderson, Jay

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the on-orbit background levels present in WFC3/UVIS full-frame images. The results are based on nearly all standard readout images taken since the installation of WFC3 on HST in May 2009, with a relatively small number of exclusions e.g. images with obvious anomalous backgrounds (such as extended targets filling the field of view) or those taken with the quad filters (different bandpass in each amp). Comparisons are provided to estimates from the Exposure Time Calculator (ETC). We anticipate these results to be helpful in fine-tuning the level of post-flash required to achieve the optimum balance of charge transfter efficiency (CTE) loss mitigation versus noise penalty. Observers considering the use of post-flash should refer to the White Paper (MacKenty & Smith 2012) on the CTE WWW page (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/ins_performance/CTE/).

  19. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Peter; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zöe H.

    2016-07-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to have a power-law form. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrization independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either overconstrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  20. CONSTRAINTS ON HYBRID METRIC-PALATINI GRAVITY FROM BACKGROUND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, N. A.; Barreto, V. S. E-mail: vsm@roe.ac.uk

    2016-02-20

    In this work, we introduce two models of the hybrid metric-Palatini theory of gravitation. We explore their background evolution, showing explicitly that one recovers standard General Relativity with an effective cosmological constant at late times. This happens because the Palatini Ricci scalar evolves toward and asymptotically settles at the minimum of its effective potential during cosmological evolution. We then use a combination of cosmic microwave background, supernovae, and baryonic accoustic oscillations background data to constrain the models’ free parameters. For both models, we are able to constrain the maximum deviation from the gravitational constant G one can have at early times to be around 1%.

  1. Nobel Lecture: From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, John C.

    NASA’s Cosmic Background Explorer satellite mission, the COBE, laid the foundations for modern cosmology by measuring the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation and discovering the cosmic infrared background radiation. I describe the history of the COBE project, its scientific context, the people who built it, and the scientific results. The COBE observed the universe on the largest scales possible by mapping the cosmic microwave and infrared background radiation fields and determining their spectra. It produced conclusive evidence that the hot Big Bang theory of the early universe is correct, showed that the early universe was very uniform but not perfectly so, and that the total luminosity of post Big Bang objects is twice as great as previously believed. The COBE concept was developed by a Mission Definition Study Team appointed by NASA in 1976, based on three competing proposals submitted in 1974. The COBE was built in-house by Goddard Space Flight Center, with a helium cryostat provided by Ball Aerospace, and was launched on a Delta rocket built by McDonnell Douglas. It is in a circular orbit 900km above the Earth, in a plane inclined 99° to the equator and roughly perpendicular to the line to the Sun. It carried three instruments, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS), a differential microwave radiometer with three channels (DMR), and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE). The helium cryostat cooled the FIRAS and DIRBE for 10months until the helium was exhausted, but operations continued for a total of 4years . Subsequent observations have confirmed the COBE results and led to measurements of the main cosmological parameters with a precision of a few percent.

  2. Environmental monitoring for nuclear safeguards. Background paper

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    To assure that states are not violating their Non-Proliferation Treaty commitments, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) must verify that states do not possess convert nuclear facilities-a mission that prior to the 1991 Gulf War, it had neither the political backing nor the resources to conduct. The IAEA recognizes the importance of this new mission and is in the process of assuming it. One of the tools it is exploring to provide some indication of the presence of secret, or undeclared, nuclear activities and facilities is environmental monitoring. Modern sampling and analysis technologies provide powerful tools to detect the presence of characteristic substances that are likely to be emitted by such illicit activities. This background paper examines the prospects for such technologies to improve nuclear safeguards. It concludes that environmental monitoring can greatly increase the ability to detect undeclared activity at declared, or known, sites, and it can significantly increase the chances of detecting and locating undeclared sites.

  3. Amplitude of primeval fluctuations from cosmological mass density reconstructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We use the POTENT reconstruction of the mass density field in the nearby universe to estimate the amplitude of the density fluctuation power spectrum for various cosmological models. We find that sigma(sub 8) Omega(sub m sup 0.6) = 1.3(sub -0.3 sup +0.4), almost independently of the power spectrum. This value agrees well with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization for the standard cold dark matter model, while alternative models predict an excessive amplitude compared with COBE. Flat, low Omega(sub m) models and tilted models with spectral index n less than 0.8 are particularly discordant.

  4. Variables Related to Outcomes of Engineering Students of Differing Occupational-Educational Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, John D.

    This study explored the relationship between the occupational-educational background of engineering students and outcome after one year of college. The variables of ability, financial aid, part-time employment, and residence were explored to determine their effect on the relationship between occupational-educational background and outcomes.…

  5. Teaching about natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-07-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also demonstrated to emphasize the important role of shielding in radiation protection. The measurements were carried out with a Geiger-Muller (GM)-based dosimeter and a NaI scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer, which are normally available in physics laboratories. Radioactivity in household materials was demonstrated using a gas mantle as an example.

  6. Geoelectrical exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseem, Mostafa Said; El Lateef, Talaat Ali Abd; Ezz El Deen, Hosny Mahomud; Abdel Rahman, Abd Allah Al Abaseiry

    2015-12-01

    Sinai development is a goal of successive governments in Egypt. The present study is a geoelectrical exploration to find appropriate solutions of the problems affecting the land of a Research Station in Southeast Al Qantara. This research station is one of the Desert Research Center stations to facilitate the development of desert land for agriculture by introducing applied research. It suffers from some problems which can be summarized in the shortage of irrigation water and water logging. The appropriate solutions of these problems have been delineated by the results of 1D and 2D geoelectrical measurements. Electrical resistivity (ER) revealed the subsurface sedimentary sequences and extension of subsurface layers in the horizontal and vertical directions, especially, the water bearing layer. Additionally it helped to choose the most suitable places to drill productive wells with a good condition.

  7. Experiences of School Belonging for Young Children with Refugee Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Due, Clemence; Riggs, Damien W.; Augoustinos, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Previous research with adolescents with refugee backgrounds living in countries of resettlement has found that school belonging has an impact on a range of well-being and developmental outcomes, including mental health, peer relationships, self-esteem and self-efficacy, and academic achievement. However, very little research has explored school…

  8. Topic and Background Knowledge Effects on Performance in Speaking Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khabbazbashi, Nahal

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which topic and background knowledge of topic affect spoken performance in a high-stakes speaking test. It is argued that evidence of a substantial influence may introduce construct-irrelevant variance and undermine test fairness. Data were collected from 81 non-native speakers of English who performed on 10…

  9. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  10. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  11. [Exploring Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brandi

    2004-01-01

    This summer I have been working with the N.A.S.A. Project at Cuyahoga Community College (Tri-C) under the title of Exploring Aeronautics Project Leader. The class that I have worked with is comprised of students that will enter the eighth grade in the fall of 2004. The program primarily focuses upon math proficiency and individualized class projects. My duties have encompassed both realms. During the first 2-3 weeks of my internship, I worked at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) researching, organizing, and compiling information for weekly Scholastic Challenges and the Super Scholastic Challenge. I was able to complete an overview of Scholastic Challenge and staff responsibilities regarding the competition; a proposal for an interactive learning system, Quizdom; a schedule for challenge equipment, as well as a schedule listing submission deadlines for the staff. Also included in my tasks, during these first 2-3 weeks, were assisting Tammy Allen and Candice Thomas with the student application review and interview processes for student applicants. For the student and parent orientation, I was assigned publications and other varying tasks to complete before the start of the program. Upon the commencement of the program, I changed location from NASA GRC to Tri-C Metro Campus, where student classes for the Cleveland site are held. During the duration of the program, I work with the instructor for the Exploring Aeronautics class, kkkk, assisting in classroom management, daily attendance, curriculum, project building, and other tasks as needed. These tasks include the conducting of the weekly competition, known as Scholastic Challenge. As a Project Leader, I am also responsible for one subject area of the Scholastic Challenge aspect of the N.A.S.A. Project curriculum. Each week I have to prepare a mission that the participants will take home the following Monday and at least 10 questions that will be included in the pool of questions used for the Scholastic Challenge

  12. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  13. Background illumination and automated perimetry.

    PubMed

    Klewin, K M; Radius, R L

    1986-03-01

    Visual field function in the right and left eyes of 31 normal volunteers was evaluated with an automated projection perimeter (OCTOPUS). Serial visual field evaluations were repeated in these same eyes with neutral filters of increasing optical density. We compared the results of threshold determinations with the different neutral filters in place before the examined eye. Significant reduction in threshold sensitivity at several test spots throughout the central 30 degrees visual field was seen with neutral density filters of 0.5 log units or greater. The low level of background illumination of the OCTOPUS perimeter (4.0 apostilbs) may allow relatively minor reduction in light transmission by the ocular media to produce significant changes in the recorded level of threshold sensitivity during visual field evaluation.

  14. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  15. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  16. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Project Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, K. K.; Henderson, A.; Lee, J.; Smith, G.; Stluka, E.

    1984-01-01

    PROJECT EXPLORER is a program that will fly student-developed experiments onboard the Space Shuttle in NASA's Get-Away Special (GAS) containers. The program is co-sponsored by the Alabama Space and Rocket Center, the Alabama-Mississippi Section of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Alabama A&M University and requires extensive support by the University of Alabama in Huntsville. A unique feature of this project will demonstrate transmissions to ground stations on amateur radio frequencies in English language. Experiments Nos. 1, 2, and 3 use the microgravity of space flight to study the solidification of lead-antimony and aluminum-copper alloys, the growth of potassium-tetracyanoplatinate hydrate crystals in an aqueous solution, and the germination of radish seeds. Flight results will be compared with Earth-based data. Experiment No. 4 features radio transmission and will also provide timing for the start of all other experiments. A microprocessor will obtain real-time data from all experiments as well as temperature and pressure measurements taken inside the canister. These data will be transmitted on previously announced amateur radio frequencies after they have been converted into the English language by a digitalker for general reception.

  18. Exploring Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuil, Stéphanie

    2016-04-01

    Mars is our neighbour planet and has always fascinated humans as it has been seen as a potential abode for life. Knowledge about Mars is huge and was constructed step by step through numerous missions. It could be difficult to describe these missions, the associated technology, the results, the questions they raise, that's why an activity is proposed, that directly interests students. Their production is presented in the poster. Step 1: The main Mars feature and the first Mars explorations using telescope are presented to students. It should be really interesting to present "Mars Canals" from Percival Lowell as it should also warn students against flawed interpretation. Moreover, this study has raised the big question about extra-terrestrial life on Mars for the first time. Using Google Mars is then a good way to show the huge knowledge we have on the planet and to introduce modern missions. Step 2: Students have to choose and describe one of the Mars mission from ESA and NASA. They should work in pairs. Web sites from ESA and NASA are available and the teacher makes sure the main missions will be studied. Step 3: Students have to collect different pieces of information about the mission - When? Which technology? What were the main results? What type of questions does it raise? They prepare an oral presentation in the form they want (role play, academic presentation, using a poster, PowerPoint). They also have to produce playing cards about the mission that could be put on a timeline. Step 4: As a conclusion, the different cards concerning different missions are mixed. Groups of students receive cards and they have to put them on a timeline as fast as possible. It is also possible to play the game "timeline".

  19. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, N.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer was proposed in 1986 for NASA's Explorer Concept Study Program by an international collaboration of 25 scientists from nine institutions. The one-year feasibility study began in June 1988. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer would obtain high resolution observations of gamma-ray lines, E/Delta E about 1000, at a sensitivity of about 0.000003 ph/sq cm s, in order to study fundamental problems in astrophysics such as nucleosynthesis, supernovae, neutron star and black-hole physics, and particle acceleration and interactions. The instrument would operate from 15 keV to 10 Mev and use a heavily shielded array of nine cooled Ge spectrometers in a very low background configuration. Its 10 deg FWHM field of view would contain a versatile coded mask system which would provide two-dimensional imaging with 4 deg resolution, one-dimensional imaging with 2 deg resolution, and efficiendt measurements of diffuse emission. An unshielded Ge spectrometer would obtain wide-field measurements of transient gamma-ray sources. The earliest possible mission would begin in 1995.

  20. Pointillist Watercolor Paintings: Exploring Optical Mixing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamwi, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the pointillist painting process offering background information about technique and how it can be used in the art classroom. Explores the appropriateness of the process for elementary through secondary school students. Includes educational objectives. (CMK)

  1. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: The Cosmic Microwave Background The Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2009-08-01

    With the successful launch of the European Space Agency's Planck satellite earlier this year the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is once again the centre of attention for cosmologists around the globe. Since its accidental discovery in 1964 by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, this relic of the Big Bang has been subjected to intense scrutiny by generation after generation of experiments and has gradually yielded up answers to the deepest questions about the origin of our Universe. Most recently, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has made a full-sky analysis of the pattern of temperature and polarization variations that helped establish a new standard cosmological model, confirmed the existence of dark matter and dark energy, and provided strong evidence that there was an epoch of primordial inflation. Ruth Durrer's book reflects the importance of the CMB for future developments in this field. Aimed at graduate students and established researchers, it consists of a basic introduction to cosmology and the theory of primordial perturbations followed by a detailed explanation of how these manifest themselves as measurable variations in the present-day radiation field. It then focuses on the statistical methods needed to obtain accurate estimates of the parameters of the standard cosmological model, and finishes with a discussion of the effect of gravitational lensing on the CMB and on the evolution of its spectrum. The book apparently grew out of various lecture notes on CMB anisotropies for graduate courses given by the author. Its level and scope are well matched to the needs of such an audience and the presentation is clear and well-organized. I am sure that this book will be a useful reference for more senior scientists too. If I have a criticism, it is not about what is in the book but what is omitted. In my view, one of the most exciting possibilities for future CMB missions, including Planck, is the possibility that they might discover physics

  3. The Cosmic Microwave Background & Inflation, Then & Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Contaldi, Carlo; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Mason, Brian; Myers, Steve; Pearson, Tim; Pen, Ue-Li; Prunet, Simon; Readhead, Tony; Sievers, Jonathan

    2002-12-01

    The most recent results from the Boomerang, Maxima, DASI, CBI and VSA CMB experiments significantly increase the case for accelerated expansion in the early universe (the inflationary paradigm) and at the current epoch (dark energy dominance). This is especially so when combined with data on high redshift supernovae (SN1) and large scale structure (LSS), encoding information from local cluster abundances, galaxy clustering, and gravitational lensing. There are ``7 pillars of Inflation'' that can be shown with the CMB probe, and at least 5, and possibly 6, of these have already been demonstrated in the CMB data: (1) the effects of a large scale gravitational potential, demonstrated with COBE/DMR in 1992-96 (2) acoustic peaks/dips in the angular power spectrum of the radiation, which tell about the geometry of the Universe, with the large first peak convincingly shown with Boomerang and Maxima data in 2000, a multiple peak/dip pattern shown in data from Boomerang and DASI (2nd, 3rd peaks, first and 2nd dips in 2001) and from CBI (2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th peaks, 3rd, 4th dips at 1-sigma in 2002) (3) damping due to shear viscosity and the width of the region over which hydrogen recombination occurred when the universe was 400000 years old (CBI 2002) (4) the primary anisotropies should have a Gaussian distribution (be maximally random) in almost all inflationary models, the best data on this coming from Boomerang; (5) secondary anisotropies associated with nonlinear phenomena subsequent to 400000 years, which must be there and may have been detected by CBI and another experiment, BIMA. Showing the 5 ``pillars'' involves detailed confrontation of the experimental data with theory; e.g., (5) compares the CBI data with predictions from two of the largest cosmological hydrodynamics simulations ever done. DASI, Boomerang and CBI in 2002, AMiBA in 2003, and many other experiments have the sensitivity to demonstrate the next pillar, (6) polarization, which must be there at the ~ 7

  4. Background and introduction: Chapter 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2010-01-01

    The Salt Cedar and Russian Olive Control Demonstration Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-320; hereafter the Act) directs the Department of the Interior to submit a report to Congress1 that includes an assessment of several issues surrounding these two nonnative trees, now dominant components of the vegetation along many rivers in the Western United States. Specifically, the Act calls for “…an assessment of the extent of salt cedar and Russian olive infestation on public and private land in the western United States,” which shall“A) consider existing research on methods to control salt cedar and Russian olive trees; B) consider the feasibility of reducing water consumption by salt cedar and Russian olive trees; C) consider methods of and challenges associated with the revegetation or restoration of infested land; and D) estimate the costs of destruction of salt cedar and Russian olive trees, related biomass removal, and revegetation or restoration and maintenance of the infested land.”Finally, the Act calls for discussion of“(i) long-term management and funding strategies…that could be implemented by Federal, State, tribal, and private land managers and owners to address the infestation by salt cedar and Russian olive; (ii) any deficiencies in the assessment or areas for additional study; and (iii) any field demonstrations that would be useful in the effort to control salt cedar and Russian olive.”The primary intent of this report is to provide the science assessment called for under the Act. A secondary purpose is to provide a common background for applicants for prospective demonstration projects, should funds be appropriated for this second phase of the Act. In addition to relying on the direction provided under Section C of the Act, the authors of this report also drew upon the detailed list of considerations presented in Section E of the Act to guide development of more expansive discussions of topics relevant to saltcedar and Russian olive control

  5. Chaotic background phase matching signal separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wu; Hui, Xia; Chen, Wang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the problem of separating the useful signal in the chaos background and using the phase matching method, the signal can be extracted effectively from the chaotic background. In this method, the chaotic background is not estimated with phase reconstruction and the geometric analysis of phase space is not required. Through the separation Simulation of the sinusoidal signal in the chaos background and the separation degree analysis, the low signal to noise ratio of the signal in the chaos background can be effectively separated. The effect of removing the chaotic background noise is obvious.

  6. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, James L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, Neil; Mahoney, William A.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE) is a concept for a possible future NASA Explorer mission which would obtain high resolution, E/Delta E about 500, observations of gamma-ray lines in order to study many fundamental problems in astrophysics. It operates from 15 keV to 10 MeV with a 3-sigma sensitivity of about 3 x 10 to the -6th ph/sq cm-s in a 10 to the 6th s observation. This is 100 times below the presently known gamma-ray line fluxes. The NAE uses a heavily shielded array of nine cooled Ge detectors in a very low background configuration. Its 10-deg field of view contains a versatile coded mask system which provides 2D imaging with 4-deg resolution, 1D imaging with 2-deg resolution and efficient measurements of emission from diffuse and point sources. The late 1990s is the earliest the NAE mission could begin. The scientific motivation, instrument concept, mission concept and expected results, and status and plans for the NAE are presented.

  7. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  8. Orbiting Debris: a Space Environmental Problem. Background Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Artificial debris, deposited in a multitude of orbits about the Earth as the result of the exploration and use of the space environment, poses a growing hazard to future space operations. Unless nations sharply reduce the amount of orbital debris they produce, future space activites could suffer loss of capability, loss of income, and even loss of life as a result of collisions between spacecraft and debris. This background paper discusses the sources of debris and how they can be greatly reduced.

  9. The high energy gamma-ray background and the interstellar radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Ranga-Ram

    This thesis provides an independent estimate of the high latitude (! b! > 20°) contribution to the E > 30 MeV gamma-ray background from Galactic nucleon-nucleon, electron bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton processes. In particular, the inverse Compton contribution has been estimated for different cosmic ray electron distributions and after factoring in the anisotropy in the interstellar radiation field and the anisotropic Klein-Nishina scattering cross section. A model for the interstellar radiation field from 0.1 μm to 1000 μm is also presented to fit the intensities observed by recent satellite experiments, especially the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments on COBE. I find that the emission from the inverse Compton process when the anisotropy in the radiation field is included can be higher by up to 50% when compared to estimates that adopt an isotropic radiation field. Simulated inverse Compton maps with a cosmic ray electron distribution represented by a ``pill box'' extending up to a distance of 5 kpc above the Galactic plane provide better fits to the EGRET intensity maps suggesting that the cosmic ray halo may be larger than previously thought. With this distribution, I find that the net contribution from the IC process to the gamma-ray background can be as high as 20% at high Galactic latitudes. Fitting for the Galactic components of gamma-ray emission confirms the existence of an isotropic component with an intensity that can be represented by the form 27.7 × E(MeV)-2.16 photons m-2 s-1 sr -1 MeV-1, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The spectrum of the isotropic component further argues strongly in favor of unresolved gamma-ray blazars being the source of this emission. Introduction of an anisotropic component improves the quality of the fits. However, this component, which could potentially arise from the dark matter in the Galactic halo, is not well characterized by a single power law which might be associated with any single dark matter

  10. 16 CFR 1101.1 - General background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General background. 1101.1 Section 1101.1 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INFORMATION DISCLOSURE UNDER SECTION 6(b) OF THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT Background § 1101.1 General background....

  11. 16 CFR 1101.1 - General background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General background. 1101.1 Section 1101.1 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INFORMATION DISCLOSURE UNDER SECTION 6(b) OF THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT Background § 1101.1 General background. (a) Basic purpose. This rule sets...

  12. 45 CFR 650.16 - Background rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Background rights. 650.16 Section 650.16 Public... Background rights. The Foundation will acquire rights to a research performer's pre-existing technology only... of the cognizant Program Manager, will negotiate a background rights provision. If the...

  13. Background Extraction Using Random Walk Image Fusion.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai-Lung; Wang, Hong-Cyuan; Yeh, Chih-Hsiang; Cheng, Wen-Huang; Lai, Yu-Chi

    2016-12-23

    It is important to extract a clear background for computer vision and augmented reality. Generally, background extraction assumes the existence of a clean background shot through the input sequence, but realistically, situations may violate this assumption such as highway traffic videos. Therefore, our probabilistic model-based method formulates fusion of candidate background patches of the input sequence as a random walk problem and seeks a globally optimal solution based on their temporal and spatial relationship. Furthermore, we also design two quality measures to consider spatial and temporal coherence and contrast distinctness among pixels as background selection basis. A static background should have high temporal coherence among frames, and thus, we improve our fusion precision with a temporal contrast filter and an optical-flow-based motionless patch extractor. Experiments demonstrate that our algorithm can successfully extract artifact-free background images with low computational cost while comparing to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  14. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  15. Career Choices: Linguistic and Educational Socialization of Sudanese-Background High-School Students in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoss, Aniko; O'Neill, Shirley; Eacersall, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the linguistic and educational socialization of Sudanese refugee-background youth in Australia. The study focussed on exploring Sudanese-background secondary school students' career aspirations, motivations and obstacles. The research used a mixed-method approach including a survey conducted with students studying in six…

  16. Acculturation and Religion in Schools: The Views of Young People from Minority Belief Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niens, Ulrike; Mawhinney, Alison; Richardson, Norman; Chiba, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the relationship between religious identity, acculturation strategies and perceptions of acculturation orientation in the school context amongst young people from minority belief backgrounds. Based on a qualitative study including interviews with 26 young people from religious minority belief backgrounds in Northern…

  17. Gender-Role Identity, Attitudes toward Marriage, and Gender-Segregated School Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsurada, Emiko; Sugihara, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between Japanese college students' gender role identity and attitudes toward marriage, exploring the effects of gender-segregated school backgrounds on gender role identity and attitudes toward marriage. Women without any coeducational school background had relatively strong masculinity and desired to marry at older…

  18. Building the cosmic infrared background brick by brick with Herschel/PEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Lutz, D.; Wuyts, S.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Castañeda, H.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Le Floc'h, E.; Maiolino, R.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Poglitsch, A.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.

    2011-08-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) includes roughly half of the energy radiated by all galaxies at all wavelengths across cosmic time, as observed at the present epoch. The PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) survey is exploited here to study the CIB and its redshift differential, at 70, 100 and 160 μm, where the background peaks. Combining PACS observations of the GOODS-S, GOODS-N, Lockman Hole and COSMOS areas, we define number counts spanning over more than two orders of magnitude in flux: from ~1 mJy to few hundreds mJy. Stacking of 24 μm sources and P(D) statistics extend the analysis down to ~0.2 mJy. Taking advantage of the wealth of ancillary data in PEP fields, differential number counts d 2N/dS/dz and CIB are studied up to z = 5. Based on these counts, we discuss the effects of confusion on PACS blank field observations and provide confusion limits for the three bands considered. While most of the available backward evolution models predict the total PACS number counts with reasonable success, the consistency to redshift distributions and CIB derivatives can still be significantly improved. The new high-quality PEP data highlight the need to include redshift-dependent constraints in future modeling. The total CIB surface brightness emitted above PEP 3σ flux limits is νIν = 4.52 ± 1.18, 8.35 ± 0.95 and 9.49 ± 0.59 [nW m-2 sr-1] at 70, 100, and 160 μm, respectively. These values correspond to 58 ± 7% and 74 ± 5% of the COBE/DIRBE CIB direct measurements at 100 and 160 μm. Employing the P(D) analysis, these fractions increase to ~65% and ~89%. More than half of the resolved CIB was emitted at redshift z ≤ 1. The 50%-light redshifts lie at z = 0.58, 0.67 and 0.73 at the three PACS wavelengths. The distribution moves towards earlier epochs at longer wavelengths: while the 70 μm CIB is mainly produced by z ≤ 1.0 objects, the contribution of z > 1.0 sources reaches 50% at 160 μm. Most of the CIB resolved in the three PACS bands was emitted by

  19. Exploring the Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Highlights National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) space exploration studies, focusing on Voyager at Saturn, advanced Jupiter exploration, infrared observatory, space telescope, Dynamics Explorers (satellites designed to provide understanding of earth/sun energy relationship), and ozone studies. (JN)

  20. Background removal procedure for rapid scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Czechowski, Tomasz; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2009-01-01

    In rapid scan EPR the changing magnetic field creates a background signal with components at the scan frequency and its harmonics. The amplitude of the background signal increases with scan width and is more significant for weak EPR signals such as are obtained in the presence of magnetic field gradients. A procedure for distinguishing this background from the EPR signal is proposed, mathematically described, and tested for various experimental conditions.

  1. Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Chris Moore delivers a presentation from the Exploration Technology Development & Demonstration (ETDD) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX....

  2. Effects of Background Music on Objective and Subjective Performance Measures in an Auditory BCI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sijie; Allison, Brendan Z.; Kübler, Andrea; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wang, Xingyu; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory, and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill) using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other) BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged. PMID:27790111

  3. Effects of Background Music on Objective and Subjective Performance Measures in an Auditory BCI.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sijie; Allison, Brendan Z; Kübler, Andrea; Cichocki, Andrzej; Wang, Xingyu; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have explored brain computer interface (BCI) systems based on auditory stimuli, which could help patients with visual impairments. Usability and user satisfaction are important considerations in any BCI. Although background music can influence emotion and performance in other task environments, and many users may wish to listen to music while using a BCI, auditory, and other BCIs are typically studied without background music. Some work has explored the possibility of using polyphonic music in auditory BCI systems. However, this approach requires users with good musical skills, and has not been explored in online experiments. Our hypothesis was that an auditory BCI with background music would be preferred by subjects over a similar BCI without background music, without any difference in BCI performance. We introduce a simple paradigm (which does not require musical skill) using percussion instrument sound stimuli and background music, and evaluated it in both offline and online experiments. The result showed that subjects preferred the auditory BCI with background music. Different performance measures did not reveal any significant performance effect when comparing background music vs. no background. Since the addition of background music does not impair BCI performance but is preferred by users, auditory (and perhaps other) BCIs should consider including it. Our study also indicates that auditory BCIs can be effective even if the auditory channel is simultaneously otherwise engaged.

  4. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

  5. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Background. 215.1 Section 215.1 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOCAL POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear...

  6. Child Care: State Requirements for Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnoni, Cynthia

    Background checks involve gathering information from state and federal databases to determine if child care providers have a history of child abuse or other criminal convictions that would make them unacceptable for working with children. Background checks include state criminal history checks, state child abuse registry checks, and Federal Bureau…

  7. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Background. 215.1 Section 215.1 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOCAL POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear...

  8. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Background. 215.1 Section 215.1 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOCAL POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear...

  9. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Background. 215.1 Section 215.1 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOCAL POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear...

  10. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  11. 47 CFR 201.0 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Background. 201.0 Section 201.0 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EXECUTIVE POLICY § 201.0 Background. National policy with respect to the conservation, allocation and use of the...

  12. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug...

  13. 47 CFR 201.0 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Background. 201.0 Section 201.0 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EXECUTIVE POLICY § 201.0 Background. National policy with respect to the conservation, allocation and use of the...

  14. 47 CFR 201.0 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Background. 201.0 Section 201.0 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EXECUTIVE POLICY § 201.0 Background. National policy with respect to the conservation, allocation and use of the...

  15. 40 CFR 761.380 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 761.380 Section 761.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT....380 Background. This subpart provides self-implementing criteria for validating the conditions for...

  16. 32 CFR 763.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 763.3 Section 763.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.3 Background. (a) Kaho'olawe...

  17. 32 CFR 763.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 763.3 Section 763.3 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.3 Background. (a) Kaho'olawe...

  18. Multiple Scatters in Single Site Gamma Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, J. P.

    2016-09-16

    nEXO aims to reduce its gamma backgrounds by taking advantage of the fact that a large number of gammas that would otherwise be backgrounds will undergo multiple compton scattering in the TPC and produce spatially distinct signals. These multi-sited (MS) events can be excluded from the 0νββ search.

  19. 45 CFR 650.16 - Background rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Background rights. 650.16 Section 650.16 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.16 Background rights. The Foundation will acquire rights to a research performer's pre-existing technology...

  20. 47 CFR 201.0 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Background. 201.0 Section 201.0 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EXECUTIVE POLICY § 201.0 Background. National policy with respect to the conservation, allocation and use of the...

  1. 47 CFR 201.0 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Background. 201.0 Section 201.0 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EXECUTIVE POLICY § 201.0 Background. National policy with respect to the conservation, allocation and use of the...

  2. 47 CFR 32.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Background. 32.1 Section 32.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Preface § 32.1 Background. The revised Uniform System of Accounts (USOA) is a...

  3. 47 CFR 32.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Background. 32.1 Section 32.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Preface § 32.1 Background. The revised Uniform System of Accounts (USOA) is a...

  4. 47 CFR 32.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Background. 32.1 Section 32.1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Preface § 32.1 Background. The revised Uniform System of Accounts (USOA) is a...

  5. RESOLVING THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 450 AND 850 μm WITH SCUBA-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2013-10-20

    We use the SCUBA-2 submillimeter camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to obtain extremely deep number counts at 450 and 850 μm. We combine data on two cluster lensing fields, A1689 and A370, and three blank fields, CDF-N, CDF-S, and COSMOS, to measure the counts over a wide flux range at each wavelength. We use statistical fits to broken power law representations to determine the number counts. This allows us to probe to the deepest possible level in the data. At both wavelengths our results agree well with the literature in the flux range over which they have been measured, with the exception of the 850 μm counts in CDF-S, where we do not observe the counts deficit found by previous single-dish observations. At 450 μm, we detect significant counts down to ∼1 mJy, an unprecedented depth at this wavelength. By integrating the number counts above this flux limit, we measure 113.9{sup +49.7}{sub -28.4} Jy deg{sup –2} of the 450 μm extragalactic background light (EBL). The majority of this contribution is from sources with S{sub 450{sub μm}} between 1-10 mJy, and these sources are likely to be the ones that are analogous to the local luminous infrared galaxies. At 850 μm, we measure 37.3{sup +21.1}{sub -12.9} Jy deg{sup –2} of the EBL. Because of the large systematic uncertainties on the COBE measurements, the percentage of the EBL we resolve could range from 48%-153% (44%-178%) at 450 (850) μm. Based on high-resolution Submillimeter Array observations of around half of the 4 σ 850 μm sample in CDF-N, we find that 12.5{sup +12.1}{sub -6.8}% of the sources are blends of multiple fainter sources. This is a low multiple fraction, and we find no significant difference between our original SCUBA-2 850 μm counts and the multiplicity-corrected counts.

  6. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  7. The efficiency of reading around learned backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Miguel P.; Pham, Binh T.; Abbey, Craig K.; Zhang, Yani

    2006-03-01

    Most metrics of medical image quality typically treat all variability components of the background as a Gaussian noise process. This includes task based model observers (non-prewhitening matched filter without and with an eye filter, NPW and NPWE; Hotelling and Channelized Hotelling) as well as Fourier metrics of medical image quality based on the noise power spectra. However, many investigators have observed that unlike many of the models/metrics, physicians often can discount signal-looking structures that are part of the normal anatomic background. This process has been referred to as reading around the background or noise. The purpose of this paper is to develop an experimental framework to systematically study the ability of human observers to read around learned backgrounds and compare their ability to that of an optimal ideal observer which has knowledge of the background. We measured human localization performance of one of twelve targets in the presence of a fixed background consisting of randomly placed Gaussians with random contrasts and sizes, and white noise. Performance was compared to a condition in which the test images contained only white noise but with higher contrast. Human performance was compared to standard model observers that treat the background as a Gaussian noise process (NPW, NPWE and Hotelling), a Fourier-based prewhitening matched filter, and an ideal observer. The Hotelling, NPW, NPWE models as well as the Fourier-based prewhitening matched filter predicted higher performance for the white noise test images than the background plus white noise. In contrast, ideal and human performance was higher for the background plus white noise condition. Furthermore, human performance exceeded that of the NPW, NPWE and Hotelling models and reached an efficiency of 19% relative to the ideal observer. Our results demonstrate that for some types of images human signal localization performance is consistent with use of knowledge about the high order

  8. The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a "second population" of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such "smaller" grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our "second component" of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  9. THE MYSTERY OF THE COSMIC DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET BACKGROUND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com E-mail: 97tyler@cardinalmail.cua.edu

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a ''second population'' of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such ''smaller'' grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our ''second component'' of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  10. The Role of Plants in Space Exploration: Some History and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    For over 3 decades, NASA has sponsored research on crops for human life support in space. Specialized watering techniques have even been tested for weightless settings, but most studies used conventional watering, such as hydroponics, which should work well on surface settings of the Moon or Mars. NASAs testing has spanned a wide range of crops and studied innovative techniques to increase yields, reduce power, minimize growing volume, and recycle water and nutrients. These issues closely parallel challenges faced in terrestrial controlled environment agriculture, which is expanding around the world.

  11. LETs and NETs: Exploring How Teachers from Diverse Cultural Backgrounds Impact Student Motivation and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper, an exploratory case study, examines how students' preferences and motivation to learn English are influenced by their perceptions of teaching practices--both of native English teachers and local English teachers. To better understand the context of this research question, this study adopts a method of triangulation in collecting data:…

  12. Exploring Disciplinary Background Effect on Social Studies Teachers' Knowledge and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Pei-Fen; Yang, Meng-Li

    2013-01-01

    Case studies have pointed out that teachers' disciplinary knowledge affects their pedagogy; however, the results are not consistent. There is a need for quantitative research to examine the relationship between teacher knowledge and practice, particularly in social studies where content-specific studies are mostly qualitative. The authors used…

  13. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    SciTech Connect

    Singal, J.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  14. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  15. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB.

  16. Cosmic Coincidences: Investigations for Neutron Background Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig R.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental investigations were made in order to reduce background counts in neutron detectors. Each investigation relied upon the fact that neutron background is largely due to cosmic ray interactions with the air and ground. The first attempt was to look at neutron arrival times. Neutron events close in time were taken to have been of a common origin due to cosmic rays. The second investigation was similar, but based on coincident neutron/muon events. The investigations showed only a small effect, not practical for the suppression of neutron background. PMID:27110457

  17. Cosmic Coincidences: Investigations for Neutron Background Suppression.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig R

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental investigations were made in order to reduce background counts in neutron detectors. Each investigation relied upon the fact that neutron background is largely due to cosmic ray interactions with the air and ground. The first attempt was to look at neutron arrival times. Neutron events close in time were taken to have been of a common origin due to cosmic rays. The second investigation was similar, but based on coincident neutron/muon events. The investigations showed only a small effect, not practical for the suppression of neutron background.

  18. Exploiting background knowledge in automated discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Aronis, J.M.; Buchanan, B.G.; Provost, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    Prior work in automated scientific discovery has been successful in finding patterns in data, given that a reasonably small set of mostly relevant features is specified. The work described in this paper places data in the context of large bodies of background knowledge. Specifically, data items are connected to multiple databases of background knowledge represented as inheritance networks. The system has made a practical impact on botanical toxicology research, which required linking examples of cases of plant exposures to databases of botanical, geographical, and climate background knowledge.

  19. Gravitational wave background from rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2012-11-01

    The background of gravitational waves produced by the ensemble of rotating neutron stars (which includes pulsars, magnetars, and gravitars) is investigated. A formula for Ω(f) (a function that is commonly used to quantify the background, and is directly related to its energy density) is derived, without making the usual assumption that each radiating system evolves on a short time scale compared to the Hubble time; the time evolution of the systems since their formation until the present day is properly taken into account. Moreover, the formula allows one to distinguish the different parts of the background: the unresolvable (which forms a stochastic background or confusion noise, since the waveforms composing it cannot be either individually observed or subtracted out of the data of a detector) and the resolvable. Several estimations of the background are obtained, for different assumptions on the parameters that characterize neutron stars and their population. In particular, different initial spin period distributions lead to very different results. For one of the models, with slow initial spins, the detection of the background by present or planned detectors can be rejected. However, other models do predict the detection of the background, that would be unresolvable, by the future ground-based gravitational wave detector ET. A robust upper limit for the background of rotating neutron stars is obtained; it does not exceed the detection threshold of two cross-correlated Advanced LIGO interferometers. If gravitars exist and constitute more than a few percent of the neutron star population, then they produce an unresolvable background that could be detected by ET. Under the most reasonable assumptions on the parameters characterizing a neutron star, the background is too faint to be detected. Previous papers have suggested neutron star models in which large magnetic fields (like the ones that characterize magnetars) induce big deformations in the star, which

  20. Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wands, David; Piattella, Oliver F.; Casarini, Luciano

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provides a remarkable window onto the early universe, revealing its composition and structure. In these lectures we review and discuss the physics underlying the main features of the CMB.

  1. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to...

  2. Expected background in the LZ experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2015-08-17

    The LZ experiment, featuring a 7-tonne active liquid xenon target, is aimed at achieving unprecedented sensitivity to WIMPs with the background expected to be dominated by astrophysical neutrinos. To reach this goal, extensive simulations are carried out to accurately calculate the electron recoil and nuclear recoil rates in the detector. Both internal (from target material) and external (from detector components and surrounding environment) backgrounds are considered. A very efficient suppression of background rate is achieved with an outer liquid scintillator veto, liquid xenon skin and fiducialisation. Based on the current measurements of radioactivity of different materials, it is shown that LZ can achieve the reduction of a total background for a WIMP search down to about 2 events in 1000 live days for 5.6 tonne fiducial mass.

  3. 16 CFR 1406.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... APPLIANCES-NOTIFICATION OF PERFORMANCE AND TECHNICAL DATA § 1406.2 Background. (a) Fire data analyzed by the... mechanical defects or excessive deposits of flammable creosote. (b) After considering the available data...

  4. 47 CFR 215.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... among affected Federal agencies information concerning the telecommunications effects of EMP and... Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FOCAL POINT FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE (EMP) INFORMATION § 215.1 Background. (a) The nuclear...

  5. Charged Hadron Properties in Background Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian C. Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-02-01

    We report on a lattice calculation demonstrating a novel new method to extract the electric polarizability of charged pseudo-scalar mesons by analyzing two point correlation functions computed in classical background electric fields.

  6. Ablation Plume Dynamics in a Background Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Amoruso, Salvatore; Schou, Joergen; Lunney, James G.

    2010-10-08

    The expansion of a plume in a background gas of pressure comparable to that used in pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been analyzed in terms of the model of Predtechensky and Mayorov (PM). This approach gives a relatively clear and simple description of the essential hydrodynamics during the expansion. The model also leads to an insightful treatment of the stopping behavior in dimensionless units for plumes and background gases of different atomic/molecular masses. The energetics of the plume dynamics can also be treated with this model. Experimental time-of-flight data of silver ions in a neon background gas show a fair agreement with predictions from the PM-model. Finally we discuss the validity of the model, if the work done by the pressure of the background gas is neglected.

  7. Activating Background Knowledge in Reading Comprehension Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Deborah Wells; Rayford, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Indicates that a broad age range of students can use some purpose questions as cues to activate background knowledge. Suggest topic familiarity, amount of information presented, and the presence of genre clues as text features affecting schema activation. (NKA)

  8. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2011-10-15

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter {Omega}(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, {Omega}(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for {Omega}(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  9. Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-27

    Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments David F. Burrelli Specialist in Military Manpower Policy Barbara Salazar Torreon...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Retirement: Background and Recent Developments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Recent Developments Congressional Research Service Summary The military retirement system is a noncontributory, defined benefit system that has

  10. Supermembrane actions for Gaiotto-Maldacena backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefański, Bogdan

    2014-06-01

    We write down the supermembrane actions for M-theory backgrounds dual to general N=2 four-dimensional superconformal field theories. The actions are given to all orders in fermions and are in a particular κ-gauge. When an extra U(1) isometry is present, our actions reduce to κ-gauge fixed Green-Schwarz actions for the corresponding Type IIA backgrounds.

  11. The pregalactic cosmic gravitational wave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An outline is given that estimates the expected gravitational wave background, based on plausible pregalactic sources. Some cosmologically significant limits can be put on incoherent gravitational wave background arising from pregalactic cosmic evolution. The spectral region of cosmically generated and cosmically limited radiation is, at long periods, P greater than 1 year, in contrast to more recent cosmological sources, which have P approx. 10 to 10(exp -3).

  12. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  13. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  14. Explore with Us

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Lester

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental goal of this vision is to advance U.S. scientific, security and economic interest through a robust space exploration program. Implement a sustained and affordable human and robotic program to explore the solar system and beyond. Extend human presence across the solar system, starting with a human return to the Moon by the year 2020, in preparation for human exploration of Mars and other destinations. Develop the innovative technologies, knowledge, and infrastructures both to explore and to support decisions about the destinations for human exploration. Promote international and commercial participation in exploration to further U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests.

  15. Symmetry and the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollock, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    A brief historical introduction to the development of observational astronomy and cosmology will be presented. The close relationship between the properties of light, symmetry, and our understanding the contents of our universe will be explored.

  16. Exploration and Mining Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-09-01

    This Exploration and Mining Technology Roadmap represents the third roadmap for the Mining Industry of the Future. It is based upon the results of the Exploration and Mining Roadmap Workshop held May 10 ñ 11, 2001.

  17. Exploration cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Huttrer, J.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Jerry Huttrer, President, Geothermal Management Company, discusses the general state of exploration in the geothermal industry today, and mentions some ways to economize and perhaps save costs of geothermal exploration in the future. He suggests an increased use of satellite imagery in the mapping of geothermal resources and the identification of hot spots. Also, coordinating with oil and gas exploration efforts, the efficiency of the exploration task could be optimized.

  18. International exploration of Mars. A special bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This bibliography lists 173 reports, articles, and other documents introduced into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database on the exploration of Mars. Historical references are cited for background. The bibliography was created for the 1991 session of the International Space University.

  19. Modeling background radiation in Southern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Haber, Daniel A; Burnley, Pamela C; Adcock, Christopher T; Malchow, Russell L; Marsac, Kara E; Hausrath, Elisabeth M

    2017-02-06

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are an important tool for national security, scientific, and industrial interests in determining locations of both anthropogenic and natural sources of radioactivity. There is a relationship between radioactivity and geology and in the past this relationship has been used to predict geology from an aerial survey. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to predict the radiologic exposure rate of the geologic materials by creating a high resolution background model. The intention is for this method to be used in an emergency response scenario where the background radiation environment is unknown. Two study areas in Southern Nevada have been modeled using geologic data, images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), geochemical data, and pre-existing low resolution aerial surveys from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Survey. Using these data, geospatial areas that are homogenous in terms of K, U, and Th, referred to as background radiation units, are defined and the gamma ray exposure rate is predicted. The prediction is compared to data collected via detailed aerial survey by the Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Lab - Nellis, allowing for the refinement of the technique. By using geologic units to define radiation background units of exposed bedrock and ASTER visualizations to subdivide and define radiation background units within alluvium, successful models have been produced for Government Wash, north of Lake Mead, and for the western shore of Lake Mohave, east of Searchlight, NV.

  20. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deporzio, Nicholas; Cuore Collaboration

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and Cherenkov radiation vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Quantum dot based liquid scintillator is similarly bombarded to produce a background induced scintillation light. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. These findings are extrapolated to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications to bolometer searches. Effects of these techniques on experiment duration and signal-background ratio are discussed.

  1. On conformal higher spins in curved background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    We address the question of how to represent an interacting action for a tower of conformal higher spin fields in a form covariant with respect to a background metric. We use the background metric to define the star product which plays a central role in the definition of the corresponding gauge transformations. By analogy with the kinetic term in the 4-derivative Weyl gravity action expanded near an on-shell background one expects that the kinetic term in such an action should be gauge-invariant in a Bach-flat metric. We demonstrate this fact to first order in expansion in powers of the curvature of the background metric. This generalizes the result of arXiv:1404.7452 for spin 3 case to all conformal higher spins. We also comment on a possibility of extending this claim to terms quadratic in the curvature and discuss the appearance of background-dependent mixing terms in the quadratic part of the conformal higher spin action.

  2. A review on natural background radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Gholami, Mehrdad; Setayandeh, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    The world is naturally radioactive and approximately 82% of human-absorbed radiation doses, which are out of control, arise from natural sources such as cosmic, terrestrial, and exposure from inhalation or intake radiation sources. In recent years, several international studies have been carried out, which have reported different values regarding the effect of background radiation on human health. Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly 232Th and 238U series, and their decay products, as well as 40K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust. Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world. Naturally occurring radioactive materials generally contain terrestrial-origin radionuclides, left over since the creation of the earth. In addition, the existence of some springs and quarries increases the dose rate of background radiation in some regions that are known as high level background radiation regions. The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations. The present review article was carried out to consider all of the natural radiations, including cosmic, terrestrial, and food radiation. PMID:24223380

  3. Explorations in Statistics: Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This seventh installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores regression, a technique that estimates the nature of the relationship between two things for which we may only surmise a mechanistic or predictive…

  4. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; Chuss, David T.; Dotson, Jessie; Dwek, Eli; Fixsen, Dale J.; Halpern, Mark; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Meyer, Stephan; Moseley, S. Harvey; Seiffert, Michael D.; Spergel, David N.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer is an Explorer-class mission to measure the gravity-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background. PIXIE uses an innovative optical design to achieve background-limited sensitivity in 400 spectral channels spanning 2.5 decades in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 micron wavelength). Multi-moded non-imaging optics feed a polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer to produce a set of interference fringes, proportional to the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from the two input beams. Multiple levels of symmetry and signal modulation combine to reduce the instrumental signature and confusion from unpolarized sources to negligible levels. PIXIE will map the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters with angular resolution 2.6 deg and sensitivity 0.2 µK per 1 deg square pixel. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r less than 10(exp -3) at 5 standard deviations. In addition, PIXIE will measure the absolute frequency spectrum to constrain physical processes ranging from inflation to the nature of the first stars to the physical conditions within the interstellar medium of the Galaxy. We describe the PIXIE instrument and mission architecture with an emphasis on the expected level of systematic error suppression.

  5. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer is an Explorer-class mission to measure the gravity-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint on the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background. PIXIE uses an innovative optical design to achieve background-limited sensitivity in 400 spectral channels spanning 2.5 decades in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 micron wavelength). Multi-moded non-imaging optics feed a polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer to produce a set of interference fringes, proportional to the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from the two input beams. The differential design and multiple signal modulations spanning 11 orders of magnitude in time combine to reduce the instrumental signature and confusion from unpolarized sources to negligible levels. PIXIE will map the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters with angular resolution 2.6 deg and sensitivity 0.2 uK per 1 deg square pixel. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r <10(exp -3) at 5 standard deviations. In addition, the rich PIXIE data will constrain physical processes ranging from Big Bang cosmology to the nature of the first stars to the physical conditions within the interstellar medium of the Galaxy. We describe the PIXIE instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  6. Estimating the normal background rate of species extinction.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Jurriaan M; Joppa, Lucas N; Gittleman, John L; Stephens, Patrick R; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-04-01

    A key measure of humanity's global impact is by how much it has increased species extinction rates. Familiar statements are that these are 100-1000 times pre-human or background extinction levels. Estimating recent rates is straightforward, but establishing a background rate for comparison is not. Previous researchers chose an approximate benchmark of 1 extinction per million species per year (E/MSY). We explored disparate lines of evidence that suggest a substantially lower estimate. Fossil data yield direct estimates of extinction rates, but they are temporally coarse, mostly limited to marine hard-bodied taxa, and generally involve genera not species. Based on these data, typical background loss is 0.01 genera per million genera per year. Molecular phylogenies are available for more taxa and ecosystems, but it is debated whether they can be used to estimate separately speciation and extinction rates. We selected data to address known concerns and used them to determine median extinction estimates from statistical distributions of probable values for terrestrial plants and animals. We then created simulations to explore effects of violating model assumptions. Finally, we compiled estimates of diversification-the difference between speciation and extinction rates for different taxa. Median estimates of extinction rates ranged from 0.023 to 0.135 E/MSY. Simulation results suggested over- and under-estimation of extinction from individual phylogenies partially canceled each other out when large sets of phylogenies were analyzed. There was no evidence for recent and widespread pre-human overall declines in diversity. This implies that average extinction rates are less than average diversification rates. Median diversification rates were 0.05-0.2 new species per million species per year. On the basis of these results, we concluded that typical rates of background extinction may be closer to 0.1 E/MSY. Thus, current extinction rates are 1,000 times higher than natural

  7. Gravitational wave background from reheating after hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Figueroa, Daniel G.; Sastre, Alfonso

    2008-02-15

    The reheating of the Universe after hybrid inflation proceeds through the nucleation and subsequent collision of large concentrations of energy density in the form of bubblelike structures moving at relativistic speeds. This generates a significant fraction of energy in the form of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, whose time evolution is determined by the successive stages of reheating: First, tachyonic preheating makes the amplitude of gravity waves grow exponentially fast. Second, bubble collisions add a new burst of gravitational radiation. Third, turbulent motions finally sets the end of gravitational waves production. From then on, these waves propagate unimpeded to us. We find that the fraction of energy density today in these primordial gravitational waves could be significant for grand unified theory (GUT)-scale models of inflation, although well beyond the frequency range sensitivity of gravitational wave observatories like LIGO, LISA, or BBO. However, low-scale models could still produce a detectable signal at frequencies accessible to BBO or DECIGO. For comparison, we have also computed the analogous gravitational wave background from some chaotic inflation models and obtained results similar to those found by other groups. The discovery of such a background would open a new observational window into the very early universe, where the details of the process of reheating, i.e. the big bang, could be explored. Moreover, it could also serve in the future as a new experimental tool for testing the inflationary paradigm.

  8. A novel approach to model EPIC variable background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelli, M.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D.; Belfiore, A.; Pizzocaro, D.

    2016-06-01

    In the past years XMM-Newton revolutionized our way to look at the X-ray sky. With more than 200 Ms of exposure, it allowed for numerous discoveries in every field of astronomy. Unfortunately, about 35% of the observing time is badly affected by soft proton flares, with background increasing by orders of magnitudes hampering any classical analysis of field sources. One of the main aim of the EXTraS ("Exploring the X-ray Transient and variable Sky") project is to characterise the variability of XMM-Newton sources within each single observation, including periods of high background. This posed severe challenges. I will describe a novel approach that we implemented within the EXTraS project to produce background-subtracted light curves, that allows to treat the case of very faint sources and very large proton flares. EXTraS light curves will be soon released to the community, together with new tools that will allow the user to reproduce EXTraS results, as well as to extend a similar analysis to future data. Results of this work (including an unprecedented characterisation of the soft proton phenomenon and instrument response) will also serve as a reference for future missions and will be particularly relevant for the Athena observatory.

  9. Morphological filter for text extraction from textured background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okun, Oleg G.

    2001-11-01

    A new method for text extraction from binary images with a textured background is proposed. Text extraction in such a case is very important for successful character recognition, because many character recognition methods expect text printed on a uniform (and typically white) background and their performance significantly degrades if this condition is not satisfied. The methods that have been already proposed to solve this problem, attempt to extract primitives or elements composing the textured background in order to separate text from them. From experiments with commercial character recognition software we observed that such an approach easily leads to the significant growth of errors in character recognition because of degradations in extracted characters, introduced during text extraction. On the other hand, it is hardly possible to reconstruct (more or less precisely) the degraded characters without knowing their class labels and this information is not yet available at this stage. In contrast, we explore another approach similar to symbolic compression of text, which is implemented as a morphological filter using the top-hat transform. This approach detects characters having similar shapes from an original image and it thus avoids character degradations. As a result, the accuracy of character recognition can be improved.

  10. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Abbreviated Environmental Assessment for P91-1 Argos Spacecraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    formula) COCO Contractor-Owned Contractor-Operated COBE COsmic Background Explorer DOPAA Description of Proposed Action and Alternatives DOT U.S...manufacturing and pre-launch servicing and checkout is carried out in contractor-owned and contractor-operated ( COCO ) facilities, (not at Vandenberg AFB...place at contractor-owned contractor-operated ( COCO ) facilities. The launch site and the WR are extensively described in Section 3.0 of the

  11. Goddard Visiting Scientist Program for the Space and Earth Sciences Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A visiting scientist program was conducted in the space and earth sciences at GSFC. Research was performed in the following areas: astronomical observations; broadband x-ray spectral variability; ground-based spectroscopic and photometric studies; Seyfert galaxies; active galactic nuclei (AGN); massive stellar black holes; the differential microwave radiometer (DMR) onboard the cosmic background explorer (COBE); atmospheric models; and airborne and ground based radar observations. The specific research efforts are detailed by tasks.

  12. Background Rejection in the ARA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfendner, Carl

    2017-03-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is a radio frequency observatory under construction at the South Pole that is searching for ultrahigh energy neutrinos via the Askaryan effect. Thermal fluctuations currently dominate the trigger-level background for the observatory and anthropogenic sources also introduce a significant source of noise. By taking advantage of the observatory's regular geometry and the expected coincident nature of the RF signals arriving from neutrino-induced events, this background can be filtered efficiently. This contribution will discuss techniques developed for the ARA analyses to reject these thermal signals, to reject anthropogenic backgrounds, and to search for neutrino-induced particle showers in the Antarctic ice. The results of a search for neutrinos from GRBs using the prototype station using some of these techniques will be presented.

  13. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  14. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    DOE PAGES

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutronmore » background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.« less

  15. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutron background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.

  16. Background modeling for the GERDA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay experiment GERDA at the LNGS of INFN has started physics data taking in November 2011. This paper presents an analysis aimed at understanding and modeling the observed background energy spectrum, which plays an essential role in searches for a rare signal like 0νββ decay. A very promising preliminary model has been obtained, with the systematic uncertainties still under study. Important information can be deduced from the model such as the expected background and its decomposition in the signal region. According to the model the main background contributions around Q{sub ββ} come from {sup 214}Bi, {sup 228}Th, {sup 42}K, {sup 60}Co and α emitting isotopes in the {sup 226}Ra decay chain, with a fraction depending on the assumed source positions.

  17. Background model for the Majorana Demonstrator

    DOE PAGES

    Cuesta, C.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; ...

    2015-01-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is constructing a system containing 40 kg of HPGe detectors to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of a future tonne-scale experiment capable of probing the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. To realize this, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. This goal is pursued through a combination of a significant reduction of radioactive impurities in construction materials with analytical methods for background rejection, for example usingmore » powerful pulse shape analysis techniques profiting from the p-type point contact HPGe detectors technology. The effectiveness of these methods is assessed using simulations of the different background components whose purity levels are constrained from radioassay measurements.« less

  18. Background model for the Majorana Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, C.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, W. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. K.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is constructing a system containing 40 kg of HPGe detectors to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of a future tonne-scale experiment capable of probing the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region. To realize this, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest around the Q-value at 2039 keV. This goal is pursued through a combination of a significant reduction of radioactive impurities in construction materials with analytical methods for background rejection, for example using powerful pulse shape analysis techniques profiting from the p-type point contact HPGe detectors technology. The effectiveness of these methods is assessed using simulations of the different background components whose purity levels are constrained from radioassay measurements.

  19. Pythia Jet Finding Study with Trento Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Joseph; Soltz, Ron

    2016-06-22

    We present results applying the Pythia SlowJet Finder to Pythia generated QCD and QED hard processes in the presence of simulated heavy ion backgrounds. The hard process events are generated with Pythia version 8.219 for √sNN=200 GeV proton-proton collisions and the backgrounds are generated by the Reduced Thickness Event-by-event Nuclear Topology model TRENTo for Au-Au collisions with a nucleon-nucleon cross-section of 4.23 fm2. The TRENTo model is used to calculate the initial entropy and ellipticity from which the total charged particle multiplicity and elliptic ow are determined. We report results in the form of event displays, total pT distributions, and fragmentation distributions for SlowJet applied to Pythia events with and without the simulated heavy ion backgrounds.

  20. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  1. The homogeneity conjecture for supergravity backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José Miguel

    2009-06-01

    These notes record three lectures given at the workshop "Higher symmetries in Physics", held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in November 2008. In them we explain how to construct a Lie (super)algebra associated to a spin manifold, perhaps with extra geometric data, and a notion of privileged spinors. The typical examples are supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds; although there are more classical instances of this construction. We focus on two results: the geometric constructions of compact real forms of the simple Lie algebras of type B4, F4 and E8 from S7, S8 and S15, respectively; and the construction of the Killing superalgebra of eleven-dimensional supergravity backgrounds. As an application of this latter construction we show that supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds with enough supersymmetry are necessarily locally homogeneous.

  2. Asteroid exploration and utilization: The Hawking explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Alan; Date, Medha; Duarte, Manny; Erian, Neil; Gafka, George; Kappler, Peter; Patano, Scott; Perez, Martin; Ponce, Edgar; Radovich, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The Earth is nearing depletion of its natural resources at a time when human beings are rapidly expanding the frontiers of space. The resources which may exist on asteroids could have enormous potential for aiding and enhancing human space exploration as well as life on Earth. With the possibly limitless opportunities that exist, it is clear that asteroids are the next step for human existence in space. This report comprises the efforts of NEW WORLDS, Inc. to develop a comprehensive design for an asteroid exploration/sample return mission. This mission is a precursor to proof-of-concept missions that will investigate the validity of mining and materials processing on an asteroid. Project STONER (Systematic Transfer of Near Earth Resources) is based on two utilization scenarios: (1) moving an asteroid to an advantageous location for use by Earth; and (2) mining an asteroids and transporting raw materials back to Earth. The asteroid explorer/sample return mission is designed in the context of both scenarios and is the first phase of a long range plane for humans to utilize asteroid resources. The report concentrates specifically on the selection of the most promising asteroids for exploration and the development of an exploration scenario. Future utilization as well as subsystem requirements of an asteroid sample return probe are also addressed.

  3. Compensatable muon collider calorimeter with manageable backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Rajendran

    2015-02-17

    A method and system for reducing background noise in a particle collider, comprises identifying an interaction point among a plurality of particles within a particle collider associated with a detector element, defining a trigger start time for each of the pixels as the time taken for light to travel from the interaction point to the pixel and a trigger stop time as a selected time after the trigger start time, and collecting only detections that occur between the start trigger time and the stop trigger time in order to thereafter compensate the result from the particle collider to reduce unwanted background detection.

  4. Elastic lattice in an incommensurate background

    SciTech Connect

    Dickman, R.; Chudnovsky, E.M. )

    1995-01-01

    We study a harmonic triangular lattice, which relaxes in the presence of an incommensurate short-wavelength potential. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the elastic lattice exhibits only short-ranged translational correlations, despite the absence of defects in either lattice. Extended orientational order, however, persists in the presence of the background. Translational correlation lengths exhibit approximate power-law dependence upon cooling rate and background strength. Our results may be relevant to Wigner crystals, atomic monolayers on crystals surfaces, and flux-line and magnetic bubble lattices.

  5. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1988-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, Earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  6. 32 CFR 735.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 735.2 Section 735.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REPORTING BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN COOPERATION...) policy is that military services will require their members to make official record of births,...

  7. 32 CFR 735.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 735.2 Section 735.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REPORTING BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN COOPERATION...) policy is that military services will require their members to make official record of births,...

  8. 32 CFR 735.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 735.2 Section 735.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REPORTING BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN COOPERATION...) policy is that military services will require their members to make official record of births,...

  9. 32 CFR 735.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 735.2 Section 735.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REPORTING BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN COOPERATION...) policy is that military services will require their members to make official record of births,...

  10. 32 CFR 735.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 735.2 Section 735.2 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL REPORTING BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN COOPERATION...) policy is that military services will require their members to make official record of births,...

  11. 45 CFR 650.16 - Background rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.16 Background rights. The Foundation will acquire rights to a research performer's pre-existing technology only in exceptional circumstances where, due to the nature of the research being supported, the...

  12. Background Oriented Schlieren Using Celestial Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward, A., Jr. (Inventor); Hill, Michael A (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method of visualizing fluid flow around an object, such as an aircraft or wind turbine, by aligning the object between an imaging system and a celestial object having a speckled background, taking images, and comparing those images to obtain fluid flow visualization.

  13. 40 CFR 761.360 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 761.360 Section 761.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... procedure is used to quickly and effectively remove PCBs on surfaces. It is important to select and use...

  14. 32 CFR 3.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... contracts, grants or cooperative agreements. “Other transactions” are generally not subject to the Federal laws and regulations limited in applicability to contracts, grants or cooperative agreements. As such..., GRANTS, OR COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS FOR PROTOTYPE PROJECTS § 3.2 Background. “Other transactions” is...

  15. 32 CFR 1290.5 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 1290.5 Section 1290.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS PREPARING AND PROCESSING MINOR OFFENSES AND VIOLATION NOTICES REFERRED TO U.S. DISTRICT COURTS §...

  16. 32 CFR 770.27 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Installations in the State of Hawaii § 770.27 Background. (a) Naval installations in Hawaii constitute a significant element of the national... only. (f) These entry regulations are being promulgated under the authority of Commander, Naval...

  17. 32 CFR 770.37 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Naval Installations and Property in Puerto Rico § 770.37 Background. In accordance with 32 CFR 765.4, Naval installations and properties in Puerto Rico are not open to the general public, i.e., they are “closed” military bases. Therefore admission to...

  18. 32 CFR 770.49 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington § 770.49 Background. (a) Puget Sound Naval Shipyard is a major naval ship repair facility, with operational requirements to complete repairs and overhaul of conventionally powered and nuclear powered...

  19. Computer Software & Intellectual Property. Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This background paper reviews copyright, patent, and trade secret protections as these issues are related to computer software. Topics discussed include current issues regarding legal protection for computer software including the necessity for defining intellectual property, determining what should or should not be protected, commerical piracy,…

  20. 16 CFR 1031.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.2 Background. (a) Congress enacted the Consumer Product Safety Act in 1972 to protect consumers against unreasonable risks of injury...

  1. 14 CFR 1214.302 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1214.302 Section 1214.302 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for Space... dedicated space flight training, allowing them to concentrate their efforts on the accomplishment of...

  2. 14 CFR 1214.302 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Background. 1214.302 Section 1214.302 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for Space... dedicated space flight training, allowing them to concentrate their efforts on the accomplishment of...

  3. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  4. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  5. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  6. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  7. 45 CFR 650.16 - Background rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Background rights. 650.16 Section 650.16 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.16... in exceptional circumstances where, due to the nature of the research being supported, the...

  8. 45 CFR 650.16 - Background rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Background rights. 650.16 Section 650.16 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PATENTS § 650.16... in exceptional circumstances where, due to the nature of the research being supported, the...

  9. BACKGROUND RADIATION IN THE UNIVERSE - Short Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R. D.

    A determination of the motion of the Sun and Local Group relative to the backdrop of galaxies extending to 70 Mpc is used to correct the observed dipole anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background. The resultant intrinsic dipole component of ΔT/T = 3±2×10-4 is consistent with no detected anisotropy.

  10. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deporzio, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and scintillating bolometer vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Modified Zinc Molybdate Bolometers are used to produce scintillation light when stimulated by alpha background. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. Results are used to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications on bolometer searches.

  11. 10 CFR 1022.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.1 Background. (a) Executive Order (E.O.) 11988—Floodplain Management (May 24, 1977) directs... effects of any action it may take in a floodplain are evaluated and that its planning programs and...

  12. 10 CFR 1022.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.1 Background. (a) Executive Order (E.O.) 11988—Floodplain Management (May 24, 1977) directs... effects of any action it may take in a floodplain are evaluated and that its planning programs and...

  13. 10 CFR 1022.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.1 Background. (a) Executive Order (E.O.) 11988—Floodplain Management (May 24, 1977) directs... effects of any action it may take in a floodplain are evaluated and that its planning programs and...

  14. 10 CFR 1022.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.1 Background. (a) Executive Order (E.O.) 11988—Floodplain Management (May 24, 1977) directs... effects of any action it may take in a floodplain are evaluated and that its planning programs and...

  15. 10 CFR 1022.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS General § 1022.1 Background. (a) Executive Order (E.O.) 11988—Floodplain Management (May 24, 1977) directs... effects of any action it may take in a floodplain are evaluated and that its planning programs and...

  16. 16 CFR 1031.17 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1031.17 Section 1031.17 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION... that it was launching a pilot program to open CPSC staff activities for public review and comment....

  17. 14 CFR 1214.302 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Background. 1214.302 Section 1214.302 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for Space... dedicated space flight training, allowing them to concentrate their efforts on the accomplishment of...

  18. 14 CFR 1214.302 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Background. 1214.302 Section 1214.302 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for Space... dedicated space flight training, allowing them to concentrate their efforts on the accomplishment of...

  19. 10 CFR 37.25 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Background investigations. 37.25 Section 37.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE... at a minimum: (1) Fingerprinting and an FBI identification and criminal history records check...

  20. ESTIMATION OF BACKGROUND LEVELS OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from hazardous waste site investigations frequently come from two or more statistical populations. Assessment of "background" levels of contaminants can be a significant problem. This problem is being investigated at the US EPA's EMSL in Las Vegas. This paper describes a ...

  1. 32 CFR 770.49 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 770.49 Section 770.49 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard,...

  2. 32 CFR 770.49 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 770.49 Section 770.49 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard,...

  3. 32 CFR 770.49 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 770.49 Section 770.49 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard,...

  4. 32 CFR 770.49 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 770.49 Section 770.49 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard,...

  5. 38 CFR 200.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the fullest extent possible, analyses and consultations required by other environmental laws be... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.2 Background. (a) The NEPA and the Council on Environmental Quality... prescribe procedures to be followed. Other laws, executive orders, and regulations provide related...

  6. 38 CFR 200.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the fullest extent possible, analyses and consultations required by other environmental laws be... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.2 Background. (a) The NEPA and the Council on Environmental Quality... prescribe procedures to be followed. Other laws, executive orders, and regulations provide related...

  7. 38 CFR 200.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the fullest extent possible, analyses and consultations required by other environmental laws be... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.2 Background. (a) The NEPA and the Council on Environmental Quality... prescribe procedures to be followed. Other laws, executive orders, and regulations provide related...

  8. 38 CFR 200.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the fullest extent possible, analyses and consultations required by other environmental laws be... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.2 Background. (a) The NEPA and the Council on Environmental Quality... prescribe procedures to be followed. Other laws, executive orders, and regulations provide related...

  9. 33 CFR 236.4 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY § 236.4 Background. (a) The role of the Corps of Engineers in the development of water and related..., water quality, fish and wildlife and low-flow augmentation. Laws, executive orders, and national... preserve or enhance critical habitat for fish and wildlife; maintain or enhance water quality;...

  10. Social Background Differences in Early Family Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Robert; Landale, Nancy S.; Daniels, Kimberly; Cheng, Yen-Hsin Alice

    2009-01-01

    Social background has historically been recognized as a major factor influencing family behavior, though recent work has largely emphasized racial/ethnic influences. Here we use 1994 - 1995 and 2001 - 2002 Add Health data to examine the cohabitation, first marriage, and first birth experience of young women. In a multi state life table context,…

  11. 22 CFR 305.3 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.3 Background investigations. Section 22 of the Peace Corps Act states that to ensure enrollment of a Volunteer is consistent with the national interest, no applicant is eligible for Peace Corps Volunteer...

  12. 22 CFR 305.3 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.3 Background investigations. Section 22 of the Peace Corps Act states that to ensure enrollment of a Volunteer is consistent with the national interest, no applicant is eligible for Peace Corps Volunteer...

  13. 22 CFR 305.3 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.3 Background investigations. Section 22 of the Peace Corps Act states that to ensure enrollment of a Volunteer is consistent with the national interest, no applicant is eligible for Peace Corps Volunteer...

  14. 22 CFR 305.3 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.3 Background investigations. Section 22 of the Peace Corps Act states that to ensure enrollment of a Volunteer is consistent with the national interest, no applicant is eligible for Peace Corps Volunteer...

  15. 22 CFR 305.3 - Background investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS ELIGIBILITY AND STANDARDS FOR PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEER SERVICE § 305.3 Background investigations. Section 22 of the Peace Corps Act states that to ensure enrollment of a Volunteer is consistent with the national interest, no applicant is eligible for Peace Corps Volunteer...

  16. 40 CFR 761.380 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 761.380 Section 761.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE...

  17. 23 CFR 777.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... NATURAL HABITAT § 777.3 Background. (a) Executive Order 11990 (42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121... natural habitats which result from projects funded pursuant to title 23, U.S. Code, as eligible for... consultation procedures relative to impacts to species listed under the authority of the Act and their...

  18. 23 CFR 777.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... NATURAL HABITAT § 777.3 Background. (a) Executive Order 11990 (42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121... natural habitats which result from projects funded pursuant to title 23, U.S. Code, as eligible for... consultation procedures relative to impacts to species listed under the authority of the Act and their...

  19. 23 CFR 777.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... NATURAL HABITAT § 777.3 Background. (a) Executive Order 11990 (42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121... natural habitats which result from projects funded pursuant to title 23, U.S. Code, as eligible for... consultation procedures relative to impacts to species listed under the authority of the Act and their...

  20. 23 CFR 777.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NATURAL HABITAT § 777.3 Background. (a) Executive Order 11990 (42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121... natural habitats which result from projects funded pursuant to title 23, U.S. Code, as eligible for... consultation procedures relative to impacts to species listed under the authority of the Act and their...

  1. 23 CFR 777.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... NATURAL HABITAT § 777.3 Background. (a) Executive Order 11990 (42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121... natural habitats which result from projects funded pursuant to title 23, U.S. Code, as eligible for... consultation procedures relative to impacts to species listed under the authority of the Act and their...

  2. OH Background Measurements and Their Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauldin, L.; Kosciuch, E.; Josh, M.

    2007-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical, OH is known to be the primary gas phase oxidant in most tropospheric environments, however other species can contribute to the total overall oxidizing capacity. Our CIMS technique for the measurement of OH involves both a signal and a background measurement. The signal measurement is a measure of all species that react with SO2 to produce H2SO4 (which presumably is mainly OH), while the background accounts for all species that can convert SO2 into H2SO4, yet do not react with propane. This background measurement while necessary for the determination of OH, is also a measure of other strong oxidants and can be quite large even in the absence of OH (as determined via the CIMS technique). Here we will focus on OH background data obtained in marine, urban, and remote continental conditions. Correlation of these measurements with other species such as NO and SO2 will be presented. Atmospheric implications will also be discussed.

  3. 38 CFR 200.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.2 Background. (a) The NEPA and the Council on Environmental Quality... means, consistent with other essential considerations of national policy, to improve and coordinate... widest range of beneficial uses of the environment without degradation, risk to health or safety,...

  4. 40 CFR 90.422 - Background sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drawing a sample during the collection phase of each test cycle mode. Hence, a single cumulative... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background sample. 90.422 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust...

  5. 40 CFR 105.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., method or device in their waste treatment and pollution abatement programs. The wastewater management... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT General § 105.1 Background. The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)...

  6. 40 CFR 105.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., method or device in their waste treatment and pollution abatement programs. The wastewater management... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS RECOGNITION AWARDS UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT General § 105.1 Background. The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA)...

  7. Can one measure the Cosmic Neutrino Background?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faessler, Amand; Hodák, Rastislav; Kovalenko, Sergey; Šimkovic, Fedor

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) yields information about our Universe at around 380,000 years after the Big Bang (BB). Due to the weak interaction of the neutrinos with matter, the Cosmic Neutrino Background (CNB) should give information about a much earlier time of our Universe, around one second after the BB. Probably, the most promising method to “see” the CNB is the capture of the electron neutrinos from the Background by Tritium, which then decays into 3He and an electron with the energy of the the Q-value = 18.562keV plus the electron neutrino rest mass. The “KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino” (KATRIN) experiment, which is in preparation, seems presently the most sensitive proposed method for measuring the electron antineutrino mass. At the same time, KATRIN can also look by the reaction νe(˜ 1.95K) +3H →3He + e‑(Q = 18.6keV + m νec2). The capture of the Cosmic Background Neutrinos (CNB) should show in the electron spectrum as a peak by the electron neutrino rest mass above Q. Here, the possibility to see the CNB with KATRIN is studied. A detection of the CNB by KATRIN seems not to be possible at the moment. But KATRIN should be able to determine an upper limit for the local electron neutrino density of the CNB.

  8. Model-based target and background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Markus; Krueger, Wolfgang; Heinze, Norbert

    2000-07-01

    Up to now most approaches of target and background characterization (and exploitation) concentrate solely on the information given by pixels. In many cases this is a complex and unprofitable task. During the development of automatic exploitation algorithms the main goal is the optimization of certain performance parameters. These parameters are measured during test runs while applying one algorithm with one parameter set to images that constitute of image domains with very different domain characteristics (targets and various types of background clutter). Model based geocoding and registration approaches provide means for utilizing the information stored in GIS (Geographical Information Systems). The geographical information stored in the various GIS layers can define ROE (Regions of Expectations) and may allow for dedicated algorithm parametrization and development. ROI (Region of Interest) detection algorithms (in most cases MMO (Man- Made Object) detection) use implicit target and/or background models. The detection algorithms of ROIs utilize gradient direction models that have to be matched with transformed image domain data. In most cases simple threshold calculations on the match results discriminate target object signatures from the background. The geocoding approaches extract line-like structures (street signatures) from the image domain and match the graph constellation against a vector model extracted from a GIS (Geographical Information System) data base. Apart from geo-coding the algorithms can be also used for image-to-image registration (multi sensor and data fusion) and may be used for creation and validation of geographical maps.

  9. 36 CFR 805.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to... IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 805.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act... to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to...

  10. 12 CFR 408.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to implement the procedural... Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 408.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42...

  11. 36 CFR 805.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to... IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 805.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act... to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to...

  12. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Order No. 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42...

  13. 7 CFR 799.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...), directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to implement the procedural... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 799.1 Background. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42...

  14. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  15. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  16. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  17. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  18. 7 CFR 799.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...), directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to implement the procedural... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 799.1 Background. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42...

  19. 18 CFR 707.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) General § 707.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy... required to give appropriate consideration to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to prepare detailed environmental statements on recommendations or reports on proposals...

  20. 7 CFR 799.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...), directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to implement the procedural... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 799.1 Background. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42...

  1. 12 CFR 408.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to implement the procedural... Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 408.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42...

  2. 18 CFR 707.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) General § 707.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy... required to give appropriate consideration to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to prepare detailed environmental statements on recommendations or reports on proposals...

  3. 7 CFR 799.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...), directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to implement the procedural... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS-COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 799.1 Background. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42...

  4. 18 CFR 707.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) General § 707.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy... required to give appropriate consideration to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to prepare detailed environmental statements on recommendations or reports on proposals...

  5. 36 CFR 805.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to... IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 805.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act... to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to...

  6. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Order No. 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42...

  7. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Order No. 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42...

  8. 36 CFR 805.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue regulations to... IMPLEMENTATION OF NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 805.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act... to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to...

  9. 18 CFR 707.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) General § 707.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy... required to give appropriate consideration to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to prepare detailed environmental statements on recommendations or reports on proposals...

  10. 18 CFR 707.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) General § 707.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy... required to give appropriate consideration to the environmental effects of their proposed actions in their decisionmaking and to prepare detailed environmental statements on recommendations or reports on proposals...

  11. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Order No. 11991 of May 24, 1977, directed the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to issue... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42...

  12. Light incoherence due to background space fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Working by analogy, we use the description of light fluctuations due to random collisions of the radiating atoms to figure out why the reduction of the coherence for light propagating a cosmological distance in the fluctuating background space is negligibly small to be observed by the stellar interferometry.

  13. Thermal neutron background measurement in CJPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Z. M.; Gong, H.; Yue, Q.; Li, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the measurement of thermal neutron flux in the CJPL underground laboratory in the proximity of the CDEX experiment. A low background thermal neutron detection system is designed which applies a combination of a 3He proportional tube and a 4He proportional tube as the detector. Thermal neutrons can be captured by the 3He proportional tube while the 4He proportional tube is for the purpose of background measurement. The tube wall is made up of oxygen-free copper to reduce the background due to radioactivity of the wall material. The electronics readout system has been developed to store triggered events' waveforms so as to get the amplitude spectrum and monitor the data quality. We observed an average thermal neutron flux of Φ = 4.00 ± 0.08 ×10-6 /cm2 s in the CJPL experiment hall in the proximity of CDEX experiment and the neutron and background events both distribute uniformly along the tube.

  14. Background-Oriented Schlieren Pattern Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Wind Tunnel Model using Background-Oriented Schlieren”. volume AIAA 2010-1736. US Air Force Test and Evaluation Days, Nashville...1 1.2 System Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.3 Existing Work...extensively been through trial and error and PIV particle size recommendations. 3 1.2 System Description The BOS technique is based on analyzing the

  15. 33 CFR 236.4 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control, beach erosion control and hurricane protection, hydroelectric power, recreation, water supply... Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WATER... QUALITY § 236.4 Background. (a) The role of the Corps of Engineers in the development of water and...

  16. 33 CFR 236.4 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... control, beach erosion control and hurricane protection, hydroelectric power, recreation, water supply... Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WATER... QUALITY § 236.4 Background. (a) The role of the Corps of Engineers in the development of water and...

  17. 33 CFR 236.4 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... control, beach erosion control and hurricane protection, hydroelectric power, recreation, water supply... Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WATER... QUALITY § 236.4 Background. (a) The role of the Corps of Engineers in the development of water and...

  18. Contemporary Rhetoric: A Conceptual Background with Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterowd, W. Ross, Ed.

    Designed for use by composition students as well as teachers, the essays and background discussions in this book address themselves to questions of theory and practice in rhetoric. The book is divided into sections on invention, form, and style, and contains articles by such authors as Janet Emig, Wayne C. Booth, Richard L. Larson, Kenneth Burke,…

  19. Does Social Background Influence Political Science Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiruneh, Gizachew

    2013-01-01

    This paper tests a hypothesized linear relationship between social background and final grades in several political science courses that I taught at the University of Central Arkansas. I employ a cross-sectional research design and ordinary least square (OLS) estimators to test the foregoing hypothesis. Relying on a sample of up to 204…

  20. Building for Reauthorization: Background and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    The report provides background information on the next reauthorization of the federal Higher Education Act, and is intended for college and university financial aid officers. An introductory section chronicles the history of federal legislation for student financial aid. The next section outlines the congressional reauthorization process,…