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  1. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  2. What Are Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information Skip sharing on ... media links Share this: Page Content What are neural tube defects? Neural (pronounced NOOR-uhl ) tube defects ...

  3. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies. PMID:25032496

  4. Genetic background influences embryonic lethality and the occurrence of neural tube defects in Men1 null mice: relevance to genetic modifiers.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Manuel C; Harding, Brian; Reed, Anita A C; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Walls, Gerard V; Bowl, Michael R; Sharpe, James; Wedden, Sarah; Moss, Julie E; Ross, Allyson; Davidson, Duncan; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2009-10-01

    Germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene cause parathyroid, pancreatic and pituitary tumours in man. MEN1 mutations also cause familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and the same MEN1 mutations, in different families, can cause either FIHP or MEN1. This suggests a role for genetic background and modifier genes in altering the expression of a mutation. We investigated the effects of genetic background on the phenotype of embryonic lethality that occurs in a mouse model for MEN1. Men1(+/-) mice were backcrossed to generate C57BL/6 and 129S6/SvEv incipient congenic strains, and used to obtain homozygous Men1(-/-) mice. No viable Men1(-/-) mice were obtained. The analysis of 411 live embryos obtained at 9.5-16.5 days post-coitum (dpc) revealed that significant deviations from the expected Mendelian 1:2:1 genotype ratio were first observed at 12.5 and 14.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively (P<0.05). Moreover, live Men1(-/-) embryos were absent by 13.5 and 15.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively thereby indicating an earlier lethality by 2 days in the 129S6/SvEv strain (P<0.01). Men1(-/-) embryos had macroscopic haemorrhages, and histology and optical projection tomography revealed them to have internal haemorrhages, myocardial hypotrophy, pericardial effusion, hepatic abnormalities and neural tube defects. The neural tube defects occurred exclusively in 129S6/SvEv embryos (21 vs 0%, P<0.01). Thus, our findings demonstrate the importance of genetic background in influencing the phenotypes of embryonic lethality and neural tube defects in Men1(-/-) mice, and implicate a role for genetic modifiers.

  5. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Hasenau, Susan M; Covington, Chandice

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs) and the role of folic acid in their prevention. NTDs are all too common and devastating outcomes of many pregnancies. The brain and spinal cord malformations that develop during gestation in the NTD-affected pregnancies are expressed through various anomalies. Estimates by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for 1995 reported over 4,000 occurrences of NTDs in the United States alone. Research has demonstrated that the preconception and prenatal addition of folic acid can greatly reduce the incidence of NTDs. Recent advances in genetic studies have increased awareness of the important role of folic acid in preventing NTDs. Identification of a genetic marker will allow for specific treatment of those women at high risk for NTDs. Despite recommendations from the CDC for folic acid supplementation, there is insufficient awareness of these guidelines by both the public and by healthcare providers. A National campaign to promote awareness of the role of folic acid in the prevention of NTDs has been initiated, and has been successful at reducing NTDs's by 19%. Nurses can be instrumental in the dissemination of information not only to women of childbearing age, but also to other nurses and physicians. PMID:11984276

  6. Screening for Open Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Krantz, David A; Hallahan, Terrence W; Carmichael, Jonathan B

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical prenatal screening was initiated with the use of maternal serum alpha fetoprotein to screen for open neural tube defects. Screening now includes multiple marker and sequential screening protocols involving serum and ultrasound markers to screen for aneuploidy. Recently cell-free DNA screening for aneuploidy has been initiated, but does not screen for neural tube defects. Although ultrasound is highly effective in identifying neural tube defects in high-risk populations, in decentralized health systems maternal serum screening still plays a significant role. Abnormal maternal serum alpha fetoprotein alone or in combination with other markers may indicate adverse pregnancy outcome in the absence of open neural tube defects. PMID:27235920

  7. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R; Kindt, Lexy M; Kangas, Ashley M; Liang, Jennifer Ostrom

    2015-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation.

  8. Folic Acid Helps Prevent Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Folic Acid Helps Prevent Neural Tube Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature you selected is no longer available. In 10 seconds you will be automatically redirected to the CDC. ...

  9. Epidemiology of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omar B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Khalil, Mohamed I.; Al-Enazy, Naif M.; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To find the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs), and compare the findings with local and international data, and highlight the important role of folic acid supplementation and flour fortification with folic acid in preventing NTDs. Methods: This is a retrospective study of data retrieved from the medical records of live newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), Security Forces Hospital (SFH), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with NTDs spanning 14 years (1996-2009). All pregnant women on their first antenatal visit to the primary care clinic were prescribed folic acid 0.5 mg daily, or 5 mg if there is a family history of NTD. The pre-fortification prevalence is compared to post-fortification, before and after excluding syndromic, genetic, and chromosomal causes. The results were compared with reports from other parts of Saudi Arabia and internationally, through a literature search using MEDLINE. Results: The prevalence of NTDs during the period was 1.2 per 1000 live births. The pre-fortification of flour with folic acid prevalence was 1.46 per 1000 live births. The post-fortification prevalence was 1.05 (p=0.103). After excluding syndromic, genetic, and chromosomal causes from calculation of the prevalence, there was a significant reduction in the prevalence, from 1.46 to 0.81 per 1000 live births (p=0.0088). Syndromic, genetic, and chromosomal causes were identified in 20 cases (19.4%). Only 2% of mothers received preconception folic acid, and only 10% of them received it during the first 4 weeks of gestation. Conclusion: Despite the implementation of fortification of flour with folic acid since 2001, the prevalence of NTDs in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is still high. This is due to the impact of genetic, syndromic, and chromosomal causes of NTD not preventable by folic acid. Other factors like unplanned pregnancy and lack of awareness of the role of folic acid in preventing nonsyndromic causes, play a significant role. PMID

  10. Are There Disorders or Conditions Associated with Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Are there disorders or conditions associated with neural tube defects? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Infants born with neural tube defects that are not immediately fatal may ...

  11. Epithelial fusion during neural tube morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun-Jin; Abdullah, N.L.; Mohd.-Zin, S.W.; Mohammed, R. S.; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion and fusion of epithelial sheets marks the completion of many morphogenetic events during embryogenesis. Neural tube closure involves an epithelial fusion sequence in which the apposing neural folds adhere initially via cellular protrusions, proceed to a more stable union, and subsequently undergo remodelling of the epithelial structures to yield a separate neural tube roof plate and overlying non-neural ectoderm. Cellular protrusions comprise lamellipodia and filopodia, and studies in several different systems emphasise the critical role of RhoGTPases in their regulation. How epithelia establish initial adhesion is poorly understood but, in neurulation, may involve interactions between EphA receptors and their ephrinA ligands. Epithelial remodelling is spatially and temporally correlated with apoptosis in the dorsal neural tube midline, but experimental inhibition of this cell death does not prevent fusion and remodelling. A variety of molecular signalling systems have been implicated in the late events of morphogenesis, but genetic redundancy, for example among the integrins and laminins, makes identification of the critical players challenging. An improved understanding of epithelial fusion can provide insights into normal developmental processes, and may also indicate the mode of origin of clinically important birth defects. PMID:22945349

  12. Microtubules, polarity and vertebrate neural tube morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cearns, Michael D; Escuin, Sarah; Alexandre, Paula; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are key cellular components, long known to participate in morphogenetic events that shape the developing embryo. However, the links between the cellular functions of MTs, their effects on cell shape and polarity, and their role in large-scale morphogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, these relationships were examined with respect to two strategies for generating the vertebrate neural tube: bending and closure of the mammalian neural plate; and cavitation of the teleost neural rod. The latter process has been compared with 'secondary' neurulation that generates the caudal spinal cord in mammals. MTs align along the apico-basal axis of the mammalian neuroepithelium early in neural tube closure, participating functionally in interkinetic nuclear migration, which indirectly impacts on cell shape. Whether MTs play other functional roles in mammalian neurulation remains unclear. In the zebrafish, MTs are important for defining the neural rod midline prior to its cavitation, both by localizing apical proteins at the tissue midline and by orienting cell division through a mirror-symmetric MT apparatus that helps to further define the medial localization of apical polarity proteins. Par proteins have been implicated in centrosome positioning in neuroepithelia as well as in the control of polarized morphogenetic movements in the neural rod. Understanding of MT functions during early nervous system development has so far been limited, partly by techniques that fail to distinguish 'cause' from 'effect'. Future developments will likely rely on novel ways to selectively impair MT function in order to investigate the roles they play.

  13. Folate metabolism and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N

    1995-01-01

    Neural tube defects may due to a number of factors acting on a susceptible embryo. The most widely accepted is a lack of folic acid at a critical time of development. Studies in which folic acid supplements have been given are reviewed. The results of these support the policy of giving folic acid, starting before conception. The metabolism of folate and vitamin B12 is discussed, including specific metabolic disorders; although there is no evidence that these play any part in causing neural tube defects. The special problems that occur among women taking anti-epileptic drugs are also considered. There are slight differences in the recommendations that have been made for supplementation, and further studies are needed before there can be complete agreement. PMID:8579214

  14. Neural Tube Defects, Folic Acid and Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Blom, Henk J.

    2013-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common complex congenital malformations resulting from failure of the neural tube closure during embryogenesis. It is established that folic acid supplementation decreases the prevalence of NTDs, which has led to national public health policies regarding folic acid. To date, animal studies have not provided sufficient information to establish the metabolic and/or genomic mechanism(s) underlying human folic acid responsiveness in NTDs. However, several lines of evidence suggest that not only folates but also choline, B12 and methylation metabolisms are involved in NTDs. Decreased B12 vitamin and increased total choline or homocysteine in maternal blood have been shown to be associated with increased NTDs risk. Several polymorphisms of genes involved in these pathways have also been implicated in risk of development of NTDs. This raises the question whether supplementation with B12 vitamin, betaine or other methylation donors in addition to folic acid periconceptional supplementation will further reduce NTD risk. The objective of this article is to review the role of methylation metabolism in the onset of neural tube defects. PMID:24048206

  15. Diabetes and apoptosis: neural crest cells and neural tube

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, James H.; Dan Wang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Birth defects resulting from diabetic pregnancy are associated with apoptosis of a critical mass of progenitor cells early during the formation of the affected organ(s). Insufficient expression of genes that regulate viability of the progenitor cells is responsible for the apoptosis. In particular, maternal diabetes inhibits expression of a gene, Pax3, that encodes a transcription factor which is expressed in neural crest and neuroepithelial cells. As a result of insufficient Pax3, cardiac neural crest and neuroepithelial cells undergo apoptosis by a process dependent on the p53 tumor suppressor protein. This, then provides a cellular explanation for the cardiac outflow tract and neural tube and defects induced by diabetic pregnancy. PMID:19333760

  16. Nodal signaling is required for closure of the anterior neural tube in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aquilina-Beck, Allisan; Ilagan, Kristine; Liu, Qin; Liang, Jennifer O

    2007-01-01

    Background Nodals are secreted signaling proteins with many roles in vertebrate development. Here, we identify a new role for Nodal signaling in regulating closure of the rostral neural tube of zebrafish. Results We find that the neural tube in the presumptive forebrain fails to close in zebrafish Nodal signaling mutants. For instance, the cells that will give rise to the pineal organ fail to move from the lateral edges of the neural plate to the midline of the diencephalon. The open neural tube in Nodal signaling mutants may be due in part to reduced function of N-cadherin, a cell adhesion molecule expressed in the neural tube and required for neural tube closure. N-cadherin expression and localization to the membrane are reduced in fish that lack Nodal signaling. Further, N-cadherin mutants and morphants have a pineal phenotype similar to that of mutants with deficiencies in the Nodal pathway. Overexpression of an activated form of the TGFβ Type I receptor Taram-A (Taram-A*) cell autonomously rescues mesendoderm formation in fish with a severe decrease in Nodal signaling. We find that overexpression of Taram-A* also corrects their open neural tube defect. This suggests that, as in mammals, the mesoderm and endoderm have an important role in regulating closure of the anterior neural tube of zebrafish. Conclusion This work helps establish a role for Nodal signals in neurulation, and suggests that defects in Nodal signaling could underlie human neural tube defects such as exencephaly, a fatal condition characterized by an open neural tube in the anterior brain. PMID:17996054

  17. Neural tube defect and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Wani, M A

    2000-01-01

    Neural tube defect (NTD) is a group of congenital anomalies, which include anencephaly, encephalocele, iniencephaly, meningocele, myelomeningocele, myeloschisis, lipomeningocele, and rashischisis. Congenital malformations of the central nervous system constitute more than half of all congenital malformations with an incidence of 1-2/1000 births. The condition is thought to arise from multifactorial etiology with a distinct genetic predisposition. This paper discusses the pathogenesis of NTD and explores the use of folic acid for the prevention of this serious congenital malformation. Two studies, which have shown a significant protective effect of folic acid use on NTD prevention in high-risk mothers, are cited. In considering the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation on NTD prevention, obstetricians, pediatricians, neonatologists, and family doctors are called to initiate a collective effort to increase awareness among women in the childbearing age on the need of daily multivitamin intake with folic acid prior to pregnancy.

  18. Aneuploidy among prenatally detected neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hume, R.F. Jr.; Lampinen, J.; Martin, L.S.; Johnson, M.P.; Evans, M.I.

    1996-01-11

    We have reported previously a 10% aneuploidy detection rate among 39 cases of fetal neural tube defects (NTD). Subsequently we amassed an additional experience of over 17,000 prenatal diagnosis cases over a 5-year period. During this period 106 cases of NTDs were identified; 44 with anencephaly, 62 with open spina bifida. The average maternal age of this population with NTDs was 29 years (15-40); 6 patients declined amniocentesis. Six of 100 cytogenetic studies were aneuploid; on anencephalic fetus had inherited a maternal marker chromosome, and 5 NTD cases had trisomy 18. The average maternal age of the aneuploid cases was 21 (19-40); 3 were 35 years or older. Four of 5 trisomy 18 cases had multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The overall aneuploidy detection rate in our cohort was 5-6, while aneuploidy occurred in 2% of the isolated NTD cases, and 24% of the MCA cases. Combining the earlier experience, 4/39 aneuploidy (2 trisomy 18, 4p+, del 13q) yields an aneuploidy detection frequency of 10/145 (7%), of which most (7/10) had trisomy 18. These data support fetal karyotyping for accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and recurrence-risk counseling. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Neural Tube Defects: From a Proteomic Standpoint

    PubMed Central

    Puvirajesinghe, Tania M.; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are congenital birth defects classified according to their resulting morphological characteristics in newborn patients. Current diagnosis of NTDs relies largely on the structural evaluation of fetuses using ultrasound imaging, with biochemical characterization used as secondary screening tools. The multigene etiology of NTDs has been aided by genetic studies, which have discovered panels of genes mutated in these diseases that encode receptors and cytoplasmic signaling molecules with poorly defined functions. Animal models ranging from flies to mice have been used to determine the function of these genes and identify their associated molecular cascades. More emphasis is now being placed on the identification of biochemical markers from clinical samples and model systems based on mass spectrometry, which open novel avenues in the understanding of NTDs at protein, metabolic and molecular levels. This article reviews how the use of proteomics can push forward the identification of novel biomarkers and molecular networks implicated in NTDs, an indispensable step in the improvement of patient management. PMID:25789708

  20. Folate status and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Molloy, A M; Mills, J L; Kirke, P N; Weir, D G; Scott, J M

    1999-01-01

    Periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents approximately 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs). While most women carrying affected fetuses do not have deficient blood folate levels, the risk of having an NTD affected child is inversely correlated with pregnancy red cell folate levels. Current research is focused on the discovery of genetic abnormalities in folate related enzymes which might explain the role of folate in NTD prevention. The first candidate gene to emerge was the C677T variant of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Normal subjects who are homozygous for the mutation (TT) have red cell folate status some 20% lower than expected. It is now established that the prevalence of the TT genotype is significantly higher among spina bifida cases and their parents. Nevertheless, our studies show that the variant does not account for the reduced blood folate levels in many NTD affected mothers. We conclude that low maternal folate status may in itself be the most important risk factor for NTDs and that food fortification may be the only population strategy of benefit in the effort to eliminate NTDs. PMID:10609896

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on ... AFP, as well as high levels of acetylcholinesterase; health care providers might conduct this test to confirm high ...

  2. Neural tube defects: issues in prenatal diagnosis and counselling.

    PubMed

    Main, D M; Mennuti, M T

    1986-01-01

    Neural tube defects are a heterogeneous group of malformations resulting from failure of neural tube closure during early embryogenesis. They range widely in severity from the lethal condition of anencephaly, to severely disabling meningomyeloceles, to completely surgically correctable meningoceles. Occurring in 1.4 to 1.6 per 1000 live births, neural tube defects rank second only to cardiac abnormalities as a cause of major congenital malformations in the United States. Technical developments over the past decade have enabled better detection of these conditions prenatally. Understanding of the etiology, neonatal treatment, and potential prevention of neural tube defects is increasing. Further, the ethical issues of treatment and screening are being widely discussed in both news magazines and the Congressional Record. Thus, it is timely to review this important area of prenatal counselling, diagnosis, and management.

  3. What Are the Treatments for Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for neural tube defects? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... the long term. There is no treatment for anencephaly or iniencephaly. 2 These conditions are usually fatal ...

  4. [Folic acid: Primary prevention of neural tube defects. Literature Review].

    PubMed

    Llamas Centeno, M J; Miguélez Lago, C

    2016-03-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are the most common congenital malformations of the nervous system, they have a multifactorial etiology, are caused by exposure to chemical, physical or biological toxic agents, factors deficiency, diabetes, obesity, hyperthermia, genetic alterations and unknown causes. Some of these factors are associated with malnutrition by interfering with the folic acid metabolic pathway, the vitamin responsible for neural tube closure. Its deficit produce anomalies that can cause abortions, stillbirths or newborn serious injuries that cause disability, impaired quality of life and require expensive treatments to try to alleviate in some way the alterations produced in the embryo. Folic acid deficiency is considered the ultimate cause of the production of neural tube defects, it is clear the reduction in the incidence of Espina Bifida after administration of folic acid before conception, this leads us to want to further study the action of folic acid and its application in the primary prevention of neural tube defects. More than 40 countries have made the fortification of flour with folate, achieving encouraging data of decrease in the prevalence of neural tube defects. This paper attempts to make a literature review, which clarify the current situation and future of the prevention of neural tube defects.

  5. Periconceptional Folate Deficiency and Implications in Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Safi, J.; Joyeux, L.; Chalouhi, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are preventable etiological and epigenetic factors causing congenital abnormalities, first cause of infant mortality. Folate deficiency has a well-established teratogenic effect, leading to an increasing risk of neural tube defects. This paper highlights the most recent medical literature about folate deficiency, be it maternal or paternal. It then focuses on associated deficiencies as nutritional deficiencies are multiple and interrelated. Observational and interventional studies have all been consistent with a 50–70% protective effect of adequate women consumption of folates on neural tube defects. Since strategies to modify women's dietary habits and vitamin use have achieved little progress, scientific as well as political effort is mandatory in order to implement global preventive public health strategies aimed at improving the alimentation of women in reproductive age, especially folic acid supplementation. Even with the recent breakthrough of fetal surgery for myelomeningocele, the emphasis should still be on prevention as the best practice rather than treatment of neural tube defects. PMID:22900183

  6. Periconceptional folate deficiency and implications in neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Safi, J; Joyeux, L; Chalouhi, G E

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are preventable etiological and epigenetic factors causing congenital abnormalities, first cause of infant mortality. Folate deficiency has a well-established teratogenic effect, leading to an increasing risk of neural tube defects. This paper highlights the most recent medical literature about folate deficiency, be it maternal or paternal. It then focuses on associated deficiencies as nutritional deficiencies are multiple and interrelated. Observational and interventional studies have all been consistent with a 50-70% protective effect of adequate women consumption of folates on neural tube defects. Since strategies to modify women's dietary habits and vitamin use have achieved little progress, scientific as well as political effort is mandatory in order to implement global preventive public health strategies aimed at improving the alimentation of women in reproductive age, especially folic acid supplementation. Even with the recent breakthrough of fetal surgery for myelomeningocele, the emphasis should still be on prevention as the best practice rather than treatment of neural tube defects. PMID:22900183

  7. Cellular mechanisms of posterior neural tube morphogenesis in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Michael J; Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel

    2010-03-01

    The zebrafish is a well established model system for studying neural development, yet neurulation remains poorly understood in this organism. In particular, the morphogenetic movements that shape the posterior neural tube (PNT) have not been described. Using tools for imaging neural tissue and tracking the behavior of cells in real time, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of the cellular events shaping the PNT. We observe that this tissue is formed in a stepwise manner, beginning with merging of presumptive neural domains in the tailbud (Stage 1); followed by neural convergence and infolding to shape the neural rod (Stage 2); and continued elongation of the PNT, in absence of further convergence (Stage 3). We further demonstrate that cell proliferation plays only a minimal role in PNT elongation. Overall, these mechanisms resemble those previously described in anterior regions, suggesting that, in contrast to amniotes, neurulation is a fairly uniform process in zebrafish.

  8. Role of polarized cell divisions in zebrafish neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jon

    2009-04-01

    Development of epithelial cell polarity and morphogenesis of a central lumen are essential prerequisites for the formation of the vertebrate neural tube. In teleost fish embryos this first involves the formation of a solid neural rod structure that then undergoes a process of cavitation to form a lumen. This process is initiated from a neural plate that has a distinct organization compared to other vertebrates, and involves complex cell intercalations and rearrangements. A key element is a mode of polarized cell division that generates daughters with mirror-image apico-basal polarity. These mirror-symmetric divisions have powerful morphogenetic influence because when they occur in ectopic locations they orchestrate the development of ectopic apical and basal specializations and the development of ectopic neural tubes.

  9. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  10. How Many People Are Affected By or Are at Risk for Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are affected by or are at risk for neural tube defects? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... with spina bifida. 1 The other types of neural tube defects are less common. About 340 infants are born ...

  11. Fumonisins, Tortillas and Neural Tube Defects: Untangling a Complex Issue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin mycotoxins are found in corn and corn-based foods. Fumonisin B1 (FB1), the most common, disrupts sphingolipid metabolism thereby causing species-specific diseases in animals that include cancer in rodents and (birth) neural tube defects (NTD) in LM/Bc mice. Fumonisins’ affect on human heal...

  12. LRP2 mediates folate uptake in the developing neural tube.

    PubMed

    Kur, Esther; Mecklenburg, Nora; Cabrera, Robert M; Willnow, Thomas E; Hammes, Annette

    2014-05-15

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell-surface receptor expressed in the embryonic neuroepithelium. Loss of LRP2 in the developing murine central nervous system (CNS) causes impaired closure of the rostral neural tube at embryonic stage (E) 9.0. Similar neural tube defects (NTDs) have previously been attributed to impaired folate metabolism in mice. We therefore asked whether LRP2 might be required for the delivery of folate to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Uptake assays in whole-embryo cultures showed that LRP2-deficient neuroepithelial cells are unable to mediate the uptake of folate bound to soluble folate receptor 1 (sFOLR1). Consequently, folate concentrations are significantly reduced in Lrp2(-/-) embryos compared with control littermates. Moreover, the folic-acid-dependent gene Alx3 is significantly downregulated in Lrp2 mutants. In conclusion, we show that LRP2 is essential for cellular folate uptake in the developing neural tube, a crucial step for proper neural tube closure.

  13. Transcription factor TEAD2 is involved in neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kotaro J; Kohn, Matthew J; Liu, Chengyu; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2007-09-01

    TEAD2, one of the first transcription factors expressed at the beginning of mammalian development, appears to be required during neural development. For example, Tead2 expression is greatest in the dorsal neural crest where it appears to regulate expression of Pax3, a gene essential for brain development. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that inactivation of the Tead2 gene in mice significantly increased the risk of exencephaly (a defect in neural tube closure). However, none of the embryos exhibited spina bifida, the major phenotype of Pax3 nullizygous embryos, and expression of Pax3 in E11.5 Tead2 nullizygous embryos was normal. Thus, Tead2 plays a role in neural tube closure that is independent of its putative role in Pax3 regulation. In addition, the risk of exencephaly was greatest with Tead2 nullizygous females, and could be suppressed either by folic acid or pifithrin-alpha. These results reveal a maternal genetic contribution to neural tube closure, and suggest that Tead2-deficient mice provide a model for anencephaly, a common human birth defect that can be prevented by folic acid. PMID:17868131

  14. Classification, clinical features, and genetics of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) constitute a major health burden (0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide), and remain a preventable cause of still birth, neonatal, and infant death, or significant lifelong handicaps. The malformations result from failure of the neural folds to fuse in the midline, and form the neural tube between the third and the fourth week of embryonic development. This review article discusses their classification, clinical features, and genetics. Most NTDs are sporadic and both genetic, and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in its etiology. Consanguinity was suggested to contribute to the high incidence of NTDs in several countries, including Saudi Arabia. Syndromes, often associated with chromosomal anomalies, account for <10% of all NTDs; but a higher proportion (20%) has been documented in Saudi Arabia. Genetic predisposition constitutes the major underlying risk factor, with a strong implication of genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity. PMID:25551113

  15. Prevention of Neural Tube Defects. ARC Q&A #101-45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This fact sheet uses a question-and-answer format to summarize issues related to the prevention of neural tube defects. Questions and answers address the following topics: what neural tube defects are and the most common types (spina bifida and anencephaly); occurrence of neural tube defects during the first month of pregnancy; the frequency of…

  16. Artificial neural networks: theoretical background and pharmaceutical applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Marek; Suchacz, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, there has been a growing interest in artificial neural networks, which are a rough simulation of the information processing ability of the human brain, as modern and vastly sophisticated computational techniques. This interest has also been reflected in the pharmaceutical sciences. This paper presents a review of articles on the subject of the application of neural networks as effective tools assisting the solution of various problems in science and the pharmaceutical industry, especially those characterized by multivariate and nonlinear dependencies. After a short description of theoretical background and practical basics concerning the computations performed by means of neural networks, the most important pharmaceutical applications of neural networks, with suitable references, are demonstrated. The huge role played by neural networks in pharmaceutical analysis, pharmaceutical technology, and searching for the relationships between the chemical structure and the properties of newly synthesized compounds as candidates for drugs is discussed.

  17. Neural tube defects – recent advances, unsolved questions and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Andrew J.; Stanier, Philip; Greene, Nicholas D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations affecting around 1 in every 1000 pregnancies. Here we review recent advances and currently unsolved issues in the NTD field. An innovation in clinical management has come from the demonstration that closure of open spina bifida lesions in utero can diminish neurological dysfunction in children. Primary prevention by folic acid has been enhanced through introduction of mandatory food fortification in some countries, although not yet in UK. Genetic predisposition comprises the majority of NTD risk, and genes that regulate folate one-carbon metabolism and planar cell polarity have been strongly implicated. The sequence of human neural tube closure events remains controversial, but study of mouse NTD models shows that anencephaly, open spina bifida and craniorachischisis result from failure of primary neurulation, while skin-covered spinal dysraphism results from defective secondary neurulation. Other ‘NTD’ malformations, such as encephalocele, are likely to be post-neurulation disorders. PMID:23790957

  18. Cats, frogs, and snakes: early concepts of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Disturbed neurulation fascinated scientists of all times. In Egypt, anencephalic infants were venerated as animal-headed gods. Roman law required them to be killed. The medieval world held the mother responsible, either because of assumed imagination or "miswatching," or because of suspected intercourse with animals or devils. Modern embryology and teratology began with the use of the microscope by Malpighi in 1672. Details of neural tube closure were described by Koelliker in 1861 and by His in 1874. From 1822, genetic disease and familial recurrence due to insufficient nutrition were discerned and lower social class identified as a risk factor. It took a century to define the malnutrition as insufficient folate intake. The mandatory supplementation of folate in staple foods successfully reduced the incidence of neural tube defects in the United States, Australia, Canada, and Chile, but it was not adopted by most European countries.

  19. New Techniques for the Study of Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yunping; Finnell, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common complex congenital malformations observed in newborns. When the neural tube fails to close completely, severe malformations of the brain and/or spinal cord and subsequent neurologic impairment occurs. It is widely believed that nutritional, environmental and genetic interactions contribute to NTDs. It is well established that low folate levels during pregnancy increases a mother’s risk of having pregnancy complicated by an NTD, and providing periconceptional folate supplementation reduces this risk. The underlying genetic mechanisms of NTDs are still unclear. We review the many new approaches to better understand the etiology, especially the genetic etiology, underlying this family of birth defects. PMID:27066597

  20. Novel Mutations in VANGL1 in Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kibar, Zoha; Bosoi, Ciprian M.; Kooistra, Megan; Salem, Sandra; Finnell, Richard H.; Marco, Patrizia De; Merello, Elisa; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Capra, Valeria; Gros, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations caused by failure of the neural tube to close during neurulation. Their etiology is complex involving both environmental and genetic factors. We have recently reported three mutations in the planar cell polarity gene VANGL1 associated with NTDs. The aim of the present study was to define the role of VANGL1 genetic variants in the development of NTDs in a large cohort of various ethnic origins. We identified five novel missense variants in VANGL1, p.Ser83Leu, p.Phe153Ser, p.Arg181Gln, p.Leu202Phe and p.Ala404Ser, occurring in sporadic and familial cases of spinal dysraphisms. All five variants affect evolutionary conserved residues and are absent from all controls analyzed. This study provides further evidence supporting the role of VANGL1 as a risk factor in the development of spinal NTDs. PMID:19319979

  1. Neural tube defects and impaired neural progenitor cell proliferation in Gbeta1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Okae, Hiroaki; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2010-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known for their roles in signal transduction downstream of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and both Galpha subunits and tightly associated Gbetagamma subunits regulate downstream effector molecules. Compared to Galpha subunits, the physiological roles of individual Gbeta and Ggamma subunits are poorly understood. In this study, we generated mice deficient in the Gbeta1 gene and found that Gbeta1 is required for neural tube closure, neural progenitor cell proliferation, and neonatal development. About 40% Gbeta1(-/-) embryos developed neural tube defects (NTDs) and abnormal actin organization was observed in the basal side of neuroepithelium. In addition, Gbeta1(-/-) embryos without NTDs showed microencephaly and died within 2 days after birth. GPCR agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and cell spreading, which were all found to be regulated by Galphai and Gbetagamma signaling, were abnormal in Gbeta1(-/-) neural progenitor cells. These data indicate that Gbeta1 is required for normal embryonic neurogenesis. PMID:20186915

  2. Etiology, pathogenesis and prevention of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Rengasamy

    2006-06-01

    Spina bifida, anencephaly, and encephalocele are commonly grouped together and termed neural tube defects (NTD). Failure of closure of the neural tube during development results in anencephaly or spina bifida aperta but encephaloceles are possibly post-closure defects. NTD are associated with a number of other central nervous system (CNS) and non-neural malformations. Racial, geographic and seasonal variations seem to affect their incidence. Etiology of NTD is unknown. Most of the non-syndromic NTD are of multifactorial origin. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted the molecular mechanisms of neurulation in vertebrates but the morphologic development of human neural tube is poorly understood. A multisite closure theory, extrapolated directly from mouse experiments highlighted the clinical relevance of closure mechanisms to human NTD. Animal models, such as circle tail, curly tail, loop tail, shrm and numerous knockouts provide some insight into the mechanisms of NTD. Also available in the literature are a plethora of chemically induced preclosure and a few post-closure models of NTD, which highlight the fact that CNS malformations are of hetergeneitic nature. No Mendelian pattern of inheritance has been reported. Association with single gene defects, enhanced recurrence risk among siblings, and a higher frequency in twins than in singletons indicate the presence of a strong genetic contribution to the etiology of NTD. Non-availability of families with a significant number of NTD cases makes research into genetic causation of NTD difficult. Case reports and epidemiologic studies have implicated a number of chemicals, widely differing therapeutic drugs, environmental contaminants, pollutants, infectious agents, and solvents. Maternal hyperthermia, use of valproate by epileptic women during pregnancy, deficiency and excess of certain nutrients and chronic maternal diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus) are reported to cause a manifold increase in the

  3. Neural Tube Closure in Mouse Whole Embryo Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jason; Ross, M. Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Genetic mouse models are an important tool in the study of mammalian neural tube closure (Gray & Ross, 2009; Ross, 2010). However, the study of mouse embryos in utero is limited by our inability to directly pharmacologically manipulate the embryos in isolation from the effects of maternal metabolism on the reagent of interest. Whether using a small molecule, recombinant protein, or siRNA, delivery of these substances to the mother, through the diet or by injection will subject these unstable compounds to a variety of bodily defenses that could prevent them from reaching the embryo. Investigations in cultures of whole embryos can be used to separate maternal from intrinsic fetal effects on development. Here, we present a method for culturing mouse embryos using highly enriched media in a roller incubator apparatus that allows for normal neural tube closure after dissection (Crockett, 1990). Once in culture, embryos can be manipulated using conventional in vitro techniques that would not otherwise be possible if the embryos were still in utero. Embryo siblings can be collected at various time points to study different aspects of neurulation, occurring from E7-7.5 (neural plate formation, just prior to the initiation of neurulation) to E9.5-10 (at the conclusion of cranial fold and caudal neuropore closure, Kaufman, 1992). In this protocol, we demonstrate our method for dissecting embryos at timepoints that are optimal for the study of cranial neurulation. Embryos will be dissected at E8.5 (approx. 10-12 somities), after the initiation of neural tube closure but prior to embryo turning and cranial neural fold closure, and maintained in culture till E10 (26-28 somities), when cranial neurulation should be complete. PMID:22042150

  4. Toward understanding the genetic basis of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Kibar, Z; Capra, V; Gros, P

    2007-04-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) represent a common group of severe congenital malformations that result from failure of neural tube closure during early development. Their etiology is quite complex involving environmental and genetic factors and their underlying molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Animal studies have recently demonstrated an essential role for the planar cell polarity pathway (PCP) in mediating a morphogenetic process called convergent extension during neural tube formation. Alterations in members of this pathway lead to NTDs in vertebrate models, representing novel and exciting candidates for human NTDs. Genetic studies in NTDs have focused mainly on folate-related genes based on the finding that perinatal folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of NTDs by 60-70%. A few variants in these genes have been found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for NTDs. The candidate gene approach investigating genes involved in neurulation has failed to identify major causative genes in the etiology of NTDs. Despite this history of generally negative findings, we are achieving a rapid and impressive progress in understanding the genetic basis of NTDs, based mainly on the powerful tool of animal models.

  5. Epidemiology of the neural tube defects in Kashmir Valley

    PubMed Central

    Laharwal, Masood Ahmed; Sarmast, Arif Hussain; Ramzan, Altaf Umer; Wani, Abrar Ahad; Malik, Nayil Khursheed; Arif, Sajad Hussain; Rizvi, Masooma

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most common congenital malformations affecting the brain and spinal cord and have a multifactorial etiology. Genetic and environmental factors have been found to cause these defects, both individually and in combination. Methods: A 2-year hospital-based prospective study was carried out from November 2013 to October 2015 to determine the incidence, types, demographics, risk factors, and other associated anamolies relevant to NTDs in Kashmir Valley. A detailed history of the mother was taken along with detailed clinical examination of neonate including measurement of head circumference and checking the status of fontanella, whether lax/full/bulging/or tense, type of NTD. Investigations that were done included were X-ray skull: Anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral, X-ray spine: AP and lateral, ultrasonography abdomen, magnetic resonance imaging: Spine and brain. Results: The total number of babies with NTD's was 125 with an overall incidence of 0.503. Kupwara district was having the highest incidence (1.047) and Srinagar district the lowest incidence of NTD's (0.197). Majority of NTD's (116 cases, 92.8%) were found in the rural areas. Among the different types of NTD's, spina bifida had an incidence of 0.342 (85 cases, 68%) and anencephaly had an incidence of 0.113 (28 cases, 22.4%). There was a slight preponderance of females over males with NTD's. There were 70 females (56%) and 55 males (44%), respectively, with a male: female ratio of 0.8:1 Conclusions: The incidence rates of NTDs is very high for Kashmir Valley. Geographical distribution of NTDs at this place confirms a relationship between the socioeconomic status, educational status, maternal too young or advanced age, and environmental factors for the development of a NTD. The results of this study point to the importance establishing a health policy to prevent NTD in Kashmir Valley. PMID:27127700

  6. Folic acid to reduce neonatal mortality from neural tube disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blencowe, Hannah; Cousens, Simon; Modell, Bernadette; Lawn, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) remain an important, preventable cause of mortality and morbidity. High-income countries have reported large reductions in NTDs associated with folic acid supplementation or fortification. The burden of NTDs in low-income countries and the effectiveness of folic acid fortification/supplementation are unclear. Objective To review the evidence for, and estimate the effect of, folic acid fortification/supplementation on neonatal mortality due to NTDs, especially in low-income countries. Methods We conducted systematic reviews, abstracted data meeting inclusion criteria and evaluated evidence quality using adapted Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. Where appropriate, meta-analyses were performed. Results Meta-analysis of three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of folic acid supplementation for women with a previous pregnancy with NTD indicates a 70% [95% confidence interval (CI): 35–86] reduction in recurrence (secondary prevention). For NTD primary prevention through folic acid supplementation, combining one RCT with three cohort studies which adjusted for confounding, suggested a reduction of 62% (95% CI: 49–71). A meta-analysis of eight population-based observational studies examining folic acid food fortification gave an estimated reduction in NTD incidence of 46% (95% CI: 37–54). In low-income countries an estimated 29% of neonatal deaths related to visible congenital abnormalities are attributed to NTD. Assuming that fortification reduces the incidence of NTDs, but does not alter severity or case-fatality rates, we estimate that folic acid fortification could prevent 13% of neonatal deaths currently attributed to congenital abnormalities in low-income countries. Discussion Scale-up of periconceptional supplementation programmes is challenging. Our final effect estimate was therefore based on folic acid fortification data. If folic acid food fortification achieved

  7. An increase in MECP2 dosage impairs neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Petazzi, Paolo; Akizu, Naiara; García, Alejandra; Estarás, Conchi; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rodríguez-Paredes, Manuel; Martínez-Balbás, Marian A; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel

    2014-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental for shaping the activity of the central nervous system (CNS). Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) acts as a bridge between methylated DNA and transcriptional effectors responsible for differentiation programs in neurons. The importance of MECP2 dosage in CNS is evident in Rett Syndrome and MECP2 duplication syndrome, which are neurodevelopmental diseases caused by loss-of-function mutations or duplication of the MECP2 gene, respectively. Although many studies have been performed on Rett syndrome models, little is known about the effects of an increase in MECP2 dosage. Herein, we demonstrate that MECP2 overexpression affects neural tube formation, leading to a decrease in neuroblast proliferation in the neural tube ventricular zone. Furthermore, an increase in MECP2 dose provokes premature differentiation of neural precursors accompanied by greater cell death, resulting in a loss of neuronal populations. Overall, our data indicate that correct MECP2 expression levels are required for proper nervous system development.

  8. Antenatal Diagnosis of a Rare Neural Tube Defect: Sincipital Encephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Kehila, Mehdi; Ghades, Sana; Abouda, Hassine Saber; Masmoudi, Aida; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis

    2015-01-01

    Context. Fetal sincipital encephalocele is one of the most serious congenital neural tube defects with a high risk of mortality and neonatal morbidity. Prenatal diagnosis of this malformation is important in fetal medicine. Case Report. We report a case of prenatal diagnosis of sincipital encephalocele using ultrasound and MRI imaging. The diagnosis was done at 25 weeks of gestation by identifying an anterior cephalic protrusion through a defect in the skull. Conclusion. Through this case, we discuss the differential diagnosis, management, and prognosis of such lesions. PMID:26294989

  9. Folic acid, methylation and neural tube closure in humans.

    PubMed

    Blom, Henk J

    2009-04-01

    This review provides a brief description of folate use and folic acid metabolism in relation to neural tube defect (NTD) risk. First, a meta-analysis of reduction in NTD recurrence and occurrence risk with periconceptional folic acid supplementation is presented. Second, an overview of the complex folate metabolism is given. Third, SNPs for genes involved in folate and homocysteine metabolism that have been studied in relation to NTD riskare discussed. Fourth, the questions whether folate receptor autoantibodies or hampered methylation are mechanisms underlying NTDs are briefly discussed.

  10. Neural network approach to background modeling for video object segmentation.

    PubMed

    Culibrk, Dubravko; Marques, Oge; Socek, Daniel; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a novel background modeling and subtraction approach for video object segmentation. A neural network (NN) architecture is proposed to form an unsupervised Bayesian classifier for this application domain. The constructed classifier efficiently handles the segmentation in natural-scene sequences with complex background motion and changes in illumination. The weights of the proposed NN serve as a model of the background and are temporally updated to reflect the observed statistics of background. The segmentation performance of the proposed NN is qualitatively and quantitatively examined and compared to two extant probabilistic object segmentation algorithms, based on a previously published test pool containing diverse surveillance-related sequences. The proposed algorithm is parallelized on a subpixel level and designed to enable efficient hardware implementation.

  11. Upper and lower neural tube defects: an alternate hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, B H; Fraser, F C

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that neural tube defects (NTDs) of the upper type (anencephaly, encephalocele, and thoracic spina bifida) may have a pathogenesis different from those of the lower type (lumbosacral spina bifida), since recurrent cases within a sibship were said always to be concordant with respect to NTD type. Also, spontaneous abortion, additional malformation, and recurrence rate were observed to be higher in the upper group, and there was an excess of females in upper NTD probands. To test this hypothesis, we measured the above variables in upper and lower NTDs in a sample from Quebec. We found less than full concordance (50%) of NTD type in 18 sib pairs. Recurrence rate was not significantly lower in the lower NTD group (5.6 v 5.8%). The other variables were in general agreement with previous studies, inconsistent findings possibly attributable to different NTD population incidences. These findings can be accounted for if upper and lower NTDs share a similar pathogenesis and the embryo is more susceptible during early than late neural tube formation. PMID:8230161

  12. Human neural tube defects: genetic causes and prevention.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Cama, Armando; Kibar, Zoha; Capra, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations affecting 1-2 in 1,000 live births, whose etiology is multifactorial, involving environmental and genetic factors. NTDs arise as consequence of the failure of fusion of the neural tube early during embryogenesis. NTDs' pathogenesis has been linked to genes involved in folate metabolism, consistent with an epidemiologic evidence that 70% of NTDs can be prevented by maternal periconceptional supplementation. However, polymorphisms in such genes are not linked in all populations, suggesting that other genetic factors and environmental factors could be involved. Animal models have provided crucial mechanistic information and possible candidate genes to explain susceptibility to NTDs. A crucial role has been assigned to the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, a highly conserved, non-canonical Wnt-frizzled-dishevelled signaling cascade that plays a key role in establishing and maintaining polarity in the plane of the epithelium and in the process of convergent extension during gastrulation and neurulation in vertebrates. The Loop-tail (Lp) mouse that develops craniorachischisis carry missense mutations in the PCP core gene Vangl2, that is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila Strabismus/Van gogh (Stbm/Vang). The presence of mutations in human VANGL1 and VANGL2 genes encourages us to extend the investigation to other PCP genes that, with VANGL, play an essential role in neurulation during development.

  13. Associated anomalies with neural tube defects in fetal autopsies.

    PubMed

    Toru, Havva Serap; Sanhal, Cem Yasar; Uzun, Özlem Ceren; Ocak, Guzide Ayse; Mendilcioğlu, İnanç; Karaveli, Fatma Şeyda

    2016-03-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD), the consequences of aberrant neural tube closure during embryogenesis, have been mostly investigated in terms of their high prevalence, rate of mortalities and serious morbidities. A proper prenatal outcome counseling of couples coming across a fetal anomaly necessitates the detection and categorization of the primer abnormality, all the co-existing malformations. The aim of this work is to study the incidence and relevance of associated malformations in order to offer a complete pathology report with a true diagnosis. In this study, among 542 fetal autopsy 62 (%11.4) cases with NTD was recorded by the Akdeniz University Pathology Department between January 2006 and June 2012. Twenty (32.4%) NTD cases were associated with anomaly. Twelve cases of associated groups consisted of a congenital syndrome/association, spondylothoracic dysplasia, amniotic band syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, schisis association. The frequency of associated NTD was 32%, this result was higher than previous reports. NTDs have a significant genetic component to their etiology that interacts with environmental risk factors, which might pose Turkey to be a country with high prevalence of NTD. We want to emphasize that intensive screening, documentation of co-existent abnormalities of NTD, should be conducted in order to exhibit certain diagnosis, to perform proper prenatal genetic counseling of parents for on-going/future pregnancies. PMID:25800566

  14. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu; Han, Zhe; Chuai, Manli; Wang, Li-jing; Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka; Geng, Jian-guo; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  15. Coordinating cell and tissue behavior during zebrafish neural tube morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Araya, Claudio; Ward, Laura C; Girdler, Gemma C; Miranda, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    The development of a vertebrate neural epithelium with well-organized apico-basal polarity and a central lumen is essential for its proper function. However, how this polarity is established during embryonic development and the potential influence of surrounding signals and tissues on such organization has remained less understood. In recent years the combined superior transparency and genetics of the zebrafish embryo has allowed for in vivo visualization and quantification of the cellular and molecular dynamics that govern neural tube structure. Here, we discuss recent studies revealing how co-ordinated cell-cell interactions coupled with adjacent tissue dynamics are critical to regulate final neural tissue architecture. Furthermore, new findings show how the spatial regulation and timing of orientated cell division is key in defining precise lumen formation at the tissue midline. In addition, we compare zebrafish neurulation with that of amniotes and amphibians in an attempt to understand the conserved cellular mechanisms driving neurulation and resolve the apparent differences among animals. Zebrafish neurulation not only offers fundamental insights into early vertebrate brain development but also the opportunity to explore in vivo cell and tissue dynamics during complex three-dimensional animal morphogenesis.

  16. Neural tube defects and abnormal brain development in F52-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M; Chen, D F; Sasaoka, T; Tonegawa, S

    1996-01-01

    F52 is a myristoylated, alanine-rich substrate for protein kinase C. We have generated F52-deficient mice by the gene targeting technique. These mutant mice manifest severe neural tube defects that are not associated with other complex malformations, a phenotype reminiscent of common human neural tube defects. The neural tube defects observed include both exencephaly and spina bifida, and the phenotype exhibits partial penetrance with about 60% of homozygous embryos developing neural tube defects. Exencephaly is the prominent type of defect and leads to high prenatal lethality. Neural tube defects are observed in a smaller percentage of heterozygous embryos (about 10%). Abnormal brain development and tail formation occur in homozygous mutants and are likely to be secondary to the neural tube defects. Disruption of F52 in mice therefore identifies a gene whose mutation results in isolated neural tube defects and may provide an animal model for common human neural tube defects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8700893

  17. Epidemiology, prenatal management, and prevention of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Murshid, Waleed R.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.

    2014-01-01

    This review article discusses the epidemiology, risk factors, prenatal screening, diagnosis, prevention potentials, and epidemiologic impact of neural tube defects (NTDs). The average incidence of NTDs is 1/1000 births, with a marked geographic variation. In the developed countries, the incidence of NTDs has fallen over recent decades. However, it still remains high in the less-developed countries in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and the Far East (>1 to 11/1000 births). Recognized NTDs risks include maternal diabetes, obesity, lower socioeconomic status, hyperthermia, and exposure to certain teratogens during the periconceptional period. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation decreased the prevalence of NTDs by 50-70%, and an obligatory folic acid fortification of food was adopted in several countries to reach women with unplanned pregnancies and those facing social deprivation. Prevention of NTDs can be accelerated if more, especially low income countries, adopted fortification of the staple food in their communities. PMID:25551106

  18. Folic Acid for the Prevention of Infant Neural Tube Defects: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Folic Acid for the Prevention of Infant Neural Tube Defects: ... modern medicine. The full reports are titled “Folic Acid for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects: U.S. ...

  19. Neogenin and RGMa control neural tube closure and neuroepithelial morphology by regulating cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Kee, Nigel; Wilson, Nicole; De Vries, Melissa; Bradford, DanaKai; Key, Brian; Cooper, Helen M

    2008-11-26

    In humans, neural tube closure defects occur in 1:1000 pregnancies. The design of new strategies for the prevention of such common defects would benefit from an improved understanding of the molecular events underlying neurulation. Neural fold elevation is a key morphological process that acts during neurulation to drive neural tube closure. However, to date, the molecular pathways underpinning neural fold elevation have not been elucidated. Here, we use morpholino knock-down technology to demonstrate that Repulsive Guidance Molecule (RGMa)-Neogenin interactions are essential for effective neural fold elevation during Xenopus neurulation and that loss of these molecules results in disrupted neural tube closure. We demonstrate that Neogenin and RGMa are required for establishing the morphology of deep layer cells in the neural plate throughout neurulation. We also show that loss of Neogenin severely disrupts the microtubule network within the deep layer cells suggesting that Neogenin-dependent microtubule organization within the deep cells is essential for radial intercalation with the overlying superficial cell layer, thereby driving neural fold elevation. In addition, we show that sustained Neogenin activity is also necessary for the establishment of the apicobasally polarized pseudostratified neuroepithelium of the neural tube. Therefore, our study identifies a novel signaling pathway essential for radial intercalation and epithelialization during neural fold elevation and neural tube morphogenesis.

  20. The Relationship of Aluminium and Silver to Neural Tube Defects; a Case Control

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Altamirano, María de Jesús; Fenton-Navarro, Patricia; Sivet-Chiñas, Elvira; Harp-Iturribarria, Flor de María; Martínez-Cruz, Ruth; Cruz, Pedro Hernández; Cruz, Margarito Martínez; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship of neurotoxic inorganic elements in the hair of patients with the diagnosis of Neural Tube Defects. Our initial hypothesis was that neurotoxic inorganic elements were associated with Neural Tube Defects. Methods Twenty-three samples of hair from newborns were obtained from the General Hospital, “Aurelio Valdivieso” in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. The study group included 8 newborn infants with neural tube pathology. The control group was composed of 15 newborns without this pathology. The presence of inorganic elements in the hair samples was determined by inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy (spectroscopic emission of the plasma). Findings The population of newborns with Neural Tube Defects showed significantly higher values of the following elements than the control group: Aluminium, Neural Tube Defects 152.77±51.06 µg/g, control group 76.24±27.89 µg/g; Silver, Neural Tube Defects 1.45±0.76, control group 0.25±0.53 µg/g; Potassium, Neural Tube Defects 553.87±77.91 µg/g, control group 341.13±205.90 µg/g. Association was found at 75 percentile between aluminium plus silver, aluminium plus potassium, silver plus potassium, and potassium plus sodium. Conclusion In the hair of newborns with Neural Tube Defects, the following metals were increased: aluminium, silver. Given the neurotoxicity of the same, and association of Neural Tube Defects with aluminum and silver, one may infer that they may be participating as factors in the development of Neural Tube Defects. PMID:23400307

  1. Understanding the causes and prevention of neural tube defects: Insights from the splotch mouse model.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Massa, Valentina; Copp, Andrew J

    2009-04-01

    Splotch mutant mice develop neural tube defects (NTDs), comprising exencephaly and/or spina bifida, as well as neural crest-related defects and abnormalities of limb musculature. Defects in splotch mice result from mutations in Pax3, and some human NTDs may also result from mutations in the human PAX3 gene. Pax3 encodes a transcription factor whose function may influence expression of multiple downstream genes associated with a variety of cellular properties (including apoptosis, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation), that could be important for neural tube closure. The frequency of NTDs varies between mutant alleles and is also influenced by genetic background and environmental factors. Notably, splotch provides a model for folic acid-preventable NTDs, and conversely, dietary folate deficiency exacerbates NTDs. Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of splotch NTDs, as well as the mechanisms by which the frequency of defects is influenced by genetic and environmental factors (such as sub-optimal folate status), may provide insight into the causation of these severe congenital malformations in humans.

  2. Nucleotide precursors prevent folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kit-Yi; De Castro, Sandra C P; Savery, Dawn; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2013-09-01

    Closure of the neural tube during embryogenesis is a crucial step in development of the central nervous system. Failure of this process results in neural tube defects, including spina bifida and anencephaly, which are among the most common birth defects worldwide. Maternal use of folic acid supplements reduces risk of neural tube defects but a proportion of cases are not preventable. Folic acid is thought to act through folate one-carbon metabolism, which transfers one-carbon units for methylation reactions and nucleotide biosynthesis. Hence suboptimal performance of the intervening reactions could limit the efficacy of folic acid. We hypothesized that direct supplementation with nucleotides, downstream of folate metabolism, has the potential to support neural tube closure. Therefore, in a mouse model that exhibits folic acid-resistant neural tube defects, we tested the effect of specific combinations of pyrimidine and purine nucleotide precursors and observed a significant protective effect. Labelling in whole embryo culture showed that nucleotides are taken up by the neurulating embryo and incorporated into genomic DNA. Furthermore, the mitotic index was elevated in neural folds and hindgut of treated embryos, consistent with a proposed mechanism of neural tube defect prevention through stimulation of cellular proliferation. These findings may provide an impetus for future investigations of supplemental nucleotides as a means to prevent a greater proportion of human neural tube defects than can be achieved by folic acid alone.

  3. Nucleotide precursors prevent folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kit-Yi; De Castro, Sandra C P; Savery, Dawn; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2013-09-01

    Closure of the neural tube during embryogenesis is a crucial step in development of the central nervous system. Failure of this process results in neural tube defects, including spina bifida and anencephaly, which are among the most common birth defects worldwide. Maternal use of folic acid supplements reduces risk of neural tube defects but a proportion of cases are not preventable. Folic acid is thought to act through folate one-carbon metabolism, which transfers one-carbon units for methylation reactions and nucleotide biosynthesis. Hence suboptimal performance of the intervening reactions could limit the efficacy of folic acid. We hypothesized that direct supplementation with nucleotides, downstream of folate metabolism, has the potential to support neural tube closure. Therefore, in a mouse model that exhibits folic acid-resistant neural tube defects, we tested the effect of specific combinations of pyrimidine and purine nucleotide precursors and observed a significant protective effect. Labelling in whole embryo culture showed that nucleotides are taken up by the neurulating embryo and incorporated into genomic DNA. Furthermore, the mitotic index was elevated in neural folds and hindgut of treated embryos, consistent with a proposed mechanism of neural tube defect prevention through stimulation of cellular proliferation. These findings may provide an impetus for future investigations of supplemental nucleotides as a means to prevent a greater proportion of human neural tube defects than can be achieved by folic acid alone. PMID:23935126

  4. Distinct enhancers at the Pax3 locus can function redundantly to regulate neural tube and neural crest expressions.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Karl R; Milewski, Rita C; Padmanabhan, Arun; Miller, Mayumi; Singh, Manvendra K; Lang, Deborah; Engleka, Kurt A; Wu, Meilin; Li, Jun; Zhou, Diane; Antonucci, Nicole; Li, Li; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2010-03-15

    Pax3 is a transcription factor expressed in somitic mesoderm, dorsal neural tube and pre-migratory neural crest during embryonic development. We have previously identified cis-acting enhancer elements within the proximal upstream genomic region of Pax3 that are sufficient to direct functional expression of Pax3 in neural crest. These elements direct expression of a reporter gene to pre-migratory neural crest in transgenic mice, and transgenic expression of a Pax3 cDNA using these elements is sufficient to rescue neural crest development in mice otherwise lacking endogenous Pax3. We show here that deletion of these enhancer sequences by homologous recombination is insufficient to abrogate neural crest expression of Pax3 and results in viable mice. We identify a distinct enhancer in the fourth intron that is also capable of mediating neural crest expression in transgenic mice and zebrafish. Our analysis suggests the existence of functionally redundant neural crest enhancer modules for Pax3.

  5. Strategies of vertebrate neurulation and a re-evaluation of teleost neural tube formation.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Laura Anne; Sive, Hazel

    2004-10-01

    The vertebrate neural tube develops by two distinct mechanisms. Anteriorly, in the brain and future trunk (cervicothoracic) region, 'primary neurulation' occurs, where an epithelial sheet rolls or bends into a tube. Posteriorly, in the future lumbar and tail region, the neural tube forms by 'secondary neurulation', where a mesenchymal cell population condenses to form a solid rod that undergoes transformation to an epithelial tube. Teleost neurulation has been described as different from that of other vertebrates. This is principally because the teleost trunk neural tube initially forms a solid rod (the neural keel) that later develops a lumen. This process has also been termed secondary neurulation. However, this description is not accurate since the teleost neural tube derives from an epithelial sheet that folds. This best fits the description of primary neurulation. It has also been suggested that teleost neurulation is primitive, however, both primary and secondary neurulation are found in groups with a more ancient origin than the teleosts. The similarity between neurulation in teleosts and other vertebrates indicates that this group includes viable models (such as the zebrafish) for understanding human neural tube development.

  6. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  7. Sall1, Sall2, and Sall4 Are Required for Neural Tube Closure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Johann; Buck, Anja; Borozdin, Wiktor; Mannan, Ashraf U.; Matysiak-Scholze, Uta; Adham, Ibrahim; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Floss, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Barrionuevo, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Four homologs to the Drosophila homeotic gene spalt (sal) exist in both humans and mice (SALL1 to SALL4/Sall1 to Sall4, respectively). Mutations in both SALL1 and SALL4 result in the autosomal-dominant developmental disorders Townes-Brocks and Okihiro syndrome, respectively. In contrast, no human diseases have been associated with SALL2 to date, and Sall2-deficient mice have shown no apparent abnormal phenotype. We generated mice deficient in Sall2 and, contrary to previous reports, 11% of our Sall2-deficient mice showed background-specific neural tube defects, suggesting that Sall2 has a role in neurogenesis. To investigate whether Sall4 may compensate for the absence of Sall2, we generated compound Sall2 knockout/Sall4 genetrap mutant mice. In these mutants, the incidence of neural tube defects was significantly increased. Furthermore, we found a similar phenotype in compound Sall1/4 mutant mice, and in vitro studies showed that SALL1, SALL2, and SALL4 all co-localized in the nucleus. We therefore suggest a fundamental and redundant function of the Sall proteins in murine neurulation, with the heterozygous loss of a particular SALL protein also possibly compensated in humans during development. PMID:18818376

  8. Abnormal folate metabolism in foetuses affected by neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dunlevy, Louisa P E; Chitty, Lyn S; Burren, Katie A; Doudney, Kit; Stojilkovic-Mikic, Taita; Stanier, Philip; Scott, Rosemary; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid supplementation can prevent many cases of neural tube defects (NTDs), whereas suboptimal maternal folate status is a risk factor, suggesting that folate metabolism is a key determinant of susceptibility to NTDs. Despite extensive genetic analysis of folate cycle enzymes, and quantification of metabolites in maternal blood, neither the protective mechanism nor the relationship between maternal folate status and susceptibility are understood in most cases. In order to investigate potential abnormalities in folate metabolism in the embryo itself, we derived primary fibroblastic cell lines from foetuses affected by NTDs and subjected them to the dU suppression test, a sensitive metabolic test of folate metabolism. Significantly, a subset of NTD cases exhibited low scores in this test, indicative of abnormalities in folate cycling that may be causally linked to the defect. Susceptibility to NTDs may be increased by suppression of the methylation cycle, which is interlinked with the folate cycle. However, reduced efficacy in the dU suppression test was not associated with altered abundance of the methylation cycle intermediates, s-adenosylmethionine and s-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that a methylation cycle defect is unlikely to be responsible for the observed abnormality of folate metabolism. Genotyping of samples for known polymorphisms in genes encoding folate-associated enzymes did not reveal any correlation between specific genotypes and the observed abnormalities in folate metabolism. These data suggest that as yet unrecognized genetic variants result in embryonic abnormalities of folate cycling that may be causally related to NTDs. PMID:17438019

  9. Folate receptor gene variants and neural tube defect occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.; Greer, K.; Lammer, E.

    1994-09-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that periconceptional use of folic acid supplements may prevent 40-50% of neural tube defects (NTDs). The FDA has subsequently recommended folic acid supplementation of all women of childbearing potential, even though the mechanism by which folic acid prevents NTDs is unknown. We investigated genetic variation of a candidate gene, the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF) receptor, that may mediate this preventive effect. The receptor concentrates folate within cells and we have localized its mRNA to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Our hypothesis is that dysfunctional 5-MeTHF receptors inadequately concentrate folate intracellularly, predisposing infants to NTDs. We have completed SSCP analysis on 3 of the 4 coding exons of the 5-MeTHF receptor gene of 474 infants participating in a large population-based epidemiological case-control study of NTDs in California; genotyping of another 500 infants is ongoing. Genomic DNA was extracted from residual blood spots from newborn screening samples of cases and controls. Genotyping was done blinded to case status. Polymorphisms have been detected for exons 4 and 5; fourteen percent of the infants have exon 5 polymorphisms. Data will be presented on the prevalence of 5-MeTHF receptor polymorphisms among cases and controls. Relationships among the polymorphisms and NTD occurrence may shed light on how folic acid supplementation prevents NTDs.

  10. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  11. Neural Tube Defects In Mice Exposed To Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Murali K; Werre, Stephen R; Hrubec, Terry C

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2006 we suddenly began to observe neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice. We hypothesized the mice were being exposed unknowingly to a teratogenic agent and investigated the cause. Our results suggested that NTDs were not resulting from bedding material, feed, strain or source of the mice. Additionally, mice were negative for routine and comprehensive screens of pathogens. To further test whether the NTDs resulted from infectious or genetic cause localized to our facility, we obtained three strains of timed pregnant mice from commercial suppliers located in 4 different states. All strains and sources of mice arrived in our laboratory with NTDs, implying that commercially available mice were possibly exposed to a teratogen prior to purchase. Our investigation eventually concluded that exposure to tap water was causing the NTDs. The incidence of NTDs was greatest in purchased mice provided tap water and lowest in purchased mice provided distilled deionized water (DDI). Providing mice DDI water for two generations (F2-DDI) eliminated the NTDs. When F2-DDI mice were provided tap water from three different urban areas prior to breeding, their offspring again developed NTDs. Increased length of exposure to tap water significantly increased the incidence of NTDs. These results indicate that a contaminant in municipal tap water is likely causing NTDs in mice. The unknown teratogen appears to have a wide geographic distribution but has not yet been identified. Water analysis is currently underway to identify candidate contaminants that might be responsible for the malformations. PMID:20549630

  12. Morphogens, modeling and patterning the neural tube: an interview with James Briscoe.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, James

    2015-01-20

    James Briscoe has a BSc in Microbiology and Virology (from the University of Warwick, UK) and a PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology (from the Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London, now Cancer Research UK). He started working on the development of the neural tube in the lab of Tom Jessel as a postdoctoral fellow, establishing that there was graded sonic hedgehog signaling in the ventral neural tube. He is currently a group leader and Head of Division in Developmental Biology at the MRC National Institute for Medical Research (which will become part of the Francis Crick Institute in April 2015). He is working to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of graded signaling in the vertebrate neural tube.We interviewed him about the development of ideas on morphogenetic gradients and his own work on modeling the development of the neural tube for our series on modeling in biology.

  13. Insights into Metabolic Mechanisms Underlying Folate-Responsive Neural Tube Defects: A Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Anna E.; Stover, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including anencephaly and spina bifida, arise from the failure of neurulation during early embryonic development. Neural tube defects are common birth defects with a heterogenous and multifactorial etiology with interacting genetic and environmental risk factors. Although the mechanisms resulting in failure of neural tube closure are unknown, up to 70% of NTDs can be prevented by maternal folic acid supplementation. However, the metabolic mechanisms underlying the association between folic acid and NTD pathogenesis have not been identified. This review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanisms by which impairments in folate metabolism might ultimately lead to failure of neural tube closure, with an emphasis on untangling the relative contributions of nutritional deficiency and genetic risk factors to NTD pathogenesis. PMID:19180567

  14. Identifying Regulators of Morphogenesis Common to Vertebrate Neural Tube Closure and Caenorhabditis elegans Gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Brown, Jessica L; Tandon, Panna; Bird, Kim E; Dickinson, Daniel J; Tintori, Sophia C; Heppert, Jennifer K; Meserve, Joy H; Trogden, Kathryn P; Orlowski, Sara K; Conlon, Frank L; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defects including spina bifida are common and severe congenital disorders. In mice, mutations in more than 200 genes can result in neural tube defects. We hypothesized that this large gene set might include genes whose homologs contribute to morphogenesis in diverse animals. To test this hypothesis, we screened a set of Caenorhabditis elegans homologs for roles in gastrulation, a topologically similar process to vertebrate neural tube closure. Both C. elegans gastrulation and vertebrate neural tube closure involve the internalization of surface cells, requiring tissue-specific gene regulation, actomyosin-driven apical constriction, and establishment and maintenance of adhesions between specific cells. Our screen identified several neural tube defect gene homologs that are required for gastrulation in C. elegans, including the transcription factor sptf-3. Disruption of sptf-3 in C. elegans reduced the expression of early endodermally expressed genes as well as genes expressed in other early cell lineages, establishing sptf-3 as a key contributor to multiple well-studied C. elegans cell fate specification pathways. We also identified members of the actin regulatory WAVE complex (wve-1, gex-2, gex-3, abi-1, and nuo-3a). Disruption of WAVE complex members reduced the narrowing of endodermal cells' apical surfaces. Although WAVE complex members are expressed broadly in C. elegans, we found that expression of a vertebrate WAVE complex member, nckap1, is enriched in the developing neural tube of Xenopus. We show that nckap1 contributes to neural tube closure in Xenopus. This work identifies in vivo roles for homologs of mammalian neural tube defect genes in two manipulable genetic model systems.

  15. ACAM, a novel member of the neural IgCAM family, mediates anterior neural tube closure in a primitive chordate.

    PubMed

    Morales Diaz, Heidi; Mejares, Emil; Newman-Smith, Erin; Smith, William C

    2016-01-01

    The neural IgCAM family of cell adhesion molecules, which includes NCAM and related molecules, has evolved via gene duplication and alternative splicing to allow for a wide range of isoforms with distinct functions and homophilic binding properties. A search for neural IgCAMs in ascidians (Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi, and Phallusia mammillata) has identified a novel set of truncated family members that, unlike the known members, lack fibronectin III domains and consist of only repeated Ig domains. Within the tunicates this form appears to be unique to the ascidians, and it was designated ACAM, for Ascidian Cell Adhesion Molecule. In C. intestinalis ACAM is expressed in the developing neural plate and neural tube, with strongest expression in the anterior sensory vesicle precursor. Unlike the two other conventional neural IgCAMs in C. intestinalis, which are expressed maternally and throughout the morula and blastula stages, ACAM expression initiates at the gastrula stage. Moreover, C. intestinalis ACAM is a target of the homeodomain transcription factor OTX, which plays an essential role in the development of the anterior central nervous system. Morpholino (MO) knockdown shows that ACAM is required for neural tube closure. In MO-injected embryos neural tube closure was normal caudally, but the anterior neuropore remained open. A similar phenotype was seen with overexpression of a secreted version of ACAM. The presence of ACAM in ascidians highlights the diversity of this gene family in morphogenesis and neurodevelopment. PMID:26542009

  16. Neural tube closure in Xenopus laevis involves medial migration, directed protrusive activity, cell intercalation and convergent extension.

    PubMed

    Davidson, L A; Keller, R E

    1999-10-01

    We have characterized the cell movements and prospective cell identities as neural folds fuse during neural tube formation in Xenopus laevis. A newly developed whole-mount, two-color fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization method, visualized with confocal microscopy, shows that the dorsal neural tube gene xpax3 and the neural-crest-specific gene xslug are expressed far lateral to the medial site of neural fold fusion and that expression moves medially after fusion. To determine whether cell movements or dynamic changes in gene expression are responsible, we used low-light videomicroscopy followed by fluorescent in situ and confocal microscopy. These methods revealed that populations of prospective neural crest and dorsal neural tube cells near the lateral margin of the neural plate at the start of neurulation move to the dorsal midline using distinctive forms of motility. Before fold fusion, superficial neural cells apically contract, roll the neural plate into a trough and appear to pull the superficial epidermal cell sheet medially. After neural fold fusion, lateral deep neural cells move medially by radially intercalating between other neural cells using two types of motility. The neural crest cells migrate as individual cells toward the dorsal midline using medially directed monopolar protrusions. These movements combine the two lateral populations of neural crest into a single medial population that form the roof of the neural tube. The remaining cells of the dorsal neural tube extend protrusions both medially and laterally bringing about radial intercalation of deep and superficial cells to form a single-cell-layered, pseudostratified neural tube. While ours is the first description of medially directed cell migration during neural fold fusion and re-establishment of the neural tube, these complex cell behaviors may be involved during cavitation of the zebrafish neural keel and secondary neurulation in the posterior axis of chicken and mouse.

  17. High incidence of neural tube defects in Northern part of India

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Royana; Pandey, Sharad; Singh, Kulwant; Shinde, Neeraj; Rai, Sangita; Prasad, Rajniti; Shama, Satya Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the absence of primary care and prevailing associated social stigma, many patients of neural tube defects (NTDs) from remote areas die without getting any treatment. The high number of such untreated cases and unregistered deaths in these areas made us ponders to the fact that tertiary care center-based studies do not represent the true incidence of NTDs. Materials and Methods: We did a population-based survey for NTDs births of rural areas from Jaunpur to Ghazipur district in Eastern Uttar Pradesh. These districts are among the least developed areas of Northern India in Uttar Pradesh among other 17. Results: The data show an incidence of 7.48 per 1000 live births. Conclusion: Besides of unawareness regarding periconceptional folate supplementation, intensive effort is required to design adequately powered studies to search other key factors responsible for high prevalence of NTDs. PMID:27695536

  18. Missing Genetic Risk in Neural Tube Defects: Can Exome Sequencing Yield an Insight?

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Deidre R.; Soldano, Karen L.; Garrett, Melanie E.; Cope, Heidi; Ashley-Koch, Allison E.; Gregory, Simon G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTD) have a strong genetic component, with up to 70% of variance in human prevalence determined by heritable factors. Although the identification of causal DNA variants by sequencing candidate genes from functionally relevant pathways and model organisms has provided some success, alternative approaches are demanded. Methods Next generation sequencing platforms are facilitating the production of massive amounts of sequencing data, primarily from the protein coding regions of the genome, at a faster rate and cheaper cost than has previously been possible. These platforms are permitting the identification of variants (de novo, rare, and common) that are drivers of NYTD etiology, and the cost of the approach allows for the screening of increased numbers of affected and unaffected individuals from NTD families and in simplex cases. Conclusion The next generation sequencing platforms represent a powerful tool in the armory of the genetics researcher to identify the causal genetic basis of NTDs. PMID:25044326

  19. High incidence of neural tube defects in Northern part of India

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Royana; Pandey, Sharad; Singh, Kulwant; Shinde, Neeraj; Rai, Sangita; Prasad, Rajniti; Shama, Satya Narayan

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the absence of primary care and prevailing associated social stigma, many patients of neural tube defects (NTDs) from remote areas die without getting any treatment. The high number of such untreated cases and unregistered deaths in these areas made us ponders to the fact that tertiary care center-based studies do not represent the true incidence of NTDs. Materials and Methods: We did a population-based survey for NTDs births of rural areas from Jaunpur to Ghazipur district in Eastern Uttar Pradesh. These districts are among the least developed areas of Northern India in Uttar Pradesh among other 17. Results: The data show an incidence of 7.48 per 1000 live births. Conclusion: Besides of unawareness regarding periconceptional folate supplementation, intensive effort is required to design adequately powered studies to search other key factors responsible for high prevalence of NTDs.

  20. Isolation of Human Neural Stem Cells from the Amniotic Fluid with Diagnosed Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jen; Su, Hong-Lin; Hsu, Lee-Feng; Huang, Po-Jui; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Hsu, Li-Wen; Tsai, Ming-Song; Chen, Chih-Ping; Chang, Yao-Lung; Chao, An-Shine; Hwang, Shiaw-Min

    2015-08-01

    Human neural stem cells (NSCs) are particularly valuable for the study of neurogenesis process and have a therapeutic potential in treating neurodegenerative disorders. However, current progress in the use of human NSCs is limited due to the available NSC sources and the complicated isolation and culture techniques. In this study, we describe an efficient method to isolate and propagate human NSCs from the amniotic fluid with diagnosed neural tube defects (NTDs), specifically, anencephaly. These amniotic fluid-derived NSCs (AF-NSCs) formed neurospheres and underwent long-term expansion in vitro. In addition, these cells showed normal karyotypes and telomerase activity and expressed NSC-specific markers, including Nestin, Sox2, Musashi-1, and the ATP-binding cassette G2 (ABCG2). AF-NSCs displayed typical morphological patterns and expressed specific markers that were consistent with neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and dopaminergic neurons after proper induction conditions. Furthermore, grafted AF-NSCs improved the physiological functions in a rat stroke model. The ability to isolate and bank human NSCs from this novel source provides a unique opportunity for translational studies of neurological disorders. PMID:25923707

  1. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew J.; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  2. Misexpression of BRE gene in the developing chick neural tube affects neurulation and somitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Chuai, Manli; Yeuk-Hon Chan, John; Lei, Jian; Münsterberg, Andrea; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    The brain and reproductive expression (BRE) gene is expressed in numerous adult tissues and especially in the nervous and reproductive systems. However, little is known about BRE expression in the developing embryo or about its role in embryonic development. In this study, we used in situ hybridization to reveal the spatiotemporal expression pattern for BRE in chick embryo during development. To determine the importance of BRE in neurogenesis, we overexpressed BRE and also silenced BRE expression specifically in the neural tube. We established that overexpressing BRE in the neural tube indirectly accelerated Pax7+ somite development and directly increased HNK-1+ neural crest cell (NCC) migration and TuJ-1+ neurite outgrowth. These altered morphogenetic processes were associated with changes in the cell cycle of NCCs and neural tube cells. The inverse effect was obtained when BRE expression was silenced in the neural tube. We also determined that BMP4 and Shh expression in the neural tube was affected by misexpression of BRE. This provides a possible mechanism for how altering BRE expression was able to affect somitogenesis, neurogenesis, and NCC migration. In summary, our results demonstrate that BRE plays an important role in regulating neurogenesis and indirectly somite differentiation during early chick embryo development. PMID:25568339

  3. Progressive Differentiation and Instructive Capacities of Amniotic Fluid and Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomes following Neural Tube Closure.

    PubMed

    Chau, Kevin F; Springel, Mark W; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Park, Hye-Yeon; Topal, Salih; Lun, Melody P; Mullan, Hillary; Maynard, Thomas; Steen, Hanno; LaMantia, Anthony S; Lehtinen, Maria K

    2015-12-21

    After neural tube closure, amniotic fluid (AF) captured inside the neural tube forms the nascent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neuroepithelial stem cells contact CSF-filled ventricles, proliferate, and differentiate to form the mammalian brain, while neurogenic placodes, which generate cranial sensory neurons, remain in contact with the AF. Using in vivo ultrasound imaging, we quantified the expansion of the embryonic ventricular-CSF space from its inception. We developed tools to obtain pure AF and nascent CSF, before and after neural tube closure, and to define how the AF and CSF proteomes diverge during mouse development. Using embryonic neural explants, we demonstrate that age-matched fluids promote Sox2-positive neurogenic identity in developing forebrain and olfactory epithelia. Nascent CSF also stimulates SOX2-positive self-renewal of forebrain progenitor cells, some of which is attributable to LIFR signaling. Our Resource should facilitate the investigation of fluid-tissue interactions during this highly vulnerable stage of early brain development.

  4. Effect of folic acid fortification on the incidence of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Amarin, Zouhair O; Obeidat, Ahmed Z

    2010-07-01

    In a few countries enriched cereal grains have been fortified with folic acid to reduce the incidence of neural tube defects. The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of folic acid fortified foods on the incidence of neural tube defects in live newborns at Princess Badea Teaching Hospital, in the north of Jordan, before and after the national food fortification with folic acid was implemented. For the 7-year period from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2006, we retrospectively extracted the total number of births at Princess Badea Hospital, as well as the number of pregnancies affected by spina bifida and anencephaly, per 1000 births during the periods before (2000-01), during (2002-04) and after (2005-06) folic acid fortification of grain products, was implemented. Neural tube defects were defined in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10): anencephaly, encephalocele and spina bifida. A total of 78 subjects with neural tube defects were recorded among 61 447 births during the study period. The incidence of neural tube defects decreased from 1.85 per 1000 births before fortification [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2, 2.4] to 1.07 per 1000 births during the fortification period [95% CI 0.7, 1.5], and 0.95 after full fortification [95% CI 0.5, 1.5], a 49% reduction. The difference between incidence of neural tube defects in the periods before and after food fortification with folic acid was statistically significant. We conclude that food fortification with folic acid was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of neural tube defects in north Jordan.

  5. Presence of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation in Puerto Rican patients with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    García-Fragoso, Lourdes; García-García, Inés; de la Vega, Alberto; Renta, Jessicca; Cadilla, Carmen L

    2002-01-01

    Folic acid supplementation can reduce the incidence of neural tube defects. The first reported genetic risk factor for neural tube defects is a C677T mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene, resulting in decreased activity of the enzyme. We examined the enzyme mutation role of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in the etiology of neural tube defects in our population. The study group consisted of 204 Puerto Rican individuals including 37 pregnant females with a prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects in their fetuses, 31 newborns, 36 fathers, and 100 healthy adults. The prevalence of the C677T mutation was examined. Homozygosity for the alanine to valine substitution (TT) was observed in 9% of the controls and 19% of the mothers with children with neural tube defects. Our results indicate that the presence of the T allele at the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677 position may increase the risk of giving birth to an infant with a neural tube defect.

  6. Modeling anterior development in mice: diet as modulator of risk for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Kappen, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    Head morphogenesis is a complex process that is controlled by multiple signaling centers. The most common defects of cranial development are craniofacial defects, such as cleft lip and cleft palate, and neural tube defects, such as anencephaly and encephalocoele in humans. More than 400 genes that contribute to proper neural tube closure have been identified in experimental animals, but only very few causative gene mutations have been identified in humans, supporting the notion that environmental influences are critical. The intrauterine environment is influenced by maternal nutrition, and hence, maternal diet can modulate the risk for cranial and neural tube defects. This article reviews recent progress toward a better understanding of nutrients during pregnancy, with particular focus on mouse models for defective neural tube closure. At least four major patterns of nutrient responses are apparent, suggesting that multiple pathways are involved in the response, and likely in the underlying pathogenesis of the defects. Folic acid has been the most widely studied nutrient, and the diverse responses of the mouse models to folic acid supplementation indicate that folic acid is not universally beneficial, but that the effect is dependent on genetic configuration. If this is the case for other nutrients as well, efforts to prevent neural tube defects with nutritional supplementation may need to become more specifically targeted than previously appreciated. Mouse models are indispensable for a better understanding of nutrient-gene interactions in normal pregnancies, as well as in those affected by metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity.

  7. Dynamic expression of LIM cofactors in the developing mouse neural tube.

    PubMed

    Ostendorff, Heather P; Tursun, Baris; Cornils, Kerstin; Schlüter, Anne; Drung, Alexander; Güngör, Cenap; Bach, Ingolf

    2006-03-01

    The developmental regulation of LIM homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HD) by the LIM domain-binding cofactors CLIM/Ldb/NLI and RLIM has been demonstrated. Whereas CLIM cofactors are thought to be required for at least some of the in vivo functions of LIM-HD proteins, the ubiquitin ligase RLIM functions as a negative regulator by its ability to target CLIM cofactors for proteasomal degradation. In this report, we have investigated and compared the protein expression of both factors in the developing mouse neural tube. We co-localize both proteins in many tissues and, although widely expressed, we detect high levels of both cofactors in specific neural tube regions, e.g., in the ventral neural tube, where motor neurons reside. The mostly ubiquitous distribution of RLIM- and CLIM-encoding mRNA differs from the more specific expression of both cofactors at the protein level, indicating post-transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, we show that both cofactors not only co-localize with each other but also with Isl and Lhx3 LIM-HD proteins in developing ventral neural tube neurons. Our results demonstrate the dynamic expression of cofactors participating in the regulation of LIM-HD proteins during the development of the neural tube in mice and suggest additional post-transcriptional regulation in the nuclear LIM-HD protein network.

  8. Modeling Anterior Development in Mice: Diet as Modulator of Risk for Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kappen, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Head morphogenesis is a complex process that is controlled by multiple signaling centers. The most common defects of cranial development are craniofacial defects, such as cleft lip and cleft palate, and neural tube defects, such as anencephaly and encephalocoele in humans. More than 400 genes that contribute to proper neural tube closure have been identified in experimental animals, but only very few causative gene mutations have been identified in humans, supporting the notion that environmental influences are critical. The intrauterine environment is influenced by maternal nutrition, and hence, maternal diet can modulate the risk for cranial and neural tube defects. This article reviews recent progress toward a better understanding of nutrients during pregnancy, with particular focus on mouse models for defective neural tube closure. At least four major patterns of nutrient responses are apparent, suggesting that multiple pathways are involved in the response, and likely in the underlying pathogenesis of the defects. Folic acid has been the most widely studied nutrient, and the diverse responses of the mouse models to folic acid supplementation indicate that folic acid is not universally beneficial, but that the effect is dependent on genetic configuration. If this is the case for other nutrients as well, efforts to prevent neural tube defects with nutritional supplementation may need to become more specifically targeted than previously appreciated. Mouse models are indispensable for a better understanding of nutrient–gene interactions in normal pregnancies, as well as in those affected by metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. PMID:24124024

  9. Maternal Antenatal Bereavement and Neural Tube Defect in Live-Born Offspring: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ingstrup, Katja Glejsted; Wu, Chun Sen; Olsen, Jørn; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Li, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal emotional stress during pregnancy has previously been associated with congenital neural malformations, but most studies are based on data collected retrospectively. The objective of our study was to investigate associations between antenatal maternal bereavement due to death of a close relative and neural tube defects (NTDs) in the offspring. Methods We performed a register-based cohort study including all live-born children (N = 1,734,190) from 1978–2008. Exposure was bereavement due to loss of a close relative from one year before conception to the end of the first trimester of pregnancy. The outcome was NTDs in the offspring according to the International Classification of Disease. We used multivariate logistic regression to estimate prevalence odds ratios (ORs). Results A total of 2% children were born to mothers who lost a close relative prenatally. During 30 years of follow-up, 1,115 children were diagnosed with any NTDs: spina bifida (n = 889), anencephaly (n = 85) and encephalocele (n = 164). And 23 children were diagnosed with two types of NTDs. Overall, when comparing bereaved mothers to non-bereaved mothers, no significant increased prevalence of NTDs in the offspring was seen (OR = 0.84; 95% confidence interval: 0.52–1.33). Conclusion Overall maternal bereavement in the antenatal period was not related to NTDs in liveborn offspring. PMID:27685943

  10. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic interactions are

  11. Spontaneous neural tube defects in splotch mice supplemented with selected micronutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J. . E-mail: bwlodarczyk@ibt.tamhsc.edu; Tang, Louisa S.; Triplett, Aleata; Aleman, Frank; Finnell, Richard H.

    2006-05-15

    Splotch (Sp/Sp) mice homozygous for a mutation in the Pax3 gene inevitably present with neural tube defects (NTDs), along with other associated congenital anomalies. The affected mutant embryos usually die by gestation days (E) 12-13. In the present study, the effect of modifier genes from a new genetic background (CXL-Sp) and periconceptional supplementation with selected micronutrients (folic acid, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, methionine, myoinositol, thiamine, thymidine, and {alpha}-tocopherol) was determined with respect to the incidence of NTDs. In order to explore how different exposure parameters (time, dose, and route of compound administration) modulate the beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation, female mice received either short- or long-term nutrient supplements via enteral or parenteral routes. Embryos were collected on E12.5 and examined for the presence of anterior or posterior NTDs. Additionally, whole mount in situ hybridization studies were conducted in order to reveal/confirm normal expression patterns of the Pax3 gene during neurulation in the wild-type and Sp/Sp homozygous mutant mouse embryos utilized in this study. A strong Pax3 signal was demonstrated in CXL-Sp embryos during neural tube closure (E9.5 to E10.5). The intensity and spatial pattern of expression were similar to other Splotch mutant mice. Of all the micronutrients tested, only supplementation with folic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate rescued the normal phenotype in Sp/Sp embryos. When the folate supplementation dose was increased to 200 mg/kg in the diet, the incidence of rescued splotch homozygotes reached 30%; however, this was accompanied by six-fold increased resorption rate.

  12. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Jennifer N; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D E; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2(Lp), Scrib(Crc) and Celsr1(Crsh) mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1(Crsh);Vangl2(Lp);Scrib(Crc) triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas Scrib(Crc) is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1(Crsh) and Vangl2(Lp) homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  13. [Fortification of food with folic acid diminishes the number of neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Brouwer, I A

    2008-01-26

    A recent study from a research group from Quebec showed a strong decrease in the number of births affected by a neural tube defect since folic acid fortification was introduced in Canada. The prevalence decreased from 1.58 neural tube defects per 1000 births before the introduction of folic acid fortification to 0.86 per 1000 births in the period of complete fortification. Although folic acid fortification of staple food is probably the most effective way to decrease the incidence of neural tube defects, more knowledge about possible health risks should be obtained before fortification is introduced. More research is needed to determine which population groups are at risk of possible negative effects of folic acid fortification and at which level of fortification. Until then, it is important to generate more attention and publicity in order to increase awareness and knowledge concerning folic acid and to promote its use before and after conception.

  14. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain.

    PubMed

    Salbaum, J Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  15. Novel Mode of Defective Neural Tube Closure in the Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Salbaum, J. Michael; Kruger, Claudia; MacGowan, Jacalyn; Herion, Nils J.; Burk, David; Kappen, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Failure to close the neural tube results in birth defects, with severity ranging from spina bifida to lethal anencephaly. Few genetic risk factors for neural tube defects are known in humans, highlighting the critical role of environmental risk factors, such as maternal diabetes. Yet, it is not well understood how altered maternal metabolism interferes with embryonic development, and with neurulation in particular. We present evidence from two independent mouse models of diabetic pregnancy that identifies impaired migration of nascent mesodermal cells in the primitive streak as the morphogenetic basis underlying the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. We conclude that perturbed gastrulation not only explains the neurulation defects, but also provides a unifying etiology for the broad spectrum of congenital malformations in diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26593875

  16. Syndecan 4 interacts genetically with Vangl2 to regulate neural tube closure and planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Noelia; Contreras, Osvaldo; Muñoz, Rosana; Farías, Marjorie; Carrasco, Héctor; Hill, Charlotte; Tran, Uyen; Pryor, Sophie E.; Wessely, Oliver; Copp, Andrew J.; Larraín, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Syndecan 4 (Sdc4) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) that regulates gastrulation, neural tube closure and directed neural crest migration in Xenopus development. To determine whether Sdc4 participates in Wnt/PCP signaling during mouse development, we evaluated a possible interaction between a null mutation of Sdc4 and the loop-tail allele of Vangl2. Sdc4 is expressed in multiple tissues, but particularly in the non-neural ectoderm, hindgut and otic vesicles. Sdc4;Vangl2Lp compound mutant mice have defective spinal neural tube closure, disrupted orientation of the stereocilia bundles in the cochlea and delayed wound healing, demonstrating a strong genetic interaction. In Xenopus, co-injection of suboptimal amounts of Sdc4 and Vangl2 morpholinos resulted in a significantly greater proportion of embryos with defective neural tube closure than each individual morpholino alone. To probe the mechanism of this interaction, we overexpressed or knocked down Vangl2 function in HEK293 cells. The Sdc4 and Vangl2 proteins colocalize, and Vangl2, particularly the Vangl2Lp mutant form, diminishes Sdc4 protein levels. Conversely, Vangl2 knockdown enhances Sdc4 protein levels. Overall HSPG steady-state levels were regulated by Vangl2, suggesting a molecular mechanism for the genetic interaction in which Vangl2Lp/+ enhances the Sdc4-null phenotype. This could be mediated via heparan sulfate residues, as Vangl2Lp/+ embryos fail to initiate neural tube closure and develop craniorachischisis (usually seen only in Vangl2Lp/Lp) when cultured in the presence of chlorate, a sulfation inhibitor. These results demonstrate that Sdc4 can participate in the Wnt/PCP pathway, unveiling its importance during neural tube closure in mammalian embryos. PMID:23760952

  17. Epidemiologic and Genetic Aspects of Spina Bifida and Other Neural Tube Defects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Au, Kit Sing; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Northrup, Hope

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs) ranges from 1.0 to 10.0 per 1,000 births with almost equal frequencies between two major categories: anencephaly and spina bifida (SB). Epidemiological studies have provided valuable insight for (a) researchers to identify nongenetic and genetic factors contributing to etiology, (b) public…

  18. dNTP deficiency induced by HU via inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase affects neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhen; Wang, Xiuwei; Dong, Yanting; Xu, Lin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to environmental toxic chemicals in utero during the neural tube development period can cause developmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neural tube development programming, the murine neural tube defects (NTDs) model was induced by interrupting folate metabolism using methotrexate in our previous study. The present study aimed to examine the effects of dNTP deficiency induced by hydroxyurea (HU), a specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor, during murine neural tube development. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with various doses of HU on gestation day (GD) 7.5, and the embryos were checked on GD 11.5. RNR activity and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels were measured in the optimal dose. Additionally, DNA damage was examined by comet analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cellular behaviors in NTDs embryos were evaluated with phosphorylation of histone H3 (PH-3) and caspase-3 using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results showed that NTDs were observed mostly with HU treatment at an optimal dose of 225 mg/kg b/w. RNR activity was inhibited and dNTP levels were decreased in HU-treated embryos with NTDs. Additionally, increased DNA damage, decreased proliferation, and increased caspase-3 were significant in NTDs embryos compared to the controls. Results indicated that HU induced murine NTDs model by disturbing dNTP metabolism and further led to the abnormal cell balance between proliferation and apoptosis.

  19. 21 CFR 101.79 - Health claims: Folate and neural tube defects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... defects—(1) Definition. Neural tube defects are serious birth defects of the brain or spinal cord that can... defects result from failure of closure of the covering of the brain or spinal cord during early embryonic... defects spina bifida or anencephaly,” “birth defects of the brain or spinal cord anencephaly or...

  20. Interactions of Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a are essential for neural tube patterning.

    PubMed

    Augustine, K A; Liu, E T; Sadler, T W

    1995-02-01

    Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a have been postulated to share functional redundancy in spinal cord morphogenesis due to their homologies in protein structure and overlapping expression patterns. In this study, antisense oligonucleotides and a murine whole embryo culture system were used to examine functional interactions of Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a in late gastrulation and neurulation. Early somite mouse embryos were injected with combinations of Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a antisense oligonucleotides and then grown in vitro for up to 48 hr. Simultaneous inhibition of Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a expression resulted in pattern loss in the presumptive spinal cord, which was apparent within 4 hr following antisense treatment. The neural tube was wavy, there was a reduction in the number of nuclear layers in the walls of the neural tube, and evidence of decreased cell adhesion between neuroepithelial cells by 12 hr postinjection. In addition, notochord and primitive streak abnormalities accompanied neural tube abnormalities. The existence of regulatory interactions between Wnt-1, Wnt-3a, and engrailed genes was also examined in this study. Antisense inhibition of Wnt-1 or Wnt-3a expression resulted in reduction of engrailed protein levels in the brain, somites, and spinal cord. However, simultaneous inhibition of both Wnt genes resulted in more complete loss of engrailed protein in these regions. Herein, we present data suggesting functional redundancy of Wnt-1 and Wnt-3a in neural tube patterning and in regulation of engrailed expression.

  1. Gene-environment interactions in susceptibility to fumonisin-induced neural tube defects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. In populations that rely on maize-based foods as a dietary staple, consumption of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs). Administration of FB1 ...

  2. From the Cover: Exposing Imidacloprid Interferes With Neurogenesis Through Impacting on Chick Neural Tube Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Shi-Yao; Zhong, Shan; Qi, Guo-Long; Wang, Chao-Jie; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-09-01

    As a neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid is widely used to control insects in agriculture and fleas on domestic animals. However, it is not known whether imidacloprid exposure negatively affects neurogenesis during embryonic development. In this study, using a chick embryo model, we investigated the effects of imidacloprid exposure on neurogenesis at the earliest stage and during late-stage embryo development. Exposing HH0 chick embryos to imidacloprid in EC culture caused neural tube defects (NTDs) and neuronal differentiation dysplasia as determined by NF/Tuj1 labeling. Furthermore, we found that F-actin accumulation on the apical side of the neural tube was suppressed by exposure to imidacloprid, and the expression of BMP4 and Shh on the dorsal and ventral sides of the neural tubes, respectively, were also reduced, which in turn affects the dorsolateral hinge points during bending of the neural plate. In addition, exposure to imidacloprid reduced cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, as determined by pHIS3 labeling and TUNEL staining, respectively, also contributing to the malformation. We obtained similar results in late-stage embryos exposed to imidacloprid. Finally, a bioinformatics analysis was employed to determine which genes identified in this study were involved in NTDs. The experimental evidence and bioinformatics analysis suggested that imidacloprid exposure during chick embryo development could increase the risk of NTDs and neural dysplasia.

  3. Zebrafish neural tube morphogenesis requires Scribble-dependent oriented cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Žigman, Mihaela; Trinh, Le A; Fraser, Scott E; Moens, Cecilia B

    2011-01-11

    How control of subcellular events in single cells determines morphogenesis on the scale of the tissue is largely unresolved. The stereotyped cross-midline mitoses of progenitors in the zebrafish neural keel provide a unique experimental paradigm for defining the role and control of single-cell orientation for tissue-level morphogenesis in vivo. We show here that the coordinated orientation of individual progenitor cell division in the neural keel is the cellular determinant required for morphogenesis into a neural tube epithelium with a single straight lumen. We find that Scribble is required for oriented cell division and that its function in this process is independent of canonical apicobasal and planar polarity pathways. We identify a role for Scribble in controlling clustering of α-catenin foci in dividing progenitors. Loss of either Scrib or N-cadherin results in abnormally oriented mitoses, reduced cross-midline cell divisions, and similar neural tube defects. We propose that Scribble-dependent nascent cell-cell adhesion clusters between neuroepithelial progenitors contribute to define orientation of their cell division. Finally, our data demonstrate that while oriented mitoses of individual cells determine neural tube architecture, the tissue can in turn feed back on its constituent cells to define their polarization and cell division orientation to ensure robust tissue morphogenesis.

  4. From the Cover: Exposing Imidacloprid Interferes With Neurogenesis Through Impacting on Chick Neural Tube Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Shi-Yao; Zhong, Shan; Qi, Guo-Long; Wang, Chao-Jie; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-09-01

    As a neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid is widely used to control insects in agriculture and fleas on domestic animals. However, it is not known whether imidacloprid exposure negatively affects neurogenesis during embryonic development. In this study, using a chick embryo model, we investigated the effects of imidacloprid exposure on neurogenesis at the earliest stage and during late-stage embryo development. Exposing HH0 chick embryos to imidacloprid in EC culture caused neural tube defects (NTDs) and neuronal differentiation dysplasia as determined by NF/Tuj1 labeling. Furthermore, we found that F-actin accumulation on the apical side of the neural tube was suppressed by exposure to imidacloprid, and the expression of BMP4 and Shh on the dorsal and ventral sides of the neural tubes, respectively, were also reduced, which in turn affects the dorsolateral hinge points during bending of the neural plate. In addition, exposure to imidacloprid reduced cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, as determined by pHIS3 labeling and TUNEL staining, respectively, also contributing to the malformation. We obtained similar results in late-stage embryos exposed to imidacloprid. Finally, a bioinformatics analysis was employed to determine which genes identified in this study were involved in NTDs. The experimental evidence and bioinformatics analysis suggested that imidacloprid exposure during chick embryo development could increase the risk of NTDs and neural dysplasia. PMID:27444676

  5. The Netrin receptor Neogenin is required for neural tube formation and somitogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, David J; Cooper, Helen M; Hogan, Benjamin M; Cody, Stephen H; Lieschke, Graham J; Heath, Joan K

    2004-05-01

    The Netrin receptor Deleted in colon cancer (Dcc) has been shown to play a pivotal role in the guidance of nascent axons towards the ventral midline in the developing nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates. In contrast, the function during embryogenesis of a second Dcc-like Netrin receptor Neogenin has not yet been defined. We used antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to knockdown Neogenin activity in zebrafish embryos and demonstrate that Neogenin plays an important role in neural tube formation and somitogenesis. In Neogenin knockdown embryos, cavitation within the neural rod failed to occur, producing a neural tube lacking a lumen. Somite formation was also defective, implicating Neogenin in the migration events underlying convergent extension during gastrulation. These observations suggest a role for Neogenin in determining cell polarity or migrational directionality of both neuroectodermal and mesodermal cells during early embryonic development.

  6. Genetic basis of neural tube defects. I. Regulatory genes for the neurulation process.

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika; Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka

    2002-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) together with cardiovascular system defects are the most common malformations in the Polish population (2.05-2.68/1000 newborns). They arise during early embryogenesis and are caused by an improper neural groove closure during the neurulation process. NTD can arise from the influence of specific environmental factors on the foetus. The genetic factor is also very important, because NTDs have multigenetic conditioning. It was suggested that genes connected with the regulation of neurulation could also be involved in NTD aetiology, especially when their deletion or modification leads to neural tube defects in the mouse model. Examples are genes from the PAX family, T (Brachyury), BRCA1 and PDGFRA genes.

  7. Cell cycle-related genes p57kip2, Cdk5 and Spin in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinjun; Yang, Zhong; Zeng, Yi; Xu, Hong; Li, Hongli; Han, Yangyun; Long, Xiaodong; You, Chao

    2013-07-15

    In the field of developmental neurobiology, accurate and ordered regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis are crucial factors contributing to the normal formation of the neural tube. Preliminary studies identified several genes involved in the development of neural tube defects. In this study, we established a model of developmental neural tube defects by administration of retinoic acid to pregnant rats. Gene chip hybridization analysis showed that genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis, signal transduction, transcription and translation regulation, energy and metabolism, heat shock, and matrix and cytoskeletal proteins were all involved in the formation of developmental neural tube defects. Among these, cell cycle-related genes were predominant. Retinoic acid ment caused differential expression of three cell cycle-related genes p57kip2, Cdk5 and Spin, the expression levels of which were downregulated by retinoic acid and upregulated during normal neural tube formation. The results of this study indicate that cell cycle-related genes play an important role in the formation of neural tube defects. P57kip2, Cdk5 and Spin may be critical genes in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects.

  8. SNPs in the neural cell adhesion molecule 1 gene (NCAM1) may be associated with human neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Deak, Kristen L.; Boyles, Abee L.; Etchevers, Heather C.; Melvin, Elizabeth C.; Siegel, Deborah G.; Graham, Felicia L.; Slifer, Susan H.; Enterline, David S.; George, Timothy M.; Vekemans, Michel; McClay, David; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Kessler, John A.; Linney, Elwood; Gilbert, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects, occurring in approximately 1/1,000 births; both genetic and environmental factors are implicated. To date, no major genetic risk factors have been identified. Throughout development, cell adhesion molecules are strongly implicated in cell–cell interactions, and may play a role in the formation and closure of the neural tube. To evaluate the role of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) in risk of human NTDs, we screened for novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the gene. Eleven SNPs across NCAM1 were genotyped using TaqMan. We utilized a family-based approach to evaluate evidence for association and/or linkage disequilibrium. We evaluated American Caucasian simplex lumbosacral myelomeningocele families (n=132 families) using the family based association test (FBAT) and the pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT). Association analysis revealed a significant association between risk for NTDs and intronic SNP rs2298526 using both the FBAT test (P=0.0018) and the PDT (P=0.0025). Using the HBAT version of the FBAT to look for haplotype association, all pairwise comparisons with SNP rs2298526 were also significant. A replication study set, consisting of 72 additional families showed no significant association; however, the overall trend for overtransmission of the less common allele of SNP rs2298526 remained significant in the combined sample set. In addition, we analyzed the expression pattern of the NCAM1 protein in human embryos, and while NCAM1 is not expressed within the neural tube at the time of closure, it is expressed in the surrounding and later in differentiated neurons of the CNS. These results suggest variations in NCAM1 may influence risk for human NTDs. PMID:15883837

  9. An adverse outcome pathway framework for neural tube and axial defects mediated by modulation of retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Elisa C M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Piersma, Aldert H

    2015-08-01

    Developmental toxicity can be caused through a multitude of mechanisms and can therefore not be captured through a single simple mechanistic paradigm. However, it may be possible to define a selected group of overarching mechanisms that might allow detection of the vast majority of developmental toxicants. Against this background, we have explored the usefulness of retinoic acid mediated regulation of neural tube and axial patterning as a general mechanism that, when perturbed, may result in manifestations of developmental toxicity that may cover a large part of malformations known to occur in experimental animals and in man. Through a literature survey, we have identified key genes in the regulation of retinoic acid homeostasis, as well as marker genes of neural tube and axial patterning, that may be used to detect developmental toxicants in in vitro systems. A retinoic acid-neural tube/axial patterning adverse outcome pathway (RA-NTA AOP) framework was designed. The framework was tested against existing data of flusilazole exposure in the rat whole embryo culture, the zebrafish embryotoxicity test, and the embryonic stem cell test. Flusilazole is known to interact with retinoic acid homeostasis, and induced common and unique NTA marker gene changes in the three test systems. Flusilazole-induced changes were similar in directionality to gene expression responses after retinoic acid exposure. It is suggested that the RA-NTA framework may provide a general tool to define mechanistic pathways and biomarkers of developmental toxicity that may be used in alternative in vitro assays for the detection of embryotoxic compounds.

  10. Mutations in the Motile Cilia Gene DNAAF1 Are Associated with Neural Tube Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Chunyue; Jiang, Qian; Li, Huili; Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Bao, Yihua; Zhang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe malformations of the central nervous system caused by complex genetic and environmental factors. Among genes involved in NTD, cilia-related genes have been well defined and found to be essential for the completion of neural tube closure (NTC). We have carried out next-generation sequencing on target genes in 373 NTDs and 222 healthy controls, and discovered eight disease-specific rare mutations in cilia-related gene DNAAF1. DNAAF1 plays a central role in cytoplasmic preassembly of distinct dynein-arm complexes, and is expressed in some key tissues involved in neural system development, such as neural tube, floor plate, embryonic node, and brain ependyma epithelial cells in zebrafish and mouse. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and functions of mutations in DNAAF1 in transfected cells to analyze the potential correlation of these mutants to NTDs in humans. One rare frameshift mutation (p.Gln341Argfs*10) resulted in significantly diminished DNAAF1 protein expression, compared to the wild type. Another mutation, p.Lys231Gln, disrupted cytoplasmic preassembly of the dynein-arm complexes in cellular assay. Furthermore, results from NanoString assay on mRNA from NTD samples indicated that DNAAF1 mutants altered the expression level of NTC-related genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the rare mutations in DNAAF1 may contribute to the susceptibility for NTDs in humans. PMID:27543293

  11. parachute/n-cadherin is required for morphogenesis and maintained integrity of the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Lele, Zsolt; Folchert, Anja; Concha, Miguel; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Geisler, Robert; Rosa, Frédéric; Wilson, Steve W; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2002-07-01

    N-cadherin (Ncad) is a classical cadherin that is implicated in several aspects of vertebrate embryonic development, including somitogenesis, heart morphogenesis, neural tube formation and establishment of left-right asymmetry. However, genetic in vivo analyses of its role during neural development have been rather limited. We report the isolation and characterization of the zebrafish parachute (pac) mutations. By mapping and candidate gene analysis, we demonstrate that pac corresponds to a zebrafish n-cadherin (ncad) homolog. Three mutant alleles were sequenced and each is likely to encode a non-functional Ncad protein. All result in a similar neural tube phenotype that is most prominent in the midbrain, hindbrain and the posterior spinal cord. Neuroectodermal cell adhesion is altered, and convergent cell movements during neurulation are severely compromised. In addition, many neurons become progressively displaced along the dorsoventral and the anteroposterior axes. At the cellular level, loss of Ncad affects beta-catenin stabilization/localization and causes mispositioned and increased mitoses in the dorsal midbrain and hindbrain, a phenotype later correlated with enhanced apoptosis and the appearance of ectopic neurons in these areas. Our results thus highlight novel and crucial in vivo roles for Ncad in the control of cell convergence, maintenance of neuronal positioning and dorsal cell proliferation during vertebrate neural tube development.

  12. Distinct regulatory mechanisms act to establish and maintain Pax3 expression in the developing neural tube.

    PubMed

    Moore, Steven; Ribes, Vanessa; Terriente, Javier; Wilkinson, David; Relaix, Frédéric; Briscoe, James

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation in developing tissues is driven by the interaction of extrinsic signals with intrinsic transcriptional networks that together establish spatially and temporally restricted profiles of gene expression. How this process is orchestrated at the molecular level by genomic cis-regulatory modules is one of the central questions in developmental biology. Here we have addressed this by analysing the regulation of Pax3 expression in the context of the developing spinal cord. Pax3 is induced early during neural development in progenitors of the dorsal spinal cord and is maintained as pattern is subsequently elaborated, resulting in the segregation of the tissue into dorsal and ventral subdivisions. We used a combination of comparative genomics and transgenic assays to define and dissect several functional cis-regulatory modules associated with the Pax3 locus. We provide evidence that the coordinated activity of two modules establishes and refines Pax3 expression during neural tube development. Mutational analyses of the initiating element revealed that in addition to Wnt signaling, Nkx family homeodomain repressors restrict Pax3 transcription to the presumptive dorsal neural tube. Subsequently, a second module mediates direct positive autoregulation and feedback to maintain Pax3 expression. Together, these data indicate a mechanism by which transient external signals are converted into a sustained expression domain by the activities of distinct regulatory elements. This transcriptional logic differs from the cross-repression that is responsible for the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression in the ventral neural tube, suggesting that a variety of circuits are deployed within the neural tube regulatory network to establish and elaborate pattern formation.

  13. miR-430 regulates oriented cell division during neural tube development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Carter M; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2016-01-15

    MicroRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression. Originally shown to regulate developmental timing, microRNAs have since been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions including cell identity, migration and signaling. miRNA-430, the earliest expressed microRNA during zebrafish embryogenesis, is required to undergo morphogenesis and has previously been shown to regulate maternal mRNA clearance, Nodal signaling, and germ cell migration. The functions of miR-430 in brain morphogenesis, however, remain unclear. Herein we find that miR-430 instructs oriented cell divisions in the neural rod required for neural midline formation. Loss of miR-430 function results in mitotic spindle misorientation in the neural rod, failed neuroepithelial integration after cell division, and ectopic cell accumulation in the dorsal neural tube. We propose that miR-430, independently of canonical apicobasal and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways, coordinates the stereotypical cell divisions that instruct neural tube morphogenesis.

  14. Neural Plasticity in Multiple Sclerosis: The Functional and Molecular Background

    PubMed Central

    Ksiazek-Winiarek, Dominika Justyna; Szpakowski, Piotr; Glabinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune neurodegenerative disorder resulting in motor dysfunction and cognitive decline. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative changes seen in the brains of MS patients lead to progressive disability and increasing brain atrophy. The most common type of MS is characterized by episodes of clinical exacerbations and remissions. This suggests the presence of compensating mechanisms for accumulating damage. Apart from the widely known repair mechanisms like remyelination, another important phenomenon is neuronal plasticity. Initially, neuroplasticity was connected with the developmental stages of life; however, there is now growing evidence confirming that structural and functional reorganization occurs throughout our lifetime. Several functional studies, utilizing such techniques as fMRI, TBS, or MRS, have provided valuable data about the presence of neuronal plasticity in MS patients. CNS ability to compensate for neuronal damage is most evident in RR-MS; however it has been shown that brain plasticity is also preserved in patients with substantial brain damage. Regardless of the numerous studies, the molecular background of neuronal plasticity in MS is still not well understood. Several factors, like IL-1β, BDNF, PDGF, or CB1Rs, have been implicated in functional recovery from the acute phase of MS and are thus considered as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26229689

  15. Adding folate to the contraceptive pill: a new concept for the prevention of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Klaus; Koletzko, Berthold; Eckmann-Scholz, Christel

    2012-09-01

    Although it is proven for a long time that folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) effectively, all measures taken so far including food fortification and awareness campaigns so far had only limited success. Since more than 50% of the pregnant women in Europe get pregnant after they have used oral contraceptives (OCs) before, OCs are an ideal vehicle to increase not only the awareness for periconceptional folate application, but they can also help to bridge the gap between the recognition of a pregnancy and closure of the neural tube which is before day 26. In order to reach a truly protective folate level at the critical time period during pregnancy, now OCs are available which contain metafolin. The availability of this innovative type of OC will significantly reduce the number of NTDs.

  16. Gastrointestinal hormones (anorexigenic peptide YY and orexigenic ghrelin) influence neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Hideki; Inui, Akio; Asakawa, Akihiro; Ueno, Naohiko; Kasuga, Masato; Meguid, Michael M; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Ninomiya, Maiko; Herzog, Herbert; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2007-07-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) hormones play an important role in GI secretion, motility, and eating behaviors. It was recently suggested that GI hormones may have a trophic role in GI tract. Here we demonstrate that two principal GI hormones, anorexigenic peptide YY (PYY) and orexigenic ghrelin, affect neural tube development. Chronic administration into the pregnant mice or transgenic overexpression of PYY led to a neural tube defect (NTD) in the embryos that was blocked by ghrelin. PYY Y1 receptor antagonist prevented the occurrence of NTD induced not only by PYY but also by vitamin A, a well-known teratogen in humans and animals. Y1 receptor deficiency also engendered NTDs, indicating the need to maintain normal Y1 receptor signaling. The present study is the first linking GI hormones to the leading cause of infant mortality and provides a novel insight for neurogenesis in which materno-fetal communication through GI hormones appears to be important. PMID:17400914

  17. Perinatal factors associated with neural tube defects (anencephaly [correction of anancephaly], spina bifida and encephalocele).

    PubMed

    Ogata, A J; Camano, L; Brunoni, D

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the presence of risk factors for the occurrence of neural tube defects. Data for 33,535 births which occurred at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo from July 1973 to December 1986 were collected in a prospective manner as recommended by "Estudo Colaborativo Latino-Americano de Malformações Congênitas" (ECLAMC, Collaborative Latin American Study on Congenital Malformations). Twenty-six cases of neural tube defects were detected (0.77/1000 births). Of these, 11 were cases of spina bifida (0.39/1000 births), 9 of anencephaly (0.27/1000 births) and 6 of encephalocele (0.18/1000 births). We observed a higher frequency of polyhydramnios, premature labor, Apgar scores of less than 7 at the first and fifth minutes, low birth weight and intrauterine growth retardation.

  18. DNA delivery into anterior neural tube of zebrafish embryos by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Teh, Cathleen; Chong, Shang Wei; Korzh, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    The zebrafish is widely used for functional studies of vertebrate genes. It is accessible to manipulations during all stages of embryogenesis because the embryo develops externally and is optically transparent. However, functional studies conducted on the zebrafish have been generally limited to the earliest phase of activity of the gene of interest, which is a limitation in studies of genes that are expressed at various stages of embryonic development. It is therefore necessary to develop methods that allow for the modulation of gene activity during later stages of zebrafish development while leaving earlier functions intact. We have successfully electroporated the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene into the neural tube of the zebrafish embryo in a unidirectional or bilateral manner. This approach can be used for the functional analysis of the late role of developmental genes in the neural tube of zebrafish embryo and larvae.

  19. Scaling Pattern to Variations in Size during Development of the Vertebrate Neural Tube.

    PubMed

    Uygur, Aysu; Young, John; Huycke, Tyler R; Koska, Mervenaz; Briscoe, James; Tabin, Clifford J

    2016-04-18

    Anatomical proportions are robustly maintained in individuals that vary enormously in size, both within a species and between members of related taxa. However, the mechanisms underlying scaling are still poorly understood. We have examined this phenomenon in the context of the patterning of the ventral neural tube in response to a gradient of the morphogen Sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the chick and zebra finch, two species that differ in size during the time of neural tube patterning. We find that scaling is achieved, at least in part, by altering the sensitivity of the target cells to SHH and appears to be achieved by modulating the ratio of the repressive and activating transcriptional regulators, GLI2 and GLI3. This mechanism contrasts with previous experimental and theoretical analyses of morphogenic scaling that have focused on compensatory changes in the morphogen gradient itself. PMID:27093082

  20. The Hectd1 Ubiquitin Ligase is Required for Development of the Head Mesenchyme and Neural Tube Closure

    PubMed Central

    Zohn, Irene E.; Anderson, Kathryn V.; Niswander, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Closure of the cranial neural tube depends on normal development of the head mesenchyme. Homozygous-mutant embryos for the ENU-induced open mind (opm) mutation exhibit exencephaly associated with defects in head mesenchyme development and dorsal-lateral hinge point formation. The head mesenchyme in opm mutant embryos is denser than in wildtype embryos and displays an abnormal cellular organization. Since cells that originate from both the cephalic paraxial mesoderm and the neural crest populate the head mesenchyme, we explored the origin of the abnormal head mesenchyme. opm mutant embryos show apparently normal development of neural crest-derived structures. Furthermore, the abnormal head mesenchyme in opm mutant embryos is not derived from the neural crest, but instead expresses molecular markers of cephalic mesoderm. We also report the identification of the opm mutation in the ubiquitously expressed Hectd1 E3 ubiquitin ligase. Two different Hectd1 alleles cause incompletely penetrant neural tube defects in heterozygous animals, indicating that Hectd1 function is required at a critical threshold for neural tube closure. This low penetrance of neural tube defects in embryos heterozygous for Hectd1 mutations suggests that Hectd1 should be considered as candidate susceptibility gene in human neural tube defects. PMID:17442300

  1. Prevention of neural tube defects with folic acid: The Chinese experience.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ai-Guo

    2015-08-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations of the central nervous system that are caused by the closure failure of the embryonic neural tube by the 28(th) day of conception. Anencephaly and spina bifida are the two major subtypes. Fetuses with anencephaly are often stillborn or electively aborted due to prenatal diagnosis, or they die shortly after birth. Most infants with spina bifida are live-born and, with proper surgical treatment, can survive into adulthood. However, these children often have life-long physical disabilities. China has one of the highest prevalence of NTDs in the world. Inadequate dietary folate intake is believed to be the main cause of the cluster. Unlike many other countries that use staple fortification with folic acid as the public health strategy to prevent NTDs, the Chinese government provides all women who have a rural household registration and who plan to become pregnant with folic acid supplements, free of charge, through a nation-wide program started in 2009. Two to three years after the initiation of the program, the folic acid supplementation rate increased to 85% in the areas of the highest NTD prevalence. The mean plasma folate level of women during early and mid-pregnancy doubled the level before the program was introduced. However, most women began taking folic acid supplements when they knew that they were pregnant. This is too late for the protection of the embryonic neural tube. In a post-program survey of the women who reported folic acid supplementation, less than a quarter of the women began taking supplements prior to pregnancy, indicating that the remaining three quarters of the fetuses remained unprotected during the time of neural tube formation. Therefore, staple food fortification with folic acid should be considered as a priority in the prevention of NTDs. PMID:26261765

  2. Genomic DNA hypomethylation is associated with neural tube defects induced by methotrexate inhibition of folate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Zhen; Chen, Yan; Dong, Yanting; Niu, Yuhu; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is thought to be involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the exact mechanism between DNA methylation and NTDs remains unclear. Herein, we investigated the change of methylation in mouse model of NTDs associated with folate dysmetabolism by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS), liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), microarray, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Real time quantitative PCR. Results showed that NTD neural tube tissues had lower concentrations of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF, P = 0.005), 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF, P = 0.040), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, P = 0.004) and higher concentrations of folic acid (P = 0.041), homocysteine (Hcy, P = 0.006) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, P = 0.045) compared to control. Methylation levels of genomic DNA decreased significantly in the embryonic neural tube tissue of NTD samples. 132 differentially methylated regions (35 low methylated regions and 97 high methylated regions) were selected by microarray. Two genes (Siah1b, Prkx) in Wnt signal pathway demonstrated lower methylated regions (peak) and higher expression in NTDs (P<0.05; P<0.05). Results suggest that DNA hypomethylation was one of the possible epigenetic variations correlated with the occurrence of NTDs induced by folate dysmetabolism and that Siah1b, Prkx in Wnt pathway may be candidate genes for NTDs.

  3. The continuing challenge of understanding, preventing, and treating neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, John B; Niswander, Lee A; Shaw, Gary M; Finnell, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Human birth defects are a major public health burden: The Center for Disease Control estimates that 1 of every 33 United States newborns presents with a birth defect, and worldwide the estimate approaches 6% of all births. Among the most common and debilitating of human birth defects are those affecting the formation of the neural tube, the precursor to the central nervous system. Neural tube defects (NTDs) arise from a complex combination of genetic and environmental interactions. Although substantial advances have been made in the prevention and treatment of these malformations, NTDs remain a substantial public health problem, and we are only now beginning to understand their etiology. Here, we review the process of neural tube development and how defects in this process lead to NTDs, both in humans and in the animal models that serve to inform our understanding of these processes. The insights we are gaining will help generate new intervention strategies to tackle the clinical challenges and to alleviate the personal and societal burdens that accompany these defects.

  4. Prenatal detection of neural tube defects by maternal serum alphafetoprotein assay.

    PubMed

    Grace, H J; Gray, R; Conradie, J D

    1981-08-22

    Mass screening for fetal neural tube defects using maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein assay as the initial test is financially justified in South Africa, despite the relatively low incidence of these defects in this country, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This technique is efficient and inexpensive and lends itself to mass screening. We report a pilot study in which 3153 maternal serum samples were received during a 4-month period. Of these 3102 were assayed and the outcome of pregnancy was recorded in 2069 cases. On the first assay 147 (4.7%) of the women had serum alpha-fetoprotein levels which were high for the gestational dates given, but in retrospect about half of these had been misinterpreted because of incorrect dates. Among the remainder, 6 women proved to be carrying twins, 4 aborted spontaneously, 10 delivered prematurely or had infants with intra-uterine growth retardation, and 4 had a fetus with a neural tube defect. Two affected fetuses were missed by screening, in both cases because serum was taken after 20 weeks gestation. In this sample the incidence in Indians (1/1000)and Coloureds (1/600) was as expected, but in Whites it was much higher (1/130), which probably reflects a sampling error and indicates that the epidemiology of neural tube defects in South Africa requires investigation.

  5. C5a Receptor Signaling Prevents Folate Deficiency-Induced Neural Tube Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Kerina J; Coulthard, Liam G; Jeanes, Angela; Lisgo, Steven; Simmons, David G; Callaway, Leonie K; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Finnell, Richard H; Woodruff, Trent M; Taylor, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is involved in a range of diverse developmental processes including cell survival, growth, differentiation, and regeneration. However, little is known about the role of complement in embryogenesis. Herein we demonstrate a novel role for the canonical complement 5a receptor (C5aR) in the development of the mammalian neural tube under conditions of maternal dietary folic acid deficiency. Specifically, we found C5aR and C5 to be expressed throughout the period of neurulation in wildtype mice and localized the expression to the cephalic regions of the developing neural tube. C5aR was also found to be expressed in the neuroepithelium of early human embryos. Ablation of the C5ar1 gene or the administration of a specific C5aR peptide antagonist to folic acid-deficient pregnant mice resulted in a high prevalence of severe anterior neural tube defect-associated congenital malformations. These findings provide a new and compelling insight into the role of the complement system during mammalian embryonic development. PMID:23420882

  6. [The effect of folic acid fortification on the reduction of neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonor Maria Pacheco; Pereira, Michelle Zanon

    2007-01-01

    Neural tube defects are congenital malformations that occur during initial fetal development, leading to anencephaly and spina bifida; folic acid deficiency is the most important risk factor identified to date. Brazil has one of the world's highest neural tube defect rates. Food consumption surveys among pregnant Brazilian women showed a high rate of inadequate folic acid intake (< 0.6 mg/day). In 2004, the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) mandated the fortification of corn meal and wheat flour with folic acid (0.15 mg/100g). The National Family Budget Survey estimated the average amount of bread/flour products available in households as 106.1g/day (contributing with 0.16 mg folic acid/day). However, while in the South of the country the supply was 144 g/day, in the North and Central West it barely reached 70 g/day. Folic acid food fortification is mandatory in some 40 countries, but only four have assessed this strategy. The existing studies have all shown a significant impact, ranging from 19 to 78%. Folic acid fortification is an undeniably important intervention for primary prevention, and neural tube defects can now be considered a preventable epidemic.

  7. [The effect of folic acid fortification on the reduction of neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonor Maria Pacheco; Pereira, Michelle Zanon

    2007-01-01

    Neural tube defects are congenital malformations that occur during initial fetal development, leading to anencephaly and spina bifida; folic acid deficiency is the most important risk factor identified to date. Brazil has one of the world's highest neural tube defect rates. Food consumption surveys among pregnant Brazilian women showed a high rate of inadequate folic acid intake (< 0.6 mg/day). In 2004, the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) mandated the fortification of corn meal and wheat flour with folic acid (0.15 mg/100g). The National Family Budget Survey estimated the average amount of bread/flour products available in households as 106.1g/day (contributing with 0.16 mg folic acid/day). However, while in the South of the country the supply was 144 g/day, in the North and Central West it barely reached 70 g/day. Folic acid food fortification is mandatory in some 40 countries, but only four have assessed this strategy. The existing studies have all shown a significant impact, ranging from 19 to 78%. Folic acid fortification is an undeniably important intervention for primary prevention, and neural tube defects can now be considered a preventable epidemic. PMID:17187100

  8. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal neural tube.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel M

    2011-05-01

    Neural progenitors are organized as a pseudostratified epithelium held together by adherens junctions (AJs), multiprotein complexes composed of cadherins and α- and β-catenin. Catenins are known to control neural progenitor division; however, it is not known whether they function in this capacity as cadherin binding partners, as there is little evidence that cadherins themselves regulate neural proliferation. We show here that zebrafish N-cadherin (N-cad) restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal region of the neural tube by regulating cell-cycle length. We further reveal that N-cad couples cell-cycle exit and differentiation, as a fraction of neurons are mitotic in N-cad mutants. Enhanced proliferation in N-cad mutants is mediated by ligand-independent activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, possibly caused by defective ciliogenesis. Furthermore, depletion of Hh signaling results in the loss of junctional markers. We therefore propose that N-cad restricts the response of dorsal neural progenitors to Hh and that Hh signaling limits the range of its own activity by promoting AJ assembly. Taken together, these observations emphasize a key role for N-cad-mediated adhesion in controlling neural progenitor proliferation. In addition, these findings are the first to demonstrate a requirement for cadherins in synchronizing cell-cycle exit and differentiation and a reciprocal interaction between AJs and Hh signaling.

  9. Mini-review: toward understanding mechanisms of genetic neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, M J; Juriloff, D M

    1999-11-01

    We review the data from studies of mouse mutants that lend insight to the mechanisms that lead to neural tube defects (NTDs). Most of the 50 single-gene mutations that cause neural tube defects (NTDs) in mice also cause severe embryonic-lethal syndromes, in which exencephaly is a nonspecific feature. In a few mutants (e.g., Trp53, Macs, Mlp or Sp), other defects may be present, but affected fetuses can survive to birth. Multifactorial genetic causes, as are present in the curly tail stock (15-20% spina bifida), or the SELH/Bc strain (15-20% exencephaly), lead to nonsyndromic NTDs. The mutations indicate that "spina bifida occulta," a dorsal gap in the vertebral arches over an intact neural tube, is usually genetically and developmentally unrelated to exencephaly or "spina bifida" (aperta). Almost all exencephaly or spina bifida aperta of genetic origin is caused by failure of neural fold elevation. The developmental mechanisms in genetic NTDs are considered in terms of distinct rostro-caudal zones along the neural folds that likely differ in mechanism of elevation. Failure of elevation leads to: split face (zone A), exencephaly (zone B), rachischisis (all of zone D), or spina bifida (caudal zone D). The developmental mechanisms leading to these genetic NTDs are heterogeneous, even within one zone. At the tissue level, the mutants show that the mechanism of failure of elevation can involve, e.g., (1) slow growth of adjacent tethered tissue (curly tail), (2) defective forebrain mesenchyme (Cart1 or twist), (3) defective basal lamina in surface ectoderm (Lama5), (4) excessive breadth of floorplate and notochord (Lp), (5) abnormal neuroepithelium (Apob, Sp, Tcfap2a), (6) morphological deformation of neural folds (jmj), (7) abnormal neuroepithelial and neural crest cell gap-junction communication (Gja1), or (8) incomplete compensation for a defective step in the elevation sequence (SELH/Bc). At the biochemical level, mutants suggest involvement of: (1) faulty regulation

  10. Association of the 677C-->T mutation on the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene in Turkish patients with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Boduroğlu, K; Alikaşifoğlu, M; Anar, B; Tunçbilek, E

    1999-03-01

    We report the analysis of the 677C-->T mutation on the 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene in Turkish controls and cases of neural tube defects. Mutation analysis of 91 patients with neural tube defects, 72 mothers, 63 fathers, and 93 healthy controls has been made by polymerase chain reaction and allele specific restriction digestion with Hinf I. We did not find a significant difference in the 677C-->T allele and genotype distribution among the patients with neural tube defects, their parents, and the control group. This result suggests that another mutation in the folate-related enzyme genes could be responsible for neural tube defects in Turkey. None of the mothers of patients with neural tube defects was advised to use folic acid as recommended to prevent neural tube defects. An immediate attempt to establish an education program for healthcare providers and women of childbearing age is crucial in Turkey. Furthermore, fortification of foods with folate would be a better approach.

  11. When folic acid fails: Insights from 20 years of neural tube defect surveillance in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Bupp, Caleb P; Sarasua, Sara M; Dean, Jane H; Stevenson, Roger E

    2015-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most common of the severe malformations of the brain and spinal cord. Increased maternal intake of folic acid (FA) during the periconceptional period is known to reduce NTD risk. Data from 1046 NTD cases in South Carolina were gathered over 20 years of surveillance. It was possible to determine maternal periconceptional FA use in 615 NTD-affected pregnancies. In 163 occurrent (26.9%) and two recurrent (22%) NTD cases, the mothers reported periconceptional FA use. These women were older and more likely to be white. Maternal periconceptional FA usage was reported in 40.4% of cases of spina bifida with other anomalies but in only 25.2% of isolated spina bifida cases (P = 0.02). This enrichment for associated anomalies was not noted among cases of anencephaly or of encephalocele. Among the 563 subsequent pregnancies to mothers with previous NTD-affected pregnancies, those taking FA had a 0.4% NTD recurrence rate, but the recurrence without FA was 8.5%. NTDs with other associated findings were less likely to be prevented by FA, suggesting there is a background NTD rate that cannot be further reduced by FA. Nonetheless, the majority (73.9%) of NTDs in pregnancies in which the mothers reported periconceptional FA use were isolated NTDs of usual types. Cases in which FA failed in prevention of NTDs provide potential areas for further study into the causation of NTDs. The measures and techniques implemented in South Carolina can serve as an effective and successful model for prevention of NTD occurrence and recurrence. PMID:26108864

  12. Maternal Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Risk of Neural Tube Defect-Affected Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Peter H.; Hoyt, Adrienne T.; Lupo, Philip J.; Lawson, Christina C.; Waters, Martha A.; Desrosiers, Tania A.; Shaw, Gary M.; Romitti, Paul A.; Lammer, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study evaluated whether there is an association between maternal occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. This is the first such study of which the authors are aware. METHODS Data were analyzed from 1997 to 2002 deliveries in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a large population-based case-control study in the United States. Maternal interviews yielded information on jobs held in the month before through 3 months after conception. Three industrial hygienists blinded to case or control status assessed occupational exposure to PAHs. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS Of the 520 mothers of children with NTDs, 5.0% were classified as exposed to occupational PAHs, as were 3.5% of the 2989 mothers of controls. The crude OR for PAH exposure was 1.43 (95% CI, 0.92–2.22) for any NTD and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.03–2.83) for spina bifida. Adjusted ORs were smaller in magnitude and not significant. Among women who were normal weight or underweight, the crude OR for spina bifida was 3.13 (95% CI, 1.63–6.03) and adjusted OR was 2.59 (95% CI, 1.32–5.07). Based on estimated cumulative exposure, a statistically significant dose-response trend was observed for spina bifida; however, it was attenuated and no longer significant after adjustment. CONCLUSION Maternal occupational exposure to PAHs may be associated with increased risk of spina bifida in offspring among women who are normal weight or underweight. Other comparisons between PAHs and NTDs were consistent with no association. PMID:22807044

  13. Dietary folate, but not choline, modifies neural tube defect risk in Shmt1 knockout mice12345

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Anna E; Abarinov, Elena V; Malysheva, Olga; Perry, Cheryll A; Caudill, Marie; Stover, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Low dietary choline intake has been proposed to increase the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in human populations. Mice with reduced Shmt1 expression exhibit a higher frequency of NTDs when placed on a folate- and choline-deficient diet and may represent a model of human NTDs. The individual contribution of dietary folate and choline deficiency to NTD incidence in this mouse model is not known. Objective: To dissociate the effects of dietary folate and choline deficiency on Shmt1-related NTD sensitivity, we determined NTD incidence in embryos from Shmt1-null dams fed diets deficient in either folate or choline. Design: Shmt1+/+ and Shmt1−/− dams were maintained on a standard AIN93G diet (Dyets), an AIN93G diet lacking folate (FD), or an AIN93G diet lacking choline (CD). Virgin Shmt1+/+ and Shmt1−/− dams were crossed with Shmt1+/− males, and embryos were examined for the presence of NTDs at embryonic day (E) 11.5 or E12.5. Results: Exencephaly was observed only in Shmt1−/− embryos isolated from dams maintained on the FD diet (P = 0.004). Approximately 33% of Shmt1−/−embryos (n = 18) isolated from dams maintained on the FD diet exhibited exencephaly. NTDs were not observed in any embryos isolated from dams maintained on the CD (n = 100) or control (n = 152) diets or in any Shmt1+/+ (n = 78) or Shmt1+/− embryos (n = 182). Conclusion: Maternal folate deficiency alone is sufficient to induce NTDs in response to embryonic Shmt1 disruption. PMID:22134951

  14. Uncoupling Protein 2 Polymorphisms as Risk Factors for Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam; Pangilinan, Faith; VanderMeer, Julie; Molloy, Anne M.; Troendle, James; Conley, Mary; Kirke, Peadar N.; Scott, John M.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Mills, James L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both environmental and genetic factors are involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTDs). Inadequate folate intake and obesity are important environmental risk factors. Several folate-related genetic variants have been identified as risk factors; however, little is known about how genetic variants relate to the increased risk seen in obese women. Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) is an attractive candidate to screen for NTD risk because of its possible role in obesity as well as energy metabolism, type-2 diabetes, and the regulation of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, a previous study found that a common UCP2 compound homozygous genotype was associated with a threefold increase in NTD risk. METHODS: We evaluated three polymorphisms, −866G>A, A55V, and the 3′UTR 45bp insertion/deletion, as risk factors for NTDs in Irish NTD cases (N=169), their mothers (N=163), their fathers (N=167) and normal control subjects (N=332). RESULTS: Allele and genotype frequencies were not significantly different when comparing NTD mothers, NTD fathers, or affected children to controls. Additionally, the previously reported risk genotype (combined homozygosity of 55VV and 3′UTR 45bp deletion/deletion) was not present at a higher frequency in any NTD group when compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: In our Irish study population, UCP2 polymorphisms do not influence NTD risk. Moreover, the prevalence of this allele in other populations was similar to the Irish prevalence but far lower than reported in the previous NTD study, suggesting that this previous finding of an association with NTDs might have been due to an unrepresentative study sample. PMID:19137581

  15. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-08-15

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  16. Cellular basis of neuroepithelial bending during mouse spinal neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    McShane, Suzanne G.; Molè, Matteo A.; Savery, Dawn; Greene, Nicholas D. E; Tam, Patrick P.L.; Copp, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bending of the neural plate at paired dorsolateral hinge points (DLHPs) is required for neural tube closure in the spinal region of the mouse embryo. As a step towards understanding the morphogenetic mechanism of DLHP development, we examined variations in neural plate cellular architecture and proliferation during closure. Neuroepithelial cells within the median hinge point (MHP) contain nuclei that are mainly basally located and undergo relatively slow proliferation, with a 7 h cell cycle length. In contrast, cells in the dorsolateral neuroepithelium, including the DLHP, exhibit nuclei distributed throughout the apico-basal axis and undergo rapid proliferation, with a 4 h cell cycle length. As the neural folds elevate, cell numbers increase to a greater extent in the dorsolateral neural plate that contacts the surface ectoderm, compared with the more ventromedial neural plate where cells contact paraxial mesoderm and notochord. This marked increase in dorsolateral cell number cannot be accounted for solely on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation in this region. We hypothesised that neuroepithelial cells may translocate in a ventral-to-dorsal direction as DLHP formation occurs, and this was confirmed by vital cell labelling in cultured embryos. The translocation of cells into the neural fold, together with its more rapid cell proliferation, leads to an increase in cell density dorsolaterally compared with the more ventromedial neural plate. These findings suggest a model in which DLHP formation may proceed through ‘buckling’ of the neuroepithelium at a dorso-ventral boundary marked by a change in cell-packing density. PMID:26079577

  17. Musical experience limits the degradative effects of background noise on the neural processing of sound.

    PubMed

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2009-11-11

    Musicians have lifelong experience parsing melodies from background harmonies, which can be considered a process analogous to speech perception in noise. To investigate the effect of musical experience on the neural representation of speech-in-noise, we compared subcortical neurophysiological responses to speech in quiet and noise in a group of highly trained musicians and nonmusician controls. Musicians were found to have a more robust subcortical representation of the acoustic stimulus in the presence of noise. Specifically, musicians demonstrated faster neural timing, enhanced representation of speech harmonics, and less degraded response morphology in noise. Neural measures were associated with better behavioral performance on the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) for which musicians outperformed the nonmusician controls. These findings suggest that musical experience limits the negative effects of competing background noise, thereby providing the first biological evidence for musicians' perceptual advantage for speech-in-noise.

  18. Neurulation abnormalities secondary to altered gene expression in neural tube defect susceptible Splotch embryos.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G D; An, J; Craig, J C; Gefrides, L A; Calvin, J A; Finnell, R H

    1998-01-01

    The murine mutant Splotch (Sp) is a well-established model for studying neural tube closure defects. In the current investigation, the progression through neural tube closure (NTC) as well as the expression patterns of 12 developmentally regulated genes were examined in the neural tissue of wildtype (+/+), Splotch heterozygous (Sp/+), and Splotch homozygous (Sp/Sp) embryos during neurulation. The overall growth of the embryos, as measured by the number of somite pairs, did not differ significantly between the three genotypes at any of the collection time-points. There was, however, a significant delay in the progression through NTC for both the Sp/+ and Sp/Sp embryos. A univariate analysis on the expression of the 12 candidate genes (bcl-2, FBP-2, Hmx-2, Msx-3, N-cam, N-cad, noggin, p53, Pax-3, Shh, Wee-1, wnt-1) revealed that although 11 were statistically altered, across time or by genotype, there were no significant interactions between gestation age and genotype for any of these genes during NTC. However, a multivariate statistical analysis on the simultaneous expression of these genes revealed interactions at both gestation day (GD) 8:12 (day:hour) and 9:00 among Pax-3, N-cam, N-cad, bcl-2, p53, and Wee-1 that could potentially explain the aberrant NTC. The data from these studies suggest that a disruption in the genes that govern the cell cycle or extracellular matrices of the developing neural tube might play a critical role in the occurrence of the NTDs observed in Splotch embryos.

  19. Junctional neurulation: a unique developmental program shaping a discrete region of the spinal cord highly susceptible to neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dady, Alwyn; Havis, Emmanuelle; Escriou, Virginie; Catala, Martin; Duband, Jean-Loup

    2014-09-24

    In higher vertebrates, the primordium of the nervous system, the neural tube, is shaped along the rostrocaudal axis through two consecutive, radically different processes referred to as primary and secondary neurulation. Failures in neurulation lead to severe anomalies of the nervous system, called neural tube defects (NTDs), which are among the most common congenital malformations in humans. Mechanisms causing NTDs in humans remain ill-defined. Of particular interest, the thoracolumbar region, which encompasses many NTD cases in the spine, corresponds to the junction between primary and secondary neurulations. Elucidating which developmental processes operate during neurulation in this region is therefore pivotal to unraveling the etiology of NTDs. Here, using the chick embryo as a model, we show that, at the junction, the neural tube is elaborated by a unique developmental program involving concerted movements of elevation and folding combined with local cell ingression and accretion. This process ensures the topological continuity between the primary and secondary neural tubes while supplying all neural progenitors of both the junctional and secondary neural tubes. Because it is distinct from the other neurulation events, we term this phenomenon junctional neurulation. Moreover, the planar-cell-polarity member, Prickle-1, is recruited specifically during junctional neurulation and its misexpression within a limited time period suffices to cause anomalies that phenocopy lower spine NTDs in human. Our study thus provides a molecular and cellular basis for understanding the causality of NTD prevalence in humans and ascribes to Prickle-1 a critical role in lower spinal cord formation. PMID:25253865

  20. Regulation of Patched by Sonic Hedgehog in the Developing Neural Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigo, Valeria; Tabin, Clifford J.

    1996-09-01

    Ventral cell fates in the central nervous system are induced by Sonic hedgehog, a homolog of hedgehog, a secreted Drosophila protein. In the central nervous system, Sonic hedgehog has been identified as the signal inducing floor plate, motor neurons, and dopaminergic neurons. Sonic hedgehog is also involved in the induction of ventral cell type in the developing somites. ptc is a key gene in the Drosophila hedgehog signaling pathway where it is involved in transducing the hedgehog signal and is also a transcriptional target of the signal. PTC, a vertebrate homolog of this Drosophila gene, is genetically downstream of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the limb bud. We analyze PTC expression during chicken neural and somite development and find it expressed in all regions of these tissues known to be responsive to Sonic hedgehog signal. As in the limb bud, ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog leads to ectopic induction of PTC in the neural tube and paraxial mesoderm. This conservation of regulation allows us to use PTC as a marker for Sonic hedgehog response. The pattern of PTC expression suggests that Sonic hedgehog may play an inductive role in more dorsal regions of the neural tube than have been previously demonstrated. Examination of the pattern of PTC expression also suggests that PTC may act in a negative feedback loop to attenuate hedgehog signaling.

  1. Lulu Regulates Shroom-Induced Apical Constriction during Neural Tube Closure

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Wen; Gerstenzang, Emma; Ossipova, Olga; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2013-01-01

    Apical constriction is an essential cell behavior during neural tube closure, but its underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Lulu, or EPB4.1l5, is a FERM domain protein that has been implicated in apical constriction and actomyosin contractility in mouse embryos and cultured cells. Interference with the function of Lulu in Xenopus embryos by a specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotide or a carboxy-terminal fragment of Lulu impaired apical constriction during neural plate hinge formation. This effect was likely due to lack of actomyosin contractility in superficial neuroectodermal cells. By contrast, overexpression of Lulu RNA in embryonic ectoderm cells triggered ectopic apico-basal elongation and apical constriction, accompanied by the apical recruitment of F-actin. Depletion of endogenous Lulu disrupted the localization and activity of Shroom3, a PDZ-containing actin-binding protein that has also been implicated in apical constriction. Furthermore, Lulu and Shroom3 RNAs cooperated in triggering ectopic apical constriction in embryonic ectoderm. Our findings reveal that Lulu is essential for Shroom3-dependent apical constriction during vertebrate neural tube closure. PMID:24282618

  2. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Žigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo. PMID:24449840

  3. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo.

  4. Regulation of patched by sonic hedgehog in the developing neural tube.

    PubMed Central

    Marigo, V; Tabin, C J

    1996-01-01

    Ventral cell fates in the central nervous system are induced by Sonic hedgehog, a homolog of hedgehog, a secreted Drosophila protein. In the central nervous system, Sonic hedgehog has been identified as the signal inducing floor plate, motor neurons, and dopaminergic neurons. Sonic hedgehog is also involved in the induction of ventral cell type in the developing somites. ptc is a key gene in the Drosophila hedgehog signaling pathway where it is involved in transducing the hedgehog signal and is also a transcriptional target of the signal. PTC, a vertebrate homolog of this Drosophila gene, is genetically downstream of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the limb bud. We analyze PTC expression during chicken neural and somite development and find it expressed in all regions of these tissues known to be responsive to Sonic hedgehog signal. As in the limb bud, ectopic expression of Sonic hedgehog leads to ectopic induction of PTC in the neural tube and paraxial mesoderm. This conservation of regulation allows us to use PTC as a marker for Sonic hedgehog response. The pattern of PTC expression suggests that Sonic hedgehog may play an inductive role in more dorsal regions of the neural tube than have been previously demonstrated. Examination of the pattern of PTC expression also suggests that PTC may act in a negative feedback loop to attenuate hedgehog signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790332

  5. Development-on-chip: in vitro neural tube patterning with a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Prabakaran; Chennampally, Phaneendra; Cox, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Embryogenesis is a highly regulated process in which the precise spatial and temporal release of soluble cues directs differentiation of multipotent stem cells into discrete populations of specialized adult cell types. In the spinal cord, neural progenitor cells are directed to differentiate into adult neurons through the action of mediators released from nearby organizing centers, such as the floor plate and paraxial mesoderm. These signals combine to create spatiotemporal diffusional landscapes that precisely regulate the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Currently, in vivo and ex vivo studies of these signaling factors present some inherent ambiguity. In vitro methods are preferred for their enhanced experimental clarity but often lack the technical sophistication required for biological realism. In this article, we present a versatile microfluidic platform capable of mimicking the spatial and temporal chemical environments found in vivo during neural tube development. Simultaneous opposing and/or orthogonal gradients of developmental morphogens can be maintained, resulting in neural tube patterning analogous to that observed in vivo. PMID:27246712

  6. Prediction of friction factor of pure water flowing inside vertical smooth and microfin tubes by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çebi, A.; Akdoğan, E.; Celen, A.; Dalkilic, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model of friction factor in smooth and microfin tubes under heating, cooling and isothermal conditions was developed in this study. Data used in ANN was taken from a vertically positioned heat exchanger experimental setup. Multi-layered feed-forward neural network with backpropagation algorithm, radial basis function networks and hybrid PSO-neural network algorithm were applied to the database. Inputs were the ratio of cross sectional flow area to hydraulic diameter, experimental condition number depending on isothermal, heating, or cooling conditions and mass flow rate while the friction factor was the output of the constructed system. It was observed that such neural network based system could effectively predict the friction factor values of the flows regardless of their tube types. A dependency analysis to determine the strongest parameter that affected the network and database was also performed and tube geometry was found to be the strongest parameter of all as a result of analysis.

  7. Folate-related gene variants in Irish families affected by neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Fisk Green, Ridgely; Byrne, Julianne; Crider, Krista S.; Gallagher, Margaret; Koontz, Deborah; Berry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Periconceptional folic acid use can often prevent neural tube defects (NTDs). Variants of genes involved in folate metabolism in mothers and children have been associated with occurrence of NTDs. We identified Irish families with individuals affected by neural tube defects. In these families, we observed that neural tube defects and birth defects overall occurred at a higher rate in the maternal lineage compared with the paternal lineage. The goal of this study was to look for evidence for genetic effects that could explain the discrepancy in the occurrence of these birth defects in the maternal vs. paternal lineage. We genotyped blood samples from 322 individuals from NTD-affected Irish families, identified through their membership in spina bifida associations. We looked for differences in distribution in maternal vs. paternal lineages of five genetic polymorphisms: the DHFR 19 bp deletion, MTHFD1 1958G>A, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTHFR 677C>T, and SLC19A1 80A>G. In addition to looking at genotypes individually, we determined the number of genotypes associated with decreased folate metabolism in each relative (“risk genotypes”) and compared the distribution of these genotypes in maternal vs. paternal relatives. Overall, maternal relatives had a higher number of genotypes associated with lower folate metabolism than paternal relatives (p = 0.017). We expected that relatives would share the same risk genotype as the individuals with NTDs and/or their mothers. However, we observed that maternal relatives had an over-abundance of any risk genotype, rather than one specific genotype. The observed genetic effects suggest an epigenetic mechanism in which decreased folate metabolism results in epigenetic alterations related to the increased rate of NTDs and other birth defects seen in the maternal lineage. Future studies on the etiology of NTDs and other birth defects could benefit from including multigenerational extended families, in order to explore potential epigenetic

  8. [Neural tube defects and folic acid: a historical overview of a highly successful preventive intervention].

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Adriana Ordoñez; Suarez-Obando, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    This article gives a broad overview of part of the historical evolution of medical knowledge about neural tube defects (NTD) and the discovery of vitamin B9 or folic acid, as well as some relevant research events that, over the course of several centuries, defined the relationships between the understanding of central nervous system embryology, the discovery of the vitamin, the correlation between folic acid and cell proliferation and lastly the development of preventive measures for this type of defects. This narrative allows us to examine historically relevant concepts underlying clinical actions with a populational impact that prevent NTDs via folic acid consumption prior to conception.

  9. Folic acid and neural tube defect: can't we come to closure?

    PubMed Central

    Willett, W C

    1992-01-01

    In a series of nonrandomized and randomized intervention trials and case-control and cohort studies, women using multivitamins or folic acid supplements during the first 6 weeks of pregnancy experienced a three- to fourfold reduction in neural tube defects among their offspring. Viewed collectively, these data provide strong evidence that an important subset of US women do not receive sufficient folic acid to minimize their risk of a defective pregnancy. Further, the amounts of folic acid contained in multivitamins (usually 200-400 micrograms per day) appear adequate to greatly reduce, and probably eliminate, the excess risk. PMID:1566943

  10. Genetic basis of neural tube defects. II. Genes correlated with folate and methionine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika; Szpecht-Potocka, Agnieszka

    2002-01-01

    Effective supplementation with folate, which prevents neural tube defect (NTD) occurrence, and high homocysteine levels in the blood of NTD children's mothers suggest that genes involved in folate and homocysteine metabolism can be involved in NTD aetiology. Genes encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) or methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) belong to the first group. Genes encoding methionine synthase (MTR), its regulator - methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) and also cystathionine synthase (CBS) can be included in the second group. We present a current list of the folate and homocysteine metabolism genes that are known to be involved in NTD and pay special attention to primary and secondary NTD prevention.

  11. Giant occipital meningohydroencephalocele in an adult: Another historical case in neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, O; Sogoba, Y; Kanikomo, D; Dama, M; Camara, M A; Diallo, O

    2016-08-01

    Meningohydroencephalocele is a herniation of meninges, cerebrospinal fluid, brain parenchyma and a part of the ventricular system through a bony defect in the skull. This bone defect may be congenital, spontaneous or traumatic in origin. The lesions are mostly congenital, discovered generally after birth or in very young infants. We report the first historical case of the entity in this location in a 29-year-old man and discuss the pathogenesis, surgical management and social considerations of this type of neural tube defect in our country. PMID:27389765

  12. MicroRNA GENE EXPRESSION SIGNATURES IN THE DEVELOPING NEURAL TUBE

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Brock, Guy; Appana, Savitri; Webb, Cynthia; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neurulation requires precise, spatio-temporal expression of numerous genes and coordinated interaction of signal transduction and gene regulatory networks, disruption of which may contribute to the etiology of neural tube (NT) defects. MicroRNAs are key modulators of cell and tissue differentiation. In order to define potential roles of miRNAs in development of the murine NT, miRNA microarray analysis was conducted to establish expression profiles, and identify miRNA target genes and functional gene networks. METHODS miRNA expression profiles in murine embryonic NTs derived from gestational days 8.5, 9.0 and 9.5 were defined and compared utilizing miRXplore™ microarrays from Miltenyi Biotech GmbH. Gene expression changes were verified by TaqMan™ quantitative Real-Time PCR. clValid R package and the UPGMA (hierarchical) clustering method were utilized for cluster analysis of the microarray data. Functional associations among selected miRNAs were examined via Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. RESULTS miRXplore™ chips enabled examination of 609 murine miRNAs. Expression of approximately 12% of these was detected in murine embryonic NTs. Clustering analysis revealed several developmentally regulated expression clusters among these expressed genes. Target analysis of differentially expressed miRNAs enabled identification of numerous target genes associated with cellular processes essential for normal NT development. Utilization of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed interactive biological networks which connected differentially expressed miRNAs with their target genes, and highlighted functional relationships. CONCLUSIONS The present study defined unique gene expression signatures of a range of miRNAs in the developing NT during the critical period of NT morphogenesis. Analysis of miRNA target genes and gene interaction pathways revealed that specific miRNAs may direct expression of numerous genes encoding proteins which have been shown to be indispensable

  13. Estimating the burden of neural tube defects in low– and middle–income countries

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Annie; Polšek, Dora; Sidhu, Simrita

    2014-01-01

    Background To provide an estimate for the burden of neural tube defects (NTD) in low– and middle–income countries (LMIC) and explore potential public health policies that may be implemented. Although effective interventions are available to prevent NTD, there is still considerable childhood morbidity and mortality present in LMIC. Methods A search of Medline, EMBASE, Global Health Library and PubMed identified 37 relevant studies that provided estimates of the burden of NTD in LMIC. Information on burden of total NTD and specific NTD types was separated according to the denominator into two groups: (i) estimates based on the number of live births only; and (ii) live births, stillbirths and terminations. The data was then extracted and analysed. Results The search retrieved NTD burden from 18 countries in 6 WHO regions. The overall burden calculated using the median from studies based on livebirths was 1.67/1000 (IQR = 0.98–3.49) for total NTD burden, 1.13/1000 (IQR = 0.75–1.73) for spina bifida, 0.25/1000 (IQR = 0.08–1.07) for anencephaly and 0.15/1000 (IQR = 0.08–0.23) for encephalocele. Corresponding estimates based on all pregnancies resulting in live births, still births and terminations were 2.55/1000 (IQR = 1.56–3.91) for total NTD burden, 1.04/1000 (IQR = 0.67–2.48) for spina bifida, 1.03/1000 (IQR = 0.67–1.60) for anencephaly and 0.21 (IQR = 0.16–0.28) for encephalocele. This translates into about 190 000neonates who are born each year with NTD in LMIC. Conclusion Limited available data on NTD in LMIC indicates the need for additional research that would improve the estimated burden of NTD and recommend suitable aid policies through maternal education on folic acid supplementation or food fortification. PMID:24976961

  14. Detection of Copy Number Variants Reveals Association of Cilia Genes with Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yonghui; Zhao, Huizhi; Sheng, Xiaoming; Zou, Jizhen; Lip, Va; Xie, Hua; Guo, Jin; Shao, Hong; Bao, Yihua; Shen, Jianliang; Niu, Bo; Gusella, James F.; Wu, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs) detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. Methods The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants) CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. Results Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV). Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05). Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24–5.87). Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05), corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27–8.01). Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. Conclusions Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis. PMID:23349908

  15. Describing the Prevalence of Neural Tube Defects Worldwide: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zaganjor, Ibrahim; Sekkarie, Ahlia; Tsang, Becky L.; Williams, Jennifer; Razzaghi, Hilda; Mulinare, Joseph; Sniezek, Joseph E.; Cannon, Michael J.; Rosenthal, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Background Folate-sensitive neural tube defects (NTDs) are an important, preventable cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a need to describe the current global burden of NTDs and identify gaps in available NTD data. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and searched multiple databases for NTD prevalence estimates and abstracted data from peer-reviewed literature, birth defects surveillance registries, and reports published between January 1990 and July 2014 that had greater than 5,000 births and were not solely based on mortality data. We classified countries according to World Health Organization (WHO) regions and World Bank income classifications. The initial search yielded 11,614 results; after systematic review we identified 160 full text manuscripts and reports that met the inclusion criteria. Data came from 75 countries. Coverage by WHO region varied in completeness (i.e., % of countries reporting) as follows: African (17%), Eastern Mediterranean (57%), European (49%), Americas (43%), South-East Asian (36%), and Western Pacific (33%). The reported NTD prevalence ranges and medians for each region were: African (5.2–75.4; 11.7 per 10,000 births), Eastern Mediterranean (2.1–124.1; 21.9 per 10,000 births), European (1.3–35.9; 9.0 per 10,000 births), Americas (3.3–27.9; 11.5 per 10,000 births), South-East Asian (1.9–66.2; 15.8 per 10,000 births), and Western Pacific (0.3–199.4; 6.9 per 10,000 births). The presence of a registry or surveillance system for NTDs increased with country income level: low income (0%), lower-middle income (25%), upper-middle income (70%), and high income (91%). Conclusions Many WHO member states (120/194) did not have any data on NTD prevalence. Where data are collected, prevalence estimates vary widely. These findings highlight the need for greater NTD surveillance efforts, especially in lower-income countries. NTDs are an important public health problem that can be prevented with folic acid

  16. Role of folic acid supplementation in prevention of neural tube defects: physicians yet unaware!

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, A; Kumhar, G Das; Harit, D; Faridi, M M A

    2010-09-01

    Folic acid supplementation is important in the prevention of Neural Tube Defects (NTD). The study was conducted to assess the awareness amongst physicians regarding the role of Folic Acid (FA) in the prevention of NTD. Physicians were interviewed regarding the awareness of FA dose, timing of supplementation and knowledge about its role in prevention of neural tube defects using a semistructured questionnaire. Among 202 physicians interviewed (48 pediatricians, 54 obstetricians, 100 recently qualified medical graduates) overall awareness about FA was present in 92.07%, similar in three groups (P > 0.05). Only 47.52% were aware of preconception administration, 61.38% about dose of supplementation and 11.88% about recurrence rate of NTD. Only 15 (7.4%) knew all these. Regarding the etiology of NTDs only 26.7% said both FA and genetic factors are involved. Though majority were aware that folic acid has a role in prevention of NTDs, their knowledge about timing and dose of supplementation was lacking. Hence attempts should be made to increase the awareness regarding prevention of NTD's by FA supplementation at a proper time.

  17. The prevalence of neural tube defects among ethnic groups in Brooklyn, New York.

    PubMed

    Feldman, J G; Stein, S C; Klein, R J; Kohl, S; Casey, G

    1982-01-01

    Records of almost 174,000 consecutive births at six Brooklyn hospitals during the years 1968-1976 were reviewed for congenital neural tube defects. Prevalence of anencephaly, myelomeningocele and occipital encephalocele combined was significantly higher in infants delivered to mothers born in Puerto Rico than in offspring of non-Puerto Rican whites or blacks. The association of prevalence rates with ethnicity remained significant after adjustment for several variables. However, when adjustment was made for private or service status the difference between Puerto Ricans and whites, although still appreciable, was no longer statistically significant. No significant differences in prevalence rates between whites and blacks were observed. Sex ratios of affected infants were close to unity in each ethnic group. Statistically significant associations were found between the prevalence of neural tube defects and parity, gravidity and economic status. The patterns of these associations varied among the ethnic groups. A declining trend in the prevalence of myelomeningocele was observed for all ethnic groups. PMID:7200098

  18. Failure in closure of the anterior neural tube causes left isomerization of the zebrafish epithalamus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-Nien; Lund, Caroline; Khuansuwan, Sataree; Schumann, Adelle; Harney-Tolo, Marijah; Gamse, Joshua T; Liang, Jennifer O

    2013-02-15

    Differences between the left and right sides of the brain are present in many animal species. For instance, in humans the left cerebral hemisphere is largely responsible for language and tool use and the right for processing spatial information. Zebrafish have prominent left-right asymmetries in their epithalamus that have been associated with differential left and right eye use and navigational behavior. In wild-type (WT) zebrafish embryos, Nodal pathway genes are expressed in the left side of the pineal anlage. Shortly thereafter, a parapineal organ forms to the left of the pineal. The parapineal organ causes differences in gene expression, neuropil density, and connectivity of the left and right habenula nuclei. In embryos that have an open neural tube, such as embryos that are deficient in Nodal signaling or the cell adhesion protein N-cadherin, the left and right sides of the developing epithalamus remain separated from one another. We find that the brains of these embryos often become left isomerized: both sides of the brain develop morphology and gene expression patterns that are characteristic of the left side. However, other aspects of epithalamic development, such as differentiation of specific neuronal cell types, are intact. We propose that there is a mechanism in embryos with closed neural tubes that prevents both sides from developing like the left side. This mechanism fails when the two sides of the epithalamus are widely separated from one another, suggesting that it is dependent upon a signaling protein with limited range.

  19. Defective neuroepithelial cell cohesion affects tangential branchiomotor neuron migration in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Petra; Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-11-01

    Facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) in zebrafish and mouse embryonic hindbrain undergo a characteristic tangential migration from rhombomere (r) 4, where they are born, to r6/7. Cohesion among neuroepithelial cells (NCs) has been suggested to function in FBMN migration by inhibiting FBMNs positioned in the basal neuroepithelium such that they move apically between NCs towards the midline of the neuroepithelium instead of tangentially along the basal side of the neuroepithelium towards r6/7. However, direct experimental evaluation of this hypothesis is still lacking. Here, we have used a combination of biophysical cell adhesion measurements and high-resolution time-lapse microscopy to determine the role of NC cohesion in FBMN migration. We show that reducing NC cohesion by interfering with Cadherin 2 (Cdh2) activity results in FBMNs positioned at the basal side of the neuroepithelium moving apically towards the neural tube midline instead of tangentially towards r6/7. In embryos with strongly reduced NC cohesion, ectopic apical FBMN movement frequently results in fusion of the bilateral FBMN clusters over the apical midline of the neural tube. By contrast, reducing cohesion among FBMNs by interfering with Contactin 2 (Cntn2) expression in these cells has little effect on apical FBMN movement, but reduces the fusion of the bilateral FBMN clusters in embryos with strongly diminished NC cohesion. These data provide direct experimental evidence that NC cohesion functions in tangential FBMN migration by restricting their apical movement.

  20. Neural tube defects – disorders of neurulation and related embryonic processes

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations affecting 1 in every 1000 pregnancies. ‘Open’ NTDs result from failure of primary neurulation as seen in anencephaly, myelomeningocele (open spina bifida) and craniorachischisis. Degeneration of the persistently open neural tube in utero leads to loss of neurological function below the lesion level. ‘Closed’ NTDs are skin-covered disorders of spinal cord structure, ranging from asymptomatic spina bifida occulta to severe spinal cord tethering, and usually traceable to disruption of secondary neurulation. ‘Herniation’ NTDs are those in which meninges, with or without brain or spinal cord tissue, become exteriorised through a pathological opening in the skull or vertebral column (e.g. encephalocele and meningocele). NTDs have multifactorial etiology, with genes and environmental factors interacting to determine individual risk of malformation. While over 200 mutant genes cause open NTDs in mice, much less is known about the genetic causation of human NTDs. Recent evidence has implicated genes of the planar cell polarity signalling pathway in a proportion of cases. The embryonic development of NTDs is complex, with diverse cellular and molecular mechanisms operating at different levels of the body axis. Molecular regulatory events include the BMP and Sonic hedgehog pathways which have been implicated in control of neural plate bending. Primary prevention of NTDs has been implemented clinically following the demonstration that folic acid, when taken as a peri-conceptional supplement, can prevent many cases. Not all NTDs respond to folic acid, however, and adjunct therapies are required for prevention of this folic acid-resistant category. PMID:24009034

  1. Melatonin prevents neural tube defects in the offspring of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shangming; Guo, Yuji; Yuan, Qiuhuan; Pan, Yan; Wang, Liyan; Liu, Qian; Wang, Fuwu; Wang, Jingjing; Hao, Aijun

    2015-11-01

    Melatonin, an endogenous neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, has a variety of physiological functions and neuroprotective effects. However, its protective role on the neural tube defects (NTDs) was not very clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on the incidence of NTDs (including anencephaly, encephalocele, and spina bifida) of offspring from diabetic pregnant mice as well as its underlying mechanisms. Pregnant mice were given 10 mg/kg melatonin by daily i.p. injection from embryonic day (E) 0.5 until being killed on E11.5. Here, we showed that melatonin decreased the NTDs (especially exencephaly) rate of embryos exposed to maternal diabetes. Melatonin stimulated proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) under hyperglycemic condition through the extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) pathway. Furthermore, as a direct free radical scavenger, melatonin decreased apoptosis of NSCs exposed to hyperglycemia. In the light of these findings, it suggests that melatonin supplementation may play an important role in the prevention of neural malformations in diabetic pregnancy. PMID:26475080

  2. Background considerations in the analysis of PIXE spectra by Artificial Neural Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, R.; Morales, J. R.; Requena, I.; Miranda, J.; Barrera, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study the importance of background in PIXE spectra to determine elemental concentrations in atmospheric aerosols using artificial neural systems ANS, two independently trained ANS were constructed, one which considered as input the net number of counts in the peak, and another which included the background. In the training and validation phases thirty eight spectra of aerosols collected in Santiago, Chile, were used. In both cases the elemental concentration values were similar. This fact was due to the intrinsic characteristic of ANS operating with normalized values of the net and total number of counts under the peaks, something that was verified in the analysis of 172 spectra obtained from aerosols collected in Mexico city. Therefore, networks operating under the mode which include background can reduce time and cost when dealing with large number of samples.

  3. Restricted Pax3 Deletion within the Neural Tube Results in Congenital Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Ming; Conway, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common birth-defect whose developmental origins are poorly understood. Pax3-null mutants show defects in myogenesis, neural tube closure, neural crest morphogenesis, and heart development that, consequently, results in embryonic lethality. Here we demonstrate that conditional deletion of the mouse Pax3 transcription factor results in fully-penetrant congenital obstructive hydrocephalus. To identify the role of Pax3 during cranial development, we deleted Pax3 within the neuroepithelium (via Pax7−Cre), in the neural crest (via P0-Cre), and in both the neuroepithelium and the neural crest (via Wnt1-Cre). Only conditional mutants generated using Pax7−Cre or Wnt1-Cre developed early onset congenital hydrocephalus due to stenosis of the third ventricle, suggesting that loss of neuroepithelial Pax3 is sufficient to disturb third ventricle morphogenesis. Dilation of lateral ventricles occurs as early as E14.5, and lineage-mapping revealed that the neuroepithelial cells in the conditional mutants are present, but fail to undergo normal differentiation at the stenotic site. Concomitant with a narrowing of the mutant third ventricle, we detected ectopic apoptosis, reduced proliferation, and abnormal β-catenin localization. Furthermore, consistent with the overlapping expression pattern of Pax3 and Pax7 in early cranial neuroepithelium, we demonstrated a combinatorial role, as compound Pax3/Pax7 heterozygotes display partially-penetrant congenital hydrocephalus. These murine data provide an experimental paradigm underpinning clinical observations of the presence of PAX3 mutations in some hydrocephalic patients. PMID:26949601

  4. Folic acid and the decline in neural tube defects in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A; Flowers, Bettye S; Smith, Veronica; Robbins, James M

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid has been shown to reduce the risk of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects (NTDs) by as much as 70%. Cereal grains sold in the U.S. have been fortified with folic acid since 1998. The Arkansas Reproductive Health Monitoring System and the Arkansas Folic Acid Coalition have encouraged use of folic acid and monitored the impact of increased consumption of folic acid among Arkansans. NTDs in Arkansas have declined 40% since intervention programs were implemented. The greatest decline has been observed among white and Hispanic women. Efforts to encourage folic acid consumption should continue to target Arkansas women. NTDs include anencephaly and spina bifida. These birth defects result from incomplete closure of the fetal neural tube during the first month of pregnancy. Infants with anencephaly are born without all or most of their brain and die within a few days of life. Infants with spina bifida have varying degrees of impairment ranging from little noticeable disability to severe, lifelong disability. Folic acid, when taken in supplement form has been shown to reduce the risk of a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect by as much as 70%. As a result of this finding, the U.S. Federal Drug Administration mandated that cereal grains sold in this country be fortified with at least 140 mcg of folic acid per 100 grams of grain by January 1, 1998. Prior to mandatory fortification, the March of Dimes and the U.S. Public Health Service released statements encouraging all women of reproductive age who are capable of becoming pregnant to take 400 mcg 'of synthetic folic acid daily. The Arkansas Reproductive Health Monitoring System (ARHMS) has monitored rates of NTDs in Arkansas since 1980. ARHMS is the lead agency of the Arkansas Folic Acid Coalition whose mission is to encourage folic acid use among all Arkansas women of reproductive age. In this report, we summarize efforts by ARHMS and the Arkansas Folic Acid Coalition to increase the awareness and

  5. Folic acid and the decline in neural tube defects in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Bridget S; Hobbs, Charlotte A; Flowers, Bettye S; Smith, Veronica; Robbins, James M

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid has been shown to reduce the risk of pregnancies affected by neural tube defects (NTDs) by as much as 70%. Cereal grains sold in the U.S. have been fortified with folic acid since 1998. The Arkansas Reproductive Health Monitoring System and the Arkansas Folic Acid Coalition have encouraged use of folic acid and monitored the impact of increased consumption of folic acid among Arkansans. NTDs in Arkansas have declined 40% since intervention programs were implemented. The greatest decline has been observed among white and Hispanic women. Efforts to encourage folic acid consumption should continue to target Arkansas women. NTDs include anencephaly and spina bifida. These birth defects result from incomplete closure of the fetal neural tube during the first month of pregnancy. Infants with anencephaly are born without all or most of their brain and die within a few days of life. Infants with spina bifida have varying degrees of impairment ranging from little noticeable disability to severe, lifelong disability. Folic acid, when taken in supplement form has been shown to reduce the risk of a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect by as much as 70%. As a result of this finding, the U.S. Federal Drug Administration mandated that cereal grains sold in this country be fortified with at least 140 mcg of folic acid per 100 grams of grain by January 1, 1998. Prior to mandatory fortification, the March of Dimes and the U.S. Public Health Service released statements encouraging all women of reproductive age who are capable of becoming pregnant to take 400 mcg 'of synthetic folic acid daily. The Arkansas Reproductive Health Monitoring System (ARHMS) has monitored rates of NTDs in Arkansas since 1980. ARHMS is the lead agency of the Arkansas Folic Acid Coalition whose mission is to encourage folic acid use among all Arkansas women of reproductive age. In this report, we summarize efforts by ARHMS and the Arkansas Folic Acid Coalition to increase the awareness and

  6. Trends in neural tube defect prevalence, folic acid fortification, and vitamin supplement use.

    PubMed

    Olney, Richard S; Mulinare, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    In this review, the authors analyze international trends in rates of neural tube defects (NTDs) during the past three decades. Population-based data sources include the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program and other US birth defects surveillance programs in the National Birth Defects Prevention Network, the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring Systems, and US and Canadian vital records. To analyze trends in vitamin consumption, we review data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys and international surveys of multivitamin use. We discuss the role of factors associated with historic and continuing declines in NTD rates in most countries. These factors include the introduction and increased utilization of prenatal diagnosis, recommendations for multivitamin use in women of childbearing age, and population-wide increases in blood folate levels that have occurred since food fortification was mandated. We also discuss research needs for further NTD prevention. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  7. Folate and neural tube defects: The role of supplements and food fortification.

    PubMed

    Ami, Noam; Bernstein, Mark; Boucher, François; Rieder, Michael; Parker, Louise

    2016-04-01

    Periconceptional folic acid significantly reduces the risk of neural tube defects. It is difficult to achieve optimal levels of folate by diet alone, even with fortification of flour, especially because flour consumption in Canada is slightly decreasing. Intermittent concerns have been raised concerning possible deleterious effects of folate supplementation, including the masking of symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency and an association with cancer, especially colorectal cancer. Both concerns have been disproved. The Canadian Paediatric Society endorses the following steps to enhance folate intake in women of child-bearing age: encouraging the consumption of folate-rich foods such as leafy vegetables, increasing the level of folate food fortification, taking a supplement containing folate and B12, and providing free folate supplementation to disadvantaged women of child-bearing age. These recommendations are consistent with those of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. PMID:27398055

  8. A Robust Single Primate Neuroepithelial Cell Clonal Expansion System for Neural Tube Development and Disease Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoqing; Li, Bo; Ai, Zongyong; Xiang, Zheng; Zhang, Kunshang; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yongchang; Li, Yuemin; Rizak, Joshua D.; Niu, Yuyu; Hu, Xintian; Sun, Yi Eve; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Tianqing

    2015-01-01

    Summary Developing a model of primate neural tube (NT) development is important to promote many NT disorder studies in model organisms. Here, we report a robust and stable system to allow for clonal expansion of single monkey neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs) to develop into miniature NT-like structures. Single NESCs can produce functional neurons in vitro, survive, and extensively regenerate neuron axons in monkey brain. NT formation and NESC maintenance depend on high metabolism activity and Wnt signaling. NESCs are regionally restricted to a telencephalic fate. Moreover, single NESCs can turn into radial glial progenitors (RGPCs). The transition is accurately regulated by Wnt signaling through regulation of Notch signaling and adhesion molecules. Finally, using the “NESC-TO-NTs” system, we model the functions of folic acid (FA) on NT closure and demonstrate that FA can regulate multiple mechanisms to prevent NT defects. Our system is ideal for studying NT development and diseases. PMID:26584544

  9. Folic acid supplementation influences the distribution of neural tube defect subtypes: A registry-based study.

    PubMed

    Bergman, J E H; Otten, E; Verheij, J B G M; de Walle, H E K

    2016-01-01

    Periconceptional folic acid (FA) reduces neural tube defect (NTD) risk, but seems to have a varying effect per NTD subtype. We aimed to study the effect of FA supplementation on NTD subtype distribution using data from EUROCAT Northern Netherlands. We included all birth types with non-syndromal NTDs born in 1997-2012. By Fisher's exact test we analyzed possible differences in NTD subtype distribution between a correct FA supplementation group and incorrect FA supplementation group. We found proportionally fewer cervical/thoracic spina bifida cases and more lumbar/sacral spina bifida cases in the correct FA supplementation group, irrespective of the presence of the main NTD risk factors. The effect on NTD subtype distribution was only seen when FA supplementation was started before conception. We conclude that FA not only prevents the occurrence of a significant proportion of NTDs, but might also decrease the severity of NTDs, as long as supplementation is started before conception. PMID:26627544

  10. Potential relationship between dengue fever and neural tube defects in a northern district of India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J B; Gulati, N

    1992-12-01

    A sudden increase in number of births of newborns with neural tube defects (NTD) was observed from June, 1989 to September, 1989 in Medical College and Hospital, Rohtak and various other government and private hospitals of the district of Rohtak. Out of a total 4785 deliveries whose records were collected, there were 87 newborns with NTD with an incidence of 18.18/1000 births which was three times higher than the previous incidence of 6.8/1000 births in the preceding 4 years. There was an epidemic of dengue fever in this area from September, 1988 to December, 1988 affecting almost one member from each family. This coincided with the period of their first trimester. Of these, 18 patients suffered clinically from dengue fever, 21 patients had positive dengue fever history in their family members, 21 patients had positive history in their neighbors. The cluster of NTD appears to be due to dengue virus infection.

  11. Use of Family History Information for Neural Tube Defect Prevention: Integration into State-Based Recurrence Prevention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ridgely Fisk; Ehrhardt, Joan; Ruttenber, Margaret F.; Olney, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    A family history of neural tube defects (NTDs) can increase the risk of a pregnancy affected by an NTD. Periconceptional folic acid use decreases this risk. Purpose: Our objective was to determine whether second-degree relatives of NTD-affected children showed differences in folic acid use compared with the general population and to provide them…

  12. Maternal Serum α-Fetoprotein Screening for the Detection of Neural Tube Defects—Report of a Pilot Program

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, Barbara F.; Robertson, Robert D.; Lebherz, Thomas B.; King, William; Schroth, Phillip C.

    1983-01-01

    We tested 10,715 low-risk pregnancies in a voluntary maternal serum α-fetoprotein screening program for the detection of neural tube defects in California. In all, 5.3 percent of women had one elevated serum level, 3.3 percent were referred for sonography and 1.5 percent for amniocentesis. There were 12 cases of open neural tube defects (1.1 per 1,000); all of the mothers had one elevated serum αfetoprotein level: nine (75 percent) completed the protocol and the neural tube defects were correctly identified. No normal pregnancies were terminated. The risk of an open neural tube defect occurring was about 1 in 50 after the first abnormal serum level and 1 in 15 at amniocentesis. We found significantly increased risk for fetal death and low birth weight after one elevated serum α-fetoprotein level, though the likelihood of a normal pregnancy outcome was about 80 percent. Maternal serum screening was also useful in identifying twin pregnancies and correcting underestimated gestational dates. PMID:6191442

  13. Awareness of folic acid for neural tube defect prevention among Israeli women.

    PubMed

    Ringel, S; Lahat, E; Elizov, T; Greenberg, R; Arieli, S; Afriat, R; Berkovitch, M

    1999-07-01

    The failure of neural tube closure during early embryogenesis results in a range of neural tube defects (NTD), the most common of which is spina bifida. The role of folic acid in reducing the rate of NTD has been well-established. Three recent cases of infants with NTD inspired this investigative study into the level of awareness and knowledge of folic acid and its function in the prevention of NTD among Israeli women. Of 920 women interviewed, only 51 (5.5%) had heard of folic acid, and 27 (2.8%) were reported to have taken it. The source of information and the motivation for self-medication were also explored with regard to socioeconomic and health profile. Awareness of folic acid was significant among women aged 17-29 years (P = 0.005) and those aged 30-39 years (P = 0.009), and among semireligious and nonreligious women (P = 0.008 and 0.01, respectively). Among women who were aware of folic acid, only nonreligious women tended to take it. No correlation was found between folic acid intake and age, religiosity, nationality, number of pregnancies, and health status among women who were aware of folic acid intake. The poor level of awareness, evident in our study, demands that the medical community broadcast the benefit of folic acid. Furthermore, government health initiatives, such as the addition of folic acid to flour preparations, may effectively ensure its appropriate daily intake. These improved education and prevention programs may forcibly reduce the rate of NTD-affected pregnancies.

  14. Maternal exposure to nitrate from drinking water and diet and risk for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Croen, L A; Todoroff, K; Shaw, G M

    2001-02-15

    In this population-based case-control study conducted in California between June 1989 and May 1991, the authors investigated the association between maternal periconceptional exposure to nitrate from drinking water and diet and risk for neural tube defects. The mothers of 538 cases and 539 nonmalformed controls were interviewed regarding residential history, consumption of tap water at home, and dietary intake during the periconceptional period. Dietary nitrate exposure was not associated with increased risk for neural tube defects. Exposure to nitrate in drinking water at concentrations above the 45 mg/liter maximum contaminant level was associated with increased risk for anencephaly (odds ratio (OR) = 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.0, 15.4), but not for spina bifida. Increased risks for anencephaly were observed at nitrate levels below the maximum contaminant level among groundwater drinkers only (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1,4.1 for 5-15 mg/liter; OR = 2.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 4.5 for 16-35 mg/liter; and OR = 6.9, 95% CI: 1.9, 24.9 for 36-67 mg/liter compared with <5 mg/liter). Adjustment for identified risk factors for anencephaly did not substantially alter these associations, nor did control for maternal dietary nitrate, total vitamin C intake, and quantity of tap water consumed. The lack of an observed elevation in risk for anencephaly in association with exposure to mixed water containing nitrate at levels comparable with the concentration in groundwater may indicate that something other than nitrate accounts for these findings.

  15. Is 5-methyltetrahydrofolate an alternative to folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects?

    PubMed

    Obeid, Rima; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Pietrzik, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Women have higher requirements for folate during pregnancy. An optimal folate status must be achieved before conception and in the first trimester when the neural tube closes. Low maternal folate status is causally related to neural tube defects (NTDs). Many NTDs can be prevented by increasing maternal folate intake in the preconceptional period. Dietary folate is protective, but recommending increasing folate intake is ineffective on a population level particularly during periods of high demands. This is because the recommendations are often not followed or because the bioavailability of food folate is variable. Supplemental folate [folic acid (FA) or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF)] can effectively increase folate concentrations to the level that is considered to be protective. FA is a synthetic compound that has no biological functions unless it is reduced to dihydrofolate and tetrahydrofolate. Unmetabolized FA appears in the circulation at doses of >200 μg. Individuals show wide variations in their ability to reduce FA. Carriers of certain polymorphisms in genes related to folate metabolism or absorption can better benefit from 5-methylTHF instead of FA. 5-MethylTHF [also known as (6S)-5-methylTHF] is the predominant natural form that is readily available for transport and metabolism. In contrast to FA, 5-methylTHF has no tolerable upper intake level and does not mask vitamin B12 deficiency. Supplementation of the natural form, 5-methylTHF, is a better alternative to supplementation of FA, especially in countries not applying a fortification program. Supplemental 5-methylTHF can effectively improve folate biomarkers in young women in early pregnancy in order to prevent NTDs.

  16. Inositol for the prevention of neural tube defects: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Leung, Kit-Yi; Gay, Victoria; Burren, Katie; Mills, Kevin; Chitty, Lyn S; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-03-28

    Although peri-conceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation can prevent a proportion of neural tube defects (NTD), there is increasing evidence that many NTD are FA non-responsive. The vitamin-like molecule inositol may offer a novel approach to preventing FA-non-responsive NTD. Inositol prevented NTD in a genetic mouse model, and was well tolerated by women in a small study of NTD recurrence. In the present study, we report the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects by Inositol (PONTI) pilot study designed to gain further experience of inositol usage in human pregnancy as a preliminary trial to a future large-scale controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of inositol in NTD prevention. Study subjects were UK women with a previous NTD pregnancy who planned to become pregnant again. Of 117 women who made contact, ninety-nine proved eligible and forty-seven agreed to be randomised (double-blind) to peri-conceptional supplementation with inositol plus FA or placebo plus FA. In total, thirty-three randomised pregnancies produced one NTD recurrence in the placebo plus FA group (n 19) and no recurrences in the inositol plus FA group (n 14). Of fifty-two women who declined randomisation, the peri-conceptional supplementation regimen and outcomes of twenty-two further pregnancies were documented. Two NTD recurred, both in women who took only FA in their next pregnancy. No adverse pregnancy events were associated with inositol supplementation. The findings of the PONTI pilot study encourage a large-scale controlled trial of inositol for NTD prevention, but indicate the need for a careful study design in view of the unwillingness of many high-risk women to be randomised.

  17. Shroom3 functions downstream of planar cell polarity to regulate myosin II distribution and cellular organization during neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Erica M.; Vijayraghavan, Deepthi; Davidson, Lance A.; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neural tube closure is a critical developmental event that relies on actomyosin contractility to facilitate specific processes such as apical constriction, tissue bending, and directional cell rearrangements. These complicated processes require the coordinated activities of Rho-Kinase (Rock), to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and actomyosin contractility, and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway, to direct the polarized cellular behaviors that drive convergent extension (CE) movements. Here we investigate the role of Shroom3 as a direct linker between PCP and actomyosin contractility during mouse neural tube morphogenesis. In embryos, simultaneous depletion of Shroom3 and the PCP components Vangl2 or Wnt5a results in an increased liability to NTDs and CE failure. We further show that these pathways intersect at Dishevelled, as Shroom3 and Dishevelled 2 co-distribute and form a physical complex in cells. We observed that multiple components of the Shroom3 pathway are planar polarized along mediolateral cell junctions in the neural plate of E8.5 embryos in a Shroom3 and PCP-dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrate that Shroom3 mutant embryos exhibit defects in planar cell arrangement during neural tube closure, suggesting a role for Shroom3 activity in CE. These findings support a model in which the Shroom3 and PCP pathways interact to control CE and polarized bending of the neural plate and provide a clear illustration of the complex genetic basis of NTDs. PMID:25596276

  18. Prediction of Mechanical Properties of 25CrMo48V Seamless Tube Using Neural Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Laibo; Zhang, Chuanyou; Wang, Qingfeng; Wang, Mingzhi; Yan, Zesheng

    In this investigation, a neural network model was established to predict mechanical properties of 25CrMo48V seamless tubes. The sensitivity analysis was also performed to estimate the relative significance of each chemical composition in mechanical behavior of steel tubes. The results of this investigation show that there is a good agreement between experimental and predicted values indicating desirable validity of the model. Among those alloying elements, the elements of carbon, silicon and chromium tended to play a more important role in controlling both the yielding strength and the Charpy-V-Notch transverse impact toughness. In comparison, the impurities such as O, N, S and P have a relatively weak impact. More detailed dependences of mechanical properties on each chemical composition in isolation can be revealed using the established model. The well-trained neural network has a great potential in designing tough and ultrahigh-strength seamless tubes and modeling the on-line production parameters.

  19. Actomyosin stiffens the vertebrate embryo during crucial stages of elongation and neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Kim, Hye Young; Davidson, Lance A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Physical forces drive the movement of tissues within the early embryo. Classical and modern approaches have been used to infer and, in rare cases, measure mechanical properties and the location and magnitude of forces within embryos. Elongation of the dorsal axis is a crucial event in early vertebrate development, yet the mechanics of dorsal tissues in driving embryonic elongation that later support neural tube closure and formation of the central nervous system is not known. Among vertebrates, amphibian embryos allow complex physical manipulation of embryonic tissues that are required to measure the mechanical properties of tissues. In this paper, we measure the stiffness of dorsal isolate explants of frog (Xenopus laevis) from gastrulation to neurulation and find dorsal tissues stiffen from less than 20 Pascal (Pa) to over 80 Pa. By iteratively removing tissues from these explants, we find paraxial somitic mesoderm is nearly twice as stiff as either the notochord or neural plate, and at least 10-fold stiffer than the endoderm. Stiffness measurements from explants with reduced fibronectin fibril assembly or disrupted actomyosin contractility suggest that it is the state of the actomyosin cell cortex rather than accumulating fibronectin that controls tissue stiffness in early amphibian embryos. PMID:19168681

  20. Lack of endothelial cell survivin causes embryonic defects in angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, and neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Zwerts, Femke; Lupu, Florea; De Vriese, Astrid; Pollefeyt, Saskia; Moons, Lieve; Altura, Rachel A.; Jiang, Yuying; Maxwell, Patrick H.; Hill, Peter; Oh, Hideyasu; Rieker, Claus; Collen, Désiré; Conway, Simon J.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the physiologic role of endothelial cell apoptosis during development by generating mouse embryos lacking the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) survivin in endothelium. This was accomplished by intercrossing survivinlox/lox mice with mice expressing cre recombinase under the control of the endothelial cell specific tie1 promoter (tie1-cre mice). Lack of endothelial cell survivin resulted in embryonic lethality. Mutant embryos had prominent and diffuse hemorrhages from embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) and died before E13.5. Heart development was strikingly abnormal. Survivin-null endocardial lineage cells could not support normal epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT), resulting in hypoplastic endocardial cushions and in utero heart failure. In addition, 30% of mutant embryos had neural tube closure defects (NTDs) that were not caused by bleeding or growth retardation, but were likely due to alterations in the release of soluble factors from endothelial cells that otherwise support neural stem cell proliferation and neurulation. Thus, regulation of endothelial cell survival, and maintenance of vascular integrity by survivin are crucial for normal embryonic angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, and neurogenesis. PMID:17299096

  1. A Neural Mechanism for Background Information-Gated Learning Based on Axonal-Dendritic Overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Mainetti, Matteo; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    Experiencing certain events triggers the acquisition of new memories. Although necessary, however, actual experience is not sufficient for memory formation. One-trial learning is also gated by knowledge of appropriate background information to make sense of the experienced occurrence. Strong neurobiological evidence suggests that long-term memory storage involves formation of new synapses. On the short time scale, this form of structural plasticity requires that the axon of the pre-synaptic neuron be physically proximal to the dendrite of the post-synaptic neuron. We surmise that such “axonal-dendritic overlap” (ADO) constitutes the neural correlate of background information-gated (BIG) learning. The hypothesis is based on a fundamental neuroanatomical constraint: an axon must pass close to the dendrites that are near other neurons it contacts. The topographic organization of the mammalian cortex ensures that nearby neurons encode related information. Using neural network simulations, we demonstrate that ADO is a suitable mechanism for BIG learning. We model knowledge as associations between terms, concepts or indivisible units of thought via directed graphs. The simplest instantiation encodes each concept by single neurons. Results are then generalized to cell assemblies. The proposed mechanism results in learning real associations better than spurious co-occurrences, providing definitive cognitive advantages. PMID:25767887

  2. Neural tube defects in Costa Rica, 1987-2012: origins and development of birth defect surveillance and folic acid fortification.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Argüello, María de la Paz; Umaña-Solís, Lila M; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica-through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas-CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987-2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992-1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987-1991; 1996-1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999-2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003-2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1-10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3-5.3) for the post-fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease of 51 % in the prevalence of neural tube defects from the pre-fortification period to the post-fortification period. Folic acid fortification via several basic food sources has shown to be a successful public health intervention for Costa Rica. Costa Rica's experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs.

  3. Neural Tube Defects in Costa Rica, 1987–2012: Origins and Development of Birth Defect Surveillance and Folic Acid Fortification

    PubMed Central

    de la Paz Barboza-Argüello, María; Umaña-Solís, Lila M.; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L.; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica—through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas—CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987–2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992–1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987–1991; 1996–1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999–2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003–2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1–10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3–5.3) for the post–fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease of 51 % in the prevalence of neural tube defects from the pre-fortification period to the post-fortification period. Folic acid fortification via several basic food sources has shown to be a successful public health intervention for Costa Rica. Costa Rica’s experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs. PMID:24952876

  4. Neural tube defects in Costa Rica, 1987-2012: origins and development of birth defect surveillance and folic acid fortification.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Argüello, María de la Paz; Umaña-Solís, Lila M; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica-through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas-CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987-2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992-1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987-1991; 1996-1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999-2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003-2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1-10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3-5.3) for the post-fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease of 51 % in the prevalence of neural tube defects from the pre-fortification period to the post-fortification period. Folic acid fortification via several basic food sources has shown to be a successful public health intervention for Costa Rica. Costa Rica's experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs. PMID:24952876

  5. Genes encoding critical transcriptional activators for murine neural tube development and human spina bifida: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Spina bifida is a malformation of the neural tube and is the most common of neural tube defects (NTDs). The etiology of spina bifida is largely unknown, although it is thought to be multi-factorial, involving multiple interacting genes and environmental factors. Mutations in transcriptional co-activator genes-Cited2, p300, Cbp, Tfap2α, Carm1 and Cart1 result in NTDs in murine models, thus prompt us to investigate whether homologues of these genes are associated with NTDs in humans. Methods Data and biological samples from 297 spina bifida cases and 300 controls were derived from a population-based case-control study conducted in California. 37 SNPs within CITED2, EP300, CREBBP, TFAP2A, CARM1 and ALX1 were genotyped using an ABI SNPlex assay. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for alleles, genotypes and haplotypes to evaluate the risk for spina bifida. Results Several SNPs showed increased or decreased risk, including CITED2 rs1131431 (OR = 5.32, 1.04~27.30), EP300 rs4820428 (OR = 1.30, 1.01~1.67), EP300 rs4820429 (OR = 0.50, 0.26~0.50, in whites, OR = 0.7, 0.49~0.99 in all subjects), EP300 rs17002284 (OR = 0.43, 0.22~0.84), TFAP2A rs3798691 (OR = 1.78, 1.13~2.87 in Hispanics), CREBBP rs129986 (OR = 0.27, 0.11~0.69), CARM1 rs17616105 (OR = 0.41, 0.22~0.72 in whites). In addition, one haplotype block in EP300 and one in TFAP2A appeared to be associated with increased risk. Conclusions Modest associations were observed in CITED2, EP300, CREBBP, TFAP2A and CARM1 but not ALX1. However, these modest associations were not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Searching for potential functional variants and rare causal mutations is warranted in these genes. PMID:20932315

  6. Rescue of neural tube defects in Pax-3-deficient embryos by p53 loss of function: implications for Pax-3- dependent development and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Lydie; Horal, Melissa; Loeken, Mary R.

    2002-01-01

    Pax-3 is a transcription factor that is expressed in the neural tube, neural crest, and dermomyotome. We previously showed that apoptosis is associated with neural tube defects (NTDs) in Pax-3-deficient Splotch (Sp/Sp) embryos. Here we show that p53 deficiency, caused by germ-line mutation or by pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53-dependent apoptosis, rescues not only apoptosis, but also NTDs, in Sp/Sp embryos. Pax-3 deficiency had no effect on p53 mRNA, but increased p53 protein levels. These results suggest that Pax-3 regulates neural tube closure by inhibiting p53-dependent apoptosis, rather than by inducing neural tube-specific gene expression. PMID:11914272

  7. A Unique Missense Allele of BAF155, a Core BAF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Protein, Causes Neural Tube Closure Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harmacek, Laura; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Chen, Jianfu; Jones, Kenneth L.; Pavan, William J.; Salbaum, J. Michael; Niswander, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Failure of embryonic neural tube closure results in the second most common class of birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). While NTDs are likely the result of complex multigenic dysfunction, it is not known whether polymorphisms in epigenetic regulators may be risk factors for NTDs. Here we characterized Baf155msp3, a unique ENU-induced allele in mice. Homozygous Baf155mps3 embryos exhibit highly penetrant exencephaly, allowing us to investigate the roles of an assembled, but malfunctional BAF chromatin remodeling complex in vivo at the time of neural tube closure. Evidence of defects in proliferation and apoptosis were found within the neural tube. RNA-Seq analysis revealed that surprisingly few genes showed altered expression in Baf155 mutant neural tissue, given the broad epigenetic role of the BAF complex, but included genes involved in neural development and cell survival. Moreover, gene expression changes between individual mutants were variable even though the NTD was consistently observed. This suggests that inconsistent gene regulation contributes to failed neural tube closure. These results shed light on the role of the BAF complex in the process of neural tube closure and highlight the importance of studying missense alleles to understand epigenetic regulation during critical phases of development. PMID:24170322

  8. Concerted involvement of Cdx/Hox genes and Wnt signaling in morphogenesis of the caudal neural tube and cloacal derivatives from the posterior growth zone.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Cesca; Bialecka, Monika; Neijts, Roel; Young, Teddy; Rowland, Jennifer E; Stringer, Emma J; Van Rooijen, Carina; Meijlink, Frits; Nóvoa, Ana; Freund, Jean-Noel; Mallo, Moises; Beck, Felix; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    Decrease in Cdx dosage in an allelic series of mouse Cdx mutants leads to progressively more severe posterior vertebral defects. These defects are corrected by posterior gain of function of the Wnt effector Lef1. Precocious expression of Hox paralogous 13 genes also induces vertebral axis truncation by antagonizing Cdx function. We report here that the phenotypic similarity also applies to patterning of the caudal neural tube and uro-rectal tracts in Cdx and Wnt3a mutants, and in embryos precociously expressing Hox13 genes. Cdx2 inactivation after placentation leads to posterior defects, including incomplete uro-rectal septation. Compound mutants carrying one active Cdx2 allele in the Cdx4-null background (Cdx2/4), transgenic embryos precociously expressing Hox13 genes and a novel Wnt3a hypomorph mutant all manifest a comparable phenotype with similar uro-rectal defects. Phenotype and transcriptome analysis in early Cdx mutants, genetic rescue experiments and gene expression studies lead us to propose that Cdx transcription factors act via Wnt signaling during the laying down of uro-rectal mesoderm, and that they are operative in an early phase of these events, at the site of tissue progenitors in the posterior growth zone of the embryo. Cdx and Wnt mutations and premature Hox13 expression also cause similar neural dysmorphology, including ectopic neural structures that sometimes lead to neural tube splitting at caudal axial levels. These findings involve the Cdx genes, canonical Wnt signaling and the temporal control of posterior Hox gene expression in posterior morphogenesis in the different embryonic germ layers. They shed a new light on the etiology of the caudal dysplasia or caudal regression range of human congenital defects.

  9. Grainyhead-like 2 downstream targets act to suppress epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition during neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Heather J.; Niswander, Lee A.

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is expressed in non-neural ectoderm (NNE) and Grhl2 loss results in fully penetrant cranial neural tube defects (NTDs) in mice. GRHL2 activates expression of several epithelial genes; however, additional molecular targets and functional processes regulated by GRHL2 in the NNE remain to be determined, as well as the underlying cause of the NTDs in Grhl2 mutants. Here, we find that Grhl2 loss results in abnormal mesenchymal phenotypes in the NNE, including aberrant vimentin expression and increased cellular dynamics that affects the NNE and neural crest cells. The resulting loss of NNE integrity contributes to an inability of the cranial neural folds to move toward the midline and results in NTD. Further, we identified Esrp1, Sostdc1, Fermt1, Tmprss2 and Lamc2 as novel NNE-expressed genes that are downregulated in Grhl2 mutants. Our in vitro assays show that they act as suppressors of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, GRHL2 promotes the epithelial nature of the NNE during the dynamic events of neural tube formation by both activating key epithelial genes and actively suppressing EMT through novel downstream EMT suppressors. PMID:26903501

  10. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development.

    PubMed

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-15

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction.

  11. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development

    PubMed Central

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A.; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D.; McNeill, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction. PMID:26209645

  12. Identification and characterization of novel rare mutations in the planar cell polarity gene PRICKLE1 in human neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Bosoi, Ciprian M.; Capra, Valeria; Allache, Redouane; Trinh, Vincent Quoc-Huy; De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Drapeau, Pierre; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Kibar, Zoha

    2011-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls the process of convergent extension (CE) during gastrulation and neural tube closure and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects (NTDs) in animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we analyzed the role of one core PCP gene PRICKLE1 in these malformations. We screened this gene in 810 unrelated NTD patients and identified 7 rare missense heterozygous mutations that were absent in all controls analyzed and predicted to be functionally deleterious using bioinformatics. Functional validation of 5 PRICKLE1 variants in a zebrafish model demonstrated that one variant, p.Arg682Cys, antagonized the CE phenotype induced by the wild-type zebrafish prickle1a in a dominant fashion. Our study demonstrates that PRICKLE1 could act as a predisposing factor to human NTDs and further expands our knowledge of the role of PCP genes in the pathogenesis of these malformations. PMID:21901791

  13. [Prevalence of neural tube defects and estimation of cases averted in the post-fortification period in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Bidondo, María P; Liascovich, Rosa; Barbero, Pablo; Groisman, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Periconceptional intake of folic acid has demonstrated to be effective to reduce the frequency of neural tube defects, and food fortification has been one of the strategies implemented to increase it. An update is herein presented on the reduced prevalence of neural tube defect cases in the post-fortification period in Argentina and an estimation of cases averted in the 2005-2013 period as a result of this intervention. When comparing the prevalence observed in the post-fortification period to that reported in the pre-fortification period, anencephaly and encephalocele decreased by 66%, and spina bifida, by 47%, which were significant reductions. The estimated number of cases averted was higher for anencephaly, followed by spina bifida; encephalocele showed the lowest number of cases averted given that the prevalence of this defect was smaller. The decrease observed in the prevalence supports findings from previous studies on the impact of fortification. PMID:26593794

  14. Identification and characterization of novel rare mutations in the planar cell polarity gene PRICKLE1 in human neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Bosoi, Ciprian M; Capra, Valeria; Allache, Redouane; Trinh, Vincent Quoc-Huy; De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Drapeau, Pierre; Bassuk, Alexander G; Kibar, Zoha

    2011-12-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls the process of convergent extension (CE) during gastrulation and neural tube closure, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects (NTDs) in animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we analyzed the role of one core PCP gene PRICKLE1 in these malformations. We screened this gene in 810 unrelated NTD patients and identified seven rare missense heterozygous mutations that were absent in all controls analyzed and predicted to be functionally deleterious using bioinformatics. Functional validation of five PRICKLE1 variants in a zebrafish model demonstrated that one variant, p.Arg682Cys, antagonized the CE phenotype induced by the wild-type zebrafish prickle1a (zpk1a) in a dominant fashion. Our study demonstrates that PRICKLE1 could act as a predisposing factor to human NTDs and further expands our knowledge of the role of PCP genes in the pathogenesis of these malformations.

  15. Folate deficiency and folic acid supplementation: the prevention of neural-tube defects and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, Andrew E; Dudás, Istvan; Vereczkey, Attila; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2013-11-21

    Diet, particularly vitamin deficiency, is associated with the risk of birth defects. The aim of this review paper is to show the characteristics of common and severe neural-tube defects together with congenital heart defects (CHD) as vitamin deficiencies play a role in their origin. The findings of the Hungarian intervention (randomized double-blind and cohort controlled) trials indicated that periconceptional folic acid (FA)-containing multivitamin supplementation prevented the major proportion (about 90%) of neural-tube defects (NTD) as well as a certain proportion (about 40%) of congenital heart defects. Finally the benefits and drawbacks of three main practical applications of folic acid/multivitamin treatment such as (i) dietary intake; (ii) periconceptional supplementation; and (iii) flour fortification are discussed. The conclusion arrived at is indeed confirmation of Benjamin Franklin's statement: "An ounce of prevention is better than a pound of care".

  16. The role of folic acid fortification in neural tube defects: a review.

    PubMed

    Osterhues, Anja; Ali, Nyima S; Michels, Karin B

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs) has fallen noticeably during the past 30 years, but the specific etiology and causative mechanism of NTDs remain unknown. Since introduction of mandatory fortification of grains with folic acid, a further decrease in NTD prevalence has been reported in North America and other countries with large variations among ethnic subgroups. However, a significant portion of NTDs still persists. Population data suggest that women of childbearing age may not yet be adequately targeted, while the general population may be overfortified with folic acid. While an excessive folate intake may be associated with adverse effects, there remains uncertainty about the minimum effective folate intake and status required for NTD prevention, and the safe upper folate level. Besides folate, several other lifestyle and environmental factors as well as genetic variations may influence NTD development, possibly by affecting one-carbon metabolism and thus epigenetic events. In conclusion, mandatory folic acid fortification plays a significant part in the reduction of NTD prevalence, but possibly at a cost and with a portion of NTDs remaining. More effective preventive strategies require better understanding of the etiology of this group of birth defects.

  17. Folic acid supplement use in the prevention of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Delany, C; McDonnell, R; Robson, M; Corcoran, S; Fitzpatrick, C; De La Harpe, D

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, planned folic acid fortification for the prevention of Neural Tube Defects (NTD) was postponed. Concurrently, the economic recession may have affected dietary folic acid intake, placing increased emphasis on supplement use. This study examined folic acid supplement use in 2009. A cross-sectional survey of 300 ante-natal women was undertaken to assess folic acid knowledge and use. Associations between demographic, obstetric variables and folic acid knowledge and use were examined. A majority, 284/297 (96%), had heard of folic acid, and 178/297 (60%) knew that it could prevent NTD. Most, 270/297 (91%) had taken it during their pregnancy, but only 107/297 (36%) had used it periconceptionally. Being older, married, planned pregnancy and better socioeconomic status were associated with periconceptional use. Periconceptional folic acid use in 2009 was very low, little changed from economic status were associated with periconceptional use. Periconceptional folic acid use in 2009 was very low, little changed from earlier years. Continuous promotion efforts are necessary. Close monitoring of folic acid intake and NTD rates is essential, particularly in the absence of fortification.

  18. [Knowledge of physicians and obstetric nurses about the prevention of neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Conceição, Ricardo Campelo da; Barbosa, Marcella Amaral Horta; Dornela, Leonardo Lima; Ramos, Plínio Santos; Castellano Filho, Didier Silveira; Ricardo, Djalma Rabelo; Calado, Adriano Almeida; Netto, José Murillo Bastos

    2012-10-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of obstetricians and obstetric nurses about folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects (NTD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in which 118 volunteers (95 physicians and 23 nurses) answered a questionnaire with 21 questions about prevention of NTD. The data were analyzed according to the reported knowledge, the recommendations made by the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MOH) and the scientific evidence (SE) available in the literature on the topic. The knowledge based on the SE and recommendations of MOH was different (4.64 ± 0.20 vs. 5.55 ± 0.15, p <0.001, Mean ± SEM). There was no difference between the knowledge of respondents compared to their training, the time spent in prenatal care and between the two classes of professionals evaluated. There were differences between the reported knowledge and that based on SE (6.76 ± 0.18 vs. 4.64 ± 0.15, p <0.001) and based on the MOH recommendations (6.76 ± 0.18 vs. 5.55 ± 0.20, p <0.001). Thus, the conclusion reached was that 94.1% of those evaluated reported knowing the importance of folic acid in preventing NTD, though 64.2% reported that they did not know when to begin administration of the supplement.

  19. Folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects: the Danish experience.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sjurdur F; Knudsen, Vibeke Kildegaard

    2008-06-01

    Evidence from controlled trials suggests that ingestion of 0.4 mg of folic acid per day in the periconceptional period is effective in preventing neural tube defects (NTD). For this reason, most countries recommend that women planning pregnancy take folic acid supplements in the periconceptional period, and some countries even fortify stable foods with folic acid. Denmark exemplifies a country with a relatively conservative attitude with respect to taking action in these matters. In 1999, a national information campaign was launched that recommended women planning pregnancy take 0.4 mg of folic acid periconceptionally, but with the moderation that women who eat a healthy diet do not need to take folic acid supplement. The campaign was repeated during 2001. The results of the latter campaign were evaluated by using data from a national survey among pregnant women conducted simultaneously with the campaign by the Danish National Birth Cohort. An increase in the proportion of folic acid users took place concomitantly with the launching of the information events, but the increase was limited. Among women who did not plan their pregnancy, a small proportion had taken folic acid supplements periconceptionally, and this proportion did not change concomitantly with the campaign. Young age and low education were factors associated with low likelihood of taking folic acid. It seems that different and more efficient actions are needed if a more substantial proportion of Danish women and their fetuses are going to benefit from the knowledge that folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period can prevent NTD.

  20. Neural tube opening and abnormal extraembryonic membrane development in SEC23A deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Tao, Jiayi; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Guojing; Khoriaty, Rami N.; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    COPII (coat protein complex-II) vesicles transport proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. Higher eukaryotes have two or more paralogs of most COPII components. Here we characterize mice deficient for SEC23A and studied interactions of Sec23a null allele with the previously reported Sec23b null allele. SEC23A deficiency leads to mid-embryonic lethality associated with defective development of extraembryonic membranes and neural tube opening in midbrain. Secretion defects of multiple collagen types are observed in different connective tissues, suggesting that collagens are primarily transported in SEC23A-containing vesicles in these cells. Other extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin, are not affected by SEC23A deficiency. Intracellular accumulation of unsecreted proteins leads to strong induction of the unfolded protein response in collagen-producing cells. No collagen secretion defects are observed in SEC23B deficient embryos. We report that E-cadherin is a cargo that accumulates in acini of SEC23B deficient pancreas and salivary glands. Compensatory increase of one paralog is observed in the absence of the second paralog. Haploinsufficiency of the remaining Sec23 paralog on top of homozygous inactivation of the first paralog leads to earlier lethality of embryos. Our results suggest that mammalian SEC23A and SEC23B transport overlapping yet distinct spectra of cargo in vivo. PMID:26494538

  1. Stress among parents of infants with neural tube defect and its associated factors.

    PubMed

    Al-Akour, Nemeh Ahmad; Khader, Yusef Saleh; Hamlan, Adlah

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the stress among parents (either the mother or the father) of infants with neural tube defects (NTDs) and its associated factors. Using Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF), 100 parents of infants with NTDs were compared with 100 parents as a normative group. The total mean score for parents of infants with NTDs was 104.0 (standard deviation (SD) = 22.9) compared with 84.3 (SD = 18.9) for parents of infants without NTDs. Fifty-three (53.5%) parents of infants with NTDs and 15% of the control group had clinically significant high total stress score. Parents of infants with NTDs had a significantly higher score of distress in all scales of PSI-SF compared with those of infants without NTDs. Multivariate analysis found that mothers of infants with NTDs had a significantly higher average score for parental distress, parent-child dysfunctional interaction and total stress than fathers. Parents' lower education, unemployed parents and lower family income per month were significantly associated with increased parent-child dysfunctional interaction and parental distress. Parents with lower education and lower family income are in need for psychological and emotional support from health-care professionals.

  2. Reduction of birth prevalence rates of neural tube defects after folic acid fortification in Chile.

    PubMed

    López-Camelo, Jorge S; Orioli, Iêda M; da Graça Dutra, Maria; Nazer-Herrera, Julio; Rivera, Nelson; Ojeda, María Elena; Canessa, Aurora; Wettig, Elisabeth; Fontannaz, Ana María; Mellado, Cecília; Castilla, Eduardo E

    2005-06-01

    To verify whether the decreasing neural tube defects birth prevalence rates in Chile are due to folic acid fortification or to pre-existing decreasing trends, we performed a population survey using a network of Estudio Colaborativo Latino Americano de Malformaciones Congenitas (ECLAMC, Latin American Collaborative Study of Congenital Malformations) maternity hospitals in Chile, between the years 1982 and 2002. Within each maternity hospital, birth prevalence rates of spina bifida and anencephaly were calculated from two pre-fortification periods (1982-1989 and 1990-2000), and from one fortified period (2001-2002). There was no historical trend for spina bifida birth prevalence rates before folic acid fortification, and there was a 51% (minimum 27%, maximum 66%) decrease in the birth prevalence rates of this anomaly in the fortified period. The relative risks of spina bifida were homogeneous among hospitals in the two period comparisons. There was no historical trend for the birth prevalence of anencephaly comparing the two pre-fortified periods, but the relative risks were heterogeneous among hospitals in this comparison. There was a 42% (minimum 10%, maximum 63%) decrease in the birth prevalence rate of anencephaly in the fortified period as compared with the immediately pre-fortified period, with homogeneous relative risks among hospitals. Within the methodological constraints of this study we conclude that the birth prevalence rates for both spina bifida and anencephaly decreased as a result of folic acid fortification, without interference of decreasing secular trends.

  3. Prediction of active nodes in the transcriptional network of neural tube patterning

    PubMed Central

    Kioussi, Chrissa; Shih, Hung-Ping; Loflin, John; Gross, Michael K.

    2006-01-01

    A transcriptional network governs patterning in the developing spinal cord. As the developmental program runs, the levels of sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (SSTFs) in each progenitor cell type change to ultimately define a set of postmitotic populations with combinatorial codes of expressed SSTFs. A network description of the neural tube (NT) transcriptional patterning process will require definition of nodes (SSTFs and target enhancers) and edges (interactions between nodes). There are 1,600 SSTF nodes in a given mammalian genome. To limit the complexity of a network description, it will be useful to discriminate between active and passive SSTF nodes. We define active SSTF nodes as those that are differentially expressed within the system. Our system, the developing NT, was partitioned into two pools of genetically defined populations by using flow sorting. Microarray comparisons across the partition led to an estimate of 500–700 active SSTF nodes in the transcriptional network of the developing NT. These included most of the 66 known SSTFs assembled from review articles and recent reports on NT patterning. Empirical cutoffs based on the performance of knowns were used to identify 188 further active SSTFs nodes that performed similarly. The general utility and limitations of the population-partitioning paradigm are discussed. PMID:17132738

  4. U-tube steam generator empirical model development and validation using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Parlos, A.G.; Chong, K.T. ); Atiya, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Empirical modeling techniques that use model structures motivated from neural networks research have proven effective in identifying complex process dynamics. A recurrent multilayer perception (RMLP) network was developed as a nonlinear state-space model structure along with a static learning algorithm for estimating the parameter associated with it. The methods developed were demonstrated by identifying two submodels of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG), each valid around an operating power level. A significant drawback of this approach is the long off-line training times required for the development of even a simplified model of a UTSG. Subsequently, a dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm was developed as an accelerated alternative to train an RMLP network for use in empirical modeling of power plants. The two main advantages of this learning algorithm are its ability to consider past error gradient information for future use and the two forward passes associated with its implementation. The enhanced learning capabilities provided by the dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm were demonstrated via the case study of a simple steam boiler power plant. In this paper, the dynamic gradient descent-based learning algorithm is used for the development and validation of a complete UTSG empirical model.

  5. Levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in maternal serum and risk of neural tube defects in offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jin, Lei; Ren, Aiguo; Yuan, Yue; Liu, Jufen; Li, Zhiwen; Zhang, Le; Yi, Deqing; Wang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu; Finnell, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, and have been reported to be a risk factor for human neural tube defects (NTDs). We investigated the relationship between PAH concentrations in maternal serum and NTD risk in offspring using a case-control study design, and explored the link between PAH concentrations to household energy usage characteristics and life styles. One hundred and seventeen women who had NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 121 women who delivered healthy infants (controls) were recruited in Northern China. Maternal blood samples were collected at pregnancy termination or at delivery. Twenty-seven PAHs were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The concentrations of 13 individual PAHs detected were significantly higher in the cases than in the controls. Clear dose-response relationships between concentrations of most individual PAHs and the risk of total NTDs or subtypes were observed, even when potential covariates were adjusted for. High-molecular-weight PAHs (H-PAHs) showed higher risk than low-molecular-weight PAHs (L-PAHs). No associations between PAH concentrations and indoor life styles and energy usage characteristics were observed. It was concluded that maternal exposure to PAHs was associated with an increased risk of NTDs, and H-PAHs overall posed a higher risk for NTDs than L-PAHs. PMID:25488567

  6. Prevention of neural tube defects in the UK: a missed opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Morris, JK; Rankin, J; Draper, ES; Kurinczuk, JJ; Springett, A; Tucker, D; Wellesley, D; Wreyford, B; Wald, NJ

    2016-01-01

    Objective In 1991, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Vitamin Study demonstrated that folic acid taken before pregnancy and in early pregnancy reduced the risk of a neural tube defect (NTD). We aimed to estimate the number of NTD pregnancies that would have been prevented if flour had been fortified with folic acid in the UK from 1998 as it had been in the USA. Design Estimates of NTD prevalence, the preventive effect of folic acid and the proportion of women taking folic acid supplements before pregnancy were used to predict the number of NTD pregnancies that would have been prevented if folic acid fortification had been implemented. Setting Eight congenital anomaly registers in England and Wales. Main outcome measures The prevalence of pregnancies with an NTD in the UK and the number of these pregnancies that would have been prevented if folic acid fortification had been implemented. Results From 1991 to 2012, the prevalence of NTD pregnancies was 1.28 (95% CI 1.24 to 1.31) per 1000 total births (19% live births, 81% terminations and 0.5% stillbirths and fetal deaths ≥20 weeks’ gestation). If the USA levels of folic acid fortification from 1998 onwards had been adopted in the UK, an estimated 2014 fewer NTD pregnancies would have occurred. Conclusions Failure to implement folic acid fortification in the UK has caused, and continues to cause, avoidable terminations of pregnancy, stillbirths, neonatal deaths and permanent serious disability in surviving children. PMID:26681697

  7. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon-carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalizes the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  8. The role of folic acid fortification in neural tube defects: a review.

    PubMed

    Osterhues, Anja; Ali, Nyima S; Michels, Karin B

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs) has fallen noticeably during the past 30 years, but the specific etiology and causative mechanism of NTDs remain unknown. Since introduction of mandatory fortification of grains with folic acid, a further decrease in NTD prevalence has been reported in North America and other countries with large variations among ethnic subgroups. However, a significant portion of NTDs still persists. Population data suggest that women of childbearing age may not yet be adequately targeted, while the general population may be overfortified with folic acid. While an excessive folate intake may be associated with adverse effects, there remains uncertainty about the minimum effective folate intake and status required for NTD prevention, and the safe upper folate level. Besides folate, several other lifestyle and environmental factors as well as genetic variations may influence NTD development, possibly by affecting one-carbon metabolism and thus epigenetic events. In conclusion, mandatory folic acid fortification plays a significant part in the reduction of NTD prevalence, but possibly at a cost and with a portion of NTDs remaining. More effective preventive strategies require better understanding of the etiology of this group of birth defects. PMID:24007422

  9. Live imaging of apoptosis in a novel transgenic mouse highlights its role in neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Shinotsuka, Naomi; Nonomura, Keiko; Takemoto, Kiwamu; Kuida, Keisuke; Yosida, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Many cells die during development, tissue homeostasis, and disease. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to cranial neural tube closure (NTC) defects like exencephaly, although the mechanism is unclear. Observing cells undergoing apoptosis in a living context could help elucidate their origin, behavior, and influence on surrounding tissues, but few tools are available for this purpose, especially in mammals. In this paper, we used insulator sequences to generate a transgenic mouse that stably expressed a genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)–based fluorescent reporter for caspase activation and performed simultaneous time-lapse imaging of apoptosis and morphogenesis in living embryos. Live FRET imaging with a fast-scanning confocal microscope revealed that cells containing activated caspases showed typical and nontypical apoptotic behavior in a region-specific manner during NTC. Inhibiting caspase activation perturbed and delayed the smooth progression of cranial NTC, which might increase the risk of exencephaly. Our results suggest that caspase-mediated cell removal facilitates NTC completion within a limited developmental window. PMID:22162136

  10. Drinking water treatment is not associated with an observed increase in neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Melin, Vanessa E; Johnstone, David W; Etzkorn, Felicia A; Hrubec, Terry C

    2014-06-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) arise when natural organic matter in source water reacts with disinfectants used in the water treatment process. Studies have suggested an association between DBPs and birth defects. Neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice were first observed in-house in May 2006 and have continued to date. The source of the NTD-inducing agent was previously determined to be a component of drinking water. Tap water samples from a variety of sources were analyzed for trihalomethanes (THMs) to determine if they were causing the malformations. NTDs were observed in CD-1 mice provided with treated and untreated surface water. Occurrence of NTDs varied by water source and treatment regimens. THMs were detected in tap water derived from surface water but not detected in tap water derived from a groundwater source. THMs were absent in untreated river water and laboratory purified waters, yet the percentage of NTDs in untreated river water were similar to the treated water counterpart. These findings indicate that THMs were not the primary cause of NTDs in the mice since the occurrence of NTDs was unrelated to drinking water disinfection.

  11. Orally administered melatonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Fang-Biao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), neural tube defects (NTDs) and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD)8 to GD12. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with melatonin (MT, 50 mg/kg) before each LPS injection. A five-day LPS injection resulted in 27.5% of fetuses with anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Additional experiment showed that maternal LPS exposure significantly down-regulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft) and disturbed folate transport from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Interestingly, melatonin significantly attenuated LPS-induced down-regulation of placental pcft. Moreover, melatonin markedly improved the transport of folate from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Correspondingly, orally administered melatonin reduced the incidence of LPS-induced anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Taken together, these results suggest that orally administered melatonin prevents LPS-induced NTDs through alleviating LPS-induced disturbance of folate transport from maternal circulation through the placenta into the fetus. PMID:25420102

  12. Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Maternal Serum and Risk of Neural Tube Defects in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, and have been reported to be a risk factor for human neural tube defects (NTDs). We investigated the relationship between PAH concentrations in maternal serum and NTD risk in offspring using a case-control study design, and explored the link between PAH concentrations to household energy usage characteristics and life styles. One hundred and seventeen women who had NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 121 women who delivered healthy infants (controls) were recruited in Northern China. Maternal blood samples were collected at pregnancy termination or at delivery. Twenty-seven PAHs were measured by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The concentrations of 13 individual PAHs detected were significantly higher in the cases than in the controls. Clear dose–response relationships between concentrations of most individual PAHs and the risk of total NTDs or subtypes were observed, even when potential covariates were adjusted for. High-molecular-weight PAHs (H-PAHs) showed higher risk than low-molecular-weight PAHs (L-PAHs). No associations between PAH concentrations and indoor life styles and energy usage characteristics were observed. It was concluded that maternal exposure to PAHs was associated with an increased risk of NTDs, and H-PAHs overall posed a higher risk for NTDs than L-PAHs. PMID:25488567

  13. Maternal dietary glycemic intake and the risk of neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Yazdy, Mahsa M; Liu, Simin; Mitchell, Allen A; Werler, Martha M

    2010-02-15

    Both maternal diabetes and obesity have been associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTD), possibly due to a sustained state of hyperglycemia and/or hyperinsulinemia. Data were collected in the Boston University Slone Birth Defects Study (a case-control study) from 1988 to 1998. The authors examined whether high dietary glycemic index (DGI) and high dietary glycemic load (DGL) increased the risk of NTDs in nondiabetic women. Mothers of NTD cases and nonmalformed controls were interviewed in person within 6 months after delivery about diet and other exposures. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from logistic regression for high DGI (> or =60) and high DGL (> or =205), with cutpoints determined by cubic spline. Of 698 case mothers, 25% had high DGI and 4% had high DGL. Of 696 control mothers, 15% had high DGI and 2% had high DGL. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors and other dietary factors, the odds ratio for high DGI was 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.0); for high DGL, it was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 0.8, 4.0). Diets with proportionally high DGI or DGL may put the developing fetus at risk of an NTD, adding further evidence that hyperglycemia lies within the pathogenic pathway.

  14. Levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in maternal serum and risk of neural tube defects in offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jin, Lei; Ren, Aiguo; Yuan, Yue; Liu, Jufen; Li, Zhiwen; Zhang, Le; Yi, Deqing; Wang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Yali; Wang, Xilong; Tao, Shu; Finnell, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, and have been reported to be a risk factor for human neural tube defects (NTDs). We investigated the relationship between PAH concentrations in maternal serum and NTD risk in offspring using a case-control study design, and explored the link between PAH concentrations to household energy usage characteristics and life styles. One hundred and seventeen women who had NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 121 women who delivered healthy infants (controls) were recruited in Northern China. Maternal blood samples were collected at pregnancy termination or at delivery. Twenty-seven PAHs were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The concentrations of 13 individual PAHs detected were significantly higher in the cases than in the controls. Clear dose-response relationships between concentrations of most individual PAHs and the risk of total NTDs or subtypes were observed, even when potential covariates were adjusted for. High-molecular-weight PAHs (H-PAHs) showed higher risk than low-molecular-weight PAHs (L-PAHs). No associations between PAH concentrations and indoor life styles and energy usage characteristics were observed. It was concluded that maternal exposure to PAHs was associated with an increased risk of NTDs, and H-PAHs overall posed a higher risk for NTDs than L-PAHs.

  15. Drinking water treatment is not associated with an observed increase in neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Melin, Vanessa E; Johnstone, David W; Etzkorn, Felicia A; Hrubec, Terry C

    2014-06-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) arise when natural organic matter in source water reacts with disinfectants used in the water treatment process. Studies have suggested an association between DBPs and birth defects. Neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice were first observed in-house in May 2006 and have continued to date. The source of the NTD-inducing agent was previously determined to be a component of drinking water. Tap water samples from a variety of sources were analyzed for trihalomethanes (THMs) to determine if they were causing the malformations. NTDs were observed in CD-1 mice provided with treated and untreated surface water. Occurrence of NTDs varied by water source and treatment regimens. THMs were detected in tap water derived from surface water but not detected in tap water derived from a groundwater source. THMs were absent in untreated river water and laboratory purified waters, yet the percentage of NTDs in untreated river water were similar to the treated water counterpart. These findings indicate that THMs were not the primary cause of NTDs in the mice since the occurrence of NTDs was unrelated to drinking water disinfection. PMID:24497082

  16. Risk factors for neural tube defects in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia: Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Waleed R; Mohamed, Ashry Gad; Ignacio, Lena C; de Jesus, Julie E; Baabbad, Rubana; El Bushra, Hassan M

    2014-01-01

    Both genetic and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTD) which affect 0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide. This study aimed to explore the risk factors for the development of NTD in Saudi population, and highlight identifiable and preventable causes. Similar studies are scarce in similar populations ofthe Arabian Peninsula and North Africa. This is an unmatched concurrent case-control study including NTD cases born at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh during a 4-year period (2002-2006). The case-control study included 25 cases and 125 controls (case: control ratio of 1:5). Years of formal education, employment, household environment (including availability of air conditioning) and rate of parental consanguinity did not differ between mothers of cases and controls. Significantly higher proportion of mothers of cases had history of stillbirth compared to control mothers (16% vs 4.1%, P=0.02). Also family history of hydrocephalus and congenital anomalies were more prevalent in cases than controls (P values=0.0000 and 0.003, respectively). There was significant protective effect of periconceptional folic acid consumption both prior to conception (OR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00-0.07) and during the first 6 weeks of conception (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.04-0.39). Further research, including a larger cohort, is required to enable ascertainment of gene-nutrient and gene environment interactions associated with NTD in Saudi Arabia. PMID:27493405

  17. Role of arsenic as a reproductive toxin with particular attention to neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Shalat, S.L.; Walker, D.B.; Finnell, R.H.

    1996-10-01

    Arsenic has been recognized as a human toxicant for over 2000 years. More recently it has been readily accepted as a human carcinogen. Animal research has demonstrated arsenic`s ability to have profound detrimental effects on the developing embryo in avian and mamalian species. This article comprehensively reviews the human and animal literature on the subject of the reproductive toxicity of arsenic. A variety of endpoints are considered, including spontaneous abortion, cardiovascular defects, and arsenic`s role in the causation of neural tube defects (NTDs). A summary of the literature that has examined the various postulated mechanisms by which arsenic may produce NTDs is also considered. In addition, a discussion of literature relative to the presence of arsenic in the general environment and in the workplace presented. This article reaches the conclusion that while further research is clearly needed, particularly on the potential toxicity of organic arsenical compounds, the current literature suggests it may be prudent and appropriate to treat inorganic arsenic as a probable human reproductive toxin. 132 refs.

  18. Periconceptional glycaemic load and intake of sugars and their association with neural tube defects in offspring.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Gary M; Carmichael, Suzan L; Laurent, Cecile; Siega-Riz, Anna M

    2008-11-01

    In a California population, we previously observed increased neural tube defect (NTD) risks associated with maternal intakes of periconceptional diets predicting higher glycaemic responses and higher sucrose. Our objective here was to replicate these results in a larger study of multiple regions within the United States. This population-based case-control study included deliveries from 1997 to 2003 from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. NTD cases were infants or fetuses born with spina bifida or anencephaly. Infants without malformations were eligible as controls. Interview participation was 71% among case mothers and 68% among control mothers. There were 720 NTD case and 4699 control mothers with completed interviews included in analyses. Diet was assessed using a 58-item food frequency questionnaire focusing on the year before conception, whereas cereals, beverages and supplement use was assessed periconceptionally. We found no increased risks of NTD-affected pregnancies with increased intakes (adjusted for kcal/day) of sucrose, glucose, fructose or with maternal diets with a higher glycaemic load. The reasons for current findings to be inconsistent with previous findings are unknown.

  19. Folate supplementation, MTHFR gene polymorphism and neural tube defects: a community based case control study in North India.

    PubMed

    Deb, Roumi; Arora, Jyoti; Meitei, Sanjenbam Yaiphaba; Gupta, Sangeeta; Verma, Vanita; Saraswathy, Kallur Nava; Saran, Sunil; Kalla, Aloke Kumar

    2011-09-01

    The present study analyses the potential role of MTHFR gene polymorphism, folate supplementation and dietary pattern among the mothers of NTD neonates and controls in heterogeneous populations of North India, with the special focus on their ethnic labels. Results indicated significant increased risk for neural tube defects with respect to low folic acid supplementation and vegetarian diet in univariate and multivariate analyses. There was no significant difference in the genotypic or allelic distribution of MTHFR C677T polymorphism, however, high frequency of CT genotype, as observed, among controls suggests heterozygous advantage probably due to supplementary folate. Among the two communities, Muslim NTD mothers had higher TT genotype showing increased risk for neural tube defects (adjusted OR: 12.9; 95% CI: 1.21-136.8) and lower folic acid supplementation (adjusted OR: 3.5; 95% CI: 1.18-10.22). Whereas, marginal increased risk for NTDs with vegetarian diet was observed among Hindus. Cultural and ethnic variation in the risk factors for neural tube defects is highlighted in the study. PMID:21792640

  20. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  1. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  2. Levels of Folate Receptor Autoantibodies in Maternal and Cord Blood and Risk of Neural Tube Defects in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Na; Wang, Linlin; Finnell, Richard H.; Li, Zhiwen; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Le; Cabrera, Robert M.; Ye, Rongwei; Ren, Aiguo

    2016-01-01

    Background After years of periconceptional folic acid supplementation, the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs) remains stable following the remarkable reduction observed immediately after the fortification practice. There is accumulating evidence that folate receptor (FR) autoimmunity may play a role in the etiology of folate-sensitive NTDs. Methods From 2011 to 2013, 118 NTD cases and 242 healthy controls were recruited from a population-based birth defects surveillance system in Northern China. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure FR autoantibodies in maternal and cord blood. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results Plasma FR autoantibodies levels were significantly elevated in mothers of infants with NTDs compared with mothers of healthy controls. Using the lowest tertile as the referent group, 2.20-fold (95% CI, 0.71–6.80) and 5.53-fold increased odds (95% CI, 1.90–16.08) of NTDs were observed for the second and third tertile of immunoglobulin G (IgG), respectively, and the odds of NTDs for each successive tertile of IgM was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.35–2.75) and 3.49 (95% CI, 1.45–8.39), respectively. A dose–response relationship was found between FR autoantibodies levels and risk of NTDs (P < 0.001 for IgG, P = 0.002 for IgM). The same pattern was observed in both subtypes of spina bifida and anencephaly. No significant difference in levels of cord blood FR autoantibodies was observed. Conclusion Higher levels of FR autoimmunity in maternal plasma are associated with elevated risk of NTDs in a dose–response manner. PMID:27166990

  3. Eddy Current Signature Classification of Steam Generator Tube Defects Using A Learning Vector Quantization Neural Network

    SciTech Connect

    Gabe V. Garcia

    2005-01-03

    A major cause of failure in nuclear steam generators is degradation of their tubes. Although seven primary defect categories exist, one of the principal causes of tube failure is intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC). This type of defect usually begins on the secondary side surface of the tubes and propagates both inwards and laterally. In many cases this defect is found at or near the tube support plates.

  4. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes. PMID:27252619

  5. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes.

  6. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background

    PubMed Central

    Cirelli, Laura K.; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes. PMID:27252619

  7. Folic acid supplements to prevent neural tube defects: trends in East of Ireland 1996-2002.

    PubMed

    Ward, M; Hutton, J; Mc Donnell, R; Bachir, N; Scallan, E; O'Leary, M; Hoey, J; Doyle, A; Delany, V; Sayers, G

    2004-10-01

    Promotion of folic acid to prevent neural Tube Defects (NTD) has been ongoing for ten years in Ireland, without a concomitant reduction in the total birth prevalence of NTD. The effectiveness of folic acid promotion as the sole means of primary prevention of NTD is therefore questionable. We examined trends in folic acid knowledge and peri-conceptional use from 1996-2002 with the aim of assessing the value of this approach. From 1996-2002, 300 women attending ante-natal clinics in Dublin hospitals annually were surveyed regarding their knowledge and use of folic acid. During the period the proportion who had heard of folic acid rose from 54% to 94% between 1996 and 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Knowledge that folic acid can prevent NTD also rose from 21% to 66% (c2 test for trend: p<0.001). Although the proportion who took folic acid during pregnancy increased from 14% to 83% from 1996 to 2002 (c2 test for trend: p<0.001), peri-conceptional intake did not rise above 24% in any year. There is a high awareness of folic acid and its relation to NTD, which is not matched by peri-conceptional uptake. The main barrier to peri-conceptional uptake is the lack of pregnancy planning. To date promotional campaigns appear to have been ineffective in reducing the prevalence of NTD in Ireland. Consequently, fortification of staple foodstuffs is the only practical and reliable means of primary prevention of NTD.

  8. Economic burden of neural tube defects and impact of prevention with folic acid: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yunni; Lindemann, Marion; Colligs, Antje; Snowball, Claire

    2011-11-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the second most common group of serious birth defects. Although folic acid has been shown to reduce effectively the risk of NTDs and measures have been taken to increase the awareness, knowledge, and consumption of folic acid, the full potential of folic acid to reduce the risk of NTDs has not been realized in most countries. To understand the economic burden of NTDs and the economic impact of preventing NTDs with folic acid, a systematic review was performed on relevant studies. A total of 14 cost of illness studies and 10 economic evaluations on prevention of NTDs with folic acid were identified. Consistent findings were reported across all of the cost of illness studies. The lifetime direct medical cost for patients with NTDs is significant, with the majority of cost being for inpatient care, for treatment at initial diagnosis in childhood, and for comorbidities in adult life. The lifetime indirect cost for patients with spina bifida is even greater due to increased morbidity and premature mortality. Caregiver time costs are also significant. The results from the economic evaluations demonstrate that folic acid fortification in food and preconception folic acid consumption are cost-effective ways to reduce the incidence and prevalence of NTDs. This review highlights the significant cost burden that NTDs pose to healthcare systems, various healthcare payers, and society and concludes that the benefits of prevention of NTDs with folic acid far outweigh the cost. Further intervention with folic acid is justified in countries where the full potential of folic acid to reduce the risk of NTDs has not been realized.

  9. [Folic acid and prevention of neural tube closure defects: the question is not solved yet].

    PubMed

    Vidailhet, M; Bocquet, A; Bresson, J-L; Briend, A; Chouraqui, J-P; Dupont, C; Darmaun, D; Frelut, M-L; Ghisolfi, J; Girardet, J-P; Goulet, O; Putet, G; Rieu, D; Rigo, J; Turck, D

    2008-07-01

    Between 1981 and 1996, several interventional studies proved the efficacy of periconceptional folic acid supplementation in the prevention of neural tube closure defects (NTCD), first in women at risk (with a previous case of NTCD) and also in women of the general population in age to become pregnant. The poor observance of this supplementation led several countries (USA, Canada, Chile...) to decide mandatory folic acid fortification of cereals, which permitted a 30% (USA) to 46% (Canada) reduction in the incidence of NTCD. Moreover, this benefit was accompanied by a diminished incidence of several other malformations and of stroke and coronary accidents in elderly people. However, several papers drew attention to an increased risk of colorectal and breast cancer in relation with high blood folate levels and the use of folic acid supplements. A controlled interventional study showed a higher rate of recurrence of colic adenomas and a higher percentage of advanced adenomas in subjects receiving 1mg/day of folic acid. A recent study demonstrated an abrupt reversal of the downward trend in colorectal cancer 1 year after the beginning of cereal folic acid fortification in the USA and Canada. Two studies also reported impaired cognitive functions in elder persons with defective vitamin B(12) status. Taken in aggregate, these studies question the wisdom of a nationwide, mandatory, folic acid fortification of cereals. As of today, despite their limited preventive efficacy, a safe approach is to keep our current French recommendations and to increase the awareness of all caregivers, so as to improve the observance of these recommendations.

  10. Maternal dietary patterns are associated with risk of neural tube and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy H; Carmichael, Suzan L; Feldkamp, Marcia L; Hobbs, Charlotte A; Olshan, Andrew F

    2013-06-01

    Studying empirically derived dietary patterns is useful in understanding dietary practice. We classified women by their dietary patterns using latent class analysis of 66 foods and studied the association of these patterns with neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart defects (CHDs) in the U.S. National Birth Defects Prevention Study (1997-2005). Logistic regression models used data from 1,047 with an NTD, 6,641 with a CHD, and 6,123 controls that were adjusted for maternal characteristics and tested the effect modification of multivitamin supplement use. Four latent dietary patterns were identified: prudent, Western, low-calorie Western, and Mexican. Among participants who did not use supplements, those in the Mexican, Western, and low-calorie Western classes were significantly more likely (odds ratios of 1.6, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively) to have offspring born with NTDs than were those in the prudent class after adjustment of for dietary folic acid intake. In contrast, among supplement users, there was no difference in the incidence of NTDs between classes. Associations between dietary class and CHD subgroups were not modified by supplement use except for tetralogy of Fallot; among supplement users, those in the Western class were twice as likely (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 2.8) as the prudent class to have offspring with tetralogy of Fallot. Women who adhered to a Western diet were 1.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.35) times more likely to have an infant with septal heart defect than were women who adhered to a prudent diet. A prudent dietary pattern, even with folate fortification, may decrease the risk of NTDs and some heart defects.

  11. Folic Acid Intake and Neural Tube Defects: Two Egyptian Centers Experience

    PubMed Central

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H.; Kamal, Naglaa Mohamed; Elhusseini, Mona Abbas; Hussein, Laila; Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali; Ali, Yahia Zakaria Abdelalim; Azab, Ahmed Abelfattah; Salama, Mostafa Abdelazim; Kassab, Muna; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations with worldwide distribution and complex etiopathogenesis. Folic acid plays a pivotal role in their prevention. We aimed to identify the protective effect of folic acid intake against NTDs and its dependence on different socioeconomic and environmental factors in a cohort of mothers in Egypt. A cross-sectional study was carried over a period of 12 months on mothers who gave birth to babies with NTDs (group 1) and a control group with healthy offsprings (group 2). Both groups completed 2 questionnaires: food frequency questionnaire targeting the daily folate intake, and socioeconomic status and medical history questionnaire. Both groups of mothers received folate <800 μg/day, recommended for pregnant women. A strong association was detected between NTDs and urban residency with medium educated mothers, with negative consanguinity, who had folate intake < 400 μg daily, and who had their food long cooked. Each of these factors separately had a limited impact to cause NTDs, but when present together they did augment each other. Interestingly enough is the role of fava bean, cauliflower, spinach, and mango in predisposing of NTDs in the presence of the above-mentioned factors. The protective effect of folic acid intake against NTDs may depend on the synergism of different socioeconomic and environmental factors (which differ from country to another). In Egypt, females especially the medium-educated who live in urban areas should be well-informed with the value of folate intake in the periconceptional period. PMID:26376380

  12. Folic Acid Intake and Neural Tube Defects: Two Egyptian Centers Experience.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Kamal, Naglaa Mohamed; Elhusseini, Mona Abbas; Hussein, Laila; Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali; Ali, Yahia Zakaria Abdelalim; Azab, Ahmed Abelfattah; Salama, Mostafa Abdelazim; Kassab, Muna; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations with worldwide distribution and complex etiopathogenesis. Folic acid plays a pivotal role in their prevention. We aimed to identify the protective effect of folic acid intake against NTDs and its dependence on different socioeconomic and environmental factors in a cohort of mothers in Egypt. A cross-sectional study was carried over a period of 12 months on mothers who gave birth to babies with NTDs (group 1) and a control group with healthy offsprings (group 2). Both groups completed 2 questionnaires: food frequency questionnaire targeting the daily folate intake, and socioeconomic status and medical history questionnaire. Both groups of mothers received folate <800 μg/day, recommended for pregnant women. A strong association was detected between NTDs and urban residency with medium educated mothers, with negative consanguinity, who had folate intake < 400 μg daily, and who had their food long cooked. Each of these factors separately had a limited impact to cause NTDs, but when present together they did augment each other. Interestingly enough is the role of fava bean, cauliflower, spinach, and mango in predisposing of NTDs in the presence of the above-mentioned factors. The protective effect of folic acid intake against NTDs may depend on the synergism of different socioeconomic and environmental factors (which differ from country to another). In Egypt, females especially the medium-educated who live in urban areas should be well-informed with the value of folate intake in the periconceptional period.

  13. Folic Acid Intake and Neural Tube Defects: Two Egyptian Centers Experience.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Kamal, Naglaa Mohamed; Elhusseini, Mona Abbas; Hussein, Laila; Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali; Ali, Yahia Zakaria Abdelalim; Azab, Ahmed Abelfattah; Salama, Mostafa Abdelazim; Kassab, Muna; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of congenital malformations with worldwide distribution and complex etiopathogenesis. Folic acid plays a pivotal role in their prevention. We aimed to identify the protective effect of folic acid intake against NTDs and its dependence on different socioeconomic and environmental factors in a cohort of mothers in Egypt. A cross-sectional study was carried over a period of 12 months on mothers who gave birth to babies with NTDs (group 1) and a control group with healthy offsprings (group 2). Both groups completed 2 questionnaires: food frequency questionnaire targeting the daily folate intake, and socioeconomic status and medical history questionnaire. Both groups of mothers received folate <800 μg/day, recommended for pregnant women. A strong association was detected between NTDs and urban residency with medium educated mothers, with negative consanguinity, who had folate intake < 400 μg daily, and who had their food long cooked. Each of these factors separately had a limited impact to cause NTDs, but when present together they did augment each other. Interestingly enough is the role of fava bean, cauliflower, spinach, and mango in predisposing of NTDs in the presence of the above-mentioned factors. The protective effect of folic acid intake against NTDs may depend on the synergism of different socioeconomic and environmental factors (which differ from country to another). In Egypt, females especially the medium-educated who live in urban areas should be well-informed with the value of folate intake in the periconceptional period. PMID:26376380

  14. [Folic acid use by pregnant women in Israel for preventing neural tube defects].

    PubMed

    Gil, Z; Aran, A; Friedman, O; Beni-Adani, L; Constantini, S

    2000-12-01

    Spina bifida and anencephaly are the most common, serious malformations in neural tube defects (NTD). Randomized trials in the last 2 decades have demonstrated that folic acid, 0.4 mg/d, reduces the incidence of NTD by more than 50%. We investigated the use of folic acid and multivitamins containing folic acid in childbearing women. Of 221 women interviewed, 67 (30%) regularly took pills containing 0.4 mg folic acid. Women with higher educational levels were more likely to take multivitamins with folic acid than were the less educated (p = 0.05). Of the women who took folic acid, only 5 (7.5%) used separate folic acid tablets, before and during their pregnancy. The rest used multivitamins containing folic acid. The 5 women who took folic acid separately were college-educated and nonreligious, and they took multivitamins in addition (p > 0.05). Of the women interviewed, 58 (26.2%) were Bedouin of the Negev. 24 (41.4%) of them took pills containing folic acid on a regular basis. This percentage is higher than that in the Jewish women in the study who took folic acid for prevention of NTD (17%; p = 0.038). Most of the women took folic acid after the first trimester. Only a minority took daily periconceptional folic acid. Multivitamins containing 0.4 mg of folic acid were more popular than folic acid tablets alone. This study emphasizes the need for continuing efforts to increase consumption of folic acid and awareness of its benefits among women of childbearing age. PMID:11341184

  15. VANGL1 rare variants associated with neural tube defects affect convergent extension in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Annie; McDearmid, Jonathan R; Lachance, Stephanie; De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Capra, Valeria; Gros, Philippe; Drapeau, Pierre; Kibar, Zoha

    2010-01-01

    In humans, rare non-synonymous variants in the planar cell polarity gene VANGL1 are associated with neural tube defects (NTDs). These variants were hypothesized to be pathogenic based mainly on genetic studies in a large cohort of NTD patients. In this study, we validate the potential pathogenic effect of these mutations in vivo by investigating their effect on convergent extension in zebrafish. Knocking down the expression of tri, the ortholog of Vangl2, using an antisense morpholino (MO), as shown previously, led to a defective convergent extension (CE) manifested by a shortened body axis and widened somites. Co-injection of the human VANGL1 with the tri-MO was able to partially rescue the tri-MO induced phenotype in zebrafish. In contrast, co-injection of two human VANGL1 variants, p.Val239Ile and p.Met328Thr, failed to rescue this phenotype. We next carried out overexpression studies where we measured the ability of the human VANGL1 alleles to induce a CE phenotype when injected at high doses in zebrafish embryos. While overexpressing the wild-type allele led to a severely defective CE, overexpression of either p.Val239Ile or p.Met328Thr variant failed to do so. Results from both tri-MO knockdown/rescue results and overexpression assays suggest that these two variants most likely represent "loss-of-function" alleles that affect protein function during embryonic development. Our study demonstrates a high degree of functional conservation of VANGL genes across evolution and provides a model system for studying potential variants identified in human NTDs.

  16. Identification of Biomarkers by Proteomics for Prenatal Screening for Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guosong; He, Pingya; Du, Ying; Zhang, Su

    2016-01-01

    Neural tube defect (NTD) is a serious congenital defect, but current methods for identifying NTD are limited. We used proteomic analysis of maternal serum to identify NTD-specific proteins whose levels differed between women with NTD fetuses (n = 50) and those with healthy fetuses (n = 40). Three NTD-specific protein peaks (8,130.6, 15,941.7, and 3,960.3 m/z) were identified using MALDI-TOF-mass spectrophotemetry, and were included in a diagnostic model developed using Biomarker Patterns software. The model used cut-offs for the relative intensity of the three peaks to indicate if a case had or did not have NTD. The model identified 48 of the 50 NTD cases and 36 of the 40 control cases correctly, resulting in the sensitivity of 96.0% (48/50) and the specificity of 90.0% (36/40). The diagnostic model was also tested on 105 clinical cases at high risk for NTD, as determined by having high alpha-fetoprotein levels, resulting in the sensitivity of 100% (101/101) and the specificity of 75.0% (3/4). Using the International Protein Index database, we identified proteins with a molecular mass of 8,130.6 Da as ADP-ribosylation factor 1 and a protein similar to cold agglutinin FS-1 antibody light-chain. The 15,941.7-Da peak corresponded to vitamin K3 protein, and the identity of the 3,960.3-Da protein was unclear. Thus, this study developed a diagnostic model consisting of the three peaks which may be indicators of NTD. This new assay may be at least as accurate for diagnosing NTD compared with the commonly used clinical test that assesses alpha-fetoprotein levels.

  17. SELDI-TOF-MS Proteomic Profiling of Serum, Urine, and Amniotic Fluid in Neural Tube Defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Yuan, Zhengwei; Zhao, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects, whose specific biomarkers are needed. The purpose of this pilot study is to determine whether protein profiling in NTD-mothers differ from normal controls using SELDI-TOF-MS. ProteinChip Biomarker System was used to evaluate 82 maternal serum samples, 78 urine samples and 76 amniotic fluid samples. The validity of classification tree was then challenged with a blind test set including another 20 NTD-mothers and 18 controls in serum samples, and another 19 NTD-mothers and 17 controls in urine samples, and another 20 NTD-mothers and 17 controls in amniotic fluid samples. Eight proteins detected in serum samples were up-regulated and four proteins were down-regulated in the NTD group. Four proteins detected in urine samples were up-regulated and one protein was down-regulated in the NTD group. Six proteins detected in amniotic fluid samples were up-regulated and one protein was down-regulated in the NTD group. The classification tree for serum samples separated NTDs from healthy individuals, achieving a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 97% in the training set, and achieving a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 97% and a positive predictive value of 95% in the test set. The classification tree for urine samples separated NTDs from controls, achieving a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 94% in the training set, and achieving a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 82% and a positive predictive value of 85% in the test set. The classification tree for amniotic fluid samples separated NTDs from controls, achieving a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 89% in the training set, and achieving a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 88% and a positive predictive value of 90% in the test set. These suggest that SELDI-TOF-MS is an additional method for NTDs pregnancies detection. PMID:25054433

  18. Variants in maternal COMT and MTHFR genes and risk of neural tube defects in offspring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jufen; Zhang, Yali; Jin, Lei; Li, Guoxing; Wang, Linlin; Bao, Yanping; Fu, Yunting; Li, Zhiwen; Zhang, Le; Ye, Rongwei; Ren, Aiguo

    2015-04-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) G158A are associated with a risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. This study examined the effect of a MTHFR × COMT interaction on the risk of NTDs in a Chinese population with a high prevalence of NTDs. A total of 576 fetuses or newborns with NTDs and 594 controls were genotyped for MTHFRrs1801133, MTHFRrs1801131, and COMTrs4680 and COMTrs737865. Information on maternal sociodemographic characteristics, reproductive history, and related behavior was collected through face-to-face interviews. Possible interactions between genetic variants of MTHFR and COMT were examined. MTHFR C677T homozygous TT was associated with an elevated risk of total NTDs (odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.93-2.03) and of anencephaly (OR = 1.67, 95 % CI = 0.98-2.84) compared with the CC genotype. There was a COMT rs737865 CC × MTHFR rs1801133 TT interaction for total NTDs (OR = 3.02, 95 % CI = 1.00-9.14) and for anencephaly (OR = 3.39, 95 % CI = 0.94-12.18). No interaction was found between COMT rs4680 AA/AG and MTHFR CT/TT genotypes for total NTDs or any subtype of NTD. The interaction of COMT rs737865 and MTHFR C677T was associated with an increased risk of NTDs, especially anencephaly, in a Chinese population with a high prevalence of NTDs. PMID:24990354

  19. Neural tube defects in Latin America and the impact of fortification: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Jorge; Casas, Jessica; Taren, Douglas; Alverson, Clinton J; Flores, Alina; Frias, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Objective Data on the prevalence of birth defects and neural tube defects (NTD) in Latin America are limited. The present review summarizes NTD prevalence and time trends in Latin American countries and compares pre- and post-fortification periods to assess the impact of folic acid fortification in these countries. Design We carried out a literature review of studies and institutional reports published between 1990 and 2010 that contained information on NTD prevalence in Latin America. Results NTD prevalence in Latin American countries varied from 0.2 to 9.6 per 1000 live births and was influenced by methods of ascertainment. Time trends from Bogota, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala City, México and Puerto Rico showed average annual declines of 2.5% to 21.8%. Pre- and post-fortification comparisons were available for Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico and México. The aggregate percentage decline in NTD prevalence ranged from 33% to 59%. Conclusions The present publication is the first to review data on time trends and the impact of folic acid fortification on NTD prevalence in Latin America. Reported NTD prevalence varied markedly by geographic region and in some areas of Latin America was among the lowest in the world, while in other areas it was among the highest. For countries with available information, time trends showed significant declines in NTD prevalence and these declines were greater in countries where folic acid fortification of staples reached the majority of the population at risk, such as Chile and Costa Rica. PMID:23464652

  20. Maternal fumonisin exposure as a risk factor for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Gelineau-van Waes, J; Voss, K A; Stevens, V L; Speer, M C; Riley, R T

    2009-01-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by the fungus F. verticillioides, a common contaminant of maize (corn) worldwide. Maternal consumption of fumonisin B(1)-contaminated maize during early pregnancy has recently been associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) in human populations that rely heavily on maize as a dietary staple. Experimental administration of purified fumonisin to mice early in gestation also results in an increased incidence of NTDs in exposed offspring. Fumonisin inhibits the enzyme ceramide synthase in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis, resulting in an elevation of free sphingoid bases and depletion of downstream glycosphingolipids. Increased sphingoid base metabolites (i.e., sphinganine-1-phosphate) may perturb signaling cascades involved in embryonic morphogenesis by functioning as ligands for sphingosine-1-P (S1P) receptors, a family of G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate key biological processes such as cell survival/proliferation, differentiation and migration. Fumonisin-induced depletion of glycosphingolipids impairs expression and function of the GPI-anchored folate receptor (Folr1), which may also contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. NTDs appear to be multifactorial in origin, involving complex gene-nutrient-environment interactions. Vitamin supplements containing folic acid have been shown to reduce the occurrence of NTDs, and may help protect the developing fetus from environmental teratogens. Fumonisins appear to be an environmental risk factor for birth defects, although other aspects of maternal nutrition and genetics play interactive roles in determining pregnancy outcome. Minimizing exposures to mycotoxins through enhanced agricultural practices, identifying biomarkers of exposure, characterizing mechanisms of toxicity, and improving maternal nutrition are all important strategies for reducing the NTD burden in susceptible human populations.

  1. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs.

  2. Maternal exposure to arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury and neural tube defects in offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Brender, Jean D. . E-mail: jdbrender@aol.com; Suarez, Lucina; Felkner, Marilyn; Gilani, Zunera; Stinchcomb, David; Moody, Karen; Henry, Judy; Hendricks, Katherine

    2006-05-15

    Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury are neurotoxins, and some studies suggest that these elements might also be teratogens. Using a case-control study design, we investigated the relation between exposure to these heavy metals and neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring of Mexican-American women living in 1 of the 14 Texas counties bordering Mexico. A total of 184 case-women with NTD-affected pregnancies and 225 control-women with normal live births were interviewed about their environmental and occupational exposures during the periconceptional period. Biologic samples for blood lead and urinary arsenic, cadmium, and mercury were also obtained for a subset of these women. Overall, the median levels of these biomarkers for heavy metal exposure did not differ significantly (P>0.05) between case- and control-women. However, among women in the highest income group, case-women were nine times more likely (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-57) than control-women to have a urinary mercury >=5.62{mu}g/L. Case-women were 4.2 times more likely (95% CI 1.1-16) to report burning treated wood during the periconceptional period than control-women. Elevated odds ratios (ORs) were observed for maternal and paternal occupational exposures to arsenic and mercury, but the 95% CIs were consistent with unity. The 95% CIs of the ORs were also consistent with unity for higher levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in drinking water and among women who lived within 2 miles at the time of conception to industrial facilities with reported emissions of any of these heavy metals. Our findings suggest that maternal exposures to arsenic, cadmium, or lead are probably not significant risk factors for NTDs in offspring. However, the elevated urinary mercury levels found in this population and exposures to the combustion of treated wood may warrant further investigation.

  3. Midline craniofacial malformations with a lipomatous cephalocele are associated with insufficient closure of the neural tube in the tuft mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Keith S. K.; Adachi, Dana A. T.; Chang, Shaun B.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations to the face and brain, posing a significant impact on health care costs and the quality of life. We have established a mouse line from a mutation that arose spontaneously in our wildtype colony that we called tuft. Tuft mice have heritable midline craniofacial defects featuring an anterior lipomatous cephalocele. Whole mount skeletal stains indicated that affected newborns had a broader interfrontal suture where the cephalocele emerged between the frontal bones. Mice with a cephalocele positioned near the rostrum also presented craniofacial malformations such as ocular hypertelorism and midfacial cleft of the nose. Gross and histological examination revealed that the lipomatous cephalocele originated as a fluid filled cyst no earlier than E14.5 while embryos with a midfacial cleft was evident during craniofacial development at E11.5. Histological sections of embryos with a midfacial cleft revealed the cephalic neuroectoderm remained proximal or fused to the frontonasal ectoderm about the closure site of the anterior neuropore, indicating a defect to neural tube closure. We found the neural folds along the rostrum of E9-10.5 embryos curled inward and failed to close as well as embryos with exencephaly and anencephaly at later stages. Whole mount in situ hybridization of anterior markers Fgf8 and Shh indicated closure of the rostral site was compromised in severe cases. We present a model demonstrating how anterior cranial cephaloceles are generated following a defect to neural tube closure and relevance to subsequent craniofacial morphogenesis in the tuft mouse. PMID:24931720

  4. Lamin B1 Polymorphism Influences Morphology of the Nuclear Envelope, Cell Cycle Progression, and Risk of Neural Tube Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Castro, Sandra C. P.; Malhas, Ashraf; Leung, Kit-Yi; Gustavsson, Peter; Vaux, David J.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are common birth defects whose complex multigenic causation has hampered efforts to delineate their molecular basis. The effect of putative modifier genes in determining NTD susceptibility may be investigated in mouse models, particularly those that display partial penetrance such as curly tail, a strain in which NTDs result from a hypomorphic allele of the grainyhead-like-3 gene. Through proteomic analysis, we found that the curly tail genetic background harbours a polymorphic variant of lamin B1, lacking one of a series of nine glutamic acid residues. Lamins are intermediate filament proteins of the nuclear lamina with multiple functions that influence nuclear structure, cell cycle properties, and transcriptional regulation. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching showed that the variant lamin B1 exhibited reduced stability in the nuclear lamina. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the variant also affects neural tube closure: the frequency of spina bifida and anencephaly was reduced three-fold when wild-type lamin B1 was bred into the curly tail strain background. Cultured fibroblasts expressing variant lamin B1 show significantly increased nuclear dysmorphology and diminished proliferative capacity, as well as premature senescence, associated with reduced expression of cyclins and Smc2, and increased expression of p16. The cellular basis of spinal NTDs in curly tail embryos involves a proliferation defect localised to the hindgut epithelium, and S-phase progression was diminished in the hindgut of embryos expressing variant lamin B1. These observations indicate a mechanistic link between altered lamin B1 function, exacerbation of the Grhl3-mediated cell proliferation defect, and enhanced susceptibility to NTDs. We conclude that lamin B1 is a modifier gene of major effect for NTDs resulting from loss of Grhl3 function, a role that is likely mediated via the key function of lamin B1 in maintaining

  5. Epidémiologie et facteurs de risque des anomalies de fermeture du tube neural: données marocaines

    PubMed Central

    Radouani, Mohammed Amine; Chahid, Naima; Benmiloud, Loubna; Elammari, Laila; Lahlou, Khalid; Barkat, Amina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Les anomalies de fermeture du tube neural sont des défauts congénitaux de la formation du système nerveux central. L'incidence varie entre 3 et 40 cas pour 10000 dans le monde. Il existe des facteurs de risque de survenue de cette affection. La prévention reste un élément important dans la prise en charge. L'objectif de ceete étude est d’étudier les paramètres sociodémographiques, maternels, obstétricaux et néonatals des anomalies de fermeture du tube neural et analyser les facteurs de risque responsables dans notre contexte. Méthodes Etude prospective cas-témoin sur 4 ans. Ont été recrutés tous les cas portant une malformation du tube neural isolée ou associée à d'autres malformations. Les données maternelles, obstétricales et néonatales ont été enregistrées. L'analyse statistique était réalisée par le biais d'un logiciel de statistiques SPSS version 17.0 pour Windows. Résultats Soixante huit cas ont été inclus. Quatre-vingts cinq pour cent des malformations étaient isolées. L'anencéphalie était l'anomalie la plus retrouvée (67%). L’âge maternel moyen était 31,03±7,50 ans. La consanguinité parentale était notée dans 9 cas. Un niveau socio-économique bas et un non suivi des grossesses ont été rapportés dans 29% des cas. L’étude a retrouvé des antécédents de mort-nés et de morts néonatales dans 4% des cas. La consommation de Fenugrec était significativement associée aux malformations du tube neural et a été retrouvée dans 8 cas contre 1 cas dans le groupe sain. La voie haute d'accouchement était utilisée dans 29% des cas. L’âge gestationnel moyen était de 35,55±4,16 semaines d'aménorrhée. Il n'y avait pas de prédominance de sexe. On avait noté une relation significative entre les malformations du tube neural et l'avènement d'une asphyxie périnatale, 15 cas présentaient un apgar à 0 à la première minute et 12 cas un apgar inférieur à 7 à la cinquième minute. Conclusion

  6. DNA methylation analysis of Homeobox genes implicates HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Rochtus, Anne; Izzi, Benedetta; Vangeel, Elise; Louwette, Sophie; Wittevrongel, Christine; Lambrechts, Diether; Moreau, Yves; Winand, Raf; Verpoorten, Carla; Jansen, Katrien; Van Geet, Chris; Freson, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects of complex etiology. Though family- and population-based studies have confirmed a genetic component, the responsible genes for NTDs are still largely unknown. Based on the hypothesis that folic acid prevents NTDs by stimulating methylation reactions, epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, are predicted to be involved in NTDs. Homeobox (HOX) genes play a role in spinal cord development and are tightly regulated in a spatiotemporal and collinear manner, partly by epigenetic modifications. We have quantified DNA methylation for the different HOX genes by subtracting values from a genome-wide methylation analysis using leukocyte DNA from 10 myelomeningocele (MMC) patients and 6 healthy controls. From the 1575 CpGs profiled for the 4 HOX clusters, 26 CpGs were differentially methylated (P-value < 0.05; β-difference > 0.05) between MMC patients and controls. Seventy-seven percent of these CpGs were located in the HOXA and HOXB clusters, with the most profound difference for 3 CpGs within the HOXB7 gene body. A validation case-control study including 83 MMC patients and 30 unrelated healthy controls confirmed a significant association between MMC and HOXB7 hypomethylation (-14.4%; 95% CI: 11.9-16.9%; P-value < 0.0001) independent of the MTHFR 667C>T genotype. Significant HOXB7 hypomethylation was also present in 12 unaffected siblings, each related to a MMC patient, suggestive of an epigenetic change induced by the mother. The inclusion of a neural tube formation model using zebrafish showed that Hoxb7a overexpression but not depletion resulted in deformed body axes with dysmorphic neural tube formation. Our results implicate HOXB7 hypomethylation as risk factor for NTDs and highlight the importance for future genome-wide DNA methylation analyses without preselecting candidate pathways.

  7. Long term trends in prevalence of neural tube defects in Europe: population based study

    PubMed Central

    Loane, Maria; de Walle, Hermien; Arriola, Larraitz; Addor, Marie-Claude; Barisic, Ingeborg; Beres, Judit; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Haeusler, Martin; Klungsoyr, Kari; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Bob; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J; O’Mahony, Mary T; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Ritvanen, Annukka; Rounding, Catherine; Sipek, Antonin; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Study question What are the long term trends in the total (live births, fetal deaths, and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly) and live birth prevalence of neural tube defects (NTD) in Europe, where many countries have issued recommendations for folic acid supplementation but a policy for mandatory folic acid fortification of food does not exist? Methods This was a population based, observational study using data on 11 353 cases of NTD not associated with chromosomal anomalies, including 4162 cases of anencephaly and 5776 cases of spina bifida from 28 EUROCAT (European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies) registries covering approximately 12.5 million births in 19 countries between 1991 and 2011. The main outcome measures were total and live birth prevalence of NTD, as well as anencephaly and spina bifida, with time trends analysed using random effects Poisson regression models to account for heterogeneities across registries and splines to model non-linear time trends. Summary answer and limitations Overall, the pooled total prevalence of NTD during the study period was 9.1 per 10 000 births. Prevalence of NTD fluctuated slightly but without an obvious downward trend, with the final estimate of the pooled total prevalence of NTD in 2011 similar to that in 1991. Estimates from Poisson models that took registry heterogeneities into account showed an annual increase of 4% (prevalence ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.07) in 1995-99 and a decrease of 3% per year in 1999-2003 (0.97, 0.95 to 0.99), with stable rates thereafter. The trend patterns for anencephaly and spina bifida were similar, but neither anomaly decreased substantially over time. The live birth prevalence of NTD generally decreased, especially for anencephaly. Registration problems or other data artefacts cannot be excluded as a partial explanation of the observed trends (or lack thereof) in the prevalence of NTD. What this study adds In the absence of mandatory fortification

  8. The study of neural tube defects after the Human Genome Project and folic acid fortification of foods.

    PubMed

    Graf, W D; Oleinik, O E

    2000-12-01

    The implementation of folic acid fortification will eliminate a proportion of neural tube defects (NTD). As a result, the etiologic and clinical profiles of the developmental disorder may both change. In the assessment of NTD as it evolves, the bioinformatics structure and content of the Human Genome Project will find vital application. One important development will be an enhanced understanding of the role of folic acid in global regulation of gene expression through epigenetic processes. In addition, bioinformatics will facilitate coordination of research in the basic sciences with clinical investigations to better define remaining etiologic factors.

  9. Dual Labeling of Neural Crest Cells and Blood Vessels Within Chicken Embryos Using ChickGFP Neural Tube Grafting and Carbocyanine Dye DiI Injection

    PubMed Central

    Delalande, Jean-Marie; Thapar, Nikhil; Burns, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    All developing organs need to be connected to both the nervous system (for sensory and motor control) as well as the vascular system (for gas exchange, fluid and nutrient supply). Consequently both the nervous and vascular systems develop alongside each other and share striking similarities in their branching architecture. Here we report embryonic manipulations that allow us to study the simultaneous development of neural crest-derived nervous tissue (in this case the enteric nervous system), and the vascular system. This is achieved by generating chicken chimeras via transplantation of discrete segments of the neural tube, and associated neural crest, combined with vascular DiI injection in the same embryo. Our method uses transgenic chickGFP embryos for intraspecies grafting, making the transplant technique more powerful than the classical quail-chick interspecies grafting protocol used with great effect since the 1970s. ChickGFP-chick intraspecies grafting facilitates imaging of transplanted cells and their projections in intact tissues, and eliminates any potential bias in cell development linked to species differences. This method takes full advantage of the ease of access of the avian embryo (compared with other vertebrate embryos) to study the co-development of the enteric nervous system and the vascular system. PMID:26065540

  10. Dual labeling of neural crest cells and blood vessels within chicken embryos using Chick(GFP) neural tube grafting and carbocyanine dye DiI injection.

    PubMed

    Delalande, Jean-Marie; Thapar, Nikhil; Burns, Alan J

    2015-05-28

    All developing organs need to be connected to both the nervous system (for sensory and motor control) as well as the vascular system (for gas exchange, fluid and nutrient supply). Consequently both the nervous and vascular systems develop alongside each other and share striking similarities in their branching architecture. Here we report embryonic manipulations that allow us to study the simultaneous development of neural crest-derived nervous tissue (in this case the enteric nervous system), and the vascular system. This is achieved by generating chicken chimeras via transplantation of discrete segments of the neural tube, and associated neural crest, combined with vascular DiI injection in the same embryo. Our method uses transgenic chick(GFP) embryos for intraspecies grafting, making the transplant technique more powerful than the classical quail-chick interspecies grafting protocol used with great effect since the 1970s. Chick(GFP)-chick intraspecies grafting facilitates imaging of transplanted cells and their projections in intact tissues, and eliminates any potential bias in cell development linked to species differences. This method takes full advantage of the ease of access of the avian embryo (compared with other vertebrate embryos) to study the co-development of the enteric nervous system and the vascular system.

  11. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915measuredsamples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rateand heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  12. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08.

  13. Artificial Neural Networks-Based Software for Measuring Heat Collection Rate and Heat Loss Coefficient of Water-in-Glass Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heaters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijian; Liu, Kejun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Xinyu; Jin, Guangya; Cheng, Kewei

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient are crucial for the evaluation of in service water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. However, conventional measurement requires expensive detection devices and undergoes a series of complicated procedures. To simplify the measurement and reduce the cost, software based on artificial neural networks for measuring heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters was developed. Using multilayer feed-forward neural networks with back-propagation algorithm, we developed and tested our program on the basis of 915 measured samples of water-in-glass evacuated tube solar water heaters. This artificial neural networks-based software program automatically obtained accurate heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient using simply "portable test instruments" acquired parameters, including tube length, number of tubes, tube center distance, heat water mass in tank, collector area, angle between tubes and ground and final temperature. Our results show that this software (on both personal computer and Android platforms) is efficient and convenient to predict the heat collection rate and heat loss coefficient due to it slow root mean square errors in prediction. The software now can be downloaded from http://t.cn/RLPKF08. PMID:26624613

  14. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Neural Tube Defects and Detection of Geographical Factors in Shanxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Wang, Jinfeng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Ningxu; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background Neural tube defects (NTDs) are congenital birth defects that occur in the central nervous system, and they have the highest incidence among all birth defects. Shanxi Province in China has the world’s highest rate of NTDs. Since the 1990s, China’s government has worked on many birth defect prevention programs to reduce the occurrence of NTDs, such as pregnancy planning, health education, genetic counseling, antenatal ultrasonography and serological screening. However, the rate of NTDs in Shanxi Province is still higher than the world’s average morbidity rate after intervention. In addition, Shanxi Province has abundant coal reserves, and is the largest coal production province in China. The objectives of this study are to determine the temporal and spatial variation of the NTD rate in rural areas of Shanxi Province, China, and identify geographical environmental factors that were associated with NTDs in the risk area. Methods In this study, Heshun County and Yuanping County in Shanxi Province, which have high incidence of NTDs, were selected as the study areas. Two paired sample T test was used to analyze the changes in the risk of NTDs from the time dimension. Ripley’s k function and spatial filtering were combined with geographic information system (GIS) software to study the changes in the risk of NTDs from the spatial dimension. In addition, geographical detectors were used to identify the risk geographical environmental factors of NTDs in the study areas, especially the areas close to the coal sites and main roads. Results In both Heshun County and Yuanping County, the incidence of NTDs was significantly (P<0.05) reduced after intervention. The results from spatial analysis showed that significant spatial heterogeneity existed in both counties. NTD clusters were still identified in areas close to coal sites and main roads after interventions. This study also revealed that the elevation, fault and soil types always had a larger influence on

  15. Folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects: awareness among laywomen and healthcare providers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Atsuo; Yamamoto, Shin-ichi; Inoue, Hiromi; Watanabe, Junichiro; Tada, Katsuhiko; Yoshimoto, Nobuko

    2009-09-01

    It is known that neural tube defects are folic acid preventable congenital anomalies. We investigated to what extent this information was disseminated among laywomen and healthcare providers. Questionnaire studies were conducted twice, in 2002 and 2007, for four groups of laywomen and seven groups of healthcare providers in Japan regarding awareness, folic acid supplements and healthy diets. Awareness among laywomen was less than 20%, except for families who had experience with spina bifida in 2002, and 5 years later only pregnant women showed a significant increase in awareness. Awareness among healthcare providers varied from 12 to 76%, depending on their profession, and this proportion increased in five of the seven groups in 2007. The majority of laywomen obtained their information from mass media, while the majority of healthcare providers received information through media for professionals. Laywomen who used folate supplements and healthcare providers who recommended them were initially fewer than 25 and 37%, respectively. Five years later, however, pregnant women who used folic acid supplements increased from 9.1 to 43.1%. As awareness among non-pregnant laywomen and some healthcare providers is considerably low, information should be presented repeatedly to these groups. The difficulty in getting women to consume folic acid supplements is an argument for the government to require folic acid fortification of grains so that the prevention of neural tube defects can be maximized.

  16. Consideration of betaine and one-carbon sources of N5-methyltetrahydrofolate for use in homocystinuria and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Benevenga, Norlin J

    2007-04-01

    A major focus in attempts to ameliorate homocystinuria and neural tube defects is supplementation of the diet with B vitamins. The metabolic defect in these cases may be due in part to a deficiency of methyl groups. B vitamin supplementation supports the need for enzyme cofactors but cannot provide substrate in the form of methyl groups. l-Methionine is an essential amino acid and is required for protein synthesis, but it also plays a unique role in metabolism as S-adenosylmethionine, which is the primary methyl donor in metabolism. The observation that l-homocysteine, which is produced in the metabolism of l-methionine, is remethylated 2-4 times before it is destroyed is key to understanding the possibility of a methyl group deficiency. This suggests that the requirement for methyl groups (ie, S-adenosylmethionine) may be 2-4 times that for methionine in support of protein synthesis. l-Homocysteine can be remethylated to form l-methionine by betaine or N(5)-methyltetrahydrofolate. Betaine and one-carbon sources that lead to the production of N(5)-methyltetrahydrofolate and the remethylation of l-homocysteine to form l-methionine should be considered along with B vitamin supplementation in the treatment of homocystinuria and neural tube defects.

  17. Fortification of the food supply with folic acid to prevent neural tube defects is not yet warranted.

    PubMed

    Gaull, G E; Testa, C A; Thomas, P R; Weinreich, D A

    1996-03-01

    The relationship between adequate folate intake by pregnant women and reduced risk of delivering infants with neural tube defects (NTDs) has raised the public health issue of increasing folate intake among women of reproductive age. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has proposed fortifying cereal and grain products with folate, although at a level less than half that recommended by its sister agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We question the wisdom of fortifying foods with folate at this time, given a variety of uncertainties, which include the following: 1) the fact that neural tube defects seem to be a multifactorial group of disorders that are polygenic as well, so folate will not help in all or perhaps even in most cases; 2) the incidence of NTDs, which varies geographically, has been decreasing in the United States for years; 3) fortifying more food with folate may pose safety concerns for some not as risk for NTDs; 4) no dose-response relationship has been established between folate and NTDs; and 5) fortification in this case would represent a conceptually new intervention strategy for addressing what may be a metabolic abnormality where pharmacological doses of a nutrient may be required. Launching a major nutritional intervention before better understanding the relationship between nutrients and NTDs and without reasonable assurance that it will not shift health risks from one group (developing embryos) to another (primarily adults with pernicious anemia) might prove ineffective and/or harmful.

  18. Updated estimates of neural tube defects prevented by mandatory folic Acid fortification - United States, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer; Mai, Cara T; Mulinare, Joe; Isenburg, Jennifer; Flood, Timothy J; Ethen, Mary; Frohnert, Barbara; Kirby, Russell S

    2015-01-16

    In 1992, the U.S. Public Health Service recommended that all women capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 µg of folic acid daily to prevent neural tube defects (NTDs). NTDs are major birth defects of the brain and spine that occur early in pregnancy as a result of improper closure of the embryonic neural tube, which can lead to death or varying degrees of disability. The two most common NTDs are anencephaly and spina bifida. Beginning in 1998, the United States mandated fortification of enriched cereal grain products with 140 µg of folic acid per 100 g. Immediately after mandatory fortification, the birth prevalence of NTD cases declined. Fortification was estimated to avert approximately 1,000 NTD-affected pregnancies annually. To provide updated estimates of the birth prevalence of NTDs in the period after introduction of mandatory folic acid fortification (i.e., the post-fortification period), data from 19 population-based birth defects surveillance programs in the United States, covering the years 1999-2011, were examined. After the initial decrease, NTD birth prevalence during the post-fortification period has remained relatively stable. The number of births occurring annually without NTDs that would otherwise have been affected is approximately 1,326 (95% confidence interval = 1,122-1,531). Mandatory folic acid fortification remains an effective public health intervention. There remain opportunities for prevention among women with lower folic acid intakes, especially among Hispanic women, to further reduce the prevalence of NTDs in the United States. PMID:25590678

  19. The role of ultrasonography and amniocentesis in the evaluation of pregnancies at risk for neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Hogge, W A; Thiagarajah, S; Ferguson, J E; Schnatterly, P T; Harbert, G M

    1989-09-01

    To assess the relative efficacy of amniocentesis versus targeted (detailed) ultrasonography, 225 patients referred because of an elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein level (79.6%) or a family history of neural tube defect (20.4%) were evaluated. Ultrasonographic examination alone detected all 26 fetal abnormalities (11 cases of anencephaly, 10 cases of open spina bifida, and five other anomalies). Twenty-eight patients declined amniocentesis; all had normal pregnancy outcomes. Of the 167 patients with apparently normal fetal anatomy by sonography, seven had elevated alpha-fetoprotein levels but no acetylcholinesterase in the amniotic fluid. Six of these pregnancies resulted in normal infants; one infant had congenital nephrosis. The remaining 160 patients had normal sonograms with normal amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein levels and no fetal malformations at delivery. Although these results suggest that targeted ultrasonography by experienced personnel is a reasonable alternative to amniocentesis in evaluations for neural tube defects, the availability, cost-effectiveness, and diagnostic accuracy of this approach must be well documented in large prospective studies.

  20. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Bauters, Marijke; Frints, Suzanna G; Van Esch, Hilde; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Baldewijns, Marcella M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2014-08-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from 138.7 to 139.8 Mb, harboring only two annotated genes, SOX3 and ATP11C, and was shown to be a direct tandem copy number gain. Unexpectedly, the microduplication did not fully segregate with the disease in this family suggesting that SOX3 duplications have variable penetrance for X-linked hypopituitarism. In the same family, a female fetus presenting with a neural tube defect was also shown to carry the SOX3 copy number gain. Since we also demonstrated increased SOX3 mRNA levels in amnion cells derived from an unrelated t(X;22)(q27;q11) female fetus with spina bifida, we propose that increased levels of SOX3 could be a risk factor for neural tube defects.

  1. Distinct Sonic Hedgehog signaling dynamics specify floor plate and ventral neuronal progenitors in the vertebrate neural tube.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Vanessa; Balaskas, Nikolaos; Sasai, Noriaki; Cruz, Catarina; Dessaud, Eric; Cayuso, Jordi; Tozer, Samuel; Yang, Lin Lin; Novitch, Ben; Marti, Elisa; Briscoe, James

    2010-06-01

    The secreted ligand Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) organizes the pattern of cellular differentiation in the ventral neural tube. For the five neuronal subtypes, increasing levels and durations of Shh signaling direct progenitors to progressively more ventral identities. Here we demonstrate that this mode of action is not applicable to the generation of the most ventral cell type, the nonneuronal floor plate (FP). In chick and mouse embryos, FP specification involves a biphasic response to Shh signaling that controls the dynamic expression of key transcription factors. During gastrulation and early somitogenesis, FP induction depends on high levels of Shh signaling. Subsequently, however, prospective FP cells become refractory to Shh signaling, and this is a prerequisite for the elaboration of their identity. This prompts a revision to the model of graded Shh signaling in the neural tube, and provides insight into how the dynamics of morphogen signaling are deployed to extend the patterning capacity of a single ligand. In addition, we provide evidence supporting a common scheme for FP specification by Shh signaling that reconciles mechanisms of FP development in teleosts and amniotes.

  2. Sept6 is required for ciliogenesis in Kupffer's vesicle, the pronephros, and the neural tube during early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Gang; Gu, Qilin; He, Jiangyan; Lou, Qiyong; Chen, Xiaowen; Jin, Xia; Bi, Erfei; Yin, Zhan

    2014-04-01

    Septins are conserved filament-forming GTP-binding proteins that act as cellular scaffolds or diffusion barriers in a number of cellular processes. However, the role of septins in vertebrate development remains relatively obscure. Here, we show that zebrafish septin 6 (sept6) is first expressed in the notochord and then in nearly all of the ciliary organs, including Kupffer's vesicle (KV), the pronephros, eye, olfactory bulb, and neural tube. Knockdown of sept6 in zebrafish embryos results in reduced numbers and length of cilia in KV. Consequently, cilium-related functions, such as the left-right patterning of internal organs and nodal/spaw signaling, are compromised. Knockdown of sept6 also results in aberrant cilium formation in the pronephros and neural tube, leading to cilium-related defects in pronephros development and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. We further demonstrate that SEPT6 associates with acetylated α-tubulin in vivo and localizes along the axoneme in the cilia of zebrafish pronephric duct cells as well as cultured ZF4 cells. Our study reveals a novel role of sept6 in ciliogenesis during early embryonic development in zebrafish.

  3. Deciphering axonal pathways of genetically defined groups of neurons in the chick neural tube utilizing in ovo electroporation.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Oshri; Zisman, Sophie; Hadas, Yoav; Vald, Lilach; Klar, Avihu

    2010-05-02

    Employment of enhancer elements to drive expression of reporter genes in neurons is a widely used paradigm for tracking axonal projection. For tracking axonal projection of spinal interneurons in vertebrates, germ line-targeted reporter genes yield bilaterally symmetric labeling. Therefore, it is hard to distinguish between the ipsi- and contra-laterally projecting axons. Unilateral electroporation into the chick neural tube provides a useful means to restrict expression of a reporter gene to one side of the central nervous system, and to follow axonal projection on both sides. This video demonstrates first how to handle the eggs prior to injection. At HH stage 18-20, DNA is injected into the sacral level of the neural tube, then tungsten electrodes are placed parallel to the embryo and short electrical pulses are administered with a pulse generator. The egg is sealed with tape and placed back into an incubator for further development. Three days later (E6) the spinal cord is removed as an open book preparation from embryo, fixed, and processed for whole mount antibody staining. The stained spinal cord is mounted on slide and visualized using confocal microscopy.

  4. [A correlation study on homocysteine metabolism in pregnant women and neural tube defects in urban and rural areas].

    PubMed

    Zhan, S; Hu, Y; Li, L

    1997-07-01

    Serum levels of homocysteine, folic acid and vitamin B12 in pregnant women in urban and rural areas were compared to study the relationship between homocysteine metabolism and neural tube defects. Four hundred and eleven serum specimens were sampled randomly from a serum bank for women with early pregnancy in Beijing area, 195 from urban and 216 from rural. Their levels of homocysteine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography combined with electrochemical methods, and those of folic acid and vitamin B12 by radioimmunoassay. Results showed that level of homocysteine was significantly higher in rural pregnant women than that in urban, with 9.31 mumol/L and 5.73 mumol/L, respectively, level of vitamin B12 was lower in rural than that in urban women, with 210.09 pmol/L and 233.35 pmol/L, respectively, and level of folic acid was higher in rural than that in urban women, but no significant difference in deficiency of folic acid between rural and urban was found. The average ratio of folic acid to homocysteine and that of vitamin B12 to homocysteine were higher in rural than those in urban women. It suggests that abnormal metabolism of homocysteine usually correlates with high incidence of neural tube defects in rural area. PMID:9812582

  5. Analysis of MTR and MTRR Polymorphisms for Neural Tube Defects Risk Association

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongxin; Liu, Yuan; Ji, Wenyu; Qin, Hu; Wu, Hao; Xu, Danshu; Tukebai, Turtuohut; Wang, Zengliang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the most common congenital defects of the central nervous system among neonates and the folate status during pregnancy was considered as the most important etiopathogenesis of NTDs. Besides, methionine synthase (MTR) gene and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) gene were folate metabolism involved genes and had been investigated in several previous studies with inconsistent results. Hence, we aimed to explore the association of 4 selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on MTRR/MTR gene and the susceptibility of NTDs in a Chinese population. Seven SNPs were selected from HapMap databases with Haploview 4.2 software. A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to genotype the polymorphisms from blood samples of 165 NTDs patients and 280 healthy controls. The correlation between these SNPs and NTDs risk was tested by Student t test and Chi-square test by STATA 11.0 software. Furthermore, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant studies to investigate the association between the SNPs MTRR 66A>G and MTR 2756A>G and the susceptibility of NTDs. An increased risk of NTDs was verified to be significantly associated with MTRR 66A>G (G allele vs. A allele: OR = 1.36 (1.03–1.80), P = 0.028; GG + AG vs. AA: OR = 1.60 (1.05–2.43), P = 0.027) and MTR 2756A>G (G allele vs. A allele: OR = 1.45 (1.06–1.98), P = 0.021; GG + AG vs. AA: OR = 1.51 (1.02–2.23), P = 0.038) in our study. However, the other SNPs in our analysis showed no significant association with NTDs risk (all P > 0.05). Furthermore, the result of the meta-analysis supported the association between MTRR 66A>G and NTDs risk (G allele vs. A allele: OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.09–1.61, GG + GA vs. AA: OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.06–2.09, GG vs. AA: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.04–2.49). Our study confirmed that the MTRR 66A>G and MTR 2756A>G were significantly

  6. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Fong, Keith S K; Hufnagel, Robert B; Khadka, Vedbar S; Corley, Michael J; Maunakea, Alika K; Fogelgren, Ben; Ahmed, Zubair M; Lozanoff, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct) cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse. PMID:26989192

  7. A mutation in the tuft mouse disrupts TET1 activity and alters the expression of genes that are crucial for neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Vedbar S.; Corley, Michael J.; Maunakea, Alika K.; Fogelgren, Ben; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic variations affecting neural tube closure along the head result in malformations of the face and brain. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the most common birth defects in humans. We previously reported a mouse mutant called tuft that arose spontaneously in our wild-type 3H1 colony. Adult tuft mice present midline craniofacial malformations with or without an anterior cephalocele. In addition, affected embryos presented neural tube closure defects resulting in insufficient closure of the anterior neuropore or exencephaly. Here, through whole-genome sequencing, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Tet1 gene, which encodes a methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET1), co-segregating with the tuft phenotype. This mutation resulted in premature termination that disrupts the catalytic domain that is involved in the demethylation of cytosine. We detected a significant loss of TET enzyme activity in the heads of tuft embryos that were homozygous for the mutation and had NTDs. RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis indicated that multiple gene pathways associated with neural tube closure were dysregulated in tuft embryo heads. Among them, the expressions of Cecr2, Epha7 and Grhl2 were significantly reduced in some embryos presenting neural tube closure defects, whereas one or more components of the non-canonical WNT signaling pathway mediating planar cell polarity and convergent extension were affected in others. We further show that the recombinant mutant TET1 protein was capable of entering the nucleus and affected the expression of endogenous Grhl2 in IMCD-3 (inner medullary collecting duct) cells. These results indicate that TET1 is an epigenetic determinant for regulating genes that are crucial to closure of the anterior neural tube and its mutation has implications to craniofacial development, as presented by the tuft mouse. PMID:26989192

  8. Prevention of neural tube defects by the fortification of flour with folic acid: a population-based retrospective study in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lecca, Roberto Carlos Reyes; Cortez-Escalante, Juan Jose; Sanchez, Mauro Niskier; Rodrigues, Humberto Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if the fortification of wheat and maize flours with iron and folic acid – which became mandatory in Brazil from June 2004 – is effective in the prevention of neural tube defects. Methods Using data from national information systems on births in central, south-eastern and southern Brazil, we determined the prevalence of neural tube defects among live births and stillbirths in a pre-fortification period – i.e. 2001–2004 – and in a post-fortification period – i.e. 2005–2014. We distinguished between anencephaly, encephalocele, meningocele, myelomeningocele and other forms of spina bifida. Findings There were 8554 neural tube defects for 17 925 729 live births notified between 2001 and 2014. For the same period, 2673 neural tube defects were reported for 194 858 stillbirths. The overall prevalence of neural tube defects fell from 0.79 per 1000 pre-fortification to 0.55 per 1000 post-fortification (prevalence ratio, PR: 1.43; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.38–1.50). For stillbirths, prevalence fell from 17.74 per 1000 stillbirths pre-fortification to 11.70 per 1000 stillbirths post-fortification. The corresponding values among live births were 0.57 and 0.44, respectively. Conclusion The introduction of the mandatory fortification of flour with iron and folic acid in Brazil was followed by a significant reduction in the prevalence of neural tube defects in our study area. PMID:26769993

  9. Analyses of copy number variation reveal putative susceptibility loci in MTX-induced mouse neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Tao; Xiang, Qian; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Zhi; Guan, Zhen; Wang, Guoliang; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Xie, Qiu; Li, Guannan; Guo, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Zhengguo; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Ting

    2014-09-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are thought to act as an important genetic mechanism underlying phenotypic heterogeneity. Impaired folate metabolism can result in neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the precise nature of the relationship between low folate status and NTDs remains unclear. Using an array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assay, we investigated whether CNVs could be detected in the NTD embryonic neural tissues of methotrexate (MTX)-induced folate dysmetabolism pregnant C57BL/6 mice and confirmed the findings with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The CNVs were then comprehensively investigated using bioinformatics methods to prioritize candidate genes. We measured dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) activity and concentrations of folate and relevant metabolites in maternal serum using enzymologic method and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Three high confidence CNVs on XqA1.1, XqA1.1-qA2, and XqE3 were found in the NTD embryonic neural tissues. Twelve putative genes and three microRNAs were identified as potential susceptibility candidates in MTX-induced NTDs and possible roles in NTD pathogenesis. DHFR activity and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF), 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-FoTHF), and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) concentrations of maternal serum decreased significantly after MTX injection. These findings suggest that CNVs caused by defects in folate metabolism lead to NTD, and further support the hypothesis that folate dysmetabolism is a direct cause for CNVs in MTX-induced NTDs.

  10. Estimating Neural Background Input with Controlled and Fast Perturbations: A Bandwidth Comparison between Inhibitory Opsins and Neural Circuits.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, David

    2016-01-01

    To test the importance of a certain cell type or brain area it is common to make a "lack of function" experiment in which the neuronal population of interest is inhibited. Here we review physiological and methodological constraints for making controlled perturbations using the corticothalamic circuit as an example. The brain with its many types of cells and rich interconnectivity offers many paths through which a perturbation can spread within a short time. To understand the side effects of the perturbation one should record from those paths. We find that ephaptic effects, gap-junctions, and fast chemical synapses are so fast that they can react to the perturbation during the few milliseconds it takes for an opsin to change the membrane potential. The slow chemical synapses, astrocytes, extracellular ions and vascular signals, will continue to give their physiological input for around 20 ms before they also react to the perturbation. Although we show that some pathways can react within milliseconds the strength/speed reported in this review should be seen as an upper bound since we have omitted how polysynaptic signals are attenuated. Thus the number of additional recordings that has to be made to control for the perturbation side effects is expected to be fewer than proposed here. To summarize, the reviewed literature not only suggests that it is possible to make controlled "lack of function" experiments, but, it also suggests that such a "lack of function" experiment can be used to measure the context of local neural computations. PMID:27574506

  11. Self-organized criticality in a two-dimensional cellular automaton model of a magnetic flux tube with background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dănilă, B.; Harko, T.; Mocanu, G.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the transition to self-organized criticality in a two-dimensional model of a flux tube with a background flow. The magnetic induction equation, represented by a partial differential equation with a stochastic source term, is discretized and implemented on a two-dimensional cellular automaton. The energy released by the automaton during one relaxation event is the magnetic energy. As a result of the simulations, we obtain the time evolution of the energy release, of the system control parameter, of the event lifetime distribution and of the event size distribution, respectively, and we establish that a self-organized critical state is indeed reached by the system. Moreover, energetic initial impulses in the magnetohydrodynamic flow can lead to one-dimensional signatures in the magnetic two-dimensional system, once the self-organized critical regime is established. The applications of the model for the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is briefly considered, and it is shown that some astrophysical parameters of the bursts, like the light curves, the maximum released energy and the number of peaks in the light curve can be reproduced and explained, at least on a qualitative level, by working in a framework in which the systems settles in a self-organized critical state via magnetic reconnection processes in the magnetized GRB fireball.

  12. Estimating Neural Background Input with Controlled and Fast Perturbations: A Bandwidth Comparison between Inhibitory Opsins and Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, David

    2016-01-01

    To test the importance of a certain cell type or brain area it is common to make a “lack of function” experiment in which the neuronal population of interest is inhibited. Here we review physiological and methodological constraints for making controlled perturbations using the corticothalamic circuit as an example. The brain with its many types of cells and rich interconnectivity offers many paths through which a perturbation can spread within a short time. To understand the side effects of the perturbation one should record from those paths. We find that ephaptic effects, gap-junctions, and fast chemical synapses are so fast that they can react to the perturbation during the few milliseconds it takes for an opsin to change the membrane potential. The slow chemical synapses, astrocytes, extracellular ions and vascular signals, will continue to give their physiological input for around 20 ms before they also react to the perturbation. Although we show that some pathways can react within milliseconds the strength/speed reported in this review should be seen as an upper bound since we have omitted how polysynaptic signals are attenuated. Thus the number of additional recordings that has to be made to control for the perturbation side effects is expected to be fewer than proposed here. To summarize, the reviewed literature not only suggests that it is possible to make controlled “lack of function” experiments, but, it also suggests that such a “lack of function” experiment can be used to measure the context of local neural computations. PMID:27574506

  13. Prenatal screening, diagnosis, and pregnancy management of fetal neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R Douglas; Wilson, R Douglas; Audibert, Francois; Brock, Jo-Ann; Campagnolo, Carla; Carroll, June; Cartier, Lola; Chitayat, David; Gagnon, Alain; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; MacDonald, W Kim; Murphy-Kaulbeck, Lynn; Okun, Nanette; Pastuck, Melanie; Popa, Vanessa

    2014-10-01

    Objectif : Fournir, aux professionnels de la santé des domaines de l’obstétrique et de la génétique, des lignes directrices et des recommandations en ce qui a trait au dépistage / diagnostic prénatal et à la prise en charge obstétricale du dysraphisme spinal ouvert / fermé (DSOF) chez le fœtus. Options : La présente analyse englobe les techniques de dépistage / diagnostic prénatal qui sont actuellement utilisées aux fins de la détection du DSOF, y compris le dépistage des concentrations sériques en alphafoetoprotéines chez la mère, l’échographie, l’imagerie par résonance magnétique visant le fœtus et l’amniocentèse. Issues : Améliorer le dépistage / diagnostic prénatal et la prise en charge obstétricale du DSOF, tout en prenant en considération les soins offerts à la patiente, l’efficacité, les coûts et les interventions de soins. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou MEDLINE, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en novembre 2013 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « prenatal screening », « congenital anomalies », « neural tube defects », « alpha-fetoprotein », « ultrasound scan », « magnetic resonance imaging »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles publiés en anglais entre 1977 et 2012. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et ont été intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’au 30 novembre 2013. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d

  14. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  15. ACOG practice bulletin. Neural tube defects. Number 44, July 2003. (Replaces committee opinion number 252, March 2001).

    PubMed

    Cheschier, Nancy

    2003-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are congenital structural abnormalities of the brain and vertebral column that occur either as an isolated malformation, along with other malformations, or as part of a genetic syndrome. Isolated (ie, nonsyndromic) NTDs occur in 1.4-2 per 1,000 pregnancies and are the second most common major congenital anomaly worldwide (cardiac malformations are first). In the United States, approximately 4,000 fetuses are affected each year of which one third are either aborted or spontaneously lost. Anencephaly accounts for one half of all cases of NTDs and is incompatible with life; with treatment, 80-90% of infants with spina bifida survive with varying degrees of disability. Most importantly, NTDs are among the few birth defects for which primary prevention is possible; prenatal screening and diagnosis are widely available, and prenatal therapy is being investigated. PMID:14626221

  16. Elevated Nuclear and Cytoplasmic FTY720-Phosphate in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Suggests the Potential for Multiple Mechanisms in FTY720-Induced Neural Tube Defects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FTY720 (fingolimod) is an FDA-approved drug to treat relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. FTY720 treatment in pregnant inbred LM/Bc mice results in approximately 60% of embryos having a neural tube defect (NTD). Sphingosine kinases (Sphk1, Sphk2) phosphorylate FTY720 in vivo to form the bioactive...

  17. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Raymond, Angela M.; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@biology.queensu.ca

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P < 0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P < 0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  18. Abnormal folate metabolism and genetic polymorphism of the folate pathway in a child with Down syndrome and neural tube defect.

    PubMed

    Al-Gazali, L I; Padmanabhan, R; Melnyk, S; Yi, P; Pogribny, I P; Pogribna, M; Bakir, M; Hamid, Z A; Abdulrazzaq, Y; Dawodu, A; James, S J

    2001-10-01

    The association of neural tube defects (NTDs) with Down syndrome (trisomy 21) and altered folate metabolism in both mother and affected offspring provide a unique opportunity for insight into the etiologic role of folate deficiency in these congenital anomalies. We describe here the case of a male child with trisomy 21, cervical meningomyelocele, agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephaly, cerebellar herniation into the foramen magnum, and shallow posterior cranial fossa. Molecular analysis of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene revealed homozygosity for the mutant 677C-->T polymorphism in both the mother and child. The plasma homocysteine of the mother was highly elevated at 25.0 micromol/L and was associated with a low methionine level of 22.1 micromol/L. Her S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) level was three times that of reference normal women, resulting in a markedly reduced ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to SAH and significant DNA hypomethylation in lymphocytes. The child had low plasma levels of both homocysteine and methionine and a reduced SAM/SAH ratio that was also associated with lymphocyte DNA hypomethylation. In addition, the child had a five-fold increase in cystathionine level relative to normal children, consistent with over-expression of the cystathionine beta synthase gene present on chromosome 21. We suggest that altered folate status plus homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene in the mother could promote chromosomal instability and meiotic non-disjunction resulting in trisomy 21. Altered folate status and homozygous TT mutation in the MTHFR gene in both mother and child would be expected to increase the risk of neural tube defects. The presence of both trisomy 21 and postclosure NTD in the same child supports the need for an extended periconceptional period of maternal folate supplementation to achieve greater preventive effects for both NTD and trisomy 21. PMID:11568918

  19. Insights into prevention of human neural tube defects by folic acid arising from consideration of mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J

    2009-04-01

    Almost 30 years after the initial study by Richard W. Smithells and coworkers, it is still unknown how maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents human neural tube defects (NTDs). In this article, questions about human NTD prevention are considered in relation to three groups of mouse models: NTD mutants that respond to folate, NTD mutants and strains that do not respond to folate, and mutants involving folate-pathway genes. Of the 200 mouse NTD mutants, only a few have been tested with folate; half respond and half do not. Among responsive mutants, folic acid supplementation reduces exencephaly and/or spina bifida aperta frequency in the Sp(2H), Sp, Cd, Cited2, Cart1, and Gcn5 mutants. Prevention ranges from 35 to 85%. The responsive Sp(2H) (Pax3) mutant has abnormal folate metabolism, but the responsive Cited2 mutant does not. Neither folic nor folinic acid reduces NTD frequency in Axd, Grhl3, Fkbp8, Map3k4, or Nog mutants or in the curly tail or SELH/Bc strains. Spina bifida frequency is reduced in Axd by methionine and in curly tail by inositol. Exencephaly frequency is reduced in SELH/Bc by an alternative commercial ration. Mutations in folate-pathway genes do not cause NTDs, except for 30% exencephaly in folate-treated Folr1. Among folate-pathway mutants, neural tube closure is normal in Cbs, Folr2, Mthfd1, Mthfd2, Mthfr, and Shmt1 mutants. Embryos die by midgestation in Folr1, Mtr, Mtrr, and RFC1 mutants. The mouse models point to genetic heterogeneity in the ability to respond to folic acid and also to heterogeneity in genetic cause of NTDs that can be prevented by folic acid.

  20. CBP/p300 and associated transcriptional co-activators exhibit distinct expression patterns during murine craniofacial and neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    BHATTACHERJEE, VASKER; HORN, KRISTIN H.; SINGH, SAURABH; WEBB, CYNTHIA L.; PISANO, M. MICHELE; GREENE, ROBERT M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in each of the transcriptional co-activator genes - CBP, p300, Cited2, Cart1 and Carm1 - result in neural tube defects in mice. The present study thus furnishes a complete and comparative temporal and spatial expression map of CBP/p300 and associated transcriptional co-activators, Cited2, Cart1 and Carm1 during the period of murine neural tube development (embryonic days 8.5 to 10.5). Each co-activator except Cart1 was expressed in the dorsal neural folds on E8.5. Although CBP and p300 are functionally interchangeable in vitro, their respective expression patterns diverge during embryogenesis before neural fold fusion is complete. CBP gene expression was lost from the neural folds by E8.75 and was thereafter weakly expressed in the maxillary region and limb buds, while p300 exhibited strong expression in the first branchial arch, limb bud and telencephalic regions on E9.5. Cart1 exhibited strong expression in the forebrain mesenchyme from E9.0 through E10.5. Although CBP, p300, Carm1 and Cited2 share temporal expression on E8.5, these co-activators have different spatial expression in mesenchyme and/or the neuroepithelium. Nevertheless, co-localization to the dorsal neural folds on E8.5 suggests a functional role in elevation and/or fusion of the neural folds. Target genes, and pathways that promote cranial neural tube fusion that are activated by CBP/p300/Carm1/Cited2/Cart1-containing transcriptional complexes await elucidation. PMID:19598128

  1. Ltap, a mammalian homolog of Drosophila Strabismus/Van Gogh, is altered in the mouse neural tube mutant Loop-tail.

    PubMed

    Kibar, Z; Vogan, K J; Groulx, N; Justice, M J; Underhill, D A; Gros, P

    2001-07-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) such as spina bifida and anencephaly are common congenital malformations in humans (1/1,000 births) that result from failure of the neural tube to close during embryogenesis. The etiology of NTDs is complex, with both genetic and environmental contributions; the genetic component has been extensively studied with mouse models. Loop-tail (Lp) is a semidominant mutation on mouse chromosome 1 (ref. 4). In the two known Lp alleles (Lp, Lpm1Jus), heterozygous mice exhibit a characteristic looped tail, and homozygous embryos show a completely open neural tube in the hindbrain and spinal region, a condition similar to the severe craniorachischisis defect in humans. Morphological and neural patterning studies indicate a role for the Lp gene product in controlling early morphogenesis and patterning of both axial midline structures and the developing neural plate. The 0.6-cM/0.7-megabase (Mb) Lp interval is delineated proximally by D1Mit113/Apoa2/Fcer1g and distally by Fcer1a/D1Mit149/Spna1 and contains a minimum of 17 transcription units. One of these genes, Ltap, encodes a homolog of Drosophila Strabismus/Van Gogh (Stbm/Vang), a component of the frizzled/dishevelled tissue polarity pathway. Ltap is expressed broadly in the neuroectoderm throughout early neurogenesis and is altered in two independent Lp alleles, identifying this gene as a strong candidate for Lp.

  2. Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) induces high occurrence of neural tube defects in embryonic mouse brain during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hongyu; Ma, Teng; Zhao, Xianxian; Zhao, Baixiong; Liu, Yunlai; Li, Hongli

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the direct embryonic teratogenicity of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM), especially the toxic effects on the early development of the nervous system and its underlying mechanisms. Pregnant mice at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) were injected with different doses of VCM (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg) and embryos were harvested at E10.5. Our results showed that doses higher than 400 mg/kg of VCM increased the incidence of malformed embryos, especially the neural tube defects (NTDs). In addition, high-dose of VCM decreased mitotic figure counts in the neuroepithelium and enhanced the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, while they were reduced in S phase. The more VCM was injected into mice, the fewer positive PCNA cells were seen and the more positive TUNEL cells were observed in the neuroepithelium. Moreover, significant increases in the levels of caspase-3 protein were observed in NTD embryos. Our results demonstrate that during early pregnancy, exposure to doses higher than 400 mg/kg of VCM increases the incidence of malformations and particularly the rate of NTDs. High-dose of VCM inhibits the proliferation of neural cells and induces cell apoptosis, leading to an imbalance in the ratio of proliferation and apoptosis. Meanwhile, the apoptosis of neuroepithelial cells might be accelerated by the activation of the caspase-3 pathway, and it might be a reason for NTDs.

  3. 3D reconstitution of the patterned neural tube from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Andrea; Eberle, Dominic; Tazaki, Akira; Ranga, Adrian; Niesche, Marco; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Stec, Agnieszka; Schackert, Gabriele; Lutolf, Matthias; Tanaka, Elly M

    2014-12-01

    Inducing organogenesis in 3D culture is an important aspect of stem cell research. Anterior neural structures have been produced from large embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates, but the steps involved in patterning such complex structures have been ill defined, as embryoid bodies typically contained many cell types. Here we show that single mouse ESCs directly embedded in Matrigel or defined synthetic matrices under neural induction conditions can clonally form neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen in 3D. Untreated cysts were uniformly dorsal and could be ventralized to floor plate (FP). Retinoic acid posteriorized cysts to cervical levels and induced localize FP formation yielding full patterning along the dorsal/ventral (DV) axis. Correct spatial organization of motor neurons, interneurons, and dorsal interneurons along the DV axis was observed. This system serves as a valuable tool for studying morphogen action in 3D and as a source of patterned spinal cord tissue.

  4. Periconceptional vitamin supplementation and neural tube defects; evidence from a case-control study in Western Australia and a review of recent publications.

    PubMed Central

    Bower, C; Stanley, F J

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to assess the association of neural tube defects with periconceptional vitamin supplementation. DESIGN--This was a matched, population based case-control study. SETTING--Western Australia, 1982-1984. PARTICIPANTS--Mothers of 77 cases (93% of those eligible) with isolated neural tube defects, mothers of 77 matched control infants with defects other than neural tube defects (control group I), and mothers of 154 liveborn, matched, control infants with no birth defects (control group II) participated in the study. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Information was collected by interview and self administered questionnaire. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (and their 95% confidence intervals) showed a small but non-significant protective effect of folate supplementation in comparisons with both control groups. The adjusted ratios for the three months before pregnancy were 0.69 (0.06, 8.53) with control group I, and 0.11 (0.01, 1.33) with control group II. In the first six weeks of pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratios were 0.70 (0.32, 1.52) with control group I and 0.74 (0.29, 1.88) with control group II. The odds ratios for vitamin supplementation of any kind were all very close to or greater than one, and all confidence intervals embraced unity. CONCLUSIONS--These data do not provide evidence of an association between periconceptional vitamin supplementation and neural tube defects, although a protective effect of folate supplementation cannot be excluded with confidence, due to the low power of the study. Of three other observational studies of vitamins and neural tube defects, two have shown an association. While further studies of this kind may be of value, evidence must now be sought from randomised controlled trials. PMID:1583432

  5. Detection of foreign matter in transfusion solution based on Gaussian background modeling and an optimized BP neural network.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Su, Zhen; Chai, Xinghua; Chen, Lipeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to detect and identify foreign matter mixed in a plastic bottle filled with transfusion solution. A spin-stop mechanism and mixed illumination style are applied to obtain high contrast images between moving foreign matter and a static transfusion background. The Gaussian mixture model is used to model the complex background of the transfusion image and to extract moving objects. A set of features of moving objects are extracted and selected by the ReliefF algorithm, and optimal feature vectors are fed into the back propagation (BP) neural network to distinguish between foreign matter and bubbles. The mind evolutionary algorithm (MEA) is applied to optimize the connection weights and thresholds of the BP neural network to obtain a higher classification accuracy and faster convergence rate. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect visible foreign matter in 250-mL transfusion bottles. The misdetection rate and false alarm rate are low, and the detection accuracy and detection speed are satisfactory. PMID:25347581

  6. Amelioration of sodium valproate-induced neural tube defects in mouse fetuses by maternal folic acid supplementation during gestation.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, R; Shafiullah, M Mohamed

    2003-03-01

    Infants of epileptic women treated with valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy have a higher risk of developing spina bifida than those of the general population. VPA induces exencephaly in experimental animal embryos. But the pathogenetic mechanism remains rather elusive. Antiepileptic drugs (AED) in general accentuate pregnancy-imposed fall in maternal folate levels. Periconceptional folic acid supplementation is reported to protect embryos from developing neural tube defects (NTD). Conflicting results have been reported by experimental studies that attempted to alleviate VPA-induced NTD by folic acid. Our objectives were to determine the critical developmental stages and an effective dose of folic acid for the prevention of VPA-induced exencephaly in mouse fetuses. A single teratogenic dose of 400 mg/kg of VPA was administered to TO mice on gestation day (GD) 7 or 8. It was followed by (1) a single dose of 12 mg/kg of FA (folinic acid) or (2) 3 doses of FA 4 mg/kg each. In experiment (3), FA (4 mg/kg) was administered thrice daily starting on GD 5 and continued through GD 10. These animals received VPA on GD 7 or 8. VPA and B12 concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. The single heavy dose of FA had no rescue effect on NTD. Three divided doses of FA on GD 7 and continuous dosing of FA from GD 5 through GD 10 substantially reduced the VPA-induced exencephaly in the fetuses. In the later experiments, the neural folds elevated faster than the non-supplemented group. VPA considerably reduced maternal plasma folate and B12 concentrations. The heavy dose of FA only moderately improved vitamin levels. Three divided doses of FA elevated the vitamin levels slightly better but it was the prolonged dosing of FA that was associated with sustained elevation of plasma levels higher than the control levels and acceleration of neural tube closure thus accounting for the pronounced protection against VPA-induced NTD development. These data suggest that plasma levels of

  7. Neural underpinnings of background acoustic noise in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sinanaj, Indrit; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Herrmann, François; Santini, Francesco; Haller, Sven; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2015-12-01

    Previous contributions in younger cohorts have revealed that reallocation of cerebral resources, a crucial mechanism for working memory (WM), may be disrupted by parallel demands of background acoustic noise suppression. To date, no study has explored the impact of such disruption on brain activation in elderly individuals with or without subtle cognitive deficits. We performed a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study in 23 cases (mean age=75.7 y.o., 16 men) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 16 elderly healthy controls (HC, mean age=70.1 y.o., three men) using a 2-back WM task, under two distinct MRI background acoustic noise conditions (louder vs. lower noise echo-planar imaging). General linear models were used to assess brain activation as a function of group and noise. In both groups, lower background noise is associated with increased activation of the working memory network (WMN). A decrease of the normally observed deactivation of the default mode network (DMN) is found under louder noise in both groups. Unlike HC, MCI cases also show decreased deactivation of the DMN under both louder and lower background noise. Under louder noise, this decrease is observed in anterior parts of the DMN in HC, and in the posterior cingulate cortex in MCI cases. Our results suggest that background acoustic noise has a differential impact on WMN activation in normal aging as a function of the cognitive status. Only louder noise has a disruptive effect on the usually observed DMN deactivation during WM task performance in HC. In contrast, MCI cases show altered DMN reactivity even in the presence of lower noise. PMID:26391923

  8. Neural underpinnings of background acoustic noise in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sinanaj, Indrit; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Herrmann, François; Santini, Francesco; Haller, Sven; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2015-12-01

    Previous contributions in younger cohorts have revealed that reallocation of cerebral resources, a crucial mechanism for working memory (WM), may be disrupted by parallel demands of background acoustic noise suppression. To date, no study has explored the impact of such disruption on brain activation in elderly individuals with or without subtle cognitive deficits. We performed a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study in 23 cases (mean age=75.7 y.o., 16 men) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 16 elderly healthy controls (HC, mean age=70.1 y.o., three men) using a 2-back WM task, under two distinct MRI background acoustic noise conditions (louder vs. lower noise echo-planar imaging). General linear models were used to assess brain activation as a function of group and noise. In both groups, lower background noise is associated with increased activation of the working memory network (WMN). A decrease of the normally observed deactivation of the default mode network (DMN) is found under louder noise in both groups. Unlike HC, MCI cases also show decreased deactivation of the DMN under both louder and lower background noise. Under louder noise, this decrease is observed in anterior parts of the DMN in HC, and in the posterior cingulate cortex in MCI cases. Our results suggest that background acoustic noise has a differential impact on WMN activation in normal aging as a function of the cognitive status. Only louder noise has a disruptive effect on the usually observed DMN deactivation during WM task performance in HC. In contrast, MCI cases show altered DMN reactivity even in the presence of lower noise.

  9. Severe neural tube defects in the loop-tail mouse result from mutation of Lpp1, a novel gene involved in floor plate specification.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, J N; Doudney, K; Paternotte, C; Copp, A J; Stanier, P

    2001-10-15

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are clinically important congenital malformations whose molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The loop-tail (Lp) mutant mouse provides a model for the most severe NTD, craniorachischisis, in which the brain and spinal cord remain open. During a positional cloning approach, we have identified a mutation in a novel gene, Lpp1, in the Lp mouse, providing a strong candidate for the genetic causation of craniorachischisis in LP: Lpp1 encodes a protein of 521 amino acids, with four transmembrane domains related to the Drosophila protein strabismus/van gogh (vang). The human orthologue, LPP1, shares 89% identity with the mouse gene at the nucleotide level and 99% identity at the amino acid level. Lpp1 is expressed in the ventral part of the developing neural tube, but is excluded from the floor plate where Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed. Embryos lacking Shh express Lpp1 throughout the ventral neural tube, suggesting negative regulation of Lpp1 by SHH: Our findings suggest that the mutual interaction between Lpp1 and Shh may define the lateral boundary of floor plate differentiation. Loss of Lpp1 function disrupts neurulation by permitting more extensive floor plate induction by Shh, thereby inhibiting midline bending of the neural plate during initiation of neurulation.

  10. Ectopic Myf5 or MyoD prevents the neuronal differentiation program in addition to inducing skeletal muscle differentiation, in the chick neural tube.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Marie-Claire; Duprez, Delphine

    2004-02-01

    Forced expression of the bHLH myogenic factors, Myf5 and MyoD, in various mammalian cell lines induces the full program of myogenic differentiation. However, this property has not been extensively explored in vivo. We have taken advantage of the chick model to investigate the effect of electroporation of the mouse Myf5 and MyoD genes in the embryonic neural tube. We found that misexpression of either mouse Myf5 or MyoD in the chick neural tube leads to ectopic skeletal muscle differentiation, assayed by the expression of the myosin heavy chains in the neural tube and neural crest derivatives. We also showed that the endogenous neuronal differentiation program is inhibited under the influence of either ectopic mouse Myf5 or MyoD. We used this new system to analyse, in vivo, the transcriptional regulation between the myogenic factors. We found that MyoD and Myogenin expression can be activated by ectopic mouse Myf5 or MyoD, while Myf5 expression cannot be activated either by mouse MyoD or by itself. We also analysed the transcriptional regulation between the myogenic factors and the different genes involved in myogenesis, such as Mef2c, Pax3, Paraxis, Six1, Mox1, Mox2 and FgfR4. We established the existence of an unexpected regulatory loop between MyoD and FgfR4. The consequences for myogenesis are discussed.

  11. Neurons derive from the more apical daughter in asymmetric divisions in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Paula; Reugels, Alexander M; Barker, David; Blanc, Eric; Clarke, Jonathan D W

    2010-06-01

    In the developing CNS, asymmetric cell division is critical for maintaining the balanced production of differentiating neurons while renewing the population of neural progenitors. In invertebrates, this process depends on asymmetric inheritance of fate determinants during progenitor divisions. A similar mechanism is widely believed to underlie asymmetrically fated divisions in vertebrates, but compelling evidence for this is missing. We used live imaging of individual progenitors in the intact zebrafish embryo CNS to test this hypothesis. We found that asymmetric inheritance of a subcellular domain is strongly correlated with asymmetric daughter fates and our results reveal an unexpected feature of this process. The daughter cell destined to become a neuron was derived from the more apical of the two daughters, whereas the more basal daughter inherited the basal process and replenished the apical progenitor pool.

  12. A Study on The Incidence of Neural Tube Defects in A Tertiary Care Hospital Over A Period of Five Years

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manickam; Rajilarajendran, Hannahsugirthabai; Ramanujam, Sailatha; Saktivel, Sathiya; Sivaanandam, Renuka

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several congenital malformations affect developing fetuses, among which Neural tube defect (NTD) is most common. Folic acid supplementation brought decline in the incidence of NTDs. The present study aims at finding the incidence of NTDs in a tertiary care hospital and compares the results with the similar Indian studies published earlier. Materials and Methods The study was done at Chettinad Hospital & Research Institute (CHRI), Kelambakkam. The total number of deliveries was recorded for a period of five years from 2009 to 2013. Fetuses which were still born with neural defect were collected and observed in detail externally for the sex, type of NTD and other associated anomalies. Indian studies published between 1987 and 2014 reporting the incidence of NTDs among the births occurred were retrieved from the Internet and their various observations were used for comparison. Results The number of deliveries conducted between 2009 and 2013 at CHRI was 3220. Of these, babies born with NTDs were nine (5 males and 4 females). The incidence of fetuses with meroanencephaly, holoanencephaly, craniorachischisis, encephalocele and myelocele were 0.62, 0.62, 0.93, 0.31 and 0.31 per 1000 births respectively. Overall incidence of NTDs in the present study was 2.79/1000 births. Fetuses with NTDs also had the following anomalies – Club foot, cleft lip and palate and exomphalos. Conclusion Comparing the results with the previous studies it is clearly evident that the incidence of NTDs have significantly reduced from 11.42/1000 births to 2.79/1000 births. In most of the previous studies NTDs had a female preponderance whereas present study has a male preponderance.In older studies, spina bifida was the most common NTDs followed by anencephaly. But in the present study anencephaly was the common NTD than spina bifida. Incidence of NTDs has reduced due to various reasons like prenatal screening for fetal anomalies and folic acid supplementation. PMID:26393168

  13. Optimal serum and red blood cell folate concentrations in women of reproductive age for prevention of neural tube defects: World Health Organization guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Amy M; Crider, Krista S; Rogers, Lisa M; Cannon, Michael J; Berry, R J

    2015-04-24

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) such as spina bifida, anencephaly, and encephalocele are serious birth defects of the brain and spine that occur during the first month of pregnancy when the neural tube fails to close completely. Randomized controlled trials and observational studies have shown that adequate daily consumption of folic acid before and during early pregnancy considerably reduces the risk for NTDs. The U.S. Public Health Service recommends that women capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 µg of folic acid daily for NTD prevention. Furthermore, fortification of staple foods (e.g., wheat flour) with folic acid has decreased folate-sensitive NTD prevalence in multiple settings and is a highly cost-effective intervention. PMID:25905896

  14. Awareness of folic acid for prevention of neural tube defects in a community with high prevalence of consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Lutfi; Karim, Igbaria A; Jawdat, Abu Moch; Fausi, Mawasi; Merlob, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations and can be fatal. Intake of 0.4 mg folic in the periconceptional period reduces the risk of NTD by 50-70%. Consanguinity in the Arab population in Israel is a prevalent custom. The aim of this study was to assess the level of awareness regarding folic acid and its effect in the prevention of NTD among Arab Israeli women of childbearing age. We conducted a cross-sectional study. Of the 653 women (18-45 years) who were randomly selected for interview while visiting their family physician or well-baby clinic, 624 women completed the questionnaire. Fifty-three percent (n = 333) of the respondents had heard of folic acid; 14% (n = 89) were familiar with the protective effect of NTD and 3% (n = 18) had taken folic acid in the first months of pregnancy whereas none of them had used it in the preconception period. Highly educated women, women with one or two children, paramedics, and women of high socioeconomic status were more knowledgeable about the protective effects of folic acid (P < 0.001). Age and religion had no significant effect. An urgent need exists to improve the awareness of this population to the protective effect of folic acid. Daily supplementation and fertification of food with folic acid should be considered as the best way to improve the balance of folic acid in women of childbearing age of this special population (high prevalence of consanguinity).

  15. [Folic acid reduces the risk of neural tube defects: awareness and folate intake among pregnant women in 2006].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Atsuo; Shimosuga, Yoichi; Oguchi, Hidenori; Shibata, Kanemitsu; Kurauchi, Osamu; Ichiko, Satoshi; Inoue, Hiromi; Tada, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Manshou; Kaseki, Nariaki; Narita, Osamu; Kusanishi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichi; Ooura, Kuniaki; Takemura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Takanori; Ishihara, Osamu; Takeda, Akihiro; Watanabe, Junichiro; Wakita, Katsuji; Itoh, Kunihiko; Katoh, Sentoyo; Koyama, Masayasu; Oota, Shunji; Ninomiya, Keiu; Matsuzawa, Katsuji; Hujishima, Yoshiko; Ishida, Shoutarou; Okai, Ikuyo; Hayakawa, Chisa; Gotoh, Tohru

    2008-08-01

    Folic acid plays an important role in proliferating cells and tissues of the fetus. A randomized control trial demonstrated in 1991 that 4 mg of folic acid supplements successfully prevented 72% of recurrence of neural tube defects (NTDs) in women who had had afflicted pregnancy. In 2000, the Japanese Government recommended women of childbearing age to take 400 microgram of folate supplements per day from 4 weeks prior to and 12 weeks after conception. A questionnaire study was performed in pregnant women by post on their awareness of the role folic acid plays, their life style, and folate intake by dietary consumption. Thirty-five percent of 1,251 pregnant women were aware of the important role of folic acid in the critical stage of fetal development and 31% actually took the supplement. Information on folic acid was obtained through mass media in 47% of the women, through the internet in 17%, through healthcare providers in 13% and so forth. The food record analysis revealed that the dietary intake of folic acid averaged 341 microg/day that was 60 microg less than what was recommended by the Government and that 33 of 86 women took the supplement. Overall, a half of pregnant women are required to take 400 microg folate supplement per day. It is to be stressed that primary prevention of NTDs by periconceptional intake of folic acid is a major public health opportunity and that prevention is more important than cure in the management of NTDs.

  16. Awareness and intake of folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects among Lebanese women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Nasr Hage, Claudine; Jalloul, Maya; Sabbah, Mohamad; Adib, Salim M

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, international recommendations have promoted folic acid supplementation during the periconception period as an effective way of preventing neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the adoption of this recommendation remains insufficient. To assess the awareness and actual intake of folic acid among married Lebanese women aged 18-45 years, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 women selected from all five administrative districts in Lebanon, using a multistage cluster sampling procedure. An anonymous questionnaire was completed which covered measures of knowledge and use of folate supplements, as well as demographic, socioeconomic and obstetrical factors. Sixty percent of surveyed women (60%; n = 360) had heard about folic acid. Doctors were the most frequent source of information (61.1%) but only 24.7% of women have been told of the correct period during which folic acid supplementation was useful. Overall, only 6.2% had taken folic acid tablets during the adequate period. Younger age, higher education level and stability/sufficiency of income appeared to be significant predictors of awareness among Lebanese women. Actual folic acid intake was significantly associated with younger age, higher number of pregnancies, planning the last pregnancy and having had that last one after 1990. In Lebanon, the level of folic acid awareness and adequate intake remain relatively low. Several approaches should be used to promote folic acid intake including awareness campaigns, and routine counseling by primary health care physicians on folic acid during preconception visits.

  17. Folic acid and prevention of neural tube defects in 2000 improved awareness--low peri-conceptional uptake.

    PubMed

    Oleary, M; Donnell, R M; Johnson, H

    2001-06-01

    Eight years have passed since recommendations were made by the Irish Department of Health on the importance of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects (NTD). There is currently no mandatory fortification of foodstuffs with folic acid in Ireland, with reliance placed on campaigns promoting increased dietary folate intake and supplements. We assessed knowledge and use of folic acid among 300 women attending ante-natal clinics in Dublin maternity hospitals in the year 2000 using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Qualitative information was obtained through means of a focus group. Ninety two percent of respondents had heard of folic acid and 67% knew it could prevent NTD. Thirty per cent were advised to take it peri-conceptionally but overall only 18% did so; 39% of women had planned their pregnancy. The focus group indicated that folic acid was not 'visible' enough and that fortification of food was more realistic. This study shows that improved folic acid awareness has not been accompanied by corresponding peri-conceptional uptake in 2000. Folic acid promotional campaigns should be continuous and targeted. Mandatory food fortification should be strongly considered.

  18. Ectopic cross-talk between thyroid and retinoic acid signaling: A possible etiology for spinal neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Huili; Bai, Baoling; Zhang, Qin; Bao, Yihua; Guo, Jin; Chen, Shuyuan; Miao, Chunyue; Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Ting

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the connections between neural tube defects (NTDs) and both thyroid hormones (TH) and vitamin A. However, whether the two hormonal signaling pathways interact in NTDs has remained unclear. We measured the expression levels of TH signaling genes in human fetuses with spinal NTDs associated with maternal hyperthyroidism as well as levels of retinoic acid (RA) signaling genes in mouse fetuses exposed to an overdose of RA using NanoString or real-time PCR on spinal cord tissues. Interactions between the two signaling pathways were detected by ChIP assays. The data revealed attenuated DIO2/DIO3 switching in fetuses with NTDs born to hyperthyroid mothers. The promoters of the RA signaling genes CRABP1 and RARB were ectopically occupied by increased RXRG and RXRB but displayed decreased levels of inhibitory histone modifications, suggesting that elevated TH signaling abnormally stimulates RA signaling genes. Conversely, in the mouse model, the observed decrease in Dio3 expression could be explained by increased levels of inhibitory histone modifications in the Dio3 promoter region, suggesting that overactive RA signaling may ectopically derepress TH signaling. This study thus raises in vivo a possible abnormal cross-promotion between two different hormonal signals through their common RXRs and the subsequent recruitment of histone modifications, prompting further investigation into their involvement in the etiology of spinal NTDs. PMID:26188161

  19. Developing effective campaign messages to prevent neural tube defects: a qualitative assessment of women's reactions to advertising concepts.

    PubMed

    Massi Lindsey, Lisa L; Silk, Kami J; Von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Marlene M; Hamner, Heather C; Prue, Christine E; Boster, Franklin J

    2009-03-01

    The incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs), serious birth defects of the brain and spine that affect approximately 3,000 pregnancies in the United States each year, can be reduced by 50-70% with daily periconceptional consumption of the B vitamin folic acid. Two studies were designed to assess college women's reactions to and perceptions of potential campaign advertising concepts derived from preproduction formative research to increase folic acid consumption through the use of a daily multivitamin. Study one assessed draft advertising concepts in eight focus groups (N = 71) composed of college-enrolled women in four cities geographically dispersed across the United States. Based on study one results, the concepts were revised and reassessed in study two with a different sample (eight focus groups; N = 73) of college women in the same four cities. Results indicated that participants generally responded favorably to concepts in each of the two studies, and provided insight into individual concepts to increase their overall appeal and effectiveness. The specific findings and implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19283538

  20. Developing effective campaign messages to prevent neural tube defects: a qualitative assessment of women's reactions to advertising concepts.

    PubMed

    Massi Lindsey, Lisa L; Silk, Kami J; Von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Marlene M; Hamner, Heather C; Prue, Christine E; Boster, Franklin J

    2009-03-01

    The incidence of neural tube defects (NTDs), serious birth defects of the brain and spine that affect approximately 3,000 pregnancies in the United States each year, can be reduced by 50-70% with daily periconceptional consumption of the B vitamin folic acid. Two studies were designed to assess college women's reactions to and perceptions of potential campaign advertising concepts derived from preproduction formative research to increase folic acid consumption through the use of a daily multivitamin. Study one assessed draft advertising concepts in eight focus groups (N = 71) composed of college-enrolled women in four cities geographically dispersed across the United States. Based on study one results, the concepts were revised and reassessed in study two with a different sample (eight focus groups; N = 73) of college women in the same four cities. Results indicated that participants generally responded favorably to concepts in each of the two studies, and provided insight into individual concepts to increase their overall appeal and effectiveness. The specific findings and implications of these results are discussed.

  1. Prevalence of neural tube defects and folic acid knowledge and consumption--Puerto Rico, 1996-2006.

    PubMed

    2008-01-11

    Birth defects are one of the leading causes of infant mortality in both the mainland United States and Puerto Rico. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are serious birth defects of the spine and brain; two of the most common NTDs are spina bifida and anencephaly. In the United States, NTD prevalence is higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black women. In Puerto Rico, where most residents are Hispanic, the prevalence of NTDs (8.68 per 10,000 live births) is higher than in the mainland United States (5.59). Consumption of folic acid before and during early pregnancy can prevent NTDs. To assess trends in NTD prevalence and prevalence of knowledge and consumption of folic acid supplements in Puerto Rico, data were analyzed from the Birth Defects Surveillance System (BDSS) for 1996-2005 and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for 1997-2006. This report describes the results of those analyses, which indicated that prevalence of folic acid knowledge and consumption among women of childbearing age increased from 1997 to 2003 but decreased from 2003 to 2006. During similar periods, NTD prevalence declined from 1996 to 2003 but did not change significantly from 2003 to 2005. To resume the decline in prevalence of NTDs, additional measures might be needed to increase folic acid supplement use among Puerto Rican women of childbearing age.

  2. Prevalence of neural tube defects and folic acid knowledge and consumption--Puerto Rico, 1996-2006.

    PubMed

    2008-01-11

    Birth defects are one of the leading causes of infant mortality in both the mainland United States and Puerto Rico. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are serious birth defects of the spine and brain; two of the most common NTDs are spina bifida and anencephaly. In the United States, NTD prevalence is higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black women. In Puerto Rico, where most residents are Hispanic, the prevalence of NTDs (8.68 per 10,000 live births) is higher than in the mainland United States (5.59). Consumption of folic acid before and during early pregnancy can prevent NTDs. To assess trends in NTD prevalence and prevalence of knowledge and consumption of folic acid supplements in Puerto Rico, data were analyzed from the Birth Defects Surveillance System (BDSS) for 1996-2005 and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for 1997-2006. This report describes the results of those analyses, which indicated that prevalence of folic acid knowledge and consumption among women of childbearing age increased from 1997 to 2003 but decreased from 2003 to 2006. During similar periods, NTD prevalence declined from 1996 to 2003 but did not change significantly from 2003 to 2005. To resume the decline in prevalence of NTDs, additional measures might be needed to increase folic acid supplement use among Puerto Rican women of childbearing age. PMID:18185495

  3. Tissue-specific distribution of aberrant DNA methylation associated with maternal low-folate status in human neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huibo; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Zhiping; Bao, Rui; Fu, Chengbo; Wang, Zhigang; Bao, Yihua; Li, Yuanyuan; Wu, Lihua; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2011-12-01

    This study compares the density and tissue-specific distribution of 5-methyl cytosine (5mC) in genomic DNA from human fetuses with or without neural tube defects (NTD) and examines whether low maternal serum folate is a possible correlate and/or risk factor for NTD. The results demonstrate significant hypomethylation of brain genomic DNA in NTD fetuses relative to controls (P<.01), as well as relative hypermethylation of skin and heart in NTD fetuses. In normal fetuses, the level of 5mC in liver genomic DNA decreased from fetal week 18 to 28 and increased over the same developmental period in kidney genomic DNA, but these trends were absent in genomic DNA from NTD fetuses. Mean maternal serum folate was significantly lower in NTD fetuses than in controls (P<.01), and maternal serum folate correlated with density of 5mC in genomic brain DNA from NTD fetuses (r=0.610). The results indicate that aberrant DNA methylation in NTD may be due to maternal folate deficiency and may be involved in the pathogenesis of NTD in humans. PMID:21333513

  4. Similarities in the epidemiology of neural tube defects and coronary heart disease: is homocysteine the missing link?

    PubMed Central

    Stone, D. H.; McCarron, P.; Smith, G. D.

    1999-01-01

    It is hypothesised that a single aetiological pathway could explain both the strong ecological association between the birth prevalence of neural tube defects (NTD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality and the potential efficacy of dietary measures, especially increased folic acid intake, in their prevention. The epidemiological similarities between NTD and CHD are strong and consistent suggesting that the relation is real rather than artefactual. It is suggested that this epidemiological association reflects a shared aetiology arising from the role of disturbed homocysteine metabolism in the pathogenesis of both conditions. Current public health measures designed to increase the intake of periconceptional folic acid in women, reinforced by a broadening of this policy to target both sexes throughout life, will (if successful) result in a reduction in both the birth prevalence of NTD and the incidence of CHD, although not necessarily contemporaneously. If disordered homocysteine metabolism is the cause of both NTD and CHD, this has implications for future research and preventive strategies for these serious and often lethal diseases.   PMID:10656088

  5. Awareness and intake of folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects among Lebanese women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Nasr Hage, Claudine; Jalloul, Maya; Sabbah, Mohamad; Adib, Salim M

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, international recommendations have promoted folic acid supplementation during the periconception period as an effective way of preventing neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the adoption of this recommendation remains insufficient. To assess the awareness and actual intake of folic acid among married Lebanese women aged 18-45 years, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 600 women selected from all five administrative districts in Lebanon, using a multistage cluster sampling procedure. An anonymous questionnaire was completed which covered measures of knowledge and use of folate supplements, as well as demographic, socioeconomic and obstetrical factors. Sixty percent of surveyed women (60%; n = 360) had heard about folic acid. Doctors were the most frequent source of information (61.1%) but only 24.7% of women have been told of the correct period during which folic acid supplementation was useful. Overall, only 6.2% had taken folic acid tablets during the adequate period. Younger age, higher education level and stability/sufficiency of income appeared to be significant predictors of awareness among Lebanese women. Actual folic acid intake was significantly associated with younger age, higher number of pregnancies, planning the last pregnancy and having had that last one after 1990. In Lebanon, the level of folic acid awareness and adequate intake remain relatively low. Several approaches should be used to promote folic acid intake including awareness campaigns, and routine counseling by primary health care physicians on folic acid during preconception visits. PMID:21210201

  6. Awareness of folic acid for prevention of neural tube defects in a community with high prevalence of consanguineous marriages.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Lutfi; Karim, Igbaria A; Jawdat, Abu Moch; Fausi, Mawasi; Merlob, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital malformations and can be fatal. Intake of 0.4 mg folic in the periconceptional period reduces the risk of NTD by 50-70%. Consanguinity in the Arab population in Israel is a prevalent custom. The aim of this study was to assess the level of awareness regarding folic acid and its effect in the prevention of NTD among Arab Israeli women of childbearing age. We conducted a cross-sectional study. Of the 653 women (18-45 years) who were randomly selected for interview while visiting their family physician or well-baby clinic, 624 women completed the questionnaire. Fifty-three percent (n = 333) of the respondents had heard of folic acid; 14% (n = 89) were familiar with the protective effect of NTD and 3% (n = 18) had taken folic acid in the first months of pregnancy whereas none of them had used it in the preconception period. Highly educated women, women with one or two children, paramedics, and women of high socioeconomic status were more knowledgeable about the protective effects of folic acid (P < 0.001). Age and religion had no significant effect. An urgent need exists to improve the awareness of this population to the protective effect of folic acid. Daily supplementation and fertification of food with folic acid should be considered as the best way to improve the balance of folic acid in women of childbearing age of this special population (high prevalence of consanguinity). PMID:15050876

  7. Amelioration of intracellular stress and reduction of neural tube defects in embryos of diabetic mice by phytochemical quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lixue; Tan, Chengyu; Meng, Fantong; Liu, Peiyan; Reece, E. Albert; Zhao, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy causes birth defects, including neural tube defects (NTDs). Hyperglycemia increases production of nitric oxide (NO) through NO synthase 2 (Nos2) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating nitrosative and oxidative stress conditions in the embryo. The present study aimed to target nitrosative stress using a naturally occurring Nos2 inhibitor, quercetin, to prevent NTDs in the embryos of diabetic mice. Daily administration of quercetin to diabetic pregnant mice during the hyperglycemia-susceptible period of organogenesis significantly reduced NTDs and cell apoptosis in the embryos, compared with those of vehicle-treated diabetic pregnant mice. Using HPLC-coupled ESI-MS/MS, quercetin metabolites, including methylated and sulfonylated derivatives, were detected in the conceptuses. The methylated metabolite, 3-O-methylquercetin, was shown to reduce ROS level in embryonic stem cells cultured in high glucose. Quercetin treatment decreased the levels of Nos2 expression, protein nitrosylation, and protein nitration, alleviating nitrosative stress. Quercetin increased the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, and reduced the levels of oxidative stress markers. Expression of genes of redox regulating enzymes and DNA damage repair factors was upregulated. Our study demonstrates that quercetin ameliorates intracellular stresses, regulates gene expression, and reduces embryonic malformations in diabetic pregnancy. PMID:26887929

  8. Mutations in the COPII vesicle component gene SEC24B are associated with human neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Yan; Zhou, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Qing Qing; Li, Hong; Chen, Ying; Lei, Yun-Ping; Ma, Xiao-Hang; Kong, Pan; Shi, Yan; Jin, Li; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Hong-Yan

    2013-08-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe birth malformations that affect one in 1,000 live births. Recently, mutations in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes had been implicated in the pathogenesis of NTDs in both the mouse model and in human cohorts. Mouse models indicate that the homozygous disruption of Sec24b, which mediates the ER-to-Golgi transportation of the core PCP gene Vangl2 as a component of the COPII vesicle, will result in craniorachischisis. In this study, we found four rare missense heterozygous SEC24B mutations (p.Phe227Ser, p.Phe682Leu, p.Arg1248Gln, and p.Ala1251Gly) in NTDs cases that were absent in all controls. Among them, p.Phe227Ser and p.Phe682Leu affected its protein stability and physical interaction with VANGL2. Three variants (p.Phe227Ser, p.Arg1248Gln, and p.Ala1251Gly) were demonstrated to affect VANGL2 subcellular localization in cultured cells. Further functional analysis in the zebrafish including overexpression and dosage-dependent rescue study suggested that these four mutations all displayed loss-of-function effects compared with wild-type SEC24B. Our study demonstrated that functional mutations in SEC24B might contribute to the etiology of a subset of human NTDs and further expanded our knowledge of the role of PCP pathway-related genes in the pathogenesis of human NTDs.

  9. Effectiveness of Folic Acid Fortified Flour for Prevention of Neural Tube Defects in a High Risk Region

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haochen; De Steur, Hans; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Pei, Lijun; Gellynck, Xavier; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite efforts to tackle folate deficiency and Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) through folic acid fortification, its implementation is still lacking where it is needed most, highlighting the need for studies that evaluate the effectiveness of folic acid fortified wheat flour in a poor, rural, high-risk, NTD region of China. One of the most affected regions, Shanxi Province, was selected as a case study. A community intervention was carried out in which 16,648 women of child-bearing age received fortified flour (eight villages) and a control group received ordinary flour (three villages). NTD birth prevalence and biological indicators were measured two years after program initiation at endline only. The effect on the NTD burden was calculated using the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) method. In the intervention group, serum folate level was higher than in the control group. NTDs in the intervention group were 68.2% lower than in the control group (OR = 0.313, 95% CI = 0.207–0473, p < 0.001). In terms of DALYs, burden in intervention group was approximately 58.5% lower than in the control group. Flour fortification was associated with lower birth prevalence and burden of NTDs in economically developing regions with a high risk of NTDs. The positive findings confirm the potential of fortification when selecting an appropriate food vehicle and target region. As such, this study provides support for decision makers aiming for the implementation of (mandatory) folic acid fortification in China. PMID:27005659

  10. Exposure of methyl mercury in utero and the risk of neural tube defects in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lei; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Le; Li, Zhiwen; Yu, Jingru; Liu, Jianmeng; Ye, Rrongwei; Chen, Laiguo; Ren, Aiguo

    2016-06-01

    To determine if exposure to methyl mercury (MeHg) in utero is associated with an elevated risk of neural tube defects (NTDs), we measured its concentration in the placentas of 36 anencephalic and 44 spina bifida cases, as well as in 50 healthy controls. The median MeHg concentration in NTD cases (0.49ng/g) was higher than that in controls (0.33ng/g). The crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for a MeHg concentration above the median were 3.54 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.68-7.49) and 3.64 (95% CI, 1.66-7.99), respectively. Both anencephaly and spina bifida subtypes had higher levels of MeHg than the controls. NTD risk increased for subjects in the second and third highest tertile of MeHg concentrations, with an OR of 2.24 (95% CI, 0.93-5.40) and 2.85 (95% CI, 1.17-6.94), respectively. In summary, higher placental levels of MeHg are associated with an elevated risk of NTDs. PMID:27049578

  11. Cadmium-induced neural tube defects and fetal growth restriction: Association with disturbance of placental folate transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Hua; Hu, Jun; Guo, Min-Yin; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Yu, Zhen; Fu, Lin; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies found that maternal Cd exposure on gestational day (GD)9 caused forelimb ectrodactyly and tail deformity, the characteristic malformations. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal Cd exposure on GD8 induces fetal neural tube defects (NTDs). Pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl2 (2.5 or 5.0mg/kg) on GD8. Neither forelimb ectrodactyly nor tail deformity was observed in mice injected with CdCl2 on GD8. Instead, maternal Cd exposure on GD8 resulted in the incidence of NTDs. Moreover, maternal Cd exposure on GD8 resulted in fetal growth restriction. In addition, maternal Cd exposure on GD8 reduced placental weight and diameter. The internal space of maternal and fetal blood vessels in the labyrinth layer was decreased in the placentas of mice treated with CdCl2. Additional experiment showed that placental PCFT protein and mRNA, a critical folate transporter, was persistently decreased when dams were injected with CdCl2 on GD8. Correspondingly, embryonic folate content was markedly decreased in mice injected with CdCl2 on GD8, whereas Cd had little effect on folate content in maternal serum. Taken together, these results suggest that maternal Cd exposure during organogenesis disturbs transport of folate from maternal circulation to the fetuses through down-regulating placental folate transporters. PMID:27417525

  12. Neighborhood Deprivation and Risk of Congenital Heart Defects, Neural Tube Defects and Orofacial Clefts: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deguen, Séverine; Kihal, Wahida; Jeanjean, Maxime; Padilla, Cindy; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to address the open question of a possible association between the socioeconomic level of the neighborhoods in which pregnant women live and the risk of Congenital Heart Defects (CHDs), Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) and OroFacial Clefts (OFCs). Methods We searched MEDLINE from its inception to December 20th, 2015 for case-control, cohort and ecological studies assessing the association between neighborhood socioeconomic level and the risk of CHDs, NTDs and the specific phenotypes Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate (CLP) and Cleft Palate (CP). Study-specific risk estimates were pooled according to random-effect and fixed-effect models. Results Out of 245 references, a total of seven case-control studies, two cohort studies and two ecological studies were assessed in the systematic review; all studies were enrolled in the meta-analysis with the exception of the two cohort studies. No significant association has been revealed between CHDs or NTDs and neighborhood deprivation index. For CLP phenotype subgroups, we found a significantly higher rate in deprived neighborhoods (Odds Ratios (OR) = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.36) whereas this was not significant for CP phenotype subgroups (OR = 1.20, 95%CI: 0.89, 1.61). Conclusion In spite of the small number of epidemiological studies included in the present literature review, our findings suggest that neighborhood socioeconomic level where mothers live is associated only with an increased risk of CLP phenotype subgroups. This finding has methodological limitations that impede the formulation of firm conclusions, and further investigations should confirm this association. PMID:27783616

  13. Patterns of folic acid use in pregnant Saudi women and prevalence of neural tube defects — Results from a nested case–control study☆

    PubMed Central

    Al Rakaf, Maha S.; Kurdi, Ahmed M.; Ammari, Amer N.; Al Hashem, Amal M.; Shoukri, Mohamed M.; Garne, Ester; Majeed-Saidan, Muhammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the role of folic acid (FA) in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs) is well documented, its optimal intake in pregnant women is still low in many countries. Here, we prospectively studied the prevalence of NTDs in the newborns and the patterns of FA intake in pregnant Saudi mothers. Methods This case–control study was nested within a 3-year project (July 2010 to June 2013) to study the patterns of birth defects in the offspring of Saudi women who received their antenatal care and delivered at Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh—Saudi Arabia. Enrolled mothers were divided into 4 groups: group 1 (FA taken before pregnancy and continued regularly after conception), group 2 (FA taken post-conception), group 3 (no FA intake), and group 4 (did not remember or were unsure of taking FA). Control mothers were randomly selected from those with normal first obstetrical ultrasound scan at 18–22 weeks of gestation. Results The cohort included 30,531 mothers giving birth to 28,646 infants. We studied 1179 mothers of babies with birth defects (BDs) and 1262 control mothers. There were 237 (9.7%) mothers in-group 1; 2001 (82%) in-group 2; 154 (6.3%) in-group 3; and 49 (2%) in-group 4. There were 49 babies with NTDs, a prevalence of 1.7/1000 total births. Among the studied mothers 2274 (93%) took FA either full or partial course. Conclusion The high prevalence of NTDs and the low optimal FA intake highlight the need for a strict implementation of staple food fortification and health education program for Saudi women. PMID:26844119

  14. Genetic Variants in the Folate Pathway and the Risk of Neural Tube Defects: A Meta-Analysis of the Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ti; Lou, Jiao; Zhong, Rong; Wu, Jing; Zou, Li; Sun, Yu; Lu, Xuzai; Liu, Li; Miao, Xiaoping; Xiong, Guanglian

    2013-01-01

    Background Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) are among the most prevalent and most severe congenital malformations worldwide. Polymorphisms in key genes involving the folate pathway have been reported to be associated with the risk of NTDs. However, the results from these published studies are conflicting. We surveyed the literature (1996–2011) and performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to provide empirical evidence on the association. Methods and Findings We investigated the effects of 5 genetic variants from 47 study populations, for a total of 85 case-control comparisons MTHFR C677T (42 studies; 4374 cases, 7232 controls), MTHFR A1298C (22 studies; 2602 cases, 4070 controls), MTR A2756G (9 studies; 843 cases, 1006 controls), MTRR A66G (8 studies; 703 cases, 1572 controls), and RFC-1 A80G (4 studies; 1107 cases, 1585 controls). We found a convincing evidence of dominant effects of MTHFR C677T (OR 1.23; 95%CI 1.07–1.42) and suggestive evidence of RFC-1 A80G (OR 1.55; 95%CI 1.24–1.92). However, we found no significant effects of MTHFR A1298C, MTR A2756G, MTRR A66G in risk of NTDs in dominant, recessive or in allelic models. Conclusions Our meta-analysis strongly suggested a significant association of the variant MTHFR C677T and a suggestive association of RFC-1 A80G with increased risk of NTDs. However, other variants involved in folate pathway do not demonstrate any evidence for a significant marginal association on susceptibility to NTDs. PMID:23593147

  15. Neutral and non-neutral collisionless plasma equilibria for twisted flux tubes: The Gold-Hoyle model in a background field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanson, O.; Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate exact one-dimensional collisionless plasma equilibria for a continuum of flux tube models, for which the total magnetic field is made up of the "force-free" Gold-Hoyle magnetic flux tube embedded in a uniform and anti-parallel background magnetic field. For a sufficiently weak background magnetic field, the axial component of the total magnetic field reverses at some finite radius. The presence of the background magnetic field means that the total system is not exactly force-free, but by reducing its magnitude, the departure from force-free can be made as small as desired. The distribution function for each species is a function of the three constants of motion; namely, the Hamiltonian and the canonical momenta in the axial and azimuthal directions. Poisson's equation and Ampère's law are solved exactly, and the solution allows either electrically neutral or non-neutral configurations, depending on the values of the bulk ion and electron flows. These equilibria have possible applications in various solar, space, and astrophysical contexts, as well as in the laboratory.

  16. "Polymorphisms in folate metabolism genes as maternal risk factor for neural tube defects: an updated meta-analysis".

    PubMed

    Yadav, Upendra; Kumar, Pradeep; Yadav, Sushil Kumar; Mishra, Om Prakash; Rai, Vandana

    2015-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between maternal methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, A1298C and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) A66G polymorphisms and risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. However, the results from the published studies on the association between these three polymorphisms and NTD risk are conflicting. To derive a clearer picture of association between these three maternal polymorphisms and risk of NTD, we performed meta-analysis. A comprehensive search was conducted to identify all case-control studies of maternal MTHFR and MTRR polymorphisms and NTD risk. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association. Overall, we found that maternal MTHFR C677T polymorphism (OR(TvsC) =1.20; 95% CI = 1.13-1.28) and MTRR A66G polymorphism (OR(GvsA) = 1.21; 95% CI = 0.98-1.49) were risk factors for producing offspring with NTD but maternal MTHFR A1298C polymorphism (OR(CvsA) = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.78-1.07) was not associated with NTD risk. However, in stratified analysis by geographical regions, we found that the maternal C677T polymorphism was significantly associated with the risk of NTD in Asian (OR(TvsC) = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.05-1.94), European (OR(TvsC) = 1.13; 95% CI: 1.04-1.24) and American (OR(TvsC) = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.13-1.41) populations. In conclusion, present meta-analysis supports that the maternal MTHFR C677T and MTRR A66G are polymorphisms contributory to risk for NTD. PMID:25005003

  17. Analysis of select folate pathway genes, PAX3, and human T in a Midwestern neural tube defect population.

    PubMed

    Trembath, D; Sherbondy, A L; Vandyke, D C; Shaw, G M; Todoroff, K; Lammer, E J; Finnell, R H; Marker, S; Lerner, G; Murray, J C

    1999-05-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a common birth defect, seen in approximately 1/1,000 births in the United States. NTDs are considered a complex trait where several genes, interacting with environmental factors, create the phenotype. Using a Midwestern NTD population consisting of probands, parents, and siblings from Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska, we analyzed a range of candidate genes, including 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), folate receptors-alpha (FOLR1; hereafter abbreviated "FR-alpha") and -beta (FOLR2; hereafter, "FR-beta"), methionine synthase (hereinafter, "MS"), T, the human homolog of the murine Brachyury gene, and the paired-box homeotic gene 3 (PAX3), for association with NTDs. We were unable to demonstrate an association using a previously described Ala-->Val mutation in MTHFR and the majority of our NTD populations. However, we discovered a silent polymorphism in exon 6 of MTHFR which conserved a serine residue and which showed significant association with NTDs in our Iowa population. Analysis of exon 7 of MTHFR then demonstrated an Ala-->Glu mutation which was significantly associated with our Iowa NTD population; however, we could not replicate this result either in a combined Minnesota/ Nebraska or in a California NTD population. Using polymorphic markers for MS, FR-beta, T, and PAX3, we were unable to demonstrate linkage disequilibrium with our NTD populations. A mutation search of FR-alpha revealed one proband with a de novo silent mutation of the stop codon. This work provides a new panel of genetic variants for studies of folate metabolism and supports, in some NTD populations, an association between MTHFR and NTDs.

  18. Diabetes and Obesity-Related Genes and the Risk of Neural Tube Defects in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Philip J.; Canfield, Mark A.; Chapa, Claudia; Lu, Wei; Agopian, A. J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Shaw, Gary M.; Waller, D. Kim; Olshan, Andrew F.; Finnell, Richard H.; Zhu, Huiping

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated genetic susceptibility related to diabetes and obesity as a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs). The authors investigated 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms among 9 genes (ADRB3, ENPP1, FTO, LEP, PPARG, PPARGC1A, SLC2A2, TCF7L2, and UCP2) associated with type 2 diabetes or obesity. Samples were obtained from 737 NTD case-parent triads included in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study during 1999–2007. Log-linear models were used to evaluate maternal and offspring genetic effects. After application of the false discovery rate, there were 5 significant maternal genetic effects. The less common alleles at the 4 FTO single nucleotide polymorphisms showed a reduction of NTD risk (for rs1421085, relative risk (RR) = 0.73 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 0.87); for rs8050136, RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.93); for rs9939609, RR = 0.79 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.94); and for rs17187449, RR = 0.80 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.95)). Additionally, maternal LEP rs2071045 (RR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.60) and offspring UCP2 rs660339 (RR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.64) were associated with NTD risk. Furthermore, the maternal genotype for TCF7L2 rs3814573 suggested an increased NTD risk among obese women. These findings indicate that maternal genetic variants associated with glucose homeostasis may modify the risk of having an NTD-affected pregnancy. PMID:23132673

  19. Genetic determinants of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism: a common pathway in neural tube defect and Down syndrome?

    PubMed

    Guéant, Jean-Louis; Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Anello, Guido; Bosco, Paolo; Brunaud, Laurent; Romano, Corrado; Ferri, Rafaele; Romano, Antonino; Candito, Mirande; Namour, Bernard

    2003-11-01

    One-carbon metabolism is under the influence of folate, vitamin B12 and genetic polymorphisms of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677 C --> T and 1298 A --> C), of methionine synthase (MTR 2756 C --> G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR 66 A --> G) and transcobalamin (TCN 776 C --> G). The pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD) may be related to this metabolism. The influence of the MTHFR 677 C --> T polymorphism reported in The Netherlands and Ireland can be questioned in southern Italy, France and Great Britain. MTRR, combined with a low level of vitamin B12, increases the risk of NTD and of having a child with NTD in Canada, while TCN 776 GG and MTRR 66 GG mutated genotypes associated with the MTHFR 677 CC wild-type are predictors of NTD cases in Sicily. Down syndrome (DS) is due to a failure of normal chromosomal segregation during meiosis, possibly related to one-carbon metabolism. MTHFR 677 C --> T and MTRR 66 A --> G polymorphisms are associated with a greater risk of having a child with DS in North America, Ireland and The Netherlands. In contrast, MTHFR 677 C --> T has no influence on DS risk in France and Sicily, while homocysteine and MTR 2756 AG/GG genotypes are predictors of DS risk in Sicily. In conclusion, NTD and DS are influenced by the same genetic determinants of one-carbon metabolism. The distinct data produced in different geographical areas may be explained by differences in the nutritional environment and genetic characteristics of the populations. PMID:14656028

  20. Maternal consumption of non-staple food in the first trimester and risk of neural tube defects in offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Gao, Li-Jie; Yang, Hui; Zhao, Zhong-Tang

    2015-05-01

    To study the associations between maternal consumption of non-staple food in the first trimester and risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. Data collected from a hospital-based case-control study conducted between 2006 and 2008 in Shandong/Shanxi provinces including 459 mothers with NTDs-affected births and 459 mothers without NTDs-affected births. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between maternal consumption of non-staple food in the first trimester and risk of NTDs in offspring. The effects were evaluated by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) with SAS9.1.3.software. Maternal consumption of milk, fresh fruits and nuts in the first trimester were protective factors for total NTDs. Compared with consumption frequency of ˂1 meal/week, the ORs for milk consumption frequency of 1-2, 3-6, ≥7 meals/week were 0.50 (95% CI: 0.28-0.88), 0.56 (0.32-0.99), and 0.59 (0.38-0.90), respectively; the ORs for fresh fruits consumption frequency of 1-2, 3-6, ≥7 meals/week were 0.29 (95% CI: 0.12-0.72), 0.22 (0.09-0.53), and 0.32 (0.14-0.71), respectively; the ORs for nuts consumption frequency of 1-2, 3-6, ≥7 meals/week were 0.60 (95% CI: 0.38-0.94), 0.49 (0.31-0.79), and 0.63 (0.36-1.08), respectively. Different effects of above factors on NTDs were found for subtypes of anencephaly and spina bifida. Maternal non-staple food consumption of milk, fresh fruits and nuts in the first trimester was associated with reducing NTDs risk in offspring. PMID:25919306

  1. Association of genomic instability, and the methylation status of imprinted genes and mismatch-repair genes, with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Yuanyuan; Ouyang, Shengrong; Chang, Huibo; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2012-05-01

    We studied the genomic instability and methylation status of the mismatch-repair (MMR) genes hMLH1 and hMSH2, and the imprinted genes H19/IGF2, in fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) to explore the pathogenesis of the disease. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was observed in 23 of 50 NTD patients. Five NTD patients showed high-degree MSI (MSI-H) and 18 showed low-degree MSI (MSI-L). The frequencies of mutated microsatellite loci were 3/50 (6%) for BatT-25, 10/50 (20%) for Bat-26, 3/50 (6%) for Bat34C4, 6/50 (12%) for D2S123, 4/50 (8%) for D2S119, and 3/50 (6%) for D3S1611. The promoter regions of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes were unmethylated in NTD patients, as determined by methylation-specific PCR. The hMLH1 and hMSH2 promoter methylation patterns, the methylation levels of H19 DMR1, and IGF2 DMR0 were detected by bisulfite sequencing PCR, sub-cloning, and sequencing. The hMSH2 promoter sequence was unmethylated, and the hMLH1 promoter showed a specific methylation pattern at two CpG sites. The methylation levels of H19 DMR1 in the NTD and control groups are 73.3% ± 15.9 and 58.3% ± 11.2, respectively. The methylation level of the NTD group was higher than that of the control group (Student's t-test, P<0.05). There is no significant difference in IGF2 DMR0 methylation level between the two groups. All of the results presented here suggest that genomic instability, the MMR system, and hyper-methylation of the H19 DMR1 may be correlated with the occurrence of NTDs.

  2. Whole genomewide linkage screen for neural tube defects reveals regions of interest on chromosomes 7 and 10

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, E; Bassuk, A; Enterline, D; George, T; Siegel, D; Melvin, E; Aben, J; Allen, J; Aylsworth, A; Brei, T; Bodurtha, J; Buran, C; Floyd, L; Hammock, P; Iskandar, B; Ito, J; Kessler, J; Lasarsky, N; Mack, P; Mackey, J; McLone, D; Meeropol, E; Mehltretter, L; Mitchell, L; Oakes, W; Nye, J; Powell, C; Sawin, K; Stevenson, R; Walker, M; West, S; Worley, G; Gilbert, J; Speer, M

    2005-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are the second most common birth defects (1 in 1000 live births) in the world. Periconceptional maternal folate supplementation reduces NTD risk by 50–70%; however, studies of folate related and other developmental genes in humans have failed to definitively identify a major causal gene for NTD. The aetiology of NTDs remains unknown and both genetic and environmental factors are implicated. We present findings from a microsatellite based screen of 44 multiplex pedigrees ascertained through the NTD Collaborative Group. For the linkage analysis, we defined our phenotype narrowly by considering individuals with a lumbosacral level myelomeningocele as affected, then we expanded the phenotype to include all types of NTDs. Two point parametric analyses were performed using VITESSE and HOMOG. Multipoint parametric and nonparametric analyses were performed using ALLEGRO. Initial results identified chromosomes 7 and 10, both with maximum parametric multipoint lod scores (Mlod) >2.0. Chromosome 7 produced the highest score in the 24 cM interval between D7S3056 and D7S3051 (parametric Mlod 2.45; nonparametric Mlod 1.89). Further investigation demonstrated that results on chromosome 7 were being primarily driven by a single large pedigree (parametric Mlod 2.40). When this family was removed from analysis, chromosome 10 was the most interesting region, with a peak Mlod of 2.25 at D10S1731. Based on mouse human synteny, two candidate genes (Meox2, Twist1) were identified on chromosome 7. A review of public databases revealed three biologically plausible candidates (FGFR2, GFRA1, Pax2) on chromosome 10. The results from this screen provide valuable positional data for prioritisation of candidate gene assessment in future studies of NTDs. PMID:15831595

  3. Cloning of zebrafish nkx6.2 and a comprehensive analysis of the conserved transcriptional response to Hedgehog/Gli signaling in the zebrafish neural tube.

    PubMed

    Guner, Burcu; Karlstrom, Rolf O

    2007-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling helps pattern the vertebrate neural tube, in part by regulating the dorsal/ventral expression of a number of homeodomain containing transcription factors. These Hh responsive genes have been divided into two classes, with Class II genes being activated by Hh signaling and Class I genes being repressed by Hh signaling. While the transcriptional response to varying Hh levels is well defined in chick and mouse, it is only partially described in zebrafish, despite the fact that zebrafish has emerged as a powerful genetic system for the study of neural patterning. To better characterize the Hh response in the zebrafish neural tube, we cloned the zebrafish Class II Hh target genes nkx2.9 and nkx6.2. We then analyzed the expression of a number of Class I and Class II Hh responsive genes in wild type, Hh mutant, and Hh over-expressing zebrafish embryos. We show that expression of Class I and Class II genes is highly conserved in the vertebrate neural tube. Further, ventral-most Class II gene expression was completely lost in all Hh pathway mutants analyzed, indicating high levels of Hh signaling are blocked in all of these mutants. In contrast, more dorsally expressed genes were variably affected in different Hh pathway mutants, indicating mid-levels of Hh signaling are differentially affected. This comprehensive expression study provides an important tool for the characterization of Hh signaling in zebrafish and provides a sensitive assay for determining the degree to which newly identified zebrafish mutants affect Hh signaling.

  4. Folate deficiency-induced oxidative stress contributes to neuropathy in young and aged zebrafish--implication in neural tube defects and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tseng-Ting; Chu, Chia-Yi; Lee, Gang-Hui; Hsiao, Tsun-Hsien; Cheng, Nai-Wei; Chang, Nan-Shan; Chen, Bing-Hung; Fu, Tzu-Fun

    2014-11-01

    Folate is a nutrient essential for the development, function and regeneration of nervous systems. Folate deficiency has been linked to many neurological disorders including neural tube defects in fetus and Alzheimer's diseases in the elderly. However, the etiology underlying these folate deficiency-associated diseases is not completely understood. In this study, zebrafish transgenic lines with timing and duration-controllable folate deficiency were developed by ectopically overexpressing a recombinant EGFP-γ-glutamyl hydrolase (γGH). Impeded neural crest cell migration was observed in the transgenic embryos when folate deficiency was induced in early stages, leading to defective neural tube closure and hematopoiesis. Adding reduced folate or N-acetylcysteine reversed the phenotypic anomalies, supporting the causal link between the increased oxidative stress and the folate deficiency-induced abnormalities. When folate deficiency was induced in aged fish accumulation of beta-amyloid and phosphorylated Tau protein were found in the fish brain cryo-sections. Increased autophagy and accumulation of acidic autolysosome were apparent in folate deficient neuroblastoma cells, which were reversed by reduced folate or N-acetylcysteine supplementation. Decreased expression of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, was also observed in cells and tissue with folate deficiency. We concluded that folate deficiency-induced oxidative stress contributed to the folate deficiency-associated neuropathogenesis in both early and late stages of life.

  5. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some can be harmful to a pregnancy, like air pollution, lead and cigarette smoke. Who is at risk ... Some can be harmful to a pregnancy, like air pollution, lead and cigarette smoke. Who is at risk ...

  6. Morphological and quantitative studies in the otic region of the neural tube in chick embryos suggest a neuroectodermal origin for the otic placode

    PubMed Central

    MAYORDOMO, RAQUEL; RODRÍGUEZ-GALLARDO, LUCÍA; ALVAREZ, IGNACIO S.

    1998-01-01

    Careful histological observation of the development of the anlage of the inner ear in chicken embryos led us to question the traditional view of otic placode (OP) formation. First, morphological studies in the cephalic region carried out on stages preceding the appearance of the placodal epithelium revealed that the medial placodal cells are continuous temporally and spatially with cells belonging to the neural fold (NF). Second, both the formation of the basal lamina between the dorsal region of the neural tube (NT) and ectoderm and the pattern of formation of the neural crest present distinctive characteristics between otic levels and regions located anteriorly and posteriorly. Third, numerical comparisons of parameters for the NT and the OP between different levels of the rhombencephalon allowed us to assign a differential behaviour in the growth pattern of the otic region. These results indicated that the medial part of the OP is not derived from already independent ectoderm that increases in thickness under the influence of the NT (as previously accepted) but that it develops directly from the NFs. Although we do not exclude other possibilities, we propose that at least a proportion of the OP cells originate directly from cells committed to be neural crest. After this incorporation, basal laminal formation would delimit the NT from the OP without transition of the otic cells to ectoderm. This hypothesis would imply that part of the otic cells originate directly from neuroepithelial cells having a neuroectodermal (rather than the previously established ectodermal) origin. PMID:9758135

  7. Prevalence of cystathionine beta synthase gene mutation 852Ins68 as a possible risk for neural tube defects in eastern India.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Gupta, J; Pandey, S; Gangopadhaya, A N; Pandey, L K

    2011-01-01

    Cystathionine beta synthase gene (CβS) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine, forming cystathionine by the transsulfuration pathway. Disruption of CβS enzyme activity due to defective folic acid metabolism increases the risk factor for neural tube defects. We evaluated the CβS gene mutation in 25 children with neural tube defects (NTDs), including lumbosacral and thoracic myelomeningocele and open NTDs and mothers of cases, along with 25 healthy children and their mothers, serving as controls. Genomic DNA was isolated to assess the polymorphism of 852Ins68 in the CβS gene using PCR-RFLP analysis and nucleotide sequencing techniques. The 68-bp insertion was observed in one of the 25 NTD cases (lumbosacral myelomeningocele), and in two of the mothers of NTD cases. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Fischer exact probability test, which showed a lack of significance (P > 0.05), but the odds ratio of 2.08 with 95% confidence interval of 0.17-24.6 in NTDs mother was quite high because of the small sample size. However, the study was further extended to find out the involvement of specific nucleotide sequences, which again confirmed the 852Ins68 insertion and replacement of nucleotides (TCCAT to GGGG) in lumbosacral myelomeningocele (due to other category of NTDs), suggesting that it could be an independent risk factor for birth defects, including NTDs.

  8. Ethanol-induced impairment of polyamine homeostasis – A potential cause of neural tube defect and intrauterine growth restriction in fetal alcohol syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi Poodeh, Saeid; Alhonen, Leena; Salonurmi, Tuire; Savolainen, Markku J.

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. • Alcohol administration perturbs polyamine levels in the tissues with various patterns. • Total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc is critical for development. • The deficiency is associated with reduction in endothelial cell sprouting in the head. • Retarded migration of neural crest cells may cause development of neural tube defect. - Abstract: Introduction: Polyamines play a fundamental role during embryogenesis by regulating cell growth and proliferation and by interacting with RNA, DNA and protein. The polyamine pools are regulated by metabolism and uptake from exogenous sources. The use of certain inhibitors of polyamine synthesis causes similar defects to those seen in alcohol exposure e.g. retarded embryo growth and endothelial cell sprouting. Methods: CD-1 mice received two intraperitoneal injections of 3 g/kg ethanol at 4 h intervals 8.75 days post coitum (dpc). The fetal head, trunk, yolk sac and placenta were collected at 9.5 and 12.5 dpc and polyamine concentrations were determined. Results: No measurable quantity of polyamines could be detected in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc, 12 h after ethanol exposure. Putrescine was not detectable in the trunk of the embryo at that time, whereas polyamines in yolk sac and placenta were at control level. Polyamine deficiency was associated with slow cell growth, reduction in endothelial cell sprouting, an altered pattern of blood vessel network formation and consequently retarded migration of neural crest cells and growth restriction. Discussion: Our results indicate that the polyamine pools in embryonic and extraembryonic tissues are developmentally regulated. Alcohol administration, at the critical stage, perturbs polyamine levels with various patterns, depending on the tissue and its developmental stage. The total absence of polyamines in the embryo head at 9.5 dpc may explain why this

  9. IRDL Cloning: A One-Tube, Zero-Background, Easy-to-Use, Directional Cloning Method Improves Throughput in Recombinant DNA Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and efficient construction of expression vectors and subsequent transformation are basic recombinant methods for the investigation of gene functionality. Although novel cloning methods have recently been developed, many laboratories worldwide continue to use traditional restriction digestion-ligation methods to construct expression vectors owing to financial constraints and the unavailability of appropriate vectors. We describe an improved restriction digestion-ligation (IRDL) cloning method that combines the advantage of directional cloning from double digestion-ligation with that of a low background observed by using a positive selection marker gene ccdB to facilitate digestion and ligation in a single tube. The IRDL cloning overcomes the time-consuming and laborious limits of traditional methods, thereby providing an easy-to-use, low-cost, and one-step strategy for directional cloning of target DNA fragments into an expression vector. As a proof-of-concept example, we developed two yeast vectors to demonstrate the feasibility and the flexibility of the IRDL cloning method. This method would provide an effective and easy-to-use system for gene cloning and functional genomics studies. PMID:25243603

  10. Epidemiologic aspects of neural tube defects in the United States: changing concepts and their importance for screening and prenatal diagnostic programs

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Strassburg, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    This report considers several major epidemiologic aspects of neural tube defects (NTDs). After examining briefly the approaches and goals of epidemiology the traditional epidemiologic concepts of NTDs are reviewed and new interpretations of the epidemiology of these defects is suggested. Three major topics are addressed: (1) that much of our knowledge of the epidemiology of the NTDs comes from areas or periods of high rates of occurrence and that generalizations based on these data may not be applicable to low incidence situations; (2) that the etiology of these defects is multifactorial, involving interaction between genetic and nongenetic factors which may differ in their relative importance between populations; and (3) that anencephalus and spina bifida may be more epidemiologically and etiologically distinct than is usually appreciated. A final consideration deals with some recent contributions of epidemiology to screening and prenatal diagnosis programs.

  11. Primary prevention of neural-tube defects and some other congenital abnormalities by folic acid and multivitamins: history, missed opportunity and tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bártfai, Zoltán; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    The history of intervention trials of periconception folic acid with multivitamin and folic acid supplementation in women has shown a recent breakthrough in the primary prevention of structural birth defects, namely neural-tube defects and some other congenital abnormalities. Recently, some studies have demonstrated the efficacy of this new method in reducing congenital abnormalities with specific origin; for example, in the offspring of diabetic and epileptic mothers, and in pregnancy with high fever. The benefits and drawbacks of four possible uses of periconception folate/folic acid and multivitamin supplementation are discussed: we believe there has been a missed opportunity to implement this preventive approach in medical practice. The four methods are as follows: (i) dietary intake of folate and other vitamins, (ii) periconception folic acid/multivitamin supplementation, (iii) food fortification with folic acid, and (iv) the combination of oral contraceptives with 6S-5-methytetrahydrofolate (‘folate’). PMID:25083211

  12. Neural Segregation of Concurrent Speech: Effects of Background Noise and Reverberation on Auditory Scene Analysis in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sayles, Mark; Stasiak, Arkadiusz; Winter, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent complex sounds (e.g., two voices speaking at once) are perceptually disentangled into separate "auditory objects". This neural processing often occurs in the presence of acoustic-signal distortions from noise and reverberation (e.g., in a busy restaurant). A difference in periodicity between sounds is a strong segregation cue under quiet, anechoic conditions. However, noise and reverberation exert differential effects on speech intelligibility under "cocktail-party" listening conditions. Previous neurophysiological studies have concentrated on understanding auditory scene analysis under ideal listening conditions. Here, we examine the effects of noise and reverberation on periodicity-based neural segregation of concurrent vowels /a/ and /i/, in the responses of single units in the guinea-pig ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN): the first processing station of the auditory brain stem. In line with human psychoacoustic data, we find reverberation significantly impairs segregation when vowels have an intonated pitch contour, but not when they are spoken on a monotone. In contrast, noise impairs segregation independent of intonation pattern. These results are informative for models of speech processing under ecologically valid listening conditions, where noise and reverberation abound. PMID:27080680

  13. The roof plate boundary is a bi-directional organiser of dorsal neural tube and choroid plexus development.

    PubMed

    Broom, Emma R; Gilthorpe, Jonathan D; Butts, Thomas; Campo-Paysaa, Florent; Wingate, Richard J T

    2012-11-01

    The roof plate is a signalling centre positioned at the dorsal midline of the central nervous system and generates dorsalising morphogenic signals along the length of the neuraxis. Within cranial ventricles, the roof plate gives rise to choroid plexus, which regulates the internal environment of the developing and adult brain and spinal cord via the secretion of cerebrospinal fluid. Using the fourth ventricle as our model, we show that the organiser properties of the roof plate are determined by its boundaries with the adjacent neuroepithelium. Through a combination of in ovo transplantation, co-culture and electroporation techniques in chick embryos between embryonic days 3 and 6, we demonstrate that organiser properties are maintained by interactions between the non-neural roof plate and the neural rhombic lip. At the molecular level, this interaction is mediated by Delta-Notch signalling and upregulation of the chick homologue of Hes1: chairy2. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that cdelta1 is both necessary and sufficient for organiser function. Our results also demonstrate that while chairy2 is specifically required for the maintenance of the organiser, its ectopic expression is not sufficient to recapitulate organiser properties. Expression of atonal1 in the rhombic lip adjacent at the roof plate boundary is acutely dependent on both boundary cell interactions and Delta-Notch signalling. Correspondingly, the roof plate boundary organiser also signals to the roof plate itself to specify the expression of early choroid plexus markers. Thus, the roof plate boundary organiser signals bi-directionally to acutely coordinate the development of adjacent neural and non-neural tissues.

  14. The roof plate boundary is a bi-directional organiser of dorsal neural tube and choroid plexus development

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Emma R.; Gilthorpe, Jonathan D.; Butts, Thomas; Campo-Paysaa, Florent; Wingate, Richard J. T.

    2012-01-01

    The roof plate is a signalling centre positioned at the dorsal midline of the central nervous system and generates dorsalising morphogenic signals along the length of the neuraxis. Within cranial ventricles, the roof plate gives rise to choroid plexus, which regulates the internal environment of the developing and adult brain and spinal cord via the secretion of cerebrospinal fluid. Using the fourth ventricle as our model, we show that the organiser properties of the roof plate are determined by its boundaries with the adjacent neuroepithelium. Through a combination of in ovo transplantation, co-culture and electroporation techniques in chick embryos between embryonic days 3 and 6, we demonstrate that organiser properties are maintained by interactions between the non-neural roof plate and the neural rhombic lip. At the molecular level, this interaction is mediated by Delta-Notch signalling and upregulation of the chick homologue of Hes1: chairy2. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that cdelta1 is both necessary and sufficient for organiser function. Our results also demonstrate that while chairy2 is specifically required for the maintenance of the organiser, its ectopic expression is not sufficient to recapitulate organiser properties. Expression of atonal1 in the rhombic lip adjacent at the roof plate boundary is acutely dependent on both boundary cell interactions and Delta-Notch signalling. Correspondingly, the roof plate boundary organiser also signals to the roof plate itself to specify the expression of early choroid plexus markers. Thus, the roof plate boundary organiser signals bi-directionally to acutely coordinate the development of adjacent neural and non-neural tissues. PMID:23052907

  15. Folic acid and soybean isoflavone combined supplementation protects the post-neural tube closure defects of rodents induced by cyclophosphamide in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haifeng; Liang, Jiang; Li, Xuemin; Yu, Huanling; Li, Xiuhua; Xiao, Rong

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of folic acid (FA) and soybean isoflavone (SIF) combined supplementation on the post-neural tube closure of rodents induced by cyclophosphamide (CPA) in vitro and in vivo, pregnant rats were randomly divided into control, model, solo-FA intervention, solo-SIF intervention and co-intervention of FA and SIF groups. Rats in solo-intervention groups and co-intervention group were treated with FA 0.7 mg/kg, SIF 160 mg/kg and FA 0.7 mg/kg+SIF 160 mg/kg at the duration of pregnancy, respectively. On the 13th day of gestation, control rats were given physiological saline and the other four groups were treated with CPA12.5mg/kg. On the 14th day of gestation, three rats selected randomly from every group were executed and the ultrastructure, DNA damage and the proteins expressions of Bcl-2, Bax and P53 on embryo brains were checked. The rest of the rats were executed on the 20th day, the frequency of neural tube closure defects and fetus' development indices were measured. In addition, T-SOD, MDA and NO in serum of the pregnant rats were checked. In vitro, the effect of FA and genistein on the apoptosis was determined. Compared with the model group, the malformation incidence was lower but fetus' development indices were higher in the combination treated group. The combination decreased the damage of CPA, such as damaged nuclear DNA, early apoptotic morphological changes, Bax and P53 expressions on embryo brains and in vivo. Furthermore, T-SOD activity in serum of the pregnant rats increased and the levels of MDA and NO decreased in the combined supplementation group. Our study indicates the neuroprotection of FA and SIF combined administration is superior to solo treatment. Decrease of DNA damage and neuron apoptosis involved in the mechanisms. Furthermore, the up-regulation of Bcl-2 and the down-regulation of Bax and P53 proteins also participate in the effect. PMID:20060418

  16. Genetic background impacts developmental potential of enteric neural crest-derived progenitors in the Sox10Dom model of Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Walters, Lauren C; Cantrell, V Ashley; Weller, Kevin P; Mosher, Jack T; Southard-Smith, E Michelle

    2010-11-15

    Abnormalities in the development of enteric neural crest-derived progenitors (ENPs) that generate the enteric nervous system (ENS) can lead to aganglionosis in a variable portion of the distal gastrointestinal tract. Cumulative evidence suggests that variation of aganglionosis is due to gene interactions that modulate the ability of ENPs to populate the intestine; however, the developmental processes underlying this effect are unknown. We hypothesized that differences in enteric ganglion deficits could be attributable to the effects of genetic background on early developmental processes, including migration, proliferation, or lineage divergence. Developmental processes were investigated in congenic Sox10(Dom) mice, an established Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) model, on distinct inbred backgrounds, C57BL/6J (B6) and C3HeB/FeJ (C3Fe). Immuno-staining on whole-mount fetal gut tissue and dissociated cell suspensions was used to assess migration and proliferation. Flow cytometry utilizing the cell surface markers p75 and HNK-1 was used to isolate live ENPs for analysis of developmental potential. Frequency of ENPs was reduced in Sox10(Dom) embryos relative to wild-type embryos, but was unaffected by genetic background. Both migration and developmental potential of ENPs in Sox10(Dom) embryos were altered by inbred strain background with the most highly significant differences seen for developmental potential between strains and genotypes. In vivo imaging of fetal ENPs and postnatal ganglia demonstrates that altered lineage divergence impacts ganglia in the proximal intestine. Our analysis demonstrates that genetic background alters early ENS development and suggests that abnormalities in lineage diversification can shift the proportions of ENP populations and thus may contribute to ENS deficiencies in vivo.

  17. Folic acid and the prevention of neural tube defects: A survey of awareness among Latina women of childbearing age residing in southeast Michigan.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Srimathi; Menotti, Elaine; Scherer, Holly K; Dickinson, Jennifer; Larson, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Periconceptional intake of folic acid is known to reduce the risk for neural tube defects (NTDs). To inform southeast Michigan Latina women of childbearing age about the benefits of food and supplemental sources of the micronutrient in the prevention of NTDs, Spanish-English bilingual health educators carried out 20 education events in supermarkets and community organizations serving Latina women. One hundred and sixty Latina women ages 19 to 50 years indicated their current folic acid awareness and stated their future intentions regarding folic acid. Of 160 women surveyed, 114 (71%) had heard of folic acid, 84 (74%) knew that folic acid prevents birth defects, 63 (55%) knew the critical time to take folic acid, and 76 (67%) identified at least one source of folic acid. After participating in the education events, 136 women (85%) reported planning to eat more folate and/or folic acid-rich foods. Although general folic acid awareness is fairly high, health promotion efforts must be coordinated at community locations serving Latina women to share folic acid's specific protective effects in the prevention of NTDs, the critical timing of intake, and its food and supplement sources.

  18. Genetic effects on variation in red-blood-cell folate in adults: Implications for the familial aggregation of neural tube defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, L.E.; Duffy, P.; Bellingham, G.

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated folic acid as an important determinant of normal human growth, development, and function. Insufficient folate levels appear to be a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTD), as well as for several chronic diseases of adulthood. However, relatively little is known about the factors that influence folate status in the general population. To estimate the relative contribution of genetic and nongenetic factors to variation in folate, we have evaluated red blood cell (RBC) folate levels in 440 pairs of MZ twins and in 331 pairs of DZ twins. The data were best described by a model in which 46% of the variance in RBC folate was attributable to additive genetic effects, 16% of the variance was due to measured phenotypic covariates, and 38% of the variance was due to random environmental effects. Moreover, the correlations for RBC folate in MZ co-twins (r = .46) and in repeat measures from the same individual (r = .51) were very similar, indicating that virtually all repeatable variation in RBC folate is attributable to genetic factors. On the basis of these results, it would seem reasonable to initiate a search for the specific genes that influence RBC folate levels in the general population. Such genes ultimately may be used to identify individuals at increased risk for NTD and other folate-related diseases. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Association of neural tube defects in children of mothers with MTHFR 677TT genotype and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Benitez, N M; Yanes-Sosa, F; Gonzalez-Meneses, A; Cerrillos, L; Acosta, D; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Neth, O; Gomez de Terreros, I; Ybot-González, P

    2014-03-26

    Abnormalities in maternal folate and carbohydrate metabolism have both been shown to induce neural tube defects (NTD) in humans and animal models. However, the relationship between these two factors in the development of NTDs remains unclear. Data from mothers of children with spina bifida seen at the Unidad de Espina Bífida del Hospital Infantil Virgen del Rocío (case group) were compared to mothers of healthy children with no NTD (control group) who were randomly selected from patients seen at the outpatient ward in the same hospital. There were 25 individuals in the case group and 41 in the control group. Analysis of genotypes for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CT polymorphism in women with or without risk factors for abnormal carbohydrate metabolism revealed that mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism were more likely to have offspring with spina bifida and high levels of homocysteine, compared to the control group. The increased incidence of NTDs in mothers homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism stresses the need for careful metabolic screening in pregnant women, and, if necessary, determination of the MTHFR 677CT genotype in those mothers at risk of developing abnormal carbohydrate metabolism.

  20. SNPs in the CpG island of NAP1L2: a possible link between DNA methylation and neural tube defects?

    PubMed

    Rogner, Ute Christine; Danoy, Patrick; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Moore, Gudrun Elizabeth; Stanier, Philip; Avner, Philip

    2002-07-01

    Deletion of the murine X-linked Nap1l2 gene causes lethality from midgestation onwards. The affected embryos exhibit neural tube defects (NTDs) closely resembling spina bifida and anencephaly in humans. X-linked familial and spontaneous cases of NTD were analyzed for sequence alterations in the human NAP1L2. No differences were found in the familial cases. However, a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the 5' region of NAP1L2 were identified both in cases of spontaneous NTD and in normal controls. Most of these SNPs lead to the replacement of guanidines or cytosines within a CpG island that is conserved between the human and the mouse promoter regions. Demethylation in vitro activates Nap1l2 transcriptional activity, suggesting the importance of the CpG island in regulating the activity of the Nap1l2/NAP1L2 genes, and the potential importance of the polymorphisms in modifying their transcriptional activity. NAP1L2/Nap1l2 expression may therefore depend on the genetic-environmental factors that are frequently associated with NTDs.

  1. Promotion of folate for the prevention of neural tube defects: knowledge and use of periconceptional folic acid supplements in Western Australia, 1992 to 1995.

    PubMed

    Bower, C; Blum, L; O'Daly, K; Higgins, C; Loutsky, F; Kosky, C

    1997-12-01

    To assess changes in knowledge and use of folic acid supplements in relation to a statewide health promotion project for the prevention of neural tube defects, we surveyed general practitioners, pharmacists, women of child-bearing age and pregnant women in Western Australia. We also collected data on wholesale sales of folic acid supplements. By the end of the project, 56.5 per cent of general practitioner respondents knew that the recommended dose of folic acid was 0.5 mg and 70 per cent offered folic acid supplements to women planning pregnancy, 82.5 per cent of responding pharmacists knew the recommended dose, and 87.5 per cent reported an increase in sales of 0.5 mg folic acid. Wholesale sales of 0.5 mg folic acid increased markedly in Western Australia compared with other states. From shopping centre surveys of women of child-bearing age we estimated that their knowledge of the association between folate and spina bifida increased from 8.2 per cent before the project to 67.5 per cent 2.5 years later, and doctors were a major source of information for women. In a 1995 survey of a sample of pregnant women, 43.1 per cent with planned pregnancies had taken folic acid supplements periconceptionally, compared with 19.1 per cent in a similar survey in 1993.

  2. Synergistic interactions between XPC and p53 mutations in double-mutant mice: neural tube abnormalities and accelerated UV radiation-induced skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheo, D L; Meira, L B; Hammer, R E; Burns, D K; Doughty, A T; Friedberg, E C

    1996-12-01

    The significance of DNA repair to human health has been well documented by studies on xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients, who suffer a dramatically increased risk of cancer in sun-exposed areas of their skin [1,2]. This autosomal recessive disorder has been directly associated with a defect in nucleotide excision-repair (NER) [1,2]. Like human XP individuals, mice carrying homozygous mutations in XP genes manifest a predisposition to skin carcinogenesis following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation [3-5]. Recent studies have suggested that, in addition to roles in apoptosis [6] and cell-cycle checkpoint control [7] in response to DNA damage, p53 protein may modulate NER [8]. Mutations in the p53 gene have been observed in 50% of all human tumors [9] and have been implicated in both the early [10] and late [11] stages of skin cancer. To examine the consequences of a combined deficiency of the XPC and the p53 proteins in mice, we generated double-mutant animals. We document a spectrum of neural tube defects in XPC p53 mutant embryos. Additionally, we show that, following exposure to UV-B radiation, XPC p53 mutant mice have more severe solar keratosis and suffer accelerated skin cancer compared with XPC mutant mice that are wild-type with respect to p53. PMID:8994835

  3. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 of Homo Sapiens (L1Hs) During Human Embryogenesis and Roles in Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chang, S; Guan, J; Shangguan, S; Lu, X; Wang, Z; Wu, L; Zou, J; Zhao, H; Bao, Y; Qiu, Z; Niu, B; Zhang, T

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposition events plays crucial roles during early development. Previously we showed that LINE-1 hypomethylation in neuronal tissues is associated with pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD). Herein, we further evaluated LINE-1 Homo sapiens (L1Hs) methylation in tissues derived from three germ layers of stillborn NTD fetuses, to define patterns of tissue specific methylation and site-specific hypomethylation at CpG sites within an L1Hs promoter region. Stable, tissue-specific L1Hs methylation patterns throughout three germ layer lineages of the fetus, placenta, and maternal peripheral blood were observed. Samples from maternal peripheral blood exhibited the highest level of L1Hs methylation (64.95%) and that from placenta showed the lowest (26.82%). Between samples from NTDs and controls, decrease in L1Hs methylation was only significant in NTD-affected brain tissue at 7.35%, especially in females (8.98%). L1Hs hypomethylation in NTDs was also associated with a significant increase in expression level of an L1Hs-encoded transcript in females (r = -0.846, p = 0.004). This could be due to genomic DNA instability and alternation in chromatins accessibility resulted from abnormal L1Hs hypomethylation, as showed in this study with HCT-15 cells treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza.

  4. Anticonvulsant activity, neural tube defect induction, mutagenicity and pharmacokinetics of a new potent antiepileptic drug, N-methoxy-2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropane carboxamide.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Eyal; Yagen, Boris; Lamb, John G; White, H Steve; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Finnell, Richard H; Bialer, Meir

    2007-01-01

    N-methoxy-2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropane carboxamide (OM-TMCD) is a methoxyamide derivative of a cyclopropyl analogue of valproic acid (VPA). The structural considerations used in the design of OM-TMCD were aimed to enhance OM-TMCD anticonvulsant potency (compared to VPA) and to prevent VPA's two life-threatening side effects, i.e., induction of neural tube defects (NTDs) and hepatotoxicity. Following i.p. administration to rats OM-TMCD demonstrated a broad spectrum of anticonvulsant activity and showed better potency than VPA in the maximal electroshock seizure and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole tests as well as in the hippocampal kindling model. OM-TMCD was inactive in the mouse 6-Hz test at 100 mg/kg dose. Teratogenicity studies performed in a SWV/Fnn-mouse model for VPA-induced-exencephaly showed that on the equimolar basis OM-TMCD possesses the same fetal toxicity and ability to induce NTDs as VPA, but since OM-TMCD is a much more potent anticonvulsant its activity/exencephaly formation ratio appears to be much more beneficial than that of VPA. OM-TMCD was found to be non-mutagenic and non-pro-mutagenic in the Ames test. It showed a beneficial pharmacokinetic profile in rats, having a high oral bioavailability of 75% and satisfactory values of clearance and volume of distribution. These results support further studies to fully characterize the therapeutic potential of OM-TMCD.

  5. Abnormal epigenetic regulation of the gene expression levels of Wnt2b and Wnt7b: Implications for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    BAI, BAOLING; CHEN, SHUYUAN; ZHANG, QIN; JIANG, QIAN; LI, HUILI

    2016-01-01

    The association between Wnt genes and neural tube defects (NTDs) is recognized, however, it remains to be fully elucidated. Our previous study demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are affected in human NTDs. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate whether Wnt2b and Wnt7b are susceptible to abnormal epigenetic modification in NTDs, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays to evaluate histone enrichments and the MassARRAY platform to detect the methylation levels of target regions within Wnt genes. The results demonstrated that the transcriptional activities of Wnt2b and Wnt7b were abnormally upregulated in mouse fetuses with NTDs and, in the GC-rich promoters of these genes, histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) acetylation was enriched, whereas H3K27 trimethylation was reduced. Furthermore, several CpG sites in the altered histone modification of target regions were significantly hypomethylated. The present study also detected abnormal epigenetic modifications of these Wnt genes in human NTDs. In conclusion, the present study detected abnormal upregulation in the levels of Wnt2b and Wnt7b, and hypothesized that the alterations may be due to the ectopic opening of chromatin structure. These results improve understanding of the dysregulation of epigenetic modification of Wnt genes in NTDs. PMID:26548512

  6. Identification of PCSK9 as a novel serum biomarker for the prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    An, Dong; Wei, Xiaowei; Li, Hui; Gu, Hui; Huang, Tianchu; Zhao, Guifeng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Weilin; Chen, Lizhu; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Henan; Cao, Songying; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    To identify candidate serum molecule biomarkers for the non-invasive early prenatal diagnosis of neural tube defects (NTDs), we employed an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze the proteomic changes in serum samples from embryonic day (E) 11 and E13 pregnant rats with spina bifida aperta (SBA) induced by all-trans retinoic acid. Among the 390 proteins identified, 40 proteins at E11 and 26 proteins at E13 displayed significant differential expression in the SBA groups. We confirmed 5 candidate proteins by ELISA. We observed the space-time expression changes of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) at different stages of fetal development, including a marked decrease in the sera of NTD pregnancies and gradual increase in the sera of normal pregnancies with embryonic development. PCSK9 demonstrated the diagnostic efficacy of potential NTD biomarkers [with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.763, 95% CI: 065–0.88]. Additionally, PCSK9 expression in the spinal cords and placentas of SBA rat fetuses was markedly decreased. PCSK9 could serve as a novel molecular biomarker for the non-invasive prenatal screening of NTDs and may be involved in the pathogenesis of NTDs at critical periods of fetal development. PMID:26691006

  7. Pre-conception Folic Acid and Multivitamin Supplementation for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Neural Tube Defects and Other Folic Acid-Sensitive Congenital Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R Douglas; Wilson, R Douglas; Audibert, François; Brock, Jo-Ann; Carroll, June; Cartier, Lola; Gagnon, Alain; Johnson, Jo-Ann; Langlois, Sylvie; Murphy-Kaulbeck, Lynn; Okun, Nanette; Pastuck, Melanie; Deb-Rinker, Paromita; Dodds, Linda; Leon, Juan Andres; Lowel, Hélène L; Luo, Wei; MacFarlane, Amanda; McMillan, Rachel; Moore, Aideen; Mundle, William; O'Connor, Deborah; Ray, Joel; Van den Hof, Michiel

    2015-06-01

    Objectif : Offrir des renseignements à jour sur l’utilisation pré et postconceptionnelle d’acide folique par voie orale, avec ou sans supplément de multivitamines / micronutriments, aux fins de la prévention des anomalies du tube neural et d’autres anomalies congénitales. Ces renseignements aideront les médecins, les sages-femmes, les infirmières et les autres professionnels de la santé à contribuer aux efforts de sensibilisation des femmes quant à l’utilisation et aux posologies adéquates de la supplémentation en acide folique / multivitamines, avant et pendant la grossesse. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed, Medline, CINAHL et la Cochrane Library en janvier 2011 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « folic acid », « prenatal multivitamins », « folate sensitive birth defects », « congenital anomaly risk reduction », « pre-conception counselling »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre 1985 et juin 2014. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2014. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques, et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Coûts, risques et avantages : Les coûts financiers sont ceux de la supplémentation quotidienne en vitamines et de la consommation d’un régime alimentaire santé enrichi en folate. Les risques sont ceux qui sont li

  8. GMDH-type neural network modeling and genetic algorithm-based multi-objective optimization of thermal and friction characteristics in heat exchanger tubes with wire-rod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Masoud; Beigzadeh, Reza; Parvizi, Mehdi; Eiamsa-ard, Smith

    2016-08-01

    The group method of data handling (GMDH) technique was used to predict heat transfer and friction characteristics in heat exchanger tubes equipped with wire-rod bundles. Nusselt number and friction factor were determined as functions of wire-rod bundle geometric parameters and Reynolds number. The performance of the developed GMDH-type neural networks was found to be superior in comparison with the proposed empirical correlations. For optimization, the genetic algorithm-based multi-objective optimization was applied.

  9. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  10. Supplement use and other characteristics among pregnant women with a previous pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect - United States, 1997-2009.

    PubMed

    Arth, Annelise; Tinker, Sarah; Moore, Cynthia; Canfield, Mark; Agopian, Aj; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-16

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) include anomalies of the brain (anencephaly and encephalocele) and spine (spina bifida). Even with ongoing mandatory folic acid fortification of enriched cereal grain products, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women of childbearing potential consume a daily supplement containing 400 µg-800 µg of folic acid. Women with a prior NTD-affected pregnancy have an increased risk for having another NTD-affected pregnancy, and if they are planning another pregnancy, the recommendation is that they consume high-dosage folic acid supplements (4.0 mg/day) beginning ≥4 weeks before conception and continuing through the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. To learn whether folic acid supplementation (from multivitamins or single- ingredient supplements) was commonly used during pregnancy by women with a previous NTD-affected pregnancy, supplement use was assessed among a convenience sample of women with a previous NTD-affected pregnancy who participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), a case-control study of major birth defects in the United States. Characteristics of women who previously had an NTD-affected pregnancy and whose index pregnancy (pregnancy included in NBDPS) was either affected by an NTD (N = 17) (i.e., recurrence-cases) or resulted in a live-born infant without a major birth defect (N = 10) (i.e., recurrence-controls) were assessed. Taking a supplement that included folic acid was more common among recurrence-control mothers (80%) than recurrence-case mothers (35%). The recommendation that women should take folic acid supplements just before and during early pregnancy is not being followed by many women and offers an opportunity for NTD prevention, especially among women who are at a higher risk because they have had a previous pregnancy affected by an NTD. PMID:25590679

  11. Supplement use and other characteristics among pregnant women with a previous pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect - United States, 1997-2009.

    PubMed

    Arth, Annelise; Tinker, Sarah; Moore, Cynthia; Canfield, Mark; Agopian, Aj; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-16

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) include anomalies of the brain (anencephaly and encephalocele) and spine (spina bifida). Even with ongoing mandatory folic acid fortification of enriched cereal grain products, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women of childbearing potential consume a daily supplement containing 400 µg-800 µg of folic acid. Women with a prior NTD-affected pregnancy have an increased risk for having another NTD-affected pregnancy, and if they are planning another pregnancy, the recommendation is that they consume high-dosage folic acid supplements (4.0 mg/day) beginning ≥4 weeks before conception and continuing through the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. To learn whether folic acid supplementation (from multivitamins or single- ingredient supplements) was commonly used during pregnancy by women with a previous NTD-affected pregnancy, supplement use was assessed among a convenience sample of women with a previous NTD-affected pregnancy who participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS), a case-control study of major birth defects in the United States. Characteristics of women who previously had an NTD-affected pregnancy and whose index pregnancy (pregnancy included in NBDPS) was either affected by an NTD (N = 17) (i.e., recurrence-cases) or resulted in a live-born infant without a major birth defect (N = 10) (i.e., recurrence-controls) were assessed. Taking a supplement that included folic acid was more common among recurrence-control mothers (80%) than recurrence-case mothers (35%). The recommendation that women should take folic acid supplements just before and during early pregnancy is not being followed by many women and offers an opportunity for NTD prevention, especially among women who are at a higher risk because they have had a previous pregnancy affected by an NTD.

  12. The C677T polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene in Mexican mestizo neural-tube defect parents, control mestizo and native populations.

    PubMed

    Dávalos, I P; Olivares, N; Castillo, M T; Cantú, J M; Ibarra, B; Sandoval, L; Morán, M C; Gallegos, M P; Chakraborty, R; Rivas, F

    2000-01-01

    The C677T mutation of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, associated with the thermolabile form of the enzyme, has reportedly been found to be increased in neural-tube defects (NTD), though this association is still unclear. A group of 107 mestizo parents of NTD children and five control populations: 101 mestizo (M), 50 Huichol (H), 38 Tarahumara (T), 21 Purepecha (P) and 20 Caucasian (C) individuals were typed for the MTHFR C677T variant by the PCR/RFLP (HinfI) method. Genotype frequencies were in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg expectations in all six populations. Allele frequency (%) of the C677T variant was 45 in NTD, 44 in M, 56 in H, 36 in T, 57 in P, 35 in C. Pairwise inter-population comparisons of allele frequency disclosed a very similar distribution between NTD and M groups (exact test, P=0.92). Among controls, differences between M and individual native groups were NS (0.06

  13. Epidemiologic study of neural tube defects in Los Angeles County. II. Etiologic factors in an area with low prevalence at birth

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Epidemiologic characteristics of neural tube defect (NTD) births occurring in Los Angeles County, California, residents during the period 1966-1972 are presented. The prevalence at birth was 0.52/1000 births for anencephalus, 0.51/1000 for spina bifida, and 0.08/1000 for encephalocele, rates considered to be low for a predominantly white population. We hypothesized that environmental (nongenetic) factors are of less etiologic importance in a low-prevalence population than in areas or time periods with high prevalence. We tested that hypothesis by examining epidemiologic characteristics of NTDs in Los Angeles County and comparing them with high-prevalence populations. The data did not support a major etiologic role for environmental factors: (1) no significant differences between rates by month of birth or conception; (2) no significant association with maternal age or parity for anencephalus; for spina bifida a significant maternal age effect (P < 0.01) and for encephalocele a parity effect (P < 0.02); and (3) no significant relationship with father's occupational class for either anencephalus or encephalocele but a marginally significant (P < 0.05) inverse association for spina bifida when a statistic based on ordinal relationships was used. Findings supporting the importance of genetic factors in etiology included: (1) a high percentage of males; (2) a higher twin concordance rate than in high-prevalence populations; and (3) an anencephalus rate among blacks comparable with rates for blacks in other United States populations. Our findings in conjunction with those from other areas and times of low prevalence suggest environmental factors play a relatively insignificant role in the etiology of NTDs in such populations.

  14. Novel mutations in Lrp6 orthologs in mouse and human neural tube defects affect a highly dosage-sensitive Wnt non-canonical planar cell polarity pathway

    PubMed Central

    Allache, Redouane; Lachance, Stéphanie; Guyot, Marie Claude; De Marco, Patrizia; Merello, Elisa; Justice, Monica J.; Capra, Valeria; Kibar, Zoha

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling has been classified as canonical Wnt/β-catenin-dependent or non-canonical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Misregulation of either pathway is linked mainly to cancer or neural tube defects (NTDs), respectively. Both pathways seem to antagonize each other, and recent studies have implicated a number of molecular switches that activate one pathway while simultaneously inhibiting the other thereby partially mediating this antagonism. The lipoprotein receptor–related protein Lrp6 is crucial for the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, but its function in Wnt/PCP signaling remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the role of Lrp6 as a molecular switch between both Wnt pathways in a novel ENU mouse mutant of Lrp6 (Skax26m1Jus) and in human NTDs. We demonstrate that Skax26m1Jus represents a hypermorphic allele of Lrp6 with increased Wnt canonical and abolished PCP-induced JNK activities. We also show that Lrp6Skax26-Jus genetically interacts with a PCP mutant (Vangl2Lp) where double heterozygotes showed an increased frequency of NTDs and defects in cochlear hair cells’ polarity. Importantly, our study also demonstrates the association of rare and novel missense mutations in LRP6 that is an inhibitor rather than an activator of the PCP pathway with human NTDs. We show that three LRP6 mutations in NTDs led to a reduced Wnt canonical activity and enhanced PCP signaling. Our data confirm an inhibitory role of Lrp6 in PCP signaling in neurulation and indicate the importance of a tightly regulated and highly dosage-sensitive antagonism between both Wnt pathways in this process. PMID:24203697

  15. Initiating Hox gene expression: in the early chick neural tube differential sensitivity to FGF and RA signaling subdivides the HoxB genes in two distinct groups.

    PubMed

    Bel-Vialar, Sophie; Itasaki, Nobue; Krumlauf, Robb

    2002-11-01

    Initiation of Hox genes requires interactions between numerous factors and signaling pathways in order to establish their precise domain boundaries in the developing nervous system. There are distinct differences in the expression and regulation of members of Hox genes within a complex suggesting that multiple competing mechanisms are used to initiate their expression domains in early embryogenesis. In this study, by analyzing the response of HoxB genes to both RA and FGF signaling in neural tissue during early chick embryogenesis (HH stages 7-15), we have defined two distinct groups of Hox genes based on their reciprocal sensitivity to RA or FGF during this developmental period. We found that the expression domain of 5' members from the HoxB complex (Hoxb6-Hoxb9) can be expanded anteriorly in the chick neural tube up to the level of the otic vesicle following FGF treatment and that these same genes are refractory to RA treatment at these stages. Furthermore, we showed that the chick caudal-related genes, cdxA and cdxB, are also responsive to FGF signaling in neural tissue and that their anterior expansion is also limited to the level of the otic vesicle. Using a dominant negative form of a Xenopus Cdx gene (XcadEnR) we found that the effect of FGF treatment on 5' HoxB genes is mediated in part through the activation and function of CDX activity. Conversely, the 3' HoxB genes (Hoxb1 and Hoxb3-Hoxb5) are sensitive to RA but not FGF treatments at these stages. We demonstrated by in ovo electroporation of a dominant negative retinoid receptor construct (dnRAR) that retinoid signaling is required to initiate expression. Elevating CDX activity by ectopic expression of an activated form of a Xenopus Cdx gene (XcadVP16) in the hindbrain ectopically activates and anteriorly expands Hoxb4 expression. In a similar manner, when ectopic expression of XcadVP16 is combined with FGF treatment, we found that Hoxb9 expression expands anteriorly into the hindbrain region. Our

  16. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via ... down through the esophagus into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to empty the stomach ...

  17. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  18. Massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computer-aided detection of polyps: Suppression of rectal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Naeppi, Janne; Dachman, Abraham H.

    2006-10-15

    One of the limitations of the current computer-aided detection (CAD) of polyps in CT colonography (CTC) is a relatively large number of false-positive (FP) detections. Rectal tubes (RTs) are one of the typical sources of FPs because a portion of a RT, especially a portion of a bulbous tip, often exhibits a cap-like shape that closely mimics the appearance of a small polyp. Radiologists can easily recognize and dismiss RT-induced FPs; thus, they may lose their confidence in CAD as an effective tool if the CAD scheme generates such ''obvious'' FPs due to RTs consistently. In addition, RT-induced FPs may distract radiologists from less common true positives in the rectum. Therefore, removal RT-induced FPs as well as other types of FPs is desirable while maintaining a high sensitivity in the detection of polyps. We developed a three-dimensional (3D) massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) for distinction between polyps and RTs in 3D CTC volumetric data. The 3D MTANN is a supervised volume-processing technique which is trained with input CTC volumes and the corresponding ''teaching'' volumes. The teaching volume for a polyp contains a 3D Gaussian distribution, and that for a RT contains zeros for enhancement of polyps and suppression of RTs, respectively. For distinction between polyps and nonpolyps including RTs, a 3D scoring method based on a 3D Gaussian weighting function is applied to the output of the trained 3D MTANN. Our database consisted of CTC examinations of 73 patients, scanned in both supine and prone positions (146 CTC data sets in total), with optical colonoscopy as a reference standard for the presence of polyps. Fifteen patients had 28 polyps, 15 of which were 5-9 mm and 13 were 10-25 mm in size. These CTC cases were subjected to our previously reported CAD scheme that included centerline-based segmentation of the colon, shape-based detection of polyps, and reduction of FPs by use of a Bayesian neural network based on geometric and texture

  19. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  20. Folic acid awareness and use among women with a history of a neural tube defect pregnancy--Texas, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Mark A; Anderson, James L; Waller, D Kim; Palmer, Susan E; Kaye, Celia I

    2002-09-13

    The use of folic acid is a critical component in preventing birth defects. Health-care providers should take advantage of all health-care visits to counsel not only women at high risk (i.e., those with a history of having an infant with a neural tube defect [NTD]) but all women regarding the importance of folic acid use. A study conducted in Texas confirmed that white and Hispanic mothers were equally likely to recall receiving postpartum advice to use folic acid; however, Hispanic women were much less likely to use folic acid, compared with white women. This report covers data from May 2000 through November 2001. A study was conducted in Texas to determine whether women at high risk recall and follow recommendations to use folic acid. The study included 195 women at high risk and 223 control mothers who gave birth to infants without birth defects. These women participated in a telephone interview for a population-based case-control study of NTDs. Approximately 56.4% (110 of 195) of mothers who had infants affected by an NTD recalled receiving postpartum advice to use folic acid, compared with 25.6% (57 of 223) of control mothers (p < 0.01). Among nonpregnant case mothers, 54 (32.7%) of 165 reported regular use of supplements containing folic acid, and 53 (25.2%) of 210 nonpregnant control mothers reported this behavior (p = 0.11). Among case mothers, use of folic acid was significantly higher for whites (64.7%) versus Hispanics (16.5%) (p < 0.001); for women with some college education (57.1%) versus no college education (20.2%; p < 0.001); for women who were trying to get pregnant (66.7%) versus those using birth control (38.3%) or reporting using no contraceptive method (18.8%) (p = 0.001); and for women who reported receiving advice to use folic acid (40.9%) versus those who did not (22.2%; p = 0.01). Findings from this study support the need to implement NTD recurrence prevention activities in Texas. Data also identify a need for educational strategies in

  1. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... A nasogastric tube (NG tube) is a special tube that carries food and medicine to the stomach through the nose. It can be ...

  2. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  3. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-07-19

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription.

  4. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-01-01

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin–mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription. PMID:21730158

  5. Apical accumulation of MARCKS in neural plate cells during neurulation in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Background The neural tube is formed by morphogenetic movements largely dependent on cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin and many of its associated proteins have been proposed as important mediators of neurulation. For instance, mice deficient in MARCKS, an actin cross-linking membrane-associated protein that is regulated by PKC and other kinases, present severe developmental defects, including failure of cranial neural tube closure. Results To determine the distribution of MARCKS, and its possible relationships with actin during neurulation, chick embryos were transversely sectioned and double labeled with an anti-MARCKS polyclonal antibody and phalloidin. In the neural plate, MARCKS was found ubiquitously distributed at the periphery of the cells, being conspicuously accumulated in the apical cell region, in close proximity to the apical actin meshwork. This asymmetric distribution was particularly noticeable during the bending process. After the closure of the neural tube, the apically accumulated MARCKS disappeared, and this cell region became analogous to the other peripheral cell zones in its MARCKS content. Actin did not display analogous variations, remaining highly concentrated at the cell subapical territory. The transient apical accumulation of MARCKS was found throughout the neural tube axis. The analysis of another epithelial bending movement, during the formation of the lens vesicle, revealed an identical phenomenon. Conclusions MARCKS is transiently accumulated at the apical region of neural plate and lens placode cells during processes of bending. This asymmetric subcellular distribution of MARCKS starts before the onset of neural plate bending. These results suggest possible upstream regulatory actions of MARCKS on some functions of the actin subapical meshwork. PMID:11329360

  6. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  7. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  8. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  9. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  10. Folate status of reproductive age women and neural tube defect risk: the effect of long-term folic acid supplementation at doses of 140 µg and 400 µg per day.

    PubMed

    Hursthouse, Nicola A; Gray, Andrew R; Miller, Jody C; Rose, Meredith C; Houghton, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    Primary prevention of most folate-responsive neural tube defects (NTDs) may not require 400 μg folic acid/day but may be achieved by attaining a high maternal folate status. Using RBC folate ≥906 nmol/L as a marker for NTD risk reduction, the study aimed to determine the change in blood folate concentrations in reproductive age women in response to long-term folic acid supplementation at 400 µg/day and 140 µg/day (dose designed to mimic the average daily folic acid intake received from New Zealand's proposed mandatory bread fortification program). Participants were randomly assigned to a daily folic acid supplement of 140 µg (n = 49), 400 µg (n = 48) or placebo (n = 47) for 40 weeks. RBC folate concentrations were measured at baseline, and after 6, 12, 29 and 40 weeks. At 40 weeks, the overall prevalence of having a RBC folate <906 nmol/L decreased to 18% and 35% in the 400 µg and 140 µg groups, respectively, while remaining relatively unchanged at 58% in the placebo group. After 40 weeks, there was no evidence of a difference in RBC folate between the two treatment groups (P = 0.340), nor was there evidence of a difference in the odds of a RBC folate <906 nmol/L (P = 0.078). In conclusion, the average daily intake of folic acid received from the proposed fortification program would increase RBC folate concentrations in reproductive age women to levels associated with a low risk of NTDs.

  11. Slits Affect the Timely Migration of Neural Crest Cells via Robo Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Giovannone, Dion; Reyes, Michelle; Reyes, Rachel; Correa, Lisa; Martinez, Darwin; Ra, Hannah; Gomez, Gustavo; Kaiser, Josh; Ma, Le; Stein, Mary-Pat; de Bellard, Maria Elena

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Neural crest cells emerge by delamination from the dorsal neural tube and give rise to various components of the peripheral nervous system in vertebrate embryos. These cells change from non-motile into highly motile cells migrating to distant areas before further differentiation. Mechanisms controlling delamination and subsequent migration of neural crest cells are not fully understood. Slit2, a chemorepellant for axonal guidance that repels and stimulates motility of trunk neural crest cells away from the gut has recently been suggested to be a tumor suppressor molecule. The goal of this study was to further investigate the role of Slit2 in trunk neural crest cell migration by constitutive expression in neural crest cells. Results We found that Slit gain-of-function significantly impaired neural crest cell migration while Slit loss-of-function favored migration. In addition, we observed that the distribution of key cytoskeletal markers was disrupted in both gain and loss of function instances. Conclusions These findings suggest that Slit molecules might be involved in the processes that allow neural crest cells to begin migration and transitioning to a mesenchymal type. PMID:22689303

  12. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  13. Developmental time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in the zebrafish neural rod

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis requires developmental processes to occur both at the right time and in the right place. During neural tube formation in the zebrafish embryo, the generation of the apical specializations of the lumen must occur in the center of the neural rod after the neural cells have undergone convergence, invagination and interdigitation across the midline. How this coordination is achieved is uncertain. One possibility is that environmental signaling at the midline of the neural rod controls the schedule of apical polarization. Alternatively, polarization could be regulated by a timing mechanism and then independent morphogenetic processes ensure the cells are in the correct spatial location. Results Ectopic transplantation demonstrates the local environment of the neural midline is not required for neural cell polarization. Neural cells can self-organize into epithelial cysts in ectopic locations in the embryo and also in three-dimensional gel cultures. Heterochronic transplants demonstrate that the schedule of polarization and the specialized cell divisions characteristic of the neural rod are more strongly regulated by time than local environmental signals. The cells’ schedule for polarization is set prior to gastrulation, is stable through several rounds of cell division and appears independent of the morphogenetic movements of gastrulation and neurulation. Conclusions Time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in zebrafish neural rod. PMID:23521850

  14. Angular glass tubing drawn from round tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Round glass tubing softened in a furnace is drawn over a shaped plug or mandel to form shapes with other than a circular cross section. Irregularly shaped tubing is formed without limitations on tube length or wall thickness.

  15. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  16. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  17. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  18. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... profile tube also has a stem length). Note: NG and NJ tubes (that go through a person’s ... Immediate Action: • Discontinue feeding. • If you have an NG or NJ tube, and the tube is curled ...

  19. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  20. Opioid Use and Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... study include codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, propoxyphene, meperidine, methadone, tramadol, hydromorphone, butorphanol, heroin, fentanyl, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, and diphenoxylate. Making Treatment Decisions When making treatment decisions just before or ...

  1. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  2. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  3. Collapse Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02154 Collapse Tubes

    The discontinuous channels in this image are collapsed lava tubes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.7N, Longitude 317.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Emergence and migration of trunk neural crest cells in a snake, the California Kingsnake (Lampropeltis getula californiae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The neural crest is a group of multipotent cells that emerges after an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition from the dorsal neural tube early during development. These cells then migrate throughout the embryo, giving rise to a wide variety derivatives including the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, pigment cells, and endocrine organs. While much is known about neural crest cells in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish, relatively little is known about their development in non-avian reptiles like snakes and lizards. Results In this study, we show for the first time ever trunk neural crest migration in a snake by labeling it with DiI and immunofluorescence. As in birds and mammals, we find that early migrating trunk neural crest cells use both a ventromedial pathway and an inter-somitic pathway in the snake. However, unlike birds and mammals, we also observed large numbers of late migrating neural crest cells utilizing the inter-somitic pathway in snake. Conclusions We found that while trunk neural crest migration in snakes is very similar to that of other amniotes, the inter-somitic pathway is used more extensively by late-migrating trunk neural crest cells in snake. PMID:20482793

  5. A tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; Depoy, D.

    1996-12-31

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  6. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  7. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  8. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - bolus; G-tube - bolus; Gastrostomy button - bolus; Bard Button - bolus; MIC-KEY - bolus ... Your child's gastrostomy tube (G-tube) is a special tube in your child's stomach that will help deliver food and medicines until your ...

  9. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  10. Development of a nerve scaffold using a tendon chitosan tube.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masumi; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Takakuda, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tanaka, Junzo

    2003-12-01

    Bridge grafting (15 mm) into the sciatic nerve of SD rats was carried out using tendon chitosan tubes having either a circular or triangular cross-section, as well as triangular tubes combined with laminin, CDPGYIGSR, or CSRARKQAASIKVAVSAD (n = 15 in each group). As a control, isografting (15 mm) was carried out in the SD rats (n = 7). Specimens were taken after 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks for histology, and nerve regeneration was evaluated electro-physiologically and histologically after 12 weeks. The mechanical strength of triangular tubes was found to be higher than circular tubes, and the inner volume of a triangular tube tends to be larger than in circular tubes. Nerve tissue regeneration along the tube wall was found in both the laminin and laminin peptide groups. According to the result of percentage neural tissue in relation to evoked action potentials, the consecutive treatments of YIGSR and IKVAV was found to match the effectiveness of intact laminin.

  11. Epigenetic Regulation in Neural Crest Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Na; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    The neural crest is a migratory and multipotent cell population that plays a crucial many aspects of embryonic development. In all vertebrate embryos, these cells emerge from the dorsal neural tube then migrate long distances to different regions of the body, where they contribute to formation of many cell types and structures. These include much of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton, smooth muscle, and pigmentation of the skin. The best-studied regulatory events guiding neural crest development are mediated by transcription factors and signaling molecules. In recent years, however, growing evidence supports an important role for epigenetic regulation as an additional mechanism for controlling the timing and level of gene expression at different stages of neural crest development. Here, we summarize the process of neural crest formation, with focus on the role of epigenetic regulation in neural crest specification, migration, and differentiation as well as in neural crest related birth defects and diseases. PMID:25446277

  12. Data analysis for steam generator tubing samples

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the Improved Eddy-Current ISI for Steam Generators program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for inservice inspection of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC`s mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report provides a description of the application of advanced eddy-current neural network analysis methods for the detection and evaluation of common steam generator tubing flaws including axial and circumferential outer-diameter stress-corrosion cracking and intergranular attack. The report describes the training of the neural networks on tubing samples with known defects and the subsequent evaluation results for unknown samples. Evaluations were done in the presence of artifacts. Computer programs are given in the appendix.

  13. Torsion Tests of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, Ambrose H; Ramberg, Walter; Back, Goldie

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 63 chromium-molybdenum steel tubes and 102 17st aluminum-alloy tubes of various sizes and lengths made to study the dependence of the torsional strength on both the dimensions of the tube and the physical properties of the tube material. Three types of failure are found to be important for sizes of tubes frequently used in aircraft construction: (1) failure by plastic shear, in which the tube material reached its yield strength before the critical torque was reached; (2) failure by elastic two-lobe buckling, which depended only on the elastic properties of the tube material and the dimensions of the tube; and (3) failure by a combination of (1) and (2) that is, by buckling taking place after some yielding of the tube material.

  14. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  15. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  16. Glass tube splitting tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. A.; Murray, C. D.; Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Tool accurately splits glass tubing so cuts are aligned 180 deg apart and reassembled tube forms low pressure, gastight enclosure. Device should interest industries using cylindrical closed glass containers.

  17. Eustachian tube (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more common in children because their eustachian tubes are shorter, narrower, and more horizontal than in ... become trapped when the tissue of the eustachian tube becomes swollen from colds or allergies. Bacteria trapped ...

  18. Feeding tube - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube is misplaced and not in the proper position, the baby may have problems with: An abnormally slow heart rate (bradycardia) Breathing Spitting up Rarely, the feeding tube can puncture the stomach.

  19. Establishing the plane of symmetry for lumen formation and bilateral brain formation in the zebrafish neural rod.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Clare; Clarke, Jon

    2014-07-01

    The lumen of the zebrafish neural tube develops precisely at the midline of the solid neural rod primordium. This process depends on cell polarisation and cell rearrangements, both of which are manifest at the midline of the neural rod. The result of this cell polarisation and cell rearrangement is an epithelial tube that has overt mirror-symmetry, such that cell morphology and apicobasal polarisation are mirrored across the midline of the neural tube. This article discusses how this mirror-symmetry is established and proposes the hypothesis that positioning the cells' centrosomes to the midline of the neural rod is a key event in organising this process.

  20. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  1. Working session 1: Tubing degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kharshafdjian, G.; Turluer, G.

    1997-02-01

    A general introductory overview of the purpose of the group and the general subject area of SG tubing degradation was given by the facilitator. The purpose of the session was described as to {open_quotes}develop conclusions and proposals on regulatory and technical needs required to deal with the issues of SG tubing degradation.{close_quotes} Types, locations and characteristics of tubing degradation in steam generators were briefly reviewed. The well-known synergistic effects of materials, environment, and stress and strain/strain rate, subsequently referred to by the acronym {open_quotes}MESS{close_quotes} by some of the group members, were noted. The element of time (i.e., evolution of these variables with time) was emphasized. It was also suggested that the group might want to consider the related topics of inspection capabilities, operational variables, degradation remedies, and validity of test data, and some background information in these areas was provided. The presentation given by Peter Millet during the Plenary Session was reviewed; Specifically, the chemical aspects and the degradation from the secondary side of the steam generator were noted. The main issues discussed during the October 1995 EPRI meeting on secondary side corrosion were reported, and a listing of the potential SG tube degradations was provided and discussed.

  2. Workshop on neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.; Emrich, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics covered in this report are: Learning, Memory, and Artificial Neural Systems; Emerging Neural Network Technology; Neural Networks; Digital Signal Processing and Neural Networks; Application of Neural Networks to In-Core Fuel Management; Neural Networks in Process Control; Neural Network Applications in Image Processing; Neural Networks for Multi-Sensor Information Fusion; Neural Network Research in Instruments Controls Division; Neural Networks Research in the ORNL Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division; Neural Network Applications for Linear Programming; Neural Network Applications to Signal Processing and Diagnostics; Neural Networks in Filtering and Control; Neural Network Research at Tennessee Technological University; and Global Minima within the Hopfield Hypercube.

  3. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  8. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  9. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  10. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    MedlinePlus

    ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI on Twitter NEI on YouTube NEI ...

  11. Determinants of Nephrostomy Tube Dislodgment After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bayne, David; Hampson, Lindsay; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) traditionally necessitates the placement of a nephrostomy tube at the conclusion of the surgical procedure. Although tubeless PCNL has become more popular, patients with complex problems still need traditional nephrostomy tube drainage. The goal of this study was to investigate whether patient body mass index (BMI) impacted inadvertent nephrostomy tube dislodgement. Furthermore, we hoped to determine whether nephrostomy tube type impacted tube dislodgement rates. Methods: A retrospective review between 2005 and 2012 of 475 consecutive PCNL cases was undertaken. Patients were categorized based on the type of nephrostomy tube placed. BMI was examined as a continuous variable. The primary outcome of nephrostomy tube dislodgment was determined based on imaging obtained at the time of PCNL and postoperative hospitalization. Logistic regression analysis was then used to adjust for nephrostomy tube type and BMI. Results: Overall, 24 (5.5%) total patients experienced nephrostomy tube dislodgment postoperatively. The mean BMI for patients experiencing nephrostomy tube dislodgment was 39.7 vs 30.9 for those without tube dislodgment (P<0.0001; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.6 to 12.9). Using logistic regression and adjusting for the use tube type, BMI was an independent predictor of tube dislodgement (P<0.001). For each unit of increase in BMI, the likelihood of tube dislodgment increased by 6% (1.06). After adjusting for BMI, however, nephrostomy tube type was not found to be an independent predictor of nephrostomy tube dislodgment. Conclusions: Nephrostomy tube type did not influence nephrostomy tube dislodgment rates. As a patient's BMI increased, the likelihood of tube dislodgment increased in a directly proportionate fashion. This is possibly because of the nephrostomy tube being fixed directly to the mobile skin associated with their fat pannus. Although the nephrostomy tube type itself did not affect

  12. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  14. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  15. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  16. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  17. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  18. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.

  19. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  20. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  1. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  2. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  3. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  4. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  5. Neural crest development: the interplay between morphogenesis and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Erickson, C A; Reedy, M V

    1998-01-01

    The final pattern of tissues established during embryogenesis reflects the outcome of two developmental processes: differentiation and morphogenesis. Avian neural crest cells are an excellent system in which to study this interaction. In the first phase of neural crest cell migration, neural crest cells separate from the neural epithelium via an epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. We present three models to account for this process: (1) separation by asymmetric mitosis, (2) separation by generating tractional force in order to rupture cell adhesions and (3) loss of expression or function of cell-cell adhesion molecules that keep the presumptive neural crest cells tethered to the neural epithelium. Evidence is presented that the segregation of the neural crest lineage apart from the neural epithelium is caused by the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Once they have detached from the neural tube, neural crest cells take two pathways in the trunk of the chick embryo: (1) the ventral path between the neural tube and somite, where neural crest cells give rise to neurons and glial cells of the peripheral nervous systems, and (2) the dorsolateral path between the ectoderm and dermamyotome of the somite, where they differentiate into pigment cells of the skin. We present data to suggest that the migration and differentiation along the ventral path is controlled primarily by environmental cues, which we refer to as the environment-directed model of neural crest morphogenesis. Conversely, only melanoblasts can migrate into the dorsolateral space, and the ability to invade that path is dependent upon their early specification as melanoblasts. We call this the phenotype-directed model for neural crest cell migration and suggest that this latter model for the positioning of neural crest derivatives in the embryo may be more common than previously suspected. These observations invite a re-examination of patterning of other crest derivates, which previously were believed

  6. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  7. Gastrostomy feeding tube - pump - child

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - gastrostomy tube - pump; G-tube - pump; Gastrostomy button - pump; Bard Button - pump; MIC-KEY - pump ... Your child has a gastrostomy tube (G-tube). This is a soft, plastic tube placed into your child's stomach. It delivers nutrition (food) and medicines until your ...

  8. Hologram recording tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajchman, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Optical memories allow extremely large numbers of bits to be stored and recalled in a matter of microseconds. Two recording tubes, similar to conventional image-converting tubes, but having a soft-glass surface on which hologram is recorded, do not degrade under repeated hologram read/write cycles.

  9. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  10. Robotic Tube-Gap Inspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Maslakowski, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision system measures small gaps between nearly parallel tubes. Robot-held video camera examines closely spaced tubes while computer determines gaps between tubes. Video monitor simultaneously displays data on gaps.

  11. [Enteral tube feeding].

    PubMed

    Haller, Alois

    2014-03-01

    Tube feeding is an integral part of medical therapies, and can be easily managed also in the outpatient setting. Tube feeding by the stomach or small intestine with nasogastral or nasojejunal tubes is common in clinical practice. Long-term nutrition is usually provided through a permanent tube, i. e. a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Modern portable nutrition pumps are used to cover the patient's nutritional needs. Enteral nutrition is always indicated if patients can not or should not eat or if nutritional requirements cannot be covered within 3 days after an intervention, e. g. after abdominal surgery. Industrially produced tube feedings with defined substrate concentrations are being used; different compositions of nutrients, such as glutamine fish oil etc., are used dependent on the the condition of the patient. Enteral nutrition may be associated with complications of the tube, e. g. dislocation, malposition or obstruction, as well as the feeding itself, e. g.hyperglycaemia, electrolyte disturbances, refeeding syndrome diarrhea or aspiration). However, the benefit of tube feeding usually exceeds the potential harm substantially.

  12. Neural network modeling of distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Baratti, R.; Vacca, G.; Servida, A.

    1995-06-01

    Neural network modeling (NNM) was implemented for monitoring and control applications on two actual distillation columns: the butane splitter tower and the gasoline stabilizer. The two distillation columns are in operation at the SARAS refinery. Results show that with proper implementation techniques NNM can significantly improve column operation. The common belief that neural networks can be used as black-box process models is not completely true. Effective implementation always requires a minimum degree of process knowledge to identify the relevant inputs to the net. After background and generalities on neural network modeling, the paper describes efforts on the development of neural networks for the two distillation units.

  13. Eustachian Tube Function.

    PubMed

    Ars, Bernard; Dirckx, Joris

    2016-10-01

    The fibrocartilaginous eustachian tube is part of a system of contiguous organs including the nose, palate, rhinopharynx, and middle ear cleft. The middle ear cleft consists of the tympanic cavity, which includes the bony eustachian tube (protympanum) and the mastoid gas cells system. The tympanic cavity and mastoid gas cells are interconnected and allow gaseous exchange and pressure regulation. The fibrocartilaginous eustachian tube is a complex organ consisting of a dynamic conduit with its mucosa, cartilage, surrounding soft tissue, peritubal muscles (ie, tensor and levator veli palatine, salpingopharyngeus and tensor tympani), and superior bony support (the sphenoid sulcus). PMID:27468632

  14. Tube flare inspection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Flare angle and symmetry of tube ends can be checked by simple tool that consists of two stainless steel pins bonded to rubber plug. Primary function of tool is to inspect tubes before they are installed, thereby eliminating expense and inconvenience of repairing leaks caused by imperfect flares. Measuring hole tapers, countersink angles, and bearing race angles are other possible uses. Tool is used with optical comparator. Axis of tool is alined with centerline of tube. Shadow of seated pins on comparator screen allows operator to verify flare angle is within tolerance.

  15. PE on YouTube--Investigating Participation in Physical Education Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quennerstedt, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this article, students' diverse ways of participating in physical education (PE) practice shown in clips on YouTube were investigated. YouTube is the largest user-generated video-sharing website on the Internet, where different video content is presented. The clips on YouTube, as used in this paper, can be seen as a user-generated…

  16. Preliminary research on eddy current bobbin quantitative test for heat exchange tube in nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Pan; Shao, Wenbin; Liao, Shusheng

    2016-02-01

    For quantitative defects detection research on heat transfer tube in nuclear power plants (NPP), two parts of work are carried out based on the crack as the main research objects. (1) Production optimization of calibration tube. Firstly, ASME, RSEM and homemade crack calibration tubes are applied to quantitatively analyze the defects depth on other designed crack test tubes, and then the judgment with quantitative results under crack calibration tube with more accuracy is given. Base on that, weight analysis of influence factors for crack depth quantitative test such as crack orientation, length, volume and so on can be undertaken, which will optimize manufacture technology of calibration tubes. (2) Quantitative optimization of crack depth. Neural network model with multi-calibration curve adopted to optimize natural crack test depth generated in in-service tubes shows preliminary ability to improve quantitative accuracy.

  17. A new perspective on behavioral inconsistency and neural noise in aging: compensatory speeding of neural communication

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S. Lee; Rebec, George V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to present a new perspective on the aging brain. Here, we make connections between two key phenomena of brain aging: (1) increased neural noise or random background activity; and (2) slowing of brain activity. Our perspective proposes the possibility that the slowing of neural processing due to decreasing nerve conduction velocities leads to a compensatory speeding of neuron firing rates. These increased firing rates lead to a broader distribution of power in the frequency spectrum of neural oscillations, which we propose, can just as easily be interpreted as neural noise. Compensatory speeding of neural activity, as we present, is constrained by the: (A) availability of metabolic energy sources; and (B) competition for frequency bandwidth needed for neural communication. We propose that these constraints lead to the eventual inability to compensate for age-related declines in neural function that are manifested clinically as deficits in cognition, affect, and motor behavior. PMID:23055970

  18. Tube Alinement for Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tool with stepped shoulders alines tubes for machining in preparation for welding. Alinement with machine tool axis accurate to within 5 mils (0.13mm) and completed much faster than visual setup by machinist.

  19. Kinking of medical tubes.

    PubMed

    Ingles, David

    2004-05-01

    The phenomenon of kinking in medical tubing remains a problem for some applications, particularly critical ones such as transporting gasses or fluids. Design features are described to prevent its occurrence.

  20. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Update Date 8/ ...

  1. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    Trach - eating ... take your first bites. Certain factors may make eating or swallowing harder, such as: Changes in the ... easier to swallow. Suction the tracheostomy tube before eating. This will keep you from coughing while eating, ...

  2. Tube-Forming Assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  3. Building with Tubes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Eugenio, Terrance, Ed.

    Text and illustrations show how to assemble furniture and toys out of cardboard tubes and sheets. Basic directions are provided, and the tools and materials necessary to the assembly of specific items are described. (MLF)

  4. Using a nasogastric tube.

    PubMed

    Candy, C

    1986-09-01

    This discussion of the use of a nasogastric tube covers the equipment needed, the method, rehydration and feeding, prolonged nasogastric feeding, and stopping nasogastric feeding. A nasogastric tube is useful when children are unable to drink safely and in sufficient amounts for any of the following reasons: severe dehydration; if intravenous (IV) therapy is unavailable; low birth weight infants; or the child is drowsy or vomiting. Severely malnourished children may be fed initially in this way if they are too weak or anorexic to eat or drink normally. The following equipment is needed: nasogastric tube; lubricating fluid; a syringe; blue litmus paper, if available; adhesive tape; stethoscope if available; and fluid to be given. Explain to the child's parents and the child, if old enough to understand, what will be done; lie infants flat; measure the approximate length from the child's nostril to the ear lobe and then to the top of the abdomen with the tube and mark the position; clean the nostrils to remove the mucus, and lubricate the tip of the tube and gently insert into the nostril; give the child a drink of water if he or she is conscious; continue to pass the tube down until the position marked reaches the nostril; use the syringe to suck up some fluid and test with blue litmus paper to check that the tube is in the stomach; and inject 5-10 ml of fluid (saline or oral rehydration solution, not milk formula) by syringe if satisfied the tube is in the correct position. Where possible, give a continuous drip of fluid. If this is not possible, give frequent small amounts using the syringe as a funnel. If feeding continues for more than 24 hours, clean the nostrils daily with warm water and change the tube to the other nostril every few days. Also keep the mouth very clean with a dilute solution of 8% sodium bicarbonate, if available, or citrus fruit juice. To remove the tube, remove the adhesive tape, take the tube out gently and smoothly, and offer the child a

  5. Tubing crimping pliers

    DOEpatents

    Lindholm, G.T.

    1981-02-27

    The disclosure relates to pliers and more particularly to pliers for crimping two or more pieces of copper tubing together prior to their being permanently joined by brazing, soldering or the like. A die containing spring-loaded pins rotates within a cammed ring in the head of the pliers. As the die rotates, the pins force a crimp on tubing held within the pliers.

  6. Aeronautical tubes and pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauclair, N.

    1984-12-01

    The main and subcomponent French suppliers of aircraft tubes and pipes are discussed, and the state of the industry is analyzed. Quality control is essential for tubes with regard to their i.d. and metallurgical compositions. French regulations do not allow welded seam tubes in hydraulic circuits unless no other form is available, and then rustproofed steel must be installed. The actual low level of orders for any run of tubes dictates that the product is only one of several among the manufacturers' line. Automation, both in NDT and quality control, assures that the tubes meet specifications. A total of 10 French companies participate in the industry, serving both civil and military needs, with some companies specializing only in titanium, steel, or aluminum materials. Concerns wishing to enter the market must upgrade their equipment to meet the higher aeronautical specifications and be prepared to furnish tubes and pipes that serve both functional and structural purposes simultaneously. Additionally, pipe-bending machines must also perform to tight specifications. Pipes can range from 0.2 mm exterior diameter to 40 mm, with wall thicknesses from 0.02 mm to 3 mm. A chart containing a list of manufacturers and their respective specifications and characteristics is presented, and a downtrend in production with reduction of personnel is noted.

  7. Clearing obstructed feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Marcuard, S P; Stegall, K L; Trogdon, S

    1989-01-01

    This is a report of an in vitro study evaluating the ability of six solutions to dissolve clotted enteral feeding, which can cause feeding tube occlusion. The following clotted enteral feeding products were tested: Ensure Plus, Ensure Plus with added protein (Promod 20 g/liter), Osmolite, Enrich, and Pulmocare. Clot dissolution was then tested by adding Adolf's Meat Tenderizer, Viokase, Sprite, Pepsi, Coke, or Mountain Dew. Distilled water served as control. Dissolution score for each mixture was assessed blindly. Best dissolution was observed with Viokase in pH 7.9 solution (p less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained when feeding tube patency was restored in eight in vitro occluded feeding tubes (Dobbhoff, French size 8) by using first Pepsi (two/eight successful) and then Viokase in pH 7.9 (six/six successful). We also report our experience in the first 10 patients with occluded feeding tubes using this Viokase solution injected through a Drum catheter into the feeding tube. In seven patients, this method proved to be successful, and the reasons for failure in three patients include a knotted tube, impacted tablet powder, and a formula clot fo 24 hr duration and 45 cm in length. PMID:2494372

  8. Clearing obstructed feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Marcuard, S P; Stegall, K L; Trogdon, S

    1989-01-01

    This is a report of an in vitro study evaluating the ability of six solutions to dissolve clotted enteral feeding, which can cause feeding tube occlusion. The following clotted enteral feeding products were tested: Ensure Plus, Ensure Plus with added protein (Promod 20 g/liter), Osmolite, Enrich, and Pulmocare. Clot dissolution was then tested by adding Adolf's Meat Tenderizer, Viokase, Sprite, Pepsi, Coke, or Mountain Dew. Distilled water served as control. Dissolution score for each mixture was assessed blindly. Best dissolution was observed with Viokase in pH 7.9 solution (p less than 0.01). Similar results were obtained when feeding tube patency was restored in eight in vitro occluded feeding tubes (Dobbhoff, French size 8) by using first Pepsi (two/eight successful) and then Viokase in pH 7.9 (six/six successful). We also report our experience in the first 10 patients with occluded feeding tubes using this Viokase solution injected through a Drum catheter into the feeding tube. In seven patients, this method proved to be successful, and the reasons for failure in three patients include a knotted tube, impacted tablet powder, and a formula clot fo 24 hr duration and 45 cm in length.

  9. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  10. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  11. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jack C.; Brown, Adam P.; Shin, John S.; Rogers, Kirsten M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endotracheal tube security is a critical safety issue. We compared the mobility of an in situ endotracheal tube secured with adhesive tape to the one secured with a new commercially available purpose-designed endotracheal tube-holder device (Haider Tube-Guard®). We also observed for the incidence of oropharyngeal or facial trauma associated with the 2 tube fixation methods. METHODS: Thirty adult patients undergoing general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade were prospectively enrolled. Immediately after intubation, a single study author positioned the endotracheal tube tip in the distal trachea using a bronchoscope. Anesthesiologists caring for patients secured the tube in their normal fashion (always with adhesive tape). A force transducer was used to apply linear force, increasing to 15 N or until the principal investigator deemed that the force be aborted for safety reasons. The displacement of the endotracheal tube was measured with the bronchoscope. Any tape was then removed and the endotracheal tube secured with the Haider Tube-Guard device. The linear force was reapplied and the displacement of the endotracheal tube measured. The Haider Tube-Guard device was left in place for the duration of the case. The patient’s face and oropharynx were examined for any evidence of trauma during surgery and in the recovery room. On discharge from the postanesthesia care unit, the patient answered a brief survey assessing for any subjective evidence of minor facial or oropharyngeal trauma. RESULTS: Under standardized tension, the endotracheal tube withdrew a mean distance of 3.4 cm when secured with adhesive tape versus 0.3 cm when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P <0.001). Ninety-seven percent of patients (29/30) experienced clinically significant endotracheal tube movement (>1 cm) when adhesive tape was used to secure the tube versus 3% (1/30) when the Haider Tube-Guard was used (P <0.001). Thirty percent of patients (9/30) were potentially deemed

  12. Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy With Gastric Tube Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Norio; Toujigamori, Manabu; Shiroshita, Hidefumi; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There is no standardized method of reconstruction in laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG). We present a novel technique of reconstruction with a long, narrow gastric tube in LPG for early gastric cancer (EGC). Methods: During the laparoscopic procedure, the upper part of the stomach is fully mobilized with perigastric and suprapancreatic lymphadenectomy, and then the abdominal esophagus is transected. After a minilaparotomy is created, the entire stomach is pulled outside. A long, narrow gastric tube (20 cm long, 3 cm wide) is created with a linear stapler. The proximal part of the gastric tube is formed into a cobra head shape for esophagogastric tube anastomosis, which is then performed with a 45-mm linear stapler under laparoscopic view. The end of the esophagus is fixed on the gastric tube to prevent postoperative esophageal reflux. Results: Thirteen patients with early proximal gastric cancer underwent the procedure. The mean operative time was 283 min, and median blood loss was 63 ml. There were no conversions to open surgery, and no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: This new technique of reconstruction after LPG is simple and feasible. The procedure has the potential of becoming a standard reconstruction technique after LPG for proximal EGC. PMID:27547027

  13. Tube plug inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Pirl, W.E.; Ray, E.A.; Costlow, A.M.; Roth, C.H. Jr.; Gradich, F.X.; Chizmar, D.A.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a system for inspecting a tube plug defining a chamber therein and having an open end in communication with the chamber, the chamber having disposed therein an expander element having a bore therethrough. It comprises: probe means having a sensor probe connected thereto for inspecting the tube plug, the probe means capable of being connected to the tube plug for extending the sensor probe a predetermined distance into the chamber through the open end of the tube plug; means connected to the probe means for rotating and translating the sensor probe within the chamber to provide an inspection scan interiorly of the tube plug, the rotating and translating means including: a flexible hose connected to the probe means for translating and rotating the probe means, the hose having adjacent segments so that the hose is flexible; and a connector interposed between adjacent segments of the hose for maintaining the hose in a tangle-free state; and drive means engaging the rotating and translating means for driving the rotating and translating means.

  14. Neural networks in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Roberto; Longo, Giuseppe; Milano, Leopoldo; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio; Ciaramella, Angelo; De Rosa, Rosario; Donalek, Ciro; Eleuteri, Antonio; Raiconi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Salvatore; Staiano, Antonino; Volpicelli, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of neural networks (NN) and of other soft computing methods has begun to spread also in the astronomical community which, due to the required accuracy of the measurements, is usually reluctant to use automatic tools to perform even the most common tasks of data reduction and data mining. The federation of heterogeneous large astronomical databases which is foreseen in the framework of the astrophysical virtual observatory and national virtual observatory projects, is, however, posing unprecedented data mining and visualization problems which will find a rather natural and user friendly answer in artificial intelligence tools based on NNs, fuzzy sets or genetic algorithms. This review is aimed to both astronomers (who often have little knowledge of the methodological background) and computer scientists (who often know little about potentially interesting applications), and therefore will be structured as follows: after giving a short introduction to the subject, we shall summarize the methodological background and focus our attention on some of the most interesting fields of application, namely: object extraction and classification, time series analysis, noise identification, and data mining. Most of the original work described in the paper has been performed in the framework of the AstroNeural collaboration (Napoli-Salerno).

  15. Mechanistic insights from a quantitative analysis of pollen tube guidance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant biologists have long speculated about the mechanisms that guide pollen tubes to ovules. Although there is now evidence that ovules emit a diffusible attractant, little is known about how this attractant mediates interactions between the pollen tube and the ovules. Results We employ a semi-in vitro assay, in which ovules dissected from Arabidopsis thaliana are arranged around a cut style on artificial medium, to elucidate how ovules release the attractant and how pollen tubes respond to it. Analysis of microscopy images of the semi-in vitro system shows that pollen tubes are more attracted to ovules that are incubated on the medium for longer times before pollen tubes emerge from the cut style. The responses of tubes are consistent with their sensing a gradient of an attractant at 100-150 μm, farther than previously reported. Our microscopy images also show that pollen tubes slow their growth near the micropyles of functional ovules with a spatial range that depends on ovule incubation time. Conclusions We propose a stochastic model that captures these dynamics. In the model, a pollen tube senses a difference in the fraction of receptors bound to an attractant and changes its direction of growth in response; the attractant is continuously released from ovules and spreads isotropically on the medium. The model suggests that the observed slowing greatly enhances the ability of pollen tubes to successfully target ovules. The relation of the results to guidance in vivo is discussed. PMID:20170550

  16. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TUBING

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1958-04-15

    The manufacture of thin-walled uranium tubing by the hot-piercing techique is described. Uranium billets are preheated to a temperature above 780 d C. The heated billet is fed to a station where it is engaged on its external surface by three convex-surfaced rotating rollers which are set at an angle to the axis of the billet to produce a surface friction force in one direction to force the billet over a piercing mandrel. While being formed around the mandrel and before losing the desired shape, the tube thus formed is cooled by a water spray.

  17. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  18. Heat-shrink plastic tubing seals joints in glass tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Duca, B.; Downey, A.

    1968-01-01

    Small units of standard glass apparatus held together by short lengths of transparent heat-shrinkable polyolefin tubing. The tubing is shrunk over glass O-ring type connectors having O-rings but no lubricant.

  19. Tube Feeding Transition Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Marsha Dunn

    2007-01-01

    The journey children make from tube feeding to oral feeding is personal for each child and family. There is a sequence of predictable plateaus that children climb as they move toward orally eating. By better understanding this sequence, parents and children can maximize the development, learning, enjoyment and confidence at each plateau. The…

  20. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  1. On the holographic width of flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giataganas, Dimitrios; Irges, Nikos

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the width of the flux tube between heavy static quark charges. Using the gauge/gravity duality, we find the properties of the minimal connected surface related to the width of the bound state. We show that in the confining phase, the logarithmic broadening predicted by the effective string description and observed in lattice simulations is a generic property of all confining backgrounds. We also study the transverse fluctuations of the string connecting two static quarks in curved backgrounds. Our formalism is applied to AdS space where we compute the expectation value of the square of transverse deviations of the string, a quantity related to the width.

  2. Hyperthermia and the induction of neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Webster, W S; Edwards, M J

    1984-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine some parameters determining the teratogenicity of hyperthermia. Pregnant inbred (C57B1/6J and CBA/Ca/T6) and outbred (QS) mice were partially immersed in a water bath at 43-43.5 degrees C until their core temperature, monitored by a rectal thermister probe, was elevated to 43 degrees C for the inbred mice and 43.5 degrees C for the outbred mice. The procedure was repeated 6 h later. The regimen of 2 heatings was performed over a range of development from pregastrulation to about the 24 somite stage. The mice were killed on day 19, and the fetuses were examined. Exencephaly was the common malformation seen in each strain. It occurred at a maximum incidence of 34% in the QS mice, 14% in the CBA strain, and 20% in C57B1 mice. For the CBA and QS mice 4 to 11-15 somites was the most heat sensitive stage of development for the induction of exencephaly while in the C57B1 mice the preceding 24 hr of development were most sensitive. Control mice were exposed to the same experimental procedure in a water bath at body temperature at the most sensitive stage of development for the strain. There were no instances of exencephaly in the controls. The sex of all fetuses was determined and revealed a high female/male ratio among the fetuses with exencephaly (2.1 for the QS mice, 1.7 for the CBA mice, and 3.1 for the C57B1 mice) compared with a ratio of approximately 1.0 for all fetuses. Analysis in the QS mice indicated that the predominance of female exencephalics was probably due to prenatal loss of male embryos.

  3. Ethical Problems of Screening for Neural Tube Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habgood, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Among the ethical problems in screening for severe spina bifida in a fetus are deciding who should be screened; whether the procedure, which has medical risks, is justified; and how to deal with the only known solution--abortion. Journal availability: see EC 114 865. (PHR)

  4. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  5. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  6. Repair boundary for parent tube indications within the upper joint zone of hybrid expansion joint (HEJ) sleeved tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, W.K.; Keating, R.F.

    1997-02-01

    In the Spring and Fall of 1994, and the Spring of 1995, crack-like indications were found in the upper hybrid expansion joint (HEJ) region of Steam Generator (S/G) tubes which had been sleeved using Westinghouse HEJ sleeves. As a result of these findings, analytic and test evaluations were performed to assess the effect of the degradation on the structural, and leakage, integrity of the sleeve/tube joint relative to the requirements of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) draft Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.121. The results of these evaluations demonstrated that tubes with implied or known crack-like circumferential parent tube indications (PTIs) located 1.1 inches or farther below the bottom of the hardroll upper transition, have sufficient, and significant, integrity relative to the requirements of RG 1.121. Thus, the purpose of this report is to provide background information related to the justification of the modified tube repair boundary.

  7. Eddy current signal deconvolution technique for the improvement of steam generator tubing burst pressure predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M. C.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Kupperman, D. S.; Reifman, J.; Morman, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Eddy current techniques are extremely sensitive to the presence of axial cracks in nuclear power plant steam generator tube walls, but they are equally sensitive to the presence of dents, fretting, support structures, corrosion products, and other artifacts. Eddy current signal interpretation is further complicated by cracking geometries more complex than a single axial crack. Although there has been limited success in classifying and sizing defects through artificial neural networks, the ability to predict tubing integrity has, so far, eluded modelers. In large part, this lack of success stems from an inability to distinguish crack signals from those arising from artifacts. We present here a new signal processing technique that deconvolves raw eddy current voltage signals into separate signal contributions from different sources, which allows signals associated with a dominant crack to be identified. The signal deconvolution technique, combined with artificial neural network modeling, significantly improves the prediction of tube burst pressure from bobbin-coil eddy current measurements of steam generator tubing.

  8. Performance of photomultiplier tubes and sodium iodide scintillation detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) and scintillation detector systems incorporating 50.8 by 1.27 cm NaI (T l) crystals was investigated to determine the characteristics of the photomultiplier tubes and optimize the detector geometry for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory. Background information on performance characteristics of PMT's and NaI (T l) detectors is provided, procedures for measurement of relevant parameters are specified, and results of these measurements are presented.

  9. Quarter-wave pulse tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Gardner, D. L.; Backhaus, S. N.

    2011-10-01

    In high-power pulse-tube refrigerators, the pulse tube itself can be very long without too much dissipation of acoustic power on its walls. The pressure amplitude, the volume-flow-rate amplitude, and the time phase between them evolve significantly along a pulse tube that is about a quarter-wavelength long. Proper choice of length and area makes the oscillations at the ambient end of the long pulse tube optimal for driving a second, smaller pulse-tube refrigerator, thereby utilizing the acoustic power that would typically have been dissipated in the first pulse-tube refrigerator's orifice. Experiments show that little heat is carried from the ambient heat exchanger to the cold heat exchanger in such a long pulse tube, even though the oscillations are turbulent and even when the tube is compactly coiled.

  10. Rubens Flame-Tube Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficken, George W.; Stephenson, Francis C.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates and explains the phenomenon associated with Rubens flame-tube demonstration, specifically the persistance of flames at regular intervals along the tube for few minutes after the gas is turned off. (GA)

  11. Vanadium tube processing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.; Tanaka, G.J.

    1993-08-11

    Vanadium tubing obtained from Century Tubes, a custom tubing manufacturer, was studied to determine as-received quality and fabricability. Applications for this tubing involve crimping and sealing operations at Pantex Plant requiring very high levels of leak-tightness (leak rates less than 10{sup {minus}8} atm-cc He/sec). The as-received material had poor OD and ID surface finish and cleanliness that needed to be improved before use in component fabrication. Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) personnel developed a cleaning procedure to make this tubing acceptable for crimping and sealing operations. After suitably cleaning the tubing, we tested several tube sealing techniques and all showed some degree of success. Pantex Plant personnel are now implementing a tube sealing process very similar to one of the techniques studied, a mechanical crimp followed by seal welding.

  12. Multiple test tubes stirred mechanically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. J.; Strong, I. J.

    1965-01-01

    Mechanical device simultaneously stirs multiple test tubes under controlled laboratory conditions. The invention provides a variable stirring rate, minimal amount of contamination of tube contents, unattended and simple operation, and easy maintenance and cleaning.

  13. Environmental test report for the WX-32335 SEC camera tube. [for International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malanoski, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The environmental testing activity on the WX-32335 was carried out to determine if this tube type could withstand the environmental requirements established for the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) camera tube (WX-32224). The results of the tests led to the following conclusions: (1) The WX-32335 as processed with a CsTe photocathode surface can withstand the temperature extremes established for the IUE camera tube without damage to the photocathode surface or without introducing background signal in the tube after one hour of dark integration. (2) The WX-32335 built with a WX-32224 type target support structure can withstand the sinusoidal vibration requirements established for the IUE camera tube. (3) Although the vibration test of the WX-32335 type tubes built with the flat target ring structure could not be completed, there was no indication that these tubes could not withstand the sinusoidal vibration requirements established for the IUE camera tube.

  14. Statistical Study of Plasma-depleted Flux Tubes in Saturnian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jia, Y. D.

    2015-10-01

    We have surveyed the occurrence of flux tubes with both enhanced and depressed field strength relative to their surroundings as observed in Cassini magnetometer data. Consistent with earlier studies, enhanced field flux tubes are concentrated near the equator while depressed field flux tubes are distributed in a larger latitudinal region. For both types of flux tubes, their occurrence rates vary with the local time in the same pattern and they contain the same magnetic flux. Therefore, we suggest that those two types of tubes are just different manifestations of the same phenomenon. Near the equator with high ambient plasma density, the flux tubes convecting in from the tail are compressed, resulting in increased field strength. Off the equator,these flux tubes expand slightly, resulting in decreased field strength. The enhanced flux tubes gradually break into smaller ones as they convect inward. Inside an L value of about 5, they become indistinguishable from the background.

  15. Composite Cathode-Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, Mukund D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed composite cathode-ray tube consists of rectangular array of cathode-ray tubes joined at edges, sharing common vacuum. Each electron gun generates independent image on portion of screen. Composite tube operates most advantageously under digital control to make available several display modes. Brightness and resolution of large images increased. Useful for classroom presentations, conferences, and the like.

  16. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  17. Tubing rotator reduces tubing wear in rod pumped wells

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M. ); Brown, C. )

    1994-04-04

    Tubing failures are both expensive and time-consuming. The most common failure results from rod cutting, or, erosion of the tubing ID because of continuous, reciprocating contact with the rod string. Installation of tubing rotators has decreased tubing failures in West Texas waterflood sucker-rod pumped wells. Pumping unit movement powers the rotator system, turning the tubing string at about 1 revolution/day. The rotator system has both surface and subsurface components. A reduction gear box attached to the walking beam converts the pumping unit's reciprocating strokes into rotary motion. A drive line transfers this rotary motion to a gear-driven suspension mandrel in the rotating tubing hanger. Near the bottom of the tubing string, a rotating tubing anchor/catcher allows the entire tubing string, including the tail pipe, seating nipple, and gas and mud anchor to rotate. The rotator hanger suspends the weight of the tubing string on a bearing system. One model of the hanger has a load capacity of 135,000 lb. A surface swivel allows rotation below the pumping tee so that the flow lines remain stationary. Also included in the string is a safety shear coupling to prevent over torquing the tubing.

  18. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  19. YouTube Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2012-09-01

    To date, this column has presented videos to show in class, Don Mathieson from Tulsa Community College suggested that YouTube could be used in another fashion. In Don's experience, his students are not always prepared for the mathematic rigor of his course. Even at the high school level, math can be a barrier for physics students. Walid Shihabi, a colleague of Don's, decided to compile a list of YouTube videos that his students could watch to relearn basic mathematics. I thought this sounded like a fantastic idea and a great service to the students. Walid graciously agreed to share his list and I have reproduced a large portion of it below.

  20. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  1. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  2. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electronic neural networks for space station are presented. Topics covered include: electronic neural networks; electronic implementations; VLSI/thin film hybrid hardware for neurocomputing; computations with analog parallel processing; features of neuroprocessors; applications of neuroprocessors; neural network hardware for terrain trafficability determination; a dedicated processor for path planning; neural network system interface; neural network for robotic control; error backpropagation algorithm for learning; resource allocation matrix; global optimization neuroprocessor; and electrically programmable read only thin-film synaptic array.

  3. [Patulous eustachian tube].

    PubMed

    Kovacević, D; Radosavljević, M; Jelesijević, J

    1995-01-01

    Patulous eustachian tube is a pathological condition which exists more often than we make a diagnosis, and a patient is not often aware of his disease. This disease can be manifested with various symptoms: respiratory synchrony noises in the ear, because of the penetration of the air current through the eustachian tube and with the movement of the eardrum outwards and inside, with autophony, reduction of the hearing, the buzzing, dizziness and disturbance of the balance. Two patients are presented. The first one was sick for many years from various chronics exhausted diseases: Jackson's epilepsy, temporary vascular brain disturbances, tuberculosis of lung, stomach ulcer, heart diseases, the patient is from low class, on one side, and also suffers from some local diseases: a paralysis of soft palate and palatal arcs, a chronic catarrhal rhinitis and sinusitis, a deviation of nasal dividing wall and hindered breathing through the nose, on the other side. Many years the patient didn't know for patological condition in the ears and in the eustachian tubes. After improving the hygienic conditions, the physical condition and local therapy, the patient felt much better. The second patient, with considerable shorter evolution of the disease and mild symptomatology, showed the amplified symptoms of the disease of the Eustachian tube in the course of the acute otitis. It is attained a satisfying calming of the manifestative symptoms by remedy therapie. Man must thing about possibility of the appearance of this pathology condition in various disease or conditions, which can take to the fast lost of the weight and physical and moral exhaustion of the patient, i.e. an adult, first as the protection of the appearance of the disease (condition) and afterwards, eventually early and regulary treatment in order to prevent various possible, above mentioned complications. PMID:16296237

  4. Joined concentric tubes

    SciTech Connect

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  5. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  6. Concentric tube support assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

    2012-09-04

    An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

  7. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  8. Tube bundle system

    PubMed Central

    Marchewka, W.; Mohamed, K.; Addis, J.; Karnack, F.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine. The gas samples are drawn via vacuum pump to the surface and are typically analyzed for oxygen, methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Results of the gas analyses are displayed and recorded for further analysis. Trends in the composition of the mine atmosphere, such as increasing methane or carbon monoxide concentration, can be detected early, permitting rapid intervention that prevents problems, such as a potentially explosive atmosphere behind seals, fire or spontaneous combustion. TBS is a well-developed technology and has been used in coal mines around the world for more than 50 years. Most longwall coal mines in Australia deploy a TBS, usually with 30 to 40 monitoring points as part of their atmospheric monitoring. The primary uses of a TBS are detecting spontaneous combustion and maintaining sealed areas inert. The TBS might also provide mine atmosphere gas composition data after a catastrophe occurs in an underground mine, if the sampling tubes are not damaged. TBSs are not an alternative to statutory gas and ventilation airflow monitoring by electronic sensors or people; rather, they are an option to consider in an overall mine atmosphere monitoring strategy. This paper describes the hardware, software and operation of a TBS and presents one example of typical data from a longwall coal mine PMID:26306052

  9. Apparatus Splits Glass Tubes Longitudinally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Ernest; Manahan, Robert O'neil

    1993-01-01

    Tubes split into half cylinders by hot-wire/thermal-shock method. Tube to be cut placed on notched jig in apparatus. Nichrome wire stretched between arms of pivoted carriage and oriented parallel to notch. Wire heated by electrical current while resting on tube. After heating for about 1 minute for each millimeter of thickness of glass, tube quenched in water and split by resulting thermal shock. Apparatus used to split tubes in sizes ranging from 3/8 in. in diameter by 1 in. long to 1 1/2 in. in diameter by 4 in. long.

  10. Artificial-neural-network-based failure detection and isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadok, Mokhtar; Gharsalli, Imed; Alouani, Ali T.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents the design of a systematic failure detection and isolation system that uses the concept of failure sensitive variables (FSV) and artificial neural networks (ANN). The proposed approach was applied to tube leak detection in a utility boiler system. Results of the experimental testing are presented in the paper.

  11. Reliability of steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Kadokami, E.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents results on studies made of the reliability of steam generator (SG) tubing. The basis for this work is that in Japan the issue of defects in SG tubing is addressed by the approach that any detected defect should be repaired, either by plugging the tube or sleeving it. However, this leaves open the issue that there is a detection limit in practice, and what is the effect of nondetectable cracks on the performance of tubing. These studies were commissioned to look at the safety issues involved in degraded SG tubing. The program has looked at a number of different issues. First was an assessment of the penetration and opening behavior of tube flaws due to internal pressure in the tubing. They have studied: penetration behavior of the tube flaws; primary water leakage from through-wall flaws; opening behavior of through-wall flaws. In addition they have looked at the question of the reliability of tubing with flaws during normal plant operation. Also there have been studies done on the consequences of tube rupture accidents on the integrity of neighboring tubes.

  12. Hybrid endotracheal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakezles, Christopher Thomas

    Intubation involves the placement of a tube into the tracheal lumen and is prescribed in any setting in which the airway must be stabilized or the patient anesthetized. The purpose of the endotracheal tube in these procedures is to maintain a viable airway, facilitate mechanical ventilation, allow the administration of anesthetics, and prevent the reflux of vomitus into the lungs. In order to satisfy these requirements a nearly airtight seal must be maintained between the tube and the tracheal lining. Most conventional endotracheal tubes provide this seal by employing a cuff that is inflated once the tube is in place. However, the design of this cuff and properties of the material are a source of irritation and injury to the tracheal tissues. In fact, the complication rate for endotracheal intubation is reported to be between 10 and 60%, with manifestations ranging from severe sore throat to erosion through the tracheal wall. These complications are caused by a combination of the materials employed and the forces exerted by the cuff on the tracheal tissues. In particular, the abrasive action of the cuff shears cells from the lining, epithelium adhering to the cuff is removed during extubation, and normal forces exerted on the basement tissues disrupt the blood supply and cause pressure necrosis. The complications associated with tracheal intubation may be reduced or eliminated by employing airway devices constructed from hydrogel materials. Hydrogels are a class of crosslinked polymers which swell in the presence of moisture, and may contain more than 95% water by weight. For the current study, several prototype airway devices were constructed from hydrogel materials including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). The raw hydrogel materials from this group were subjected to tensile, swelling, and biocompatibility testing, while the finished devices were subjected to extensive mechanical simulation and animal trials

  13. Liquid-Nitrogen Test for Blocked Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Nondestructive test identifies obstructed tube in array of parallel tubes. Trickle of liquid nitrogen allowed to flow through tube array until array accumulates substantial formation of frost from moisture in air. Flow stopped and warm air introduced into inlet manifold to heat tubes in array. Tubes still frosted after others defrosted identified as obstructed tubes. Applications include inspection of flow systems having parallel legs.

  14. Syringosubarachnoid shunting using a myringotomy tube

    PubMed Central

    Leschke, Jack M.; Mumert, Michael L.; Kurpad, Shekar N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Syringomyelia results from obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow due to a multitude of causes. Often symptoms of pain, weakness, and sensory disturbance are progressive and require surgical treatment. We present here a rare technique for syringosubarachnoid shunting. Case Description: We present the case of a 38-year-old male who suffered a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury due to a motor vehicle accident. With progressive pain and motor decline, a magnetic resonance imaging was obtained and showed a new syrinx extending cervical multiple segments. A unique surgical procedure using a myringotomy tube to shunt CSF into the subarachnoid space was employed in this case. The patient's examination stabilized postoperatively, and at 2 months and 6 months follow-up visits, his strength and sensation continued to improve. Conclusion: We used a myringotomy tube for syringosubarachnoid shunting for the surgical management of a posttraumatic syrinx with good results. This technique minimizes suturing and may minimize shunt-related complications. PMID:26862456

  15. NONLINEAR MULTISCALE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Ragot, B. R.

    2011-10-20

    A new method for the full nonlinear computation of sets of turbulent field lines has recently been introduced that allows inclusion of the equivalent of more than four decades of turbulent scales with a fully three-dimensional distribution of wavevectors. The integration scheme is here detailed, which, through transformation of the set of differential equations into mappings, compounds the efficiency and accuracy of the method. The potential of the method is then demonstrated with multiscale simulations of magnetic flux tubes ranging over nearly four decades of length scales both along and across the background field. Magnetic flux tubes of various sizes are computed for a turbulence spectrum typical of the quiet slow solar wind near 1 AU. Implications of the simulation results for the transport of energetic particles, and in particular, for the interpretation of impulsive solar-energetic-particle and upstream ion-event observations are discussed.

  16. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  17. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Recent limits on spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are reviewed. The various backgrounds are described, and the theoretical implications are assessed. Constraints on inflationary cosmology dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) and on open cosmological models dominated by baryonic dark matter (BDM), with, respectively, primordial random phase scale-invariant curvature fluctuations or non-gaussian isocurvature fluctuations are described. More exotic theories are addressed, and I conclude with the 'bottom line': what theorists expect experimentalists to be measuring within the next two to three years without having to abandon their most cherished theories.

  18. Zebrafish Zic2a and Zic2b regulate neural crest and craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Teslaa, Jessica J; Keller, Abigail N; Nyholm, Molly K; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2013-08-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the human forebrain, is associated with defects of the craniofacial skeleton. ZIC2, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is strongly linked to HPE and to a characteristic set of dysmorphic facial features in humans. We have previously identified important functions for zebrafish Zic2 in the developing forebrain. Here, we demonstrate that ZIC2 orthologs zic2a and zic2b also regulate the forming zebrafish craniofacial skeleton, including the jaw and neurocranial cartilages, and use the zebrafish to study Zic2-regulated processes that may contribute to the complex etiology of HPE. Using temporally controlled Zic2a overexpression, we show that the developing craniofacial cartilages are sensitive to Zic2 elevation prior to 24hpf. This window of sensitivity overlaps the critical expansion and migration of the neural crest (NC) cells, which migrate from the developing neural tube to populate vertebrate craniofacial structures. We demonstrate that zic2b influences the induction of NC at the neural plate border, while both zic2a and zic2b regulate NC migratory onset and strongly contribute to chromatophore development. Both Zic2 depletion and early ectopic Zic2 expression cause moderate, incompletely penetrant mispatterning of the NC-derived jaw precursors at 24hpf, yet by 2dpf these changes in Zic2 expression result in profoundly mispatterned chondrogenic condensations. We attribute this discrepancy to an additional role for Zic2a and Zic2b in patterning the forebrain primordium, an important signaling source during craniofacial development. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that transplanted Zic2-deficient cells can contribute to craniofacial cartilages in a wild-type background. Collectively, these data suggest that zebrafish Zic2 plays a dual role during craniofacial development, contributing to two disparate aspects of craniofacial morphogenesis: (1) neural crest induction and migration, and (2) early

  19. Plasma-depleted Flux Tubes in the Saturnian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Jia, Y. D.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Similar to Io's mass loading in the jovian magnetosphere, Saturn's moon, Enceladus, provides 100s of kilograms of water group neutrals and plasma to the planet's magnetosphere every second. The newly added plasma, being accelerated and convecting outward due to the centrifugal force, is then lost through magnetic reconnection in the tail. To conserve the total magnetic flux established by the internal dynamo, the 'empty' reconnected magnetic flux must return from the tail back to the inner magnetosphere. At both Jupiter and Saturn, flux tubes with enhanced field strength relative to their surroundings have been detected and are believed to be taking the role of returning the magnetic flux. However, at Saturn, flux tubes with depressed field strength are also reported. To reveal the relationship between the two kinds of flux tubes, we have systematically surveyed all the available 1-sec magnetic field data measured by Cassini and studied their statistical properties. The spatial distributions show that enhanced-field flux tubes are concentrated near the equator and closer to the planet while depressed-field flux tubes are distributed in a larger latitudinal region and can be detected at larger distances. In addition, we find that for both types of flux tubes, their occurrence rates vary with the local time in the same pattern and their magnetic flux is in the same magnitude. Therefore, the two types of flux tubes are just different manifestations of the same phenomenon: near the equator with high ambient plasma density, the flux tubes convecting in from the tail are compressed, resulting in increased field strength; off the equator, these flux tubes expand slightly, resulting in decreased field strength. Here we also present the lifecycle of the enhanced-field flux tubes: they gradually break into smaller ones when convecting inward and become indistinguishable from the background inside an L-value of about 4.

  20. Neural crest: The fourth germ layer

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, K; Yanduri, Sarita; Girish, HC; Murgod, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The neural crest cells (NCCs), a transient group of cells that emerges from the dorsal aspect of the neural tube during early vertebrate development has been a fascinating group of cells because of its multipotency, long range migration through embryo and its capacity to generate a prodigious number of differentiated cell types. For these reasons, although derived from the ectoderm, the neural crest (NC) has been called the fourth germ layer. The non neural ectoderm, the neural plate and the underlying mesoderm are needed for the induction and formation of NC cells. Once formed, NC cells start migrating as a wave of cells, moving away from the neuroepithelium and quickly splitting into distinct streams. These migrating NCCs home in to different regions and give rise to plethora of tissues. Umpteen number of signaling molecules are essential for formation, epithelial mesenchymal transition, delamination, migration and localization of NCC. Authors believe that a clear understanding of steps and signals involved in NC formation, migration, etc., may help in understanding the pathogenesis behind cancer metastasis and many other diseases. Hence, we have taken this review to discuss the various aspects of the NC cells. PMID:26604500